Science.gov

Sample records for a4 hydrolase inhibitors

  1. Discovery of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Inhibitors Using Metabolomics Biased Fragment Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.; Mamat, B; Magnusson, O; Christensen, J; Haraldsson, M; Mishra, R; Pease, B; Hansen, E; Singh, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel fragment library termed fragments of life (FOL) for structure-based drug discovery. The FOL library includes natural small molecules of life, derivatives thereof, and biaryl protein architecture mimetics. The choice of fragments facilitates the interrogation of protein active sites, allosteric binding sites, and protein-protein interaction surfaces for fragment binding. We screened the FOL library against leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) by X-ray crystallography. A diverse set of fragments including derivatives of resveratrol, nicotinamide, and indole were identified as efficient ligands for LTA4H. These fragments were elaborated in a small number of synthetic cycles into potent inhibitors of LTA4H representing multiple novel chemotypes for modulating leukotriene biosynthesis. Analysis of the fragment-bound structures also showed that the fragments comprehensively recapitulated key chemical features and binding modes of several reported LTA4H inhibitors.

  2. Discovery of novel leukotriene A4 hydrolase inhibitors based on piperidine and piperazine scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sandanayaka, Vincent; Mamat, Bjorn; Bhagat, Nikhil; Bedell, Louis; Halldorsdottir, Gudrun; Sigthorsdottir, Heida; Andrésson, Thorkell; Kiselyov, Alex; Gurney, Mark; Singh, Jasbir

    2010-05-01

    Novel piperidine and piperazine derivatives have been designed and tested as inhibitors of LTA(4) hydrolase (LTA(4)H). Most potent compounds showed good potency in both enzymatic and functional human whole blood assay. Crystallography studies further confirmed observed structure-activity relationship and LTA(4)H binding mode for analogs from the piperidine series.

  3. Binding of Pro-Gly-Pro at the active site of leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase and development of an epoxide hydrolase selective inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Olsson, Ulrika; Wan, Min; Kleinschmidt, Thea; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Zubarev, Roman A.; Samuelsson, Bengt; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2014-01-01

    Leukotriene (LT) A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the committed step in the formation of the proinflammatory mediator LTB4. Recently, the chemotactic tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro was identified as an endogenous aminopeptidase substrate for LTA4 hydrolase. Here, we determined the crystal structure of LTA4 hydrolase in complex with a Pro-Gly-Pro analog at 1.72 Å. From the structure, which includes the catalytic water, and mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis products of Pro-Gly-Pro, it could be inferred that LTA4 hydrolase cleaves at the N terminus of the palindromic tripeptide. Furthermore, we designed a small molecule, 4-(4-benzylphenyl)thiazol-2-amine, denoted ARM1, that inhibits LTB4 synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 of ∼0.5 μM) and conversion of LTA4 into LTB4 by purified LTA4H with a Ki of 2.3 μM. In contrast, 50- to 100-fold higher concentrations of ARM1 did not significantly affect hydrolysis of Pro-Gly-Pro. A 1.62-Å crystal structure of LTA4 hydrolase in a dual complex with ARM1 and the Pro-Gly-Pro analog revealed that ARM1 binds in the hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the ω-end of LTA4, distant from the aminopeptidase active site, thus providing a molecular basis for its inhibitory profile. Hence, ARM1 selectively blocks conversion of LTA4 into LTB4, although sparing the enzyme’s anti-inflammatory aminopeptidase activity (i.e., degradation and inactivation of Pro-Gly-Pro). ARM1 represents a new class of LTA4 hydrolase inhibitor that holds promise for improved anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:24591641

  4. Effect of alpha lipoic acid on leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Torres, María José; Fierro, Angélica; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Romero-Parra, Javier; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Faúndez, Mario

    2017-03-15

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase is a soluble enzyme with epoxide hydrolase and aminopeptidase activities catalysing the conversion of leukotriene A4 to leukotriene B4 and the hydrolysis of the peptide proline-glycine-proline. Imbalances in leukotriene B4 synthesis are related to several pathologic conditions. Currently there are no available drugs capable to modulate the synthesis of leukotriene B4 or to block its receptors. Here we show the inhibitory profile of alpha lipoic acid on the activity of leukotriene A4 Hydrolase. Alpha lipoic acid inhibited both activities of the enzyme at concentrations lower than 10μM. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton, or the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor MK-886, were unable to inhibit the activity of the enzyme. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60 cells were differentiated to leukotriene A4 hydrolase expressing neutrophil-like cells. Alpha lipoic acid inhibited the aminopeptidase activity of the cytosolic fraction from neutrophil-like cells but had no effect on the cytosolic fraction from undifferentiated cells. Docking and molecular dynamic approximations revealed that alpha lipoic acid participates in electrostatic interactions with K-565 and R-563, which are key residues for the carboxylate group recognition of endogenous substrates by the enzyme. Alpha lipoic acid is a compound widely used in clinical practice, most of its therapeutic effects are associated with its antioxidants properties, however, antioxidant effect alone is unable to explain all clinical effects observed with alpha lipoic acid. Our results invite to evaluate the significance of the inhibitory effect of alpha lipoic acid on the catalytic activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase using in vivo models.

  5. 1,2,3-Triazolylalkylribitol derivatives as nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, A; McNaughton, M; Bal, G; Surpateanu, G; Van der Veken, P; De Prol, S; Versées, W; Steyaert, J; Apers, S; Haemers, A; Augustyns, K

    2007-05-01

    A range of novel 1,2,3-triazolylalkylribitol derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors. The most active compound (11a) has low micromolar potency and is structurally diverse from previously reported nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors, which, along with the simplicity of the chemistry involved in its synthesis, makes it a good lead for the further development of novel nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors.

  6. Starch hydrolase inhibitors from edible plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Tingting; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease with gradual deterioration in glucose metabolism, which causes multiple systemic complications. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a concern in the management of type 2 diabetes. Of all the available antidiabetic therapeutic methods, inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase is postulated to be a preventive treatment. Many natural products and herbal medicines have been recommended as being beneficial for mitigation of postprandial hyperglycemia. In this review, recent discoveries of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitors from edible plants are described along with their chemical structures. Their inhibition mechanisms, the type of each glucosidase and amylase, and measurement methods for the inhibitory activity are also given. Finally, recent progress on low glycemic index foods incorporated with plants containing starch hydrolase inhibitors is summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective N-hydroxyhydantoin carbamate inhibitors of mammalian serine hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Cognetta, Armand B.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Martini, Michael L.; Hulce, Jonathan J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    Serine hydrolase inhibitors, which facilitate enzyme function assignment and are used to treat a range of human disorders, often act by an irreversible mechanism that involves covalent modification of the serine hydrolase catalytic nucleophile. The portion of mammalian serine hydrolases for which selective inhibitors have been developed, however, remains small. Here, we show that N-hydroxyhydantoin (NHH) carbamates are a versatile class of irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitors that can be modified on both the staying (carbamylating) and leaving (NHH) groups to optimize potency and selectivity. Synthesis and screening of a small library of NHH carbamates by competitive activity-based protein profiling furnished selective, in vivo-active inhibitors and tailored activity-based probes for multiple mammalian serine hydrolases, including palmitoyl protein thioesterease-1 (PPT1), mutations of which cause the human disease infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:26120000

  8. Potent Urea and Carbamate Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisseau, Christophe; Goodrow, Marvin H.; Dowdy, Deanna; Zheng, Jiang; Greene, Jessica F.; Sanborn, James R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    1999-08-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a significant role in the biosynthesis of inflammation mediators as well as xenobiotic transformations. Herein, we report the discovery of substituted ureas and carbamates as potent inhibitors of sEH. Some of these selective, competitive tightbinding inhibitors with nanomolar Ki values interacted stoichiometrically with the homogenous recombinant murine and human sEHs. These inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of trans-stilbene oxide, which is active as the epoxide, but reduce cytotoxicity of leukotoxin, which is activated by epoxide hydrolase to its toxic diol. They also reduce toxicity of leukotoxin in vivo in mice and prevent symptoms suggestive of acute respiratory distress syndrome. These potent inhibitors may be valuable tools for testing hypotheses of involvement of diol and epoxide lipids in chemical mediation in vitro or in vivo systems.

  9. Discovery of 4-[(2S)-2-{[4-(4-chlorophenoxy)phenoxy]methyl}-1-pyrrolidinyl]butanoic acid (DG-051) as a novel leukotriene A4 hydrolase inhibitor of leukotriene B4 biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sandanayaka, Vincent; Mamat, Bjorn; Mishra, Rama K; Winger, Jennifer; Krohn, Michael; Zhou, Li-Ming; Keyvan, Monica; Enache, Livia; Sullins, David; Onua, Emmanuel; Zhang, Jun; Halldorsdottir, Gudrun; Sigthorsdottir, Heida; Thorlaksdottir, Audur; Sigthorsson, Gudmundur; Thorsteinnsdottir, Margret; Davies, Douglas R; Stewart, Lance J; Zembower, David E; Andresson, Thorkell; Kiselyov, Alex S; Singh, Jasbir; Gurney, Mark E

    2010-01-28

    Both in-house human genetic and literature data have converged on the identification of leukotriene 4 hydrolase (LTA(4)H) as a key target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. We combined fragment-based crystallography screening with an iterative medicinal chemistry effort to optimize inhibitors of LTA(4)H. Ligand efficiency was followed throughout our structure-activity studies. As applied within the context of LTA(4)H inhibitor design, the chemistry team was able to design a potent compound 20 (DG-051) (K(d) = 26 nM) with high aqueous solubility (>30 mg/mL) and high oral bioavailability (>80% across species) that is currently undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. The structural biology-chemistry interaction described in this paper provides a sound alternative to conventional screening techniques. This is the first example of a gene-to-clinic paradigm enabled by a fragment-based drug discovery effort.

  10. Genetic regulation of expression of leukotriene A4 hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lung disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the concurrent organ-specific and systemic inflammatory responses lead to airway remodelling and vascular dysfunction. Although a major common risk factor for COPD, cigarette smoke alone cannot explain the progression of this disease; there is increasing evidence that genetic predisposition also plays a role in COPD susceptibility and progression. A key enzyme in chronic lung inflammation is leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). With its aminopeptidase activity, LTA4H degrades the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide PGP. In this study, we used the luciferase reporter gene analysis system and quantitative trait locus analysis to explore the impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the putative promoter region of LTA4H on LTA4H expression. We show that not only is the putative promoter of LTA4H larger than previously reported but also that SNPs in the expanded promoter region regulate expression of LTA4H both in cell-based systems and in peripheral blood samples from human subjects. These findings provide significant evidence for an active region upstream of the previously reported LTA4H promoter, which may have implications related to ongoing inflammatory processes in chronic lung disease. PMID:27730172

  11. Peripheral FAAH and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors are synergistically antinociceptive.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Wagner, Karen; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-07-01

    We need better medicines to control acute and chronic pain. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) catalyze the deactivating hydrolysis of two classes of bioactive lipid mediators--fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) and epoxidized fatty acids (EpFAs), respectively--which are biogenetically distinct but share the ability to attenuate pain responses and inflammation. In these experiments, we evaluated the antihyperalgesic activity of small-molecule inhibitors of FAAH and sEH, administered alone or in combination, in two pain models: carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in mice and streptozocin-induced allodynia in rats. When administered separately, the sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidine-4-yl)urea (TPPU) and the peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor URB937 were highly active in the two models. The combination TPPU plus URB937 was markedly synergistic, as assessed using isobolographic analyses. The results of these experiments reveal the existence of a possible functional crosstalk between FAEs and EpFAs in regulating pain responses. Additionally, the results suggest that combinations of sEH and FAAH inhibitors might be exploited therapeutically to achieve greater analgesic efficacy.

  12. Identification of benzofuran central cores for the inhibition of leukotriene A(4) hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Wendy; Blevitt, Jonathan M; Booker, Jamila N; Chrovian, Christa C; Crawford, Shelby; de Leon, Aimee Rose; Deng, Xiaohu; Fourie, Anne M; Grice, Cheryl A; Herman, Krystal; Karlsson, Lars; Kearney, Aaron M; Lee-Dutra, Alice; Liang, Jimmy; Luna, Rosa; Pippel, Dan; Rao, Navin; Riley, Jason P; Santillán, Alejandro; Savall, Brad; Tanis, Virginia M; Xue, Xiaohua; Young, Arlene L

    2013-02-01

    Leukotrienes (LT's) are known to play a physiological role in inflammatory immune response. Leukotriene A(4) hydrolase (LTA(4)H) is a cystolic enzyme that stereospecifically catalyzes the transformation of LTA(4) to LTB(4). LTB(4) is a known pro-inflammatory mediator. This paper describes the identification and synthesis of substituted benzofurans as LTH(4)H inhibitors. The benzofuran series demonstrated reduced mouse and human whole blood LTB(4) levels in vitro and led to the identification one analog for advanced profiling. Benzofuran 28 showed dose responsive target engagement and provides a useful tool to explore a LTA(4)H inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  13. Sulfonyl Fluoride Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O.; Nikas, Spyros P.; Bharatan, Indu; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Nasr, Mahmoud L.; Bowman, Anna L.; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  14. Discovery of enantioselectivity of urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Manoj; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Boggu, PullaReddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Jalani, Hitesh B; Kim, Nam-Doo; Lee, Seul Ki; Jeon, Jang Su; Kim, Sang Kyum; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2016-07-19

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyzes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in the metabolic pathway of arachidonic acid and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and inflammation. Although many urea derivatives are known as sEH inhibitors, the enantioselectivity of the inhibitors is not highlighted in spite of the stereoselective hydrolysis of EETs by sEH. In an effort to explore the importance of enantioselectivity in the urea scaffold, a series of enantiomers with the stereocenter adjacent to the urea nitrogen atom were prepared. The selectivity of enantiomers of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)ureas showed wide range differences up to 125 fold with the low IC50 value up to 13 nM. The S-configuration with planar phenyl and small alkyl groups at α-position is crucial for the activity and selectivity. However, restriction of the free rotation of two α-groups with indan-1-yl or 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl moiety abolishes the selectivity between the enantiomers, despite the increase in activity up to 13 nM. The hydrophilic group like sulfonamido group at para position of 3-phenylpropyl motif of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea improves the activity as well as enantiomeric selectivity. All these ureas are proved to be specific inhibitor of sEH without inhibition against mEH. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C D; Rådmark, O; Fu, J Y; Matsumoto, T; Jörnvall, H; Shimizu, T; Samuelsson, B

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to leukotriene A4 hydrolase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antiserum. Several additional clones from human lung and placenta cDNA lambda g11 libraries were obtained by plaque hybridization with the 32P-labeled lung cDNA clone. One of these clones has an insert of 1910 base pairs that contains the complete protein-coding region. From the deduced primary structure, leukotriene A4 hydrolase is a 610 amino and protein with a calculated molecular weight of 69,140. No apparent homologies with microsomal epoxide hydrolases were found. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of a discrete mRNA of approximately equal to 2250 nucleotides in lung tissue and leukocytes. Images PMID:2821541

  16. Arachidonoylserotonin and other novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bisogno, T; Melck, D; De Petrocellis, L; Bobrov MYu; Gretskaya, N M; Bezuglov, V V; Sitachitta, N; Gerwick, W H; Di Marzo, V

    1998-07-30

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of bioactive fatty acid amides and esters such as the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, anandamide (N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the putative sleep inducing factor cis-9-octadecenoamide (oleamide). Most FAAH blockers developed to date also inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and/or bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor subtype. Here we report the finding of four novel FAAH inhibitors, two of which, malhamensilipin A and grenadadiene, were screened out of a series of thirty-two different algal natural products, and two others, arachidonoylethylene glycol (AEG) and arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) were selected out of five artificially functionalized polyunsaturated fatty acids. When using FAAH preparations from mouse neuroblastoma N18TG2 cells and [14C]anandamide as a substrate, the IC50s for these compounds ranged from 12.0 to 26 microM, the most active compound being AA-5-HT. This substance was also active on FAAH from rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells (IC50 = 5.6 microM), and inhibited [14C]anandamide hydrolysis by both N18TG2 and RBL-2H3 intact cells without affecting [14C]anandamide uptake. While AEG behaved as a competitive inhibitor and was hydrolyzed to arachidonic acid (AA) by FAAH preparations, AA-5-HT was resistant to FAAH-catalyzed hydrolysis and behaved as a tight-binding, albeit non-covalent, mixed inhibitor. AA-5-HT did not interfere with cPLA2-mediated, ionomycin or antigen-induced release of [3H]AA from RBL-2H3 cells, nor with cPLA2 activity in cell-free experiments. Finally, AA-5-HT did not activate CB1 cannabinoid receptors since it acted as a very weak ligand in in vitro binding assays, and, at 10-15 mg/kg body weight, it was not active in the 'open field', 'hot plate' and rectal hypothermia tests carried out in mice. Conversely AEG behaved as a cannabimimetic substance in these tests as well as in the 'ring' immobility test where AA-5

  17. Evaluation of NHS Carbamates as a Potent and Selective Class of Endocannabinoid Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a principal metabolic enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Selective inhibitors of MAGL offer valuable probes to further understand the enzyme’s function in biological systems and may lead to drugs for treating a variety of diseases, including psychiatric disorders, neuroinflammation, and pain. N-Hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates have recently been identified as a promising class of serine hydrolase inhibitors that shows minimal cross-reactivity with other proteins in the proteome. Here, we explore NHS carbamates more broadly and demonstrate their potential as inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolases and additional enzymes from the serine hydrolase class. We extensively characterize an NHS carbamate 1a (MJN110) as a potent, selective, and in-vivo-active MAGL inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrate that MJN110 alleviates mechanical allodynia in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy, marking NHS carbamates as a promising class of MAGL inhibitors. PMID:23731016

  18. Evaluation of NHS carbamates as a potent and selective class of endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Niphakis, Micah J; Cognetta, Armand B; Chang, Jae Won; Buczynski, Matthew W; Parsons, Loren H; Byrne, Frederika; Burston, James J; Chapman, Victoria; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2013-09-18

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a principal metabolic enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Selective inhibitors of MAGL offer valuable probes to further understand the enzyme's function in biological systems and may lead to drugs for treating a variety of diseases, including psychiatric disorders, neuroinflammation, and pain. N-Hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates have recently been identified as a promising class of serine hydrolase inhibitors that shows minimal cross-reactivity with other proteins in the proteome. Here, we explore NHS carbamates more broadly and demonstrate their potential as inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolases and additional enzymes from the serine hydrolase class. We extensively characterize an NHS carbamate 1a (MJN110) as a potent, selective, and in-vivo-active MAGL inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrate that MJN110 alleviates mechanical allodynia in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy, marking NHS carbamates as a promising class of MAGL inhibitors.

  19. Discovery of Triterpenoids as Reversible Inhibitors of α/β-hydrolase Domain Containing 12 (ABHD12)

    PubMed Central

    Parkkari, Teija; Haavikko, Raisa; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Rytilahti, Roosa; Vaara, Miia; Lehtonen, Marko; Alakurtti, Sami; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Nevalainen, Tapio; Savinainen, Juha R.; Laitinen, Jarmo T.

    2014-01-01

    Background α/β-hydrolase domain containing (ABHD)12 is a recently discovered serine hydrolase that acts in vivo as a lysophospholipase for lysophosphatidylserine. Dysfunctional ABHD12 has been linked to the rare neurodegenerative disorder called PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinosis pigmentosa, cataract). In vitro, ABHD12 has been implicated in the metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Further studies on ABHD12 function are hampered as no selective inhibitor have been identified to date. In contrast to the situation with the other endocannabinoid hydrolases, ABHD12 has remained a challenging target for inhibitor development as no crystal structures are available to facilitate drug design. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the unexpected discovery that certain triterpene-based structures inhibit human ABHD12 hydrolase activity in a reversible manner, the best compounds showing submicromolar potency. Based on structure activity relationship (SAR) data collected for 68 natural and synthetic triterpenoid structures, a pharmacophore model has been constructed. A pentacyclic triterpene backbone with carboxyl group at position 17, small hydrophobic substituent at the position 4, hydrogen bond donor or acceptor at position 3 accompanied with four axial methyl substituents was found crucial for ABHD12 inhibitor activity. Although the triterpenoids typically may have multiple protein targets, we witnessed unprecedented selectivity for ABHD12 among the metabolic serine hydrolases, as activity-based protein profiling of mouse brain membrane proteome indicated that the representative ABHD12 inhibitors did not inhibit other serine hydrolases, nor did they target cannabinoid receptors. Conclusions/Significance We have identified reversibly-acting triterpene-based inhibitors that show remarkable selectivity for ABHD12 over other metabolic serine hydrolases. Based on SAR data, we have constructed the first pharmacophore

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF METABOLICALLY STABLE INHIBITORS OF MAMMALIAN MICROSOMAL EPOXIDE HYDROLASE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a significant role in the metabolism of xenobiotics such as polyaromatic toxicants. Additionally, polymorphism studies have underlined a potential role of this enzyme in relation to a number of diseases, such as emphysema, spontaneous abortion, eclampsia ...

  1. O-hydroxyacetamide carbamates as a highly potent and selective class of endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Niphakis, Micah J; Johnson, Douglas S; Ballard, T Eric; Stiff, Cory; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-05-16

    The two major endocannabinoid transmitters, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are degraded by distinct enzymes in the nervous system, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), respectively. FAAH and MAGL inhibitors cause elevations in brain AEA and 2-AG levels, respectively, and reduce pain, anxiety, and depression in rodents without causing the full spectrum of psychotropic behavioral effects observed with direct cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) agonists. These findings have inspired the development of several classes of endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors, most of which have been optimized to show specificity for either FAAH or MAGL or, in certain cases, equipotent activity for both enzymes. Here, we investigate an unusual class of O-hydroxyacetamide carbamate inhibitors and find that individual compounds from this class can serve as selective FAAH or dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors in vivo across a dose range (0.125-12.5 mg kg(-1)) suitable for behavioral studies. Competitive and click chemistry activity-based protein profiling confirmed that the O-hydroxyacetamide carbamate SA-57 is remarkably selective for FAAH and MAGL in vivo, targeting only one other enzyme in brain, the additional 2-AG hydrolase ABHD6. These data designate O-hydroxyacetamide carbamates as a versatile chemotype for creating endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors that display excellent in vivo activity and tunable selectivity for FAAH-anandamide versus MAGL (and ABHD6)-2-AG pathways.

  2. O-Hydroxyacetamide Carbamates as a Highly Potent and Selective Class of Endocannabinoid Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The two major endocannabinoid transmitters, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are degraded by distinct enzymes in the nervous system, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), respectively. FAAH and MAGL inhibitors cause elevations in brain AEA and 2-AG levels, respectively, and reduce pain, anxiety, and depression in rodents without causing the full spectrum of psychotropic behavioral effects observed with direct cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) agonists. These findings have inspired the development of several classes of endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors, most of which have been optimized to show specificity for either FAAH or MAGL or, in certain cases, equipotent activity for both enzymes. Here, we investigate an unusual class of O-hydroxyacetamide carbamate inhibitors and find that individual compounds from this class can serve as selective FAAH or dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors in vivo across a dose range (0.125–12.5 mg kg–1) suitable for behavioral studies. Competitive and click chemistry activity-based protein profiling confirmed that the O-hydroxyacetamide carbamate SA-57 is remarkably selective for FAAH and MAGL in vivo, targeting only one other enzyme in brain, the additional 2-AG hydrolase ABHD6. These data designate O-hydroxyacetamide carbamates as a versatile chemotype for creating endocannabinoid hydrolase inhibitors that display excellent in vivo activity and tunable selectivity for FAAH-anandamide versus MAGL (and ABHD6)-2-AG pathways. PMID:22860211

  3. Synthesis of bicyclic N-arylmethyl-substituted iminoribitol derivatives as selective nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Berg, Maya; Bal, Gunther; Goeminne, Annelies; Van der Veken, Pieter; Versées, Wim; Steyaert, Jan; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2009-02-01

    The purine metabolism of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. provides a good target in the search for new selective drugs. Bicyclic N-arylmethyl-substituted iminoribitols were developed as inhibitors of T. vivax nucleoside hydrolase, a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The obtained results and structure-activity data confirmed our model for inhibitor binding with a hydrogen bond between a nitrogen atom of the nucleobase mimetic and the protonated Asp40 from the enzyme. This interaction depends on an optimal pK(a) value, which can be influenced by the electronic properties of the substituents. These compounds are potent, selective inhibitors of nucleoside hydrolase and are inactive toward human nucleoside phosphorylase.

  4. Pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamates as inhibitors of human fatty acid amide hydrolases (FAAH).

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Ruggiero, Emanuela; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Stefania; Romagnoli, Romeo; Martinelli, Adriano; Tuccinardi, Tiziano

    2015-06-05

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors have gained attention as potential therapeutic targets in the management of neuropathic pain. Here, we report a series of pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamate derivatives standing on the known carbamoyl FAAH inhibitor URB597. Structural modifications led to the recognition of compound 22 that inhibited human recombinant FAAH (hrFAAH) in the low nanomolar range (IC50 = 11 nM). The most active compounds of this series showed significant selectivity toward monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) enzyme. In addition, molecular modeling and reversibility behavior of the new class of FAAH inhibitors are presented in this article.

  5. N-aryl 2-aryloxyacetamides as a new class of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sunduru, Naresh; Svensson, Mona; Cipriano, Mariateresa; Marwaha, Sania; Andersson, C David; Svensson, Richard; Fowler, Christopher J; Elofsson, Mikael

    2017-12-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a promising target for the development of drugs to treat neurological diseases. In search of new FAAH inhibitors, we identified 2-(4-cyclohexylphenoxy)-N-(3-(oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)acetamide, 4g, with an IC50 of 2.6 µM as a chemical starting point for the development of potent FAAH inhibitors. Preliminary hit-to-lead optimisation resulted in 2-(4-phenylphenoxy)-N-(3-(oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)acetamide, 4i, with an IC50 of 0.35 µM.

  6. N-Arylmethyl substituted iminoribitol derivatives as inhibitors of a purine specific nucleoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, Annelies; Berg, Maya; McNaughton, Michael; Bal, Gunther; Surpateanu, Georgiana; Van der Veken, Pieter; De Prol, Stijn; Versées, Wim; Steyaert, Jan; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2008-07-15

    A key enzyme within the purine salvage pathway of parasites, nucleoside hydrolase, is proposed as a good target for new antiparasitic drugs. We have developed N-arylmethyl-iminoribitol derivatives as a novel class of inhibitors against a purine specific nucleoside hydrolase from Trypanosoma vivax. Several of our inhibitors exhibited low nanomolar activity, with 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-N-(8-quinolinyl)methyl-d-ribitol (UAMC-00115, K(i) 10.8nM), N-(9-deaza-adenin-9-yl)methyl-1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-ribitol (K(i) 4.1nM), and N-(9-deazahypoxanthin-9-yl)methyl-1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-ribitol (K(i) 4.4nM) being the three most active compounds. Docking studies of the most active inhibitors revealed several important interactions with the enzyme. Among these interactions are aromatic stacking of the nucleobase mimic with two Trp-residues, and hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups of the inhibitors and amino acid residues in the active site. During the course of these docking studies we also identified a strong interaction between the Asp40 residue from the enzyme and the inhibitor. This is an interaction which has not previously been considered as being important.

  7. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ<sup>9</sup>-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors' therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted.

  8. Product formation controlled by substrate dynamics in leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Tholander, Fredrik; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Qureshi, Abdul Aziz; Niegowski, Damian; Hasan, Mahmudul; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) (EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme with both an epoxide hydrolase and an aminopeptidase activity. LTA4H from the African claw toad, Xenopus laevis (xlLTA4H) has been shown to, unlike the human enzyme, convert LTA4 to two enzymatic metabolites, LTB4 and another biologically active product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4 (5(S),12R-dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid). In order to study the molecular aspect of the formation of this product we have characterized the structure and function of xlLTA4H. We solved the structure of xlLTA4H to a resolution of 2.3Å. It is a dimeric structure where each monomer has three domains with the active site in between the domains, similar as to the human structure. An important difference between the human and amphibian enzyme is the phenylalanine to tyrosine exchange at position 375. Our studies show that mutating F375 in xlLTA4H to tyrosine abolishes the formation of the LTB4 isomeric product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4. In an attempt to understand how one amino acid exchange leads to a new product profile as seen in the xlLTA4H, we performed a conformer analysis of the triene part of the substrate LTA4. Our results show that the Boltzmann distribution of substrate conformers correlates with the observed distribution of products. We suggest that the observed difference in product profile between the human and the xlLTA4H arises from different level of discrimination between substrate LTA4 conformers.

  9. Role of leukotriene A4 hydrolase aminopeptidase in the pathogenesis of emphysema1

    PubMed Central

    Paige, Mikell; Wang, Kan; Burdick, Marie; Park, Sunhye; Cha, Josiah; Jeffrey, Erin; Sherman, Nicholas; Shim, Y. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) is a bi-functional enzyme with an epoxy hydrolase and aminopeptidase activities. We hypothesize that the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity alleviates neutrophilic inflammation, which contributes to cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema by clearing Proline-Glycine-Proline (PGP), a tri-amino acid chemokine known to induce chemotaxis of neutrophils. To investigate the biological contributions made by the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity in CS-induced emphysema, we exposed wild type mice to CS over five months while treating them with a vehicle or a pharmaceutical agent (4MDM) that selectively augments the LTA4H aminopeptidase without affecting the bio-production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Emphysematous phenotypes were assessed by pre mortem lung physiology with a small animal ventilator and by postmortem histologic morphometry. CS exposure acidified the airspaces and induced localization of the LTA4H protein into the nuclei of the epithelial cells. This resulted in accumulation of PGP in the airspaces by suppressing the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity. When the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity was selectively augmented by 4MDM, the levels of PGP in the BALF and infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs were significant reduced without affecting the levels of LTB4. This protected murine lungs from CS-induced emphysematous alveolar remodeling. In conclusion, CS exposure promotes the development of CS-induced emphysema by suppressing the enzymatic activities of the LTA4H aminopeptidase in lung tissues and accumulating PGP and neutrophils in the airspaces. However, restoring the LTA4 aminopeptidase activity with a pharmaceutical agent protected murine lungs from developing CS-induced emphysema. PMID:24771855

  10. α-Ketoheterocycle-Based Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the initial discovery and characterization of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and the subsequent advancement of an important class of competitive, reversible, potent, and selective inhibitors is presented. Initially explored using substrate-inspired inhibitors bearing electrophilic carbonyls, the examination of α-ketoheterocyle-based inhibitors of FAAH with the benefit of a unique activity-based protein-profiling (ABPP)-based proteome-wide selectivity assay, a powerful in vivo biomarker-based in vivo screen, and subsequent retrospective X-ray cocrystal structures with the enzyme, is summarized. These efforts defined the impact of the central activating heterocycle and its key substituents, provided key simplifications in the C2 acyl side chain and clear interpretations for the unique role and subsequent optimization of the central activating heterocycle, and established the basis for the recent further conformational constraints in the C2 acyl side chain, providing potent, long-acting, orally active FAAH inhibitors. PMID:22639704

  11. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors’ therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted. PMID:26630956

  12. Use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor as adjunctive analgesic in a laminitic horse

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso G. P.; Morisseau, Christophe; Sole, Albert; Soares, Joao H. N.; Ulu, Arzu; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    A 4-year old, 500 kg Thoroughbred female horse diagnosed with bilateral forelimb laminitis and cellulitis on the left forelimb became severely painful and refractory to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapy (flunixin meglumine on days 1, 2, 3 and 4; and phenylbutazone on days 5, 6 and 7) alone or in combination with gabapentin (days 6 and 7). Pain scores assessed independently by three individuals with a visual analog scale (VAS; 0= no pain and 10=worst possible pain) were 8.5 on day 6, and it increased to 9.5 on day 7. Non-invasive blood pressure monitoring revealed severe hypertension. As euthanasia was being considered for humane reasons as well as technical and financial constraints, a decision was made to add an experimental new drug, trans-4-{4-[3-(4-Trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), which is an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), to the treatment protocol. Dose and frequency of administration were selected to produce plasma concentrations within the range of 2.5 μM and 30 nM based on the drug potency against equine sEH. Pain scores decreased sharply and remarkably following t-TUCB administration and blood pressure progressively decreased to physiologic normal values. Plasma concentrations of t-TUCB, measured daily, were within the expected range, whereas phenylbutazone and gabapentin plasma levels were below the suggested efficacious concentrations. No adverse effects were detected on clinical and laboratory examinations during and after t-TUCB administration. The mare did not get any episode of laminitis in the three months following the treatment. PMID:23463912

  13. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2013-09-27

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure–activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development.

  14. Characterization of tunable piperidine and piperazine carbamates as inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jonathan Z.; Jin, Xin; Adibekian, Alexander; Li, Weiwei; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are two enzymes from the serine hydrolase superfamily that degrade the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide, respectively. We have recently discovered that MAGL and FAAH are both inhibited by carbamates bearing an N-piperidine/piperazine group. Piperidine/piperazine carbamates show excellent in vivo activity, raising brain endocannabinoid levels and producing CB1-dependent behavioral effects in mice, suggesting that they represent a promising class of inhibitors for studying the endogenous functions of MAGL and FAAH. Herein, we disclose a full account of the syntheses, structure-activity relationships, and inhibitory activities of piperidine/piperazine carbamates against members of the serine hydrolase family. These scaffolds can be tuned for MAGL-selective or dual MAGL-FAAH inhibition by the attachment of an appropriately substituted bisarylcarbinol or aryloxybenzyl moiety, respectively, on the piperidine/piperazine ring. Modifications to the piperidine/piperazine ring ablated inhibitory activity, suggesting a strict requirement for a six-member ring to maintain potency. PMID:20099888

  15. Aryl Piperazinyl Ureas as Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) in Rat, Dog, and Primate.

    PubMed

    Keith, John M; Apodaca, Rich; Tichenor, Mark; Xiao, Wei; Jones, William; Pierce, Joan; Seierstad, Mark; Palmer, James; Webb, Michael; Karbarz, Mark; Scott, Brian; Wilson, Sandy; Luo, Lin; Wennerholm, Michelle; Chang, Leon; Brown, Sean; Rizzolio, Michele; Rynberg, Raymond; Chaplan, Sandra; Breitenbucher, J Guy

    2012-10-11

    A series of aryl piperazinyl ureas that act as covalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is described. A potent and selective (does not inhibit FAAH-2) member of this class, JNJ-40355003, was found to elevate the plasma levels of three fatty acid amides: anandamide, oleoyl ethanolamide, and palmitoyl ethanolamide, in the rat, dog, and cynomolgous monkey. The elevation of the levels of these lipids in the plasma of monkeys suggests that FAAH-2 may not play a significant role in regulating plasma levels of fatty acid ethanolamides in primates.

  16. Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Genotype and HIV Infection Influence Intracerebral Inflammation and Survival From Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Thuong, Nguyen T T; Heemskerk, Dorothee; Tram, Trinh T B; Thao, Le T P; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Ha, Vu T N; Bang, Nguyen D; Chau, Tran T H; Lan, Nguyen H; Caws, Maxine; Dunstan, Sarah J; Chau, Nguyen V V; Wolbers, Marcel; Mai, Nguyen T H; Thwaites, Guy E

    2017-04-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most devastating form of tuberculosis, yet very little is known about the pathophysiology. We hypothesized that the genotype of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (encoded by LTA4H), which determines inflammatory eicosanoid expression, influences intracerebral inflammation, and predicts survival from TBM. We characterized the pretreatment clinical and intracerebral inflammatory phenotype and 9-month survival of 764 adults with TBM. All were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17525495, and inflammatory phenotype was defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocyte and cytokine concentrations. LTA4H genotype predicted survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected patients, with TT-genotype patients significantly more likely to survive TBM than CC-genotype patients, according to Cox regression analysis (univariate P = .040 and multivariable P = .037). HIV-uninfected, TT-genotype patients had high CSF proinflammatory cytokine concentrations, with intermediate and lower concentrations in those with CT and CC genotypes. Increased CSF cytokine concentrations correlated with more-severe disease, but patients with low CSF leukocytes and cytokine concentrations were more likely to die from TBM. HIV infection independently predicted death due to TBM (hazard ratio, 3.94; 95% confidence interval, 2.79-5.56) and was associated with globally increased CSF cytokine concentrations, independent of LTA4H genotype. LTA4H genotype and HIV infection influence pretreatment inflammatory phenotype and survival from TBM. LTA4H genotype may predict adjunctive corticosteroid responsiveness in HIV-uninfected individuals.

  17. The Molecular Structure of Epoxide Hydrolase B From And Its Complex With Urea-Based Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, B.K.; Morisseau, C.; Garen, G.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.; Niu, C.; Hammock, B.D.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the intracellular pathogen that infects macrophages primarily, is the causative agent of the infectious disease tuberculosis in humans. The Mtb genome encodes at least six epoxide hydrolases (EHs A to F). EHs convert epoxides to trans-dihydrodiols and have roles in drug metabolism as well as in the processing of signaling molecules. Herein, we report the crystal structures of unbound Mtb EHB and Mtb EHB bound to a potent, low-nanomolar (IC(50) approximately 19 nM) urea-based inhibitor at 2.1 and 2.4 A resolution, respectively. The enzyme is a homodimer; each monomer adopts the classical alpha/beta hydrolase fold that composes the catalytic domain; there is a cap domain that regulates access to the active site. The catalytic triad, comprising Asp104, His333 and Asp302, protrudes from the catalytic domain into the substrate binding cavity between the two domains. The urea portion of the inhibitor is bound in the catalytic cavity, mimicking, in part, the substrate binding; the two urea nitrogen atoms donate hydrogen bonds to the nucleophilic carboxylate of Asp104, and the carbonyl oxygen of the urea moiety receives hydrogen bonds from the phenolic oxygen atoms of Tyr164 and Tyr272. The phenolic oxygen groups of these two residues provide electrophilic assistance during the epoxide hydrolytic cleavage. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding-site residues undergo subtle structural rearrangement. In particular, the side chain of Ile137 exhibits a rotation of around 120 degrees about its C(alpha)-C(beta) bond in order to accommodate the inhibitor. These findings have not only shed light on the enzyme mechanism but also have opened a path for the development of potent inhibitors with good pharmacokinetic profiles against all Mtb EHs of the alpha/beta type.

  18. Discovery and molecular basis of potent noncovalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH).

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaoshan; Thibault, Stephen T; Porter, Amy C; Gustin, Darin J; Carlson, Timothy J; Xu, Haoda; Lindstrom, Michelle; Xu, Guifen; Uyeda, Craig; Ma, Zhihua; Li, Yihong; Kayser, Frank; Walker, Nigel P C; Wang, Zhulun

    2011-05-03

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an amidase-signature family member, is an integral membrane enzyme that degrades lipid amides including the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing molecule oleamide. Both genetic knock out and pharmacological administration of FAAH inhibitors in rodent models result in analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes. Targeting FAAH activity, therefore, presents a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain and other neurological-related or inflammatory disorders. Nearly all FAAH inhibitors known to date attain their binding potency through a reversible or irreversible covalent modification of the nucleophile Ser241 in the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. Here, we report the discovery and mechanism of action of a series of ketobenzimidazoles as unique and potent noncovalent FAAH inhibitors. Compound 2, a representative of these ketobenzimidazoles, was designed from a series of ureas that were identified from high-throughput screening. While urea compound 1 is characterized as an irreversible covalent inhibitor, the cocrystal structure of FAAH complexed with compound 2 reveals that these ketobenzimidazoles, though containing a carbonyl moiety, do not covalently modify Ser241. These inhibitors achieve potent inhibition of FAAH activity primarily from shape complementarity to the active site and through numerous hydrophobic interactions. These noncovalent compounds exhibit excellent selectivity and good pharmacokinetic properties. The discovery of this distinctive class of inhibitors opens a new avenue for modulating FAAH activity through nonmechanism-based inhibition.

  19. Optimized Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Improve in Vitro Target Residence Time and in Vivo Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is affecting the life of millions of people. A large proportion of diabetic patients suffer from severe complications such as neuropathic pain, and current treatments for these complications have deleterious side effects. Thus, alternate therapeutic strategies are needed. Recently, the elevation of epoxy-fatty acids through inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) was shown to reduce diabetic neuropathic pain in rodents. In this report, we describe a series of newly synthesized sEH inhibitors with at least 5-fold higher potency and doubled residence time inside both the human and rodent sEH enzyme than previously reported inhibitors. These inhibitors also have better physical properties and optimized pharmacokinetic profiles. The optimized inhibitor selected from this new series displayed improved efficacy of almost 10-fold in relieving pain perception in diabetic neuropathic rats as compared to the approved drug, gabapentin, and previously published sEH inhibitors. Therefore, these new sEH inhibitors could be an attractive alternative to treat diabetic neuropathy in humans. PMID:25079952

  20. A Systems Pharmacology Perspective on the Clinical Development of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors for Pain

    PubMed Central

    Benson, N; Metelkin, E; Demin, O; Li, G L; Nichols, D; van der Graaf, P H

    2014-01-01

    The level of the endocannabinoid anandamide is controlled by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In 2011, PF-04457845, an irreversible inhibitor of FAAH, was progressed to phase II clinical trials for osteoarthritic pain. This article discusses a prospective, integrated systems pharmacology model evaluation of FAAH as a target for pain in humans, using physiologically based pharmacokinetic and systems biology approaches. The model integrated physiological compartments; endocannabinoid production, degradation, and disposition data; PF-04457845 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and cannabinoid receptor CB1-binding kinetics. The modeling identified clear gaps in our understanding and highlighted key risks going forward, in particular relating to whether methods are in place to demonstrate target engagement and pharmacological effect. The value of this modeling exercise will be discussed in detail and in the context of the clinical phase II data, together with recommendations to enable optimal future evaluation of FAAH inhibitors. PMID:24429592

  1. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  2. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  3. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  4. Leukotriene A4 hydrolase haplotype, diet and atherosclerosis: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinying; Goldberg, Jack; Vaccarino, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process resulting from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Leukotrienes are inflammatory mediators generated from arachidonic acid, and genetic polymorphisms involved in leukotriene metabolism are implicated in atherosclerosis. The objectives of this study are to examine whether genetic variants in key leukotriene enzymes are associated with atherosclerosis, and whether dietary intake of competing leukotriene substrates modifies the effect of leukotriene variants on atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis was assessed by common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) using ultrasound. Sequence variants within arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (ALOX5AP) and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) genes were analyzed with 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 169 Caucasian twin pairs from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. The associations between genetic polymorphisms and carotid atherosclerosis, and gene × diet interactions were examined by generalized estimating equation controlling for potential confounders. A six-SNP haplotype in LTA4H, designated HapE, was significantly associated with carotid IMT after adjusting for known coronary risk factors. Twins carrying HapE had a much lower IMT compared to twins not carrying (695 μm vs. 750 μm, p = 0.0007). Moreover, dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids strongly augmented the cardioprotective effect of HapE among those with this haplotype but not those without, suggesting a haplotype × diet interaction (interaction P(HapE×n-3) = 0.03, P(HapE×n-6) = 0.015). We identified a novel leukotriene haplotype that appears to be protective toward subclinical atherosclerosis. This association is modified by dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Piperazine and piperidine carboxamides and carbamates as inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL).

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Jani; Kuusisto, Anne; van Bruchem, John; Patel, Jayendra Z; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Savinainen, Juha R; Parkkari, Teija; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2014-12-01

    The key hydrolytic enzymes of the endocannabinoid system, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), are potential targets for various therapeutic applications. In this paper, we present more extensively the results of our previous work on piperazine and piperidine carboxamides and carbamates as FAAH and MAGL inhibitors. The best compounds of these series function as potent and selective MAGL/FAAH inhibitors or as dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitors at nanomolar concentrations. This study revealed that MAGL inhibitors should comprise leaving-groups with a conjugate acid pKa of 8-10, while diverse leaving groups are tolerated for FAAH inhibitors.

  6. Structure-Based Optimization of Arylamides as Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Eldrup, Anne B.; Soleymanzadeh, Fariba; Taylor, Steven J.; Muegge, Ingo; Farrow, Neil A.; Joseph, David; McKellop, Keith; Man, Chuk C.; Kukulka, Alison; De Lombaert, Stephane

    2009-11-04

    Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is hypothesized to lead to an increase in circulating levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, resulting in the potentiation of their in vivo pharmacological properties. As part of an effort to identify inhibitors of sEH with high and sustained plasma exposure, we recently performed a high throughput screen of our compound collection. The screen identified N-(3,3-diphenyl-propyl)-nicotinamide as a potent inhibitor of sEH. Further profiling of this lead revealed short metabolic half-lives in microsomes and rapid clearance in the rat. Consistent with these observations, the determination of the in vitro metabolic profile of N-(3,3-diphenyl-propyl)-nicotinamide in rat liver microsomes revealed extensive oxidative metabolism and a propensity for metabolite switching. Lead optimization, guided by the analysis of the solid-state costructure of N-(3,3-diphenyl-propyl)-nicotinamide bound to human sEH, led to the identification of a class of potent and selective inhibitors. An inhibitor from this class displayed an attractive in vitro metabolic profile and high and sustained plasma exposure in the rat after oral administration.

  7. Purification and characterization of porcine skeletal muscle aminopeptidase T, a novel metallopeptidase homologous to leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Mohammed Alamgir; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizutani, Osamu; Rao, Shengbin; Migita, Koshiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami; Iefuji, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2011-01-01

    A novel aminopeptidase, Aminopeptidase T (APase T), was purified from porcine skeletal muscle following successive column chromatography: twice on DEAE-cellulose, hydroxyapatite, and Sephacryl S-200 HR using Leu-β-naphthylamide (LeuNap) as a substrate. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 69 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH towards LeuNap of the enzyme was about 7. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by bestatin and was negatively affected by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Chlorine-activated APase T liberated Leu, Ala, Met, Pro, and Arg from Nap derivatives. The APase T gene consisted of an ORF of 1,836 bp encoding a protein of 611 amino acid residues. The APase T was highly homologous to bovine, human, and mouse Leukotriene A(4) hydrolase (LTA(4)H), a bifunctional enzyme which exhibits APase and epoxide hydrolase activity.

  8. Acetylleucine chloromethyl ketone, an inhibitor of acylpeptide hydrolase, induces apoptosis of U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Kambayashi, D; Toda, J; Sano, T; Toyoshima, S; Hojo, H

    1999-09-16

    Acetylleucine chloromethyl ketone (ALCK), an inhibitor of acylpeptide hydrolase (ACPH), inhibited the growth of human monoblastic U937 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphology of the ALCK-exposed cells showed typical apoptosis, judging from the nuclear condensation and segmentation. Chromosomal DNA of U937 cells treated with ALCK showed an internucleosomal ladder-like pattern on electrophoresis, being characteristic of apoptosis. Of the other leucine chloromethyl ketone analogues, butyloylleucine chloromethyl ketone (BLCK) induced a weak ladder-like formation but caploylleucine chloromethyl ketone (CLCK)barely did. On the other hand, intracellular ACPH activity of U937 cells was strongly inhibited by culturing with ALCK, moderately with BLCK, and not with CLCK. These findings indicate that the inhibition of ACPH activity leads to apoptosis and suggest that ACPH may play a vital role in eukaryotic cells. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Human Intestinal Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) Catalyzes Prasugrel as a Bioactivation Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Miho; Ogura, Yuji; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Prasugrel is a thienopyridine antiplatelet prodrug that undergoes rapid hydrolysis in vivo to a thiolactone metabolite by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCE2) during gastrointestinal absorption. The thiolactone metabolite is further converted to a pharmacologically active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoforms. The aim of the current study was to elucidate hydrolases other than hCE2 involved in the bioactivation step of prasugrel in human intestine. Using size-exclusion column chromatography of a human small intestinal S9 fraction, another peak besides the hCE2 peak was observed to have prasugrel hydrolyzing activity, and this protein was found to have a molecular weight of about 20 kDa. This prasugrel hydrolyzing protein was successfully purified from a monkey small intestinal cytosolic fraction by successive four-step column chromatography and identified as Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Second, we evaluated the enzymatic kinetic parameters for prasugrel hydrolysis using recombinant human RKIP and hCE2 and estimated the contributions of these two hydrolyzing enzymes to the prasugrel hydrolysis reaction in human intestine, which were approximately 40% for hRKIP and 60% for hCE2. Moreover, prasugrel hydrolysis was inhibited by anti-hRKIP antibody and carboxylesterase-specific chemical inhibitor (bis p-nitrophenyl phosphate) by 30% and 60%, respectively. In conclusion, another protein capable of hydrolyzing prasugrel to its thiolactone metabolite was identified as RKIP, and this protein may play a significant role with hCE2 in prasugrel bioactivation in human intestine. RKIP is known to have diverse functions in many intracellular signaling cascades, but this is the first report describing RKIP as a hydrolase involved in drug metabolism.

  10. Optimization of Amide-Based Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase with Improved Water Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hae; Heirtzler, Fenton R.; Morisseau, Christophe; Nishi, Kosuke; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays an important role in the metabolism of endogenous chemical mediators involved in the regulation of blood pressure and inflammation. 1,3-Disubstituted ureas with a polar group located on the fifth atom from the carbonyl group of urea function are active inhibitors of sEH both in vitro and in vivo. However, their limited solubility in water and relatively high melting point lead to difficulties in formulating the compounds and poor in vivo efficacy. To improve these physical properties, the effect of structural modification of the urea pharmacophore on the inhibition potencies, water solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients (log P), and melting points of a series of compounds was evaluated. For murine sEH, no loss of inhibition potency was observed when the urea pharmacophore was modified to an amide function, while for human sEH 2.5-fold decreased inhibition was obtained in the amide compounds. In addition, a NH group on the right side of carbonyl group of the amide pharmacophore substituted with an adamantyl group (such as compound 14) and a methylene carbon present between the adamantyl and amide groups were essential to produce potent inhibition of sEH. The resulting amide inhibitors have 10–30-fold better solubility and lower melting point than the corresponding urea compounds. These findings will facilitate synthesis of sEH inhibitors that are easier to formulate and more bioavailable. PMID:15887969

  11. Rational design of potent and selective inhibitors of an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Seiya; Hvorecny, Kelli L.; Niu, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.; Madden, Dean R.; Morisseau, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The virulence factor cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the founding member of a distinct class of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) that triggers the catalysis-dependent degradation of the CFTR. We describe here the development of a series of potent and selective Cif inhibitors by structure-based drug design. Initial screening revealed 1a (KB2115), a thyroid hormone analog, as a lead compound with low micromolar potency. Structural requirements for potency were systematically probed, and interactions between Cif and 1a were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Based on these data, new compounds were designed to yield additional hydrogen bonding with residues of the Cif active site. From this effort, three compounds were identified that are 10-fold more potent toward Cif than our first-generation inhibitors and have no detectable thyroid hormone-like activity. These inhibitors will be useful tools to study the pathological role of Cif, and have the potential for clinical application. PMID:27120257

  12. Rational Design of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Seiya; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Niu, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Madden, Dean R; Morisseau, Christophe

    2016-05-26

    The virulence factor cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the founding member of a distinct class of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) that triggers the catalysis-dependent degradation of the CFTR. We describe here the development of a series of potent and selective Cif inhibitors by structure-based drug design. Initial screening revealed 1a (KB2115), a thyroid hormone analog, as a lead compound with low micromolar potency. Structural requirements for potency were systematically probed, and interactions between Cif and 1a were characterized by X-ray crystallography. On the basis of these data, new compounds were designed to yield additional hydrogen bonding with residues of the Cif active site. From this effort, three compounds were identified that are 10-fold more potent toward Cif than our first-generation inhibitors and have no detectable thyroid hormone-like activity. These inhibitors will be useful tools to study the pathological role of Cif and have the potential for clinical application.

  13. In vitro metabolism of the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl-urea.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takaho; Morisseau, Christophe; Newman, John W; Hammock, Bruce D

    2003-07-01

    The metabolism of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor, 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl-urea (CDU), was studied in rat and human hepatic microsomes. The microsomal metabolism of CDU enhanced sEH inhibition potency of the reaction mixture and resulted in the formation of several metabolites. During the course of this study, a sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analytical method was developed to investigate simultaneously the production of these metabolites. In both rat and human hepatic microsomes, CDU was ultimately transformed into the corresponding omega-carboxylate; however, the rodent tissue appeared to perform this transformation more rapidly. After a 60-min incubation in rat hepatic microsomes, the percentage of residual CDU, the omega-carboxylate, and the intermediary omega-hydroxyl were about 20%, 20%, and 50%, respectively. Carbon monoxide inhibited the metabolism of CDU by rat hepatic microsomes, suggesting that the initial step is catalyzed by cytochrome P450. Further metabolism was enhanced by the addition of NAD, suggesting that dehydrogenases are associated with intermediate metabolic steps. Regardless, the ultimate product of microsomal metabolism, 12-(3-cyclohexyl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid, is also an excellent sEH inhibitor with several hundred-fold higher solubility, supporting the hypothesis that CDU has prodrug characteristics. These findings will facilitate the rational design and optimization of sEH inhibitors with better physical properties and improved metabolic stability.

  14. In vitro and in vivo metabolism of N-adamantyl substituted urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Morisseau, Christophe; Lango, Jozsef; Hwang, Sung Hee; Watanabe, Takaho; Kim, In-Hae; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-12-15

    N,N'-disubstituted urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors are promising therapeutics for hypertension, inflammation, and pain in multiple animal models. The drug absorption and pharmacological efficacy of these inhibitors have been reported extensively. However, the drug metabolism of these inhibitors is not well described. Here we reported the metabolic profile and associated biochemical studies of an N-adamantyl urea-based sEH inhibitor 1-adamantan-1-yl-3-(5-(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) in vitro and in vivo. The metabolites of AEPU were identified by interpretation of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and/or NMR. In vitro, AEPU had three major positions for phase I metabolism including oxidations on the adamantyl moiety, urea nitrogen atoms, and cleavage of the polyethylene glycol chain. In a rodent model, the metabolites from the hydroxylation on the adamantyl group and nitrogen atom were existed in blood while the metabolites from cleavage of polyethylene glycol chain were not found in urine. The major metabolite found in rodent urine was 3-(3-adamantyl-ureido)-propanoic acid, a presumably from cleavage and oxidation of the polyethylene glycol moiety. All the metabolites found were active but less potent than AEPU at inhibiting human sEH. Furthermore, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 was found to be a major enzyme mediating AEPU metabolism. In conclusion, the metabolism of AEPU resulted from oxidation by CYP could be shared with other N-adamantyl-urea-based compounds. These findings suggest possible therapeutic roles for AEPU and new strategies for drug design in this series of possible drugs.

  15. Discovery of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors Using an Efficient High-Throughput Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  16. Discovery of bile salt hydrolase inhibitors using an efficient high-throughput screening system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth.

  17. Occurrence of urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors from the plants in the order Brassicales.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Seiya; Morisseau, Christophe; Harris, Todd R; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D

    2017-01-01

    Recently, dibenzylurea-based potent soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors were identified in Pentadiplandra brazzeana, a plant in the order Brassicales. In an effort to generalize the concept, we hypothesized that plants that produce benzyl glucosinolates and corresponding isothiocyanates also produce these dibenzylurea derivatives. Our overall aim here was to examine the occurrence of urea derivatives in Brassicales, hoping to find biologically active urea derivatives from plants. First, plants in the order Brassicales were analyzed for the presence of 1, 3-dibenzylurea (compound 1), showing that three additional plants in the order Brassicales produce the urea derivatives. Based on the hypothesis, three dibenzylurea derivatives with sEH inhibitory activity were isolated from maca (Lepidium meyenii) roots. Topical application of one of the identified compounds (compound 3, human sEH IC50 = 222 nM) effectively reduced pain in rat inflammatory pain model, and this compound was bioavailable after oral administration in mice. The biosynthetic pathway of these urea derivatives was investigated using papaya (Carica papaya) seed as a model system. Finally, a small collection of plants from the Brassicales order was grown, collected, extracted and screened for sEH inhibitory activity. Results show that several plants of the Brassicales order could be potential sources of urea-based sEH inhibitors.

  18. Occurrence of urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors from the plants in the order Brassicales

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Seiya; Morisseau, Christophe; Harris, Todd R.; Inceoglu, Bora

    2017-01-01

    Recently, dibenzylurea-based potent soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors were identified in Pentadiplandra brazzeana, a plant in the order Brassicales. In an effort to generalize the concept, we hypothesized that plants that produce benzyl glucosinolates and corresponding isothiocyanates also produce these dibenzylurea derivatives. Our overall aim here was to examine the occurrence of urea derivatives in Brassicales, hoping to find biologically active urea derivatives from plants. First, plants in the order Brassicales were analyzed for the presence of 1, 3-dibenzylurea (compound 1), showing that three additional plants in the order Brassicales produce the urea derivatives. Based on the hypothesis, three dibenzylurea derivatives with sEH inhibitory activity were isolated from maca (Lepidium meyenii) roots. Topical application of one of the identified compounds (compound 3, human sEH IC50 = 222 nM) effectively reduced pain in rat inflammatory pain model, and this compound was bioavailable after oral administration in mice. The biosynthetic pathway of these urea derivatives was investigated using papaya (Carica papaya) seed as a model system. Finally, a small collection of plants from the Brassicales order was grown, collected, extracted and screened for sEH inhibitory activity. Results show that several plants of the Brassicales order could be potential sources of urea-based sEH inhibitors. PMID:28472063

  19. Ingestion of the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor AUDA modulates immune responses of the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus during blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2016-09-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that play roles in metabolizing xenobiotic epoxides from the environment, and in regulating lipid signaling molecules, such as juvenile hormones in insects and epoxy fatty acids in mammals. In this study we fed mosquitoes with an epoxide hydrolase inhibitor AUDA during artificial blood feeding, and we found the inhibitor increased the concentration of epoxy fatty acids in the midgut of female mosquitoes. We also observed ingestion of AUDA triggered early expression of defensin A, cecropin A and cecropin B2 at 6 h after blood feeding. The expression of cecropin B1 and gambicin were not changed more than two fold compared to controls. The changes in gene expression were transient possibly because more than 99% of the inhibitor was metabolized or excreted at 42 h after being ingested. The ingestion of AUDA also affected the growth of bacteria colonizing in the midgut, but did not affect mosquito longevity, fecundity and fertility in our laboratory conditions. When spiked into the blood, EpOMEs and DiHOMEs were as effective as the inhibitor AUDA in reducing the bacterial load in the midgut, while EETs rescued the effects of AUDA. Our data suggest that epoxy fatty acids from host blood are immune response regulators metabolized by epoxide hydrolases in the midgut of female mosquitoes, inhibition of which causes transient changes in immune responses, and affects growth of microbes in the midgut.

  20. Aminopeptidase B from the rat testis is a bifunctional enzyme structurally related to leukotriene-A4hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Cadel, Sandrine; Foulon, Thierry; Viron, Annie; Balogh, Agnès; Midol-Monnet, Stéphanie; Noël, Nadine; Cohen, Paul

    1997-01-01

    An aminopeptidase B (Ap-B) was previously purified to homogeneity from rat testis extracts and characterized. In the present work, by using oligonucleotides selected on the basis of partial amino acid microsequences of pure Ap-B and PCR techniques, the nucleotide sequence of a 2.2-kb cDNA was obtained. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to a 648-residue protein (72.3 kDa) containing the canonical “HEXXHX18E” signature, which allowed its classification as a member of the M1 family of metallopeptidases. It exhibits 33% identity and 48% similarity with leukotriene-A4 hydrolase, a relation further supported by the capacity of Ap-B to hydrolyze leukotriene A4. Both enzymes also were closely related to a partially sequenced protein from Dictyostelium discoideum, which might constitute the putative common ancestor of either aminopeptidase or epoxide hydrolase, or both. Ap-B and its mRNA were detected in the germ line and in the Sertoli and peritubular cells of the seminiferous tubules. Because the enzyme was found in the medium conditioned by spermatocytes and spermatids and in the acrosome during spermatozoa formation, together these observations suggested an involvement of this exometallopeptidase in the secretory pathway. It is concluded that this ubiquitous enzyme may be involved in multiple processing mechanisms. PMID:9096329

  1. Predicting binding sites of hydrolase-inhibitor complexes by combining several methods

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Taner Z; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L; Yan, Changhui; Honavar, Vasant; Ho, Kai-Ming; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ihm, Yungok; Cao, Haibo; Gu, Xun; Dobbs, Drena

    2004-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in protein function. Completion of many genomes is being followed rapidly by major efforts to identify interacting protein pairs experimentally in order to decipher the networks of interacting, coordinated-in-action proteins. Identification of protein-protein interaction sites and detection of specific amino acids that contribute to the specificity and the strength of protein interactions is an important problem with broad applications ranging from rational drug design to the analysis of metabolic and signal transduction networks. Results In order to increase the power of predictive methods for protein-protein interaction sites, we have developed a consensus methodology for combining four different methods. These approaches include: data mining using Support Vector Machines, threading through protein structures, prediction of conserved residues on the protein surface by analysis of phylogenetic trees, and the Conservatism of Conservatism method of Mirny and Shakhnovich. Results obtained on a dataset of hydrolase-inhibitor complexes demonstrate that the combination of all four methods yield improved predictions over the individual methods. Conclusions We developed a consensus method for predicting protein-protein interface residues by combining sequence and structure-based methods. The success of our consensus approach suggests that similar methodologies can be developed to improve prediction accuracies for other bioinformatic problems. PMID:15606919

  2. Use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor in smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Jun; Guo, Lei; Uyeminami, Dale; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2012-05-01

    Tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prolonged inflammatory condition of the lungs characterized by progressive and largely irreversible airflow limitation attributable to a number of pathologic mechanisms, including bronchitis, bronchiolitis, emphysema, mucus plugging, pulmonary hypertension, and small-airway obstruction. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (sEHIs) demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in a rat model after acute exposure to tobacco smoke. We compared the efficacy of sEHI t-TUCB (trans-4-{4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-benzoic acid) and the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor Rolipram (Biomol International, Enzo Life Sciences, Farmingdale, NY) to reduce lung injury and inflammation after subacute exposure to tobacco smoke over a period of 4 weeks. Pulmonary physiology, bronchoalveolar lavage, cytokine production, and histopathology were analyzed to determine the efficacy of sEHI and Rolipram to ameliorate tobacco smoke-induced inflammation and injury in the spontaneously hypertensive rat. Both t-TUCB and Rolipram inhibited neutrophil elevation in bronchoalveolar lavage. sEHI t-TUCB suppressed IFN-γ, while improving lung function by reducing tobacco smoke-induced total respiratory resistance and tissue damping (small-airway and peripheral tissue resistance). Increases in tobacco smoke-induced alveolar airspace size were attenuated by t-TUCB. Rolipram inhibited the production of airway mucus. Both t-TUCB and Rolipram inhibited vascular remodeling-related growth factor. These findings suggest that sEHI t-TUCB has therapeutic potential for treating COPD by improving lung function and attenuating the lung inflammation and emphysematous changes caused by tobacco smoke. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that sEHI exerts significant protective effects after repeated, subacute tobacco smoke-induced lung injury in a rat model of COPD.

  3. Use of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor in Smoke-Induced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Jun; Guo, Lei; Uyeminami, Dale; Dong, Hua; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prolonged inflammatory condition of the lungs characterized by progressive and largely irreversible airflow limitation attributable to a number of pathologic mechanisms, including bronchitis, bronchiolitis, emphysema, mucus plugging, pulmonary hypertension, and small-airway obstruction. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (sEHIs) demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in a rat model after acute exposure to tobacco smoke. We compared the efficacy of sEHI t-TUCB (trans-4-{4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-benzoic acid) and the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor Rolipram (Biomol International, Enzo Life Sciences, Farmingdale, NY) to reduce lung injury and inflammation after subacute exposure to tobacco smoke over a period of 4 weeks. Pulmonary physiology, bronchoalveolar lavage, cytokine production, and histopathology were analyzed to determine the efficacy of sEHI and Rolipram to ameliorate tobacco smoke–induced inflammation and injury in the spontaneously hypertensive rat. Both t-TUCB and Rolipram inhibited neutrophil elevation in bronchoalveolar lavage. sEHI t-TUCB suppressed IFN-γ, while improving lung function by reducing tobacco smoke–induced total respiratory resistance and tissue damping (small-airway and peripheral tissue resistance). Increases in tobacco smoke–induced alveolar airspace size were attenuated by t-TUCB. Rolipram inhibited the production of airway mucus. Both t-TUCB and Rolipram inhibited vascular remodeling–related growth factor. These findings suggest that sEHI t-TUCB has therapeutic potential for treating COPD by improving lung function and attenuating the lung inflammation and emphysematous changes caused by tobacco smoke. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that sEHI exerts significant protective effects after repeated, subacute tobacco smoke–induced lung injury in a rat model of COPD. PMID

  4. Anti-Ulcer Efficacy of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor TPPU on Diclofenac-Induced Intestinal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Trindade da Silva, Carlos A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Kodani, Sean D.; Yang, Guang-Yu; Inceoglu, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (OME) reduce the severity of gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) but can also increase the chance of dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that preventive use of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (sEHI) such as TPPU can decrease NSAID-induced ulcers by increasing anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Dose- [10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, by mouth (PO)] and time-dependent (6 and 18 hours) ulcerative effects of diclofenac sodium (DCF, an NSAID) were studied in the small intestine of Swiss Webster mice. Dose-dependent effects of TPPU (0.001–0.1 mg/kg per day for 7 days, in drinking water) were evaluated in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity and compared with OME (20 mg/kg, PO). In addition, the effect of treatment was studied on levels of Hb in blood, EETs in plasma, inflammatory markers such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) in intestinal tissue homogenates, and tissue necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum. DCF dose dependently induced ulcers that were associated with both a significant (P < 0.05) loss of Hb and an increase in the level of MPO and TNF-α, with severity of ulceration highest at 18 hours. Pretreatment with TPPU dose dependently prevented ulcer formation by DCF, increased the levels of epoxy fatty acids, including EETs, and TPPU’s efficacy was comparable to OME. TPPU significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the effect of DCF on the level of Hb, MPO, and TNF-α. Thus sEHI might be useful in the management of NSAID-induced ulcers. PMID:26989141

  5. Novel zinc protease gene isolated from Dictyostelium discoideum is structurally related to mammalian leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Hou, L S

    2015-12-09

    The allantoicase (allC) gene of Dictyostelium discoideum allC RNAi mutant strain was silenced using the RNA interference technique. The mutant strain is motile, aggregated, and could not undergo further morphological development. The growth rate is high and the cells show a shortened cell cycle comparing with wild-type D. discoideum. However, the mechanisms regarding these actions remain unclear. mRNA differential display was used in this study to identify genetic differences. A novel D. discoideum gene (GenBank accession number: KC759140) encoding a new zinc protease was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the novel gene exhibited a conserved zinc-binding domain (HEX2HX18E) that allowed its classification into the M1 family of metallopeptidases. The gene encoded a 345-amino acid protein with a theoretical molecular mass of 39.69 kDa and a theoretical pI of 6.05. This protein showed strong homology with leukotriene A4 (LTA4) hydrolase of Homo sapiens (41% identity and 60% similarity at the amino acid level). By analyzing quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data, this zinc protease gene was more highly expressed in D. discoideum allC RNAi mutant type than in wild-type KAx-3 cells during the trophophase. The novel zinc protease gene may function as an LTA4 hydrolase and contribute to the shortening of the allC RNAi mutant cell cycle.

  6. α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: Exploration of Conformational Constraints in the Acyl Side Chain

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Katharine K.; Otrubova, Katerina; Boger, Dale L.

    2014-01-01

    A series of α-ketooxazoles containing heteroatoms embedded within conformational constraints in the C2 acyl side chain of 2 (OL-135) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The studies reveal that the installation of a heteroatom (O) in the conformational constraint is achievable, although the potency of these novel derivatives is reduced slightly relative to 2 and the analogous 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene series. Interestingly, both enantiomers (R and S) of the candidate inhibitors bearing a chiral center adjacent to the electrophilic carbonyl were found to effectively inhibit FAAH. PMID:24690529

  7. Serine hydrolase inhibitors block necrotic cell death by preventing calcium overload of the mitochondria and permeability transition pore formation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Ghosh, Moumita; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Bonventre, Joseph V; Ewing, Heather; Gelb, Michael H; Leslie, Christina C

    2014-01-17

    Perturbation of calcium signaling that occurs during cell injury and disease, promotes cell death. In mouse lung fibroblasts A23187 triggered mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and necrotic cell death that were blocked by cyclosporin A (CsA) and EGTA. LDH release temporally correlated with arachidonic acid release but did not involve cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) or calcium-independent PLA2. Surprisingly, release of arachidonic acid and LDH from cPLA2α-deficient fibroblasts was inhibited by the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone, and another serine hydrolase inhibitor KT195, by preventing mitochondrial calcium uptake. Inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) regulator, also prevented MPTP formation and arachidonic acid release induced by A23187 and H2O2. Pyrrophenone blocked MCU-mediated mitochondrial calcium uptake in permeabilized fibroblasts but not in isolated mitochondria. Unlike pyrrophenone, the diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol and CsA blocked cell death and arachidonic acid release not by preventing mitochondrial calcium uptake but by inhibiting MPTP formation. In fibroblasts stimulated with thapsigargin, which induces MPTP formation by a direct effect on mitochondria, LDH and arachidonic acid release were blocked by CsA and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol but not by pyrrophenone or EGTA. Therefore serine hydrolase inhibitors prevent necrotic cell death by blocking mitochondrial calcium uptake but not the enzyme releasing fatty acids that occurs by a novel pathway during MPTP formation. This work reveals the potential for development of small molecule cell-permeable serine hydrolase inhibitors that block MCU-mediated mitochondrial calcium overload, MPTP formation, and necrotic cell death.

  8. Serine Hydrolase Inhibitors Block Necrotic Cell Death by Preventing Calcium Overload of the Mitochondria and Permeability Transition Pore Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Ghosh, Moumita; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Ewing, Heather; Gelb, Michael H.; Leslie, Christina C.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbation of calcium signaling that occurs during cell injury and disease, promotes cell death. In mouse lung fibroblasts A23187 triggered mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and necrotic cell death that were blocked by cyclosporin A (CsA) and EGTA. LDH release temporally correlated with arachidonic acid release but did not involve cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) or calcium-independent PLA2. Surprisingly, release of arachidonic acid and LDH from cPLA2α-deficient fibroblasts was inhibited by the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone, and another serine hydrolase inhibitor KT195, by preventing mitochondrial calcium uptake. Inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) regulator, also prevented MPTP formation and arachidonic acid release induced by A23187 and H2O2. Pyrrophenone blocked MCU-mediated mitochondrial calcium uptake in permeabilized fibroblasts but not in isolated mitochondria. Unlike pyrrophenone, the diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol and CsA blocked cell death and arachidonic acid release not by preventing mitochondrial calcium uptake but by inhibiting MPTP formation. In fibroblasts stimulated with thapsigargin, which induces MPTP formation by a direct effect on mitochondria, LDH and arachidonic acid release were blocked by CsA and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol but not by pyrrophenone or EGTA. Therefore serine hydrolase inhibitors prevent necrotic cell death by blocking mitochondrial calcium uptake but not the enzyme releasing fatty acids that occurs by a novel pathway during MPTP formation. This work reveals the potential for development of small molecule cell-permeable serine hydrolase inhibitors that block MCU-mediated mitochondrial calcium overload, MPTP formation, and necrotic cell death. PMID:24297180

  9. Discovery of potent inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase by combinatorial library design and structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Xing, Li; McDonald, Joseph J; Kolodziej, Steve A; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Williams, Jennifer M; Warren, Chad J; O'Neal, Janet M; Skepner, Jill E; Roberds, Steven L

    2011-03-10

    Structure-based virtual screening was applied to design combinatorial libraries to discover novel and potent soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. X-ray crystal structures revealed unique interactions for a benzoxazole template in addition to the conserved hydrogen bonds with the catalytic machinery of sEH. By exploitation of the favorable binding elements, two iterations of library design based on amide coupling were employed, guided principally by the docking results of the enumerated virtual products. Biological screening of the libraries demonstrated as high as 90% hit rate, of which over two dozen compounds were single digit nanomolar sEH inhibitors by IC(50) determination. In total the library design and synthesis produced more than 300 submicromolar sEH inhibitors. In cellular systems consistent activities were demonstrated with biochemical measurements. The SAR understanding of the benzoxazole template provides valuable insights into discovery of novel sEH inhibitors as therapeutic agents.

  10. Enhancement of antinociception by coadministration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Kara R.; Inceoglu, Bora; Kubala, Lukas; Kim, In-Hae; Jinks, Steven L.; Eiserich, Jason P.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Combination therapies have long been used to treat inflammation while reducing side effects. The present study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of combination treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and previously undescribed soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (sEHIs) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged mice. NSAIDs inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and thereby decrease production of metabolites that lead to pain and inflammation. The sEHIs, such as 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid butyl ester (AUDA-BE), stabilize anti-inflammatory epoxy-eicosatrienoic acids, which indirectly reduce the expression of COX-2 protein. Here we demonstrate that the combination therapy of NSAIDs and sEHIs produces significantly beneficial effects that are additive for alleviating pain and enhanced effects in reducing COX-2 protein expression and shifting oxylipin metabolomic profiles. When administered alone, AUDA-BE decreased protein expression of COX-2 to 73 ± 6% of control mice treated with LPS only without altering COX-1 expression and decreased PGE2 levels to 52 ± 8% compared with LPS-treated mice not receiving any therapeutic intervention. When AUDA-BE was used in combination with low doses of indomethacin, celecoxib, or rofecoxib, PGE2 concentrations dropped to 51 ± 7, 84 ± 9, and 91 ± 8%, respectively, versus LPS control, without disrupting prostacyclin and thromboxane levels. These data suggest that these drug combinations (NSAIDs and sEHIs) produce a valuable beneficial analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect while prospectively decreasing side effects such as cardiovascular toxicity. PMID:16950874

  11. Leukotriene A4 hydrolase: Selective abrogation of leukotriene B4 formation by mutation of aspartic acid 375

    PubMed Central

    Rudberg, Peter C.; Tholander, Fredrik; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Samuelsson, Bengt; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2002-01-01

    Leukotriene A4 (LTA4, 5S-trans-5,6-oxido-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) hydrolase (LTA4H)/aminopeptidase is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4, 5S,12R-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid), a classical chemoattractant and immune modulating lipid mediator. Two chemical features are key to the bioactivity of LTB4, namely, the chirality of the 12R-hydroxyl group and the cis-trans-trans geometry of the conjugated triene structure. From the crystal structure of LTA4H, a hydrophilic patch composed of Gln-134, Tyr-267, and Asp-375 was identified in a narrow and otherwise hydrophobic pocket, believed to bind LTA4. In addition, Asp-375 belongs to peptide K21, a previously characterized 21-residue active site-peptide to which LTA4 binds during suicide inactivation. In the present report we used site-directed mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography to show that Asp-375, but none of the other candidate residues, is specifically required for the epoxide hydrolase activity of LTA4H. Thus, mutation of Asp-375 leads to a selective loss of the enzyme's ability to generate LTB4 whereas the aminopeptidase activity is preserved. We propose that Asp-375, possibly assisted by Gln-134, acts as a critical determinant for the stereoselective introduction of the 12R-hydroxyl group and thus the biological activity of LTB4. PMID:11917124

  12. ADMINISTRATION OF A SUBSTITUTED ADAMANTLY-UREA INHIBITOR OF THE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE PROTECTS THE KIDNEY FROM DAMAGE IN HYPERTENSIVE GOTO-KAKIZAKI RATS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hypertension and type II diabetes are co-morbid diseases that lead to the development of nephropathy. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors are reported to provide protection from renal injury. We hypothesized that the sEH inhibitor 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid (AUDA) protects ...

  13. The fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 does not affect triacylglycerol hydrolysis in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Jason R; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-11-01

    The O-arylcarbamate URB597 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester; also referred to as KDS-4103) is a potent inhibitor of fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an intracellular serine hydrolase responsible for the inactivation of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. URB597 demonstrates a remarkable degree of selectivity for FAAH over other serine hydrolases (e.g. cholinesterases) or other components of the endocannabinoid system (e.g. cannabinoid receptors). However, in a proteomic-based selectivity screen based on the displacement of fluorophosphonate-rhodamine (FPR) from mouse brain proteins, it was recently shown that URB597 prevents FPR binding to triacylglycerol hydrolase (TGH) with a median inhibitory concentration of 192nM. To determine whether this effect correlates with inhibition of TGH activity, we investigated the ability of URB597 to inhibit triolein hydrolysis in rat liver and heart tissues, which are rich in TGH, as well as white adipose tissue (WAT), which is rich in adipose triacylglycerol lipase (TGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase. The results show that URB597 does not affect triolein hydrolysis in any of these tissues at concentrations as high as 10microM, whereas it inhibits FAAH activity at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of URB597 at doses that maximally inhibit FAAH in vivo (0.3-3mgkg(-1)) exerts no effect on triolein hydrolysis and tissue triacylglycerol (TAG) levels in rat liver, heart or WAT. The results indicate that URB597, while potent at inhibiting FAAH, does not affect TGH and TGL activities in rat tissues.

  14. Binding and Inactivation Mechanism of a Humanized Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase by [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Revealed from Cocrystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; DeMartino, Jessica K.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-08-17

    The cocrystal X-ray structures of two isomeric {alpha}-ketooxazole inhibitors (1 (OL-135) and 2) bound to fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), a key enzymatic regulator of endocannabinoid signaling, are disclosed. The active site catalytic Ser241 is covalently bound to the inhibitors electrophilic carbonyl groups, providing the first structures of FAAH bound to an inhibitor as a deprotonated hemiketal mimicking the enzymatic tetrahedral intermediate. The work also offers a detailed view of the oxyanion hole and an exceptional 'in-action' depiction of the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. These structures capture the first picture of inhibitors that span the active site into the cytosolic port providing new insights that help to explain FAAH's interaction with substrate leaving groups and their role in modulating inhibitor potency and selectivity. The role for the activating central heterocycle is clearly defined and distinguished from that observed in prior applications with serine proteases, reconciling the large electronic effect of attached substituents found unique to this class of inhibitors with FAAH. Additional striking active site flexibility is seen upon binding of the inhibitors, providing insights into the existence of a now well-defined membrane access channel with the disappearance of a spatially independent portion of the acyl chain-binding pocket. Finally, comparison of the structures of OL-135 (1) and its isomer 2 indicates that they bind identically to FAAH, albeit with reversed orientations of the central activating heterocycle, revealing that the terminal 2-pyridyl substituent and the acyl chain phenyl group provide key anchoring interactions and confirming the distinguishing role of the activating oxazole.

  15. Rational Design of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors that Act by Covalently Bonding to Two Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    Otrubova, Katerina; Brown, Monica; McCormick, Michael S.; Han, Gye W.; O’Neal, Scott T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    The design and characterization of α-ketoheterocycle fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors are disclosed that additionally and irreversibly target a cysteine (Cys269) found in the enzyme cytosolic port while maintaining the reversible covalent Ser241 attachment responsible for their rapid and initially reversible enzyme inhibition. Two α-ketooxazoles (3 and 4) containing strategically placed electrophiles at the C5 position of the pyridyl substituent of 2 (OL-135) were prepared and examined as inhibitors of FAAH. Consistent with the observed time-dependent non-competitive inhibition, the co-crystal X-ray structure of 3 bound to a humanized variant of rat FAAH revealed that 3 was not only covalently bound to the active site catalytic nucleophile Ser241 as a deprotonated hemiketal, but also to Cys269 through the pyridyl C5-substituent, thus providing an inhibitor with dual covalent attachment in the enzyme active site. In vivo characterization of the prototypical inhibitors in mice demonstrate that they raise endogenous brain levels of FAAH substrates to a greater extent and for a much longer duration (>6 h) than the reversible inhibitor 2, indicating that the inhibitors accumulate and persist in the brain to completely inhibit FAAH for a prolonged period. Consistent with this behavior and the targeted irreversible enzyme inhibition, 3 reversed cold allodynia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in mice for a sustained period (>6 h) beyond that observed with the reversible inhibitor 2, providing effects that were unchanged over the 1–6 h time course monitored. PMID:23581831

  16. O-(triazolyl)methyl carbamates as a novel and potent class of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Colombano, Giampiero; Albani, Clara; Ottonello, Giuliana; Ribeiro, Alison; Scarpelli, Rita; Tarozzo, Glauco; Daglian, Jennifer; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Piomelli, Daniele; Bandiera, Tiziano

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity is under investigation as a valuable strategy for the treatment of several disorders, including pain and drug addiction. A number of potent FAAH inhibitors belonging to different chemical classes have been disclosed to date; O-aryl carbamates are one of the most representative families. In the search for novel FAAH inhibitors, a series of O-(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl carbamate derivatives were designed and synthesized exploiting a copper- catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition reaction between azides and alkynes (click chemistry). Exploration of the structure-activity relationships within this new class of compounds identified potent inhibitors of both rat and human FAAH with IC50 values in the single-digit nanomolar range. In addition, these derivatives showed improved stability in rat plasma and kinetic solubility in buffer with respect to the lead compound. Based on the results of the study, the novel analogues identified can be considered to be promising starting point for the development of new FAAH inhibitors with improved drug-like properties.

  17. Covalent inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH): A rationale for the activity of piperidine and piperazine aryl ureas

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Branduardi, Davide; Masetti, Matteo; Lodola, Alessio; Mor, Marco; Piomelli, Daniele; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Recently, covalent drugs have attracted great interest in the drug discovery community, with successful examples that have demonstrated their therapeutic effects. Here, we focus on the covalent inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which is a promising strategy in the treatment of pain and inflammation. Among the most recent and potent FAAH inhibitors (FAAHi), there are the cyclic piperidine/piperazine aryl ureas. FAAH hydrolyzes efficiently the amide bond of these compounds, forming a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. To rationalize this experimental evidence, we performed an extensive computational analysis centered on the piperidine-based PF750 (1) and the piperazine-based JNJ1661010 (2), two potent lead compounds used to generating covalent inhibitors as clinical candidates. We found that FAAH induces a distortion of the amide bond of the piperidine/piperazine aryl ureas. QM/MM ΔELUMO-HOMO energies indicate that the observed enzyme-induced distortion of the amide bond favors the formation of a covalent FAAH- inhibitor adduct. These findings could help in the rational structure-based design of novel covalent FAAHi. PMID:21830831

  18. X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Bound to a Humanized Variant of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Kimball, F. Scott; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Three cocrystal X-ray structures of the α-ketoheterocycle inhibitors 3–5 bound to a humanized variant of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed and comparatively discussed alongside those of 1 (OL-135) and its isomer 2. These five X-ray structures systematically probe each of the three active site regions key to substrate or inhibitor binding: (1) the conformationally mobile acyl chain-binding pocket and membrane access channel responsible for fatty acid amide substrate and inhibitor acyl chain binding, (2) the atypical active site catalytic residues and surrounding oxyanion hole that covalently binds the core of the α-ketoheterocycle inhibitors captured as deprotonated hemiketals mimicking the tetrahedral intermediate of the enzyme catalyzed reaction, and (3) the cytosolic port and its uniquely important imbedded ordered water molecules and a newly identified anion binding site. The detailed analysis of their key active site interactions and their implications on the interpretation of the available structure–activity relationships are discussed providing important insights for future design. PMID:19924997

  19. Application of computational methods to the design of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors based on a carbamic template structure.

    PubMed

    Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided approaches are widely used in modern medicinal chemistry to improve the efficiency of the discovery phase. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a key component of the endocannabinoid system and a potential drug target for several therapeutic applications. During the past decade, different chemical classes of inhibitors, with different mechanisms of action, had been developed. Among them, alkyl carbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl esters represent a prototypical class of active site-directed inhibitors, which allowed detailed pharmacological characterization of FAAH inhibition. Both ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches have been applied to rationalize structure-activity relationships and to drive the optimization of the inhibitory potency for this class of compounds. In this chapter, we review our contribution to the discovery and optimization of therapeutically promising FAAH inhibitors, based on a carbamic template structure, which block FAAH in an irreversible manner exerting analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic effects in animal models. The peculiar catalytic mechanism of FAAH, and the covalent interaction with carbamate-based inhibitors, prompted the application of different computer-aided tools, ranging from ligand-based approaches to docking procedures and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid techniques. Latest advancements in the field are also reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of guanidino-alkyl-ribitol derivatives as nucleoside hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, A; McNaughton, M; Bal, G; Surpateanu, G; Van Der Veken, P; De Prol, S; Versées, W; Steyaert, J; Haemers, A; Augustyns, K

    2008-02-01

    Nucleoside hydrolase (NH) is a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway. The purine specificity of the IAG-NH from Trypanosoma vivax is at least in part due to cation-pi-stacking interactions. Guanidinium ions can be involved in cation-pi-stacking interactions, therefore a series of guanidino-alkyl-ribitol derivatives were synthesized in order to examine the binding affinity of these compounds towards the target enzyme. The compounds show moderate to good inhibiting activity towards the IAG-NH from T. vivax.

  1. His374 of wheat endoxylanase inhibitor TAXI-I stabilizes complex formation with glycoside hydrolase family 11 endoxylanases.

    PubMed

    Fierens, Katleen; Gils, Ann; Sansen, Stefaan; Brijs, Kristof; Courtin, Christophe M; Declerck, Paul J; De Ranter, Camiel J; Gebruers, Kurt; Rabijns, Anja; Robben, Johan; Campenhout, Steven; Volckaert, Guido; Delcour, Jan A

    2005-11-01

    Wheat endoxylanase inhibitor TAXI-I inhibits microbial glycoside hydrolase family 11 endoxylanases. Crystallographic data of an Aspergillus niger endoxylanase-TAXI-I complex showed His374 of TAXI-I to be a key residue in endoxylanase inhibition. Its role in enzyme-inhibitor interaction was further investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of His374 into alanine, glutamine or lysine. Binding kinetics and affinities of the molecular interactions between A. niger, Bacillus subtilis, Trichoderma longibrachiatumendoxylanases and wild-type TAXI-I and TAXI-I His374 mutants were determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Enzyme-inhibitor binding was in accordance with a simple 1 : 1 binding model. Association and dissociation rate constants of wild-type TAXI-I towards the endoxylanases were in the range between 1.96 and 36.1 x 10(4)m(-1) x s(-1) and 0.72-3.60 x 10(-4) x s(-1), respectively, resulting in equilibrium dissociation constants in the low nanomolar range. Mutation of TAXI-I His374 to a variable degree reduced the inhibition capacity of the inhibitor mainly due to higher complex dissociation rate constants (three- to 80-fold increase). The association rate constants were affected to a smaller extent (up to eightfold decrease). Substitution of TAXI-I His374 therefore strongly affects the affinity of the inhibitor for the enzymes. In addition, the results show that His374 plays a critical role in the stabilization of the endoxylanase-TAXI-I complex rather than in the docking of inhibitor onto enzyme.

  2. The macamide N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide is a time-dependent fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Almukadi, Haifa; Wu, Hui; Böhlke, Mark; Kelley, Charles J; Maher, Timothy J; Pino-Figueroa, Alejandro

    2013-10-01

    The Peruvian plant Lepidium meyenii (Maca) has been shown to possess neuroprotective activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have also demonstrated the activity of the pentane extract and its macamides, the most representative lipophilic constituents of Maca, in the endocannabinoid system as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors. One of the most active macamides, N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide, was studied to determine its mechanism of interaction with FAAH and whether it has inhibitory activity on mono-acyl glycerol lipase (MAGL), the second enzyme responsible for endocannabinoid degradation. Macamide concentrations from 1 to 100 μM were tested using FAAH and MAGL inhibitor assay methods and showed no effect on MAGL. Tests with other conditions were performed in order to characterize the inhibitory mechanism of FAAH inhibition. N-3-methoxybenzyl-linoleamide displayed significant time-dependent and dose-dependent FAAH inhibitory activity. The mechanism of inhibition was most likely irreversible or slowly reversible. These results suggest the potential application of macamides isolated from Maca as FAAH inhibitors, as they might act on the central nervous system to provide analgesic, anti-inflammatory, or neuroprotective effects, by modulating the release of neurotransmitters.

  3. Development and characterization of endocannabinoid hydrolases FAAH and MAGL inhibitors bearing a benzotriazol-1-yl carboxamide scaffold.

    PubMed

    Morera, Ludovica; Labar, Geoffray; Ortar, Giorgio; Lambert, Didier M

    2012-11-01

    A series of (1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)(4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl)methanones and of (1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)methanones has been prepared and tested on human fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In the benzylpiperazinyl series, compound 29 (ML30) exhibited an IC(50) value of 0.54 nM on MAGL, combined with a 1000-fold selectivity versus FAAH, while compounds 11 and 16 acted as potent dual FAAH-MAGL inhibitors (IC(50)<10 nM). In the phenylpiperazinyl series, compounds 37, 38, 42, and 43 displayed IC(50) values against MAGL in the nanomolar range, whilst being between one and two orders of magnitude less potent on the FAAH, while compounds 31 and 32 were potent FAAH inhibitors (IC(50)<20 nM) and over 12-fold selective versus MAGL. The key structural determinants driving the structure-activity relationships were explored by the minimization of the inhibitors inside the active site of both enzymes.

  4. (4-Phenoxyphenyl)tetrazolecarboxamides and related compounds as dual inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL).

    PubMed

    Holtfrerich, Angela; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Inhibitors of the enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the principle enzymes involved in the degradation of endogenous cannabinoids like anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, have potential utility in the treatment of several disorders including pain, inflammation and anxiety. In the present study, the effectivity and selectivity of eight known FAAH and MAGL inhibitors for inhibition of the appropriate enzyme were measured applying in vitro assays, which work under comparable conditions. Because many of the known FAAH and MAGL inhibitors simply consist of a lipophilic scaffold to which a heterocyclic system is bound, furthermore, different heterocyclic structures were evaluated for their contribution to enzyme inhibition by attaching them to the same lipophilic backbone, namely 4-phenoxybenzene. One of the most active compound synthesized during this investigation was N,N-dimethyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-2H-tetrazole-2-carboxamide (16) (IC50 FAAH: 0.012 μM; IC50 MAGL: 0.028 μM). This inhibitor was systematically modified in the lipophilic 4-phenoxyphenyl region. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the inhibitory potency against FAAH and MAGL, respectively, could still be increased by replacement of the phenoxy residue of 16 by 3-chlorophenoxy (45) or pyrrol-1-yl groups (49). Finally, the tetrazolecarboxamide 16 and some related compounds were tested for metabolic stability with rat liver S9 fractions showing that these kind of FAAH/MAGL inhibitors are readily inactivated by cleavage of the bond between the tetrazole ring and its carboxamide substituent.

  5. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase in ternary complex with substrate and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Kuppan, Gokulan; Shetty, Nishant D.; Owen, Joshua L.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-12-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is a ubiquitous enzyme that plays a central role in methylation-based processes by maintaining the intracellular balance between S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and S-adenosylmethionine. We report the first prokaryotic crystal structure of SAHH, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in complex with adenosine (ADO) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Structures of complexes with three inhibitors are also reported: 3{prime}-keto aristeromycin (ARI), 2-fluoroadenosine, and 3-deazaadenosine. The ARI complex is the first reported structure of SAHH complexed with this inhibitor, and confirms the oxidation of the 3{prime} hydroxyl to a planar keto group, consistent with its prediction as a mechanism-based inhibitor. We demonstrate the in vivo enzyme inhibition activity of the three inhibitors and also show that 2-fluoradenosine has bactericidal activity. While most of the residues lining the ADO-binding pocket are identical between Mtb and human SAHH, less is known about the binding mode of the homocysteine (HCY) appendage of the full substrate. We report the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution structure of the complex of SAHH cocrystallized with SAH. The most striking change in the structure is that binding of HCY forces a rotation of His363 around the backbone to flip out of contact with the 5{prime} hydroxyl of the ADO and opens access to a nearby channel that leads to the surface. This complex suggests that His363 acts as a switch that opens up to permit binding of substrate, then closes down after release of the cleaved HCY. Differences in the entrance to this access channel between human and Mtb SAHH are identified.

  6. Effect of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor, UC1728, on LPS-Induced Uveitis in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Gillian J.; Aktas, Zeynep; Hennes-Beean, Elizabeth; Kolb, Aaron W.; Larsen, Inna V.; Schmitz, Emily J.; Clausius, Hilary R.; Yang, Jun; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Hammock, Bruce D.; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase isozymes convert free arachidonic acid into eicosanoids named epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) that have roles in regulating inflammation. EETs are rapidly converted to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DiHETs) by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Little is known about the potential role of these metabolites in uveitis, but conversion of EETs to DiHETs could contribute to the inflammation. We tested a potent and orally available inhibitor of sEH for its ability to reduce ocular inflammation in a rabbit LPS-induced model of uveitis. Rabbits were treated by subcutaneous injection with the sEH inhibitor (UC1728, 3 mg/kg), or the vehicle control (PEG400) and uveitis was assessed at 6, 24 and 48 h post-intracameral LPS injection using a modified Hackett-McDonald scoring system. Eyes treated by intra-cameral injection of PBS, or by aseptic preparation served as further controls. Signs of inflammation in this model were mild and transient. Treatment with UC1728 did not significantly reduce inflammation compared to animals treated with the PEG400 vehicle. Blood levels of UC1728 were a thousand fold higher than the in vitro determined inhibitory potency (IC50) of the compound suggesting a significant degree of inhibition of sEH in the rabbit. The lack of efficacy suggests that sEH or its substrates the EETs may not be involved in mediating inflammation in this model of uveitis. PMID:28066796

  7. Synthesis and QSAR of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors: Modulation at the N-Portion of Biphenyl-3-yl Alkylcarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Vacondio, Federica; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Sanchini, Silvano; Piersanti, Giovanni; Clapper, Jason R.; King, Alvin R.; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Alkylcarbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl esters are a class of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors that comprises cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3′-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597), a compound with analgesic, anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like properties in rat and mouse models. Here, we extended the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for this class of compounds by replacing the cyclohexyl ring of the parent compound cyclohexylcarbamic acid biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB524) (IC50, for FAAH = 63 nM) with a selected set of substituents of different size, shape, flexibility and lipophilicity. Docking experiments and Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) calculations indicated that the N-terminal group of O-arylcarbamates fits within the lipophilic region of the substrate-binding site, mimicking the arachidonoyl chain of anandamide. Significant potency improvements were observed for the β-naphthylmethyl derivative 4q (IC50 = 5.3 nM) and its 3′-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl ester 4z (URB880, IC50 = 0.63 nM), indicating that shape complementarity and hydrogen bonds are crucial to obtain highly potent inhibitors. PMID:18507372

  8. Discovering Drugs with DNA-Encoded Library Technology: From Concept to Clinic with an Inhibitor of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Ding, Yun; Callahan, James F; Lazaar, Aili L; Israel, David I

    2017-03-09

    DNA-encoded chemical library technology was developed with the vision of its becoming a transformational platform for drug discovery. The hope was that a new paradigm for the discovery of low-molecular-weight drugs would be enabled by combining the vast molecular diversity achievable with combinatorial chemistry, the information-encoding attributes of DNA, the power of molecular biology, and a streamlined selection-based discovery process. Here, we describe the discovery and early clinical development of GSK2256294, an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EPHX2), by using encoded-library technology (ELT). GSK2256294 is an orally bioavailable, potent and selective inhibitor of sEH that has a long half life and produced no serious adverse events in a first-time-in-human clinical study. To our knowledge, GSK2256294 is the first molecule discovered from this technology to enter human clinical testing and represents a realization of the vision that DNA-encoded chemical library technology can efficiently yield molecules with favorable properties that can be readily progressed into high-quality drugs.

  9. Characterization of human S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase in vitro and identification of its potential inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Weiwei; Li, Yanhua; Shan, Qiuli; Han, Tian; Li, Wencheng; He, Sheng; Zhu, Kongkai; Li, Yumei; Tan, Xiaojun; Gu, Jinsong

    2017-12-01

    Human S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH, E.C.3.3.1.1) has been considered to be an attractive target for the design of medicines to treat human disease, because of its important role in regulating biological methylation reactions to catalyse the reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) to adenosine (Ado) and l-homocysteine (Hcy). In this study, SAHH protein was successfully cloned and purified with optimized, Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system. The biological activity results revealed that, among the tested compounds screened by ChemMapper and SciFinder Scholar, 4-(3-hydroxyprop-1-en-1-yl)-2-methoxyphenol (coniferyl alcohol, CAS: 458-35-5, ZINC: 12359045) exhibited the highest inhibition against rSAHH (IC50= 34 nM). Molecular docking studies showed that coniferyl alcohol was well docked into the active cavity of SAHH. And several H-bonds formed between them, which stabilized coniferyl alcohol in the active site of rSAHH with a proper conformation.

  10. Effects of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitors in Non-Human Primate Models of Nicotine Reward and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Redhi, Godfrey H; Auber, Alessia; Secci, Maria E; Mascia, Paola; Bandiera, Tiziano; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Chefer, Svetlana I; Barnes, Chanel; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Goldberg, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) counteracts reward-related effects of nicotine in rats, but it has not been tested for this purpose in non-human primates. Therefore, we studied the effects of the first- and second-generation O-arylcarbamate-based FAAH inhibitors, URB597 (cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3’-carbamoyl-3-yl ester) and URB694 (6-hydroxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl-cyclohexylcarbamate), in squirrel monkeys. Both FAAH inhibitors: (1) blocked FAAH activity in brain and liver, increasing levels of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid and α-type peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR-α) receptors; (2) shifted nicotine self-administration dose–response functions in a manner consistent with reduced nicotine reward; (3) blocked reinstatement of nicotine seeking induced by reexposure to either nicotine priming or nicotine-associated cues; and (4) had no effect on cocaine or food self-administration. The effects of FAAH inhibition on nicotine self-administration and nicotine priming-induced reinstatement were reversed by the PPAR-α antagonist, MK886. Unlike URB597, which was not self-administered by monkeys in an earlier study, URB694 was self-administered at a moderate rate. URB694 self-administration was blocked by pretreatment with an antagonist for either PPAR-α (MK886) or cannabinoid CB1 receptors (rimonabant). In additional experiments in rats, URB694 was devoid of THC-like or nicotine-like interoceptive effects under drug-discrimination procedures, and neither of the FAAH inhibitors induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell—consistent with their lack of robust reinforcing effects in monkeys. Overall, both URB597 and URB694 show promise for the initialization and maintenance of smoking cessation because of their ability to block the rewarding effects of nicotine and prevent nicotine priming-induced and cue-induced reinstatement. PMID:25754762

  11. Effects of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitors in Non-Human Primate Models of Nicotine Reward and Relapse.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Redhi, Godfrey H; Auber, Alessia; Secci, Maria E; Mascia, Paola; Bandiera, Tiziano; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Chefer, Svetlana I; Barnes, Chanel; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Goldberg, Steven R

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) counteracts reward-related effects of nicotine in rats, but it has not been tested for this purpose in non-human primates. Therefore, we studied the effects of the first- and second-generation O-arylcarbamate-based FAAH inhibitors, URB597 (cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-3-yl ester) and URB694 (6-hydroxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl-cyclohexylcarbamate), in squirrel monkeys. Both FAAH inhibitors: (1) blocked FAAH activity in brain and liver, increasing levels of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid and α-type peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR-α) receptors; (2) shifted nicotine self-administration dose-response functions in a manner consistent with reduced nicotine reward; (3) blocked reinstatement of nicotine seeking induced by reexposure to either nicotine priming or nicotine-associated cues; and (4) had no effect on cocaine or food self-administration. The effects of FAAH inhibition on nicotine self-administration and nicotine priming-induced reinstatement were reversed by the PPAR-α antagonist, MK886. Unlike URB597, which was not self-administered by monkeys in an earlier study, URB694 was self-administered at a moderate rate. URB694 self-administration was blocked by pretreatment with an antagonist for either PPAR-α (MK886) or cannabinoid CB1 receptors (rimonabant). In additional experiments in rats, URB694 was devoid of THC-like or nicotine-like interoceptive effects under drug-discrimination procedures, and neither of the FAAH inhibitors induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell--consistent with their lack of robust reinforcing effects in monkeys. Overall, both URB597 and URB694 show promise for the initialization and maintenance of smoking cessation because of their ability to block the rewarding effects of nicotine and prevent nicotine priming-induced and cue-induced reinstatement.

  12. An Orally Active Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor Lowers Blood Pressure and Provides Renal Protection in Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D.; Zhao, Xueying; Zaharis, Constantine Z.; Olearczyk, Jeffrey J.; Pollock, David M.; Newman, John W.; Kim, In-Hae; Watanabe, Takaho; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that increasing epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) would lower blood pressure and ameliorate renal damage in salt-sensitive hypertension. Rats were infused with angiotensin and fed a normal-salt diet or an 8% NaCl diet for 14 days. The sEH inhibitor, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), was given orally to angiotensin-infused animals during the 14-day period. Plasma AUDA metabolite levels were measured, and they averaged 10±2 ng/mL in normal-salt angiotensin hypertension and 19±3 ng/mL in high-salt angiotensin hypertension on day 14 in the animals administered the sEH inhibitor. Mean arterial blood pressure averaged 161±4 mm Hg in normal-salt and 172±5 mmHg in the high-salt angiotensin hypertension groups on day 14. EH inhibitor treatment significantly lowered blood pressure to 140±5 mm Hg in the normal-salt angiotensin hypertension group and to 151±6 mm Hg in the high-salt angiotensin hypertension group on day 14. The lower arterial blood pressures in the AUDA-treated groups were associated with increased urinary epoxide-to-diol ratios. Urinary microalbumin levels were measured, and ED-1 staining was used to determine renal damage and macrophage infiltration in the groups. Two weeks of AUDA treatment decreased urinary microalbumin excretion in the normal-salt and high-salt angiotensin hypertension groups and macrophage number in the high-salt angiotensin hypertension group. These data demonstrate that sEH inhibition lowers blood pressure and ameliorates renal damage in angiotensin-dependent, salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:16157792

  13. Omeprazole increases the efficacy of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor in a PGE2 induced pain model

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inceoglu, Bora; Yang, Jun; Wan, Debin; Kodani, Sean D.; da Silva, Carlos Antonio Trindade; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are potent endogenous analgesic metabolites produced from arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450s (P450s). Metabolism of EETs by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduces their activity, while their stabilization by sEH inhibition decreases both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Here, we tested the complementary hypothesis that increasing the level of EETs through induction of P450s by omeprazole (OME), can influence pain related signaling by itself, and potentiate the anti-hyperalgesic effect of sEH inhibitor. Rats were treated with OME (100 mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days), sEH inhibitor TPPU (3 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and OME (100 mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days) + TPPU (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., last 3 days of OME dose) dissolved in vehicle PEG400, and their effect on hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to pain) induced by PGE2 was monitored. While OME treatment by itself exhibited variable effects on PGE2 induced hyperalgesia, it strongly potentiated the effect of TPPU in the same assay. The significant decrease in pain with OME + TPPU treatment correlated with the increased levels of EETs in plasma and increased activities of P450 1A1 and P450 1A2 in liver microsomes. The results show that reducing catabolism of EETs with a sEH inhibitor yielded a stronger analgesic effect than increasing generation of EETs by OME, and combination of both yielded the strongest pain reducing effect under the condition of this study. PMID:26522832

  14. Piperazinyl carbamate fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors and transient receptor potential channel modulators as "dual-target" analgesics.

    PubMed

    Maione, Sabatino; Costa, Barbara; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Morera, Enrico; De Chiaro, Maria; Comelli, Francesca; Boccella, Serena; Guida, Francesca; Verde, Roberta; Ortar, Giorgio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    We showed previously that inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels with the same molecule, the naturally occurring N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT), produces more efficacious anti-nociceptive and anti-hyperalgesic actions than the targeting of FAAH or TRPV1 alone. We also reported the synthesis of some piperazinyl carbamates as "dual" FAAH inhibitors and either antagonists at TRPV1 or agonists/desensitizers of the transient receptor potential ankyrin type-1 (TRPA1) cannel, another target for analgesic drugs. We investigated here if two such compounds, the FAAH/TRPV1 blocker OMDM198 and the FAAH inhibitor/TRPA1 agonist, OMDM202, exert anti-nociceptive actions in the formalin test of pain in mice, and through what mechanism. Both compounds inhibited the second phase of the response to formalin, the effect being maximal at 3 mg/kg, i.p. Antagonism of CB1 or CB2 receptors with AM251 or AM630 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively, reversed this effect. A TRPV1 agonist, palvanil (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), also reversed the analgesic effect of OMDM198. OMDM202 action was also antagonized by a per se inactive dose of the selective TRPA1 blocker, AP-18 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.), but not by a TRPV1 antagonist. AP-18 at higher doses (0.1-0.2 mg/kg) inhibited both the first and second phase of the formalin response. The effects of OMDM198 and OMDM202 were accompanied by elevation of anandamide levels in the spinal cord. OMDM198 (0.1-5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) also reversed carrageenan-induced oedema and thermal hyperalgesia in mice with efficacy similar to that of AA-5-HT. These data suggest that "dual" fatty acid amide hydrolase and transient receptor potential channel modulators should be clinically evaluated as novel analgesics.

  15. Trimeric crystal structure of the glycoside hydrolase family 42 beta-galactosidase from Thermus thermophilus A4 and the structure of its complex with galactose.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Masafumi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Ohtsu, Naomi; Motoshima, Hidemasa; Matsuzawa, Hiroshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2002-09-06

    The beta-galactosidase from an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus A4 (A4-beta-Gal), is thermostable and belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 42 (GH-42). As the first known structures of a GH-42 enzyme, we determined the crystal structures of free and galactose-bound A4-beta-Gal at 1.6A and 2.2A resolution, respectively. A4-beta-Gal forms a homotrimeric structure resembling a flowerpot. Each monomer has an active site located inside a large central tunnel. The N-terminal domain of A4-beta-Gal has a TIM barrel fold, as predicted from hydrophobic cluster analysis. The putative catalytic residues of A4-beta-Gal (Glu141 and Glu312) superimpose well with the catalytic residues of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The environment around the catalytic nucleophile (Glu312) is similar to that in the case of E.coli beta-galactosidase, but the recognition mechanism for a substrate is different. Trp182 of the next subunit of the trimer constitutes a part of the active-site pocket, indicating that the trimeric structure is essential for the enzyme activity. Structural comparison with other glycoside hydrolases revealed that many features of the 4/7 superfamily are conserved in the A4-beta-Gal structure. On the basis of the results of 1H NMR spectroscopy, A4-beta-Gal was determined to be a "retaining" enzyme. Interestingly, the active site was similar with those of retaining enzymes, but the overall fold of the TIM barrel domain was very similar to that of an inverting enzyme, beta-amylase.

  16. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3- (1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Yang, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Duan, Jia-Xi; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Lee, Kin Sing; Hammock, Bruce D; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), the metabolites of arachidonic acid derived from the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases, are mainly metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to their corresponding diols. EETs but not their diols, have anti-inflammatory properties and inhibition of sEH might provide protective effects against inflammatory fibrosis. We test the effects of a selected sEH inhibitor, 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU), on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in mice. A mouse model of PF was established by intratracheal injection of bleomycin and TPPU was administered for 21 days after bleomycin injection. We found TPPU treatment improved the body weight loss and survival rate of bleomycin-stimulated mice. Histological examination showed that TPPU treatment alleviated bleomycin-induced inflammation and maintained the alveolar structure of the pulmonary tissues. TPPU also decreased the bleomycin-induced deposition of collagen and the expression of procollagen I mRNA in lung tissues of mice. TPPU decreased the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 levels in the serum of bleomycin-stimulated mice. Furthermore, TPPU inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of mouse fibroblasts and partially reversed TGF-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin expression. Our results indicate that the inhibition of sEH attenuates bleomycin-induced inflammation and collagen deposition and therefore prevents bleomycin-induced PF in a mouse model.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Oesophagostomum dentatum (Nematoda) during Larval Transition, and the Effects of Hydrolase Inhibitors on Development

    PubMed Central

    Ondrovics, Martina; Silbermayr, Katja; Mitreva, Makedonka; Young, Neil D.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Gasser, Robin B.; Joachim, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro drug testing was combined with proteomic and bioinformatic analyses to identify and characterize proteins involved in larval development of Oesophagostomum dentatum, an economically important parasitic nematode. Four hydrolase inhibitors ο-phenanthroline, sodium fluoride, iodoacetamide and 1,2-epoxy-3-(pnitrophenoxy)-propane (EPNP) significantly inhibited (≥90%) larval development. Comparison of the proteomic profiles of the development-inhibited larvae with those of uninhibited control larvae using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and subsequent MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis identified a down-regulation of 12 proteins inferred to be involved in various larval developmental processes, including post-embryonic development and growth. Furthermore, three proteins (i.e. intermediate filament protein B, tropomyosin and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase) inferred to be involved in the moulting process were down-regulated in moulting- and development-inhibited O. dentatum larvae. This first proteomic map of O. dentatum larvae provides insights in the protein profile of larval development in this parasitic nematode, and significantly improves our understanding of the fundamental biology of its development. The results and the approach used might assist in developing new interventions against parasitic nematodes by blocking or disrupting their key biological pathways. PMID:23717515

  18. Single administration of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor suppresses neuroinflammation and improves neuronal damage after cardiac arrest in mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Noriko; Nakayama, Shin; Tanaka, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) causes ischemia-reperfusion injury in the whole body among victims. Especially in the brain, inflammation and neuronal cell death can lead to irreversible dysfunction. Our goal was to determine whether a single administration of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (AS2586144-CL) has a neuroprotective effect and decreases the inflammatory response after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Global cerebral ischemia was induced in male C57BL/6 mice with 8min of CA. Thirty minutes after recovery of spontaneous circulation, the mice were randomly assigned to three groups and administered AS2586144-CL: 1mg/kg (n=25), 10mg/kg (n=25), or 0mg/kg (vehicle, n=25). At 6 and 7 days after CA/CPR, behavioral tests were conducted and brains were removed for histological evaluation. Analysis of histological damage 7 days after CA/CPR revealed that 10mg/kg of AS2586144-CL protected neurons, and suppressed cytokine production and microglial migration into the hippocampus. Two hours after CA/CPR, 10mg/kg of AS2586144-CL suppressed serum tumor necrosis factor-α and hippocampal nuclear factor κB expression. Our data show that 10mg/kg of AS2586144-CL administered following CA/CPR suppresses inflammation and decreases neuronal damage.

  19. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3- (1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Duan, Jia-Xi; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Lee, Kin Sing; Hammock, Bruce D.; Fang, Xiang; Guan, Cha-Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), the metabolites of arachidonic acid derived from the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases, are mainly metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to their corresponding diols. EETs, but not their diols, have anti-inflammatory properties, and inhibition of sEH might provide protective effects against inflammatory fibrosis. In this study, we tested the effects of a selected sEH inhibitor, 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3- (1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU), on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in mice. A mouse model of PF was established by intratracheal injection of bleomycin, and TPPU was administered for 21 days after bleomycin injection. We found TPPU treatment improved the body weight loss and survival rate of bleomycin-stimulated mice. Histological examinations showed that TPPU treatment alleviated bleomycin-induced inflammation, and maintained alveolar structure of pulmonary tissues. TPPU also decreased bleomycin-induced deposition of collagen, and expression of the procollagen I mRNA in lung tissues of mice. TPPU decreased the TGF-β1, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in serum of bleomycin-stimulated mice. Moreover, TPPU inhibited proliferation, collagen synthesis of the mouse fibroblasts, and partially reversed TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression. Our results indicated that inhibition of sEH attenuates bleomycin-induced inflammation, collagen deposition, and therefore prevents bleomycin-induced PF in mice model. PMID:26310139

  20. Activation of TRPA1 channels by the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB597).

    PubMed

    Niforatos, Wende; Zhang, Xu-Feng; Lake, Marc R; Walter, Karl A; Neelands, Torben; Holzman, Thomas F; Scott, Victoria E; Faltynek, Connie R; Moreland, Robert B; Chen, Jun

    2007-05-01

    As a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel superfamily, the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1 has been implicated in nociceptive function and pain states. The endogenous ligands that activate TRPA1 remain unknown. However, various agonists have been identified, including environmental irritants (e.g., acrolein) and ingredients of pungent natural products [e.g., allyl isothiocyanate (ITC), cinnamaldehyde, allicin, and gingerol]. In general, these agents are either highly reactive, nonselective, or not potent or efficacious, significantly limiting their utilities in the study of TRPA1 channel properties and biological functions. In a search for novel TRPA1 agonists, we identified 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB597), a potent and systemically active inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This enzyme is responsible for anandamide degradation and therefore has been pursued as an antinociceptive and antiepileptic drug target. Using Ca(2+) influx assays and patch-clamp techniques, we demonstrated that URB597 could activate heterologously expressed human and rat TRPA1 channels, whereas two other FAAH inhibitors (i.e., URB532 and Compound 7) had no effect. When applied to inside-out membrane patches expressing rat TRPA1, URB597 elicited single-channel activities with a unitary conductance of 40 pS. Furthermore, URB597 activated TRPA1 channels endogenously expressed in a population of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons that also responded to ITC. In contrast to its effect on TRPA1, URB597 inhibited TRPM8 and had no effects on TRPV1 or TRPV4. Thus, we conclude that URB597 is a novel agonist of TRPA1 and probably activates the channel through a direct gating mechanism.

  1. Optimization of the Central Heterocycle of α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Rayl, Thomas J.; Hochstatter, Dustin G.; Hwang, Inkyu; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of a refined series of α-ketoheterocycles based on the oxazole 2 (OL-135) incorporating systematic changes in the central heterocycle bearing a key set of added substituents are described. The nature of the central heterocycle, even within the systematic and minor perturbations explored herein, significantly influenced the inhibitor activity: 1,3,4-oxadiazoles and 1,2,4-oxadiazoles 9 > tetrazoles, the isomeric 1,2,4-oxadiazoles 10, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles > oxazoles including 2 > 1,2-diazines > thiazoles > 1,3,4-triazoles. Most evident in these trends is the observation that introduction of an additional heteroatom at position 4 (oxazole numbering, N > O > CH) substantially increases activity that may be attributed to a reduced destabilizing steric interaction at the FAAH active site. Added heterocycle substituents displaying well defined trends may be utilized to enhance the inhibitor potency and, more significantly, to enhance the inhibitor selectivity. These trends, exemplified herein, emerge from both enhancements in the FAAH activity and simultaneous disruption of binding affinity for competitive off-target enzymes. PMID:18630870

  2. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors Reduce the Development of Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Arzu; Davis, Benjamin B.; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Kim, In-Hae; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Fiehn, Oliver; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine whether sEH inhibitors influence atherosclerotic lesion formation, we utilized an established murine model of accelerated atherogenesis, ApoE knockout (−/−) mice. The sEH inhibitor, 1-adamantan-3-(5-(2-(2-ethylethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) was delivered in drinking water. All animals were fed an atherogenic diet while simultaneously infused with angiotensin II by osmotic minipump to induce atherosclerosis. In AEPU-treated animals, there was a 53% reduction in atherosclerotic lesions in the descending aortae as compared to control aortae. AEPU and its major metabolites were detected in the plasma of animals which received it. As expected from the inhibition of sEH, a significant increase in linoleic and arachidonic acid epoxides, as well as an increase in individual 11,12-EET/DHET and 14,15-EET/DHET ratios, were observed. The reduction in atherosclerotic lesion area was inversely correlated with 11,12- and 14,15- EET/DHET ratios, suggesting that the reduction corresponds to the inhibition of sEH. Our data suggest that orally-available sEH inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:18791465

  3. Structure activity relationships of cycloalkylamide derivatives as inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hae; Park, Yong-Gyu; Hammock, Bruce D.; Nishi, Kosuke

    2012-01-01

    Structure activity relationships of cycloalkylamide compounds as inhibitors of human sEH were investigated. When the left side of amide function was modified by a variety of cycloalkanes, at least a C6 like cyclohexane was necessary to yield reasonable inhibition potency on the target enzyme. In compounds with a smaller cycloalkane or with a polar group on the left side of amide function, no inhibition was observed. On the other hand, increased hydrophobicity dramatically improved inhibition potency. Especially, a tetrahydronaphthalene (20) effectively increased the potency. When a series of alkyl or aryl derivatives of cycloalkylamide were investigated to continuously optimize the right side of the amide pharmacophore, a benzyl moiety functionalized with a polar group produced highly potent inhibition. Non-substituted benzyl, alkyl, aryl, or biaryl structure present in the right side of cycloalkylamide function induced a big decrease in inhibition potency. Also, a resulting potent cycloalkylamide (32) showed reasonable physical properties. PMID:21338111

  4. 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas Functionalized with Ether Groups are Potent Inhibitors of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase with Improved Pharmacokinetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hae; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Nishi, Kosuke; Kasagami, Takeo; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a therapeutic target for treating hypertension and inflammation. 1,3-Disubstituted ureas functionalized with an ether group are potent sEH inhibitors. However, their relatively low metabolic stability leads to poor pharmacokinetic properties. To improve their bioavailability, we investigated the effect of incorporating various polar groups on the ether function on the inhibition potencies, physical properties, in vitro metabolic stability, and pharmacokinetic properties. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies showed that a hydrophobic linker between the urea group and the ether function is necessary to keep their potency. In addition, urea-ether inhibitors having a polar group such as diethylene glycol or morpholine significantly improved their physical properties and metabolic stability without any loss of inhibitory potency. Furthermore, improved pharmacokinetic properties in murine and canine models were obtained with the resulting inhibitors. These findings will facilitate the usage of sEH inhibitors in animal models of hypertension and inflammation. PMID:17894481

  5. Chemistry around imidazopyrazine and ibuprofen: discovery of novel fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Wael, Frédéric; Muccioli, Giulio G; Lambert, Didier M; Sergent, Thérèse; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Rees, Jean-François; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline

    2010-09-01

    Based on the imidazo-[1,2-a]-pyrazin-3-(7H)-one scaffold, a dual action prodrug has been designed for combining antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, possibly unmasked upon oxidation. The construction of the target-molecule requires two building blocks, namely a 2-amino-1,4-pyrazine and a 2-ketoaldehyde. Attempts to synthesize the 2-ketoaldehyde (5a) derived from ibuprofen failed, but led to the corresponding 2-ketoaldoxime (7a) which could not be condensed with the pyrazine synthons. However, a model compound, i.e. phenylglyoxal aldoxime, reacted well under microwave activation to furnish novel imidazo[1,2-a]-pyrazine-3-(7H)-imine derivatives (18a,b). These heterobicycles behave as antioxidants by inhibiting the lipid peroxidation, and one compound (18b) is endowed with a significant anti-inflammatory effect in a cellular test. Unexpectedly, all the synthetic intermediates derived from ibuprofen are good inhibitors of FAAH, the most active compound (4a) featuring the 1,3-dithian-2-yl motif.

  6. URB597, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, reduces hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Parviz, Mohsen; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Roohbakhsh, Ali

    2009-06-01

    Diabetic rats display increased pain responses after injection of formalin into the paw or thermal stimulation of the tail, suggesting the presence of hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of URB597 (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of endocannabinoids metabolism, on 2 models of experimental hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Animals were divided into control, URB597-treated control (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg), diabetic, and URB597-treated diabetic (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg) groups. Formalin and tail-flick tests were performed 4 and 8 weeks after the onset of hyperglycemia, respectively. Diabetes caused significant hyperalgesia during these tests. URB597 (0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg) reversed chemical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. Administration of URB597 at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg did not alter pain-related behaviors in control and diabetic groups compared with those of the respective control groups. URB597 treatment did not affect body weight or plasma glucose level of treated animals compared with nontreated animals. This study shows that increasing endocannabinoid neurotransmission with URB597 displays efficacy in chemical and thermal models of diabetic hyperalgesia. It also suggests that URB597 is a promising tool for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Lipid sulfates and sulfonates are allosteric competitive inhibitors of the N-terminal phosphatase activity of the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Tran, Katherine L; Aronov, Pavel A; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Newman, John W; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe

    2005-09-13

    The EPXH2 gene encodes for the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a homodimeric enzyme with each monomer containing two domains with distinct activities. The C-terminal domain, containing the epoxide hydrolase activity (Cterm-EH), is involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid epoxides, endogenous chemical mediators that play important roles in blood pressure regulation, cell growth, and inflammation. We recently demonstrated that the N-terminal domain contains a Mg2+-dependent lipid phosphate phosphatase activity (Nterm-phos). However, the biological role of this activity is unknown. The inability of known phosphatase inhibitors to inhibit the Nterm-phos constitutes a significant barrier to the elucidation of its function. We describe herein sulfate, sulfonate, and phosphonate lipids as novel potent inhibitors of Nterm-phos. These compounds are allosteric competitive inhibitors with K(I) in the hundred nanomolar range. These inhibitors may provide a valuable tool to investigate the biological role of the Nterm-phos. We found that polyisoprenyl phosphates are substrates of Nterm-phos, suggesting a possible role in sterol synthesis or inflammation. Furthermore, some of these compounds inhibit the C-terminal sEH activity through a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism involving a new binding site on the C-terminal domain. This novel site may play a role in the natural in vivo regulation of epoxide hydrolysis by sEH.

  8. Chemoproteomic, biochemical and pharmacological approaches in the discovery of inhibitors targeting human α/β-hydrolase domain containing 11 (ABHD11).

    PubMed

    Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Patel, Jayendra Z; López Navarro, Miriam; Jakupović, Hermina; Goffart, Steffi; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Nevalainen, Tapio J; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Laitinen, Tuomo; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Savinainen, Juha R

    2016-10-10

    ABHD11 (α/β-hydrolase domain containing 11) is a non-annotated enzyme belonging to the family of metabolic serine hydrolases (mSHs). Its natural substrates and products are unknown. Using competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) to identify novel inhibitors of human (h)ABHD11, three compounds from our chemical library exhibited low nanomolar potency towards hABHD11. Competitive ABPP of various proteomes revealed fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) as the sole off-target among the mSHs. Our fluorescent activity assays designed for natural lipase substrates revealed no activity of hABHD11 towards mono- or diacylglycerols. A broader profiling using para-nitrophenyl (pNP)-linked substrates indicated no amidase/protease, phosphatase, sulfatase, phospholipase C or phosphodiesterase activity. Instead, hABHD11 readily utilized para-nitrophenyl butyrate (pNPC4), indicating lipase/esterase-type activity that could be exploited in inhibitor discovery. Additionally, a homology model was created based on the crystal structure of bacterial esterase YbfF. In contrast to YbfF, which reportedly hydrolyze long-chain acyl-CoA, hABHD11 did not utilize oleoyl-CoA or arachidonoyl-CoA. In conclusion, the present study reports the discovery of potent hABHD11 inhibitors with good selectivity among mSHs. We developed substrate-based activity assays for hABHD11 that could be further exploited in inhibitor discovery and created the first homology-based hABHD11 model, offering initial insights into the active site of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and Structure-activity Relationship Studies of O-Biphenyl-3-yl Carbamates as Peripherally Restricted Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Duranti, Andrea; Melzig, Laurin; Fiorelli, Claudio; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Colombano, Giampiero; Mestichelli, Paola; Sanchini, Silvano; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Bandiera, Tiziano; Scarpelli, Rita; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The peripherally restricted fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB937 (3, cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3’-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) is extruded from the brain and spinal cord by the Abcg2 efflux transporter. Despite its inability to enter the central nervous system (CNS), 3 exerts profound antinociceptive effects in mice and rats, which result from the inhibition of FAAH in peripheral tissues and the consequent enhancement of anandamide signaling at CB1 cannabinoid receptors localized on sensory nerve endings. In the present study, we examined the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for the biphenyl region of compound 3, focusing on the carbamoyl and hydroxyl groups in the distal and proximal phenyl rings. Our SAR studies generated a new series of peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitors and identified compound 35 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3’-carbamoyl-5-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) as the most potent brain-impermeant FAAH inhibitor disclosed to date. PMID:23822179

  10. Structure-based optimization of the piperazino-containing 1,3-disubstituted ureas affording sub-nanomolar inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shao-Xu; Cao, Bin; Morisseau, Christophe; Jin, Yi; Hammock, Bruce D.; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a promising new therapy in the treatment of hypertension, inflammation and other cardiovascular disorders. Piperazino functionality as the tertiary pharmacophore remarkably improved the drug-like profile of the 1,3-disubstituted urea sEH inhibitors. However, the potency was more dependent on the overall best balance of the hydrophilicity and lipophilicity. Based on the sEH-inhibitor complex structure, further structural optimization on the piperazino-containing 1,3-disubstituted urea scaffold was conducted for an improved potency. The 1-adamantylacetamide and para-phenylcarbonyl group were identified to be an optimal primary pharmacophore and secondary pharmacophore motif, respectively, generating sub-nanomolar sEH inhibitors with favorable water solubility. PMID:25225606

  11. Structure-based optimization of the piperazino-containing 1,3-disubstituted ureas affording sub-nanomolar inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Xu; Cao, Bin; Morisseau, Christophe; Jin, Yi; Hammock, Bruce D; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2012-03-01

    The inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a promising new therapy in the treatment of hypertension, inflammation and other cardiovascular disorders. Piperazino functionality as the tertiary pharmacophore remarkably improved the drug-like profile of the 1,3-disubstituted urea sEH inhibitors. However, the potency was more dependent on the overall best balance of the hydrophilicity and lipophilicity. Based on the sEH-inhibitor complex structure, further structural optimization on the piperazino-containing 1,3-disubstituted urea scaffold was conducted for an improved potency. The 1-adamantylacetamide and para-phenylcarbonyl group were identified to be an optimal primary pharmacophore and secondary pharmacophore motif, respectively, generating sub-nanomolar sEH inhibitors with favorable water solubility.

  12. Crystal Structure of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Bound to the Carbamate Inhibitor URB597: Discovery of a Deacylating Water Molecule and Insight into Enzyme Inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Kamtekar, Satwik; Wood, David C.; Benson, Timothy E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-08-12

    The endocannabinoid system regulates a wide range of physiological processes including pain, inflammation, and cognitive/emotional states. URB597 is one of the best characterized covalent inhibitors of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Here, we report the structure of the FAAH-URB597 complex at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure provides insights into mechanistic details of enzyme inactivation and experimental evidence of a previously uncharacterized active site water molecule that likely is involved in substrate deacylation. This water molecule is part of an extensive hydrogen-bonding network and is coordinated indirectly to residues lining the cytosolic port of the enzyme. In order to corroborate our hypothesis concerning the role of this water molecule in FAAH's catalytic mechanism, we determined the structure of FAAH conjugated to a urea-based inhibitor, PF-3845, to a higher resolution (2.4 {angstrom}) than previously reported. The higher-resolution structure confirms the presence of the water molecule in a virtually identical location in the active site. Examination of the structures of serine hydrolases that are non-homologous to FAAH, such as elastase, trypsin, or chymotrypsin, shows a similarly positioned hydrolytic water molecule and suggests a functional convergence between the amidase signature enzymes and serine proteases.

  13. Crystal structure of the cold-active aminopeptidase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a close structural homologue of the human bifunctional leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bauvois, Cédric; Jacquamet, Lilian; Huston, Adrienne L; Borel, Franck; Feller, Georges; Ferrer, Jean-Luc

    2008-08-22

    The crystal structure of a cold-active aminopeptidase (ColAP) from Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H has been determined, extending the number of crystal structures of the M1 metallopeptidase family to four among the 436 members currently identified. In agreement with their sequence similarity, the overall structure of ColAP displayed a high correspondence with leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H), a human bifunctional enzyme that converts leukotriene A4 (LTA4) in the potent chemoattractant leukotriene B4. Indeed, both enzymes are composed of three domains, an N-terminal saddle-like domain, a catalytic thermolysin-like domain, and a less conserved C-terminal alpha-helical flat spiral domain. Together, these domains form a deep cavity harboring the zinc binding site formed by residues included in the conserved HEXXHX(18)H motif. A detailed structural comparison of these enzymes revealed several plausible determinants of ColAP cold adaptation. The main differences involve specific amino acid substitutions, loop content and solvent exposure, complexity and distribution of ion pairs, and differential domain flexibilities. Such elements may act synergistically to allow conformational flexibility needed for an efficient catalysis in cold environments. Furthermore, the region of ColAP corresponding to the aminopeptidase active site of LTA4H is much more conserved than the suggested LTA4 substrate binding region. This observation supports the hypothesis that this region of the LTA4H active site has evolved in order to fit the lipidic substrate.

  14. Discovery of the first dual inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein and soluble epoxide hydrolase using pharmacophore-based virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Temml, Veronika; Garscha, Ulrike; Romp, Erik; Schubert, Gregor; Gerstmeier, Jana; Kutil, Zsofia; Matuszczak, Barbara; Waltenberger, Birgit; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Schuster, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are pro-inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) with roles in inflammatory and allergic diseases. The biosynthesis of LTs is initiated by transfer of AA via the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). FLAP inhibition abolishes LT formation exerting anti-inflammatory effects. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts AA-derived anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (di-HETEs). Its inhibition consequently also counteracts inflammation. Targeting both LT biosynthesis and the conversion of EETs with a dual inhibitor of FLAP and sEH may represent a novel, powerful anti-inflammatory strategy. We present a pharmacophore-based virtual screening campaign that led to 20 hit compounds of which 4 targeted FLAP and 4 were sEH inhibitors. Among them, the first dual inhibitor for sEH and FLAP was identified, N-[4-(benzothiazol-2-ylmethoxy)-2-methylphenyl]-N’-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea with IC50 values of 200 nM in a cell-based FLAP test system and 20 nM for sEH activity in a cell-free assay. PMID:28218273

  15. Discovery of the first dual inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein and soluble epoxide hydrolase using pharmacophore-based virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temml, Veronika; Garscha, Ulrike; Romp, Erik; Schubert, Gregor; Gerstmeier, Jana; Kutil, Zsofia; Matuszczak, Barbara; Waltenberger, Birgit; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Schuster, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are pro-inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) with roles in inflammatory and allergic diseases. The biosynthesis of LTs is initiated by transfer of AA via the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). FLAP inhibition abolishes LT formation exerting anti-inflammatory effects. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts AA-derived anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (di-HETEs). Its inhibition consequently also counteracts inflammation. Targeting both LT biosynthesis and the conversion of EETs with a dual inhibitor of FLAP and sEH may represent a novel, powerful anti-inflammatory strategy. We present a pharmacophore-based virtual screening campaign that led to 20 hit compounds of which 4 targeted FLAP and 4 were sEH inhibitors. Among them, the first dual inhibitor for sEH and FLAP was identified, N-[4-(benzothiazol-2-ylmethoxy)-2-methylphenyl]-N’-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea with IC50 values of 200 nM in a cell-based FLAP test system and 20 nM for sEH activity in a cell-free assay.

  16. Prediction of drug-drug interactions with carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide using a new in vitro assay for epoxide hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria; Bonnaillie, Pierre; Chanteux, Hugues

    2016-12-01

    1. Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic drug which is metabolized by CYP3A4 into carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. This metabolite is then detoxified by epoxide hydrolase. As carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide has been associated with neurotoxicity, it is critical to identify whether a new antiepileptic drug has the potential to inhibit epoxide hydrolase and therefore increase carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide plasma levels. 2. In this study, an in vitro assay was developed to evaluate epoxide hydrolase activity by using carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide as probe substrate. The ability of this assay to predict drug-drug interactions (DDI) at the epoxide hydrolase level was also investigated. 3. To this aim, known inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase for which in vivo data are available were used. Firstly, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide hydrolase activity was determined in liver microsomes, cytosol and hepatocytes. Thereafter, the IC50 of epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (progabide, valproic acid, valpromide and valnoctamide) was determined in liver microsomes and hepatocytes. Finally, prediction of AUC increase was performed using the in vitro data generated. 4. Interestingly, epoxide hydrolase activity was found to be much higher in human hepatocytes compared to liver microsomes/cytosol. Even though assessed on a limited number of compounds, this study demonstrated that the use of hepatocytes seems to be a more relevant model to assess and predict DDI at the epoxide hydrolase level.

  17. Structure-activity relationship studies on 1-heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones acting as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: replacement of the activated ketone group by other serine traps.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are serine hydrolases. cPLA2α is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, FAAH terminates the anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids. Therefore, inhibitors of these enzymes may represent new drug candidates for the treatment of inflammation. We have reported that certain 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are potent inhibitors of cPLA2α and FAAH. The serine reactive ketone group of these compounds, which is crucial for enzyme inhibition, is readily metabolized resulting in inactive alcohol derivatives. In order to obtain metabolically more stable inhibitors, we replaced this moiety by α-ketoheterocyle, cyanamide and nitrile serine traps. Investigations on activity and metabolic stability of these substances revealed that in all cases an increased metabolic stability was accompanied by a loss of inhibitory potency against cPLA2α and FAAH, respectively.

  18. Discovery and Optimization of Piperidyl-1,2,3-Triazole Ureas as Potent, Selective, and In Vivo-Active Inhibitors of Alpha/Beta-Hydrolase Domain Containing 6 (ABHD6)

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ku-Lung; Tsuboi, Katsunori; Chang, Jae Won; Whitby, Landon R.; Speers, Anna E.; Pugh, Holly; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha/beta-hydrolase domain containing 6 (ABHD6) is a transmembrane serine hydrolase that hydrolyzes the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to regulate certain forms of cannabinoid receptor-dependent signaling in the nervous system. The full spectrum of ABHD6 metabolic activities and functions is currently unknown and would benefit from selective, in vivo-active inhibitors. Here, we report the development and characterization of an advanced series of irreversible (2-substituted)-piperidyl-1,2,3-triazole urea inhibitors of ABHD6, including compounds KT182 and KT203, which show exceptional potency and selectivity in cells (< 5 nM) and, at equivalent doses in mice (1 mg kg-1), served as systemic and peripherally-restricted ABHD6 inhibitors, respectively. We also describe an orally-bioavailable ABHD6 inhibitor KT185 that displays excellent selectivity against other brain and liver serine hydrolases in vivo. We thus describe several chemical probes for biological studies of ABHD6, including brain-penetrant and peripherally-restricted inhibitors that should prove of value for interrogating ABHD6 function in animal models. PMID:24152295

  19. Selective inhibition and selective induction of multiple microsomal epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M

    1986-03-01

    The inhibition in vitro and induction in vivo of microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase have been studied. This microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity is distinguishable from the previously well-defined microsomal arene oxide hydrolase by a number of catalytic criteria. Two substituted chalcone oxides, 4-phenylchalcone oxide and 4'-phenylchalcone oxide, are potent inhibitors of microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase, but have no apparent activity against benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide hydrolase. Conversely, compounds that are potent inhibitors of benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide hydrolase, including styrene oxide, cyclohexene oxide, and trichloropropene oxide, inhibit microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase only at very high (millimolar) concentrations. The chalcone oxides inhibit microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase noncompetitively, and have micromolar or nanomolar affinity constants for the enzyme. Attempts were made to induce microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase in vivo. Compounds that induced microsomal benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide hydrolase levels in mice did not simultaneously induce trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase levels. Clofibrate was an exception; it induced levels of both enzymes to a small but statistically significant degree. The two microsomal hydrolase activities have, therefore, very different catalytic sites and appear to be under separate genetic control. 4-Phenylchalcone oxide and 4'-phenylchalcone oxide are selective inhibitors of microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase and may prove to be very useful in assessing the involvement of this enzyme in the metabolism of endogenous or xenobiotic epoxides.

  20. Attenuation of persistent pain-related behavior by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors in a rat model of HIV sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Jergova, Stanislava; Pearson, James P.; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Distal sensory neuropathies are a hallmark of HIV infections and can result in persistent and disabling pain despite advances in antiretroviral therapies. HIV-sensory neuropathic (HIV-SN) pain may be amenable to cannabinoid treatment, but currently available agonist treatments are limited by untoward side effects and potential for abuse in this patient population. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors may offer an alternative approach by inhibiting the degradation of endocannabinoids with purportedly fewer untoward CNS side effects. In order to evaluate this potential approach in the management of HIV-SN pain, the recombinant HIV envelope protein gp120 was applied epineurally to the rat sciatic nerve to induce an HIV-SN-like pain syndrome. Two distinct FAAH inhibitory compounds, URB597 and PF-3845 were tested, and contrasted with standard antinociceptive gabapentin or vehicle treatment, for attenuation of tactile allodynia, cold allodynia, and mechanical hyperalgesia. Both FAAH inhibitors markedly reduced cold and tactile allodynia with limited anti-hyperalgesic effects. Peak antinociceptive effects produced by both agents were more modest than gabapentin in reducing tactile allodynia with similar potency ranges. URB597 produced comparable cold anti-allodynic effects to gabapentin, and the effects of both FAAH inhibitors were longer lasting than gabapentin. To assess the contribution of cannabinoid receptors in these antinociceptive effects, CB1 antagonist AM251 or CB2 antagonist SR144528 were tested in conjunction with FAAH inhibitors. Results suggested a contribution of both CB1- and CB2-mediated effects, particularly in reducing tactile allodynia. In summary, these findings support inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation as a promising target for management of disabling persistent HIV-SN pain syndromes. PMID:25486617

  1. Attenuation of persistent pain-related behavior by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors in a rat model of HIV sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Jergova, Stanislava; Pearson, James P; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    Distal sensory neuropathies are a hallmark of HIV infections and can result in persistent and disabling pain despite advances in antiretroviral therapies. HIV-sensory neuropathic (HIV-SN) pain may be amenable to cannabinoid treatment, but currently available agonist treatments are limited by untoward side effects and potential for abuse in this patient population. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors may offer an alternative approach by inhibiting the degradation of endocannabinoids with purportedly fewer untoward CNS side effects. In order to evaluate this potential approach in the management of HIV-SN pain, the recombinant HIV envelope protein gp120 was applied epineurally to the rat sciatic nerve to induce an HIV-SN-like pain syndrome. Two distinct FAAH inhibitory compounds, URB597 and PF-3845 were tested, and contrasted with standard antinociceptive gabapentin or vehicle treatment, for attenuation of tactile allodynia, cold allodynia, and mechanical hyperalgesia. Both FAAH inhibitors markedly reduced cold and tactile allodynia with limited anti-hyperalgesic effects. Peak antinociceptive effects produced by both agents were more modest than gabapentin in reducing tactile allodynia with similar potency ranges. URB597 produced comparable cold anti-allodynic effects to gabapentin, and the effects of both FAAH inhibitors were longer lasting than gabapentin. To assess the contribution of cannabinoid receptors in these antinociceptive effects, CB1 antagonist AM251 or CB2 antagonist SR144528 were tested in conjunction with FAAH inhibitors. Results suggested a contribution of both CB1- and CB2-mediated effects, particularly in reducing tactile allodynia. In summary, these findings support inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation as a promising target for management of disabling persistent HIV-SN pain syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors exert pharmacological effects, but lack antinociceptive efficacy in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Hama, Aldric T; Germano, Peter; Varghese, Matthew S; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Milne, G Todd; Pearson, James P; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Amelioration of neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI) pain is a clinical challenge. Increasing the endocannabinoid anandamide and other fatty acid amides (FAA) by blocking fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been shown to be antinociceptive in a number of animal models of chronic pain. However, an antinociceptive effect of blocking FAAH has yet to be demonstrated in a rat model of neuropathic SCI pain. Four weeks following a SCI, rats developed significantly decreased hind paw withdrawal thresholds, indicative of below-level cutaneous hypersensitivity. A group of SCI rats were systemically treated (i.p.) with either the selective FAAH inhibitor URB597 or vehicle twice daily for seven days. A separate group of SCI rats received a single dose (p.o.) of either the selective FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 or vehicle. Following behavioral testing, levels of the FAA N-arachidonoylethanolamide, N-oleoyl ethanolamide and N-palmitoyl ethanolamide were quantified in brain and spinal cord from SCI rats. Four weeks following SCI, FAA levels were markedly reduced in spinal cord tissue. Although systemic treatment with URB597 significantly increased CNS FAA levels, no antinociceptive effect was observed. A significant elevation of CNS FAA levels was also observed following oral PF-3845 treatment, but only a modest antinociceptive effect was observed. Increasing CNS FAA levels alone does not lead to robust amelioration of below-level neuropathic SCI pain. Perhaps utilizing FAAH inhibition in conjunction with other analgesic mechanisms could be an effective analgesic therapy.

  3. Administration of a substituted adamantyl urea inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase protects the kidney from damage in hypertensive Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Olearczyk, Jeffrey J; Quigley, Jeffrey E; Mitchell, Bradford C; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Kim, In-Hae; Newman, John W; Luria, Ayala; Hammock, Bruce D; Imig, John D

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension and Type 2 diabetes are co-morbid diseases that lead to the development of nephropathy. sEH (soluble epoxide hydrolase) inhibitors are reported to provide protection from renal injury. We hypothesized that the sEH inhibitor AUDA [12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid] protects the kidney from the development of nephropathy associated with hypertension and Type 2 diabetes. Hypertension was induced in spontaneously diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats using AngII (angiotensin II) and a high-salt diet. Hypertensive GK rats were treated for 2 weeks with either AUDA or its vehicle added to drinking water. MAP (mean arterial pressure) increased from 118+/-2 mmHg to 182+/-20 and 187+/-6 mmHg for vehicle and AUDA-treated hypertensive GK rats respectively. AUDA treatment did not alter blood glucose. Hypertension in GK rats resulted in a 17-fold increase in urinary albumin excretion, which was decreased with AUDA treatment. Renal histological evaluation determined that AUDA treatment decreased glomerular and tubular damage. In addition, AUDA treatment attenuated macrophage infiltration and inhibited urinary excretion of MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and kidney cortex MCP-1 gene expression. Taken together, these results provide evidence that sEH inhibition with AUDA attenuates the progression of renal damage associated with hypertension and Type 2 diabetes.

  4. Potent Natural Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors from Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon: Synthesis, Quantification, and Measurement of Biological Activities In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Seiya; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Kamita, Shizuo G.; De Nicola, Gina R.; Nyegue, Maximilienne; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here three urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors from the root of the plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana. The concentration of these ureas in the root was quantified by LC-MS/MS, showing that 1, 3-bis (4-methoxybenzyl) urea (MMU) is the most abundant (42.3 μg/g dry root weight). All of the ureas were chemically synthesized, and their inhibitory activity toward recombinant human and recombinant rat sEH was measured. The most potent compound, MMU, showed an IC50 of 92 nM via fluorescent assay and a Ki of 54 nM via radioactivity-based assay on human sEH. MMU effectively reduced inflammatory pain in a rat nociceptive pain assay. These compounds are among the most potent sEH inhibitors derived from natural sources. Moreover, inhibition of sEH by these compounds may mechanistically explain some of the therapeutic effects of P. brazzeana. PMID:25659109

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive effects of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid epoxyeicosatrienoic acids also exhibit antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may lower the blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for 3 weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension. Also, because EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of an sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II, increased the blood pressure, further increased the renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (ie, prostaglandins and MCP-1), downregulated an epithelial sodium channel, and upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 message and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering systolic blood pressure and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

  6. Bioactive lipid profiling reveals drug target engagement of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor in a murine model of tobacco smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Nording, Malin L; Yang, Jun; Hoang, Laura; Zamora, Vanessa; Uyeminami, Dale; Espiritu, Imelda; Pinkerton, Kent E; Hammock, Bruce D; Luria, Ayala

    2015-04-01

    The inflammatory process underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be caused by tobacco smoke (TS) exposure. Previous studies show that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) possess promising anti-inflammatory properties, therefore stabilization of EETs and other fatty acid epoxides through inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) was investigated in mouse models of acute and sub-chronic inflammation caused by TS exposure. During the entire TS exposure, the potent sEH inhibitor 1-(1-methylsulfonyl-piperidin-4-yl)-3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-urea (TUPS) was given via drinking water. To assess drug target engagement of TUPS, a tandem mass spectrometry method was used for bioactive lipid profiling of a broad range of fatty acid metabolites, including EETs, and their corresponding diols (DHETs) derived from arachidonic acid, as well as epoxides and diols derived from other fatty acids. Several, but not all, plasma epoxide/diol ratios increased in mice treated with sEH inhibitor, compared to non-treated mice suggesting a wider role for sEH involving more fatty acid precursors besides arachidonic acid. This study supports qualitative use of epoxide/diol ratios explored by bioactive lipid profiling to indicate drug target engagement in mouse models of TS exposure relevant to COPD, which may have ramifications for future therapeutic interventions of sEH.

  7. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors in Angiotensin-II Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive effects of long chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids; EETs) also exhibit anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may lower blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for three weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. Also, since EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of a sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II increased blood pressure, further increased renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (i.e. prostaglandins and MCP-1), down-regulated an epithelial sodium channel and up-regulated Angiotensin converting enzyme-2 message (ACE-2) and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering SBP and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by up-regulation of ACE-2 in angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. PMID:23676336

  8. Fluoride-mediated capture of a noncovalent bound state of a reversible covalent enzyme inhibitor: X-ray crystallographic analysis of an exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Stevens, Raymond C; Boger, Dale L

    2011-03-23

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K(i) = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same "in action" state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of α-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  9. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-11-02

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K{sub i} = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same 'in action' state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of {alpha}-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  10. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (Ki = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same “in action” state with the three catalytic residues Ser241–Ser217–Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of α-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed. PMID:21355555

  11. Cardioprotective effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB694, in a rodent model of trait anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Carnevali, Luca; Vacondio, Federica; Rossi, Stefano; Macchi, Emilio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Neumann, Inga D.; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In humans, chronic anxiety represents an independent risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Here we evaluate in male Wistar rats bred for high (HAB) and low (LAB) anxiety-related behavior, as well as non-selected (NAB) animals, the relationship between trait anxiety and cardiac electrical instability and investigate whether pharmacological augmentation of endocannabinoid anandamide-mediated signaling exerts anxiolytic-like and cardioprotective effects. HAB rats displayed (i) a higher incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by isoproterenol, and (ii) a larger spatial dispersion of ventricular refractoriness assessed by means of an epicardial mapping protocol. In HAB rats, acute pharmacological inhibition of the anandamide-degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), with URB694 (0.3 mg/kg), (i) decreased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, (ii) increased anandamide levels in the heart, (iii) reduced isoproterenol-induced occurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and (iv) corrected alterations of ventricular refractoriness. The anti-arrhythmic effect of URB694 was prevented by pharmacological blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1), but not of the CB2, receptor. These findings suggest that URB694 exerts anxiolytic-like and cardioprotective effects in HAB rats, the latter via anandamide-mediated activation of CB1 receptors. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH might be a viable pharmacological strategy for the treatment of anxiety-related cardiac dysfunction. PMID:26656183

  12. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 reduces viability, migration and invasiveness of human colon adenocarcinoma Colo-205 cell line: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wasilewski, Andrzej; Krajewska, Urszula; Owczarek, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Urszula; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Earlier reports suggest that the endocannabinoids may play a role of endogenous tumor growth modulators. In this study, we investigated whether inhibition of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids may reduce colorectal cancer cell invasion and migration. The human colon adenocarcinoma Colo-205 cells were incubated with PF-3845, JZL-184 and RHC-80267 (fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), mono- (MAGL) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) inhibitors, respectively) for 48 h. The MTT colorimetric assay was performed to quantify cell viability. Next, Colo-205 cells were incubated with PF-3845 alone or with PF-3845 together with selected antagonists: AM 251, AM 630, SB 366791, RN 1734 and G-15 (CB1, CB2, TRPV1, TRPV4 and GPR30 antagonists, respectively). Western blot assay was applied to identify the changes in CB1 and CB2 receptor expression. Migration and invasion assays were employed to characterize the effect of PF-3845 on colorectal cancer cell invasion. We found that of all the inhibitors used, the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 reduced the Colo-205 cell line viability the most effectively (IC50=52.55 μM). We also showed that the effect of decreased cell viability was enhanced when Colo-205 cells were incubated with PF-3845 and RN-1734, a TRPV4 antagonist (IC50=30.54 μM). Western blot assay revealed significantly decreased CB1 receptor expression levels, while CB2 expression was increased in response to PF-3845 when compared to control. Furthermore, PF-3845 inhibited migration and invasion of Colo-205 cell line. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of FAAH and consequent enhancement of the endocannabinoid levels may reduce the colorectal cancer growth and progression.

  13. Flavonoids and polymer derivatives as CYP3A4 inhibitors for improved oral drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius; Choonara, Yahya E; Khan, Riaz A; Du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Pillay, Viness

    2013-02-01

    Molecular modeling computations were utilized to generate pharmaceutical grade CYP3A4-enzyme inhibitors. In vitro metabolism of felodipine in human intestinal and liver microsomes (HLM and HIM) was optimized yielding a Michaelis-Menten plot from where the K(m) and V(max) values were estimated by nonlinear regression. The flavonoids, naringin, naringenin, and quercetin, were subsequently incubated with felodipine at the determined K(m) value in HLM. Comparing results obtained from a known CYP3A4 inhibitor, verapamil, the flavonoids inhibited felodipine metabolism. In-depth computational analysis of these flavonoids in terms of CYP3A4 binding, sequencing, and affinity, computational biomimetism was employed to validate the potential CYP3A4 inhibitors. The modeled compounds were comparatively evaluated by incubation with felodipine in both HLM and HIM. Results showed that the polymers 8-arm-PEG, o-(2-aminoethyl)-o-methyl-PEG, 4-arm-PEG (molecular weight = 10,000 g/mol and 20,000 g/mol, respectively), and poly(l-lysine) were able to inhibit the felodipine metabolism with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 7.22 to 30.0 μM (HLM) and 5.78 to 41.03 μM (HIM). Molecular docking confirmed drug-enzyme interactions by computing the free energies of binding (ΔE) and inhibition constants (K(i)) of the docked compounds utilizing a Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm. Comparative correlations between the computed and experimental K(i) values were obtained. Computational modeling of CYP3A4 inhibitors provided a suitable strategy to screen pharmaceutical grade compounds that may potentially inhibit presystemic CYP3A4-dependent drug metabolism with the prospect of improving oral drug bioavailability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mechanistic and Pharmacological Characterization of PF-04457845: A Highly Potent and Selective Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitor That Reduces Inflammatory and Noninflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah E.; Liimatta, Marya B.; Beidler, David; Sadagopan, Nalini; Dudley, David T.; Young, Tim; Wren, Paul; Zhang, Yanhua; Swaney, Steven; Van Becelaere, Keri; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Bhattachar, Shobha N.; Stiff, Cory; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Johnson, Douglas S.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) anandamide is principally degraded by the integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Pharmacological blockade of FAAH has emerged as a potentially attractive strategy for augmenting endocannabinoid signaling and retaining the beneficial effects of cannabinoid receptor activation, while avoiding the undesirable side effects, such as weight gain and impairments in cognition and motor control, observed with direct cannabinoid receptor 1 agonists. Here, we report the detailed mechanistic and pharmacological characterization of N-pyridazin-3-yl-4-(3-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]oxy}benzylidene)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-04457845), a highly efficacious and selective FAAH inhibitor. Mechanistic studies confirm that PF-04457845 is a time-dependent, covalent FAAH inhibitor that carbamylates FAAH's catalytic serine nucleophile. PF-04457845 inhibits human FAAH with high potency (kinact/Ki = 40,300 M−1s−1; IC50 = 7.2 nM) and is exquisitely selective in vivo as determined by activity-based protein profiling. Oral administration of PF-04457845 produced potent antinociceptive effects in both inflammatory [complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)] and noninflammatory (monosodium iodoacetate) pain models in rats, with a minimum effective dose of 0.1 mg/kg (CFA model). PF-04457845 displayed a long duration of action as a single oral administration at 1 mg/kg showed in vivo efficacy for 24 h with a concomitant near-complete inhibition of FAAH activity and maximal sustained elevation of anandamide in brain. Significantly, PF-04457845-treated mice at 10 mg/kg elicited no effect in motility, catalepsy, and body temperature. Based on its exceptional selectivity and in vivo efficacy, combined with long duration of action and optimal pharmacokinetic properties, PF-04457845 is a clinical candidate for the treatment of pain and other nervous system disorders. PMID:21505060

  15. The novel reversible fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor ST4070 increases endocannabinoid brain levels and counteracts neuropathic pain in different animal models.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Antonio; Coccurello, Roberto; Rapino, Cinzia; Di Serio, Stefano; Di Tommaso, Monia; Vertechy, Mario; Vacca, Valentina; Battista, Natalia; Pavone, Flaminia; Maccarrone, Mauro; Borsini, Franco

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the enol carbamate 1-biphenyl-4-ylethenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate (ST4070), a novel reversible inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), was investigated for acute pain sensitivity and neuropathic pain in rats and mice. Brain enzymatic activity of FAAH and the endogenous levels of its substrates, anandamide (AEA; N-arachidonoylethanolamine), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), were measured in control and ST4070-treated mice. ST4070 (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) was orally administered to assess mechanical nociceptive thresholds and allodynia by using the Randall-Selitto and von Frey tests, respectively. Neuropathy was induced in rats by either the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine or streptozotocin-induced diabetes, whereas the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model was chosen to evaluate neuropathy in mice. ST4070 produced a significant increase of nociceptive threshold in rats and counteracted the decrease of nociceptive threshold in the three distinct models of neuropathic pain. In diabetic mice, ST4070 inhibited FAAH activity and increased the brain levels of AEA and PEA, without affecting that of 2-AG. The administration of ST4070 generated long-lasting pain relief compared with pregabalin and the FAAH inhibitors 1-oxo-1[5-(2-pyridyl)-2-yl]-7-phenylheptane (OL135) and cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-ylester (URB597) in CCI neuropathic mice. The antiallodynic effects of ST4070 were prevented by pretreatment with cannabinoid type 1 and cannabinoid type 2 receptor antagonists and by the selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α antagonist [(2S)-2-[[(1Z)-1-methyl-3-oxo-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1-propenyl]amino]-3-[4-[2-(5-methyl-2-phenyl-4-oxazolyl)ethoxy]phenyl]propyl]-carbamic acid ethyl ester (GW6471). The administration of ST4070 generated long-lasting neuropathic pain relief compared with pregabalin and the FAAH inhibitors OL135 and URB597. Taken together, the reversible FAAH

  16. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase by the anandamide uptake inhibitor VDM11: evidence that VDM11 acts as an FAAH substrate.

    PubMed

    Vandevoorde, Séverine; Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-08-01

    There is some dispute concerning the extent to which the uptake inhibitor VDM11 (N-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenyl) arachidonoyl amide) is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In view of a recent study demonstrating that the closely related compound AM404 (N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)arachidonylamide) is a substrate for FAAH, we re-examined the interaction of VDM11 with FAAH. In the presence of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.125% w v(-1)), both AM404 and VDM11 inhibited the metabolism of AEA by rat brain FAAH with similar potencies (IC(50) values of 2.1 and 2.6 microM, respectively). The compounds were about 10-fold less potent as inhibitors of the metabolism of 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) by cytosolic monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The potency of VDM11 towards FAAH was dependent upon the assay concentration of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA). Thus, in the absence of fatty acid-free BSA, the IC(50) value for inhibition of FAAH was reduced by a factor of about two (from 2.9 to 1.6 microM). A similar reduction in the IC(50) value for the inhibition of membrane bound MAGL by both this compound (from 14 to 6 microM) and by arachidonoyl serinol (from 24 to 13 microM) was seen. An HPLC assay was set up to measure 4-amino-m-cresol, the hypothesised product of FAAH-catalysed VDM11 hydrolysis. 4-Amino-m-cresol was eluted with a retention time of approximately 2.4 min, but showed a time-dependent degradation to compounds eluting at peaks of approximately 5.6 and approximately 8 min. Peaks with the same retention times were also found following incubation of the membranes with VDM11, but were not seen when the membranes were preincubated with the FAAH inhibitors URB597 (3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl-cyclohexylcarbamate) and CAY10401 (1-oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-yl-9-octadecyn-1-one) prior to addition of VDM11. The rate of metabolism of VDM11 was estimated to be roughly 15-20% of that for

  17. Characterisation of (R)-2-(2-Fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-yl)Propanamide as a Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Karlsson, Jessica; Deplano, Alessandro; Hashemian, Sanaz; Svensson, Mona; Fredriksson Sundbom, Marcus; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased endocannabinoid tonus by dual-action fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and substrate selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors is a promising approach for pain-relief. One such compound with this profile is 2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-N-(3-methylpyridin-2-yl)propanamide (Flu-AM1). These activities are shown by Flu-AM1 racemate, but it is not known whether its two single enantiomers behave differently, as is the case towards COX-2 for the parent flurbiprofen enantiomers. Further, the effects of the compound upon COX-2-derived lipids in intact cells are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings COX inhibition was determined using an oxygraphic method with arachidonic acid and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) as substrates. FAAH was assayed in mouse brain homogenates using anandamide (AEA) as substrate. Lipidomic analysis was conducted in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Both enantiomers inhibited COX-2 in a substrate-selective and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values in the absence of a preincubation phase of: (R)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 6 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 20 μM; COX-2 (2-AG) 1 μM; (S)-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid) 3 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid) 10 μM; COX-2 (2-AG) 0.7 μM. The compounds showed no enantiomeric selectivity in their FAAH inhibitory properties. (R)-Flu-AM1 (10 μM) greatly inhibited the production of prostaglandin D2 and E2 in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Levels of 2-AG were not affected either by (R)-Flu-AM1 or by 10 μM flurbiprofen, either alone or in combination with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1 μM). Conclusions/Significance Both enantiomers of Flu-AM1 are more potent inhibitors of 2-AG compared to arachidonic acid oxygenation by COX-2. Inhibition of COX in lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 cells is insufficient to affect 2-AG levels despite the

  18. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor PF-3845 promotes neuronal survival, attenuates inflammation and improves functional recovery in mice with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tchantchou, Flaubert; Tucker, Laura B; Fu, Amanda H; Bluett, Rebecca J; McCabe, Joseph T; Patel, Sachin; Zhang, Yumin

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death in young adults in the United States, but there is still no effective agent for treatment. N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) is a major endocannabinoid in the brain. Its increase after brain injury is believed to be protective. However, the compensatory role of AEA is transient due to its rapid hydrolysis by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Thus, inhibition of FAAH can boost the endogenous levels of AEA and prolong its protective effect. Using a TBI mouse model, we found that post-injury chronic treatment with PF3845, a selective and potent FAAH inhibitor, reversed TBI-induced impairments in fine motor movement, hippocampus dependent working memory and anxiety-like behavior. Treatment with PF3845 inactivated FAAH activity and enhanced the AEA levels in the brain. It reduced neurodegeneration in the dentate gyrus, and up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and Hsp70/72 in both cortex and hippocampus. PF3845 also suppressed the increased production of amyloid precursor protein, prevented dendritic loss and restored the levels of synaptophysin in the ipsilateral dentate gyrus. Furthermore, PF3845 suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and enhanced the expression of arginase-1 post-TBI, suggesting a shift of microglia/macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype. The effects of PF3845 on TBI-induced behavioral deficits and neurodegeneration were mediated by activation of cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptors and might be attributable to the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT. These results suggest that selective inhibition of FAAH is likely to be beneficial for TBI treatment.

  19. Specific characterization of substrate and inhibitor binding sites of a glycosyl hydrolase family 11 xylanase from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Tariq A; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Flatman, Ruth; Roussel, Alain; Roepstorff, Peter; Williamson, Gary; Juge, Nathalie

    2002-11-15

    The importance of aromatic and charged residues at the surface of the active site of a family 11 xylanase from Aspergillus niger was evaluated using site-directed mutagenesis. Ten mutant proteins were heterologously produced in Pichia pastoris, and their biochemical properties and kinetic parameters were determined. The specific activity of the Y6A, Y10A, Y89A, Y164A, and W172A mutant enzymes was drastically reduced. The low specific activities of Y6A and Y89A were entirely accounted for by a change in k(cat) and K(m), respectively, whereas the lower values of Y10A, Y164A, and W172A were due to a combination of increased K(m) and decreased k(cat). Tyr(6), Tyr(10), Tyr(89), Tyr(164), and Trp(172) are proposed as substrate-binding residues, a finding consistent with structural sequence alignments of family 11 xylanases and with the three-dimensional structure of the A. niger xylanase in complex with the modeled xylobiose. All other variants, D113A, D113N, N117A, E118A, and E118Q, retained full wild-type activity. Only N117A lost its sensitivity to xylanase inhibitor protein I (XIP-I), a protein inhibitor isolated from wheat, and this mutation did not affect the fold of the xylanase as revealed by circular dichroism. The N117A variant showed kinetics, pH stability, hydrolysis products pattern, substrate specificity, and structural properties identical to that of the wild-type xylanase. The loss of inhibition, as measured in activity assays, was due to abolition of the interaction between XIP-I and the mutant enzyme, as demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic titration. A close inspection of the three-dimensional structure of A. niger xylanase suggests that the binding site of XIP-I is located at the conserved "thumb" hairpin loop of family 11 xylanases.

  20. Hemopericardium with tamponade following rivaroxaban administration and its attenuation by CYP3A4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Denisse

    2016-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants including the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban are important alternatives to warfarin for the prevention of thromboembolic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. The pharmacology and metabolism of these agents differ from those of the vitamin K antagonists used over the decades preceding their introduction. We present a case of spontaneous hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade following administration of rivaroxaban. A review of the patient's medications revealed a total of seven agents known to be metabolized through cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major pathway for rivaroxaban metabolism. While most physicians are familiar with recommendations to monitor renal function in patients prescribed rivaroxaban, we suspect that many fail to evaluate possible interactions with other agents having CYP3A4 inhibitory or inducer activity. PMID:27695181

  1. Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase reduce carrageenan-induced hind paw inflammation in pentobarbital-treated mice: comparison with indomethacin and possible involvement of cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Holt, Sandra; Comelli, Francesca; Costa, Barbara; Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-10-01

    The in vivo effect of inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) upon oedema volume and FAAH activity was evaluated in the carrageenan induced hind paw inflammation model in the mouse. Oedema was measured at two time points, 2 and 4 h, after intraplantar injection of carrageenan to anaesthetised mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (0.1, 0.3, 1 and 3 mg kg(-1)) 30 min prior to carrageenan administration, dose-dependently reduced oedema formation. At the 4 h time point, the ED(50) for URB597 was approximately 0.3 mg kg(-1). Indomethacin (5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) completely prevented the oedema response to carrageenan. The antioedema effects of indomethacin and URB597 were blocked by 3 mg kg(-1) i.p. of the CB(2) receptor antagonist SR144528. The effect of URB597 was not affected by pretreatment with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (30 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 mg kg(-1) i.p.), when oedema was assessed 4 h after carrageenan administration. The CB(1) receptor antagonists AM251 (3 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and rimonabant (0.5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) gave inconsistent effects upon the antioedema effect of URB597. FAAH measurements were conducted ex vivo in the paws, spinal cords and brains of the mice. The activities of FAAH in the paws and spinal cords of the inflamed vehicle-treated mice were significantly lower than the corresponding activities in the noninflamed mice. PMSF treatment almost completely inhibited the FAAH activity in all three tissues, as did the highest dose of URB597 (3 mg kg(-1)) in spinal cord samples, whereas no obvious changes were seen ex vivo for the other treatments. In conclusion, the results show that in mice, treatment with indomethacin and URB597 produce SR144528-sensitive anti-inflammatory effects in the carrageenan model of acute inflammation.

  2. Hybrid Receptor-Bound/MM-GBSA-Per-residue Energy-Based Pharmacophore Modelling: Enhanced Approach for Identification of Selective LTA4H Inhibitors as Potential Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Appiah-Kubi, Patrick; Soliman, Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase has been identified as an enzyme with dual anti- and pro-inflammatory role, thus, the conversion of leukotriene to leukotriene B4 in the initiation stage of inflammation and the removal of the chemotactic Pro-Gly-Pro tripeptide. These findings make leukotriene A4 hydrolase an attractive drug target: suggesting an innovative approach towards the identification and design of novel class of compounds that can selectively inhibit leukotriene B4 synthesis while sparing the aminopeptidase activity. Previous inhibitors block the dual activity of the enzyme. Recently, a small lead molecule inhibitor denoted as ARM1 has been identified to block the hydrolase activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase whilst sparing the aminopeptidase activity. In this study, a hybrid receptor-bound/MM-GBSA-per-residue energy based pharmacophore modeling approach was implemented to identify potential selective hydrolase inhibitors of leukotriene A4 hydrolase. In this approach, active site residues that favorably contributed to the binding of the bound conformation of ARM1 were derived from MD ensembles and MM/GBSA thermodynamic calculations. These residues were then mapped to key pharmacophore features of ARM1. The generated pharmacophore model was used to search the ZINC database for 3D structures that match the pharmacophore. Five new compounds have been identified and proposed as potential epoxide hydrolase selective inhibitors of leukotriene A4 hydrolase. Molecular docking and MM/GBSA analyses revealed that, these top five lead-like compounds ZINC00142747, ZINC94260794, ZINC01382396, ZINC02508448, and ZINC53994447 showed better binding affinities to the hydrolase active site pocket compared to ARM1. Per-residue energy decomposition analysis revealed that amino acid residues Phe314, Tyr378, Pro382, Trp311, Val367, and Ala377 are key residues critical in the selective inhibition of these hits. Information highlighted in this study may guide the the design the next

  3. Effect of aprepitant, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on bosutinib exposure in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Hsyu, Poe-Hirr; Pignataro, Daniela Soriano; Matschke, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Bosutinib is an oral, dual Src and Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia resistant or intolerant to prior TKI therapy. Bosutinib is primarily metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, suggesting drug interaction potential with other CYP3A4 modulators. This open-label, randomized, 2-sequence, 2-period crossover study assessed the effect of single-dose aprepitant, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on the single-dose pharmacokinetic profile of oral bosutinib 500 mg. Nineteen healthy, fed adults received bosutinib (100 mg × 5) alone or coadministered with aprepitant (125 mg × 1) in each treatment period (with a ≥14-day washout); serial blood samples were analyzed. Safety was evaluated. Following coadministration of aprepitant with bosutinib, the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity (AUCinf) and maximum plasma concentration (C max) were higher than in bosutinib alone (AUCinf, 4719 and 2268 ng•h/mL; C max, 146.0 and 94.94 ng/mL). For bosutinib with aprepitant versus bosutinib alone, mean terminal elimination half-life was similar (25.99 vs 27.79 h), time to C max was longer (6.02 vs 4.15 h), and apparent oral clearance (CL/F) was decreased (105.9 vs 220.4 L/h). The ratio of adjusted geometric means of AUCinf and C max for bosutinib with aprepitant relative to bosutinib alone were 199 % (90 % confidence interval, 167-237 %) and 153 % (127-184 %), respectively. Both treatments were well tolerated. In healthy volunteers, administering a single dose of aprepitant increased the AUC and C max following a single dose of bosutinib by 99 and 53 %, respectively. These results are consistent with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor effect of aprepitant on bosutinib (Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02058277).

  4. Glycoside hydrolases having multiple hydrolase activities

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zhiwei; Friedland, Gregory D.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Chivian, Dylan C.; Simmons, Blake A

    2017-08-08

    Glycoside hydrolases having at least two different hydrolytic activities are provided. In one embodiment, an isolated recombinant hydrolase having at least two activities selected from a group including asparagine derivatives, glutamine derivatives, and histidine derivatives is provided. Further, a method of generating free sugars from a mixture comprising asparagine derivatives, glutamine derivatives, and histidine derivatives is provided.

  5. The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 acts in the nervous system to reverse LPS-induced tactile allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Lamont; Kinsey, Steven G; Abdullah, Rehab A; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Long, Jonathan Z; Ezzili, Cyrine; Boger, Dale L; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammatory pain presents a problem of clinical relevance and often elicits allodynia, a condition in which non-noxious stimuli are perceived as painful. One potential target to treat inflammatory pain is the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system, which is comprised of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and several endogenous ligands, including anandamide (AEA). Blockade of the catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) elevates AEA levels and elicits antinociceptive effects, without the psychomimetic side effects associated with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Allodynia was induced by intraplantar injection of LPS. Complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches were used to determine the strategy of blocking FAAH to reverse LPS-induced allodynia. Endocannabinoid levels were quantified using mass spectroscopy analyses. KEY RESULTS FAAH (−/−) mice or wild-type mice treated with FAAH inhibitors (URB597, OL-135 and PF-3845) displayed an anti-allodynic phenotype. Furthermore, i.p. PF-3845 increased AEA levels in the brain and spinal cord. Additionally, intraplantar PF-3845 produced a partial reduction in allodynia. However, the anti-allodynic phenotype was absent in mice expressing FAAH exclusively in the nervous system under a neural specific enolase promoter, implicating the involvement of neuronal fatty acid amides (FAAs). The anti-allodynic effects of FAAH-compromised mice required activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors, but other potential targets of FAA substrates (i.e. µ-opioid, TRPV1 and PPARα receptors) had no apparent role. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS AEA is the primary FAAH substrate reducing LPS-induced tactile allodynia. Blockade of neuronal FAAH reverses allodynia through the activation of both cannabinoid receptors and represents a promising target to treat inflammatory pain. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To

  6. Effects of CYP3A4 inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; Russell, Deborah; Taylor-Worth, Richard J; Ridgway, Caroline E; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the influence of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitors on the clinical pharmacokinetics of maraviroc, a novel CCR5 antagonist. Methods Four open-label, randomized, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in healthy subjects to assess the effect of separate and distinct combinations of CYP3A4 inhibitors on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of maraviroc. Study 1 was a two-way crossover study investigating the influence of saquinavir (SQV; 1200 mg t.i.d.) and ketoconazole (400 mg q.d.) on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.). All subjects received maraviroc for 7 days in both study periods. Cohort 1 subjects also received SQV or placebo and cohort 2 subjects also received ketoconazole or placebo. Study 2 was a parallel-group study including four treatment groups investigating the effects of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r; 400 mg/100 mg b.i.d.), ritonavir-boosted saquinavir (SQV/r; 1000 mg/100 mg b.i.d.), and low-dose ritonavir (RTV; 100 mg b.i.d.) on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.), and exploring whether maraviroc dose adjustment can compensate for interaction effects. Treatment lasted 28 days and comprised three distinct phases: (i) maraviroc alone on days 1–7; (ii) maraviroc + interactant on days 8–21; and (iii) maraviroc (adjusted dose) + interactant on days 22–28. Study 3 was a two-way crossover study investigating the effects of atazanavir (ATZ; 400 mg q.d.) and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATZ/r; 300 mg/100 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc (300 mg b.i.d.). All subjects received maraviroc on days 1–14 of both study periods. Subjects also received ATZ on days 1–7 and ATZ/r on days 8–14 of one treatment period, and placebo on days 1–14 of the other treatment period. Study 4 was a two-way crossover study investigating the effects of ritonavir-boosted tipranavir (TPV/r; 500 mg/200 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc (150 mg b.i.d.). Subjects received maraviroc

  7. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Drug-drug interactions associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely known. A major interaction by SSRIs is the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated hepatic drug metabolism. The SSRI, sertraline, is also reported to increase the blood concentration of co-administered drugs. The potency of sertraline directly to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism is relatively weak compared with the other SSRIs, implying that additional mechanisms are involved in the interactions. The study examined whether sertraline produces time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 and/or other P450 enzymes. Incubation of human liver microsomes with sertraline in the presence of NADPH resulted in marked decreases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activities, indicating that sertraline metabolism leads to CYP3A4 inactivation. This inactivation required NADPH and was not protected by glutathione. No significant inactivation was observed for other P450 enzymes. Spectroscopic evaluation revealed that microsomes with and without sertraline in the presence of NADPH gave a Soret peak at 455 nm, suggesting the formation of metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes of sertraline metabolite(s) with the reduced form of P450. This is the first report indicating that sertraline produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4, which may be associated with MI complex formation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A support vector machine approach to classify human cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegl, Jan M.; Arnhold, Thomas; Beck, Bernd; Fox, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme superfamily plays a major role in the metabolism of commercially available drugs. Inhibition of these enzymes by a drug may result in a plasma level increase of another drug, thus leading to unwanted drug-drug interactions when two or more drugs are coadministered. Therefore, fast and reliable in silico methods predicting CYP inhibition from calculated molecular properties are an important tool which can be applied to assess both already synthesized as well as virtual compounds. We have studied the performance of support vector machines (SVMs) to classify compounds according to their potency to inhibit CYP3A4. The data set for model generation consists of more than 1300 structural diverse drug-like research molecules which were divided into training and test sets. The predictive power of SVMs crucially depends on a careful selection of parameters specifying the kernel function and the penalty for misclassifications. In this study we have investigated a procedure to identify a valid set of SVM parameters which is based on a sampling of the parameter space on a regular grid. From this set of parameters, either single SVMs or SVM committees were trained to distinguish between strong and weak inhibitors or to achieve a more realistic three-class assignment, with one class representing medium inhibitors. This workflow was studied for several kernel functions and descriptor sets. All SVM models performed significantly better than PLS-DA models which were generated from the corresponding descriptor sets. As a very promising result, simple two-dimensional (2D) descriptors yield a three-class model which correctly classifies more than 70% of the test set. Our work illustrates that SVMs used in combination with simple 2D descriptors provide a very effective and reliable tool which allows a fast assessment of CYP3A4 inhibition potency in an early in silico filtering process.

  9. Co-administration of statins with cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitors in a UK primary care population.

    PubMed

    Bakhai, Ameet; Rigney, Una; Hollis, Samuel; Emmas, Cathy

    2012-05-01

    The co-administration of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibitors with simvastatin or atorvastatin (CYP3A4-metabolised statins) is associated with increased statin exposure and can increase the risk of adverse drug reactions. The aim of this study was to measure the concomitant exposure of patients to CYP3A4-metabolised statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors in the UK primary care population. The co-administration of statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors during 2008 was examined in the General Practice Research Database, a large nationally representative UK primary care database. All known inhibitors were included with labelled inhibitors identified using the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency Drug Safety Update and UK summary of product characteristics for statins. Exposure was examined in patients overall, patients 65 years and older and those prescribed higher doses of statins. There were 364,574 patients included in the analyses. Ninety-three percent of the patients were prescribed CYP3A4-metabolised statins, most whom received simvastatin (72%) and atorvastatin (24%). Approximately one third (30%) of the patients prescribed a CYP3A4-metabolised statin had also been prescribed a concomitant CYP3A4 inhibitor during the study period, including 11% prescribed a concomitant labelled inhibitor, with an annualised median days of concomitant use of 173 days, predominantly involving macrolide antibiotics and calcium channel blockers co-prescriptions. Rates were higher in the subgroup aged 65 and over and in those on high dose statins. The co-prescription of CYP3A4-metabolised statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors is common in UK primary care. This co-prescription suggests the limited appreciation of potential interactions and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency safety advice, with the potential to increase likelihood for side effects amongst patients. Strategies to reduce drug interactions with potential adverse effects should be targeted at prescribers and

  10. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  11. Structure of Francisella tularensis peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Teresa E.; Romanov, Vladimir; Lam, Robert; Gothe, Scott A.; Peddi, Srinivasa R.; Razumova, Ekaterina B.; Lipman, Richard S. A.; Branstrom, Arthur A.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2011-01-01

    The rational design of novel antibiotics for bacteria involves the identification of inhibitors for enzymes involved in essential biochemical pathways in cells. In this study, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and structure of the enzyme peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, was performed. The structure of F. tularensis peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase is comparable to those of other bacterial peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases, with most residues in the active site conserved amongst the family. The resultant reagents, structural data and analyses provide essential information for the structure-based design of novel inhibitors for this class of proteins. PMID:21505237

  12. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 belongs to a novel class of epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; Overkamp, K M; de Bont, J A

    1998-10-01

    An epoxide hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 catalyzes the hydrolysis of limonene-1,2-epoxide to limonene-1,2-diol. The enzyme is induced when R. erythropolis is grown on monoterpenes, reflecting its role in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase was purified to homogeneity. It is a monomeric cytoplasmic enzyme of 17 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. No cofactor was required for activity of this colorless enzyme. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 7 and 50 degrees C. None of the tested inhibitors or metal ions inhibited limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase has a narrow substrate range. Of the compounds tested, only limonene-1,2-epoxide, 1-methylcyclohexene oxide, cyclohexene oxide, and indene oxide were substrates. This report shows that limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase belongs to a new class of epoxide hydrolases based on (i) its low molecular mass, (ii) the absence of any significant homology between the partial amino acid sequence of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and amino acid sequences of known epoxide hydrolases, (iii) its pH profile, and (iv) the inability of 2-bromo-4'-nitroacetophenone, diethylpyrocarbonate, 4-fluorochalcone oxide, and 1, 10-phenanthroline to inhibit limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity.

  13. Pharmacokinetic interactions between the orexin receptor antagonist almorexant and the CYP3A4 inhibitors ketoconazole and diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Jasper; Cruz, Hans Gabriel; Gehin, Martine; Hoever, Petra

    2014-05-01

    Almorexant, a tetrahydroisoquinoline orexin receptor antagonist and first representative of a new class of compounds for the treatment of insomnia, is a substrate of the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme (CYP3A4). Two randomized two-way crossover studies were performed in healthy subjects investigating the pharmacokinetic interaction between almorexant and the CYP3A4 inhibitors ketoconazole and diltiazem. When administered as a single dose of 100 mg almorexant during steady state of ketoconazole (400 mg once daily for 14 days) or diltiazem treatment (300 mg once daily for 11 days), the exposure to almorexant was 10.5- and 3.5-fold, respectively, greater when compared with almorexant alone. Exposure to the phenol metabolites M3 and M8 increased in the presence of the CYP3A4 inhibitors, whereas that to M6 (dealkylated metabolite) decreased. Concomitant ketoconazole decreased formation of the dehydrogenated metabolite M5 and diltiazem increased concentrations of this metabolite. Higher almorexant exposure was associated with an increased incidence of typical almorexant-related adverse events such as fatigue (both studies) and somnolence (ketoconazole study only). The present results indicate that dose adaptation must be considered when almorexant would be coadministered with inhibitors of CYP3A4.

  14. A Novel Glycoside Hydrolase Family 113 Endo-β-1,4-Mannanase from Alicyclobacillus sp. Strain A4 and Insight into the Substrate Recognition and Catalytic Mechanism of This Family

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Lu, Haiqiang; Xia, Mengjuan; Cui, Ying; Bai, Yingguo; Qian, Lichun; Luo, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    Few members of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 113 have been characterized, and information on substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of this family is extremely limited. In the present study, a novel endo-β-1,4-mannanase of GH 113, Man113A, was identified in thermoacidophilic Alicyclobacillus sp. strain A4 and found to exhibit both hydrolytic and transglycosylation activities. The enzyme had a broad substrate spectrum, showed higher activities on glucomannan than on galactomannan, and released mannobiose and mannotriose as the main hydrolysis products after an extended incubation. Compared to the only functionally characterized and structure-resolved counterpart Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius ManA (AaManA) of GH 113, Man113A showed much higher catalytic efficiency on mannooligosaccharides, in the order mannohexaose ≈ mannopentaose > mannotetraose > mannotriose, and required at least four sugar units for efficient catalysis. Homology modeling, molecular docking analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis revealed the vital roles of eight residues (Trp13, Asn90, Trp96, Arg97, Tyr196, Trp274, Tyr292, and Cys143) related to substrate recognition by and catalytic mechanism of GH 113. Comparison of the binding pockets and key residues of β-mannanases of different families indicated that members of GH 113 and GH 5 have more residues serving as stacking platforms to support −4 to −1 subsites than those of GH 26 and that the residues preceding the acid/base catalyst are quite different. Taken as a whole, this study elucidates substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of GH 113 β-mannanases and distinguishes them from counterparts of other families. PMID:26921423

  15. A Novel Glycoside Hydrolase Family 113 Endo-β-1,4-Mannanase from Alicyclobacillus sp. Strain A4 and Insight into the Substrate Recognition and Catalytic Mechanism of This Family.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Lu, Haiqiang; Xia, Mengjuan; Cui, Ying; Bai, Yingguo; Qian, Lichun; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Yao, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Few members of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 113 have been characterized, and information on substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of this family is extremely limited. In the present study, a novel endo-β-1,4-mannanase of GH 113, Man113A, was identified in thermoacidophilic Alicyclobacillus sp. strain A4 and found to exhibit both hydrolytic and transglycosylation activities. The enzyme had a broad substrate spectrum, showed higher activities on glucomannan than on galactomannan, and released mannobiose and mannotriose as the main hydrolysis products after an extended incubation. Compared to the only functionally characterized and structure-resolved counter part Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius ManA (AaManA) of GH 113, Man113A showed much higher catalytic efficiency on mannooligosaccharides, in the order mannohexaose ≈ mannopentaose > mannotetraose > mannotriose, and required at least four sugar units for efficient catalysis. Homology modeling, molecular docking analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis revealed the vital roles of eight residues (Trp13, Asn90, Trp96, Arg97, Tyr196, Trp274, Tyr292, and Cys143) related to substrate recognition by and catalytic mechanism of GH 113. Comparison of the binding pockets and key residues of β-mannanases of different families indicated that members of GH 113 and GH 5 have more residues serving as stacking platforms to support -4 to -1 subsites than those of GH 26 and that the residues preceding the acid/base catalyst are quite different. Taken as a whole, this study elucidates substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of GH 113 β-mannanases and distinguishes them from counterparts of other families. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. 1-(3-biaryloxy-2-oxopropyl)indole-5-carboxylic acids and related compounds as dual inhibitors of human cytosolic phospholipase A2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zahov, Stefan; Drews, Andreas; Hess, Mark; Schulze Elfringhoff, Alwine; Lehr, Matthias

    2011-03-07

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes that have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that 1-[3-(4-octylphenoxy)-2-oxopropyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (5) is a dual inhibitor of cPLA2α and FAAH. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that substituents at the indole 3- and 5-positions and replacement of the indole scaffold of this compound by other heterocycles strongly influences the inhibitory potency against cPLA2α and FAAH, respectively. Herein we report the effect of variation of the 4-octyl residue of 5 and an exchange of its carboxylic acid moiety by some bioisosteric functional groups. Several of the compounds assayed were favorably active against both enzymes, and could therefore represent agents with improved analgesic and anti-inflammatory qualities in comparison with selective cPLA2 α and FAAH inhibitors.

  17. Crystal Structure of Novel Metallocarboxypeptidase Inhibitor from Marine Mollusk Nerita versicolor in Complex with Human Carboxypeptidase A4*

    PubMed Central

    Covaleda, Giovanni; Alonso del Rivero, Maday; Chávez, María A.; Avilés, Francesc X.; Reverter, David

    2012-01-01

    NvCI is a novel exogenous proteinaceous inhibitor of metallocarboxypeptidases from the marine snail Nerita versicolor. The complex between human carboxypeptidase A4 and NvCI has been crystallized and determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The NvCI structure defines a distinctive protein fold basically composed of a two-stranded antiparallel β-sheet connected by three loops and the inhibitory C-terminal tail and stabilized by three disulfide bridges. NvCI is a tight-binding inhibitor that interacts with the active site of the enzyme in a substrate-like manner. NvCI displays an extended and novel interface with human carboxypeptidase A4, responsible for inhibitory constants in the picomolar range for some members of the M14A subfamily of carboxypeptidases. This makes NvCI the strongest inhibitor reported so far for this family. The structural homology displayed by the C-terminal tails of different carboxypeptidase inhibitors represents a relevant example of convergent evolution. PMID:22294694

  18. Effects of the moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, fluconazole, on the pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Bimal; Dickins, Maurice; Alvey, Christine; Jumadilova, Zhanna; Li, Xiaoxi; Duczynski, Gregory; Gandelman, Kuan

    2011-08-01

    Available data suggest that fesoterodine dosage should not exceed 4 mg once daily when taken concomitantly with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole. Currently, no information is available on whether dose adjustment is necessary when fesoterodine is administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. This study shows that adjustment of fesoterodine dose is not warranted when co-administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. To assess the effects of fluconazole, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety/tolerability of fesoterodine. In this open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects (18-55 years) received single doses of fesoterodine 8 mg alone or with fluconazole 200 mg. PK endpoints, including the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ), time to C(max) (t(max) ), and half-life (t(1/2) ), were assessed for 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), the active moiety of fesoterodine. Concomitant administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole increased AUC(0,∞) and C(max) of 5-HMT by approximately 27% and 19%, respectively, with corresponding 90% confidence intervals of (18%, 36%) and (11%, 28%). There was no apparent effect of fluconazole on 5-HMT t(max) or t(½) . Fesoterodine was generally well tolerated regardless of fluconazole co-administration, with no reports of death, serious adverse events (AEs) or severe AEs. Following co-administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole, 13 subjects (48%) experienced a total of 40 AEs; following administration of fesoterodine alone, six subjects (22%) experienced a total of 19 AEs. The majority of AEs were of mild intensity. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory or physical examination parameters. Fesoterodine 8 mg single dose was well tolerated when administered alone or with fluconazole. Based on the observed increase in 5-HMT exposures being within the inherent

  19. Isolation of CYP3A4 Inhibitors from the Black Cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigation on drug interaction has shown that some foods and herbal medicines increase the oral availability of a variety of CYP3A4 substrates, which is caused by the reduction of CYP3A4 in intestinal epithelium. During the course of our investigation on CYP3A4 interaction, we found that the commercially available dietary supplement made from black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) showed CYP3A4 inhibition. Black cohosh has been used for the treatment of menopausal and post-menopausal symptoms as a dietary supplement. Bioassay-guided isolation from the supplement afforded six active principles, which were identified as cycloartanoid triterpene glycosides. PMID:15937564

  20. Biochemical and biological properties of 4-(3-phenyl-[1,2,4] thiadiazol-5-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid phenylamide, a mechanism-based inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Karbarz, Mark J; Luo, Lin; Chang, Leon; Tham, Chui-Se; Palmer, James A; Wilson, Sandy J; Wennerholm, Michelle L; Brown, Sean M; Scott, Brian P; Apodaca, Richard L; Keith, John M; Wu, Jiejun; Breitenbucher, James Guy; Chaplan, Sandra R; Webb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an integral membrane enzyme within the amidase-signature family. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of several endogenous biologically active lipids, including anandamide (arachidonoyl ethanolamide), oleoyl ethanolamide, and palmitoyl ethanolamide. These endogenous FAAH substrates have been shown to be involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including synaptic regulation, regulation of sleep and feeding, locomotor activity, pain and inflammation. Here we describe the biochemical and biological properties of a potent and selective FAAH inhibitor, 4-(3-phenyl-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid phenylamide (JNJ-1661010). The time-dependence of apparent IC(50) values at rat and human recombinant FAAH, dialysis and mass spectrometry data indicate that the acyl piperazinyl fragment of JNJ-1661010 forms a covalent bond with the enzyme. This bond is slowly hydrolyzed, with release of the piperazinyl fragment and recovery of enzyme activity. The lack of inhibition observed in a rat liver esterase assay suggests that JNJ-1661010 is not a general esterase inhibitor. JNJ-1661010 is >100-fold preferentially selective for FAAH-1 when compared to FAAH-2. JNJ-1661010 dose-dependently increases arachidonoyl ethanolamide, oleoyl ethanolamide, and palmitoyl ethanolamide in the rat brain. The compound attenuates tactile allodynia in the rat mild thermal injury model of acute tissue damage and in the rat spinal nerve ligation (Chung) model of neuropathic pain. JNJ-1661010 also diminishes thermal hyperalgesia in the inflammatory rat carrageenan paw model. These data suggest that FAAH inhibitors with modes of action similar to JNJ-1661010 may be useful clinically as broad-spectrum analgesics.

  1. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  2. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH.

  3. Effects of the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 on the sleep-wake cycle, c-Fos expression and dopamine levels of the rat.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Vázquez, Edgar; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Drucker-Colin, René

    2007-05-07

    Our group has described previously that the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide induces sleep. The hydrolysis of this lipid involves the activity of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which additionally catalyzes the degradation of the satiety factor oleoylethanolamide and the analgesic-inducing lipid palmitoylethanolamide. It has been demonstrated that the inhibition of the FAAH by URB597 increases levels of anandamide, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide in the brain of rats. In order to determinate the physiological properties of the FAAH inhibition on the sleep modulation, we report the pharmacological effects on the sleep-wake cycle of the rat after i.c.v. administrations of URB597, oleoylethanolamide or palmitoylethanolamide (10, 20 microg/5 microl). Separate unilateral i.c.v. injections of 3 compounds during the lights-on period, increased wakefulness and decreased slow wave (SW) sleep in rats in a dose-dependent fashion. We additionally found out that, compared to controls, c-Fos immunoreactivity in hypothalamus and dorsal raphe nucleus was increased in rats that received URB597, oleoylethanolamide or palmitoylethanolamide (10, 20 microg/5 microl, i.c.v.). Next, we found that after an injection of the compounds, levels of dopamine were increased whereas extracellular levels of levodopa (l-DOPA) were decreased. These findings indicate that that inhibition of the FAAH, via URB597, modulates waking. These effects were mimicked separately by the administration of oleoylethanolamide or palmitoylethanolamide. The alertness induced by the compounds tested here activated wake-promoting brain regions and they also induced the release of dopamine. Our results suggest that FAAH activity as well as two molecules that are catalyzed by this enzyme, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, participate in the regulation of the waking state. Alternative approaches to treat sleep disorders such as excessive somnolence might consider the use of the URB597

  4. Quantum chemistry calculation-aided structural optimization of combretastatin A-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors: improved stability and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junhang; Zheng, Canhui; Zhu, Kongkai; Liu, Jia; Sun, Nannan; Wang, Chongqing; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Ju; Luo, Cheng; Zhou, Youjun

    2015-03-12

    A potent combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) like tubulin polymerization inhibitor 22b was found with strong antitumor activity previously. However, it easily undergoes cis-trans isomerization under natural light, and the resulting decrease in activity limits its further applications. In this study, we used quantum chemistry calculations to explore the molecular basis of its instability. Aided by the calculations, two rounds of structural optimization of 22b were conducted. Accelerated quantitative light stability testing confirmed that the stability of these designed compounds was significantly improved as predicted. Among them, compounds 1 and 3b displayed more potent inhibitory activity on tumor cell growth than 22b. In addition, the potent in vivo antitumor activity of compound 1 was confirmed. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in the optimization of stilbene-like molecules, providing new insight into stilbenoid optimization and important implications for the future development of novel CA-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

  5. Effects of CYP3A4 inducers with and without CYP3A4 inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; Jenkins, Timothy M; Whitlock, Lyndsey A; Ridgway, Caroline E; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To assess the potential of known CYP3A4 inducers, with and without CYP3A4 inhibitors, to alter the pharmacokinetic profile of maraviroc. Methods Two separate, open, randomized, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in healthy subjects. Study 1 was a 28-day parallel-group study with three treatment groups of 12 subjects each. On days 1–7, all subjects received maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d.; on days 8–21, subjects received maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. plus either rifampicin 600 mg q.d., efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg q.d., or placebo q.d. as assigned; on days 22–28, the maraviroc dose was increased to 200 mg b.i.d. for patients receiving either rifampicin or EFV. Study 2 was a 21-day, two-way crossover study with three cohorts (12 subjects per cohort). On days 1–21, subjects received maraviroc 300 mg b.i.d. and boosted lopinavir (LPV/r, lopinavir 400 mg + ritonavir 100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 1, maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. and boosted saquinavir (SQV/r, saquinavir 1000 mg + ritonavir 100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 2, and maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. and 1000 mg saquinavir + LPV/r (400 mg/100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 3. On days 8–21, subjects in all three cohorts also received EFV 600 mg or placebo q.d. Results Maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.) exposure (AUC12 and Cmax) was reduced in the presence of rifampicin and EFV by approximately 70% and 50%, respectively. Maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax approached preinduction values when the maraviroc dose was increased to 200 mg b.i.d. for both the rifampicin-treated and EFV-treated groups. Co-administration of LPV/r with maraviroc (300 mg b.i.d.) resulted in geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of 395% and 197% for maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax, respectively, compared with placebo; addition of EFV resulted in GMRs of 253% and 125% for AUC12 and Cmax, respectively. Co-administration of SQV/r with maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.) resulted in GMRs of 977% and 478% for maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax, respectively, compared with placebo; addition of EFV

  6. Reducing endocannabinoid metabolism with the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, fails to modify reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned floor preference and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Amanda L; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A

    2010-10-01

    The potential of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597, to modify drug prime-induced reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned floor preference or naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance was evaluated. In Experiment 1, morphine-induced conditioned floor preference was established across 4 conditioning trials. Following extinction training (4 trials), rats were pretreated with URB597 or vehicle prior to a morphine prime or a saline prime. Morphine reinstated the previously extinguished floor preference, but URB597 did not modify the strength of the reinstated preference. In Experiment 2, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance was established across 2 conditioning trials. Following extinction training (14 trials), rats were pretreated with URB597 or vehicle prior to a saline prime or a morphine withdrawal prime. The morphine withdrawal prime reinstated the previously extinguished floor avoidance, but URB597 did not modify the strength of reinstated avoidance. These results suggest that under the conditions in which URB597 promotes extinction (e.g., Manwell et al. (2009)) it does not interfere with drug-induced reinstatement of either conditioned floor preference or avoidance. That is, although activation of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system promotes extinction of aversive learning, it may not prevent reinstatement of that aversion by re-exposure to the aversive treatment.

  7. The computational model to predict accurately inhibitory activity for inhibitors towards CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2010-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a superfamily of enzymes with oxidative function responsible for the metabolism of xenobiotics especially drug metabolism. CYP3A4, an extensive studied CYP isoform, plays crucial role in the metabolism of structurally diverse drugs. Furthermore, the drug-drug interaction resulted from the inhibition of CYP3A4 activity is of extreme importance for the treatment of disease and the development of new drug. In this study, using the method of the support vector machine (SVM) and three descriptors selected from the 153 descriptors we construct the models that can predict accurately the inhibitory effect of a compound on the activity of CYP3A4. By optimizing the parameters related to SVM, the cross validation correlation efficient of the model can achieve 0.71, which is higher than those of other models obtained using Artifical Neutral Network (ANN) and Partial least square (PLS) methods to our knowledge, and thus our model can present the important application in assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug as well as prediction of drug-drug interactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alterations in endocannabinoid tone following chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: Effects of endocannabinoid deactivation inhibitors targeting fatty-acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase in comparison to reference analgesics following cisplatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guindon, Josée; Lai, Yvonne; Takacs, Sara M.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cisplatin, a platinum-derived chemotherapeutic agent, produces mechanical and cold allodynia reminiscent of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in humans. The endocannabinoid system represents a novel target for analgesic drug development. The endocannabinoid consists of endocannabinoids (e.g. anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), cannabinoid receptors (e.g. CB1 and CB2) and the enzymes controlling endocannabinoid synthesis and degradation. AEA is hydrolyzed by fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) whereas 2-AG is hydrolyzed primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). We compared effects of brain permeant (URB597) and impermeant (URB937) inhibitors of FAAH with an irreversible inhibitor of MGL (JZL184) on cisplatin-evoked behavioral hypersensitivities. Endocannabinoid modulators were compared with agents used clinically to treat neuropathy (i.e. the opioid analgesic morphine, the anticonvulsant gabapentin and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline). Cisplatin produced robust mechanical and cold allodynia but did not alter responsiveness to heat. After neuropathy was fully established, groups received acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of vehicle, amitriptyline (30 mg/kg), gabapentin (100 mg/kg), morphine (6 mg/kg), URB597 (0.1 or 1 mg/kg), URB937 (0.1 or 1 mg/kg) or JZL184 (1, 3 or 8 mg/kg). Pharmacological specificity was assessed by coadministering each endocannabinoid modulator with either a CB1 (AM251 3 mg/kg), CB2 (AM630 3 mg/kg), TRPV1 (AMG9810 3 mg/kg) or TRPA1 (HC030031 8 mg/kg) antagonist. Effects of cisplatin on endocannabinoid levels and transcription of receptors (CB1, CB2, TRPV1, TRPA1) and enzymes (FAAH, MGL) linked to the endocannabinoid system were also assessed. URB597, URB937, JZL184 and morphine reversed cisplatin-evoked mechanical and cold allodynia to pre-cisplatin levels. By contrast, gabapentin only partially reversed the neuropathy while amitriptyline, administered acutely, was ineffective. CB1 or CB2 antagonist

  9. Alterations in endocannabinoid tone following chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: effects of endocannabinoid deactivation inhibitors targeting fatty-acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase in comparison to reference analgesics following cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guindon, Josée; Lai, Yvonne; Takacs, Sara M; Bradshaw, Heather B; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum-derived chemotherapeutic agent, produces mechanical and coldallodynia reminiscent of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in humans. The endocannabinoid system represents a novel target for analgesic drug development. The endocannabinoid signaling system consists of endocannabinoids (e.g. anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), cannabinoid receptors (e.g. CB(1) and CB(2)) and the enzymes controlling endocannabinoid synthesis and degradation. AEA is hydrolyzed by fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) whereas 2-AG is hydrolyzed primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). We compared effects of brain permeant (URB597) and impermeant (URB937) inhibitors of FAAH with an irreversible inhibitor of MGL (JZL184) on cisplatin-evoked behavioral hypersensitivities. Endocannabinoid modulators were compared with agents used clinically to treat neuropathy (i.e. the opioid analgesic morphine, the anticonvulsant gabapentin and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline). Cisplatin produced robust mechanical and cold allodynia but did not alter responsiveness to heat. After neuropathy was fully established, groups received acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of vehicle, amitriptyline (30 mg/kg), gabapentin (100 mg/kg), morphine (6 mg/kg), URB597 (0.1 or 1 mg/kg), URB937 (0.1 or 1 mg/kg) or JZL184 (1, 3 or 8 mg/kg). Pharmacological specificity was assessed by coadministering each endocannabinoid modulator with either a CB(1) (AM251 3 mg/kg), CB(2) (AM630 3 mg/kg), TRPV1 (AMG9810 3 mg/kg) or TRPA1 (HC030031 8 mg/kg) antagonist. Effects of cisplatin on endocannabinoid levels and transcription of receptors (CB(1), CB(2), TRPV1, TRPA1) and enzymes (FAAH, MGL) linked to the endocannabinoid system were also assessed. URB597, URB937, JZL184 and morphine reversed cisplatin-evoked mechanical and cold allodynia to pre-cisplatin levels. By contrast, gabapentin only partially reversed the observed allodynia while amitriptyline, administered acutely, was ineffective

  10. Effects of the moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, fluconazole, on the pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bimal; Dickins, Maurice; Alvey, Christine; Jumadilova, Zhanna; Li, Xiaoxi; Duczynski, Gregory; Gandelman, Kuan

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To assess the effects of fluconazole, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety/tolerability of fesoterodine. METHODS In this open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects (18–55 years) received single doses of fesoterodine 8 mg alone or with fluconazole 200 mg. PK endpoints, including the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (tmax), and half-life (t1/2), were assessed for 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), the active moiety of fesoterodine. RESULTS Concomitant administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole increased AUC(0,∞) and Cmax of 5-HMT by approximately 27% and 19%, respectively, with corresponding 90% confidence intervals of (18%, 36%) and (11%, 28%). There was no apparent effect of fluconazole on 5-HMT tmax or t½. Fesoterodine was generally well tolerated regardless of fluconazole co-administration, with no reports of death, serious adverse events (AEs) or severe AEs. Following co-administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole, 13 subjects (48%) experienced a total of 40 AEs; following administration of fesoterodine alone, six subjects (22%) experienced a total of 19 AEs. The majority of AEs were of mild intensity. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory or physical examination parameters. CONCLUSION Fesoterodine 8 mg single dose was well tolerated when administered alone or with fluconazole. Based on the observed increase in 5-HMT exposures being within the inherent variability of 5-HMT pharmacokinetics, adjustment of fesoterodine dose is not warranted when co-administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor provided they are not also inhibitors of transporters. PMID:21545485

  11. Discovery libraries targeting the major enzyme classes: the serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Otrubova, Katerina; Srinivasan, Venkat; Boger, Dale L

    2014-08-15

    Two libraries of modestly reactive ureas containing either electron-deficient acyl anilines or acyl pyrazoles were prepared and are reported as screening libraries for candidate serine hydrolase inhibitors. Within each library is a small but powerful subset of compounds that serve as a chemotype fragment screening library capable of subsequent structural diversification. Elaboration of the pyrazole-based ureas provided remarkably potent irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, apparent Ki=100-200 pM) complementary to those previously disclosed enlisting electron-deficient aniline-based ureas.

  12. Discovery libraries targeting the major enzyme classes: the serine hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Otrubova, Katerina; Srinivasan, Venkat; Boger, Dale L.

    2014-01-01

    Two libraries of modestly reactive ureas containing either electron-deficient acyl anilines or acyl pyrazoles were prepared and are reported as screening libraries for candidate serine hydrolase inhibitors. Within each library is a small but powerful subset of compounds that serve as a chemotype fragment screening library capable of subsequent diversification. Elaboration of the pyrazole-based ureas provided remarkably potent irreversible structural inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, apparent Ki = 100-200 pM) complementary to those previously disclosed enlisting electron-deficient aniline-based ureas. PMID:25037918

  13. Proteome-wide reactivity profiling identifies diverse carbamate chemotypes tuned for serine hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Cognetta, Armand B; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2013-07-19

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Inhibitors of serine hydrolases are used to treat many diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cognitive dementia, and bacterial and viral infections. Nonetheless, the majority of the 200+ serine hydrolases in mammals still lack selective inhibitors for their functional characterization. We and others have shown that activated carbamates, through covalent reaction with the conserved serine nucleophile of serine hydrolases, can serve as useful inhibitors for members of this enzyme family. The extent to which carbamates, however, cross-react with other protein classes remains mostly unexplored. Here, we address this problem by investigating the proteome-wide reactivity of a diverse set of activated carbamates in vitro and in vivo, using a combination of competitive and click chemistry (CC)-activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). We identify multiple classes of carbamates, including O-aryl, O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP), and O-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates that react selectively with serine hydrolases across entire mouse tissue proteomes in vivo. We exploit the proteome-wide specificity of HFIP carbamates to create in situ imaging probes for the endocannabinoid hydrolases monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and α-β hydrolase-6 (ABHD6). These findings, taken together, designate the carbamate as a privileged reactive group for serine hydrolases that can accommodate diverse structural modifications to produce inhibitors that display exceptional potency and selectivity across the mammalian proteome.

  14. Proteome-wide reactivity profiling identifies diverse carbamate chemotypes tuned for serine hydrolase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Cognetta, Armand B.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Inhibitors of serine hydrolases are used to treat many diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cognitive dementia, and bacterial and viral infections. Nonetheless, the majority of the 200+ serine hydrolases in mammals still lack selective inhibitors for their functional characterization. We and others have shown that activated carbamates, through covalent reaction with the conserved serine nucleophile of serine hydrolases, can serve as useful inhibitors for members of this enzyme family. The extent to which carbamates, however, cross-react with other protein classes remains mostly unexplored. Here, we address this problem by investigating the proteome-wide reactivity of a diverse set of activated carbamates in vitro and in vivo using a combination of competitive and click chemistry (CC)-activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). We identify multiple classes of carbamates, including O-aryl, O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP), and O-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates that react selectively with serine hydrolases across entire mouse tissue proteomes in vivo. We exploit the proteome-wide specificity of HFIP carbamates to create in situ imaging probes for the endocannabinoid hydrolases monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and alpha-beta hydrolase-6 (ABHD6). These findings, taken together, designate the carbamate as a privileged reactive group for serine hydrolases that can accommodate diverse structural modifications to produce inhibitors that display exceptional potency and selectivity across the mammalian proteome. PMID:23701408

  15. Inhibition of Chronic Pancreatitis and Murine Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia by a Dual Inhibitor of c-RAF and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx-1-Cre Mice

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, JIE; HWANG, SUNG HEE; LI, HAONAN; LIU, JUN-YAN; HAMMOCK, BRUCE D.; YANG, GUANG-YU

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. In the process of long-standing chronic inflammation, aberrant metabolites of arachidonic acid play a crucial role in promoting carcinogenesis, in which the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), as a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we determined the effect of our newly-synthesized novel compound trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM), a dual inhibitor of sEH and RAF1 proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (c-RAF), on inhibiting the development of pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN) in LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx1-Cre mice. The results showed that t-CUPM significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis, as measured by the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The progression of low-grade mPanIN I to high-grade mPanIN II/III was significantly suppressed. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase’s kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases was demonstrated in pancreatic tissues by western blots. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that t-CUPM treatment significantly reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis facor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, as well as vascular adhesion molecule-1, and the levels of Sonic hedgehog and Gli transcription factor (Hedgehog pathway). Analysis of the eicosanoid profile revealed a significant increase of the EETs/dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids ratio, which further confirmed sEH inhibition by t-CUPM. These results indicate that simultaneous inhibition of sEH and c-RAF by t-CUPM is important in preventing chronic pancreatitis and carcinogenesis

  16. Early postnatal treatment with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor or 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 prevents prenatal dexamethasone and postnatal high saturated fat diet induced programmed hypertension in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Lin, Yu-Ju; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Huang, Li-Tung; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure, postnatal high-fat (HF) intake, and arachidonic acid pathway are closely related to hypertension. We tested whether a soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH) inhibitor, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) or 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 (15dPGJ2) therapy can rescue programmed hypertension in the DEX+HF two-hit model. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were studied: control, DEX+HF, AUDA, and 15dPGJ2. Dexamethasone (0.1mg/kg body weight) was intraperitoneally administered to pregnant rats from gestational day 16-22. Male offspring received high-fat diet (D12331, Research Diets) from weaning to 4 months of age. In AUDA group, mother rats received 25mg/L in drinking water during lactation. In the 15dPGJ2 group, male offspring received 15dPGJ2 1.5mg/kg BW by subcutaneous injection once daily for 1 week after birth. We found postnatal HF diet aggravated prenatal DEX-induced programmed hypertension, which was similarly prevented by early treatment with AUDA or 15dPGJ2. The beneficial effects of AUDA and 15d-PGJ2 therapy include inhibition of SEH, increases of renal angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) protein levels, and restoration of nitric oxide bioavailability. Better understanding of the impact of arachidonic acid pathway in the two-hit model will help prevent programmed hypertension in children exposed to corticosteroids and postnatal HF intake.

  17. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2017-07-11

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  18. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  19. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah [Davis, CA; Ward, Connie [Hamilton, MT; Cherry, Joel [Davis, CA; Jones, Aubrey [Davis, CA; Harris, Paul [Carnation, WA; Yi, Jung [Sacramento, CA

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  20. The consequence of regional gradients of P-gp and CYP3A4 for drug-drug interactions by P-gp inhibitors and the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay in the human intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Steeg, Evita; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal P-gp and CYP3A4 work coordinately to reduce the intracellular concentration of drugs, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on this interplay are of clinical importance and require pre-clinical investigation. Using precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) of human jejunum, ileum and colon, we investigated the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay and related DDIs with P-gp inhibitors at the different regions of the human intestine with quinidine (Qi), dual substrate of P-gp and CYP3A4, as probe. All the P-gp inhibitors increased the intracellular concentrations of Qi by 2.1-2.6 fold in jejunum, 2.6-3.8 fold in ileum but only 1.2-1.3 fold in colon, in line with the different P-gp expression in these intestinal regions. The selective P-gp inhibitors (CP100356 and PSC833) enhanced 3-hydroxy-quinidine (3OH-Qi) in jejunum and ileum, while dual inhibitors of P-gp and CYP3A4 (verapamil and ketoconazole) decreased the 3OH-Qi production, despite of the increased intracellular Qi concentration, due to inhibition of CYP3A4. The outcome of DDIs based on P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay, shown as remarkable changes in the intracellular concentration of both the parent drug and the metabolite, varied among the intestinal regions, probably due to the different expression of P-gp and CYP3A4, and were different from those found in rat PCIS, which may have important implications for the disposition and toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

  1. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  2. Evaluation of Ketoconazole and Its Alternative Clinical CYP3A4/5 Inhibitors as Inhibitors of Drug Transporters: The In Vitro Effects of Ketoconazole, Ritonavir, Clarithromycin, and Itraconazole on 13 Clinically-Relevant Drug Transporters.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Lydia M M; Isringhausen, Caleb D; Ogilvie, Brian W; Buckley, David B

    2016-03-01

    Ketoconazole is a potent CYP3A4/5 inhibitor and, until recently, recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency as a strong CYP3A4/5 inhibitor in clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. Ketoconazole sporadically causes liver injury or adrenal insufficiency. Because of this, the FDA and European Medicines Agency recommended suspension of ketoconazole use in DDI studies in 2013. The FDA specifically recommended use of clarithromycin or itraconazole as alternative strong CYP3A4/5 inhibitors in clinical DDI studies, but many investigators have also used ritonavir as an alternative. Although the effects of these clinical CYP3A4/5 inhibitors on other CYPs are largely established, reports on the effects on the broad range of drug transporter activities are sparse. In this study, the inhibitory effects of ketoconazole, clarithromycin, ritonavir, and itraconazole (and its CYP3A4-inhibitory metabolites, hydroxy-, keto-, and N-desalkyl itraconazole) toward 13 drug transporters (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, OCT1, OCT2, MATE1, MATE2-K, P-gp, BCRP, MRP2, MRP3, and BSEP) were systematically assessed in transporter-expressing HEK-293 cell lines or membrane vesicles. In vitro findings were translated into clinical context with the basic static model approaches outlined by the FDA in its 2012 draft guidance on DDIs. The results indicate that, like ketoconazole, the alternative clinical CYP3A4/5 inhibitors ritonavir, clarithromycin, and itraconazole each have unique transporter inhibition profiles. None of the alternatives to ketoconazole provided a clean inhibition profile toward the 13 drug transporters evaluated. The results provide guidance for the selection of clinical CYP3A4/5 inhibitors when transporters are potentially involved in a victim drug's pharmacokinetics.

  3. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between ethinyl estradiol and gestodene, administered as a transdermal fertility control patch, and two CYP3A4 inhibitors and a CYP3A4 substrate.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Julia; Goldammer, Mark; Ludwig, Matthias; Rohde, Beate; Zurth, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) pathway and transdermally administered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) were investigated. This paper reports the findings of three open-label, intra-individual, one-way crossover, Phase I trials. In two studies, women used a novel contraceptive patch for 3 weeks during two 4-week study periods; in the second period, the CYP3A4 inhibitors erythromycin (Study 1) or ketoconazole (Study 2) were administered concurrently. In a third study, women received single doses of the CYP3A4 model substrate midazolam, alone and after 3 weeks of concurrent patch application. In each period, the EE/GSD patch (delivering low EE and GSD doses resulting in the same systemic exposure as a combined oral contraceptive containing 0.02 mg EE and 0.06 mg GSD) was applied once weekly for 3 weeks, with one patch-free week. Erythromycin, ketoconazole, and midazolam were administered orally. Main outcome measures were area under the curves (AUCs) and maximum plasma concentration (C max) of EE, and total and unbound GSD (Studies 1 and 2). AUC and C max of midazolam (Study 3). Co-administration of CYP3A4 inhibitors did not affect EE metabolism, and had only weak effects on the PK of total and unbound GSD. The patch had no clinically relevant effect on metabolism of the CYP3A4 substrate midazolam.

  4. Polyglycine hydrolases secreted by pathogenic fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogens are known to produce proteases that target host defense proteins. Here we describe polyglycine hydrolases, fungal proteases that selectively cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds within the polyglycine interdomain linker of targeted plant defense chitinases. Polyglycine hydrolases were puri...

  5. A molecular model for the active site of S-adenosyl- l-homocysteine hydrolase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jerry C.; Borchardt, Ronald T.; Vedani, Angelo

    1991-06-01

    S-adenosyl- l-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase, EC 3.3.1.1.), a specific target for antiviral drug design, catalyzes the hydrolysis of AdoHcy to adenosine (Ado) and homocysteine (Hcy) as well as the synthesis of AdoHcy from Ado and Hcy. The enzyme isolated from different sources has been shown to contain tightly bound NAD+. Based on the 2.0 Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of dogfish lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which is functionally homologous to AdoHcy hydrolase, and the primary sequence of rat liver AdoHcy hydrolase, we have derived a molecular model of an extended active site for AdoHcy hydrolase. The computational mutation was performed using the software MUTAR (Yeh et al., University of Kansas, Lawrence), followed by molecular mechanics optimizations using the programs AMBER (Singh et al., University of California, San Francisco) and YETI (Vedani, University of Kansas). Solvation of the model structure was achieved by use of the program SOLVGEN (Jacober, University of Kansas); 56 water molecules were explicitly included in all refinements. Some of these may be involved in the catalytic reaction. We also studied a model of the complex of AdoHcy hydrolase with NAD+, as well as the ternary complexes of the redox reaction catalyzed by AdoHcy hydrolase and has been used to differentiate the relative binding strength of inhibitors.

  6. Characterization of multiple epoxide hydrolase activities in mouse liver nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M

    1986-10-01

    A nuclear envelope-associated epoxide hydrolase in mouse liver that hydrates trans-stilbene oxide has been identified and characterized. This epoxide hydrolase is distinct from the enzyme in nuclear envelopes that hydrates benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide and other arene oxides. This distinction was demonstrated by the criteria of pH optima, response to specific inhibitors in vitro, and precipitation by specific antibodies. The new epoxide hydrolase had a pH optimum of 6.8, was poorly inhibited by trichloropropene oxide, was potently inhibited by 4-phenylchalcone oxide, and did not bind to antiserum against benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide hydrolase. This nuclear enzyme is similar in many of its properties to cytosolic and microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolases and may be nuclear envelope-bound form of these other epoxide hydrolases. It differed from these other trans-stilbene oxide hydrolases in that its affinities for both trans-stilbene oxide (measured as apparent Km) and 4-phenylchalcone oxide (measured as I50) were 4- to 20-fold lower than those of either the cytosolic or microsomal forms.

  7. Expanding the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase Protein Family to the Fungal Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Preiner, Chelsea S.

    2013-01-01

    The known enzymes that open the s-triazine ring, the cyanuric acid hydrolases, have been confined almost exclusively to the kingdom Bacteria and are all homologous members of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase protein family. In the present study, a filamentous fungus, Sarocladium sp. strain CA, was isolated from soil by enrichment culturing using cyanuric acid as the sole source of nitrogen. A reverse-genetic approach identified a fungal cyanuric acid hydrolase gene composed of two exons and one intron. The translated spliced sequence was 39 to 53% identical to previously characterized bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases. The sequence was used to generate a gene optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and encoding an N-terminally histidine-tagged protein. The protein was purified by nickel affinity and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protein was shown by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) to produce carboxybiuret as the product, which spontaneously decarboxylated to yield biuret and carbon dioxide. The protein was very narrow in substrate specificity, showing activity only with cyanuric acid and N-methyl cyanuric acid. Barbituric acid was an inhibitor of enzyme activity. Sequence analysis identified genes with introns in other fungi from the Ascomycota that, if spliced, are predicted to encode proteins with cyanuric acid hydrolase activity. The Ascomycota cyanuric acid hydrolase homologs are most closely related to cyanuric acid hydrolases from Actinobacteria. PMID:24039269

  8. Clinical importance of the drug interaction between statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors: a retrospective cohort study in The Health Improvement Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Christopher G.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Flory, James; Reese, Peter P.; Hennessy, Sean; Lewis, James; Mines, Daniel; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Bilker, Warren; Strom, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the relative hazard of muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, and hepatic dysfunction associated with the drug interaction between statins and concomitant medications that inhibit the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Background Although statins provide important clinical benefits related to mitigating the risk of cardiovascular events, this class of medications also has the potential for severe adverse reactions. The risk for adverse events may be potentiated by concomitant use of medications that interfere with statin metabolism. Methods Data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) from 1990 to 2008 were used to conduct a retrospective cohort study. Cohorts were created to evaluate each outcome (muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, and hepatic dysfunction) independently. Each cohort included new statin initiators and compared the relative hazard of the outcome. The interaction ratio (I*R) was the primary contrast of interest. The I*R represents the relative effect of each statin type (statin 3A4 substrate vs. statin non-3A4 substrate) with a CYP3A4 inhibitor, independent of the effect of the statin type without a CYP3A4 inhibitor. We adjusted for confounding variables using the multinomial propensity score. Results The median follow-up time per cohort was 1.5 years. There were 7889 muscle toxicity events among 362 809 patients and 792 665 person-years. The adjusted muscle toxicity I*R was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.90–1.66). There were 1449 renal dysfunction events among 272,099 patients and 574 584 person-years. The adjusted renal dysfunction I*R was 0.91 (95%CI = 0.58–1.44). There were 1434 hepatic dysfunction events among 367 612 patients and 815 945 person-years. The adjusted hepatic dysfunction I*R was 0.78 (95%CI = 0.45–1.31). Conclusions Overall, this study found no difference in the relative hazard of muscle toxicity, renal dysfunction, or hepatic dysfunction for patients prescribed a statin 3A4 substrate versus a statin non-3A4

  9. Similarities between catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Qato, M; Whalen, R; Glomb, S

    1989-01-01

    Cytosolic epoxide hydrolase, measured as trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase activity, was isolated and purified from human and guinea pig liver cytosol. Antiserum to the guinea pig liver preparation reacted strongly with bovine liver catalase. We determined that this lack of selectivity of the antiserum was due to catalase contamination of the epoxide hydrolase preparation. We also determined that several commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with cytosolic epoxide hydrolase. Our human epoxide hydrolase preparation contained no detectable catalase contamination, yet antiserum to this protein also cross-reacted slightly with catalase, indicating some intrinsic similarity between the two enzymes. We conclude that catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase contain some similar immunogenic epitopes, and we surmise that similarities between the subunits of these two enzymes may lead to their partial copurification. Functional similarities between the two enzymes are also demonstrated, as several compounds that inhibit catalase are also shown to inhibit cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activity in the same concentration range and rank order.

  10. Hydrolysis of the 2',3'-allylic epoxides of allylbenzene, estragole, eugenol, and safrole by both microsomal and cytosolic epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Qato, M K; Guenthner, T M

    1992-01-01

    2',3'-Allylic epoxide derivatives of allylbenzene and its analogs estragole, eugenol, and safrole were synthesized, and their enzymatic conversion to dihydrodiols by cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolases was examined. All four epoxides were good substrates for both epoxide hydrolases, with Michaelis constants in the low micromolar range. Two putatively selective inhibitors of cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolases, trichloropropylene oxide and nordihydroguaiaretic acid, were used to inhibit the hydrolysis of these allylic epoxides. Minimal selectivity toward either hydrolase was seen with either inhibitor, suggesting that the "selectivity" of these inhibitors is highly substrate-dependent. The susceptibilities of these epoxides to rapid hydrolysis by both epoxide hydrolases may explain their low genotoxic potencies in vivo.

  11. SPF-5506-A4, a new peptaibol inhibitor of amyloid beta-peptide formation produced by Trichoderma sp.

    PubMed

    Hosotani, Nobuo; Kumagai, Kazuo; Honda, Shigeyuki; Ito, Akira; Shimatani, Takuro; Saji, Ikutaro

    2007-03-01

    A new peptaibol compound, SPF-5506-A4, was isolated from the fermentation broth of Trichoderma sp. SPF-5506. The chemical structure of the 14-residue peptide was determined by MS, NMR and amino acid sequence analyses. The absolute configuration of amino acid residues in the acid hydrolysate was determined by Marfey's method. The structure of SPF-5506-A4 was established as Ac-Aib-L-Asn-L-Ile-Aib-L-Pro-L-Ser-L-Ile-Aib-L-Pro-L-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-L-Pro-L-leucinol. The compound inhibited amyloid beta-peptide formation in primary guinea pig cerebral cortex neuron cell culture dose-dependently with an IC50 of 0.1 microg/ml. Cytotoxicity was not observed at concentrations of <3 microg/ml.

  12. Cell Cycle Regulation of Smooth Muscle Cells--Searching for Inhibitors of Neointima Formation: Is Combretastatin A4 an Alternative to Sirolimus and Paclitaxel?

    PubMed

    Spira, Daniel; Grözinger, Gerd; Domschke, Nicole; Bantleon, Rüdiger; Schmehl, Jörg; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Wiesinger, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    To compare the effects of sirolimus, paclitaxel, and combretastatin A4 (CA4) on regulatory proteins of the cell cycle in proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Human aortic SMCs were treated with sirolimus, paclitaxel, and CA4 at 5 × 10(-9) mol/L. After 1 day, half of the cells were harvested (DAY1 group). The treatment medium of the other half was replaced with culture medium on day 4, and those cells were harvested on day 5 (DAY5 group). Cyclins D1, D2, E, and A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16, p21, and p27 were detected by Western blot technique. Quantification was performed by scanning densitometry of the specific bands. In the DAY1 group, treatment with sirolimus resulted in decreased intracellular levels of cyclins D2 and A (P < .05). Increased D cyclins and reduced levels of cyclins E and A (P < .05) in the DAY5 group indicated a permanent G1/S block by sirolimus. Paclitaxel led to only slight alterations of cyclin and CDK inhibitor expression (P > .05). In the DAY1 group, CA4 decreased intracellular levels of cyclins D2, E, and A (P < .05). Despite recovery effects in the DAY5 group (increase of cyclins D1, D2, and A compared with DAY1 group; P < .05), the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p21, increased D cyclins, and decreased cyclins E and A (P < .05) are compatible with a G1 arrest. CA4 is a stronger inhibitor of the SMC cycle than sirolimus or paclitaxel and may represent an alternative for drug-eluting stents in atherosclerotic luminal stenosis. The effect of CA4 on neointima formation should be evaluated further. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Itraconazole, a P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 inhibitor, markedly raises the plasma concentrations and enhances the renin-inhibiting effect of aliskiren.

    PubMed

    Tapaninen, Tuija; Backman, Janne T; Kurkinen, Kaisa J; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Niemi, Mikko

    2011-03-01

    In a randomized crossover study, 11 healthy volunteers took 100 mg (first dose 200 mg) of the antifungal drug itraconazole, a P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 inhibitor, or placebo twice daily for 5 days. On day 3, they ingested a single 150-mg dose of aliskiren, a renin inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension. Itraconazole raised the peak plasma aliskiren concentration 5.8-fold (range, 1.1- to 24.3-fold; P < .001) and the area under the plasma aliskiren concentration-time curve 6.5-fold (range, 2.6- to 20.5-fold; P < .001) but had no significant effect on aliskiren elimination half-life. Itraconazole increased the amount of aliskiren excreted into the urine during 12 hours 8.0-fold (P < .001) and its renal clearance 1.2-fold (P = .042). Plasma renin activity 24 hours after aliskiren intake was 68% lower during the itraconazole phase than during the placebo phase (P = .011). In conclusion, itraconazole markedly raises the plasma concentrations and enhances the renin-inhibiting effect of aliskiren. The interaction is probably mainly explained by inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux of aliskiren in the small intestine, with a minor contribution from inhibition of CYP3A4. Concomitant use of aliskiren and itraconazole is best avoided.

  14. Effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in rats: Possible role of P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibition by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Ki; Choi, Jun-Shik; Choi, Dong-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in rats. We determined the pharmacokinetic parameters of nifedipine and dehydronifedipine in rats after oral and intravenous administration of nifedipine without and with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. We evaluated the effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on the activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4. Atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin inhibited CYP3A4 activities; inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were 47.0, 5.2, 15.0 and 3.3 μM, respectively. Simvastatin and fluvastatin increased the cellular uptake of rhodamine-123. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) and the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) of oral nifedipine were significantly increased by fluvastatin and simvastatin, respectively, compared to control group. The total body clearance (CL/F) of nifedipine after oral administration with fluvastatin and simvastatin were significantly decreased compared to those of control. The metabolite-parent AUC ratio (MR) of nifedipine with fluvastatin and simvastatin were significantly decreased, which suggested that fluvastatin and simvastatin inhibited metabolism of nifedipine, respectively. The AUC0-∞ of intravenouse nifedipine with fluvastatin and simvastatin was significantly higher than that of the control group. The increased bioavailability of nifedipine may be mainly due to inhibition of both P-gp in the small intestine and CYP3A subfamily-mediated metabolism of nifedipine in the small intestine and/or in the liver and to the reduction of the CL/F of nifedipine by fluvastatin and simvastatin. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its main metabolite EXP-3174 in rats: possible role of CYP3A4 and P-gp inhibition by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Hyung; Choi, Jun-Shik; Choi, Dong-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (atorvastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin) on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its active metabolite EXP-3174 in rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters of losartan and EXP-3174 in rats were determined after oral and intravenous administration of losartan (9 mg/kg) without and with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (1 mg/kg). The effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on P-gp and cytochrome (CYP) 3A4 activity were also evaluated. Atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin inhibited CYP3A4 activities with IC₅₀ values of 48.0, 14.1 and 3.10 μmol/l, respectively. Simvastatin (1-10 μmol/l) enhanced the cellular uptake of rhodamine-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC₀₋∞) and the peak plasma concentration of losartan were significantly (p < 0.05) increased by 59.6 and 45.8%, respectively, by simvastatin compared to those of control. The total body clearance (CL/F) of losartan after oral administration with simvastatin was significantly decreased (by 34.8%) compared to that of controls. Consequently, the absolute bioavailability (F) of losartan after oral administration with simvastatin was significantly increased by 59.4% compared to that of control. The metabolite-parent AUC ratio was significantly decreased by 25.7%, suggesting that metabolism of losartan was inhibited by simvastatin. In conclusion, the enhanced bioavailability of losartan might be mainly due to inhibition of P-gp in the small intestine and CYP3A subfamily-mediated metabolism of losartan in the small intestine and/or liver and to reduction of the CL/F of losartan by simvastatin.

  16. Uncleaved BAP31 in association with A4 protein at the endoplasmic reticulum is an inhibitor of Fas-initiated release of cytochrome c from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Stojanovic, Marina; Clemons, Paul A; Kuppig, Stephan; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-04-18

    BAP31 is a polytopic integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and, like BID, is a preferred substrate of caspase-8. Upon Fas/CD95 stimulation, BAP31 is cleaved within its cytosolic domain, generating proapoptotic p20 BAP31. In human KB epithelial cells expressing the caspase-resistant mutant crBAP31, Fas stimulation resulted in cleavage of BID and insertion of BAX into mitochondrial membrane, but subsequent oligomerization of BAX and BAK, egress of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and apoptosis were impaired. Bap31-null mouse cells expressing crBAP31 cannot generate the endogenous p20 BAP31 cleavage product, yet crBAP31 conferred resistance to cellular condensation and cytochrome c release in response to activation of ectopic FKBPcasp8 by FK1012z. Full-length BAP31, therefore, is a direct inhibitor of these caspase-8-initiated events, acting independently of its ability to sequester p20, with which it interacts. Employing a novel split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen for BAP31-interacting membrane proteins, the putative ion channel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, A4, was detected and identified as a constitutive binding partner of BAP31 in human cells. Ectopic A4 that was introduced into A4-deficient cells cooperated with crBAP31 to resist Fas-induced egress of cytochrome c from mitochondria and cytoplasmic apoptosis.

  17. BW A4C and other hydroxamic acids are potent inhibitors of linoleic acid 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    PubMed

    Brodowsky, I D; Hamberg, M; Oliw, E H

    1994-03-11

    Linoleic acid is converted to 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid by the soluble 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis. Effects of different lipoxygenase inhibitors on the 8R-dioxygenase were evaluated. Three hydroxamic acid derivatives were investigated. BW A4C (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)acetohydroxamic acid) was the most potent with an IC50 of 0.2 microM, followed by zileuton (3-10 microM) and linoleate-hydroxamic acid (0.02 mM). Two other lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and eicosatetraynoic acid, were less potent (IC50 0.09 and 0.15 mM, respectively). The 8R-dioxygenase was also strongly inhibited by commonly used buffer additives, dithiothreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. G. graminis also contains a hydroperoxide isomerase, which converts 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid to 7S,8S-dihydroxylinoleic acid. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration indicated that the dioxygenase and the hydroperoxide isomerase activities could be separated.

  18. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationships of tri- and tetrasubstituted olefins related to isocombretastatin A-4 as new tubulin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Jessy; Brachet, Etienne; Hamze, Abdallah; Peyrat, Jean-François; Bernadat, Guillaume; Morvan, Estelle; Bignon, Jérôme; Wdzieczak-Bakala, Joanna; Desravines, Déborah; Dubois, Joelle; Tueni, Marie; Yassine, Ahmad; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Alami, Mouad

    2013-01-21

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships associated with a series of 1,1-diarylethylene tubulin polymerization inhibitors 3 and 4 are described. The key step for their preparation involves a palladium-catalyzed coupling of N-arylsulfonylhydrazones with aryl halides, thus providing flexible and convergent access to tri- and tetrasubstituted 1,1-diarylolefins 3 and 4 related to isocombretastatin A-4 (isoCA-4). These compounds have been evaluated for tubulin polymerization inhibitory activity as well as for cytotoxic activity. The most potent compounds are 1,1-diaryl-2-methoxyethylenes 4b, 4d and 4e having a trisubstituted double bond. They exhibited good antiproliferative activity against various human cancer cell lines (GI(50) = 8-80 nM). Compounds 4b and 4e strongly inhibited tubulin polymerization with IC(50) values of 2 and 3 μM, respectively, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G(2)/M phase in the K562 cell line. Docking studies in the colchicine binding site of tubulin allowed identification of residues most likely to interact with these inhibitors and explain their potent anti-tubulin activity.

  19. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: I. Spectral data-activity relationship and structure-activity relationship models for inhibitors and non-inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Brooks; Tie, Yunfeng; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Valerio, Luis G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fowler, Bruce A; Demchuk, Eugene; Beger, Richard D

    2012-03-15

    An interagency collaboration was established to model chemical interactions that may cause adverse health effects when an exposure to a mixture of chemicals occurs. Many of these chemicals--drugs, pesticides, and environmental pollutants--interact at the level of metabolic biotransformations mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In the present work, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches were used to develop machine-learning classifiers of inhibitors and non-inhibitors of the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes. The models were built upon 602 reference pharmaceutical compounds whose interactions have been deduced from clinical data, and 100 additional chemicals that were used to evaluate model performance in an external validation (EV) test. SDAR is an innovative modeling approach that relies on discriminant analysis applied to binned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral descriptors. In the present work, both 1D ¹³C and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectra were used together in a novel implementation of the SDAR technique. It was found that increasing the binning size of 1D ¹³C-NMR and ¹⁵N-NMR spectra caused an increase in the tenfold cross-validation (CV) performance in terms of both the rate of correct classification and sensitivity. The results of SDAR modeling were verified using SAR. For SAR modeling, a decision forest approach involving from 6 to 17 Mold2 descriptors in a tree was used. Average rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in a hundred CV tests were 60% and 61% for CYP3A4, and 62% and 70% for CYP2D6, respectively. The rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in the EV test were 73% and 86% for CYP3A4, and 76% and 90% for CYP2D6, respectively. Thus, both SDAR and SAR methods demonstrated a comparable performance in modeling a large set of structurally diverse data. Based on unique NMR structural descriptors, the new SDAR modeling method complements the existing SAR

  20. Combretastatin A-4 Analogue: A Dual-Targeting and Tubulin Inhibitor Containing Antitumor Pt(IV) Moiety with a Unique Mode of Action.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaochao; Huang, Rizhen; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Zhimei; Liao, Zhixin; Wang, Hengshan

    2016-09-21

    Three new Pt(IV) complexes comprising a combretastatin A-4 analogue were designed and synthesized. The resulting antitumor Pt(IV) complexes could significantly improve the antiproliferative activity and overcome the drug resistance of cisplatin in vitro. Interestingly, these novel compounds not only can carry the DNA binding Pt(II) warhead into the cancer cells but also have a small molecule fragment that can inhibit tubulin polymerization. Among them, complex 13, which was attached to an inhibitor of tubulin at one axial position of Pt(IV) octahedral coordination sphere, could effectively enter cancer cells, arrest the cell cycle in HepG-2 cancer cells at G2/M phases, and induce activation of caspases triggering apoptotic signaling via the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathways. Moreover, complex 13 has the ability to effectively inhibit the tumor growth in the HepG-2 xenograft model without causing significant loss of animal body weight in comparison with cisplatin.

  1. Identification of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors with no evidence of CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition and improved aqueous solubility.

    PubMed

    Zak, Mark; Liederer, Bianca M; Sampath, Deepak; Yuen, Po-Wai; Bair, Kenneth W; Baumeister, Timm; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Clodfelter, Karl H; Cheng, Eric; Crocker, Lisa; Fu, Bang; Han, Bingsong; Li, Guangkun; Ho, Yen-Ching; Lin, Jian; Liu, Xiongcai; Ly, Justin; O'Brien, Thomas; Reynolds, Dominic J; Skelton, Nicholas; Smith, Chase C; Tay, Suzanne; Wang, Weiru; Wang, Zhongguo; Xiao, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Guiling; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Dragovich, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    Herein we report the optimization efforts to ameliorate the potent CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and low aqueous solubility exhibited by a previously identified lead compound from our NAMPT inhibitor program (1, GNE-617). Metabolite identification studies pinpointed the imidazopyridine moiety present in 1 as the likely source of the TDI signal, and replacement with other bicyclic systems was found to reduce or eliminate the TDI finding. A strategy of reducing the number of aromatic rings and/or lowering cLogD7.4 was then employed to significantly improve aqueous solubility. These efforts culminated in the discovery of 42, a compound with no evidence of TDI, improved aqueous solubility, and robust efficacy in tumor xenograft studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibiting an epoxide hydrolase virulence strategy protects CFTR**

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Christopher D.; Hvorecny, Kelli L.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, Cif's mechanism of action has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. Here, we show that Cif's hydrolase activity is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. We also uncover a small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system. Our results provide a basis for targeting Cif's distinctive virulence chemistry and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  3. Polymorphism of rs3813034 in Serotonin Transporter Gene SLC6A4 Is Associated With the Selective Serotonin and Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor Response in Depressive Disorder: Sequencing Analysis of SLC6A4.

    PubMed

    Nonen, Shinpei; Kato, Masaki; Takekita, Yoshiteru; Wakeno, Masataka; Sakai, Shiho; Serretti, Alessandro; Kinoshita, Toshihiko

    2016-02-01

    Selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SNRI) are commonly used for treating major depression. Regretfully, significant heterogeneity exists regarding the benefits of SSRI/SNRI in individual cases. We previously reported that a polymorphism located in the serotonin transporter linked promoter region (5-HTT LPR) is associated with an interindividual difference in SSRI treatment efficacy. However, this explains only a small part of the variation of this complex phenotype. Other 5-HTT variants in the coding regions, 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), and introns adjacent to each exon could also contribute to treatment response. Therefore, we performed a sequencing analysis of the SLC6A4 gene (coding for 5-HTT) and investigated the association between variants detected in this study and the antidepressant response to SSRI/SNRI in 201 Japanese depressive patients. Seventeen novel mutations were identified by sequencing analysis. We found that the polymorphism G2563T (rs3813034) as a tag single-nucleotide polymorphism of IVS9 A-90G (rs140701), G2356T (rs1042173), and A3641C (rs7224199) is associated with interindividual variability of SSRI/SNRI efficacy at week 6, independent from clinical variables and effect of 5-HTT LPR (P < 0.001 by multiple regression analysis). This polymorphism could help determine individualized SSRI/SNRI treatments for depressive patients in combination with 5-HTT LPR.

  4. Synthesis, evaluation, and mechanism of N,N,N-trimethyl-D-glucosamine-(1→4)-chitooligosaccharides as selective inhibitors of glycosyl hydrolase family 20 β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Yang, You; Liu, Tian; Yang, Yongliang; Wu, Qingyue; Yang, Qing; Yu, Biao

    2011-02-11

    GH20 β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases are enzymes involved in many vital processes. Inhibitors that specifically target GH20 enzymes in pests are of agricultural and economic importance. Structural comparison has revealed that the bacterial chitindegrading β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases each have an extra +1 subsite in the active site; this structural difference could be exploited for the development of selective inhibitors. N,N,Ntrimethyl-D-glucosamine (TMG)-chitotriomycin, which contains three GlcNAc residues, is a natural selective inhibitor against bacterial and insect β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases. However, our structural alignment analysis indicated that the two GlcNAc residues at the reducing end might be unnecessary. To prove this hypothesis, we designed and synthesized a series of TMG-chitotriomycin analogues containing one to four GlcNAc units. Inhibitory kinetics and molecular docking showed that TMG-(GlcNAc)(2), is as active as TMG-chitotriomycin [TMG-(GlcNAc)(3)]. The selective inhibition mechanism of TMG-chitotriomycin was also explained.

  5. Binary and ternary combinations of anti-HIV protease inhibitors: effect on gene expression and functional activity of CYP3A4 and efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Khurana, Varun; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify the effect of binary and ternary combinations of anti-HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) on the expression of metabolizing enzyme (CYP3A4) and efflux transporters [multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP)] in a model intestinal cell line (LS-180). Methods LS-180 cells were treated with various combinations of PIs (amprenavir, indinavir, saquinavir and lopinavir), and the mRNA expression levels of metabolizing enzyme and efflux transporters were measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The alteration of gene expression was further correlated to the expression of nuclear hormone receptor PXR. Uptake of fluorescent and radioactive substrates was carried out to study the functional activity of these proteins. Cytotoxicity and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assays were carried out to measure stress responses. Results Binary and ternary combinations of PIs appeared to modulate the expression of CYP3A4, MRP2, P-gp and BCRP in a considerable manner. Unlike the individual PIs, their binary combinations showed much greater induction of metabolizing enzyme and efflux proteins. However, such pronounced induction was not observed in the presence of ternary combinations. The observed trend of altered mRNA expression was found to correlate well with the change in expression levels of PXR. The gene expression was found to correlate with activity assays. Lack of cytotoxicity and ATP activity was observed in the treatment samples, suggesting that these alterations in expression levels were probably not stress responses. Conclusions In the present study, we demonstrated that combinations of drugs can have serious consequences toward the treatment of HIV infection by altering their bioavailability and disposition. PMID:24399676

  6. Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promoter genotype (SLC6A4) influence executive functions at 6 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Weikum, Whitney M.; Brain, Ursula; Chau, Cecil M. Y.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Diamond, Adele; Oberlander, Tim F.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants and maternal depression may affect prefrontal cognitive skills (executive functions; EFs) including self-control, working memory and cognitive flexibility. We examined long-term effects of prenatal SRI exposure on EFs to determine whether effects are moderated by maternal mood and/or genetic variations in SLC6A4 (a gene that codes for the serotonin transporter [5-HTT] central to the regulation of synaptic serotonin levels and behavior). Children who were exposed to SRIs prenatally (SRI-exposed N = 26) and non-exposed (N = 38) were studied at age 6 years (M = 6.3; SD = 0.5) using the Hearts & Flowers task (H&F) to assess EFs. Maternal mood was measured during pregnancy (3rd trimester) and when the child was age 6 years (Hamilton Depression Scale). Parent reports of child behavior were also obtained (MacArthur Health & Behavior Questionnaire). Parents of prenatally SRI-exposed children reported fewer child externalizing and inattentive (ADHD) behaviors. Generalized estimate equation modeling showed a significant 3-way interaction between prenatal SRI exposure, SLC6A4 variant, and maternal mood at the 6-year time-point on H&F accuracy. For prenatally SRI-exposed children, regardless of maternal mood, the H&F accuracy of children with reduced 5HTT expression (a short [S] allele) remained stable. Even with increasing maternal depressive symptoms (though all below clinical threshold), EFs of children with at least one short allele were comparable to children with the same genotype whose mothers reported few if any depressive symptoms—in this sense they showed resilience. Children with two long (L) alleles were more sensitive to context. When their mothers had few depressive symptoms, LL children showed extremely good EF performance—better than any other group. When their mothers reported more depressive symptoms, LL children's EF performance was worse than that of any other group. In the face of

  7. Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promoter genotype (SLC6A4) influence executive functions at 6 years of age.

    PubMed

    Weikum, Whitney M; Brain, Ursula; Chau, Cecil M Y; Grunau, Ruth E; Boyce, W Thomas; Diamond, Adele; Oberlander, Tim F

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants and maternal depression may affect prefrontal cognitive skills (executive functions; EFs) including self-control, working memory and cognitive flexibility. We examined long-term effects of prenatal SRI exposure on EFs to determine whether effects are moderated by maternal mood and/or genetic variations in SLC6A4 (a gene that codes for the serotonin transporter [5-HTT] central to the regulation of synaptic serotonin levels and behavior). Children who were exposed to SRIs prenatally (SRI-exposed N = 26) and non-exposed (N = 38) were studied at age 6 years (M = 6.3; SD = 0.5) using the Hearts & Flowers task (H&F) to assess EFs. Maternal mood was measured during pregnancy (3rd trimester) and when the child was age 6 years (Hamilton Depression Scale). Parent reports of child behavior were also obtained (MacArthur Health & Behavior Questionnaire). Parents of prenatally SRI-exposed children reported fewer child externalizing and inattentive (ADHD) behaviors. Generalized estimate equation modeling showed a significant 3-way interaction between prenatal SRI exposure, SLC6A4 variant, and maternal mood at the 6-year time-point on H&F accuracy. For prenatally SRI-exposed children, regardless of maternal mood, the H&F accuracy of children with reduced 5HTT expression (a short [S] allele) remained stable. Even with increasing maternal depressive symptoms (though all below clinical threshold), EFs of children with at least one short allele were comparable to children with the same genotype whose mothers reported few if any depressive symptoms-in this sense they showed resilience. Children with two long (L) alleles were more sensitive to context. When their mothers had few depressive symptoms, LL children showed extremely good EF performance-better than any other group. When their mothers reported more depressive symptoms, LL children's EF performance was worse than that of any other group. In the face of a

  8. Curcuminoids inhibit multiple human cytochromes P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes, while piperine is a relatively selective CYP3A4 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Volak, Laurie P.; Ghirmai, Senait; Cashman, John R.; Court, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Curcuminoid extract and piperine are being evaluated for beneficial effects in Alzheimer’s disease, among other intractable disorders. Consequently, we studied the potential for herb-drug interactions involving cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes. The curcuminoid extract inhibited SULT > CYP2C19 > CYP2B6 > UGT > CYP2C9 > CYP3A activities with IC50 values ranging from 0.99 ± 0.04 to 25.3 ± 1.3 μM, while CYP2D6, CYP1A2, and CYP2E1 activities were less affected (IC50 values >60 μM). Inhibition of CYP3A activity by curcuminoid extract was consistent with competitive inhibition (Ki = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM), while inhibition of both CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 activities were consistent with mixed competitive-noncompetitive inhibition (10.6 ± 1.1 μM and 7.8 ± 0.9 μM, respectively). Piperine was a relatively selective noncompetitive inhibitor of CYP3A (IC50 5.5 ± 0.7 μM, Ki = 5.4 ± 0.3 μM) with less effect on other enzymes evaluated (IC50 >29 μM). Curcuminoid extract and piperine inhibited recombinant CYP3A4 much more potently (by >5-fold) than CYP3A5. Pure synthetic curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin) were also evaluated for their effects on CYP3A, CYP2C9, UGT, and SULT activities. All three curcuminoids had similar effects on CYP3A, UGT, and SULT activity, but demethoxycurcumin (IC50 = 8.8 ± 1.2 μM) was more active against CYP2C9 than either curcumin or bisdemethoxycurcumin (IC50 >50 μM). Based on these data and expected tissue concentrations of inhibitors, we predict that an orally administered curcuminoid/piperine combination is most likely to inhibit CYP3A, CYP2C9, UGT, and SULT metabolism within the intestinal mucosa. PMID:18480186

  9. Epoxide hydrolase activities and epoxy fatty acids in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Mamatha, Dadala M.

    2015-01-01

    Culex mosquitoes have emerged as important model organisms for mosquito biology, and are disease vectors for multiple mosquito-borne pathogens, including West Nile virus. We characterized epoxide hydrolase activities in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, which suggested multiple forms of epoxide hydrolases were present. We found EH activities on epoxy eicosatrienoic acids (EETs). EETs and other eicosanoids are well-established lipid signaling molecules in vertebrates. We showed EETs can be synthesized in vitro from arachidonic acids by mosquito lysate, and EETs were also detected in vivo both in larvae and adult mosquitoes by LC-MS/MS. The EH activities on EETs can be induced by blood feeding, and the highest activity was observed in the midgut of female mosquitoes. The enzyme activities on EETs can be inhibited by urea-based inhibitors designed for mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases (sEH). The sEH inhibitors have been shown to play diverse biological roles in mammalian systems, and they can be useful tools to study the function of EETs in mosquitoes. Besides juvenile hormone metabolism and detoxification, insect epoxide hydrolases may also play a role in regulating lipid signaling molecules, such as EETs and other epoxy fatty acids, synthesized in vivo or obtained from blood feeding by female mosquitoes. PMID:25686802

  10. Distinct rat hepatic microsomal epoxide hydrolases catalyze the hydration of cholesterol 5,6 alpha-oxide and certain xenobiotic alkene and arene oxides.

    PubMed

    Levin, W; Michaud, D P; Thomas, P E; Jerina, D M

    1983-02-01

    Metabolism of cholesterol 5,6 alpha-oxide to the 5,6-glycol is catalyzed by a rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase that is distinct from the microsomal epoxide hydrolase that metabolizes a wide range of xenobiotic alkene and arene oxides. The two enzymes are antigenically distinct, and the purified microsomal epoxide hydrolase that metabolizes xenobiotic oxides does not catalyze the hydration of cholesterol 5,6 alpha-oxide. In vivo treatment of rats with inducers of microsomal epoxide hydrolase does not enhance the activity of cholesterol 5,6 alpha-oxide hydrolase and, in some cases, actually depresses enzyme activity in the resultant microsomal preparations. Octene 1,2-oxide and benz[a]anthracene 5,6-oxide, both good substrates for xenobiotic epoxide hydrolase, are not competitive inhibitors of cholesterol oxide hydration by rat liver microsomes. The above results establish the existence of a liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase that is under different regulatory control and that appears to have a different substrate specificity than the well-characterized microsomal epoxide hydrolase involved in the metabolism of a widely diverse group of alkene and arene oxides.

  11. Molecular characterization of aspartylglucosaminidase, a lysosomal hydrolase upregulated during strobilation in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Natsumi; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroki; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuniyoshi, Hisato

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, alternates between a benthic asexual polyp stage and a planktonic sexual medusa (jellyfish) stage. Transition from polyp to medusa is called strobilation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of strobilation, we screened for genes that are upregulated during strobilation using the differential display method and we identified aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), which encodes a lysosomal hydrolase. Similar to AGAs from other species, Aurelia AGA possessed an N-terminal signal peptide and potential N-glycosylation sites. The genomic region of Aurelia AGA was approximately 9.8 kb in length and contained 12 exons and 11 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that AGA expression increased during strobilation, and was then decreased in medusae. To inhibit AGA function, we administered the lysosomal acidification inhibitors, chloroquine or bafilomycin A1, to animals during strobilation. Both inhibitors disturbed medusa morphogenesis at the oral end, suggesting involvement of lysosomal hydrolases in strobilation.

  12. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: II. Molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship, and structure-activity relationship models for potent and weak inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Tie, Yunfeng; McPhail, Brooks; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Fowler, Bruce A; Beger, Richard D; Demchuk, Eugene

    2012-03-15

    Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR), and structure-activity relationship (SAR) models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2-3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D ¹³C-NMR and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors and 88 weak

  13. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  14. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  15. Hydrolase-like properties of a cofactor-independent dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Thierbach, Sven; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Dreiling, Alena; Hennecke, Ulrich; König, Simone; Fetzner, Susanne

    2012-05-29

    Mechanistic promiscuity: The (2-alkyl)-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone-cleaving dioxygenase Hod has an α/β-hydrolase fold and a Ser/His/Asp triad in its active site. Isatoic anhydride, a suicide substrate of serine hydrolases, inactivates Hod by covalent modification of the active-site serine, thus indicating that the α/β-hydrolase fold can accommodate dioxygenase chemistry without completely abandoning hydrolase-like properties.

  16. Structure and function of polyglycine hydrolases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyglycine hydrolases (PGH)s are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave polyglycine linkers of targeted plant defense chitinases. Unlike typical endoproteases that cleave a specific peptide bond, these 640 amino acid glycoproteins selectively cleave one of multiple peptide bonds within polyglyci...

  17. Small-molecule APOBEC3G DNA cytosine deaminase inhibitors based on a 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold.

    PubMed

    Olson, Margaret E; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions in innate immunity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Although A3G can potently restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1 replication by catalyzing excessive levels of G→A hypermutation, sublethal levels of A3G-catalyzed mutation may contribute to the high level of HIV-1 fitness and its incurable prognosis. To chemically modulate A3G catalytic activity with the goal of decreasing the HIV-1 genomic mutation rate, we synthesized and biochemically evaluated a class of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol small-molecule inhibitors identified by high-throughput screening. This class of compounds exhibits low-micromolar (3.9-8.2 μM) inhibitory potency and remarkable specificity for A3G versus the related cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3A. Chemical modification of inhibitors, A3G mutational screening, and thiol reactivity studies implicate C321, a residue proximal to the active site, as the critical A3G target for this class of molecules.

  18. Recognition of Corn Defense Chitinases by Fungal Polyglycine Hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Todd A; Bakota, Erica L; Price, Neil P J

    2017-04-06

    Polyglycine hydrolases (PGH)s are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave peptide bonds in the polyglycine interdomain linker of ChitA chitinase, an antifungal protein from domesticated corn (Zea mays ssp. mays). These target-specific endoproteases are unusual because they do not cut a specific peptide bond but select one of many Gly-Gly bonds within the polyglycine region. Some Gly-Gly bonds are cleaved frequently while others are never cleaved. Moreover, we have previously shown that PGHs from different fungal pathogens prefer to cleave different Gly-Gly peptide bonds. It is not understood how PGHs selectively cleave the ChitA linker, especially because its polyglycine structure lacks peptide sidechains. To gain insights into this process we synthesized several peptide analogs of ChitA to evaluate them as potential substrates and inhibitors of Es-cmp, a PGH from the plant pathogenic fungus Epicoccum sorghi. Our results showed that part of the PGH recognition site for substrate chitinases is adjacent to the polyglycine linker on the carboxy side. More specifically, four amino acid residues were implicated, each spaced four residues apart on an alpha helix. Moreover, analogous peptides with selective Gly->sarcosine (N-methylglycine) mutations or a specific Ser->Thr mutation retained inhibitor activity but were no longer cleaved by PGH. Additonally, our findings suggest that peptide analogs of ChitA that inhibit PGH activity could be used to strengthen plant defenses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Dienelactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain B13.

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, K L; Schlömann, M; Knackmuss, H J; Ornston, L N

    1987-01-01

    Dienelactone hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.45) catalyzes the conversion of cis- or trans-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide (dienelactone) to maleylacetate. An approximately 24-fold purification from extracts of 3-chlorobenzoate-grown Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 yielded a homogeneous preparation of the enzyme. The purified enzyme crystallized readily and proved to be a monomer with a molecular weight of about 30,000. Each dienelactone hydrolase molecule contains two cysteinyl side chains. One of these was readily titrated by stoichiometric amounts of p-chloromercuribenzoate, resulting in inactivation of the enzyme; the inactivation could be reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol. The other cysteinyl side chain appeared to be protected in the native protein against chemical reaction with p-chloromercuribenzoate. The properties of sulfhydryl side chains in dienelactone hydrolase resembled those that have been characterized for bacterial 4-carboxymethylbut-3-en-4-olide (enol-lactone) hydrolases (EC 3.1.1.24), which also are monomers with molecular weights of about 30,000. The amino acid composition of the dienelactone hydrolase resembled the amino acid composition of enol-lactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas putida, and alignment of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the dienelactone hydrolase with the corresponding sequence of an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus enol-lactone hydrolase revealed sequence identity at 8 of the 28 positions. These observations foster the hypothesis that the lactone hydrolases share a common ancestor. The lactone hydrolases differed in one significant property: the kcat of dienelactone hydrolase was 1,800 min-1, an order of magnitude below the kcat observed with enol-lactone hydrolases. The relatively low catalytic activity of dienelactone hydrolase may demand its production at the high levels observed for induced cultures of Pseudomonas sp. strain B13. PMID:3804973

  20. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  2. Inhibition of Xenobiotic-Degrading Hydrolases by Organophosphinates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    carboxylester hydrolases and pancreatic proteinases (3). The choice of organophosphinate candidates for pretreatment agents should be made with these factors...M 4 Q r 000 44 Table 11. Purification of arylester hydrolase Specific Total Total Activity Volume Activity Proteina (Umoles/ Purifi- Fraction (mL...reaction products after the racemic mixture was exposed to arylester hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.2) or proteinases ; chiral-phase capillary gas-liquid

  3. Efficacy of the If current inhibitor ivabradine in patients with chronic stable angina receiving beta-blocker therapy: a 4-month, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Jean-Claude; Ponikowski, Piotr; Kahan, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the anti-anginal and anti-ischaemic efficacy of the selective If current inhibitor ivabradine in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris receiving beta-blocker therapy. Methods and results In this double-blinded trial, 889 patients with stable angina receiving atenolol 50 mg/day were randomized to receive ivabradine 5 mg b.i.d. for 2 months, increased to 7.5 mg b.i.d. for a further 2 months, or placebo. Patients underwent treadmill exercise tests at the trough of drug activity using the standard Bruce protocol for randomization and at 2 and 4 months. Total exercise duration at 4 months increased by 24.3 ± 65.3 s in the ivabradine group, compared with 7.7 ± 63.8 s with placebo (P < 0.001). Ivabradine was superior to placebo for all exercise test criteria at 4 months (P < 0.001 for all) and 2 months (P-values between <0.001 and 0.018). Ivabradine in combination with atenolol was well tolerated. Only 1.1% of patients withdrew owing to sinus bradycardia in the ivabradine group. Conclusion The combination of ivabradine 7.5 mg b.i.d. and atenolol at the commonly used dosage in clinical practice in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris produced additional efficacy with no untoward effect on safety or tolerability. PMID:19136486

  4. Studies of CDK 8/19 inhibitors: Discovery of novel and selective CDK8/19 dual inhibitors and elimination of their CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition potential.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Jun; Hirayama, Takaharu; Hirata, Yasuhiro; Hikichi, Yukiko; Murai, Saomi; Hasegawa, Maki; Hasegawa, Yuka; Yonemori, Kazuko; Hata, Akito; Aoyama, Kazunobu; Cary, Douglas R

    2017-03-30

    In this article, synthetic studies around a pyridylacrylamide-based hit compound (1), utilizing structure-based drug design guided by CDK8 docking models, is discussed. Modification of the pendant 4-fluorophenyl group to various heteroaromatic rings was conducted aiming an interaction with the proximal amino acids, and then replacement of the morpholine ring was targeted for decreasing potential of time-dependent CYP3A4 inhibition. These efforts led to the compound 4k, with enhanced CDK8 inhibitory activity and no apparent potential for time-dependent CYP3A4 inhibition (CDK8 IC50: 2.5nM; CYP3A4 TDI: 99% compound remaining). Compound 4k was found to possess a highly selective kinase inhibition profile, and also showed favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Oral administration of 4k (15mg/kg, bid. for 2weeks) suppressed tumor growth (T/C 29%) in an RPMI8226 mouse xenograft model.

  5. Expression and characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae with high activity on epoxy fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In insects, epoxide hydrolases (EHs) play critical roles in the metabolism of xenobiotic epoxides from the food resources and in the regulation of endogenous chemical mediators, such as juvenile hormones. Using the baculovirus expression system, we expressed and characterized an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae (AgEH) that is distinct in evolutionary history from insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases (JHEHs). We partially purified the enzyme by ion exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The experimentally determined molecular weight and pI were estimated to be 35kD and 6.3 respectively, different than the theoretical ones. The AgEH had the greatest activity on long chain epoxy fatty acids such as 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (14,15-EET) and 9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acids (9,10-EpOME or leukotoxin) among the substrates evaluated. Juvenile hormone III, a terpenoid insect growth regulator, was the next best substrate tested. The AgEH showed kinetics comparable to the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases, and the activity could be inhibited by AUDA [12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid], a urea-based inhibitor designed to inhibit the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases. The rabbit serum generated against the soluble epoxide hydrolase of Mus musculus can both cross-react with natural and denatured forms of the AgEH, suggesting immunologically they are similar. The study suggests there are mammalian sEH homologs in insects, and epoxy fatty acids may be important chemical mediators in insects. PMID:25173592

  6. In silico prediction of cytochrome P450 2D6 and 3A4 inhibition using Gaussian kernel weighted k-nearest neighbor and extended connectivity fingerprints, including structural fragment analysis of inhibitors versus noninhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Berith F; Vind, Christian; Padkjaer, Søren B; Brockhoff, Per B; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2007-02-08

    Inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes is unwanted because of the risk of severe side effects due to drug-drug interactions. We present two in silico Gaussian kernel weighted k-nearest neighbor models based on extended connectivity fingerprints that classify CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition. Data used for modeling consisted of diverse sets of 1153 and 1382 drug candidates tested for CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition in human liver microsomes. For CYP2D6, 82% of the classified test set compounds were predicted to the correct class. For CYP3A4, 88% of the classified compounds were correctly classified. CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition were additionally classified for an external test set on 14 drugs, and multidimensional scaling plots showed that the drugs in the external test set were in the periphery of the training sets. Furthermore, fragment analyses were performed and structural fragments frequent in CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibitors and noninhibitors are presented.

  7. Positioning of aminopeptidase inhibitors in next generation cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Sarina M; Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2014-04-01

    Aminopeptidases represent a class of (zinc) metalloenzymes that catalyze the cleavage of amino acids nearby the N-terminus of polypeptides, resulting in hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Aminopeptidases operate downstream of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and are implicated in the final step of intracellular protein degradation either by trimming proteasome-generated peptides for antigen presentation or full hydrolysis into free amino acids for recycling in renewed protein synthesis. This review focuses on the function and subcellular location of five key aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1/2) and their association with different diseases, in particular cancer and their current position as target for therapeutic intervention by aminopeptidase inhibitors. Historically, bestatin was the first prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor that entered the clinic 35 years ago and is still used for the treatment of lung cancer. More recently, new generation aminopeptidase inhibitors became available, including the aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug tosedostat, which is currently tested in phase II clinical trials for acute myeloid leukemia. Beyond bestatin and tosedostat, medicinal chemistry has emerged with additional series of potential aminopeptidases inhibitors which are still in an early phase of (pre)clinical investigations. The expanded knowledge of the unique mechanism of action of aminopeptidases has revived interest in aminopeptidase inhibitors for drug combination regimens in anti-cancer treatment. In this context, this review will discuss relevant features and mechanisms of action of aminopeptidases and will also elaborate on factors contributing to aminopeptidase inhibitor efficacy and/or loss of efficacy due to drug resistance-related phenomena. Together, a growing body of data point to aminopeptidase inhibitors as attractive tools for

  8. Diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase is part of the transcriptional regulation network in immunologically activated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Carmi-Levy, Irit; Yannay-Cohen, Nurit; Kay, Gillian; Razin, Ehud; Nechushtan, Hovav

    2008-09-01

    We previously discovered that microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) each forms a complex with its inhibitor histidine triad nucleotide-binding 1 (Hint-1) and with lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS). Moreover, we showed that the dinucleotide diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap(4)A), previously shown to be synthesized by LysRS, binds to Hint-1, and as a result the transcription factors are released from their suppression. Thus, transcriptional activity is regulated by Ap(4)A, suggesting that Ap(4)A is a second messenger in this context. For Ap(4)A to be unambiguously established as a second messenger, several criteria have to be fulfilled, including the presence of a metabolizing enzyme. Since several enzymes are able to hydrolyze Ap(4)A, we provided here evidence that the "Nudix" type 2 gene product, Ap(4)A hydrolase, is responsible for Ap(4)A degradation following the immunological activation of mast cells. The knockdown of Ap(4)A hydrolase modulated Ap(4)A accumulation, resulting in changes in the expression of MITF and USF2 target genes. Moreover, our observations demonstrated that the involvement of Ap(4)A hydrolase in gene regulation is not a phenomenon exclusive to mast cells but can also be found in cardiac cells activated with the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Thus, we have provided concrete evidence establishing Ap(4)A as a second messenger in the regulation of gene expression.

  9. Hydrolase activity in the venom of the pupal endoparasitic wasp, Pimpla hypochondriaca.

    PubMed

    Dani, M P; Edwards, J P; Richards, E H

    2005-07-01

    Venom from the pupal endoparasitoid, Pimpla hypochondriaca has previously been shown to contain a mixture of biologically active molecules. Currently, P. hypochondriaca venom was examined for the presence of hydrolase activity. Six hydrolases were consistently detected using the API ZYM semiquantitative colourimetric kit. The main hydrolases detected were; acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, esterase, beta-galactosidase, esterase lipase, and lipase. The most rapid and intense colour reaction was detected for acid phosphatase. The pH optimum and the specific activity of venom acid phosphatase was determined using p-nitrophenol phosphate as a substrate and were 4.8 and 0.47 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/microg of venom protein, respectively. The acid phosphatase activity was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by sodium fluoride (IC(50) 4.2 x 10(-4) M), and by cocktail inhibitor 2 (CI 2). P. hypochondriaca venom has previously been shown to display potent cytotoxic activity towards Lacanobia oleracea haemocytes maintained in vitro. The contribution of acid phosphatase in venom to this cytotoxic activity was investigated by titrating venom against CI 2 prior to the addition of L. oleracea haemocytes. The results suggest that, despite the relatively high levels of acid phosphatase activity in venom, venom acid phosphatase plays no role in the antihaemocytic activity of P. hypochondriaca venom in vitro.

  10. The importance of nucleoside hydrolase enzyme (NH) in studies to treatment of Leishmania: A review.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Villar, José D; Sales, Edijane M

    2017-02-01

    Leishmania is a genus of trypanosomes, which are responsible for leishmaniasis disease, a major trypanosome infection in humans. In recent years, published studies have shown that the search for new drugs for Leishmania treatments has intensified. Through technique modeling it has been possible to develop new compounds, which act as nucleoside hydrolase (NH) inhibitors. The effect of these enzymes is the hydrolysis of certain RNA nucleotides, which include uridine and inosine, necessary for the protozoa to transform certain nucleosides obtained from infected individuals into nucleobases for the preparation of their DNA. The obtention of NH inhibitors is very important to eliminate leishmaniasis disease in infected individuals. The aim of this study is to discuss the research and development of new agents for the treatment of Leishmania, and to stimulate the formulation of new NH inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of α-Ketoheterocycles That Additionally Target the Cytosolic Port Cys269 of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of α-ketooxazoles incorporating electrophiles at the C5 position of the pyridyl ring of 2 (OL-135) and related compounds were prepared and examined as inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) that additionally target the cytosolic port Cys269. From this series, a subset of the candidate inhibitors exhibited time-dependent FAAH inhibition and noncompetitive irreversible inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with the targeted Cys269 covalent alkylation or addition, and maintained or enhanced the intrinsic selectivity for FAAH versus other serine hydrolases. A preliminary in vivo assessment demonstrates that these inhibitors raise endogenous brain levels of anandamide and other FAAH substrates upon intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration to mice, with peak levels achieved within 1.5–3 h, and that the elevations of the signaling lipids were maintained >6 h, indicating that the inhibitors effectively reach and remain active in the brain, inhibiting FAAH for a sustained period. PMID:24456116

  12. Fatty acid amide hydrolase: an emerging therapeutic target in the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2003-08-01

    The medicinal properties of exogenous cannabinoids have been recognized for centuries and can largely be attributed to the activation in the nervous system of a single G-protein-coupled receptor, CB1. However, the beneficial properties of cannabinoids, which include relief of pain and spasticity, are counterbalanced by adverse effects such as cognitive and motor dysfunction. The recent discoveries of anandamide, a natural lipid ligand for CB1, and an enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), that terminates anandamide signaling have inspired pharmacological strategies to augment endogenous cannabinoid ('endocannabinoid') activity with FAAH inhibitors, which might exhibit superior selectivity in their elicited behavioral effects compared with direct CB1 agonists.

  13. Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Structure–Activity Relationships of Substituted Phenyl 4-(2-Oxoimidazolidin-1-yl)benzenesulfonates as New Tubulin Inhibitors Mimicking Combretastatin A-4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sixty-one phenyl 4-(2-oxoimidazolidin-1-yl)benzenesulfonates (PIB-SOs) and 13 of their tetrahydro-2-oxopyrimidin-1(2H)-yl analogues (PPB-SOs) were prepared and biologically evaluated. The antiproliferative activities of PIB-SOs on 16 cancer cell lines are in the nanomolar range and unaffected in cancer cells resistant to colchicine, paclitaxel, and vinblastine or overexpressing the P-glycoprotein. None of the PPB-SOs exhibit significant antiproliferative activity. PIB-SOs block the cell cycle progression in the G2/M phase and bind to the colchicine-binding site on β-tubulin leading to cytoskeleton disruption and cell death. Chick chorioallantoic membrane tumor assays show that compounds 36, 44, and 45 efficiently block angiogenesis and tumor growth at least at similar levels as combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and exhibit low to very low toxicity on the chick embryos. PIB-SOs were subjected to CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses to establish quantitative structure–activity relationships. PMID:21604746

  14. Bile acids and their oxo derivatives: Potential inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase I and II, androgen receptor antagonists and CYP3A4 substrates.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Jovana; Borčić, Vladan; Mikov, Momir

    2017-05-01

    Some biological properties of bile acids and their oxo derivatives have not been sufficiently investigated, although the interest in bile acids as signaling molecules is rising. The aim of this work was to evaluate physico-chemical parametar b (slope) that represents the lipophilicity of the examined molecules and to investigate interactions of bile acids with carbonic anhydrase I, II, androgen receptor and CYP450s. Thirteen candidates were investigated using normal-phase thin-layer chromatography in two solvent systems. Retention parameters were used in further quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis and docking studies to predict interactions and binding affinities of examined molecules with enzymes and receptors. Prediction of activity on androgen receptor showed that compounds 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic and 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic acid have stronger antiandrogen activity than natural bile acids. The inhibitory potential for carbonic anhydrase I and II was tested and it was concluded that molecules 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3,7,12-trioxo-5β-cholanoic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid show the best results. Substrate behavior for CYP3A4 was confirmed for all investigated compounds. Oxo derivatives of bile acids show stronger interactions with enzymes and receptors as classical bile acids and lower membranolytic activity compared with them. These significant observations could be valuable in consideration of oxo derivatives as building blocks in medicinal chemistry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Effects of silybinin, CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor in vitro, on the bioavailability of loratadine in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Lee, M Y; Choi, J S

    2010-07-01

    The effect of silybinin on the pharmacokinetics of orally and intravenously administered loratadine in rats was investigated. Pharmacokinetic parameters of loratadine were determined in rats following oral (4 mg x kg(-1)) and intravenous (1 mg x kg(-1)) administration to rats in the presence and absence of silybinin (0.3, 1.5 and 6 mg x kg(-1)). Compared to those animals in an oral control group (given loratadine alone), the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of loratadine were increased significantly (P < 0.05 for 1.5 mg x kg(-1), P < 0.01 for 6 mg x kg(-1)) by 50.0-76.7% and 65.4-90.1%, respectively, by silybinin. Consequently, the absolute bioavailability of loratadine in the presence of silybinin (1.5 and 6 mg x kg(-1)) was 8.6-10.2%, which was significantly (1.5 mg x kg(-1), P < 0.05; 6 mg x kg(-1), P < 0.01) enhanced compared to that in oral control group (5.8%). Moreover, the relative bioavailability of loratadine was 1.50- to 1.77-fold greater than that in the control group. In contrast, silybinin had no effect on any pharmacokinetic parameters of loratadine given intravenously, implying that coadministration of silybinin could inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4-mediated metabolism of loratadine, resulting in reducing gastrointestinal and hepatic first-pass metabolism, and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump in the small intestine. Silybinin significantly enhanced the oral bioavailability of loratadine, suggesting that concurrent use of silybinin and loratadine should be monitored closely for potential drug interactions.

  16. Optimization of a novel series of N-phenylindoline-5-sulfonamide-based acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 inhibitors: Mitigation of CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition and phototoxic liabilities.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenjiro; Takahagi, Hiroki; Kubo, Osamu; Hidaka, Kousuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Nakakariya, Masanori; Amano, Nobuyuki; Adachi, Ryutaro; Maki, Toshiyuki; Take, Kazumi; Takekawa, Shiro; Kitazaki, Tomoyuki; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2015-08-01

    Acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (MGAT2) has emerged as a potential peripheral target for the treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders. We previously identified a novel series of N-phenylindoline-5-sulfonamide derivatives exemplified by 2 as potent and orally bioavailable MGAT2 inhibitors. Despite its attractive potency, further assessment revealed that this compound exhibited time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). To remove the undesirable CYP3A4 TDI activity, structural modification was focused on the 2,4-difluoroaniline moiety on the basis of the assumption that this moiety would be involved in mechanism-based inhibition of CYP3A4 via oxidative metabolism. This led to the finding that the introduction of 4-chloro-2,6-difluoroaniline significantly improved CYP3A4 TDI risk. Further optimization resulted in the discovery of N-(4-chloro-2,6-difluorophenyl)-1-{5-[1-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-7-(2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole-5-sulfonamide (27c) with potent MGAT2 inhibitory activity (IC50=7.8 nM) and excellent ADME-Tox profiles including metabolic stability, oral bioavailability, and CYP3A4 TDI. In a mouse oral fat tolerance test, compound 27c effectively and dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of plasma triacylglycerol levels after oral administration at doses of 1 and 3mg/kg. We also discuss mitigation of the phototoxic liability of biaryl derivatives on the basis of the HOMO-LUMO gap hypothesis during the course of optimization efforts.

  17. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitory activity of anthraquinone components from Aloe.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya Nan; Kim, Jang Hoon; Li, Wei; Jo, A Reum; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-10-15

    Aloe is a short-stemmed succulent herb widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases and as raw material in cosmetics and heath foods. In this study, we isolated and identified two new anthraquinone derivatives, aloinoside C (6) and aloinoside D (7), together with six known compounds from an aqueous dissolved Aloe exudate. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were evaluated. Compounds 1-8 inhibited sEH activity potently, with IC50 values ranging from 4.1±0.6 to 41.1±4.2 μM. A kinetic analysis of compounds 1-8 revealed that the inhibitory actions of compounds 1, 6 and 8 were non-competitive, whereas those of compounds 2-5 and 7 were the mixed-type. Molecular docking increases our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of all compounds. These results demonstrate that compounds 1-8 from Aloe are potential sEH inhibitors.

  18. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  19. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  20. An insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor induces CYP3A4 expression through a pregnane X receptor-independent, noncanonical constitutive androstane receptor-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhao; Sinz, Michael W; Zimmermann, Kurt; Wang, Hongbing

    2012-03-01

    Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling represents an attractive therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. A first-generation IGF-1R inhibitor (R)-4-(3-(3-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl)-3-(4-methyl-6-morpholino-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)pyridin-2(1H)-one (BMS-536924), however, was associated with potent CYP3A4 induction mediated by pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) transactivation. Structural activity-based modification led to the synthesis of 4-(1-(2-(4-((2-(4-chloro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethyl)amino)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)-4-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-6-yl)piperidin-4-yl) piperazine-1-carboxylate (BMS-665351) with no PXR activity while maintaining its ability to inhibit IGF-1R. However, BMS-665351 significantly induces CYP3A4 expression in human primary hepatocytes (HPHs). Here, we report a novel nonclassical constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3)-related pathway of BMS-665351-mediated CYP3A4 induction. BMS-665351 treatment resulted in the significant induction of CYP3A4 in HPHs and HepG2 cells, but failed to activate either PXR or CAR in cell-based reporter assays. Moreover, BMS-665351 at concentrations that induce CYP3A4 expression was unable to translocate human CAR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of HPHs, which represents the initial step of CAR activation. Nevertheless, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that BMS-665351 significantly enhanced the expression of CYP3A4 in CAR- but not PXR-transfected HepG2 and Huh7 cells. It is noteworthy that BMS-665351 selectively induced the expression of CAR but not PXR in all tested hepatic cell systems. Synergistic induction of CYP3A4 was observed in HPHs cotreated with BMS-665351 and prototypical activators of CAR but not PXR. In summary, our results indicate that BMS-665351-mediated induction of CYP3A4 is CAR-dependent, but BMS-665351 itself is not a typical activator of either CAR or PXR, rather it functions as a selective inducer of CAR expression and

  1. Bacterial growth does require peptidoglycan hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Waldemar

    2012-12-01

    Most bacteria surround their cytoplasmic membrane with a net-like, elastic heteropolymer, the peptidoglycan sacculus, to protect themselves from bursting due to the turgor and to maintain cell shape. It has been assumed that growing bacteria require peptidoglycan hydrolases to open meshes in the peptidoglycan net allowing the insertion of the newly synthesized material for surface expansion. However, peptidoglycan hydrolases essential for bacterial growth have long remained elusive. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology Singh et al. (2012) report the identification in Escherichia coli of three new DD-endopeptidases (Spr, YdhO and YebA) which are collectively required for peptidoglycan growth. Cells depleted of the three enzymes fail to incorporate new peptidoglycan, indicating that the cleavage of cross-links by the new endopeptidases is needed for surface growth of the sacculus. These results are corroborated by recent data showing that Bacillus subtilis cells require the DL-endopeptidase activity of CwlO or LytE for growth.

  2. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: a novel therapeutic target in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenri; Koerner, Ines P; Noppens, Ruediger; Grafe, Marjorie; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Morisseau, Christophe; Luria, Ayala; Hammock, Bruce D; Falck, John R; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2009-01-01

    The P450 eicosanoids epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are produced in brain and perform important biological functions, including protection from ischemic injury. The beneficial effect of EETs, however, is limited by their metabolism via soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition is protective against ischemic brain damage in vivo by a mechanism linked to enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF). We determined expression and distribution of sEH immunoreactivity (IR) in brain, and examined the effect of sEH inhibitor 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid butyl ester (AUDA-BE) on CBF and infarct size after experimental stroke in mice. Mice were administered a single intraperitoneal injection of AUDA-BE (10 mg/kg) or vehicle at 30 mins before 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or at reperfusion, in the presence and absence of P450 epoxygenase inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl) hexanamide (MS-PPOH). Immunoreactivity for sEH was detected in vascular and non-vascular brain compartments, with predominant expression in neuronal cell bodies and processes. 12-(3-Adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid butyl ester was detected in plasma and brain for up to 24 h after intraperitoneal injection, which was associated with inhibition of sEH activity in brain tissue. Finally, AUDA-BE significantly reduced infarct size at 24 h after MCAO, which was prevented by MS-PPOH. However, regional CBF rates measured by iodoantipyrine (IAP) autoradiography at end ischemia revealed no differences between AUDA-BE- and vehicle-treated mice. The findings suggest that sEH inhibition is protective against ischemic injury by non-vascular mechanisms, and that sEH may serve as a therapeutic target in stroke. PMID:17440491

  3. Bacterial CS2 Hydrolases from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Strains Are Homologous to the Archaeal Catenane CS2 Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Smeulders, Marjan J.; Pol, Arjan; Venselaar, Hanka; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Hermans, John; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) are important in the global sulfur cycle, and CS2 is used as a solvent in the viscose industry. These compounds can be converted by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans species, to carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a property used in industrial biofiltration of CS2-polluted airstreams. We report on the mechanism of bacterial CS2 conversion in the extremely acidophilic A. thiooxidans strains S1p and G8. The bacterial CS2 hydrolases were highly abundant. They were purified and found to be homologous to the only other described (archaeal) CS2 hydrolase from Acidianus strain A1-3, which forms a catenane of two interlocked rings. The enzymes cluster in a group of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) homologues that may comprise a subclass of CS2 hydrolases within the β-CA family. Unlike CAs, the CS2 hydrolases did not hydrate CO2 but converted CS2 and COS with H2O to H2S and CO2. The CS2 hydrolases of A. thiooxidans strains G8, 2Bp, Sts 4-3, and BBW1, like the CS2 hydrolase of Acidianus strain A1-3, exist as both octamers and hexadecamers in solution. The CS2 hydrolase of A. thiooxidans strain S1p forms only octamers. Structure models of the A. thiooxidans CS2 hydrolases based on the structure of Acidianus strain A1-3 CS2 hydrolase suggest that the A. thiooxidans strain G8 CS2 hydrolase may also form a catenane. In the A. thiooxidans strain S1p enzyme, two insertions (positions 26 and 27 [PD] and positions 56 to 61 [TPAGGG]) and a nine-amino-acid-longer C-terminal tail may prevent catenane formation. PMID:23836868

  4. The comparative effects of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex with established proteasome inhibitors on expression levels of CYP1A2/3A4 and their master regulators, aryl hydrocarbon and pregnane X receptor in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2016-12-01

    In the recent years, a therapeutic potential of disulfiram (Antabuse) complex with copper, as an anticancer drug, was recognized towards several cancer cell lines. The proteasome was suggested as one of the cellular targets for this compound. As the therapeutic use of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex (CuET) is expected to increase, it is of great interest to know whether this compound may be the source of drug-drug interactions via the induction of biotransformation enzymes, especially cytochromes P450 (CYPs). To this purpose, we examined the effect of CuET and compared it with typical inducers (rifampicin and dioxin) of CYPs and with well-established proteasome inhibitors (MG132 and bortezomib). Diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex revealed inconsistent and rather modulatory effect on the expression of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in several cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, it was able to cause neither ubiquitin accumulation nor significant and dose-dependent inhibition of proteasome activity. It had no effect on essential transcription factors involved in regulation of selected CYPs, aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) nor pregnane X receptor (PXR). However, the AhR protein was increased in majority of examined hepatocyte cultures. The main finding of this study is that: (i) disulfiram-copper complex is not the cause of drug-drug interactions via CYP1A2/3A4 induction; (ii) proteasome inhibitors may have different impact on studied parameters in given in vitro system. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  5. Computational insights into function and inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-16

    The Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme is a membrane-bound serine hydrolase responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of a family of naturally occurring fatty acid amides. FAAH is a critical enzyme of the endocannabinoid system, being mainly responsible for regulating the level of its main cannabinoid substrate anandamide. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, which increases the level of endogenous anandamide, is a promising strategy to cure a variety of diseases including pain, inflammation, and cancer. Much structural, mutagenesis, and kinetic data on FAAH has been generated over the last couple of decades. This has prompted several informative computational investigations to elucidate, at the atomic-level, mechanistic details on catalysis and inhibition of this pharmaceutically relevant enzyme. Here, we review how these computational studies - based on classical molecular dynamics, full quantum mechanics, and hybrid QM/MM methods - have clarified the binding and reactivity of some relevant substrates and inhibitors of FAAH. We also discuss the experimental implications of these computational insights, which have provided a thoughtful elucidation of the complex physical and chemical steps of the enzymatic mechanism of FAAH. Finally, we discuss how computations have been helpful for building structure-activity relationships of potent FAAH inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acids are new substrates for the phosphatase domain of soluble epoxide hydrolase[S

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Ami; Imaoka, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme that has a C-terminus epoxide hydrolase domain and an N-terminus phosphatase domain. The endogenous substrates of epoxide hydrolase are known to be epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, but the endogenous substrates of the phosphatase activity are not well understood. In this study, to explore the substrates of sEH, we investigated the inhibition of the phosphatase activity of sEH toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate by using lecithin and its hydrolyzed products. Although lecithin itself did not inhibit the phosphatase activity, the hydrolyzed lecithin significantly inhibited it, suggesting that lysophospholipid or fatty acid can inhibit it. Next, we investigated the inhibition of phosphatase activity by lysophosphatidyl choline, palmitoyl lysophosphatidic acid, monopalmitoyl glycerol, and palmitic acid. Palmitoyl lysophosphatidic acid and fatty acid efficiently inhibited phosphatase activity, suggesting that lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are substrates for the phosphatase activity of sEH. As expected, palmitoyl, stearoyl, oleoyl, and arachidonoyl LPAs were efficiently dephosphorylated by sEH (Km, 3–7 μM; Vmax, 150–193 nmol/min/mg). These results suggest that LPAs are substrates of sEH, which may regulate physiological functions of cells via their metabolism. PMID:22217705

  7. Inhibition of soluble and microsomal epoxide hydrolase by zinc and other metals.

    PubMed

    Draper, A J; Hammock, B D

    1999-11-01

    Inhibition of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes by metals may represent an important mechanism in regulating enzyme activity. Fourteen cations were evaluated for inhibition of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) (mouse, rat, and human liver), soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) (mouse, rat, and human liver), and recombinant potato sEH. Of the metals tested, Hg2+ and Zn2+ were the strongest inhibitors of mEH, while Cd2+ and Cu2+ were also strong inhibitors of sEH (I50 for all approximately 20 microM). Nickel (divalent) and Pb2+ were moderate inhibitors, but Al2+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ were weak inhibitors of both mEH and sEH (less than 50% inhibition by 1 mM metal). Six anions (acetate, bromide, chloride, nitrate, perchlorate, and sulfate) were tested and found to have no effect on the inhibition of sEH or mEH by cations. The kinetics and type of inhibition for zinc inhibition of sEH and mEH were examined for mouse, rat, human, and potato. Zinc inhibits mEH in a competitive manner. Inhibition of human and potato sEH was noncompetitive, but interestingly, zinc inhibition of mouse sEH was very strong and uncompetitive. Inhibition by zinc could be reversed by adding EDTA to the incubation buffer. Additionally, mouse liver microsomes and cytosol were incubated with these chelators. Following incubation at 4 degrees C, samples were dialyzed to remove chelator. Both mEH and sEH activity recovered was greater in samples treated with chelator than in control incubations. Similar treatment with the protease inhibitor Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) did not affect enzyme activity recovered. During systemic inflammation, hepatic metallothionien is induced, and liver metal concentrations increase while serum metal concentrations are decreased. The inhibition of microsomal and soluble epoxide hydrolase by metals may represent a mechanism of down-regulation of enzyme activity during inflammation.

  8. Glycoside Hydrolases across Environmental Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Berlemont, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Across many environments microbial glycoside hydrolases support the enzymatic processing of carbohydrates, a critical function in many ecosystems. Little is known about how the microbial composition of a community and the potential for carbohydrate processing relate to each other. Here, using 1,934 metagenomic datasets, we linked changes in community composition to variation of potential for carbohydrate processing across environments. We were able to show that each ecosystem-type displays a specific potential for carbohydrate utilization. Most of this potential was associated with just 77 bacterial genera. The GH content in bacterial genera is best described by their taxonomic affiliation. Across metagenomes, fluctuations of the microbial community structure and GH potential for carbohydrate utilization were correlated. Our analysis reveals that both deterministic and stochastic processes contribute to the assembly of complex microbial communities. PMID:27992426

  9. Localization of Acid Hydrolases in Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Henry C.; Wagner, George J.; Siegelman, Harold W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of techniques to isolate and purify relatively large quantities of intact vacuoles from mature tissues permits direct biochemical analysis of this ubiquitous mature plant cell organelle. Vacuoles and a fraction enriched in soluble cytoplasmic constituents were quantitatively prepared from Hippeastrum flower petal protoplasts. Vacuolar lysate and soluble cytoplasmic fractions were examined for acid hydrolase activities commonly associated with animal lysosomes, and pH optima were determined. Esterase, protease, carboxypeptidase, β-galactosidase, α-glycosidase and β-glycosidase, not found in the vacuole lysate fraction, were components of the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. Acid phosphatase, RNase and DNase were present in both fractions. Vacuolar enzyme activities were also examined as a function of flower development from bud through senescent stages. The data obtained are not consistent with the concept that the mature plant cell vacuole functions as a generalized lysosome. PMID:16660001

  10. A simplified electrostatic model for hydrolase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa Filho, Pedro de Alcantara; Prausnitz, John M

    2015-07-01

    Toward the development of an electrostatic model for enzyme catalysis, the active site of the enzyme is represented by a cavity whose surface (and beyond) is populated by electric charges as determined by pH and the enzyme's structure. The electric field in the cavity is obtained from electrostatics and a suitable computer program. The key chemical bond in the substrate, at its ends, has partial charges with opposite signs determined from published force-field parameters. The electric field attracts one end of the bond and repels the other, causing bond tension. If that tension exceeds the attractive force between the atoms, the bond breaks; the enzyme is then a successful catalyst. To illustrate this very simple model, based on numerous assumptions, some results are presented for three hydrolases: hen-egg white lysozyme, bovine trypsin and bovine ribonuclease. Attention is given to the effect of pH.

  11. Human adipose triglyceride lipase (PNPLA2) is not regulated by obesity and exhibits low in vitro triglyceride hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Langin, D; Arner, P; Hoffstedt, J

    2006-07-01

    The recent identification of murine adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, now known as patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2 [PNPLA2]), gene product of Pnpla2, has questioned the unique role of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL, now known as LIPE), gene product of Lipe, in fat cell lipolysis. Here, we investigated human ATGL and HSL adipose tissue gene expression and in vitro lipase activity. Levels of mRNA in adipose tissue from healthy obese and non-obese subjects were measured and lipase activity and adipocyte lipolytic capacity determined. HSL and ATGL cDNAs were transfected into Cos-7 cells and the relative tri- and diglyceride hydrolase activities were measured. Obesity was associated with a decreased subcutaneous and increased omental adipose tissue level of HSL mRNA. Subcutaneous HSL mRNA content was normalised upon weight reduction. In contrast, ATGL mRNA levels were unaffected by obesity and weight reduction. A high adipose tissue lipase activity was associated with increased maximal lipolysis and increased HSL, but not with ATGL mRNA levels. The in vitro triglyceride hydrolase activity of HSL was markedly higher than that of ATGL and contrary to HSL, ATGL was devoid of diglyceride hydrolase activity. The use of a selective HSL-inhibitor resulted in complete inhibition of HSL-mediated tri- and diglyceride hydrolase activity. The pH profile of human white adipose tissue triolein hydrolase activity was identical to that of HSL but differed from the ATGL profile. HSL, but not ATGL gene expression shows a regulation according to obesity status and is associated with increased adipose tissue lipase activity. Moreover, HSL has a higher capacity than ATGL to hydrolyse triglycerides in vitro.

  12. Excessive ATP hydrolysis in ischemic myocardium by mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase: effect of selective pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial ATPase hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Gary J; Atwal, Karnail S; Sleph, Paul G; Wang, Feng-Li; Monshizadegan, Hossain; Monticello, Thomas; Green, David W

    2004-10-01

    Mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATPase normally synthesizes ATP in the heart, but under ischemic conditions this enzyme paradoxically causes ATP hydrolysis. Nonselective inhibitors of this enzyme (aurovertin, oligomycin) inhibit ATP synthesis in normal tissue but also inhibit ATP hydrolysis in ischemic myocardium. We characterized the profile of aurovertin and oligomycin in ischemic and nonischemic rat myocardium and compared this with the profile of BMS-199264, which only inhibits F(1)F(0)-ATP hydrolase activity. In isolated rat hearts, aurovertin (1-10 microM) and oligomycin (10 microM), at concentrations inhibiting ATPase activity, reduced ATP concentration and contractile function in the nonischemic heart but significantly reduced the rate of ATP depletion during ischemia. They also inhibited recovery of reperfusion ATP and contractile function, consistent with nonselective F(1)F(0)-ATPase inhibitory activity, which suggests that upon reperfusion, the hydrolase activity switches back to ATP synthesis. BMS-199264 inhibits F(1)F(0) hydrolase activity in submitochondrial particles with no effect on ATP synthase activity. BMS-199264 (1-10 microM) conserved ATP in rat hearts during ischemia while having no effect on preischemic contractile function or ATP concentration. Reperfusion ATP levels were replenished faster and necrosis was reduced by BMS-199264. ATP hydrolase activity ex vivo was selectively inhibited by BMS-199264. Therefore, excessive ATP hydrolysis by F(1)F(0)-ATPase contributes to the decline in cardiac energy reserve during ischemia and selective inhibition of ATP hydrolase activity can protect ischemic myocardium.

  13. Functional analysis of a group A streptococcal glycoside hydrolase Spy1600 from family 84 reveals it is a β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and not a hyaluronidase

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, William L.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Taylor, Edward J.; Robinson, Charlotte E.; Charnock, Simon J.; Davies, Gideon J.; Vocadlo, David J.; Black, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) is the causative agent of severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis (the so-called ‘flesh eating disease’) and toxic-shock syndrome. Spy1600, a glycoside hydrolase from family 84 of the large superfamily of glycoside hydrolases, has been proposed to be a virulence factor. In the present study we show that Spy1600 has no activity toward galactosaminides or hyaluronan, but does remove β-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine from mammalian glycoproteins – an observation consistent with the inclusion of eukaryotic O-glycoprotein 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosidases within glycoside hydrolase family 84. Proton NMR studies, structure–reactivity studies for a series of fluorinated analogues and analysis of 1,2-dideoxy-2′-methyl-α-D-glucopyranoso-[2,1-d]-Δ2′-thiazoline as a competitive inhibitor reveals that Spy1600 uses a double-displacement mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Family 84 glycoside hydrolases are therefore comprised of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic β-N-acetylglucosaminidases using a conserved catalytic mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Since these enzymes do not have detectable hyaluronidase activity, many family 84 glycoside hydrolases are most likely incorrectly annotated as hyaluronidases. PMID:16822234

  14. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities.

  15. Activity of murein hydrolases in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hakenbeck, R; Messer, W

    1977-01-01

    Murein hydrolase activities were analyzed in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli B/r. Cell wall-bound murein hydrolase activities, including the penicillin-sensitive endopeptidase, increased discontinuously during the cell cycle and showed maximum activity at a cell age of 30 to 35 min (generation time, 43 min). Maximum activity was observed at the same time that the rate of cell wall synthesis reached its maximum. These oscillations depended on the termination of replication: no increase in hydrolase activity was found if deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was inhibited at an early time in the life cycle. In contrast, the activity of another murein hydrolase that was not tightly bound to the membrane (transglycosylase) increased exponentially with time, even when deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was inhibited. PMID:321419

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolases of human erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain: Sensitive targets of conserved specificity for organophosphorus delayed neurotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Holland, Nina T.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Casida, John E.

    2007-10-01

    Brain neuropathy target esterase (NTE), associated with organophosphorus (OP)-induced delayed neuropathy, has the same OP inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles assayed in the classical way (paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive hydrolysis of phenyl valerate) or with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) as the substrate. Extending our earlier observation with mice, we now examine human erythrocyte, lymphocyte, and brain LysoPC hydrolases as possible sensitive targets for OP delayed neurotoxicants and insecticides. Inhibitor profiling of human erythrocytes and lymphocytes gave the surprising result of essentially the same pattern as with brain. Human erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolases are highly sensitive to OP delayed neurotoxicants, with in vitro IC{sub 50} values of 0.13-85 nM for longer alkyl analogs, and poorly sensitive to the current OP insecticides. In agricultural workers, erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolyzing activities are similar for newborn children and their mothers and do not vary with paraoxonase status but have high intersample variation that limits their use as a biomarker. Mouse erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolase activity is also of low sensitivity in vitro and in vivo to the OP insecticides whereas the delayed neurotoxicant ethyl n-octylphosphonyl fluoride inhibits activity in vivo at 1-3 mg/kg. Overall, inhibition of blood LysoPC hydrolases is as good as inhibition of brain NTE as a predictor of OP inducers of delayed neuropathy. NTE and lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) both hydrolyze LysoPC, yet they are in distinct enzyme families with no sequence homology and very different catalytic sites. The relative contributions of NTE and LysoPLAs to LysoPC hydrolysis and clearance from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain remain to be defined.

  17. A high throughput fluorescent assay for measuring the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kage, Karen L; Richardson, Paul L; Traphagen, Linda; Severin, Jean; Pereda-Lopez, Ana; Lubben, Thomas; Davis-Taber, Rachel; Vos, Melissa H; Bartley, Diane; Walter, Karl; Harlan, John; Solomon, Larry; Warrior, Usha; Holzman, Thomas F; Faltynek, Connie; Surowy, Carol S; Scott, Victoria E

    2007-03-30

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the enzyme responsible for the rapid degradation of fatty acid amides such as the endocannabinoid anandamide. Inhibition of FAAH activity has been suggested as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic pain, depression and anxiety, through local activation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1. We have developed a high throughput screening assay for identification of FAAH inhibitors using a novel substrate, decanoyl 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin (D-AMC) that is cleaved by FAAH to release decanoic acid and the highly fluorescent molecule 7-amino-4-methyl coumarin (AMC). This assay gives an excellent signal window for measuring FAAH activity and, as a continuous assay, inherently offers improved sensitivity and accuracy over previously reported endpoint assays. The assay was validated using a panel of known FAAH inhibitors and purified recombinant human FAAH, then converted to a 384 well format and used to screen a large library of compounds (>600,000 compounds) to identify FAAH inhibitors. This screen identified numerous novel FAAH inhibitors of diverse chemotypes. These hits confirmed using a native FAAH substrate, anandamide, and had very similar rank order potency to that obtained using the D-AMC substrate. Collectively these data demonstrate that D-AMC can be successfully used to rapidly and effectively identify novel FAAH inhibitors for potential therapeutic use.

  18. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Ji, Tianyang; Li, Weiwei; Simon, Gabriel M.; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Adibekian, Alexander; Hoover, Heather; Niessen, Sherry; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in mammals. They play fundamental roles in virtually all physiological processes and are targeted by drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite this, we lack biological understanding for most of the 110+ predicted mammalian metabolic SHs, in large part because of a dearth of assays to assess their biochemical activities and a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their function in living systems. We show here that the vast majority (> 80%) of mammalian metabolic SHs can be labeled in proteomes by a single, active site-directed fluorophosphonate probe. We exploit this universal activity-based assay in a library-versus-library format to screen 70+ SHs against 140+ structurally diverse carbamates. Lead inhibitors were discovered for ∼40% of the screened enzymes, including many poorly characterized SHs. Global profiles identified carbamate inhibitors that discriminate among highly sequence-related SHs and, conversely, enzymes that share inhibitor sensitivity profiles despite lacking sequence homology. These findings indicate that sequence relatedness is not a strong predictor of shared pharmacology within the SH superfamily. Finally, we show that lead carbamate inhibitors can be optimized into pharmacological probes that inactivate individual SHs with high specificity in vivo. PMID:21084632

  19. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Ji, Tianyang; Li, Weiwei; Simon, Gabriel M; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Adibekian, Alexander; Hoover, Heather; Niessen, Sherry; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-07

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in mammals. They play fundamental roles in virtually all physiological processes and are targeted by drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite this, we lack biological understanding for most of the 110+ predicted mammalian metabolic SHs, in large part because of a dearth of assays to assess their biochemical activities and a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their function in living systems. We show here that the vast majority (> 80%) of mammalian metabolic SHs can be labeled in proteomes by a single, active site-directed fluorophosphonate probe. We exploit this universal activity-based assay in a library-versus-library format to screen 70+ SHs against 140+ structurally diverse carbamates. Lead inhibitors were discovered for ∼40% of the screened enzymes, including many poorly characterized SHs. Global profiles identified carbamate inhibitors that discriminate among highly sequence-related SHs and, conversely, enzymes that share inhibitor sensitivity profiles despite lacking sequence homology. These findings indicate that sequence relatedness is not a strong predictor of shared pharmacology within the SH superfamily. Finally, we show that lead carbamate inhibitors can be optimized into pharmacological probes that inactivate individual SHs with high specificity in vivo.

  20. Peptide hydrolase activities of the mucosa of human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.; Laster, Leonard

    1969-01-01

    Few studies have been published on peptide hydrolase activities of human small intestine mucosa. We developed methods to screen tissue extracts for such enzymes and to quantitate hydrolase activities for dipeptides containing the aromatic amino acid L-phenylalanine. The screening procedure indicated glycyl-L-proline hydrolase activity was reduced in biopsy specimens from patients with flattened intestinal mucosa. To explore this further, we established optimal assay conditions for hydrolase activities (a) glycyl-L-proline, (b) L-phenylalanyl-L-proline, (c) L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and (d) L-phenylalanylglycine. Biopsy specimens from patients with various intestinal disorders, but without flattened mucosa, and from three patients with flattened mucosa, showed a disproportionate reduction in activities (a) and (b), with the reduction being significantly more marked in the latter patients. We suggest that intestinal imidopeptide hydrolase activities, such as (a) and (b), are sensitive to changes in intestinal disease generally, particularly to the altered physiology associated with flattening of the mucosa, and are secondary to, rather than a cause of, the intestinal pathology. Our finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity tended to parallel imidopeptide hydrolase activity, and that activity (a) was partially localized to the particulate fraction of mucosal homogenate, suggested that imidopeptide hydrolase activities may be located in the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and that, like alkaline phosphatase activity, they may be reduced in flattened mucosae, in part at least because of the pathologic changes in the microvilli. In our studies of control subjects we did not detect peptide hydrolase activity deficiency analogous to asymptomatic disaccharidase deficiency. Images PMID:5765024

  1. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase increases coronary perfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun; Sun, Dong; Jiang, Houli; Kandhi, Sharath; Froogh, Ghezal; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Wolin, Michael S; Thompson, Carl I; Hintze, Thomas H; Huang, An

    2015-01-01

    Roles of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to their diols (DHETs), in the coronary circulation and cardiac function remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that compromising EET hydrolysis/degradation, via sEH deficiency, lowers the coronary resistance to promote cardiac perfusion and function. Hearts were isolated from wild type (WT), sEH knockout (KO) mice and WT mice chronically treated with t-TUCB (sEH inhibitor), and perfused with constant flow at different pre-loads. Compared to WT controls, sEH-deficient hearts required significantly greater basal coronary flow to maintain the perfusion pressure at 100 mmHg and exhibited a greater reduction in vascular resistance during tension-induced heart work, implying a better coronary perfusion during cardiac performance. Cardiac contractility, characterized by developed tension in response to changes in preload, was potentially increased in sEH-KO hearts, manifested by an enlarged magnitude at each step-wise increase in end-diastolic to peak-systolic tension. 14,15-EEZE (EET antagonist) prevented the adaptation of coronary circulation in sEH null hearts whereas responses in WT hearts were sensitive to the inhibition of NO. Cardiac expression of EET synthases (CYP2J2/2C29) was comparable in both genotypic mice whereas, levels of 14,15-, 11,12- and 8,9-EETs were significantly higher in sEH-KO hearts, accompanied with lower levels of DHETs. In conclusion, the elevation of cardiac EETs, as a function of sEH deficiency, plays key roles in the adaptation of coronary flow and cardiac function. PMID:26071213

  2. Alterations of structure and hydrolase activity of parkinsonism-associated human ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 variants.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kaori; Li, Hang; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Wang, Yu-Lai; Hara, Yoko; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Manago, Yoshimasa; Amano, Taiju; Noda, Mami; Aoki, Shunsuke; Wada, Keiji

    2003-04-25

    Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a neuron-specific ubiquitin recycling enzyme. A mutation at residue 93 and polymorphism at residue 18 within human UCH-L1 are linked to familial Parkinson's disease and a decreased Parkinson's disease risk, respectively. Thus, we constructed recombinant human UCH-L1 variants and examined their structure (using circular dichroism) and hydrolase activities. We confirmed that an I93M substitution results in a decrease in kcat (45.6%) coincident with an alteration in alpha-helical content. These changes may contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In contrast, an S18Y substitution results in an increase in kcat (112.6%) without altering the circular dichroistic spectrum. These data suggest that UCH-L1 hydrolase activity may be inversely correlated with Parkinson's disease risk and that the hydrolase activity is protective against the disease. Furthermore, we found that oxidation of UCH-L1 by 4-hydroxynonenal, a candidate for endogenous mediator of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death, results in a loss of hydrolase activity. Taken together, these results suggest that further studies of altered UCH-L1 hydrolase function may provide new insights into a possible common pathogenic mechanism between familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

  3. Investigation of the mechanism of phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, T.W.; Olsen, D.B.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Mariano, P.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors are presently studying enzymes which catalyze the formation and cleavage of carbon phosphorous bonds. In 1970 LaNauze et. al. reported the isolation of one enzyme of interest - phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase from a mutant of Bacillus cereus. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphonoaldehyde to acetaldehyde and inorganic phosphate. They have isolated phosphonatase from wild type B. cereus (grown on 2-aminoethylphosphonate as the P/sub i/ source) and have used /sup 1/H-NMR and /sup 31/P-NMR techniques to determine the products of the enzyme reaction as phosphate and acetaldehyde. The mechanism of the enzyme could involve the formation of a Schiff base between phosphonoacetaldehyde and lysine or it might only require Mg/sup + +/, an essential cofactor for activity. To distinguish between these possibilities they have begun to look at the Schiff base formation in more detail. NaBH/sub 4/ was found to inactivate the enzyme in the presence of substrate but not in its absence. This is consistent with results obtained for the enzyme isolated from the mutant bacteria. In addition treatment of the wild type enzyme with tritiated NaBH/sub 4/ resulted in significant incorporation of radiolabel into the protein as compared to the control. These results tentatively suggest that hydrolysis proceeds via a covalent imine intermediate.

  4. Human Valacyclovir Hydrolase/Biphenyl Hydrolase-Like Protein Is a Highly Efficient Homocysteine Thiolactonase

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew G.; Rademacher, Peter M.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Hsieh, Edward J.; Rettie, Allan E.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 104 M−1s−1, orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  5. Alteration of the mutagenicity 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine by modifiers of rat hepatic epoxide hydrolase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iba, M.M.

    1986-03-05

    The involvement of arene oxides in the activation of benzidines was assessed by examining the effect of (I) the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor trichloropropylene oxide (TCPO), (II) purified rat liver microsomal (P) epoxide hydrolase (EH), and (III) pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital (PB) on hepatic Sg- or P-catalyzed mutagenicity of benzidine (BZ) and 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine (DCB) to Salmonella TA 98. When catalyzed by Sg from untreated rats, the mutagenicity of DCB and BZ was 601 +/- 101 and 79 +/- 25 (His/sup +/ revertants/plate) respectively, but was 345 +/- 55 and 226 +/- 30 respectively, when catalyzed by microsomes (P) from untreated rats. PB-pretreatment enhanced the Sg-catalyzed mutagenicity of DCB and BZ (2.3-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively) and the P-catalyzed mutagenicity of DCB (1.7-fold), but totally inhibited the P-catalyzed mutagenicity of BZ. In TCPO-supplemented activating systems from PB-pretreated rats, the mutagenicity of DCB was enhanced in both Sg and P (1.9-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively), whereas that of BZ was unchanged. Added EH enhanced the P-catalyzed mutagenicity of DCB (1.4-fold) but had no effect on that of BZ, suggesting that the activity of the enzyme on DCB metabolites may not be entirely detoxifying. The data suggest that epoxidation may contribute to the activation of DCB but not BZ.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of cyanuric acid hydrolase from Azorhizobium caulinodans.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghee; Shi, Ke; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aihara, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    Cyanuric acid is synthesized industrially and forms during the microbial metabolism of s-triazine herbicides. Cyanuric acid is metabolized by some microorganisms via cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH), which opens the s-triazine ring as a prelude to further metabolism. CAH is a member of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase family. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CAH from Azorhizobium caulinodans are reported. CAH was cocrystallized with barbituric acid, a close analog of cyanuric acid that is a tight-binding competitive inhibitor. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction experiments were grown in conditions containing PEG 8K or magnesium sulfate as precipitants. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected from CAH-barbituric acid crystals to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group I4₁22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 237.9, c = 105.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  7. Lethal Effect of a Heterologous Murein Hydrolase on Penicillin-Treated Streptococcus sanguis

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Diane; Tomasz, Alexander

    1980-01-01

    Nine strains of Streptococcus sanguis exhibited tolerance to benzylpenicillin: the growth of each strain was susceptible to penicillin with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.1 μg/ml or lower, but the bacteriolytic and bactericidal effects were limited in each case. The tolerance of these bacteria was also reflected in the large discrepancies between the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations for benzylpenicillin. The hypothesis that a natural deficiency of endogenous murein hydrolase (autolysin) in this species accounts for the penicillin tolerance was tested by using a heterologous murein hydrolase, the C-phage-associated lysin. In seven of the strains, addition of the lysin to the culture together with penicillin or other cell wall inhibitors resulted in lysis and rapid loss of viability. The enzyme alone did not appreciably affect normally growing cultures. The irreversible effects of penicillin plus lysin were drastically reduced in the presence of the bacteriostatic agents chloramphenicol and cerulenin. Speculations based on experiments are presented for the mechanisms by which penicillin treatment sensitizes these bacteria to an exogenous lytic enzyme. Similar phenomena requiring cooperation of host factors and penicillin may occur during infection, since somewhat similar although less pronounced results were obtained by addition of human lysozyme to penicillin-treated S. sanguis. PMID:6104471

  8. Structure of HsaD, a steroid-degrading hydrolase, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lack, Nathan; Lowe, Edward D; Liu, Jie; Eltis, Lindsay D; Noble, Martin E M; Sim, Edith; Westwood, Isaac M

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of death worldwide. Understanding of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been advanced by gene analysis and has led to the identification of genes that are important for intracellular survival in macrophages. One of these genes encodes HsaD, a meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond in cholesterol metabolism. This paper describes the production of HsaD as a recombinant protein and, following crystallization, the determination of its three-dimensional structure to 2.35 A resolution by X-ray crystallography at the Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, England. To the authors' knowledge, this study constitutes the first report of a structure determined at the new synchrotron facility. The volume of the active-site cleft of the HsaD enzyme is more than double the corresponding active-site volumes of related MCP hydrolases involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, consistent with the specificity of HsaD for steroids such as cholesterol. Knowledge of the structure of the enzyme facilitates the design of inhibitors.

  9. Behavioral effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on morphine withdrawal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Siamak; Hasanein, Parisa

    2011-08-10

    Chronic morphine exposure causes tolerance and dependence. The cessation of morphine consumption induces a withdrawal syndrome that may involve cannabinoids and is characterized by undesirable psychological and physical signs. The present study examined whether augmentation of the endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase could suppress the morphine withdrawal syndrome in morphine-addicted rats. Morphine dependency was induced by 7 consecutive days of morphine injection. The morphine-addicted rats received URB597 (1, 0.5, 0.3, 0.1, 0.03 mg/kg), a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, before the precipitation of morphine withdrawal syndromes by naloxone. Withdrawal symptoms including jumping, teeth chattering, paw tremor, wet dog shakes, face grooming, penis licking, standing, rearing, sniffing and percent of weight loss were recorded during 30 min after naloxone injection. The results showed that the morphine withdrawal precipitated rats had significantly more withdrawal symptoms than naive control rats and the administration of URB597 (all doses except 0.03 mg/kg) reduced most of the morphine withdrawal symptoms. We conclude that the administration of URB597 modulated morphine withdrawal symptoms. This finding shows that endocannabinoids interact with the opioid system during the morphine withdrawal period and that potentiation of the endogenous cannabinoid system by URB597 may be a new target strategy for the management of morphine addiction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The serine hydrolase ABHD6 Is a critical regulator of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gwynneth; Betters, Jenna L; Lord, Caleb C; Brown, Amanda L; Marshall, Stephanie; Ferguson, Daniel; Sawyer, Janet; Davis, Matthew A; Melchior, John T; Blume, Lawrence C; Howlett, Allyn C; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Milne, Stephen B; Myers, David S; Mrak, Irina; Leber, Vera; Heier, Christoph; Taschler, Ulrike; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Zimmermann, Robert; Brown, H Alex; Brown, J Mark

    2013-10-31

    The serine hydrolase α/β hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) has recently been implicated as a key lipase for the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain. However, the biochemical and physiological function for ABHD6 outside of the central nervous system has not been established. To address this, we utilized targeted antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to selectively knock down ABHD6 in peripheral tissues in order to identify in vivo substrates and understand ABHD6's role in energy metabolism. Here, we show that selective knockdown of ABHD6 in metabolic tissues protects mice from high-fat-diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and systemic insulin resistance. Using combined in vivo lipidomic identification and in vitro enzymology approaches, we show that ABHD6 can hydrolyze several lipid substrates, positioning ABHD6 at the interface of glycerophospholipid metabolism and lipid signal transduction. Collectively, these data suggest that ABHD6 inhibitors may serve as therapeutics for obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and type II diabetes.

  11. Rehabilitation of faulty kinetic determinations and misassigned glycoside hydrolase family of retaining mechanism β-xylosidases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Vermillion, Karl E; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Braker, Jay D

    2013-09-15

    We obtained Cx1 from a commercial supplier, whose catalog listed it as a β-xylosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 43. NMR experiments indicate retention of anomeric configuration in its reaction stereochemistry, opposing the assignment of GH43, which follows an inverting mechanism. Partial protein sequencing indicates Cx1 is similar to but not identical to β-xylosidases of GH52, including Q09LZ0, that have retaining mechanisms. Q09LZ0 β-xylosidase had been characterized biochemically in kinetic reactions that contained Tris. We overproduced Q09LZ0 and demonstrated that Tris is a competitive inhibitor of the β-xylosidase. Also, the previous work used grossly incorrect extinction coefficients for product 4-nitrophenol. We redetermined kinetic parameters using reactions that omitted Tris and using correct extinction coefficients for 4-nitrophenol. Cx1 and Q09LZ0 β-xylosidases were thus shown to possess similar kinetic properties when acting on 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside and xylobiose. kcat pH profiles of Cx1 and Q09LZ0 acting on 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside and xylobiose have patterns containing two rate increases with increasing acidity, not reported before for glycoside hydrolases. The dexylosylation step of 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside hydrolysis mediated by Q09LZ0 is not rate determining for kcat(4NPX). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. First Glycoside Hydrolase Family 2 Enzymes from Thermus antranikianii and Thermus brockianus with β-Glucosidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Carola; Blank, Saskia; Antranikian, Garabed

    2015-01-01

    Two glycoside hydrolase encoding genes (tagh2 and tbgh2) were identified from different Thermus species using functional screening. Based on amino acid similarities, the enzymes were predicted to belong to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 2. Surprisingly, both enzymes (TaGH2 and TbGH2) showed twofold higher activities for the hydrolysis of nitrophenol-linked β-D-glucopyranoside than of -galactopyranoside. Specific activities of 3,966 U/mg for TaGH2 and 660 U/mg for TbGH2 were observed. In accordance, Km values for both enzymes were significantly lower when β-D-glucopyranoside was used as substrate. Furthermore, TaGH2 was able to hydrolyze cellobiose. TaGH2 and TbGH2 exhibited highest activity at 95 and 90°C at pH 6.5. Both enzymes were extremely thermostable and showed thermal activation up to 250% relative activity at temperatures of 50 and 60°C. Especially, TaGH2 displayed high tolerance toward numerous metal ions (Cu2+, Co2+, Zn2+), which are known as glycoside hydrolase inhibitors. In this study, the first thermoactive GH family 2 enzymes with β-glucosidase activity have been identified and characterized. The hydrolysis of cellobiose is a unique property of TaGH2 when compared to other enzymes of GH family 2. Our work contributes to a broader knowledge of substrate specificities in GH family 2. PMID:26090361

  13. Dynamic hydrolase activities precede hypersensitive tissue collapse in tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sueldo, Daniela; Ahmed, Ali; Misas-Villamil, Johana; Colby, Tom; Tameling, Wladimir; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2014-08-01

    Hydrolases such as subtilases, vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) and the proteasome play important roles during plant programmed cell death (PCD). We investigated hydrolase activities during PCD using activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which displays the active proteome using probes that react covalently with the active site of proteins. We employed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings undergoing synchronized hypersensitive cell death by co-expressing the avirulence protein Avr4 from Cladosporium fulvum and the tomato resistance protein Cf-4. Cell death is blocked in seedlings grown at high temperature and humidity, and is synchronously induced by decreasing temperature and humidity. ABPP revealed that VPEs and the proteasome are not differentially active, but that activities of papain-like cysteine proteases and serine hydrolases, including Hsr203 and P69B, increase before hypersensitive tissue collapse, whereas the activity of a carboxypeptidase-like enzyme is reduced. Similar dynamics were observed for these enzymes in the apoplast of tomato challenged with C. fulvum. Unexpectedly, these challenged plants also displayed novel isoforms of secreted putative VPEs. In the absence of tissue collapse at high humidity, the hydrolase activity profile is already altered completely, demonstrating that changes in hydrolase activities precede hypersensitive tissue collapse. © 2014 The Authors New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Structure of XC6422 from Xanthomonas campestris at 1.6 Å resolution: a small serine α/β-hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Yu; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein from X. campestris has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The determined X. campestris structure shows that it belongs to the superfamily of serine α/β hydrolase, with an extra strand preceding the first β-strand to lead to extensive subunit interactions in the crystal. XC6422 is a conserved hypothetical protein from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc), a Gram-negative yellow-pigmented pathogenic bacterium that causes black rot, one of the major worldwide diseases of cruciferous crops. The protein consists of 220 amino acids and its structure has been determined to 1.6 Å resolution using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. Although it has very low sequence identity to protein sequences in the PDB (less than 20%), the determined structure nevertheless shows that it belongs to the superfamily of serine α/β-hydrolases, with an active site that is fully accessible to solvent owing to the absence of a lid domain. Modelling studies with the serine esterase inhibitor E600 indicate that XC6422 adopts a conserved Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad common to this superfamily and has a preformed oxyanion hole for catalytic activation. These structural features suggest that XC6422 is most likely to be a hydrolase active on a soluble ester or a small lipid. An extra strand preceding the first β-strand in the canonical α/β-hydrolase fold leads to extensive subunit interactions between XC6422 monomers, which may explain why XC6422 crystals of good diffraction quality can grow to dimensions of up to 1.5 mm in a few days.

  15. N-terminal domain of soluble epoxide hydrolase negatively regulates the VEGF-mediated activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Hammock, Bruce D.; Su, Kou-Hui; Morisseau, Christophe; Kou, Yu Ru; Imaoka, Susumu; Oguro, Ami; Shyue, Song-Kun; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2012-01-01

    Aims The mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has both an epoxide hydrolase and a phosphatase domain. The role of sEH hydrolase activity in the metabolism of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs) has been well defined. However, far less is known about the role of sEH phosphatase activity in eNOS activation. In the present study, we investigated whether the phosphatase domain of sEH was involved in the eNOS activation in ECs. Methods and results The level of eNOS phosphorylation in aortas is higher in the sEH knockout (sEH−/−) mice than in wild-type mice. In ECs, pharmacological inhibition of sEH phosphatase or overexpressing sEH with an inactive phosphatase domain enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. In contrast, overexpressing the phosphatase domain of sEH prevented the VEGF-mediated NO production and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179. Additionally, treatment with VEGF induced a c-Src kinase-dependent increase in transient tyrosine phosphorylation of sEH and the formation of a sEH–eNOS complex, which was abolished by treatment with a c-Src kinase inhibitor, PP1, or the c-Src dominant-negative mutant K298M. We also demonstrated that the phosphatase domain of sEH played a key role in VEGF-induced angiogenesis by detecting the tube formation in ECs and neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Conclusion In addition to epoxide hydrolase activity, phosphatase activity of sEH plays a pivotal role in the regulation of eNOS activity and NO-mediated EC functions. PMID:22072631

  16. Cellular viability effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on cerebellar neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (ANA) participates in the control of cell death inducing the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the ANA degrading enzyme, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), would induce cellular death. Experiments were performed in cerebellar granule neurons cultured with the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) as well as endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and cellular viability was determined by MTT test. Neurons cultured with URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) displayed a decrease in cellular viability. In addition, if cultured with OEA (25 nM) or PEA (100 nM), cellular death was found. These results further suggest that URB597, OEA or PEA promote cellular death. PMID:21854612

  17. Design and synthesis of dual modulators of soluble epoxide hydrolase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    la Buscató, Estel; Blöcher, René; Lamers, Christina; Klingler, Franca-Maria; Hahn, Steffen; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Proschak, Ewgenij

    2012-12-13

    Metabolic syndrome is a complex condition which often requires the use of multiple medications as a treatment. The resulting problems of polypharmacy are increase in side effects, drug-drug interactions, and its high economic cost. Development of multitarget compounds is a promising strategy to avoid the complications arising from administration of multiple drugs. Modulators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are established agents in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, and insulin resistance. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) are under evaluation for their use in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, a series of dual sEH/PPAR modulators containing a pyrrole acidic headgroup and a urea pharmacophore were designed, synthesized, and evaluated in vitro using recombinant enzyme and cell-based assays. Compounds with different activity profiles were obtained which could be used in the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  18. Structural Snapshots for Mechanism‐Based Inactivation of a Glycoside Hydrolase by Cyclopropyl Carbasugars

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Christopher; Pengelly, Robert J.; Shamsi Kazem Abadi, Saeideh; Chakladar, Saswati; Draper, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) have attracted considerable attention as targets for therapeutic agents, and thus mechanism‐based inhibitors are of great interest. We report the first structural analysis of a carbocyclic mechanism‐based GH inactivator, the results of which show that the two Michaelis complexes are in 2H3 conformations. We also report the synthesis and reactivity of a fluorinated analogue and the structure of its covalently linked intermediate (flattened 2H3 half‐chair). We conclude that these inactivator reactions mainly involve motion of the pseudo‐anomeric carbon atom, knowledge that should stimulate the design of new transition‐state analogues for use as chemical biology tools. PMID:27783466

  19. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases, but with notable differences such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional co-crystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently-bound transition state mimic, provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMID:22035792

  20. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  1. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitory Activity of Selaginellin Derivatives from Selaginella tamariscina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Cho, Chong Woon; Tai, Bui Huu; Yang, Seo Young; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-12-02

    Selaginellin derivatives 1-3 isolated from Selaginella tamariscina were evaluated for their inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to demonstrate their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. All selaginellin derivatives (1-3) inhibited sEH enzymatic activity and PHOME hydrolysis, in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 3.1 ± 0.1, 8.2 ± 2.2, and 4.2 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. We further determined that the derivatives function as non-competitive inhibitors. Moreover, the predicted that binding sites and interaction between 1-3 and sEH were solved by docking simulations. According to quantitative analysis, 1-3 were confirmed to have high content in the roots of S. tamariscina; among them, selaginellin 3 exhibited the highest content of 189.3 ± 0.0 μg/g.

  2. Catalytic scope of the thiamine-dependent multifunctional enzyme cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Loschonsky, Sabrina; Waltzer, Simon; Fraas, Sonja; Wacker, Tobias; Andrade, Susana L A; Kroneck, Peter M H; Müller, Michael

    2014-02-10

    The thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography (Ni-NTA). Recombinant CDH showed the same C-C bond-cleavage and C-C bond-formation activities as the native enzyme. Furthermore, we have shown that CDH catalyzes the asymmetric cross-benzoin reaction of aromatic aldehydes and (decarboxylated) pyruvate (up to quantitative conversion, 92-99 % ee). CDH accepts also hydroxybenzaldehydes and nitrobenzaldehydes; these previously have not (or only in rare cases) been known as substrates of other ThDP-dependent enzymes. On a semipreparative scale, sterically demanding 4-(tert-butyl)benzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde were transformed into the corresponding 2-hydroxy ketone products in high yields. Additionally, certain benzaldehydes with electron withdrawing substituents were identified as potential inhibitors of the ligase activity of CDH.

  3. Inhibiting an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Protects CFTR.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R

    2015-08-17

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, the mechanism of action of Cif has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. It was demonstrated that the hydrolase activity of Cif is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. A small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system was also uncovered. These results provide a basis for targeting the distinctive virulence chemistry of Cif and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking.

  4. Luciferin Amides Enable in Vivo Bioluminescence Detection of Endogenous Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Firefly luciferase is homologous to fatty acyl-CoA synthetases. We hypothesized that the firefly luciferase substrate d-luciferin and its analogs are fatty acid mimics that are ideally suited to probe the chemistry of enzymes that release fatty acid products. Here, we synthesized luciferin amides and found that these molecules are hydrolyzed to substrates for firefly luciferase by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the presence of luciferase, these molecules enable highly sensitive and selective bioluminescent detection of FAAH activity in vitro, in live cells, and in vivo. The potency and tissue distribution of FAAH inhibitors can be imaged in live mice, and luciferin amides serve as exemplary reagents for greatly improved bioluminescence imaging in FAAH-expressing tissues such as the brain. PMID:26120870

  5. Physarum polymalic acid hydrolase: Recombinant expression and enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Wolfgang; Haindl, Markus; Holler, Eggehard

    2008-12-19

    As a platform for syntheses of nanoconjugates in antitumor drug delivery, polymalic acid together with its tailoring specific exohydrolase is purified from plasmodium cultures of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a member of the phylum myxomycota. Polymalic acid hydrolase is expressed in an inactive form that functions as a molecular adapter for polymalic acid trafficking within the plasmodium and is activated only during secretion. Activation follows specific protein tyrosine phosphorylation and dissociation from plasma membranes. Purified inactive Physarum polymalic acid hydrolase, recombinantly expressed in yeast Saccharomyces, is activated on a preparative basis by the addition of plasma membrane fragments from plasmodia of P. polycephalum. Activation of polymalic acid hydrolase and inhibition of polymalic acid synthesis by protein tyrosine phosphorylation are complementary events and could indicate a joint signal response to plasma membrane damage.

  6. Discovery of multitarget inhibitors by combining molecular docking with common pharmacophore matching.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dengguo; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhou, Lu; Chen, Jing; Chen, Zheng; He, Chong; Yang, Kun; Liu, Ying; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2008-12-25

    Multitarget drugs have been to be found effective in controlling complex diseases. However, how to design multitarget drugs presents a great challenge. We have developed a computer-assisted strategy to screen for multitarget inhibitors using a combination of molecular docking and common pharmacophore matching. This strategy was successfully applied to screen for dual-target inhibitors against both the human leukotriene A(4) hydrolase (LTA4H-h) and the human nonpancreatic secretory phospholipase A2 (hnps-PLA2). Three compounds screened from the chemical database MDL Available Chemical Directory were found to inhibit these two enzymes at the 10 microM level. Moreover, one synthetic compound matching the common pharmacophores inhibits LTA4H-h and hnps-PLA2 with IC(50) values of 35 nM and 7.3 microM, respectively. The common pharmacophore model can also be used to search small molecule databases or collections of existing inhibitors, as well as to guide combinatorial library design to search for ideal multitarget inhibitors.

  7. Long-term consequences of perinatal fatty acid amino hydrolase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Morgan, Daniel; Jew, Chris P; Haskins, Chris; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Leishman, Emma; Spencer, Corinne M; Czyzyk, Traci; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeFatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors show promise as a treatment for anxiety, depression and pain. Here we investigated whether perinatal exposure to URB597, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, alters brain development and affects behaviour in adult mice. Experimental ApproachMouse dams were treated daily from gestational day 10.5 to 16.5 with 1, 3 or 10 mg kg−1 URB597. MS was used to measure a panel of endocannabinoids and related lipid compounds and brain development was assessed at embryonic day 16.5. Separate cohorts of mouse dams were treated with 10 mg kg−1 URB597, from gestational day 10.5 to postnatal day 7, and the adult offspring were assessed with a battery of behavioural tests. Key ResultsPerinatal URB597 exposure elevated anandamide and related N-acyl amides. URB597 did not induce signs of toxicity or affect dam weight gain, neurogenesis or axonal development at embryonic day 16.5. It did lead to subtle behavioural deficits in adult offspring, manifested by reduced cocaine-conditioned preference, increased depressive behaviours and impaired working memory. Anxiety levels, motor function and sensory-motor gating were not significantly altered. Conclusions and ImplicationsTaken together, the present results highlight how exposure to elevated levels of anandamide and related N-acyl amides during brain development can lead to subtle alterations in behaviour in adulthood. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24730060

  8. Long-term consequences of perinatal fatty acid amino hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Morgan, Daniel; Jew, Chris P; Haskins, Chris; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Leishman, Emma; Spencer, Corinne M; Czyzyk, Traci; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2014-03-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors show promise as a treatment for anxiety, depression and pain. Here we investigated whether perinatal exposure to URB597, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, alters brain development and affects behaviour in adult mice. Mouse dams were treated daily from gestational day 10.5 to 16.5 with 1, 3 or 10 mg kg−1 URB597. MS was used to measure a panel of endocannabinoids and related lipid compounds and brain development was assessed at embryonic day 16.5. Separate cohorts of mouse dams were treated with 10 mg kg−1 URB597, from gestational day 10.5 to postnatal day 7, and the adult offspring were assessed with a battery of behavioural tests. Perinatal URB597 exposure elevated anandamide and related N-acyl amides. URB597 did not induce signs of toxicity or affect dam weight gain, neurogenesis or axonal development at embryonic day 16.5. It did lead to subtle behavioural deficits in adult offspring, manifested by reduced cocaine-conditioned preference, increased depressive behaviours and impaired working memory. Anxiety levels, motor function and sensory-motor gating were not significantly altered. Taken together, the present results highlight how exposure to elevated levels of anandamide and related N-acyl amides during brain development can lead to subtle alterations in behaviour in adulthood. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6

  9. Expression of key hydrolases for soy sauce fermentation in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Yuzuki, Masanobu; Matsushima, Kenichiro; Koyama, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Several key hydrolases in soy sauce fermentation such as proteases, peptidases, and glutaminases are supplied by Aspergillus sojae or Aspergillus oryzae. The genes encoding these hydrolases were successfully expressed in salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. These transformants are expected to supply extra hydrolases during soy sauce fermentation process.

  10. Development of fluorescent substrates for microsomal epoxide hydrolase and application to inhibition studies

    PubMed Central

    Morisseau, Christophe; Bernay, Maud; Escaich, Aurélie; Sanborn, James R.; Lango, Jozsef; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a significant role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. Additionally, it has a potential role in sexual development and bile acid transport, and it is associated with a number of diseases, such as emphysema, spontaneous abortion, eclampsia and several forms of cancer. Toward developing chemical tools to study mEH biological role, we designed and synthesized a series of absorbent and fluorescent substrates. The highest activity for both rat and human mEH was obtained with the fluorescent substrate cyano(6-methoxy-naphthalen-2-yl)methyl glycidyl carbonate (11). An in vitro inhibition assay using this substrate ranked a series of known inhibitors similarly to the assay that used radioactive cis-stilbene oxide, but with a greater discrimination between inhibitors. These results demonstrate that the new fluorescence-based assay is a useful tool for the discovery of structure-activity relationships among mEH inhibitors. Further, this substrate could also be used for the screening chemical library with high accuracy and with a Z' value about 0.7. This new assay permits a significant decrease in labor and cost as well as offering the advantage of a continuous readout. However, it should not be used with crude enzyme preparations due to interfering reactions. PMID:21371418

  11. Structure of the Ubiquitin Hydrolase UCH-L3 Complexed with a Suicide Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Misaghi, S.; Galardy, P.J.; Meester, W.J.; Ovaa, H.; Ploegh, H.L.; Gaudet, R.

    2009-03-24

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) comprise a family of small ubiquitin-specific proteases of uncertain function. Although no cellular substrates have been identified for UCHs, their highly tissue-specific expression patterns and the association of UCH-L1 mutations with human disease strongly suggest a critical role. The structure of the yeast UCH Yuh1-ubiquitin aldehyde complex identified an active site crossover loop predicted to limit the size of suitable substrates. We report the 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of human UCH-L3 in complex with the inhibitor ubiquitin vinylmethylester, an inhibitor that forms a covalent adduct with the active site cysteine of ubiquitin-specific proteases. This structure confirms the predicted mechanism of the inhibitor and allows the direct comparison of a UCH family enzyme in the free and ligand-bound state. We also show the efficient hydrolysis by human UCH-L3 of a 13-residue peptide in isopeptide linkage with ubiquitin, consistent with considerable flexibility in UCH substrate size. We propose a model for the catalytic cycle of UCH family members which accounts for the hydrolysis of larger ubiquitin conjugates.

  12. Structure of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L3 complexed with a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Galardy, Paul J; Meester, Wim J N; Ovaa, Huib; Ploegh, Hidde L; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2005-01-14

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) comprise a family of small ubiquitin-specific proteases of uncertain function. Although no cellular substrates have been identified for UCHs, their highly tissue-specific expression patterns and the association of UCH-L1 mutations with human disease strongly suggest a critical role. The structure of the yeast UCH Yuh1-ubiquitin aldehyde complex identified an active site crossover loop predicted to limit the size of suitable substrates. We report the 1.45 A resolution crystal structure of human UCH-L3 in complex with the inhibitor ubiquitin vinylmethylester, an inhibitor that forms a covalent adduct with the active site cysteine of ubiquitin-specific proteases. This structure confirms the predicted mechanism of the inhibitor and allows the direct comparison of a UCH family enzyme in the free and ligand-bound state. We also show the efficient hydrolysis by human UCH-L3 of a 13-residue peptide in isopeptide linkage with ubiquitin, consistent with considerable flexibility in UCH substrate size. We propose a model for the catalytic cycle of UCH family members which accounts for the hydrolysis of larger ubiquitin conjugates.

  13. Development of fluorescent substrates for microsomal epoxide hydrolase and application to inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Morisseau, Christophe; Bernay, Maud; Escaich, Aurélie; Sanborn, James R; Lango, Jozsef; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-07-01

    The microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a significant role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. In addition, it has a potential role in sexual development and bile acid transport, and it is associated with a number of diseases such as emphysema, spontaneous abortion, eclampsia, and several forms of cancer. Toward developing chemical tools to study the biological role of mEH, we designed and synthesized a series of absorbent and fluorescent substrates. The highest activity for both rat and human mEH was obtained with the fluorescent substrate cyano(6-methoxy-naphthalen-2-yl)methyl glycidyl carbonate (11). An in vitro inhibition assay using this substrate ranked a series of known inhibitors similarly to the assay that used radioactive cis-stilbene oxide but with a greater discrimination between inhibitors. These results demonstrate that the new fluorescence-based assay is a useful tool for the discovery of structure-activity relationships among mEH inhibitors. Furthermore, this substrate could also be used for the screening chemical library with high accuracy and with a Z' value of approximately 0.7. This new assay permits a significant decrease in labor and cost and also offers the advantage of a continuous readout. However, it should not be used with crude enzyme preparations due to interfering reactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase or genetic deletion reduces diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Rand, Amelia Ann; Wan, Debin; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; Thomas, Melany; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Guang-Yu; Hammock, Bruce D

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that gastric ulcers caused by the NSAID diclofenac sodium (DCF) can be prevented by the soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor TPPU. Mice were administered a single dose of 10, 30 or 100mg/kg of DCF. Once an ulcerative dose of DCF was chosen, mice were pretreated with TPPU for 7days at 0.1mg/kg to evaluate anti-ulcer effects of the sEH inhibitor on anatomy, histopathology, pH, inflammatory markers and epithelial apoptosis of stomachs. Diclofenac caused ulceration of the stomach at a dose of 100mg/kg and a time post dose of 6h. Ulcers generated under these conditions were associated with a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in serum and increased apoptosis compared to control mice. Pretreatment with TPPU resulted in a decrease of ulceration in mice treated with DCF with a significant decrease in the level of apoptosis, TNF-α and IL-6 in the serum in comparison to diclofenac-treated mice. TPPU did not affect the pH of the stomach, whereas omeprazole elevated the pH of the stomach as expected. A similar anti-ulcer effect was observed in sEH gene knockout mice treated with DCF. The sEH inhibitor TPPU decreases the NSAID-induced stomach ulcers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of phosphatase activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase in regulating simvastatin-activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Liao, Yi-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2015-08-25

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has C-terminal epoxide hydrolase and N-terminal lipid phosphatase activity. Its hydrolase activity is associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. However, little is known about the role of sEH phosphatase in regulating eNOS activity. Simvastatin, a clinical lipid-lowering drug, also has a pleiotropic effect on eNOS activation. However, whether sEH phosphatase is involved in simvastatin-activated eNOS activity remains elusive. We investigated the role of sEH phosphatase activity in simvastatin-mediated activation of eNOS in endothelial cells (ECs). Simvastain increased the phosphatase activity of sEH, which was diminished by pharmacological inhibitors of sEH phosphatase. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of sEH phosphatase or overexpressing the inactive phosphatase domain of sEH enhanced simvastatin-induced NO bioavailability, tube formation and phosphorylation of eNOS, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, overexpressing the phosphatase domain of sEH limited the simvastatin-increased NO biosynthesis and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179. Simvastatin evoked epidermal growth factor receptor-c-Src-increased Tyr phosphorylation of sEH and formation of an sEH-Akt-AMPK-eNOS complex, which was abolished by the c-Src kinase inhibitor PP1 or c-Src dominant-negative mutant K298M. These findings suggest that sEH phosphatase activity negatively regulates simvastatin-activated eNOS by impeding the Akt-AMPK-eNOS signaling cascade.

  16. Role of phosphatase activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase in regulating simvastatin-activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Liao, Yi-Jen; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has C-terminal epoxide hydrolase and N-terminal lipid phosphatase activity. Its hydrolase activity is associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. However, little is known about the role of sEH phosphatase in regulating eNOS activity. Simvastatin, a clinical lipid-lowering drug, also has a pleiotropic effect on eNOS activation. However, whether sEH phosphatase is involved in simvastatin-activated eNOS activity remains elusive. We investigated the role of sEH phosphatase activity in simvastatin-mediated activation of eNOS in endothelial cells (ECs). Simvastain increased the phosphatase activity of sEH, which was diminished by pharmacological inhibitors of sEH phosphatase. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of sEH phosphatase or overexpressing the inactive phosphatase domain of sEH enhanced simvastatin-induced NO bioavailability, tube formation and phosphorylation of eNOS, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, overexpressing the phosphatase domain of sEH limited the simvastatin-increased NO biosynthesis and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179. Simvastatin evoked epidermal growth factor receptor–c-Src–increased Tyr phosphorylation of sEH and formation of an sEH–Akt–AMPK–eNOS complex, which was abolished by the c-Src kinase inhibitor PP1 or c-Src dominant-negative mutant K298M. These findings suggest that sEH phosphatase activity negatively regulates simvastatin-activated eNOS by impeding the Akt–AMPK–eNOS signaling cascade. PMID:26304753

  17. ENGINEERING OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN HYDROLASES FOR CONTROL OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages are viruses exclusively infecting bacteria and therefore offer suitable tools for their detection and control. At the end of their multiplication cycle, most phages lyse their hosts from within by means of an endolysin (peptidoglycan hydrolase), thereby enabling release of the phage p...

  18. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. Their action usually generates a small hole through which the phage tail crosses the cell envelope to inject the phage genetic m...

  19. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2016-10-25

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacylethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings. The subject matter disclosed herein relates to enhancers of amidohydrolase activity.

  20. Curation of characterized glycoside hydrolases of Fungal origin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin; Powlowski, Justin; Wu, Min; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Fungi produce a wide range of extracellular enzymes to break down plant cell walls, which are composed mainly of cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose. Among them are the glycoside hydrolases (GH), the largest and most diverse family of enzymes active on these substrates. To facilitate research and development of enzymes for the conversion of cell-wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars, we have manually curated a comprehensive set of characterized fungal glycoside hydrolases. Characterized glycoside hydrolases were retrieved from protein and enzyme databases, as well as literature repositories. A total of 453 characterized glycoside hydrolases have been cataloged. They come from 131 different fungal species, most of which belong to the phylum Ascomycota. These enzymes represent 46 different GH activities and cover 44 of the 115 CAZy GH families. In addition to enzyme source and enzyme family, available biochemical properties such as temperature and pH optima, specific activity, kinetic parameters and substrate specificities were recorded. To simplify comparative studies, enzyme and species abbreviations have been standardized, Gene Ontology terms assigned and reference to supporting evidence provided. The annotated genes have been organized in a searchable, online database called mycoCLAP (Characterized Lignocellulose-Active Proteins of fungal origin). It is anticipated that this manually curated collection of biochemically characterized fungal proteins will be used to enhance functional annotation of novel GH genes. Database URL: http://mycoCLAP.fungalgenomics.ca/ PMID:21622642

  1. Novel microbial epoxide hydrolases for biohydrolysis of glycidyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kotik, Michael; Brichac, Jiri; Kyslík, Pavel

    2005-12-06

    Microbial isolates from biofilters and petroleum-polluted bioremediation sites were screened for the presence of enantioselective epoxide hydrolases active towards tert-butyl glycidyl ether, benzyl glycidyl ether, and allyl glycidyl ether. Out of 270 isolated strains, which comprised bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi, four were selected based on the enantioselectivities of their epoxide hydrolases determined in biotransformation reactions. The enzyme of Aspergillus niger M200 preferentially hydrolyses (S)-tert-butyl glycidyl ether to (S)-3-tert-butoxy-1,2-propanediol with a relatively high enantioselectivity (the enantiomeric ratio E is about 30 at a reaction temperature of 28 degrees C). Epoxide hydrolases of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa M002 and Rhodococcus fascians M022 hydrolyse benzyl glycidyl ether with relatively low enantioselectivities, the former reacting predominantly with the (S)-enantiomer, the latter preferring the (R)-enantiomer. Enzymatic hydrolysis of allyl glycidyl ether by Cryptococcus laurentii M001 proceeds with low enantioselectivity (E=3). (R)-tert-Butyl glycidyl ether with an enantiomeric excess (ee) of over 99%, and (S)-3-tert-butoxy-1,2-propanediol with an ee-value of 86% have been prepared on a gram-scale using whole cells of A. niger M200. An enantiomeric ratio of approximately 100 has been determined under optimised biotransformation conditions with the partially purified epoxide hydrolase from A. niger M200. The regioselectivity of this enzyme was determined to be total for both (S)-tert-butyl glycidyl ether and (R)-tert-butyl glycidyl ether.

  2. Recognition of corn defense chitinases by fungal polyglycine hydrolases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyglycine hydrolases (PGH)s are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave peptide bonds in the polyglycine interdomain linker of ChitA chitinase, an antifungal protein from domesticated corn (Zea mays ssp. mays). These target-specific endoproteases are unusual because they do not cut a defined pep...

  3. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED ASSAY FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a rapid and versatile Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphates. This assay is based on a substrate-dependent change in pH at the local vicinity of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), ...

  4. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED ASSAY FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a rapid and versatile Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphates. This assay is based on a substrate-dependent change in pH at the local vicinity of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), ...

  5. Soluble epoxide hydrolase activity and pharmacologic inhibition in horses with chronic severe laminitis.

    PubMed

    Guedes, A; Galuppo, L; Hood, D; Hwang, S H; Morisseau, C; Hammock, B D

    2017-05-01

    The roles of soluble epoxide hydrolase and lipid mediators in inflammatory and neuropathic pain could be relevant in laminitis pain management. To determine soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) activity in the digital laminae, sEH inhibitor potency in vitro, and efficacy of a sEH inhibitor as an adjunct analgesic therapy in chronic laminitic horses. In vitro experiments and clinical case series. sEH activity was measured in digital laminae from euthanised healthy and laminitic horses (n = 5-6/group). Potency of 7 synthetic sEH inhibitors was determined in vitro using equine liver cytosol. One of them (t-TUCB; 0.1 mg/kg bwt i.v. every 24 h) was selected based on potency and stability, and used as adjunct therapy in 10 horses with severe chronic laminitis (Obel grades 2, one horse; 3-4, nine horses). Daily assessments of forelimb lifts, pain scores, physiologic and laboratory examinations were performed before (baseline) and during t-TUCB treatment. Data are presented as mean ± s.d. and 95% confidence intervals (CI). sEH activity in the digital laminae from laminitic horses (0.9±0.6 nmol/min/mg; 95% CI 0.16-1.55 nmol/min/mg) was significantly greater (P = 0.01) than in healthy horses (0.17±0.09 nmol/min/mg; CI 0.07-0.26 nmol/min/mg). t-TUCB as an adjunct analgesic up to 10 days (4.3±3 days) in laminitic horses was associated with significant reduction in forelimb lifts (36±22%; 95% CI 9-64%) and in pain scores (18±23%; 95% CI 2-35%) compared with baseline (P = 0.04). One horse developed gas colic and another corneal vascularisation in a blind eye during treatment. No other significant changes were observed. Absence of control group and evaluator blinding in case series. sEH activity is significantly higher in the digital laminae of actively laminitic compared with healthy horses, and use of a potent inhibitor of equine sEH as adjunct analgesic therapy appears to decrease signs of pathologic pain in laminitic horses. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  6. The role of human glutathione transferases and epoxide hydrolases in the metabolism of xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Seidegård, J; Ekström, G

    1997-01-01

    Human glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a multigene family of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of a wide range of electrophilic compounds of both exogenous and endogenous origin. GSTs are generally recognized as detoxifying enzymes by catalyzing the conjugation of these compounds with glutathione, but they may also be involved in activation of some carcinogens. The memmalian GSTs can be differentiated into four classes of cytosolic enzymes and two membrane bound enzymes. Human epoxide hydrolases (EHs) catalyze the addition of water to epoxides to form the corresponding dihydrodiol. The enzymatic hydration is essentially irreversible and produces mainly metabolites of lower reactivity that can be conjugated and excreted. The reaction of EHs is therefore generally regarded as detoxifying. The mammalian EHs can be distinguished by their physical and enzymatic properties. Microsomal EH (mEH) exhibits a broad substrate specificity, while the soluble EH (sEH) is an enzyme with a "complementary" substrate specificity to mEH. Cholesterol EH and leukotriene A4 hydrolase are two EHs with very limited substrate specificity. The activities of either GSTs or EHs expressed in vivo exhibit a relatively large interindividual variation, which might be explained by induction, inhibition, or genetic factors. These variations in levels or activities of individual isoenzymes are of importance with respect to an individual's susceptibility to genotoxic effects. This article gives a general overview of GSTs and EHs, discussing the modulation of activities, determination of these enzymes ex vivo, and the polymorphic expression of some isoenzymes. PMID:9255563

  7. Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Hydrolase Activities of Mutant Esterases from the Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Farnsworth, Claire A.; Coppin, Chris W.; Teese, Mark G.; Liu, Jian-Wei; Scott, Colin; Zhang, Xing; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Two mutations have been found in five closely related insect esterases (from four higher Diptera and a hymenopteran) which each confer organophosphate (OP) hydrolase activity on the enzyme and OP resistance on the insect. One mutation converts a Glycine to an Aspartate, and the other converts a Tryptophan to a Leucine in the enzymes’ active site. One of the dipteran enzymes with the Leucine mutation also shows enhanced activity against pyrethroids. Introduction of the two mutations in vitro into eight esterases from six other widely separated insect groups has also been reported to increase substantially the OP hydrolase activity of most of them. These data suggest that the two mutations could contribute to OP, and possibly pyrethroid, resistance in a variety of insects. We therefore introduced them in vitro into eight Helicoverpa armigera esterases from a clade that has already been implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance. We found that they do not generally enhance either OP or pyrethroid hydrolysis in these esterases but the Aspartate mutation did increase OP hydrolysis in one enzyme by about 14 fold and the Leucine mutation caused a 4–6 fold increase in activity (more in one case) of another three against some of the most insecticidal isomers of fenvalerate and cypermethrin. The Aspartate enzyme and one of the Leucine enzymes occur in regions of the H. armigera esterase isozyme profile that have been previously implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance, respectively. PMID:24204917

  8. Organophosphate and pyrethroid hydrolase activities of mutant Esterases from the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Farnsworth, Claire A; Coppin, Chris W; Teese, Mark G; Liu, Jian-Wei; Scott, Colin; Zhang, Xing; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2013-01-01

    Two mutations have been found in five closely related insect esterases (from four higher Diptera and a hymenopteran) which each confer organophosphate (OP) hydrolase activity on the enzyme and OP resistance on the insect. One mutation converts a Glycine to an Aspartate, and the other converts a Tryptophan to a Leucine in the enzymes' active site. One of the dipteran enzymes with the Leucine mutation also shows enhanced activity against pyrethroids. Introduction of the two mutations in vitro into eight esterases from six other widely separated insect groups has also been reported to increase substantially the OP hydrolase activity of most of them. These data suggest that the two mutations could contribute to OP, and possibly pyrethroid, resistance in a variety of insects. We therefore introduced them in vitro into eight Helicoverpa armigera esterases from a clade that has already been implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance. We found that they do not generally enhance either OP or pyrethroid hydrolysis in these esterases but the Aspartate mutation did increase OP hydrolysis in one enzyme by about 14 fold and the Leucine mutation caused a 4-6 fold increase in activity (more in one case) of another three against some of the most insecticidal isomers of fenvalerate and cypermethrin. The Aspartate enzyme and one of the Leucine enzymes occur in regions of the H. armigera esterase isozyme profile that have been previously implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance, respectively.

  9. The 2014 Bernard B. Brodie Award Lecture—Epoxide Hydrolases: Drug Metabolism to Therapeutics for Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Bernard Brodie’s legacy is built on fundamental discoveries in pharmacology and drug metabolism that were then translated to the clinic to improve patient care. Similarly, the development of a novel class of therapeutics termed the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors was originally spurred by fundamental research exploring the biochemistry and physiology of the sEH. Here, we present an overview of the history and current state of research on epoxide hydrolases, specifically focusing on sEHs. In doing so, we start with the translational project studying the metabolism of the insect juvenile hormone mimic R-20458 [(E)-6,7-epoxy-1-(4-ethylphenoxy)-3,7-dimethyl-2-octene], which led to the identification of the mammalian sEH. Further investigation of this enzyme and its substrates, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, led to insight into mechanisms of inflammation, chronic and neuropathic pain, angiogenesis, and other physiologic processes. This basic knowledge in turn led to the development of potent inhibitors of the sEH that are promising therapeutics for pain, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, arthritis, and other disorders. PMID:25762541

  10. Consolidation of glycosyl hydrolase family 30 : a dual domain 4/7 hydrolase family consisting of two structurally distinct groups

    Treesearch

    Franz J. St John; Javier M. Gonzalez; Edwin Pozharski

    2010-01-01

    In this work glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 30 (GH30) is analyzed and shown to consist of its currently classified member sequences as well as several homologous sequence groups currently assigned within family GH5. A large scale amino acid sequence alignment and a phylogenetic tree were generated and GH30 groups and subgroups were designated. A partial rearrangement...

  11. Flaxseed consumption reduces blood pressure in patients with hypertension by altering circulating oxylipins via an α-linolenic acid-induced inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Aukema, Harold M; Ravandi, Amir; Guzman, Randy; Dibrov, Elena; Pierce, Grant N

    2014-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial, participants with peripheral arterial disease (75% hypertensive) consumed 30 g of milled flaxseed/d for 6 months. The flaxseed group exhibited significant reductions in systolic (-10 mm Hg) and diastolic (-7 mm Hg) blood pressure. Flaxseed contains the n3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid. Plasma α-linolenic acid increased with ingestion of flaxseed and was inversely associated with blood pressure. However, the antihypertensive mechanism was unclear. Oxylipins derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids regulate vascular tone. Therefore, the objective was to examine whether flaxseed consumption altered plasma oxylipins in a manner that influenced blood pressure. Plasma of FlaxPAD (Flaxseed for Peripheral Arterial Disease) participants underwent solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. The flaxseed group exhibited significant decreases in 8 plasma oxylipins versus control. Six of these (5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid and 9,10- and 12,13-dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid) were products of soluble epoxide hydrolase, a pharmacological target for antihypertensive treatment. Patients exhibiting a decrease in total plasma soluble epoxide hydrolase-derived oxylipins, exhibited a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (mean [95% confidence interval], -7.97 [-14.4 to -1.50] mm Hg) versus those who exhibited increased plasma soluble epoxide hydrolase-derived oxylipins (+3.17 [-4.78 to 11.13] mm Hg). These data suggest that a flaxseed bioactive may have decreased blood pressure via soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition. Using a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor screening assay, increasing concentrations of α-linolenic acid decreased soluble epoxide hydrolase activity (P=0.0048; ρ=-0.94). In conclusion, α-linolenic acid in flaxseed may have inhibited soluble epoxide hydrolase, which altered oxylipin concentrations that

  12. Pharmacokinetics of OpdA, an organophosphorus hydrolase, in the African Green Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Colin J; Scott, Colin; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith; Ollis, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are a broad class of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that are responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide, contributing to an estimated 300,000 deaths annually. Current pharmacotherapy for acute OP poisoning includes the use of atropine, an oxime, and benzodiazepines. However, even with such therapy, the mortality from these agents are as high as 40%. Enzymatic hydrolysis of OPs is an attractive new potential therapy for acute OP poisoning. A number of bacterial OP hydrolases have been isolated. A promising OP hydrolase is an enzyme isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter, named OpdA. OpdA has been shown to decrease lethality in rodent models of parathion and dichlorvos poisoning. However, pharmacokinetic data have not been obtained. In this study, we examined the pharmacokinetics of OpdA in an African Green Monkey model. At a dose of 1.2 mg/kg the half-life of OpdA was approximately 40 minutes, with a mean residence time of 57 minutes. As expected, the half-life did not change with the dose of OpdA given: at doses of 0.15 and 0.45 mg/kg, the half-life of OpdA was 43.1 and 38.9 minutes, respectively. In animals subjected to 5 daily doses of OpdA, the residual activity that was measured 24 hours after each OpdA dose increased 5-fold for the 0.45 mg/kg dose and 11-fold for the 1.2 mg/kg dose. OpdA exhibits pharmacokinetics favorable for the further development as a therapy for acute OP poisoning, particularly for hydrophilic OP pesticides. Future work to increase the half-life of OpdA may be beneficial. PMID:20599794

  13. Combined cocaine hydrolase gene transfer and anti-cocaine vaccine synergistically block cocaine-induced locomotion.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Marilyn E; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Anker, Justin J; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Kinsey, Berma; Parks, Robin J; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/kg. When CocH was injected i.p. along with a murine cocaine antiserum that also did not affect spontaneous locomotion, there was no response to any cocaine dose. This suppression of locomotor activity required active enzyme, as it was lost after pretreatment with iso-OMPA, a selective BChE inhibitor. Comparable results were obtained in rats that developed high levels of CocH by gene transfer with helper-dependent adenoviral vector, and/or high levels of anti-cocaine antibody by vaccination with norcocaine hapten conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). After these treatments, rats were subjected to a locomotor sensitization paradigm involving a "training phase" with an initial i.p. saline injection on day 1 followed by 8 days of repeated cocaine injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.). A 15-day rest period then ensued, followed by a final "challenge" cocaine injection. As in mice, the individual treatment interventions reduced cocaine-stimulated hyperactivity to a modest extent, while combined treatment produced a greater reduction during all phases of testing compared to control rats (with only saline pretreatment). Overall, the present results strongly support the view that anti-cocaine vaccine and cocaine hydrolase vector treatments together provide enhanced protection against the stimulatory actions of cocaine in rodents. A similar combination therapy in human cocaine users might provide a robust therapy to help maintain abstinence.

  14. INHIBITION OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE DOES NOT PROTECT AGAINST ENDOTOXIN-MEDIATED HEPATIC INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Kimberly L.; Liu, YingMei; Schmelzer, Kara R.; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Kim, In-Hae; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2009-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are derived from cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed epoxygenation of arachidonic acid and have emerged as important mediators of numerous biological effects. The major elimination pathway for EETs is through soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) catalyzed metabolism to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). Based on previous studies showing that EETs have anti-inflammatory effects, we hypothesized that chronic inhibition of sEH would attenuate a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in vivo. Continuous dosing of the sEH inhibitors 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a polyethylene glycol ester of AUDA (AUDA-PEG), and 1-adamantan-1-yl-3-(5-(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) resulted in robust exposure to the inhibitor and target engagement, as evidenced by significant increases in plasma EET/DHET ratios following six days of inhibitor treatment. However, sEH inhibitor treatment was not associated with an attenuation of LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression in the liver and AUDA did not protect from LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, Ephx2 −/− mice that lack sEH expression and have significantly increased plasma EET/DHET ratios were not protected from LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression or neutrophil accumulation in the liver. LPS did have an effect on sEH expression and function, as evident from a significant downregulation of Ephx2 mRNA and a significant shift in plasma EET/DHET ratios four hours after LPS treatment. In conclusion, there was no evidence that increasing EET levels in vivo could modulate an LPS-induced inflammatory response in the liver. However, LPS did have significant effects on plasma eicosanoid levels and hepatic Ephx2 expression, suggesting that in vivo EET levels are modulated in response to an inflammatory signal. PMID:18815352

  15. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2.

  16. Diversity and Biocatalytic Potential of Epoxide Hydrolases Identified by Genome Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Bert; Kingma, Jaap; Arand, Michael; Wubbolts, Marcel G.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2006-01-01

    Epoxide hydrolases play an important role in the biodegradation of organic compounds and are potentially useful in enantioselective biocatalysis. An analysis of various genomic databases revealed that about 20% of sequenced organisms contain one or more putative epoxide hydrolase genes. They were found in all domains of life, and many fungi and actinobacteria contain several putative epoxide hydrolase-encoding genes. Multiple sequence alignments of epoxide hydrolases with other known and putative α/β-hydrolase fold enzymes that possess a nucleophilic aspartate revealed that these enzymes can be classified into eight phylogenetic groups that all contain putative epoxide hydrolases. To determine their catalytic activities, 10 putative bacterial epoxide hydrolase genes and 2 known bacterial epoxide hydrolase genes were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The production of active enzyme was strongly improved by fusion to the maltose binding protein (MalE), which prevented inclusion body formation and facilitated protein purification. Eight of the 12 fusion proteins were active toward one or more of the 21 epoxides that were tested, and they converted both terminal and nonterminal epoxides. Four of the new epoxide hydrolases showed an uncommon enantiopreference for meso-epoxides and/or terminal aromatic epoxides, which made them suitable for the production of enantiopure (S,S)-diols and (R)-epoxides. The results show that the expression of epoxide hydrolase genes that are detected by analyses of genomic databases is a useful strategy for obtaining new biocatalysts. PMID:16597997

  17. Cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolases are immunologically distinguishable from each other in the rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Hammock, B D; Vogel, U; Oesch, F

    1981-04-10

    Antibodies raised to homogeneous rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase were used to distinguish microsomal epoxide hydrolase from epoxide hydrolase of cytosolic origin in mice and rats. Using double diffusion analysis in agarose gels, we show that anti-rat liver microsomal epoxide hydrolase forms a single precipitin line with solubilized microsomes from rat and mouse liver, but no reaction is seen with the corresponding cytosolic fractions. Rat or mouse microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity (using benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide as substrate) can be completely precipitated out of solubilized preparations by the antibody, which is equipotent against rat and mouse microsomal epoxide hydrolase. No precipitation of cytosolic hydrolase activity (using trans-beta-ethyl styrene oxide as substrate) is seen with any concentration of the antibody tested. Thus, in the case of microsomal epoxide hydrolase, extensive immunological cross-reactivity exists between the two species, rat and mouse. In contrast, no cross-reactivity is detectable between cytosolic and microsomal epoxide hydrolase, even when enzymes from the same species are compared. We conclude that microsomal and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activities represent distinct and immunologically non-cross-reactive protein species.

  18. Molecular modeling studies on nucleoside hydrolase from the biological warfare agent Brucella suis.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Daiana T; Matos, Karina S; da Cunha, Elaine F F; Assis, Tamiris M; Guimarães, Ana P; França, Tanos C C; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2012-01-01

    Brucella suis is a dangerous biological warfare agent already used for military purposes. This bacteria cause brucellosis, a zoonosis highly infective and difficult to fight. An important selective target for chemotherapy against this disease is nucleoside hydrolase (NH), an enzyme still not found in mammals. We present here the first three-dimensional structure of B. suis NH (BsNH) and propose this enzyme as a molecular target to the drug design in the fight against brucellosis. In addition, we performed molecular docking studies, aiming to analyze the three-dimensional positioning of nine known inhibitors of Chritidia fasciculata NH (CfNH) in the active sites of BsNH and CfNH. We also analyzed the main interactions of some of these compounds inside the active site of BsNH and the relevant factors to biological activity. These results, together with further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, pointed out to the most promising compound as lead for the design of potential inhibitors of BsNH. Most of the docking and MD results corroborated to each other and the docking results also suggested a good correlation with experimental data.

  19. Role of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 in antipolyspermy defense of mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Susor, Andrej; Liskova, Lucie; Toralova, Tereza; Pavlok, Antonin; Pivonkova, Katerina; Karabinova, Pavla; Lopatarova, Miloslava; Sutovsky, Peter; Kubelka, Michal

    2010-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates many cellular processes through rapid proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1) is one of the most abundant proteins in mammalian oocytes. It has weak hydrolytic activity as a monomer and acts as a ubiquitin ligase in its dimeric or oligomeric form. Recently published data show that insufficiency in UCHL1 activity coincides with polyspermic fertilization; however, the mechanism by which UCHL1 contributes to this process remains unclear. Using UCHL1-specific inhibitors, we induced a high rate of polyspermy in bovine zygotes after in vitro fertilization. We also detected decreased levels in the monomeric ubiquitin and polyubiquitin pool. The presence of UCHL1 inhibitors in maturation medium enhanced formation of presumptive UCHL1 oligomers and subsequently increased abundance of K63-linked polyubiquitin chains in oocytes. We analyzed the dynamics of cortical granules (CGs) in UCHL1-inhibited oocytes; both migration of CGs toward the cortex during oocyte maturation and fertilization-induced extrusion of CGs were impaired. These alterations in CG dynamics coincided with high polyspermy incidence in in vitro-produced UCHL1-inhibited zygotes. These data indicate that antipolyspermy defense in bovine oocytes may rely on UCHL1-controlled functioning of CGs.

  20. Synthesis of Phenoxyacyl-Ethanolamides and Their Effects on Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Lionel; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Hwang, Hyeondo; Montgomery, Christa L.; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; John, George; Koulen, Peter; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Chapman, Kent D.

    2014-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are involved in numerous biological activities in plant and animal systems. The metabolism of these lipids by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a key regulatory point in NAE signaling activity. Several active site-directed inhibitors of FAAH have been identified, but few compounds have been described that enhance FAAH activity. Here we synthesized two sets of phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides from natural products, 3-n-pentadecylphenolethanolamide and cardanolethanolamide, with structural similarity to NAEs and characterized their effects on the hydrolytic activity of FAAH. Both compounds increased the apparent Vmax of recombinant FAAH proteins from both plant (Arabidopsis) and mammalian (Rattus) sources. These NAE-like compounds appeared to act by reducing the negative feedback regulation of FAAH activity by free ethanolamine. Both compounds added to seedlings relieved, in part, the negative growth effects of exogenous NAE12:0. Cardanolethanolamide reduced neuronal viability and exacerbated oxidative stress-mediated cell death in primary cultured neurons at nanomolar concentrations. This was reversed by FAAH inhibitors or exogenous NAE substrate. Collectively, our data suggest that these phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides act to enhance the activity of FAAH and may stimulate the turnover of NAEs in vivo. Hence, these compounds might be useful pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH-mediated regulation of NAE signaling in plants or animals. PMID:24558037

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase ameliorates diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abishek; Kauter, Kathleen; Alam, Md Ashraful; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The signs of metabolic syndrome following chronic excessive macronutrient intake include body weight gain, excess visceral adipose deposition, hyperglycaemia, glucose and insulin intolerances, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, endothelial damage, cardiovascular hypertrophy, inflammation, ventricular contractile dysfunction, fibrosis, and fatty liver disease. Recent studies show increased activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) during obesity and metabolic dysfunction. We have tested whether sEH inhibition has therapeutic potential in a rat model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. In these high-carbohydrate, high-fat-fed rats, chronic oral treatment with trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB), a potent sEH inhibitor, alleviated the signs of metabolic syndrome in vivo including glucose, insulin, and lipid abnormalities, changes in pancreatic structure, increased systolic blood pressure, cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities, and structural and functional changes in the liver. The present study describes the pharmacological responses to this selective sEH inhibitor in rats with the signs of diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

  2. Purification and characterization of pranlukast hydrolase from rat liver microsomes: the hydrolase is identical to carboxylesterase pI 6.2.

    PubMed

    Luan, L; Sugiyama, T; Takai, S; Usami, Y; Adachi, T; Katagiri, Y; Hirano, K

    1997-01-01

    Two carboxylesterases with pI 6.0 and 6.2 derived from rat liver microsomes were purified. The two isozymes were remarkably different in substrate specificity, but they had equal enzymatic activity for alpha-naphthyl acetate and were inhibited equally by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and bis-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP). Carboxylesterases pI 6.0 and 6.2 are identical to the enzymes referred to as hydrolase A and B, respectively, from the results of amino acid sequence analyses. Pranlukast was effectively hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase pI 6.2 but not by the pI 6.0 enzyme, and the difference in the pranlukast metabolism between the human and the rat could be explained by the substrate specificity of carboxylesterase. Furthermore, prodrugs of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were found to be converted to the active drugs after hydrolysis by the carboxylesterases pI 6.0 and 6.2. Carboxylesterases generally catalyze the hydrolysis of ester-type drugs preferentially rather than amide-type drugs.

  3. pHluorin-based in vivo assay for hydrolase screening.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Sascha; Enzelberger, Markus; Trauthwein, Harald; Schmid, Rolf D; Urlacher, Vlada B

    2005-05-01

    pHluorin, a pH-sensitive mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFP), acts as a sensor for intracellular pH shifts, triggered by hydrolytic enzymes. This principle was used to develop a pHluorin-based in vivo assay for hydrolase screening. The presented assay was evaluated for Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells, producing heterologous pHluorin and an esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus which is considered as a model hydrolase. Subsequently, the utility of this detection system was also demonstrated with recombinantly expressed hydantoinase and amidase in E. coli. This in vivo assay also shows capability for readout with flow cytometric devices. Population shifts of pHluorin-expressing E. coli cells were easily recognized due to pH changes caused by substrate hydrolysis.

  4. Production, crystallization and structure determination of a mycobacterial glucosylglycerate hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cereija, Tatiana Barros; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2017-09-01

    Glucosylglycerate hydrolase is highly conserved among rapidly growing mycobacteria and has been found to be involved in recovery from nitrogen starvation by promoting the rapid mobilization of the glucosylglycerate that accumulates under these conditions. Here, the production, crystallization and structure determination of glucosylglycerate hydrolase from Mycobacterium hassiacum using two-wavelength anomalous diffraction of selenomethionine-substituted crystals are described. The monoclinic (space group P21) crystals diffracted to ∼2.0 Å resolution at a synchrotron-radiation source and contained four molecules in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 3.07 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 59.9%. The quality of the experimental phases allowed the automated building of 1677 of the 1792 residues in the asymmetric unit.

  5. Alpha/Beta-hydrolase fold enzymes: structures, functions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha/beta-hydrolase fold family of enzymes is rapidly becoming one of the largest group of structurally related enzymes with diverse catalytic functions. Members in this family include acetylcholinesterase, dienelactone hydrolase, lipase, thioesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, proline iminopeptidase, proline oligopeptidase, haloalkane dehalogenase, haloperoxidase, epoxide hydrolase, hydroxynitrile lyase and others. The enzymes all have a Nucleophile-His-Acid catalytic triad evolved to efficiently operate on substrates with different chemical composition or physicochemical properties and in various biological contexts. For example, acetylcholine esterase catalyzes the cleavage of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, at a rate close to the limits of diffusion of substrate to the active site of the enzyme. Dienelactone hydrolase uses substrate-assisted catalysis to degrade aromatic compounds. Lipases act adsorbed at the water/lipid interface of their neutral water-insoluble ester substrates. Most lipases have their active site buried under secondary structure elements, a flap, which must change conformation to allow substrate to access the active site. Thioesterases are involved in a multitude of biochemical processes including bioluminiscence, fatty acid- and polyketide biosynthesis and metabolism. Serine carboxypeptidases recognize the negatively charged carboxylate terminus of their peptide substrates. Haloalkane dehalogenase is a detoxifying enzyme that converts halogenated aliphatics to the corresponding alcohols, while haloperoxidase catalyzes the halogenation of organic compounds. Hydroxynitrile lyase cleaves carbon-carbon bonds in cyanohydrins with concomitant hydrogen cyanide formation as a defense mechanism in plants. This paper gives an overview of catalytic activities reported for this family of enzymes by discussing selected examples. The current state of knowledge of the molecular basis for catalysis and substrate specificity is outlined

  6. Isolation and characterization of Xenopus soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Purba, Endang R; Oguro, Ami; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) contributes to cell growth, but the contribution of sEH to embryonic development is not well understood. In this study, Xenopus sEH cDNA was isolated from embryos of Xenopus laevis. The Xenopus sEH was expressed in Escherichia coli and was purified. The epoxide hydrolase and phosphatase activities of purified sEH were investigated. The Xenopus sEH did not show phosphatase activity toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate or several lysophosphatidic acids although it had EH activity. The amino acid sequence of Xenopus sEH was compared with that reported previously. We found amino acid substitutions of the 29th Thr to Asn and the 146th Arg to His and prepared a sEH mutant (N29T/H146R), designed as mutant 1. Neither wild-type sEH nor mutant 1 had phosphatase activity. Additional substitution of the 11th Gly with Asp was found by comparison with human sEH which has phosphatase activity, but the Xenopus sEH mutant G11D prepared as mutant 2 did not have phosphatase activity. The epoxide hydrolase activity of sEH seemed to be similar to that of human sEH, while Xenopus sEH did not have phosphatase activity toward several substrates that human sEH metabolizes.

  7. Optimization of 1,2,5-Thiadiazole Carbamates as Potent and Selective ABHD6 Inhibitors #

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jayendra Z.; Nevalainen, Tapio J.; Savinainen, Juha R.; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Runyon, Robert S.; Vaara, Miia; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Kaczor, Agnieszka A.; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Gynther, Mikko; Aaltonen, Niina; Joharapurkar, Amit A.; Jain, Mukul R.; Haka, Abigail S.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Laitinen, Jarmo T.; Parkkari, Teija

    2015-01-01

    At present, inhibitors of α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) are viewed as a promising approach to treat inflammation and metabolic disorders. This article describes the optimization of 1,2,5-thiadiazole carbamates as ABHD6 inhibitors. Altogether, 34 compounds were synthesized and their inhibitory activity was tested using lysates of HEK293 cells transiently expressing human ABHD6 (hABHD6). Among the compound series, 4-morpholino-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl cyclooctyl(methyl)carbamate (JZP-430, 55) potently and irreversibly inhibited hABHD6 (IC50 44 nM) and showed good selectivity (∼230 fold) over fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), the main off-targets of related compounds. Additionally, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) indicated that compound 55 (JZP-430) displayed good selectivity among the serine hydrolases of mouse brain membrane proteome. PMID:25504894

  8. Human lung hydrolases delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis-macrophage interactions and the capacity to control infection.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Sasindran, Smitha J; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60-80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proinflammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis-macrophage interactions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection).

  9. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Ludmila; Bragg, Jennifer; Wu, Jiajie; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Vogel, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights

  10. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, at the levels of the whole genome and individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. For several glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51), we present a detailed literature review together with an examination of the family structures. This analysis of individual families revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and eudicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within GH families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for

  11. Contribution of hydrolase and phosphatase domains in soluble epoxide hydrolase to vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Ami; Sakamoto, Koichi; Suzuki, Sachiko; Imaoka, Susumu

    2009-12-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is an important pharmacological target because it metabolizes potent bioactive substrates, epoxyeicosatrienoinc acids (EETs) and other lipid epoxide. EETs have a variety of biological functions including angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. However, the regulation and physiological function of sEH is not well understood. In this study, we found that hypoxia significantly suppressed the expression of sEH in mouse liver and a human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B. Hypoxia promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells or carcinoma cells. Knockdown of sEH in Hep3B cells induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and cell growth, both of which were suppressed by overexpression of sEH. sEH has phosphatase activity as well as epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity. We prepared mutant clones which lacking EH or phosphatase activity using the amino acid change Asp335Ser or Asp9Ala, respectively. The effects of WT sEH on cell growth were lost by mutation of either the EH domain or phosphatase domain. However, mutation of the phosphatase domain but not EH domain did not influence the expression of VEGF. These results suggest that sEH plays an important role in the physiology of cells including proliferation and that the epoxide hydrolase and phosphatase domains of sEH have different biological functions.

  12. Immunohistochemical study of epoxide hydrolase induced by trichloroethylene in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, T.; Hobara, T.; Ogino, K.; Takemoto, T.; Nakamura, K.; Imamura, A.; Koshiro, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Iwamoto, S.; Sakai, T.

    1987-10-01

    Epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolation of potentially toxic, electrophilic epoxides that are often generated during cytochrome P-450 catalyzed monooxigenation, forming the corresponding transdihydrodiols. It is well-known that trichloroethylene is metabolized by cytochrome P-450 containing mixed-function oxidase systems to trichloroethylene oxide, which decomposes to other metabolites. As trichloroethylene is an epoxide, epoxide hydrolase is suspected to catalyze the hydrolation of trichloroethylene oxide. No reports have appeared about the relationship between trichloroethylene and epoxide hydrolase. In this report, the authors studied the effect of trichloroethylene on epoxide hydrolase immunohistochemically.

  13. SKI-606, a 4-anilino-3-quinolinecarbonitrile dual inhibitor of Src and Abl kinases, is a potent antiproliferative agent against chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in culture and causes regression of K562 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Golas, Jennifer M; Arndt, Kim; Etienne, Carlo; Lucas, Judy; Nardin, Danielle; Gibbons, James; Frost, Philip; Ye, Fei; Boschelli, Diane H; Boschelli, Frank

    2003-01-15

    Constitutive tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl promotes proliferation and survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Inhibition of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase activity or signaling proteins activated by Bcr-Abl in CML cells blocks proliferation and causes apoptotic cell death. The selective Abl kinase inhibitor, STI-571 (marketed as Gleevec), is toxic to CML cells in culture, causes regression of CML tumors in nude mice, and is currently used to treat CML patients. Here we describe a p.o. active, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor with potent antiproliferative activity against CML cells in culture. This 4-anilino-3-quinolinecarbonitrile (SKI-606) ablates tyrosine phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl in CML cells and of v-Abl expressed in fibroblasts. SKI-606 inhibits phosphorylation of cellular proteins, including STAT5, at concentrations that inhibit proliferation in CML cells. Phosphorylation of the autoactivation site of the Src family kinases Lyn and/or Hck is also reduced by treatment with SKI-606. Once daily oral administration of this compound at 100 mg/kg for 5 days causes complete regression of large K562 xenografts in nude mice.

  14. α/β-Hydrolase Domain 6 Deletion Induces Adipose Browning and Prevents Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shangang; Mugabo, Yves; Ballentine, Gwynne; Attane, Camille; Iglesias, Jose; Poursharifi, Pegah; Zhang, Dongwei; Nguyen, Thuy Anne; Erb, Heidi; Prentki, Raphael; Peyot, Marie-Line; Joly, Erik; Tobin, Stephanie; Fulton, Stephanie; Brown, J Mark; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-03-29

    Suppression of α/β-domain hydrolase-6 (ABHD6), a monoacylglycerol (MAG) hydrolase, promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells. We report here that high-fat-diet-fed ABHD6-KO mice show modestly reduced food intake, decreased body weight gain and glycemia, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and enhanced locomotor activity. ABHD6-KO mice also show increased energy expenditure, cold-induced thermogenesis, brown adipose UCP1 expression, fatty acid oxidation, and white adipose browning. Adipose browning and cold-induced thermogenesis are replicated by the ABHD6 inhibitor WWL70 and by antisense oligonucleotides targeting ABHD6. Our evidence suggests that one mechanism by which the lipolysis derived 1-MAG signals intrinsic and cell-autonomous adipose browning is via PPARα and PPARγ activation, and that ABHD6 regulates adipose browning by controlling signal competent 1-MAG levels. Thus, ABHD6 regulates energy homeostasis, brown adipose function, and white adipose browning and is a potential therapeutic target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Responses of Rat Intestinal Brush Border and Cytosol Peptide Hydrolase Activities to Variation in Dietary Protein Content DIETARY REGULATION OF INTESTINAL PEPTIDE HYDROLASES

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, J. Alex; McCarthy, Denis M.; Kim, Young S.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of variation in dietary protein content on small intestinal brush border and cytosol peptide hydrolase activities have been investigated. One group of rats was fed a high protein diet (55% casein) and another group was fed a low protein diet (10% casein). After 1 wk, brush border peptide hydrolase activity (L-leucyl-β-naphthylamide as substrate) and cytosol peptide hydrolase activity (L-prolyl-L-leucine as substrate) were determined in mucosae taken from the proximal, middle, and distal small intestine. As judged by several parameters, brush border peptide hydrolase activity was significantly greater in rats fed the high protein diet when data for corresponding segments were compared. In contrast, no significant difference was seen in cytosol peptide hydrolase activity. In a second study, brush border and cytosol peptide hydrolase activities were determined in the proximal intestine by utilizing an additional three peptide substrates: L-leucyl-L-alanine, L-phenylalanylglycine, and glycyl-L-phenylalanine. Sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were also determined. As before, brush border peptide hydrolase activities were significantly greater in rats fed the high protein diet. However, activities of the nonproteolytic brush border enzymes did not vary significantly with diet. In contrast to the results obtained with L-prolyl-L-leucine as substrate for the cytosol enzymes, cytosol activity against the three additional peptide substrates was greater in rats fed the high protein diet. It is suggested that the brush border peptide hydrolase response to variation in dietary protein content represents a functional adaptation analogous to the regulation of intestinal disaccharidases by dietary carbohydrates. The implication of the differential responses of the cytosol peptide hydrolases is uncertain, since little is known of the functional role of these nonorgan-specific enzymes. PMID:4430719

  16. An isofenphos-methyl hydrolase (Imh) capable of hydrolyzing the P-O-Z moiety of organophosphorus pesticides containing an aryl or heterocyclic group.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Kai; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphorus pesticide (OP) hydrolases play key roles in the degradation and decontamination of agricultural and household OPs and in the detoxification of chemical warfare agents. In this study, an isofenphos-methyl hydrolase gene (imh) was cloned from the isocarbophos-degrading strain of Arthrobacter sp. scl-2 using the polymerase chain reaction method. Isofenphos-methyl hydrolase (Imh) showed 98% sequence identity with the isofenphos hydrolase from Arthrobacter sp. strain B-5. Imh was highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the His(6)-tagged Imh was purified (1.7 mg/ml) with a specific activity of 14.35 U/mg for the substrate isofenphos-methyl. The molecular mass of the denatured Imh is about 44 kDa, and the isoelectric point (pI) value was estimated to be 3.4. The optimal pH and temperature for hydrolysis of isofenphos-methyl were pH 8.0 and 35 °C, respectively. The secondary structure of Imh shows that Imh is a metallo-dependent hydrolase, and it was found that Imh was completely inhibited by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (0.5 mM), and the catalytic activity was restored by the subsequent addition of Zn(2+). Interestingly, Imh had a relatively broader substrate specificity and was capable of hydrolyzing 12 of the tested oxon and thion OPs with the P-O-Z moiety instead of the P-S(C)-Z moiety. Furthermore, it was found that the existence of an aryl or heterocyclic group in the leaving group (Z) is also important in determining the substrate specificity. Among all the substrates hydrolyzed by Imh, it was assumed that Imh preferred P-O-Z substrates still with a phosphamide bond (P-N), such as isofenphos-methyl, isofenphos, isocarbophos, and butamifos. The newly characterized Imh has a great potential for use in the decontamination and detoxification of agricultural and household OPs and is a good candidate for the study of the catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of OP hydrolases.

  17. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  18. Structure of a soluble epoxide hydrolase identified in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carolina; De Oliveira, Gabriel S; Adriani, Patrícia P; Chambergo, Felipe S; Dias, Marcio V B

    2017-08-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that have high biotechnological interest for the fine and transformation industry. Several of these enzymes have enantioselectivity, which allows their application in the separation of enantiomeric mixtures of epoxide substrates. Although two different families of EHs have been described, those that have the α/β-hidrolase fold are the most explored for biotechnological purpose. These enzymes are functionally very well studied, but only few members have three-dimensional structures characterised. Recently, a new EH from the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reseei (TrEH) has been discovered and functionally studied. This enzyme does not have high homology to any other EH structure and have an enatiopreference for (S)-(-) isomers. Herein we described the crystallographic structure of TrEH at 1.7Å resolution, which reveals features of its tertiary structure and active site. TrEH has a similar fold to the other soluble epoxide hydrolases and has the two characteristic hydrolase and cap domains. The enzyme is predominantly monomeric in solution and has also been crystallised as a monomer in the asymmetric unit. Although the catalytic residues are conserved, several other residues of the catalytic groove are not, and might be involved in the specificity for substrates and in the enantioselectivy of this enzyme. In addition, the determination of the crystallographic structure of TrEH might contribute to the rational site direct mutagenesis to generate an even more stable enzyme with higher efficiency to be used in biotechnological purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enzymatic degradation of monocrotophos by extracellular fungal OP hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena

    2013-11-01

    The present study explores the potential of extracellular fungal organophosphate (OP) hydrolase for the degradation of monocrotophos. Extracellular OP hydrolases were isolated and purified from five different fungal isolates viz. Aspergillus niger (M1), Aspergillus flavus (M2), Penicillium aculeatum (M3), Fusarium pallidoroseum (M4), and Macrophomina sp. (M5) by AmSO4 precipitation, dialysis, and G-100 chromatography. M3 showed highest percentage yield of 68.81 followed by 55.41 % for M1. Each of the purified enzyme fraction constituted of two different subunits of 33- and 67-kDa molecular weight. Optimum enzyme fraction (150 μg ml(-1)) rapidly degraded monocrotophos within 120 h in phosphorus-free liquid culture medium (CZM) with K deg of 0.0368, 0.0138, 0.048, 0.016, 0.0138, and 0.048 day(-1) and half-life of 0.79, 2.11, 0.6, 1.8, and 2.11 days for M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5, respectively. The results were further confirmed by high performance thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared which indicate the disappearance of monocrotophos by hydrolytic cleavage of vinyl phosphate bond. The overall order of enzymatic degradation was found to be P. aculeatum > A. niger > F. pallidoroseum > A. flavus = Macrophomina sp. Hence, the study concludes that extracellular OP hydrolases efficiently degraded monocrotophos and could be used as a potential candidate for the detoxification of this neurotoxin pesticide.

  20. Inverting hydrolases and their use in enantioconvergent biotransformations

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Markus; Faber, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the more abundant occurrence of racemic compounds compared to prochiral or meso forms, most enantiomerically pure products are obtained via racemate resolution. This review summarizes (chemo)enzymatic enantioconvergent processes based on the use of hydrolytic enzymes, which are able to invert a stereocenter during catalysis that can overcome the 50%-yield limitation of kinetic resolution. Recent developments are presented in the fields of inverting or retaining sulfatases, epoxide hydrolases and dehalogenases, which allow the production of secondary alcohols or vicinal diols at a 100% theoretical yield from a racemate via enantioconvergent processes. PMID:23809848

  1. Design, synthesis and evaluation of polar head group containing 2-keto-oxazole inhibitors of FAAH.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Marion; Zahov, Stefan; Vetter, Ingrid R; Lehr, Matthias; Hedberg, Christian

    2012-01-15

    2-α-Keto oxazoles containing polar head groups in their C5-side chains were designed as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors. Variation in the spacer length resulted in submicromolar α-keto-oxazole FAAH inhibitor (IC(50)=436 nM) presenting electrostatic stabilizing interactions between its polar head group contained in the C5-side chain and the hydrophilic pocket of the enzyme.

  2. Parathion hydrolase specified by the Flavobacterium opd gene: relationship between the gene and protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mulbry, W W; Karns, J S

    1989-01-01

    The sequence of a 1,693-base-pair plasmid DNA fragment from Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551 containing the parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was determined. Within this sequence, there is only one open reading frame large enough to encode the 35,000-dalton membrane-associated hydrolase protein purified from Flavobacterium extracts. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of the purified Flavobacterium hydrolase demonstrated that serine is the amino-terminal residue of the hydrolase protein. The amino-terminal serine corresponds to a TCG codon located 87 base pairs downstream of the presumptive ATG initiation codon in the nucleotide sequence. The amino acid composition of the purified protein agrees well with that predicted from the nucleotide sequence, using serine as the amino-terminal residue. These data suggest that the parathion hydrolase protein is processed at its amino terminus in Flavobacterium sp. Construction in Escherichia coli of a lacZ-opd gene fusion in which the first 33 amino-terminal residues of opd were replaced by the first 5 residues of lacZ resulted in the production of an active hydrolase identical in molecular mass to the hydrolase isolated from Flavobacterium sp. E. coli cells containing the lacZ-opd fusion showed higher levels of hydrolase activity than did cells containing the parent plasmid. Images PMID:2556372

  3. Parathion hydrolase specified by the Flavobacterium opd gene: relationship between the gene and protein.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, W W; Karns, J S

    1989-12-01

    The sequence of a 1,693-base-pair plasmid DNA fragment from Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551 containing the parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was determined. Within this sequence, there is only one open reading frame large enough to encode the 35,000-dalton membrane-associated hydrolase protein purified from Flavobacterium extracts. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of the purified Flavobacterium hydrolase demonstrated that serine is the amino-terminal residue of the hydrolase protein. The amino-terminal serine corresponds to a TCG codon located 87 base pairs downstream of the presumptive ATG initiation codon in the nucleotide sequence. The amino acid composition of the purified protein agrees well with that predicted from the nucleotide sequence, using serine as the amino-terminal residue. These data suggest that the parathion hydrolase protein is processed at its amino terminus in Flavobacterium sp. Construction in Escherichia coli of a lacZ-opd gene fusion in which the first 33 amino-terminal residues of opd were replaced by the first 5 residues of lacZ resulted in the production of an active hydrolase identical in molecular mass to the hydrolase isolated from Flavobacterium sp. E. coli cells containing the lacZ-opd fusion showed higher levels of hydrolase activity than did cells containing the parent plasmid.

  4. Recognition and cleavage of corn defense chitinases by fungal polyglycine hydrolases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave peptide bonds in the polyglycine interdomain linker of ChitA chitinase, an antifungal protein from domesticated corn. Polyglycine hydrolases are novel proteins in terms of activity and sequence. The objective of the study is to und...

  5. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we ann...

  6. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACE inhibitors There are many different names and brands of ACE inhibitors. Most work as well as ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  7. Abnormal Hypermethylation at Imprinting Control Regions in Patients with S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase (AHCY) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Motzek, Antje; Knežević, Jelena; Switzeny, Olivier J.; Cooper, Alexis; Barić, Ivo; Beluzić, Robert; Strauss, Kevin A.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Vugrek, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in methionine metabolism caused by mutations in the AHCY gene. Main characteristics are psychomotor delay including delayed myelination and myopathy (hypotonia, absent tendon reflexes etc.) from birth, mostly associated with hypermethioninaemia, elevated serum creatine kinase levels and increased genome wide DNA methylation. The prime function of AHCY is to hydrolyse and efficiently remove S-adenosylhomocysteine, the by-product of transmethylation reactions and one of the most potent methyltransferase inhibitors. In this study, we set out to more specifically characterize DNA methylation changes in blood samples from patients with AHCY deficiency. Global DNA methylation was increased in two of three analysed patients. In addition, we analysed the DNA methylation levels at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of six imprinted genes (MEST, SNRPN, LIT1, H19, GTL2 and PEG3) as well as Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements in seven patients. Three patients showed a hypermethylation in up to five imprinted gene DMRs. Abnormal methylation in Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements was not observed. We conclude that DNA hypermethylation seems to be a frequent but not a constant feature associated with AHCY deficiency that affects different genomic regions to different degrees. Thus AHCY deficiency may represent an ideal model disease for studying the molecular origins and biological consequences of DNA hypermethylation due to impaired cellular methylation status. PMID:26974671

  8. Role of soluble epoxide hydrolase in age-related vascular cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Young, Jennifer M; Borkar, Rohan N; Woltjer, Randy L; Quinn, Joseph F; Silbert, Lisa C; Grafe, Marjorie R; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2014-10-01

    P450 eicosanoids are important regulators of the cerebral microcirculation, but their role in cerebral small vessel disease is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is linked to reduced cerebral microvascular eicosanoid signaling. We analyzed human brain tissue from individuals formerly enrolled in the Oregon Brain Aging Study, who had a history of cognitive impairment histopathological evidence of microvascular disease. VCI subjects had significantly higher lesion burden both on premortem MRI and postmortem histopathology compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Mass spectrometry-based eicosanoid analysis revealed that 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DHET) was elevated in cortical brain tissue from VCI subjects. Immunoreactivity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the enzyme responsible for 14,15-DHET formation, was localized to cerebral microvascular endothelium, and was enhanced in microvessels of affected tissue. Finally, we evaluated the genotype frequency of two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of sEH gene EPHX2 in VCI and control groups. Our findings support a role for sEH and a potential benefit from sEH inhibitors in age-related VCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D; Convertino, Marino; De Vivo, Marco

    2016-06-20

    The design of multitarget-directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget-directed ligand named ARN2508 (2-[3-fluoro-4-[3-(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2-arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti-inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX.

  10. The role of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in nicotine reward and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Pretal P.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Parsons, Loren H.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) exerts the majority of its effects at CB1 and CB2 receptors and is degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH KO mice and animals treated with FAAH inhibitors are impaired in their ability to hydrolyze AEA and other non-cannabinoid lipid signaling molecules, such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). AEA and these other substrates activate non- cannabinoid receptor systems, including TRPV1 and PPAR-α receptors. In this mini review, we describe the functional consequences of FAAH inhibition on nicotine reward and dependence as well as the underlying endocannabinoid and non-cannabinoid receptor systems mediating these effects. Interestingly, FAAH inhibition seems to mediate nicotine dependence differently in mice and rats. Indeed, pharmacological and genetic FAAH disruption in mice enhances nicotine reward and withdrawal. However, in rats, pharmacological blockade of FAAH significantly inhibits nicotine reward and has no effect in nicotine withdrawal. Studies suggest that non-cannabinoid mechanisms may play a role in these species differences. PMID:22705310

  11. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase limits niacin-induced vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Inceoglu, A. B.; Clifton, H.L.; Yang, J.; Hegedus, C.; Hammock, B. D.; Schaefer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of niacin in the treatment of dyslipidemias is limited by the common side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly termed flushing. Flushing is thought to be due to release of the vasodilatory prostanoids PGD2 and PGE2 from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Arachidonic acid is also metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system which is regulated, in part, by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Methods: These experiments used an established murine model in which ear tissue perfusion was measured by laser Doppler to test the hypothesis that inhibition of sEH would limit niacin-induced flushing. Results: Niacin-induced flushing was reduced from 506 ± 126 to 213 ± 39 % in sEH knockout animals. Pharmacologic treatment with 3 structurally distinct sEH inhibitors similarly reduced flushing in a dose dependent manner, with maximal reduction to 143±15% of baseline flow using a concentration of 1 mg/kg TPAU (1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-acetylpiperidin-4-yl) urea). Systemically administered PGD2 caused ear vasodilation which was not changed by either pharmacologic sEH inhibition or by sEH gene deletion. Conclusions: Inhibition of sEH markedly reduces niacin-induced flushing in this model without an apparent effect on the response to PGD2. sEH inhibition may be a new therapeutic approach to limit flushing in humans. PMID:22526297

  12. Abnormal Hypermethylation at Imprinting Control Regions in Patients with S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase (AHCY) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Motzek, Antje; Knežević, Jelena; Switzeny, Olivier J; Cooper, Alexis; Barić, Ivo; Beluzić, Robert; Strauss, Kevin A; Puffenberger, Erik G; Mudd, S Harvey; Vugrek, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in methionine metabolism caused by mutations in the AHCY gene. Main characteristics are psychomotor delay including delayed myelination and myopathy (hypotonia, absent tendon reflexes etc.) from birth, mostly associated with hypermethioninaemia, elevated serum creatine kinase levels and increased genome wide DNA methylation. The prime function of AHCY is to hydrolyse and efficiently remove S-adenosylhomocysteine, the by-product of transmethylation reactions and one of the most potent methyltransferase inhibitors. In this study, we set out to more specifically characterize DNA methylation changes in blood samples from patients with AHCY deficiency. Global DNA methylation was increased in two of three analysed patients. In addition, we analysed the DNA methylation levels at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of six imprinted genes (MEST, SNRPN, LIT1, H19, GTL2 and PEG3) as well as Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements in seven patients. Three patients showed a hypermethylation in up to five imprinted gene DMRs. Abnormal methylation in Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements was not observed. We conclude that DNA hypermethylation seems to be a frequent but not a constant feature associated with AHCY deficiency that affects different genomic regions to different degrees. Thus AHCY deficiency may represent an ideal model disease for studying the molecular origins and biological consequences of DNA hypermethylation due to impaired cellular methylation status.

  13. Soluble epoxide hydrolase in podocytes is a significant contributor to renal function under hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Hsu, Ming-Fo; Ito, Yoshihiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Gruzdev, Artiom; Calvo-Rubio, Miguel; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Inceoglu, Bora; Imig, John D; Villalba, Jose M; Zeldin, Darryl C; Hammock, Bruce D; Haj, Fawaz G

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of renal failure, and podocyte dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of DN. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, encoded by Ephx2) is a conserved cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has beneficial effects on renal function. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of sEH in podocytes to hyperglycemia-induced renal injury. Mice with podocyte-specific sEH disruption (pod-sEHKO) were generated, and alterations in kidney function were determined under normoglycemia, and high-fat diet (HFD)- and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia. sEH protein expression increased in murine kidneys under HFD- and STZ-induced hyperglycemia. sEH deficiency in podocytes preserved renal function and glucose control and mitigated hyperglycemia-induced renal injury. Also, podocyte sEH deficiency was associated with attenuated hyperglycemia-induced renal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, inflammation and fibrosis, and enhanced autophagy. Moreover, these effects were recapitulated in immortalized murine podocytes treated with a selective sEH pharmacological inhibitor. Furthermore, pharmacological-induced elevation of ER stress or attenuation of autophagy in immortalized podocytes mitigated the protective effects of sEH inhibition. These findings establish sEH in podocytes as a significant contributor to renal function under hyperglycemia. These data suggest that sEH is a potential therapeutic target for podocytopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Substrate specificity and inhibition of brassinin hydrolases, detoxifying enzymes from the plant pathogens Leptosphaeria maculans and Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Minic, Zoran; Sarma-Mamillapalle, Vijay K

    2009-12-01

    Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and Leptosphaeria biglobosa) and black spot (Alternaria brassicicola) fungi are devastating plant pathogens known to detoxify the plant defence metabolite, brassinin. The significant roles of brassinin as a crucifer phytoalexin and as a biosynthetic precursor of several other plant defences make it important in plant fitness. Brassinin detoxifying enzymes produced by L. maculans and A. brassicicola catalyse the detoxification of brassinin by hydrolysis of its dithiocarbamate group to indolyl-3-methanamine. The purification and characterization of brassinin hydrolases produced by L. maculans (BHLmL2) and A. brassicicola (BHAb) were accomplished: native BHLmL2 was found to be a tetrameric protein with a molecular mass of 220 kDa, whereas native BHAb was found to be a dimeric protein of 120 kDa. Protein characterization using LC-MS/MS and sequence alignment analyses suggested that both enzymes belong to the family of amidases with the catalytic Ser/Ser/Lys triad. Furthermore, chemical modification of BHLmL2 and BHAb with selective reagents suggested that the amino acid serine was involved in the catalytic activity of both enzymes. The overall results indicated that BHs have new substrate specificities with a new catalytic activity that can be designated as dithiocarbamate hydrolase. Investigation of the effect of various phytoalexins on the activities of BHLmL2 and BHAb indicated that cyclobrassinin was a competitive inhibitor of both enzymes. On the basis of pH dependence, sequence analyses, chemical modifications of amino acid residues and identification of headspace volatiles, a chemical mechanism for hydrolysis of the dithiocarbamate group of brassinin catalysed by BHLmL2 and BHAb is proposed. The current information should facilitate the design of specific synthetic inhibitors of these enzymes for plant treatments against blackleg and black spot fungal infections.

  15. Hydration of vinyl ether groups by unsaturated glycoside hydrolases and their role in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Itoh, Takafumi; Maruyama, Yukie; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku

    2007-12-01

    Many pathogenic microorganisms invade mammalian and/or plant cells by producing polysaccharide-degrading enzymes (lyases and hydrolases). Mammalian glycosaminoglycans and plant pectins that form part of the cell surface matrix are typical targets for these microbial enzymes. Unsaturated glycoside hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolytic release of an unsaturated uronic acid from oligosaccharides, which are produced through the reaction of matrix-degrading polysaccharide lyase. This enzymatic ability suggests that unsaturated glycoside hydrolases function as virulence factors in microbial infection. This review focuses on the molecular identification, bacterial distribution, and structure/function relationships of these enzymes. In contrast to general glycoside hydrolases, in which the catalytic mechanism involves the retention or inversion of an anomeric configuration, unsaturated glycoside hydrolases uniquely trigger the hydrolysis of vinyl ether groups in unsaturated saccharides but not of their glycosidic bonds.

  16. Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T Molinate Hydrolase, a Novel Cobalt-Dependent Amidohydrolase ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Márcia; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Junca, Howard; Gales, Luís; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Nunes, Olga C.

    2011-01-01

    A new pathway of molinate mineralization has recently been described. Among the five members of the mixed culture able to promote such a process, Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T has been observed to promote the initial breakdown of the herbicide into ethanethiol and azepane-1-carboxylate. In the current study, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for molinate hydrolysis was identified and heterologously expressed, and the resultant active protein was purified and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a 465-amino-acid protein of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily with a predicted molecular mass of 50.9 kDa. Molinate hydrolase shares the highest amino acid sequence identity (48 to 50%) with phenylurea hydrolases of Arthrobacter globiformis and Mycobacterium brisbanense. However, in contrast to previously described members of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily, molinate hydrolase contains cobalt as the only active-site metal. PMID:21840982

  17. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  18. Mechanistic Investigations of Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Jongkees, Seino A. K.; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct 1H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  19. Structure of unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase complexed with substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Takafumi; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku . E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 YteR has been identified as a novel enzyme 'unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase' classified in glycoside hydrolase family 105. This enzyme acts specifically on unsaturated rhamnogalacturonan (RG) produced from plant cell wall RG type-I treated with RG lyases, releasing unsaturated galacturonic acid ({delta}GalA) from the substrate. The most likely candidate catalytic residue is Asp-143. Here, we show the structure of D143N in complex with unsaturated RG disaccharide (substrate) determined at 1.9 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. This structural feature directly contributes to the postulation of the enzyme reaction mechanism. YteR triggers the hydration of vinyl ether group in {delta}GalA, but not of glycoside bond, by using Asp-143 as a general acid and base catalyst. Asp-143 donates proton to the double bond of {delta}GalA as an acid catalyst and also deprotonates a water molecule as a base catalyst. Deprotonated water molecule attacks the C5 atom of {delta}GalA.

  20. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-03-09

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ~30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Furthermore, application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties.

  1. Structural model for family 32 of glycosyl-hydrolase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pons, T; Olmea, O; Chinea, G; Beldarraín, A; Márquez, G; Acosta, N; Rodríguez, L; Valencia, A

    1998-11-15

    A structural model is presented for family 32 of the glycosyl-hydrolase enzymes based on the beta-propeller fold. The model is derived from the common prediction of two different threading methods, TOPITS and THREADER. In addition, we used a correlated mutation analysis and prediction of active-site residues to corroborate the proposed model. Physical techniques (circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry) confirmed two aspects of the prediction, the proposed all-beta fold and the multi-domain structure. The most reliable three-dimensional model was obtained using the structure of neuraminidase (1nscA) as template. The analysis of the position of the active site residues in this model is compatible with the catalytic mechanism proposed by Reddy and Maley (J. Biol. Chem. 271:13953-13958, 1996), which includes three conserved residues, Asp, Glu, and Cys. Based on this analysis, we propose the participation of one more conserved residue (Asp 162) in the catalytic mechanism. The model will facilitate further studies of the physical and biochemical characteristics of family 32 of the glycosyl-hydrolases.

  2. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-03

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications.

  3. Acetylcarnitine hydrolase activity in bovine caudal epididymal spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, K.; Foster, R.A.; Casillas, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors identified mM concentrations of acetylcarnitine in epidiymal fluids and have investigated the metabolism of acetylcarnitine by bovine and hamster caudal epididymal spermatozoa. (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine is oxidized to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by washed, intact hamster and bovine sperm at maximal rates of 8.4 and 15.2 nmol/hr/10/sup 7/ cells respectively. Conversely, the carnitine moiety of acetyl-L-(/sup 3/H-methyl)carnitine is not accumulated by sperm under similar conditions. Hydrolysis of (/sup 3/H)acetyl-L-carnitine and competition of uptake of (/sup 3/H)acetate by unlabeled acetate was demonstrated in incubations of intact cells of both species. The amount of (/sup 3/H)acetate accumulated in the incubation medium is time-dependent and also depends on the concentration of unlabeled acetate. A partial solubilization of acetylcarnitine hydrolase activity from washed, intact bovine caudal epididymal spermatozoa in buffer or 0.01% Triton X-100 is observed. There is an enrichment of acetylcarnitine hydrolase activity in purified plasma membranes from bovine caudal epididymal spermatozoa when compared to the activity present in broken cell preparations or other cellular fractions. The results suggest that acetylcarnitine is a substrate for spermatozoa as they traverse the epididymis.

  4. Recovering glycoside hydrolase genes from active tundra cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Lee J; Dunford, Eric; Ronan, Patrick; Hausner, Martina; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria responsible for cellulose hydrolysis in situ are poorly understood, largely because of the relatively recent development of cultivation-independent methods for their detection and characterization. This study combined DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and metagenomics for identifying active bacterial communities that assimilated carbon from glucose and cellulose in Arctic tundra microcosms. Following DNA-SIP, bacterial fingerprint analysis of gradient fractions confirmed isotopic enrichment. Sequenced fingerprint bands and clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified active bacterial taxa associated with cellulose-associated labelled DNA, including Bacteroidetes (Sphingobacteriales), Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderiales), Alphaproteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae), and Chloroflexi (Anaerolineaceae). We also compared glycoside hydrolase metagenomic profiles from bulk soil and heavy DNA recovered from DNA-SIP incubations. Active populations consuming [(13)C]glucose and [(13)C]cellulose were distinct, based on ordinations of light and heavy DNA. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated a ∼3-fold increase in the relative abundance of glycoside hydrolases in DNA-SIP libraries over bulk-soil libraries. The data also indicate that multiple displacement amplification introduced bias into the resulting metagenomic analysis. This research identified DNA-SIP incubation conditions for glucose and cellulose that were suitable for Arctic tundra soil and confirmed that DNA-SIP enrichment can increase target gene frequencies in metagenomic libraries.

  5. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase in mice promotes reverse cholesterol transport and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Peng, Hongchun; Peng, Ran; Fan, Qingsong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xu, Danyan; Morisseau, Christophe; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue is the body largest free cholesterol reservoir and abundantly expresses ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), which maintains plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. HDLs have a protective role in atherosclerosis by mediating reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has various beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The sEH is highly expressed in adipocytes, and it converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) into less bioactive dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. We previously showed that increasing EETs levels with a sEH inhibitor (sEHI) (t-AUCB) resulted in elevated ABCA1 expression and promoted ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The present study investigates the impacts of t-AUCB in mice deficient for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (Ldlr(-/-) mice) with established atherosclerotic plaques. The sEH inhibitor delivered in vivo for 4 weeks decreased the activity of sEH in adipose tissue, enhanced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux from adipose depots, and consequently increased HDL levels. Furthermore, t-AUCB enhanced RCT to the plasma, liver, bile and feces. It also showed the reduction of plasma LDL-C levels. Consistently, t-AUCB-treated mice showed reductions in the size of atherosclerotic plaques. These studies establish that raising adipose ABCA1 expression, cholesterol efflux, and plasma HDL levels with t-AUCB treatment promotes RCT, decreasing LDL-C and atherosclerosis regression, suggesting that sEH inhibition may be a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase confers resilience to repeated social defeat stress

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qian; Ma, Min; Ishima, Tamaki; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Wagner, Karen M.; Zhang, Ji-chun; Yang, Chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Han, Mei; Hammock, Bruce D.; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a severe and chronic psychiatric disease, affecting 350 million subjects worldwide. Although multiple antidepressants have been used in the treatment of depressive symptoms, their beneficial effects are limited. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the inflammation that is involved in depression. Thus, we examined here the role of sEH in depression. In both inflammation and social defeat stress models of depression, a potent sEH inhibitor, TPPU, displayed rapid antidepressant effects. Expression of sEH protein in the brain from chronically stressed (susceptible) mice was higher than of control mice. Furthermore, expression of sEH protein in postmortem brain samples of patients with psychiatric diseases, including depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, was higher than controls. This finding suggests that increased sEH levels might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain psychiatric diseases. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with TPPU prevented the onset of depression-like behaviors after inflammation or repeated social defeat stress. Moreover, sEH KO mice did not show depression-like behavior after repeated social defeat stress, suggesting stress resilience. The sEH KO mice showed increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylation of its receptor TrkB in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, but not nucleus accumbens, suggesting that increased BDNF-TrkB signaling in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus confer stress resilience. All of these findings suggest that sEH plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression, and that epoxy fatty acids, their mimics, as well as sEH inhibitors could be potential therapeutic or prophylactic drugs for depression. PMID:26976569

  7. Development of surface plasmon resonance imaging biosensors for detection of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Sankiewicz, Anna; Laudanski, Piotr; Romanowicz, Lech; Hermanowicz, Adam; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Debek, Wojciech; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a new method for highly selective determination of the ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) concentration using a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) technique and two different biosensors. UCH-L1 was captured from a solution by immobilized specific rabbit monoclonal antibody or specific LDN-57444 inhibitor due to formation of receptor-UCH-L1 complex on the biosensor surface. The analytically useful dynamic response range of both biosensors is between 0.1 and 2.5ng/ml. The detection limit is 0.06ng/ml for the biosensor with antibody and 0.08ng/ml for the biosensor with inhibitor. Biosensors based on both antibody and inhibitor were found to be suitable for quantitative determination of the UCH-L1 and exhibit good tolerance to the potential interferents. Both biosensors gave comparable results in the range of 0 to 0.20ng/ml for plasma samples and 0.30 to 0.49ng/ml for cerebrospinal fluid samples. To validate the new methods, comparative determination of UCH-L1 by the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit was performed. In general, in terms of UCH-L1 concentration, a good correlation between SPRI and ELISA was found. The developed biosensors can be used successfully for the determination of UCH-L1 in body fluids.

  8. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) reduces spinal nociceptive responses and expression of spinal long-term potentiation (LTP).

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Guro S; Jacobsen, Line Melå; Mahmood, Aqsa; Pedersen, Linda M; Gjerstad, Johannes

    2012-02-10

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an enzyme that metabolizes endocannabinoids and fatty acid amides possibly linked to activation of the opioid system. To examine how this enzyme affects spinal signalling, electrophysiological recordings in the dorsal horn and qPCR on dorsal horn tissue following systemic administration of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (0.3 and 1.0mg/kg i.v.) and spinal administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.1 μg/μl i.th.), were performed. The present data showed that the suppressive effect of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1.0mg/kg i.v.) on the spinal nociceptive responses was prevented by spinal administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.1 μg/μl i.th.). Moreover, the present findings demonstrated that the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1.0mg/kg i.v.) partly reversed expression of spinal long-term potentiation (LTP) and also attenuated the LTP-associated increased Zif expression. We conclude that pharmacological inactivation of FAAH may be a promising strategy to inhibit the development of central hyperalgesia; thereby reinforcing the role of FAAH as a potential therapeutic target.

  9. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Cathcart, Martha K

    2013-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA(2)-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA(2) activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis.

  10. Bile salt hydrolase of Bifidobacterium longum-biochemical and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Hashiba, H; Kok, J; Mierau, I

    2000-06-01

    A bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was isolated from Bifidobacterium longum SBT2928, purified, and characterized. Furthermore, we describe for the first time cloning and analysis of the gene encoding BSH (bsh) in a member of the genus Bifidobacterium. The enzyme has a native molecular weight of 125,000 to 130,000 and a subunit molecular weight of 35,024, as determined from the deduced amino acid sequence, indicating that the enzyme is a tetramer. The pH optimum of B. longum BSH is between 5 and 7, and the temperature optimum is 40 degrees C. The enzyme is strongly inhibited by thiol enzyme inhibitors, indicating that a Cys residue is likely to be involved in the catalytic reaction. The BSH of B. longum can hydrolyze all six major human bile salts and at least two animal bile salts. A slight preference for glycine-conjugated bile acids was detected based on both the specificity and the K(m) values. The nucleotide sequence of bsh was determined and used for homology studies, transcript analysis, and construction and analysis of various mutants. The levels of homology with BSH of other bacteria and with penicillin V acylase (PVA) of Bacillus sphaericus were high. On the basis of the similarity of BSH and PVA, whose crystal structure has been elucidated, BSH can be classified as an N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase with Cys as the N-terminal amino acid. This classification was confirmed by the fact that a Cys1Ala exchange by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in an inactive protein. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that bsh is part of an operon containing at least two genes, bsh and glnE (GlnE is glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase). Two UV-induced BSH-negative mutants and one spontaneous BSH-negative mutant were isolated from B. longum SBT2928 cultures and characterized. These mutants had point mutations that inactivated bsh by premature termination, frameshift, or amino acid exchange.

  11. Solution structure of the catalytic domain of human stromelysin complexed with a hydrophobic inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, S. R.; Kurochkin, A. V.; Hu, W.; Ye, Q. Z.; Johnson, L. L.; Hupe, D. J.; Zuiderweg, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin, a representative matrix metalloproteinase and target of drug development efforts, plays a prominent role in the pathological proteolysis associated with arthritis and secondarily in that of cancer metastasis and invasion. To provide a structural template to aid the development of therapeutic inhibitors, we have determined a medium-resolution structure of a 20-kDa complex of human stromelysin's catalytic domain with a hydrophobic peptidic inhibitor using multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This domain of this zinc hydrolase contains a mixed beta-sheet comprising one antiparallel strand and four parallel strands, three helices, and a methionine-containing turn near the catalytic center. The ensemble of 20 structures was calculated using, on average, 8 interresidue NOE restraints per residue for the 166-residue protein fragment complexed with a 4-residue substrate analogue. The mean RMS deviation (RMSD) to the average structure for backbone heavy atoms is 0.91 A and for all heavy atoms is 1.42 A. The structure has good stereochemical properties, including its backbone torsion angles. The beta-sheet and alpha-helices of the catalytic domains of human stromelysin (NMR model) and human fibroblast collagenase (X-ray crystallographic model of Lovejoy B et al., 1994b, Biochemistry 33:8207-8217) superimpose well, having a pairwise RMSD for backbone heavy atoms of 2.28 A when three loop segments are disregarded. The hydroxamate-substituted inhibitor binds across the hydrophobic active site of stromelysin in an extended conformation. The first hydrophobic side chain is deeply buried in the principal S'1 subsite, the second hydrophobic side chain is located on the opposite side of the inhibitor backbone in the hydrophobic S'2 surface subsite, and a third hydrophobic side chain (P'3) lies at the surface. PMID:8580839

  12. POTENT UREA AND CARBAMATE INHIBITORS OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. POTENT UREA AND CARBAMATE INHIBITORS OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Sequence of the bphD gene encoding 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-(phenyl/chlorophenyl)hexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOP/cPDA) hydrolase involved in the biphenyl/polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway in Comamonas testosteroni: evidence suggesting involvement of Ser112 in catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, D; Fraser, J; Sylvestre, M; Larose, A; Khan, A; Bergeron, J; Juteau, J M; Sondossi, M

    1995-04-14

    The nucleotide sequence of bphD, encoding 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-(phenyl/chlorophenyl)hexa-2,4-dienoic acid hydrolase involved in the biphenyl/polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Comamonas testosteroni strain B-356, was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino-acid sequence with published sequences led to the identification of a 'lipase box', containing a consensus pentapeptide sequence GlyXaaSerXaaGly. This suggested that the mechanism of action of this enzyme may involve an Asp-Ser-His catalytic triad similar to that of classical lipases and serine hydrolases. Further biochemical and genetic evidence for the active-site involvement of Ser112 was obtained by showing that a semipurified enzyme was inhibited by PMSF, a classic inhibitor of serine hydrolases, and by site-directed Ser112-->Ala mutagenesis.

  15. Identification and characterization of a new epoxide hydrolase from mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Oesch, F

    1983-12-25

    A new microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH2) has been identified and characterized. This enzyme has properties which distinguish it from previously described cytosolic (cEH) or membrane-bound (mEH1) epoxide hydrolases. The enzyme is an integral microsomal protein which is not dissociated from the membrane by repeated washing, high ionic strength salt, or chaotropic agent solutions, or by sonication. It is very different from the normally described microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH1) as shown by its different substrate specificity and kinetic properties and by immunological criteria. In contrast to the hitherto described microsomal epoxide hydrolase, mEH1, the new enzyme effectively catalyzes the hydration of transdisubstituted oxiranes such as trans-stilbene oxide and trans-beta-ethyl styrene oxide and has no appreciable activity toward benzo(a)pyrene 4,5-oxide. It is also structurally distinct, in that it does not cross-react with antibodies raised against the normally described microsomal epoxide hydrolase mEH1. This newly described microsomal epoxide hydrolase probably represents an important factor in the control of reactive epoxides; its location in the membrane ensures access to lipophilic epoxides generated by membrane-bound monooxygenases, and its substrate specificity is such that it can hydrolyze epoxides poorly metabolized by the previously described microsomal epoxide hydrolase.

  16. A Proton Wire and Water Channel Revealed in the Crystal Structure of Isatin Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Sommer, Theis; Jensen, Jan K.; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Etzerodt, Michael; Morth, J. Preben

    2014-01-01

    The high resolution crystal structures of isatin hydrolase from Labrenzia aggregata in the apo and the product state are described. These are the first structures of a functionally characterized metal-dependent hydrolase of this fold. Isatin hydrolase converts isatin to isatinate and belongs to a novel family of metalloenzymes that include the bacterial kynurenine formamidase. The product state, mimicked by bound thioisatinate, reveals a water molecule that bridges the thioisatinate to a proton wire in an adjacent water channel and thus allows the proton released by the reaction to escape only when the product is formed. The functional proton wire present in isatin hydrolase isoform b represents a unique catalytic feature common to all hydrolases is here trapped and visualized for the first time. The local molecular environment required to coordinate thioisatinate allows stronger and more confident identification of orthologous genes encoding isatin hydrolases within the prokaryotic kingdom. The isatin hydrolase orthologues found in human gut bacteria raise the question as to whether the indole-3-acetic acid degradation pathway is present in human gut flora. PMID:24917679

  17. Remarkably selective inhibitors of monoacylglycerol lipase bearing a reactive group that is bioisosteric with endocannabinoid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Niphakis, Micah J.; Lum, Kenneth M.; Cognetta, Armand B.; Wang, Chu; Matthews, Megan L.; Niessen, Sherry; Buczynski, Matthew W.; Parsons, Loren H.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) are principally degraded by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), respectively. The recent discovery of O-aryl carbamates such as JZL184 as selective MAGL inhibitors has enabled the functional investigation of 2-AG signaling pathways in vivo. Nonetheless, JZL184 and other reported MAGL inhibitors still display low-level cross-reactivity with FAAH and peripheral carboxylesterases, which can complicate their use in certain biological studies. Here, we report a distinct class of O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP) carbamates that inhibit MAGL in vitro and in vivo with excellent potency and greatly improved selectivity, including showing no detectable cross-reactivity with FAAH. These findings designate HFIP-carbamates as a versatile chemotype for inhibiting MAGL and should encourage the pursuit of other serine hydrolase inhibitors that bear reactive groups resembling the structures of natural substrates. PMID:22542104

  18. Discovery of MK-4409, a Novel Oxazole FAAH Inhibitor for the Treatment of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report herein the identification of MK-4409, a potent and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor. Starting from a high throughput screening (HTS) hit, medicinal chemistry efforts focused on optimizing of FAAH inhibition in vitro potency, improving the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, and increasing in vivo efficacy in rodent inflammatory and neuropathic pain assays. PMID:24944750

  19. Discovery of MK-4409, a Novel Oxazole FAAH Inhibitor for the Treatment of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Chobanian, Harry R; Guo, Yan; Liu, Ping; Chioda, Marc D; Fung, Selena; Lanza, Thomas J; Chang, Linda; Bakshi, Raman K; Dellureficio, James P; Hong, Qingmei; McLaughlin, Mark; Belyk, Kevin M; Krska, Shane W; Makarewicz, Amanda K; Martel, Elliot J; Leone, Joseph F; Frey, Lisa; Karanam, Bindhu; Madeira, Maria; Alvaro, Raul; Shuman, Joyce; Salituro, Gino; Terebetski, Jenna L; Jochnowitz, Nina; Mistry, Shruti; McGowan, Erin; Hajdu, Richard; Rosenbach, Mark; Abbadie, Catherine; Alexander, Jessica P; Shiao, Lin-Lin; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Nargund, Ravi P; Wyvratt, Matthew J; Lin, Linus S; DeVita, Robert J

    2014-06-12

    We report herein the identification of MK-4409, a potent and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor. Starting from a high throughput screening (HTS) hit, medicinal chemistry efforts focused on optimizing of FAAH inhibition in vitro potency, improving the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, and increasing in vivo efficacy in rodent inflammatory and neuropathic pain assays.

  20. Retinyl ester hydrolases and their roles in vitamin A homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Renate; Taschler, Ulrike; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, dietary vitamin A intake is essential for the maintenance of adequate retinoid (vitamin A and metabolites) supply of tissues and organs. Retinoids are taken up from animal or plant sources and subsequently stored in form of hydrophobic, biologically inactive retinyl esters (REs). Accessibility of these REs in the intestine, the circulation, and their mobilization from intracellular lipid droplets depends on the hydrolytic action of RE hydrolases (REHs). In particular, the mobilization of hepatic RE stores requires REHs to maintain steady plasma retinol levels thereby assuring constant vitamin A supply in times of food deprivation or inadequate vitamin A intake. In this review, we focus on the roles of extracellular and intracellular REHs in vitamin A metabolism. Furthermore, we will discuss the tissue-specific function of REHs and highlight major gaps in the understanding of RE catabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism.

  1. Ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 significance for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Suong, Dang Ngoc Anh; Thao, Dang Thi Phuong; Masamitsu, Yamaguchi; Thuoc, Tran Linh

    2014-07-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is an abundant multifunctional neuron protein. It plays an important role in maintaining the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), vital for recognizing and degrading dysfunctional proteins in organisms. In recent decades, UCH-L1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer and diabetes. However, the mechanisms of UCH-L1 involvement have yet to be revealed in detail. Since UCH-L1 contributes many different functions to cell metabolism, its role and regulation might be more complex than previously thought and it has become a research target in many laboratories. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to the actions of UCH-L1 in several human diseases.

  2. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: Gene structure, expression and deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  3. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions. Part 3. Hydrolases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-11-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the hydrolase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: The reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 145 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  4. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of pain and inflammatory diseases in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sałaga, Maciej; Sobczak, Marta; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-02-14

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is the enzyme crucially involved in the modulation of physiological processes mediated by anandamide (AEA), as well as other endocannabinoids and non-cannabinoid biolipids in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. FAAH also plays a major role in the etiology and the course of GI diseases and the inhibition of the enzyme has recently become a potential target for their therapy. In this review we look at the pharmacology of FAAH and possible clinical application of FAAH inhibitors in the treatment of GI disorders. In particular, we focus on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), whose symptoms include abdominal pain and motility disturbances. We also discuss why the inhibitor-based drugs may replace in future conventional therapies for IBD and IBS.

  5. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  6. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55

    DOE PAGES

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; ...

    2015-03-09

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define themore » active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ~30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Furthermore, application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties.« less

  7. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  8. Oxidative inactivation of an extramitochondrial acetyl-CoA hydrolase by autoxidation of L-ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Y; Isohashi, F; Matsunaga, T; Sakamoto, Y

    1985-10-15

    The activity of acetyl-CoA hydrolase (dimeric form) purified from the supernatant fraction of rat liver was shown to have a half-life (t1/2) of 3 min at 0 degree C, but to stable at 37 degrees C (t1/2 = 34 h) [Isohashi, F., Nakanishi, Y. & Sakamoto, Y. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 584-590]. Incubation of the purified enzyme with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) at 37 degrees C resulted in inactivation of the enzyme (t1/2 = 90 min at 2 mM AsA). The extent of inactivation was greatly enhanced by addition of transition metal ions (Cu2+, Fe2+, and Fe3+). Thiol reducing agents, such as reduced glutathione and DL-dithiothreitol, protected the hydrolase from inactivation by AsA. However, these materials did not restore the catalytic activity of the enzyme inactivated by AsA. When AsA solution containing Cu2+ was preincubated under aerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for various times in the absence of enzyme, and then aliquots were incubated with the enzyme solution for 20 min, remaining activity was found to decrease with increase in the preincubation time, reaching a minimum at 60 min. However, further preincubation reduced the potential for inactivation. Catalase, a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, almost completely prevented inactivation of the enzyme by AsA plus Cu2+. Superoxide dismutase and tiron, which are both superoxide (O2-) scavengers, also prevented inactivation of the enzyme. A high concentration of mannitol, a hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenger, partially protected the enzyme from inactivation. These results suggest that inactivation of the enzyme by AsA in the presence of Cu2+ was due to the effect of active oxygen species (H2O2, O2-, OH) that are known to be autoxidation products of AsA. Valeryl-CoA, a competitive inhibitor of acetyl-CoA hydrolase, greatly protected the enzyme from inactivation by AsA plus Cu2+, but ATP and ADP, which are both effectors of this enzyme, had only slight protective effects. These results suggest that inactivation of this enzyme by addition

  9. Refined homology model of monoacylglycerol lipase: toward a selective inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Anna L.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-11-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) is primarily responsible for the hydrolysis of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), an endocannabinoid with full agonist activity at both cannabinoid receptors. Increased tissue 2-AG levels consequent to MGL inhibition are considered therapeutic against pain, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the lack of MGL structural information has hindered the development of MGL-selective inhibitors. Here, we detail a fully refined homology model of MGL which preferentially identifies MGL inhibitors over druglike noninhibitors. We include for the first time insight into the active-site geometry and potential hydrogen-bonding interactions along with molecular dynamics simulations describing the opening and closing of the MGL helical-domain lid. Docked poses of both the natural substrate and known inhibitors are detailed. A comparison of the MGL active-site to that of the other principal endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, demonstrates key differences which provide crucial insight toward the design of selective MGL inhibitors as potential drugs.

  10. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Katie J.; Suits, Michael D. L.; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2015-01-01

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the −1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue. PMID:26304114

  11. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Katie J; Suits, Michael D L; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2015-10-16

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the -1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates hepatic fibrosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Kodani, Sean; Dong, Hua; Myers, Richard; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Haj, Fawaz G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a pathological condition in which chronic inflammation and changes to the extracellular matrix lead to alterations in hepatic tissue architecture and functional degradation of the liver. Inhibitors of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce fibrosis in the heart, pancreas and kidney in several disease models. In this study, we assess the effect of sEH inhibition on the development of fibrosis in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model by monitoring changes in the inflammatory response, matrix remolding and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU) was administered in drinking water. Collagen deposition in the liver was increased five-fold in the CCl4-treated group, and this was returned to control levels by TPPU treatment. Hepatic expression of Col1a2 and 3a1 mRNA was increased over fifteen-fold in the CCl4-treated group relative to the control group, and this increase was reduced by 50% by TPPU treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress observed in the livers of CCl4-treated animals was attenuated by TPPU treatment. In order to support the hypothesis that TPPU is acting to reduce the hepatic fibrosis and ER stress through its action as a sEH inhibitor we used a second sEH inhibitor, trans-4-{4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), and sEH null mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the sEH may play an important role in the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4, presumably by reducing endogenous fatty acid epoxide chemical mediators acting to reduce ER stress. PMID:25827057

  13. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  14. A novel member of glycoside hydrolase family 30 subfamily 8 with altered substrate specificity

    Treesearch

    Franz J. St John; Diane Dietrich; Casey Crooks; Edwin Pozharski; Javier M. González; Elizabeth Bales; Kennon Smith; Jason C. Hurlbert

    2014-01-01

    Endoxylanases classified into glycoside hydrolase family 30 subfamily 8 (GH30-8) are known to hydrolyze the hemicellulosic polysaccharide glucuronoxylan (GX) but not arabinoxylan or neutral xylooligosaccharides. This is owing to the specificity of these enzymes for the

  15. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  16. High-throughput cloning, expression and purification of glycoside hydrolases using Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC).

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques have led to an explosion in the amount of available genome sequencing data and this provided an inexhaustible source of uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases (GH) to be studied both structurally and enzymatically. Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC), an interesting alternative to traditional, restriction enzyme-based cloning, and commercial recombinatorial cloning, was adopted and optimized successfully for a high throughput cloning, expression and purification pipeline. Using this platform, 130 genes encoding mainly uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases from 13 different organisms were cloned and submitted to a semi-automated protein expression and solubility screening in Escherichia coli, resulting in 73 soluble targets. The high throughput approach proved to be a powerful tool for production of recombinant glycoside hydrolases for further structural and biochemical characterization and confirmed that thioredoxin fusion tag (TRX) is a better choice to increase solubility of recombinant glycoside hydrolases expressed in E. coli, when compared to His-tag alone.

  17. Mode of action of xylogalacturonan hydrolase towards xylogalacturonan and xylogalacturonan oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    XGH (xylogalacturonan hydrolase; GH 28) is an enzyme that is capable of degrading XGA (xylogalacturonan), which is a polymer of α-D-galacturonic acid, highly substituted with β-D-xylose. XGA is present in cell walls of various plants and exudates, such as gum tragacanth. XGA oligosaccharides were derived from an XGH digestion of gum tragacanth, then fractionated, and analysed for their sugar composition and structure by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight MS and nanospray MS. Several oligosaccharides from XGA were identified with different galacturonic acid/xylose ratios including five oligosaccharide isomers. Although XGH can act as an endo-enzyme, product-progression profiling showed that the disaccharide GalAXyl was predominantly produced from XGA by XGH, which indicated also an exolytic action. The latter was further supported by degradation studies of purified oligosaccharide GalA4Xyl3. It was shown that XGH acted from the non-reducing end towards the reducing end of this oligosaccharide, and showed the processive character of XGH. The results from this study further show that although XGH prefers to act between two xylosidated GalA units, it tolerates unsubstituted GalA units in its −1 and +1 subsites. PMID:15560751

  18. An integrated molecular docking and rescoring method for predicting the sensitivity spectrum of various serine hydrolases to organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling-Ling; Yang, Xiao; Li, Guo-Bo; Fan, Kai-Ge; Yin, Peng-Fei; Chen, Xiang-Gui

    2016-04-01

    The enzymatic chemistry method is currently the most widely used method for the rapid detection of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, but the enzymes used, such as cholinesterases, lack sufficient sensitivity to detect low concentrations of OP pesticides present in given samples. Serine hydrolase is considered an ideal enzyme source in seeking high-sensitivity enzymes used for OP pesticide detection. However, it is difficult to systematically evaluate sensitivities of various serine hydrolases to OP pesticides by in vitro experiments. This study aimed to establish an in silico method to predict the sensitivity spectrum of various serine hydrolases to OP pesticides. A serine hydrolase database containing 219 representative serine hydrolases was constructed. Based on this database, an integrated molecular docking and rescoring method was established, in which the AutoDock Vina program was used to produce the binding poses of OP pesticides to various serine hydrolases and the ID-Score method developed recently by us was adopted as a rescoring method to predict their binding affinities. In retrospective case studies, this method showed good performance in predicting the sensitivities of known serine hydrolases to two OP pesticides: paraoxon and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The sensitivity spectrum of the 219 collected serine hydrolases to 37 commonly used OP pesticides was finally obtained using this method. Overall, this study presented a promising in silico tool to predict the sensitivity spectrum of various serine hydrolases to OP pesticides, which will help in finding high-sensitivity serine hydrolases for OP pesticide detection. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after aortic constriction in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lisa A; Olzinski, Alan R; Upson, John J; Zhao, Shufang; Wang, Tao; Eisennagel, Stephen H; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James R; Marino, Joseph P; Willette, Robert N; Jucker, Beat M; Behm, David J

    2013-04-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, substrates for soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), exhibit vasodilatory and antihypertrophic activities. Inhibitors of sEH might therefore hold promise as heart failure therapeutics. We examined the ability of sEH inhibitors GSK2188931 and GSK2256294 to modulate cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and function after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in rats and mice. GSK2188931 administration was initiated in rats 1 day before TAC, whereas GSK2256294 treatment was initiated in mice 2 weeks after TAC. Four weeks later, cardiovascular function was assessed, plasma was collected for drug and sEH biomarker concentrations, and left ventricle was isolated for messenger RNA and histological analyses. In rats, although GSK2188931 prevented TAC-mediated increases in certain genes associated with hypertrophy and fibrosis (α-skeletal actin and connective tissue growth factor), the compound failed to attenuate TAC-induced increases in left ventricle mass, posterior wall thickness, end-diastolic volume and pressure, and perivascular fibrosis. Similarly, in mice, GSK2256294 did not reverse cardiac remodeling or systolic dysfunction induced by TAC. Both compounds increased the sEH substrate/product (leukotoxin/leukotoxin diol) ratio, indicating sEH inhibition. In summary, sEH inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling or dysfunction after TAC. Thus, targeting sEH seems to be insufficient for reducing pressure overload hypertrophy.

  20. Design of Selective Substrates and Activity-Based Probes for Hydrolase Important for Pathogenesis 1 (HIP1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although serine proteases are important mediators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence, there are currently no tools to selectively block or visualize members of this family of enzymes. Selective reporter substrates or activity-based probes (ABPs) could provide a means to monitor infection and response to therapy using imaging methods. Here, we use a combination of substrate selectivity profiling and focused screening to identify optimized reporter substrates and ABPs for the Mtb “Hydrolase important for pathogenesis 1” (Hip1) serine protease. Hip1 is a cell-envelope-associated enzyme with minimal homology to host proteases, making it an ideal target for probe development. We identified substituted 7-amino-4-chloro-3-(2-bromoethoxy)isocoumarins as irreversible inhibitor scaffolds. Furthermore, we used specificity data to generate selective reporter substrates and to further optimize a selective chloroisocoumarin inhibitor. These new reagents are potentially useful in delineating the roles of Hip1 during pathogenesis or as diagnostic imaging tools for specifically monitoring Mtb infections. PMID:27739665

  1. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of [11C-Carbonyl]-Labeled Carbamates as Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays a key role in regulating the tone of the endocannabinoid system. Radiotracers are required to image and quantify FAAH activity in vivo. We have synthesized a series of potent FAAH inhibitors encompassing two classes of N-alkyl-O-arylcarbamates and radiolabeled eight of them with carbon-11. The [11C-carbonyl]-radiotracers were evaluated in vitro and ex vivo in rats as potential FAAH imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). Both sets of [11C]O-arylcarbamates showed good to excellent brain penetration and an appropriate regional distribution. Pretreatments with a FAAH inhibitor demonstrated that 80–95% of brain uptake of radioactivity constituted binding of the radiotracers to FAAH. Brain extraction measurements showed that binding to FAAH was irreversible and kinetically different for the two classes of carbamates. These promising results are discussed in terms of the requirements of a suitable radiotracer for the in vivo imaging of FAAH using PET. PMID:23214511

  2. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Qiu, Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. PMID:21741984

  3. Design of Selective Substrates and Activity-Based Probes for Hydrolase Important for Pathogenesis 1 (HIP1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Christian S; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; La Greca, Florencia; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Schulze, Christopher J; Powers, James C; Craik, Charles S; Drag, Marcin; Jain, Sanjay K; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-11-11

    Although serine proteases are important mediators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence, there are currently no tools to selectively block or visualize members of this family of enzymes. Selective reporter substrates or activity-based probes (ABPs) could provide a means to monitor infection and response to therapy using imaging methods. Here, we use a combination of substrate selectivity profiling and focused screening to identify optimized reporter substrates and ABPs for the Mtb "Hydrolase important for pathogenesis 1" (Hip1) serine protease. Hip1 is a cell-envelope-associated enzyme with minimal homology to host proteases, making it an ideal target for probe development. We identified substituted 7-amino-4-chloro-3-(2-bromoethoxy)isocoumarins as irreversible inhibitor scaffolds. Furthermore, we used specificity data to generate selective reporter substrates and to further optimize a selective chloroisocoumarin inhibitor. These new reagents are potentially useful in delineating the roles of Hip1 during pathogenesis or as diagnostic imaging tools for specifically monitoring Mtb infections.

  4. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase reduces LPS-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Inceoglu, Bora; Jinks, Steven L.; Schmelzer, Kara R.; Waite, Troy; Kim, In Hae; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolases catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides in acyclic systems. In man this enzyme is the product of a single copy gene (EPXH-2) present on chromosome 8. The human sEH is of interest due to emerging roles of its endogenous substrates, epoxygenated fatty acids, in inflammation and hypertension. One of the consequences of inhibiting sEH in rodent inflammation models is a profound decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory and proalgesic lipid metabolites including prostaglandins. This prompted us to hypothesize that sEH inhibitors may have antinociceptive properties. Here we tested if sEH inhibitors can reduce inflammatory pain. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar LPS injection and sEH inhibitors were delivered topically. We found that two structurally dissimilar but equally potent sEH inhibitors can be delivered through the transdermal route and that sEH inhibitors effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats treated with LPS. In addition we show that epoxydized arachidonic acid metabolites, EETs, are also effective in attenuating thermal hyperalgesia in this model. In parallel with the observed biological activity metabolic analysis of oxylipids showed that inhibition of sEH resulted with a decrease in PGD2 levels and sEH generated degradation products of linoleic and arachidonic acid metabolites with a concomitant increase in epoxides of linoleic acid. These data show that inhibition of sEH may become a viable therapeutic strategy to attain analgesia. PMID:16962614

  5. Repurposing Suzuki Coupling Reagents as a Directed Fragment Library Targeting Serine Hydrolases and Related Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are susceptible to potent reversible inhibition by boronic acids. Large collections of chemically diverse boronic acid fragments are commercially available because of their utility in coupling chemistry. We repurposed the approximately 650 boronic acid reagents in our collection as a directed fragment library targeting serine hydrolases and related enzymes. Highly efficient hits (LE > 0.6) often result. The utility of the approach is illustrated with the results against autotaxin, a phospholipase implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:28564542

  6. Compositional profile of α/β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different α/β-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08; ∼ 23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09; ∼ 12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01; < 5%). Detailed analysis of the genes predicted to encode proteins of the abH08 superfamily revealed a high proportion related to epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in polluted mangroves BrMgv01-02-03. This suggested selection and putative involvement in local degradation/detoxification of the pollutants. Seven sequences that were annotated as genes for putative epoxide hydrolases and five for putative haloalkane dehalogenases were found in a fosmid library generated from BrMgv02 DNA. The latter enzymes were predicted to belong to Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Our integrated approach thus identified 12 genes (complete and/or partial) that may encode hitherto undescribed enzymes. The low amino acid identity (< 60%) with already-described genes opens perspectives for both production in an expression host and genetic screening of metagenomes. PMID:25171437

  7. Compositional profile of α / β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different α/β-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08; ∼ 23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09; ∼ 12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01; < 5%). Detailed analysis of the genes predicted to encode proteins of the abH08 superfamily revealed a high proportion related to epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in polluted mangroves BrMgv01-02-03. This suggested selection and putative involvement in local degradation/detoxification of the pollutants. Seven sequences that were annotated as genes for putative epoxide hydrolases and five for putative haloalkane dehalogenases were found in a fosmid library generated from BrMgv02 DNA. The latter enzymes were predicted to belong to Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Our integrated approach thus identified 12 genes (complete and/or partial) that may encode hitherto undescribed enzymes. The low amino acid identity (< 60%) with already-described genes opens perspectives for both production in an expression host and genetic screening of metagenomes.

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase prevents renal interstitial fibrogenesis in obstructive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Yoon, Sang Pil; Toews, Myron L.; Imig, John D.; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been challenging because of its pathogenic complexity. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P-450-dependent derivatives of arachidonic acid with antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and profibrinolytic functions. We recently reported that genetic ablation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), an enzyme that converts EETs to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in experimental mouse models of CKD. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of sEH after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) would attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in mouse kidneys and may provide a novel approach to manage the progression of CKD. Inhibition of sEH enhanced levels of EET regioisomers and abolished tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as demonstrated by reduced collagen deposition and myofibroblast formation after UUO. The inflammatory response was also attenuated, as demonstrated by decreased influx of neutrophils and macrophages and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines keratinocyte chemoattractant, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in kidneys after UUO. UUO upregulated transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3 signaling and induced NF-κB activation, oxidative stress, tubular injury, and apoptosis; in contrast, it downregulated antifibrotic factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, especially PPAR-γ. sEH inhibition mitigated the aforementioned malevolent effects in UUO kidneys. These data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of sEH promotes anti-inflammatory and fibroprotective effects in UUO kidneys by preventing tubular injury, downregulation of NF-κB, transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3, and inflammatory signaling pathways, and activation of PPAR isoforms. Our data suggest the potential use of sEH inhibitors in treating fibrogenesis

  9. Erectogenic and Aphrodisiac Property of Moringa oleifera: Involvement of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Dethe, Shekhar M; Gururaj, Giligar M; Jamwal, Rohitash; Bhaskar, Anirban; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Agarwal, Amit

    2016-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors have been reported to improve penile erection; therefore, sEH could be useful for management of erectile dysfunction. Methanolic and aqueous extracts of 30 Indian medicinal plants were screened for their sEH inhibition potential. Fifteen extracts showed >50% inhibition when screened at 50 µg/mL in sEH inhibition assay. Methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) seeds (MEMO) was most potent with IC50 1.7 ± 0.1 µg/mL and was selected for in vitro studies on isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and in vivo sexual behaviour studies on healthy and diabetic rats. Rats were divided into five groups, each containing six animals and treated orally with either water, vehicle (1% Tween-20), MEMO (45 and 90 mg/kg/day for 21 days), and standard drug, sildenafil (5 mg/kg/day for 7 days). An equal number of female rats were used, and the effect of MEMO and sildenafil was compared with that of vehicle. MEMO significantly relaxed isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle at 0.1-100 µg/mL in vitro and significantly increased (p < 0.05) sexual activity, intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure in normal and diabetic rats. The increase in erectile function of rats by MEMO could be because of its sEH inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition and Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acid Treatment Improve Vascularization of Engineered Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Jennifer M.; McFarland, Kevin L.; Combs, Kelly A.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Inceoglu, Bora; Wan, Debin; Boyce, Steven T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Autologous engineered skin substitutes comprised of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and biopolymers can serve as an adjunctive treatment for excised burns. However, engineered skin lacks a vascular plexus at the time of grafting, leading to slower vascularization and reduced rates of engraftment compared with autograft. Hypothetically, vascularization of engineered skin grafts can be improved by treatment with proangiogenic agents at the time of grafting. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid that are inactivated by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). EETs have multiple biological activities and have been shown to promote angiogenesis. Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) represent attractive therapeutic agents because they increase endogenous EET levels. We investigated sEHI administration, alone or combined with EET treatment, for improved vascularization of engineered skin after grafting to mice. Methods: Engineered skin substitutes, prepared using primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes, were grafted to full-thickness surgical wounds in immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with the sEHI 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU), which was administered in drinking water throughout the study period, with or without topical EET treatment, and were compared with vehicle-treated controls. Vascularization was quantified by image analysis of CD31-positive areas in tissue sections. Results: At 2 weeks after grafting, significantly increased vascularization was observed in the TPPU and TPPU + EET groups compared with controls, with no evidence of toxicity. Conclusions: The results suggest that sEH inhibition can increase vascularization of engineered skin grafts after transplantation, which may contribute to enhanced engraftment and improved treatment of full-thickness wounds. PMID:28293507

  11. Peptidase E, a Peptidase Specific for N-Terminal Aspartic Dipeptides, Is a Serine Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Lassy, Rachel A. L.; Miller, Charles G.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium peptidase E (PepE) is an N-terminal Asp-specific dipeptidase. PepE is not inhibited by any of the classical peptidase inhibitors, and its amino acid sequence does not place it in any of the known peptidase structural classes. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of PepE with a number of related sequences has allowed us to define the amino acid residues that are strongly conserved in this family. To ensure the validity of this comparison, we have expressed one of the most distantly related relatives (Xenopus) in Escherichia coli and have shown that it is indeed an Asp-specific dipeptidase with properties very similar to those of serovar Typhimurium PepE. The sequence comparison suggests that PepE is a serine hydrolase. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to change all of the conserved Ser, His, and Asp residues and have found that Ser120, His157, and Asp135 are all required for activity. Conversion of Ser120 to Cys leads to severely reduced (104-fold) but still detectable activity, and this activity but not that of the parent is inhibited by thiol reagents; these results confirm that this residue is likely to be the catalytic nucleophile. These results suggest that PepE is the prototype of a new family of serine peptidases. The phylogenetic distribution of the family is unusual, since representatives are found in eubacteria, an insect (Drosophila), and a vertebrate (Xenopus) but not in the Archaea or in any of the other eukaryotes for which genome sequences are available. PMID:10762256

  12. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  13. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates endothelial dysfunction in animal models of diabetes, obesity and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Ning; Vincelette, Jon; Chen, Dawn; Gless, Richard D; Anandan, Sampath-Kumar; Rubanyi, Gabor M; Webb, Heather K; MacIntyre, D Euan; Wang, Yi-Xin Jim

    2011-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases, including type II diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. It has been well established that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) act as an endothelial derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (s-EH) rapidly hydrolyses certain epoxylipids (e.g. EETs) to less bioactive diols (DHETs), thereby attenuating the evoked vasodilator effects. The aim of the present study was to examine if inhibition of s-EH can restore impaired endothelial function in three animal models of cardiometabolic diseases. Isolated vessel rings of the aorta and/or mesenteric artery from mice or rats were pre-contracted using phenylephrine or U46619. Endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were measured using wire myography in vessels isolated from db/db or diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice, and angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats treated chronically with s-EH inhibitors AR9281 or AR9276 or with vehicle. Vasorelaxation to acetylcholine, but not to SNP was severely impaired in all three animal models. Oral administration of AR9281 or AR9276 abolished whole blood s-EH activity, elevated epoxy/diol lipid ratio, and abrogated endothelial dysfunction in all three models. Incubating the mesenteric artery of db/db mice with L-NAME and indomethacin to block nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin formation did not affect AR9821-induced improvement of endothelial function. These data indicate that inhibition of s-EH ameliorates endothelial dysfunction and that effects in the db/db model are independent of the presence of NO and cyclooxygenase derived prostanoids. Thus, preserving vasodilator EETs by inhibition of s-EH may be of therapeutic benefit by improving endothelial function in cardiometabolic diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase prevents renal interstitial fibrogenesis in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinu; Yoon, Sang Pil; Toews, Myron L; Imig, John D; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Padanilam, Babu J

    2015-01-15

    Treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been challenging because of its pathogenic complexity. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P-450-dependent derivatives of arachidonic acid with antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and profibrinolytic functions. We recently reported that genetic ablation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), an enzyme that converts EETs to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in experimental mouse models of CKD. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of sEH after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) would attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation in mouse kidneys and may provide a novel approach to manage the progression of CKD. Inhibition of sEH enhanced levels of EET regioisomers and abolished tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as demonstrated by reduced collagen deposition and myofibroblast formation after UUO. The inflammatory response was also attenuated, as demonstrated by decreased influx of neutrophils and macrophages and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines keratinocyte chemoattractant, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in kidneys after UUO. UUO upregulated transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3 signaling and induced NF-κB activation, oxidative stress, tubular injury, and apoptosis; in contrast, it downregulated antifibrotic factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, especially PPAR-γ. sEH inhibition mitigated the aforementioned malevolent effects in UUO kidneys. These data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of sEH promotes anti-inflammatory and fibroprotective effects in UUO kidneys by preventing tubular injury, downregulation of NF-κB, transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3, and inflammatory signaling pathways, and activation of PPAR isoforms. Our data suggest the potential use of sEH inhibitors in treating fibrogenesis

  15. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase prevents renal interstitial fibrosis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Imig, John D.; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiological events that lead to renal interstitial fibrogenesis are incompletely understood. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET), an arachidonic acid metabolite, has anti-inflammatory and profibrinolytic functions. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts EET to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. Here, we tested the hypothesis that sEH deficiency would prevent tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mouse kidneys. The loss of sEH enhanced levels of EET regioisomers and abolished tubulointerstitial fibrosis as demonstrated by reduced collagen deposition and myofibroblast formation at 3 and 10 days after UUO. The inflammatory response was prevented as demonstrated by decreased influx of neutrophil and macrophage, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and chemotactic factors in sEH-deficient UUO kidneys. Pharmacological inhibition of sEH also prevented inflammation and fibrosis after UUO. Next, we delved into the molecular mechanisms piloting the beneficial effects of sEH deficiency in renal fibrosis. UUO upregulated profibrotic factors associated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smad3 signaling, oxidative stress, and NF-κB activation, and downregulated antifibrotic factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, especially PPARγ, but the loss of sEH prevented these adverse effects in UUO kidneys. Furthermore, administration of PPAR antagonists enhanced myofibroblast formation and activation of Smad3 and NF-κB p65, effects that were prevented by sEH deficiency in UUO kidneys. These data demonstrate that loss of sEH promotes anti-inflammatory and fibroprotective effects in UUO kidneys via activation of PPAR isoforms and downregulation of NF-κB, TGF-β1/Smad3, and inflammatory signaling pathways. Our data suggest the potential use of sEH inhibitors in treating fibrotic diseases. PMID:25164080

  16. A New Family of Biuret Hydrolases Involved in S-Triazine Ring Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Stephan M.; Durchschein, Katharina; Richman, Jack E.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    Biuret is an intermediate in the bacterial metabolism of s-triazine ring compounds and is occasionally used as a ruminant feed supplement. We used bioinformatics to identify a biuret hydrolase, an enzyme that has previously resisted efforts to stabilize, purify and characterize. This newly discovered enzyme is a member of the cysteine hydrolase superfamily, a family of enzymes previously not found to be involved in s-triazine metabolism. The gene from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain 3841 encoding biuret hydrolase was synthesized, transformed into Escherichia coli, and expressed. The enzyme was purified and found to be stable. Biuret hydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of biuret to allophanate and ammonia. The kcat/KM of 1.7 × 105 M−1s−1 and the relatively low KM of 23 ± 4 μM together suggested that this enzyme acts uniquely on biuret physiologically. This is supported by the fact that of the 34 substrate analogs of biuret tested, only two demonstrated reactivity, both at less than 5% of the rate determined for biuret. Biuret hydrolase does not react with carboxybiuret, the product of the enzyme immediately preceding biuret hydrolase in the metabolic pathway for cyanuric acid. This suggests an unusual metabolic strategy of an enzymatically-produced intermediate undergoing non-enzymatic decarboxylation to produce the substrate for the next enzyme in the pathway. PMID:21897878

  17. Human Lung Hydrolases Delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–Macrophage Interactions and the Capacity To Control Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesus; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60–80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proin-flammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis–macrophage inter-actions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection). PMID:21602490

  18. A Phylogenetically Informed Comparison of GH1 Hydrolases between Arabidopsis and Rice Response to Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun-Ying; Yang, Jing-Fang; Liu, Tie-Yuan; Su, Zhen-Feng; Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Fan, Tao; Ye, Neng-Hui; Feng, Zhen; Wang, Ling-Juan; Hao, Ge-Fei; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Ying-Gao

    2017-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases Family 1 (GH1) comprises enzymes that can hydrolyze β-O-glycosidic bond from a carbohydrate moiety. The plant GH1 hydrolases participate in a number of developmental processes and stress responses, including cell wall modification, plant hormone activation or deactivation and herbivore resistance. A large number of members has been observed in this family, suggesting their potential redundant functions in various biological processes. In this study, we have used 304 sequences of plant GH1 hydrolases to study the evolution of this gene family in plant lineage. Gene duplication was found to be a common phenomenon in this gene family. Although many members of GH1 hydrolases showed a high degree of similarity in Arabidopsis and rice, they showed substantial tissue specificity and differential responses to various stress treatments. This differential regulation implies each enzyme may play a distinct role in plants. Furthermore, some of salt-responsive Arabidopsis GH1 hydrolases were selected to test their genetic involvement in salt responses. The knockout mutants of AtBGLU1 and AtBGLU19 were observed to be less-sensitive during NaCl treatment in comparison to the wild type seedlings, indicating their participation in salt stress response. In summary, Arabidopsis and rice GH1 glycoside hydrolases showed distinct features in their evolutionary path, transcriptional regulation and genetic functions. PMID:28392792

  19. Purification and characterization of three parathion hydrolases from gram-negative bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, W W; Karns, J S

    1989-02-01

    Three unique parathion hydrolases were purified from gram-negative bacterial isolates and characterized. All three purified enzymes had roughly comparable affinities for ethyl parathion and had broad temperature optima at ca. 40 degrees C. The membrane-bound hydrolase of Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551 was composed of a single subunit of approximately 35,000 daltons (Da) and was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents such as dithiothreitol (DTT) and by metal salts such as CuCl2. The cytosolic hydrolase of strain B-1 was composed of a single subunit of approximately 43,000 Da and was stimulated by DTT and inhibited by CuCl2. The membrane-bound hydrolase of strain SC was composed of four identical subunits of 67,000 Da and was inhibited by DTT and stimulated by CuCl2. The substrate ranges of the three enzymes also differed, as evidenced by their relative affinities for parathion and the related organophosphate insecticide O-ethyl-O-4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). The B-1 hydrolase displayed equal affinity for both compounds, the Flavobacterium enzyme showed twofold-lower affinity for EPN than for parathion, and the SC hydrolase displayed no activity toward EPN. The range in characteristics of these three enzymes can be exploited in different waste disposal strategies.

  20. Purification and characterization of three parathion hydrolases from gram-negative bacterial strains.

    PubMed Central

    Mulbry, W W; Karns, J S

    1989-01-01

    Three unique parathion hydrolases were purified from gram-negative bacterial isolates and characterized. All three purified enzymes had roughly comparable affinities for ethyl parathion and had broad temperature optima at ca. 40 degrees C. The membrane-bound hydrolase of Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551 was composed of a single subunit of approximately 35,000 daltons (Da) and was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents such as dithiothreitol (DTT) and by metal salts such as CuCl2. The cytosolic hydrolase of strain B-1 was composed of a single subunit of approximately 43,000 Da and was stimulated by DTT and inhibited by CuCl2. The membrane-bound hydrolase of strain SC was composed of four identical subunits of 67,000 Da and was inhibited by DTT and stimulated by CuCl2. The substrate ranges of the three enzymes also differed, as evidenced by their relative affinities for parathion and the related organophosphate insecticide O-ethyl-O-4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). The B-1 hydrolase displayed equal affinity for both compounds, the Flavobacterium enzyme showed twofold-lower affinity for EPN than for parathion, and the SC hydrolase displayed no activity toward EPN. The range in characteristics of these three enzymes can be exploited in different waste disposal strategies. Images PMID:2541658

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  2. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  3. Kinetic characterization of a cocaine hydrolase engineered from mouse butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Geng, Liyi; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Zheng, Xirong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-03-01

    Mouse butyrylcholinesterase (mBChE) and an mBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (mCocH, i.e. the A¹⁹⁹S/S²²⁷A/S²⁸⁷G/A³²⁸W/Y³³²G mutant) have been characterized for their catalytic activities against cocaine, i.e. naturally occurring (-)-cocaine, in comparison with the corresponding human BChE (hBChE) and an hBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (hCocH, i.e. the A¹⁹⁹S/F²²⁷A/S²⁸⁷G/A³²⁸W/Y³³²G mutant). It has been demonstrated that mCocH and hCocH have improved the catalytic efficiency of mBChE and hBChE against (-)-cocaine by ~8- and ~2000-fold respectively, although the catalytic efficiencies of mCocH and hCocH against other substrates, including acetylcholine (ACh) and butyrylthiocholine (BTC), are close to those of the corresponding wild-type enzymes mBChE and hBChE. According to the kinetic data, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of mBChE against (-)-cocaine is comparable with that of hBChE, but the catalytic efficiency of mCocH against (-)-cocaine is remarkably lower than that of hCocH by ~250-fold. The remarkable difference in the catalytic activity between mCocH and hCocH is consistent with the difference between the enzyme-(-)-cocaine binding modes obtained from molecular modelling. Further, both mBChE and hBChE demonstrated substrate activation for all of the examined substrates [(-)-cocaine, ACh and BTC] at high concentrations, whereas both mCocH and hCocH showed substrate inhibition for all three substrates at high concentrations. The amino-acid mutations have remarkably converted substrate activation of the enzymes into substrate inhibition, implying that the rate-determining step of the reaction in mCocH and hCocH might be different from that in mBChE and hBChE.

  4. A new group of exo-acting family 28 glycoside hydrolases of Aspergillus niger that are involved in pectin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Martens-Uzunova, Elena S.; Zandleven, Joris S.; Benen, Jaques A. E.; Awad, Hanem; Kools, Harrie J.; Beldman, Gerrit; Voragen, Alphons G. J.; Van Den Berg, Johan A.; Schaap, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    The fungus Aspergillus niger is an industrial producer of pectin-degrading enzymes. The recent solving of the genomic sequence of A. niger allowed an inventory of the entire genome of the fungus for potential carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. By applying bioinformatics tools, 12 new genes, putatively encoding family 28 glycoside hydrolases, were identified. Seven of the newly discovered genes form a new gene group, which we show to encode exoacting pectinolytic glycoside hydrolases. This group includes four exo-polygalacturonan hydrolases (PGAX, PGXA, PGXB and PGXC) and three putative exo-rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases (RGXA, RGXB and RGXC). Biochemical identification using polygalacturonic acid and xylogalacturonan as substrates demonstrated that indeed PGXB and PGXC act as exo-polygalacturonases, whereas PGXA acts as an exo-xylogalacturonan hydrolase. The expression levels of all 21 genes were assessed by microarray analysis. The results from the present study demonstrate that exo-acting glycoside hydrolases play a prominent role in pectin degradation. PMID:16822232

  5. ADP-Ribosylarginine Hydrolase Regulates Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Jiro; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Chengyu; Stylianou, Mario; Hoffmann, Victoria; Lizak, Martin J.; Glasgow, Connie G.; Moss, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of uncertain significance in cancer. In this study, we evaluated the consequences for cancer susceptibility in the mouse of a genetic deletion of the enzyme responsible for removing mono-ADP–ribose moieties from arginines in cellular proteins. Specifically, we analyzed cancer susceptibility in animals lacking the ADP-ribosylarginine hydrolase (ARH1) that cleaves the ADP ribose–protein bond. ARH1−/− cells or ARH1−/− cells overexpressing an inactive mutant ARH1 protein (ARH1−/− +dm) had higher proliferation rates than either wild-type ARH1+/+ cells or ARH1−/− cells engineered to express the wild-type ARH1 enzyme. More significantly, ARH1−/− and ARH1+/− mice spontaneously developed lymphomas, adenocarcinomas, and metastases more frequently than wild-type ARH1+/+ mice. In ARH1+/− mice, we documented in all arising tumors mutation of the remaining wild-type allele (or loss of heterozygosity), illustrating the strict correlation that existed between tumor formation and absence of ARH1 gene function. Our findings show that proper control of protein ADP-ribosylation levels affected by ARH1 is essential for cancer suppression. PMID:21697277

  6. ADP-ribosylarginine hydrolase regulates cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jiro; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Chengyu; Stylianou, Mario; Hoffmann, Victoria; Lizak, Martin J; Glasgow, Connie G; Moss, Joel

    2011-08-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of uncertain significance in cancer. In this study, we evaluated the consequences for cancer susceptibility in the mouse of a genetic deletion of the enzyme responsible for removing mono-ADP-ribose moieties from arginines in cellular proteins. Specifically, we analyzed cancer susceptibility in animals lacking the ADP-ribosylarginine hydrolase (ARH1) that cleaves the ADP ribose-protein bond. ARH1(-/-) cells or ARH1(-/-) cells overexpressing an inactive mutant ARH1 protein (ARH1(-/-)+dm) had higher proliferation rates than either wild-type ARH1(+/+) cells or ARH1(-/-) cells engineered to express the wild-type ARH1 enzyme. More significantly, ARH1(-/-) and ARH1(+/-) mice spontaneously developed lymphomas, adenocarcinomas, and metastases more frequently than wild-type ARH1(+/+) mice. In ARH1(+/-) mice, we documented in all arising tumors mutation of the remaining wild-type allele (or loss of heterozygosity), illustrating the strict correlation that existed between tumor formation and absence of ARH1 gene function. Our findings show that proper control of protein ADP-ribosylation levels affected by ARH1 is essential for cancer suppression.

  7. Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst-Kennedy, Jennifer; Chin, Lih-Shen; Li, Lian

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, aka PGP9.5) is an abundant, neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme that has also been suggested to possess E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and/or stabilize ubiquitin monomers in vivo. Recent evidence implicates dysregulation of UCH-L1 in the pathogenesis and progression of human cancers. Although typically only expressed in neurons, high levels of UCH-L1 have been found in many nonneuronal tumors, including breast, colorectal, and pancreatic carcinomas. UCH-L1 has also been implicated in the regulation of metastasis and cell growth during the progression of nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and lymphoma. Together these studies suggest UCH-L1 has a potent oncogenic role and drives tumor development. Conversely, others have observed promoter methylation-mediated silencing of UCH-L1 in certain tumor subtypes, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor role for UCH-L1. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the involvement of UCH-L1 in tumor development and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of UCH-L1 in oncogenesis. PMID:22811913

  8. Mapping human brain fatty acid amide hydrolase activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    Rusjan, Pablo M; Wilson, Alan A; Mizrahi, Romina; Boileau, Isabelle; Chavez, Sofia E; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Kish, Stephen J; Houle, Sylvain; Tong, Junchao

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoid tone has recently been implicated in a number of prevalent neuropsychiatric conditions. [11C]CURB is the first available positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer for imaging fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme which metabolizes the prominent endocannabinoid anandamide. Here, we sought to determine the most suitable kinetic modeling approach for quantifying [11C]CURB that binds selectively to FAAH. Six healthy volunteers were scanned with arterial blood sampling for 90 minutes. Kinetic parameters were estimated regionally using a one-tissue compartment model (TCM), a 2-TCM with and without irreversible trapping, and an irreversible 3-TCM. The 2-TCM with irreversible trapping provided the best identifiability of PET outcome measures among the approaches studied (coefficient of variation (COV) of the net influx constant Ki and the composite parameter λk3 (λ=K1/k2) <5%, and COV(k3)<10%). Reducing scan time to 60 minutes did not compromise the identifiability of rate constants. Arterial spin labeling measures of regional cerebral blood flow were only slightly correlated with Ki, but not with k3 or λk3. Our data suggest that λk3 is sensitive to changes in FAAH activity, therefore, optimal for PET quantification of FAAH activities with [11C]CURB. Simulations showed that [11C]CURB binding in healthy subjects is far from a flow-limited uptake. PMID:23211960

  9. Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that are present in all living organisms and catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. EHs have biotechnological potential in chiral chemistry. We report the cloning, purification, enzymatic activity, and conformational analysis of the TrEH gene from Trichoderma reesei strain QM9414 using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The EH gene has an open reading frame encoding a protein of 343 amino acid residues, resulting in a molecular mass of 38.2kDa. The enzyme presents an optimum pH of 7.2, and it is highly active at temperatures ranging from 23 to 50°C and thermally inactivated at 70°C (t1/2=7.4min). The Michaelis constants (Km) were 4.6mM for racemic substrate, 21.7mM for (R)-(+)-styrene oxide and 3.0mM for (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The kcat/Km analysis indicated that TrEH is enantioselective and preferentially hydrolyzes (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The conformational stability studies suggested that, despite the extreme conditions (high temperatures and extremely acid and basic pHs), TrEH is able to maintain a considerable part of its regular structures, including the preservation of the native cores in some cases. The recombinant protein showed enantioselectivity that was distinct from other fungus EHs, making this protein a potential biotechnological tool.

  10. Regulation of S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase by Lysine Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Chen, Zan; Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Cole, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an NAD+-dependent tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine and is important in cell growth and the regulation of gene expression. Loss of SAHH function can result in global inhibition of cellular methyltransferase enzymes because of high levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine. Prior proteomics studies have identified two SAHH acetylation sites at Lys401 and Lys408 but the impact of these post-translational modifications has not yet been determined. Here we use expressed protein ligation to produce semisynthetic SAHH acetylated at Lys401 and Lys408 and show that modification of either position negatively impacts the catalytic activity of SAHH. X-ray crystal structures of 408-acetylated SAHH and dually acetylated SAHH have been determined and reveal perturbations in the C-terminal hydrogen bonding patterns, a region of the protein important for NAD+ binding. These crystal structures along with mutagenesis data suggest that such hydrogen bond perturbations are responsible for SAHH catalytic inhibition by acetylation. These results suggest how increased acetylation of SAHH may globally influence cellular methylation patterns. PMID:25248746

  11. Disrupting Dimerization Translocates Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to Peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Das, Anjali J; Barnes, Anthony P; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2016-01-01

    The epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) neutralizing enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a neuronal enzyme, which has been localized in both the cytosol and peroxisomes. The molecular basis for its dual localization remains unclear as sEH contains a functional peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS). Recently, a missense polymorphism was identified in human sEH (R287Q) that enhances its peroxisomal localization. This same polymorphism has also been shown to generate weaker sEH homo-dimers. Taken together, these observations suggest that dimerization may mask the sEH PTS and prevent peroxisome translocation. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that dimerization is a key regulator of sEH subcellular localization. Specifically, we altered the dimerization state of sEH by introducing substitutions in amino acids responsible for the dimer-stabilizing salt-bridge. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusions of each of mutants were co-transfected into mouse primary cultured cortical neurons together with a PTS-linked red fluorescent protein to constitutively label peroxisomes. Labeled neurons were analyzed using confocal microscopy and co-localization of sEH with peroxisomes was quantified using Pearson's correlation coefficient. We find that dimer-competent sEH constructs preferentially localize to the cytosol, whereas constructs with weakened or disrupted dimerization were preferentially targeted to peroxisomes. We conclude that the sEH dimerization status is a key regulator of its peroxisomal localization.

  12. Purification and characterization of paraoxon hydrolase from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, L; Gil, F; Hernandez, A F; Marina, A; Vazquez, J; Pla, A

    1997-01-01

    Paraoxonase (paraoxon hydrolase), an enzyme that hydrolyses paraoxon (O,O-diethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), is located in mammals primarily in the serum and liver. Although considerable information is available regarding serum paraoxonase, little is known about the hepatic form of this enzyme. The present work represents the first study on the purification of rat liver paraoxonase. This enzyme has been purified 415-fold to apparent homogeneity with a final specific activity of 1370 units/mg using a protocol consisting of five steps: solubilization of the microsomal fraction, hydroxyapatite adsorption, chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, non-specific affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue 3GA and anion exchange on Mono Q HR 5/5. The presence of Ca2+ and Triton X-100 in the buffers throughout the purification procedure was essential for maintaining enzyme activity. SDS/PAGE of the final preparation indicated a single protein-staining band with an apparent Mr of 45 000. N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences were determined and compared with those of paraoxonases from human and rabbit serum and mouse liver, showing a high similarity. The pH profile showed optimum activity at pH 8.5. The pH stability and heat inactivation of the enzyme were also studied. The Km for liver paraoxonase was 1.69 mM. PMID:9032442

  13. Investigation of the Bacillus cereus phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase catalytic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    The enzyme phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase) from Bacillus cereus catalyzes the conversion of phosphonoacetaldehyde and phosphate. We have demonstrated that phosphonatase is inactivated when incubated with either acetaldehyde or phosphonoacetaldehyde for short time periods at low temperature in the presence of NaBH{sup 4}. This result suggests that the Schiff base mechanism is operative since such treatment might be expected to inactivate the enzyme by reducing an iminium cation mechanistic intermediate. The inactivation process was shown to be highly specific for a single lysine residue. Incubation of phosphonatase with ({sup 3}H)-NaBH{sub 4} and phosphonacetaldehyde ({sup 14}C)-acetaldehyde and NaBH{sub 4} or (C{sub 2}-{sup 3}H)- phosphonoacetaldehyde and NaBH{sup 4} resulted in radiolabeled inactivated enzyme. Tryptic hydrolysis and reverse phase HPLC chromatography of the resulting digests demonstrated that the (C{sub 2} - {sup 3}H)- phosphonoacetaldehyde/NaBH{sub 4} methodology afforded the most specifically tritium labeled, inactivated phosphonatase. The radiolabeled, active site peptide was purified to homogeneity and its amino acid sequence was determined.

  14. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Donovan, David M; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. In contrast to endolysins, PGHs that mediate lysis of the host bacteria at the end of the lytic cycle to release of phage progeny, the action of VAPGHs generates a small hole through which the phage tail tube crosses the cell envelope to eject the phage genetic material at the beginning to the infection cycle. The antimicrobial activity of VAPGHs was first discovered through the observation of the phenomenon of 'lysis from without', in which the disruption of the bacterial cell wall occurs prior to phage production and is caused by a high number of phages adsorbed onto the cell surface. Based on a unique combination of properties of VAPGHs such as high specificity, remarkable thermostability, and a modular organization, these proteins are potential candidates as new antibacterial agents, e.g. against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in human therapy and veterinary as well as biopreservatives in food safety, and as biocontrol agents of harmful bacteria in agriculture. This review provides an overview of the different VAPGHs discovered to date and their potential as novel antimicrobials.

  15. Expression of organophosphate hydrolase in the filamentous fungus Gliocladium virens.

    PubMed

    Dave, K I; Lauriano, C; Xu, B; Wild, J R; Kenerley, C M

    1994-05-01

    The broad-spectrum organophosphate hydrolase (OPH; EC 3.1.8.1) encoded by the organophosphate-degrading gene (opd) from Pseudomonas diminuta MG and Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 possesses capabilities of both P-O bond hydrolysis (e.g. paraoxon) and P-F bond hydrolysis [e.g. sarin and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP)]. In the present study a 9.4-kb plasmid, pCL1, was used to transform the saprophytic fungus Gliocladium virens. pCL1 was derived from pJS294 by placing the fungal promoter (prom1) from Cochliobolus heterostrophus upstream and the trpC terminator from Aspergillus nidulans down-stream of the opd gene. Southern analysis of restricted genomic DNA from various transformants indicated that integration occurred non-specifically at multiple sites. Western blot analysis of mycelial extracts from transformants confirmed the production of a processed form of the enzyme in the fungus. Maximal levels of OPH activity (rate of p-nitrophenol production from paraoxon) were observed after 168 h of culture and activity levels correlated with biomass production in mature vegetative growth.

  16. Molecular Basis of Arabinobio-hydrolase Activity in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Carapito, Raphaël; Imberty, Anne; Jeltsch, Jean-Marc; Byrns, Simon C.; Tam, Pui-Hang; Lowary, Todd L.; Varrot, Annabelle; Phalip, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum secretes a very diverse pool of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) aimed at degrading plant cell walls. α-l-Arabinanases are essential GHs participating in the complete hydrolysis of hemicellulose, a natural resource for various industrial processes, such as bioethanol or pharmaceuticals production. Arb93A, the exo-1,5-α-l-arabinanase of F. graminearum encoded by the gene fg03054.1, belongs to the GH93 family, for which no structural data exists. The enzyme is highly active (1065 units/mg) and displays a strict substrate specificity for linear α-1,5-l-arabinan. Biochemical assays and NMR experiments demonstrated that the enzyme releases α-1,5-l-arabinobiose from the nonreducing end of the polysaccharide. We determined the crystal structure of the native enzyme and its complex with α-1,5-l-arabinobiose, a degradation product of α-Me-1,5-l-arabinotetraose, at 1.85 and 2.05Å resolution, respectively. Arb93A is a monomeric enzyme, which presents the six-bladed β-propeller fold characteristic of sialidases of clan GHE. The configuration of the bound arabinobiose is consistent with the retaining mechanism proposed for the GH93 family. Catalytic residues were proposed from the structural analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to validate their role. They are significantly different from those observed for GHE sialidases. PMID:19269961

  17. Ancient origin of glycosyl hydrolase family 9 cellulase genes.

    PubMed

    Davison, Angus; Blaxter, Mark

    2005-05-01

    While it is widely accepted that most animals (Metazoa) do not have endogenous cellulases, relying instead on intestinal symbionts for cellulose digestion, the glycosyl hydrolase family 9 (GHF9) cellulases found in the genomes of termites, abalone, and sea squirts could be an exception. Using information from expressed sequence tags, we show that GHF9 genes (subgroup E2) are widespread in Metazoa because at least 11 classes in five phyla have expressed GHF9 cellulases. We also demonstrate that eukaryotic GHF9 gene families are ancient, forming distinct monophyletic groups in plants and animals. As several intron positions are also conserved between four metazoan phyla then, contrary to the still widespread belief that cellulases were horizontally transferred to animals relatively recently, GHF9 genes must derive from an ancient ancestor. We also found that sequences isolated from the same animal phylum tend to group together, and in some deuterostomes, GHF9 genes are characterized by substitutions in catalytically important sites. Several paralogous subfamilies of GHF9 can be identified in plants, and genes from primitive species tend to arise basally to angiosperm representatives. In contrast, GHF9 subgroup E2 genes are relatively rare in bacteria.

  18. Thermus thermophilus Glycoside Hydrolase Family 57 Branching Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Marta; Pijning, Tjaard; Booiman, Thijs; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; van der Vlist, Jeroen; Kralj, Slavko; Planas, Antoni; Loos, Katja; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Leemhuis, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18; glycogen branching enzyme; GBE) catalyzes the formation of α1,6-branching points in glycogen. Until recently it was believed that all GBEs belong to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13). Here we describe the cloning and expression of the Thermus thermophilus family GH57-type GBE and report its biochemical properties and crystal structure at 1.35-Å resolution. The enzyme has a central (β/α)7-fold catalytic domain A with an inserted domain B between β2 and α5 and an α-helix-rich C-terminal domain, which is shown to be essential for substrate binding and catalysis. A maltotriose was modeled in the active site of the enzyme which suggests that there is insufficient space for simultaneously binding of donor and acceptor substrates, and that the donor substrate must be cleaved before acceptor substrate can bind. The biochemical assessment showed that the GH57 GBE possesses about 4% hydrolytic activity with amylose and in vitro forms a glucan product with a novel fine structure, demonstrating that the GH57 GBE is clearly different from the GH13 GBEs characterized to date. PMID:21097495

  19. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD+ to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP—the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  20. Bacterial 2,4-dioxygenases: new members of the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold superfamily of enzymes functionally related to serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Fischer, F; Künne, S; Fetzner, S

    1999-09-01

    1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinoline 2,4-dioxygenase (Qdo) from Pseudomonas putida 33/1 and 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (Hod) from Arthrobacter ilicis Rü61a catalyze an N-heterocyclic-ring cleavage reaction, generating N-formylanthranilate and N-acetylanthranilate, respectively, and carbon monoxide. Amino acid sequence comparisons between Qdo, Hod, and a number of proteins belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold superfamily of enzymes and analysis of the similarity between the predicted secondary structures of the 2,4-dioxygenases and the known secondary structure of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 strongly suggested that Qdo and Hod are structurally related to the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold enzymes. The residues S95 and H244 of Qdo were found to be arranged like the catalytic nucleophilic residue and the catalytic histidine, respectively, of the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold enzymes. Investigation of the potential functional significance of these and other residues of Qdo through site-directed mutagenesis supported the hypothesis that Qdo is structurally as well as functionally related to serine hydrolases, with S95 being a possible catalytic nucleophile and H244 being a possible catalytic base. A hypothetical reaction mechanism for Qdo-catalyzed 2,4-dioxygenolysis, involving formation of an ester bond between the catalytic serine residue and the carbonyl carbon of the substrate and subsequent dioxygenolysis of the covalently bound anionic intermediate, is discussed.

  1. Characterization of active-site residues in diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase from Lupinus angustifolius.

    PubMed Central

    Maksel, D; Gooley, P R; Swarbrick, J D; Guranowski, A; Gange, C; Blackburn, G M; Gayler, K R

    2001-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to characterize the functions of key amino acid residues in the catalytic site of the 'nudix' hydrolase, (asymmetrical) diadenosine 5',5"'-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolase (EC 3.6.1.17) from Lupinus angustifolius, the three-dimensional solution structure of which has recently been solved. Residues within the nudix motif, Gly-(Xaa)5-Glu-(Xaa)7-Arg-Glu-Uaa-Xaa-(Glu)2-Xaa-Gly (where Xaa represents unspecified amino acids and Uaa represents the bulky aliphatic amino acids Ile, Leu or Val) conserved in 'nudix enzymes', and residues important for catalysis from elsewhere in the molecule, were mutated and the expressed proteins characterized. The results reveal a high degree of functional conservation between lupin asymmetric Ap4A hydrolase and the 8-oxo-dGTP hydrolase from Escherichia coli. Charged residues in positions equivalent to those that ligate an enzyme-bound metal ion in the E. coli 8-oxo-dGTP hydrolase [Harris, Wu, Massiah and Mildvan (2000) Biochemistry 39, 1655-1674] were shown to contribute to catalysis to similar extents in the lupin enzyme. Mutations E55Q, E59Q and E125Q all reduced kcat markedly, whereas mutations R54Q, E58Q and E122Q had smaller effects. None of the mutations produced a substantial change in the Km)for Ap4A, but several extensively modified the pH-dependence and fluoride-sensitivities of the hydrolase. It was concluded that the precisely positioned glutamate residues Glu-55, Glu-59 and Glu-125 are conserved as functionally significant components of the hydrolytic mechanism in both of these members of the nudix family of hydrolases. PMID:11439089

  2. Identification and characterization of a bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus salivarius for development of novel alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Zeng, Ximin; Mo, Yiming; Smith, Katie; Guo, Yuming; Lin, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) have been used as feed additives to improve average body weight gain and feed efficiency in food animals for more than 5 decades. However, there is a worldwide trend to limit AGP use to protect food safety and public health, which raises an urgent need to discover effective alternatives to AGPs. The growth-promoting effect of AGPs has been shown to be highly correlated with the decreased activity of intestinal bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an enzyme that is produced by various gut microflora and involved in host lipid metabolism. Thus, BSH inhibitors are likely promising feed additives to AGPs to improve animal growth performance. In this study, the genome of Lactobacillus salivarius NRRL B-30514, a BSH-producing strain isolated from chicken, was sequenced by a 454 GS FLX sequencer. A BSH gene identified by genome analysis was cloned and expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system for enzymatic analyses. The BSH displayed efficient hydrolysis activity for both glycoconjugated and tauroconjugated bile salts, with slightly higher catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) on glycoconjugated bile salts. The optimal pH and temperature for the BSH activity were 5.5 and 41°C, respectively. Examination of a panel of dietary compounds using the purified BSH identified some potent BSH inhibitors, in which copper and zinc have been recently demonstrated to promote feed digestion and body weight gain in different food animals. In sum, this study identified and characterized a BSH with broad substrate specificity from a chicken L. salivarius strain and established a solid platform for us to discover novel BSH inhibitors, the promising feed additives to replace AGPs for enhancing the productivity and sustainability of food animals.

  3. A Personal Retrospective: Elevating Anandamide (AEA) by Targeting Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) and the Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs)

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Dale G.

    2016-01-01

    This perspective was adapted from a Career Achievement Award talk given at the International Cannabinoid Research Society Symposium in Bukovina, Poland on June 27, 2016. As a biochemist working in the neurosciences, I was always fascinated with neurotransmitter inactivation. In 1993 we identified an enzyme activity that breaks down anandamide. We called the enzyme anandamide amidase, now called FAAH. We and other laboratories developed FAAH inhibitors that were useful reagents that also proved to have beneficial physiological effects and until recently, new generations of inhibitors were in clinical trials. Nearly all neurotransmitters are water soluble and as such, require a transmembrane protein transporter to pass through the lipid membrane for inactivation inside the cell. However, using model systems, we and others have shown that this is unnecessary for anandamide, an uncharged hydrophobic molecule that readily diffuses across the cellular membrane. Interestingly, its uptake is driven by the concentration gradient resulting from its breakdown mainly by FAAH localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. We identified the FABPs as intracellular carriers that “solubilize” anandamide, transporting anandamide to FAAH. Compounds that bind to FABPs block AEA breakdown, raising its level. The cannabinoids (THC and CBD) also were discovered to bind FABPs and this may be one of the mechanisms by which CBD works in childhood epilepsy, raising anandamide levels. Targeting FABPs may be advantageous since they have some tissue specificity and do not require reactive serine hydrolase inhibitors, as does FAAH, with potential for off-target reactions. At the International Cannabis Research Society Symposium in 1992, Raphe Mechoulam revealed that his laboratory isolated an endogenous lipid molecule that binds to the CB1 receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) and this became the milestone paper published in December of that year describing anandamide (AEA, Devane et al., 1992

  4. A Personal Retrospective: Elevating Anandamide (AEA) by Targeting Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) and the Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs).

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Dale G

    2016-01-01

    This perspective was adapted from a Career Achievement Award talk given at the International Cannabinoid Research Society Symposium in Bukovina, Poland on June 27, 2016. As a biochemist working in the neurosciences, I was always fascinated with neurotransmitter inactivation. In 1993 we identified an enzyme activity that breaks down anandamide. We called the enzyme anandamide amidase, now called FAAH. We and other laboratories developed FAAH inhibitors that were useful reagents that also proved to have beneficial physiological effects and until recently, new generations of inhibitors were in clinical trials. Nearly all neurotransmitters are water soluble and as such, require a transmembrane protein transporter to pass through the lipid membrane for inactivation inside the cell. However, using model systems, we and others have shown that this is unnecessary for anandamide, an uncharged hydrophobic molecule that readily diffuses across the cellular membrane. Interestingly, its uptake is driven by the concentration gradient resulting from its breakdown mainly by FAAH localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. We identified the FABPs as intracellular carriers that "solubilize" anandamide, transporting anandamide to FAAH. Compounds that bind to FABPs block AEA breakdown, raising its level. The cannabinoids (THC and CBD) also were discovered to bind FABPs and this may be one of the mechanisms by which CBD works in childhood epilepsy, raising anandamide levels. Targeting FABPs may be advantageous since they have some tissue specificity and do not require reactive serine hydrolase inhibitors, as does FAAH, with potential for off-target reactions. At the International Cannabis Research Society Symposium in 1992, Raphe Mechoulam revealed that his laboratory isolated an endogenous lipid molecule that binds to the CB1 receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) and this became the milestone paper published in December of that year describing anandamide (AEA, Devane et al., 1992). As to

  5. Soluble epoxide hydrolase activity regulates inflammatory responses and seizure generation in two mouse models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Wen; Hung, Shao-Wen; Wu, Yi-Chen; Wong, Lin-King; Lai, Ming-Tsong; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to be involved in epileptogenesis with unclear mechanisms. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) seems to offer anti-inflammatory protection to ischemic brain injury in rodents. Thus, it is hypothesized that sEH inhibition might also affect the neuroinflammatory responses caused by epileptic seizures. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sEH in neuroinflammation, seizure generation and subsequent epileptogenesis using two mouse models of temporal lobe epilepsy. Experimental epileptic seizures were induced by either pilocarpine or electrical amygdala kindling in both wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and sEH knockout (sEH KO) mice. The sEH expression in the hippocampus was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The effects of the sEH hydrolase inhibitors, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) and N-[1-(1-oxopropyl)-4-piperidinyl]-N'-[4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl)-urea (TPPU), and of the genetic deletion of sEH on seizure-induced neuroinflammatory responses and the development of epilepsy were evaluated. In the hippocampus of WT mice, sEH was mainly expressed in astrocytes (GFAP(+)), neurons (NeuN(+)) and scattered microglia (Iba-1(+)) in the regions of CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. Expression of sEH was significantly increased on day 7, 14, 21 and 28 after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Administration with sEH inhibitors attenuated the SE-induced up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), the degradation of EETs, as well as IκB phosphorylation. Following treatment with AUDA, the frequency and duration of spontaneous motor seizures in the pilocarpine-SE mice were decreased and the seizure-induction threshold of the fully kindled mice was increased. Up-regulation of hippocampal IL-1β and IL-6 was found in both WT and sEH KO mice after successful induction of SE. Notably, sEH KO mice were more susceptible to seizures than WT mice. Seizure related

  6. Piperidinyl thiazole isoxazolines: A new series of highly potent, slowly reversible FAAH inhibitors with analgesic properties.

    PubMed

    Pember, Stephen O; Mejia, Galo L; Price, Theodore J; Pasteris, Robert J

    2016-06-15

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a membrane anchored serine hydrolase that has a principle role in the metabolism of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. Docking studies using representative FAAH crystal structures revealed that compounds containing a novel piperidinyl thiazole isoxazoline core fit within the ligand binding domains. New potential FAAH inhibitors were designed and synthesized incorporating urea, carbamate, alkyldione and thiourea reactive centers as potential pharmacophores. A small library of candidate compounds (75) was then screened against human FAAH leading to the identification of new carbamate and urea based inhibitors (Ki=pM and nM, respectively). Representative carbamate and urea based chemotypes displayed slow, time dependent inhibition kinetics leading to enzyme inactivation which was slowly reversible. However, evidence indicated that features of the mechanism of inactivation differ between the two pharmacophore types. Selected compounds were also evaluated for analgesic activity in the mouse-tail flick test.

  7. Detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Final report, 1 June 1984-30 November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.R.; O'Donovan, G.A.; Chang, T.

    1987-02-19

    The research support by ARO contract 21288-LS entitled Detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors resulted in the cloning and partial sequence of two opd genes from Pseudomonas diminuta and Flavobacterium species. It has been possible to isolate the enzyme in association with a small membrane fraction and initiate an evaluation of the organophosphate hydrolase. Collaborative interactions with research scientists at the Chemical Defense Research Command have suggested that the Pseudomonas species is competent to degrade selected types of biological neurotoxins.

  8. Development of a differential medium for bile salt hydrolase-active Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dashkevicz, M P; Feighner, S D

    1989-01-01

    An agar plate assay was developed to detect bile salt hydrolase activity in lactobacilli. On Lactobacillus-selective MRS or Rogosa SL medium supplemented with taurodeoxycholic, taurocholic, or taurochenodeoxycholic acids, bile salt hydrolysis was manifested at two intensities: (i) the formation of precipitate halos around colonies or (ii) the formation of opaque granular white colonies. Sixty-six lactobacilli were tested for bile salt hydrolase activity by both the plate assay and a sensitive radiochemical assay. No false-positive or false-negative results were detected by the plate assay. Based on results of experiments with Eubacterium lentum and Bacteroides species, the plate assay was dependent on two factors: (i) the presence of bile salt hydrolytic activity and (ii) the ability of the organism to sufficiently acidify the medium to protonate free bile acids. The availability of a differential medium for determination of bile salt hydrolase activity will provide a rapid method for determining shifts in a specific functional activity of intestinal Lactobacillus species and provide a rapid screening capability for identifying bile salt hydrolase-deficient mutants. The latter application should allow bile salt hydrolase activity to be used as a marker enzyme in genetic experiments. Images PMID:2705765

  9. Soluble epoxide hydrolase limits mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytochrome-P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases metabolise arachidonic acid (AA) into four different biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) regioisomers. Three of the EETs (i.e., 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET) are rapidly hydrolysed by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Here, we investigated the role of sEH in nociceptive processing during peripheral inflammation. Results In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we found that sEH is expressed in medium and large diameter neurofilament 200-positive neurons. Isolated DRG-neurons from sEH-/- mice showed higher EET and lower DHET levels. Upon AA stimulation, the largest changes in EET levels occurred in culture media, indicating both that cell associated EET concentrations quickly reach saturation and EET-hydrolyzing activity mostly effects extracellular EET signaling. In vivo, DRGs from sEH-deficient mice exhibited elevated 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET-levels. Interestingly, EET levels did not increase at the site of zymosan-induced inflammation. Cellular imaging experiments revealed direct calcium flux responses to 8,9-EET in a subpopulation of nociceptors. In addition, 8,9-EET sensitized AITC-induced calcium increases in DRG neurons and AITC-induced calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sciatic nerve axons, indicating that 8,9-EET sensitizes TRPA1-expressing neurons, which are known to contribute to mechanical hyperalgesia. Supporting this, sEH-/- mice showed increased nociceptive responses to mechanical stimulation during zymosan-induced inflammation and 8,9-EET injection reduced mechanical thresholds in naive mice. Conclusion Our results show that the sEH can regulate mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation by inactivating 8,9-EET, which sensitizes TRPA1-expressing nociceptors. Therefore we suggest that influencing the CYP450 pathway, which is actually highly considered to treat cardiovascular diseases, may cause pain side effects. PMID:21970373

  10. Alterations of intestinal glycoprotein hydrolases in congenital diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The diabetic BioBreed (BB{sub d}) rat was used for the study of the molecular structure of intestinal brush border sucrase-{alpha}-dextrinase (SD) and aminooligopeptidase (AOP) in diabetes mellitus. The specific catalytic activity of S-D and AOP in the BB{sub d} rat is normal. However, solid-phase radioimmunoassay revealed loss of some antigenic determinants in the BB{sub d} rat. S-D and AOP migrated abnormally on 6% SDS-gel electrophoresis in the BB{sub d} rat. S was larger (+5 kDa), D was either smaller (-5 kDa) or unaltered, and AOP was smaller (-5 kDa) in the BB{sub d} than in the normal Wistar. The structural abnormalities were independent of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis and restored to normal by daily insulin treatment (NPH, 3-4 units/rat) for two to three weeks. Newly-synthesized brush border hydrolases were examined after 6 hours of intraperitoneal injection of ({sup 35}S) methionine (2 mCi) and found to be altered, suggesting that structural abnormality appeared acutely during intracellular synthesis rather than being due to slow extracellular modifications such as non-enzymatic glycosylation. Deglycosylation of brush border proteins by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid resulted in an apoprotein with normal electrophoretic migration in BB{sub d}, indicating that the alteration was due to the carbohydrates component of the glycoprotein. Pulse-chase studies with ({sup 35}S) methionine were consistent with normal protein an co-translational and initial N-linked carbohydrate assembly in association with the endoplasmic reticulum in BB{sub d}. However, the post-translational maturation of N-linked and addition of 0-linked carbohydrate chains in Golgi were prolonged, and produced a larger single-chain precursor of S-D in BB{sub d} than normal.

  11. Mechanistic studies of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Case, April; Stein, Ross L

    2006-02-21

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) cleave Ub-X bonds (Ub is ubiquitin and X an alcohol, an amine, or a protein) through a thioester intermediate that is produced by nucleophilic attack of the Cys residue