Science.gov

Sample records for a4 parity violation

  1. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Parity violation in the hadronic weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, Septimiu

    This thesis deals with the first measurements done with a cold neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental technique consisted of capturing polarized cold neutrons by nuclei to measure parity-violation in the angular distribution of the gamma rays following neutron capture. The measurements presented here for the nuclei Chlorine (35Cl) and Aluminum (27Al) are part of a program with the ultimate goal of measuring the asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays emitted in the capture of neutrons on protons, with a precision better than 10-8, in order to extract the weak hadronic coupling constant due to pion exchange interaction with isospin change equal with one (hpi 1). Based on theoretical calculations asymmetry in the angular distribution of the gamma rays from neutron capture on protons has an estimated size of 5·10 -8. This implies that the Al parity violation asymmetry and its uncertainty have to be known with a precision smaller than 4·10 -8. The proton target is liquid Hydrogen (H2) contained in an Aluminum vessel. Results are presented for parity violation and parity-conserving asymmetries in Chlorine and Aluminum. The systematic and statistical uncertainties in the calculation of the parity-violating and parity-conserving asymmetries are discussed.

  3. R parity violation from discrete R symmetries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Takhistov, Volodymyr

    2014-12-15

    We consider supersymmetric extensions of the standard model in which the usual R or matter parity gets replaced by another R or non–R discrete symmetry that explains the observed longevity of the nucleon and solves the µ problem of MSSM. In order to identify suitable symmetries, we develop a novel method of deriving the maximal Z (R) N symmetry that satisfies a given set of constraints. We identify R parity violating (RPV) and conserving models that are consistent with precision gauge unification and also comment on their compatibility with a unified gauge symmetry such as the Pati–Salam group. Finally, wemore » provide a counter– example to the statement found in the recent literature that the lepton number violating RPV scenarios must have µ term and the bilinear κ L Hu operator of comparable magnitude.« less

  4. Parity-Violating Møller Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna S.

    2009-12-01

    Precision measurements of electroweak observables at Q2≪MZ2 complement high energy collider experiments in order to comprehensively search for new dynamics at the TeV scale. Parity-violating electron scattering is one promising technique that has demonstrated the potential to achieve sufficient precision, and which has unique sensitivity to TeV scale dynamics. In particular, we discuss parity-violating electron-electron (Mo/ller scattering). After reviewing the completed SLAC E158 experiment, we discuss a new project to improve on the SLAC measurement by a factor of 5 using the upgraded 12 GeV beam at Jefferson Laboratory, allowing a measurement of the weak mixing angle sin 2θW with comparable precision to the single best measurement at e+e- colliders, and thus accessing the contact interaction scale Λee˜25 TeV.

  5. Muon anomaly and dark parity violation.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Lee, Hye-Sung; Marciano, William J

    2012-07-20

    The muon anomalous magnetic moment exhibits a 3.6σ discrepancy between experiment and theory. One explanation requires the existence of a light vector boson, Z(d) (the dark Z), with mass 10-500 MeV that couples weakly to the electromagnetic current through kinetic mixing. Support for such a solution also comes from astrophysics conjectures regarding the utility of a U(1)(d) gauge symmetry in the dark matter sector. In that scenario, we show that mass mixing between the Z(d) and ordinary Z boson introduces a new source of "dark" parity violation, which is potentially observable in atomic and polarized electron scattering experiments. Restrictive bounds on the mixing (m(Z(d))/m(Z))δ are found from existing atomic parity violation results, δ2<2×10(-5). Combined with future planned and proposed polarized electron scattering experiments, a sensitivity of δ2∼10(-6) is expected to be reached, thereby complementing direct searches for the Z(d) boson.

  6. Parity Violation Experiments with Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry

    1997-10-01

    Since the first suggestions (V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and I. B. Khriplovich, Z. Phys. D1, 243 (1986).), (A. Gongora and P. G. H. Sandars, J. Phys. B 19, L291 (1986).) to search for parity violation in the rare earth atoms, experiments have been carried out by groups in Novosibirsk, Oxford, Hiroshima and Berkeley with Sm, Yb and Dy. The status of these experiments will be reviewed, with some details given on recent Berkeley Dy results ( A.-T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Submitted to Phys. Rev. A.). Progress of the Berkeley Yb experiment ( D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4165 (1995).), ( C.J. Bowers, D. Budker, E.D. Commins, D. DeMille, S.J. Freedman, A.-T. Nguyen, S.-Q. Shang, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 53, 3103-9(1996). ) will be described elsewhere at this meeting by C. J. Bowers et al.

  7. Parity-violating interactions and currents in the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Carlson, J.; Paris, M.

    2003-03-01

    We investigate parity-violating asymmetries in n→p radiative capture at thermal neutron energies and in deuteron electrodisintegration in quasielastic kinematics, using the Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein model for the parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interaction. We find dramatic cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interaction and those arising from the associated parity-violating pion-exchange currents. In the n→p capture, the model dependence of the result is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasielastic electron scattering, these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by γ-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system.

  8. Gravitational wave probes of parity violation in compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon H.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-03-01

    Is gravity parity violating? Given the recent observations of gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries, we develop a strategy to find an answer with current and future detectors. We identify the key signatures of parity violation in gravitational waves: amplitude birefringence in their propagation and a modified chirping rate in their generation. We then determine the optimal binaries to test the existence of parity violation in gravity, and prioritize the research in modeling that will be required to carry out such tests before detectors reach their design sensitivity.

  9. Towards improved measurements of parity violation in atomic ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, D.; Fabricant, A.; Bougas, L.; Tsigutkin, K.; Budker, D.

    2017-11-01

    We report on progress towards performing precision measurements of parity violation in Yb, in which the theoretical prediction for a strong weak-interaction-induced effect in the 6s2 1S0→ 5d6s3D1 optical transition at 408 nm has already been confirmed, with a measurement of the effect at the ≈10 % level of accuracy. With a new atomic-beam apparatus offering enhanced sensitivity, we are aiming at precisely determining the parity violation observable in Yb, which will allow us to probe the distributions of neutrons in different isotopes, investigate physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as to study intra-nucleus weak interactions, through an observation of the anapole moment of Yb nuclei with nonzero spin. We present the experimental principle employed to probe atomic parity violation, describe our new apparatus, and discuss the attained experimental sensitivity as well as the methods for characterizing systematics in these measurements.

  10. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, J.; Sucher, J.; Bhatia, A. K.; Feinberg, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in He in order to gain insight into the reliability of approximate calculations which are carried out for transitions in many-electron atoms. The contributions of the nearest-lying states are computed with a variety of wave functions, including very simple product wave functions, Hartree-Fock functions and Hylleraas-type wave functions with up to 84 parameters. It is found that values of the matrix elements of the parity-violating interaction can differ considerably from the values obtained from the good wave functions, even when these simple wave functions give accurate values for the matrix elements in question

  11. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  12. Parity-violating interaction effects in the np system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Carlson, J.; Paris, M.

    2004-10-01

    We investigate parity-violating observables in the np system, including the longitudinal asymmetry and neutron-spin rotation in n→ p elastic scattering, the photon asymmetry in n→ p radiative capture, and the asymmetries in deuteron photodisintegration d( γ→ ,n)p in the threshold region and electrodisintegration d( e→ , e' )np in quasielastic kinematics. To have an estimate of the model dependence for the various predictions, a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials—Argonne v18 , Bonn 2000, and Nijmegen I—are used in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of π -, ρ -, and ω -meson exchanges—the Desplanques-Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) model. The complete bound and scattering problems in the presence of parity-conserving, including electromagnetic, and parity-violating potentials are solved in both configuration and momentum space. The issue of electromagnetic current conservation is examined carefully. We find large cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated pion-exchange currents. In the n→ p capture, the model dependence is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasielastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by γ-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system. Finally, we find that the neutron-spin rotation in n→ p elastic scattering and asymmetry in deuteron disintegration by circularly polarized photons exhibit significant sensitivity both to the values used for the weak vector-meson couplings in the DDH model and to the input strong-interaction potential adopted in the calculation. This reinforces the conclusion that these short

  13. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks chirality preference when participating in the weak force,more » which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40?years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u???C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.« less

  14. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not1, 2. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks’ chirality preference when participating in the weakmore » force, which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron–quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u-C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.« less

  15. Measurement of parity violation in electron-quark scattering.

    PubMed

    2014-02-06

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks' chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u - C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  16. Constraints on parity violating conformal field theories in d = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Subham Dutta; David, Justin R.; Prakash, Shiroman

    2017-11-01

    We derive constraints on three-point functions involving the stress tensor, T, and a conserved U(1) current, j, in 2+1 dimensional conformal field theories that violate parity, using conformal collider bounds introduced by Hofman and Maldacena. Conformal invariance allows parity-odd tensor-structures for the 〈 T T T〉 and 〈 jjT〉 correlation functions which are unique to three space-time dimensions. Let the parameters which determine the 〈 T T T〉 correlation function be t 4 and α T , where α T is the parity-violating contribution. Similarly let the parameters which determine 〈 jjT〉 correlation function be a 2, and α J , where α J is the parity-violating contribution. We show that the parameters ( t 4, α T ) and (a2, α J ) are bounded to lie inside a disc at the origin of the t 4 - α T plane and the a 2 - α J plane respectively. We then show that large N Chern-Simons theories coupled to a fundamental fermion/boson lie on the circle which bounds these discs. The `t Hooft coupling determines the location of these theories on the boundary circles.

  17. Parity violating optical rotation in Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, P.; Meekhof, D.M.; Majumder, P.K.

    1993-05-01

    Parity non-conserving (PNC) optical rotation has been measured in the 6{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} {yields} 6{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} 1.28 {mu}m M1 transition in atomic Tl with a polarimetry method. PNC is measured as the amplitude of a dispersive lineshape of optical rotation across the transition. The technique is sensitive to {approx} 10{sup -8} rad. This allows precise measurement of the nuclear spin independent contribution to atomic PNC, and measurements on different hyperfine components of the transition will allow improved measurement of the nuclear spin dependent contributions, including the anapole moment of the nucleus. The study of PNC in this transition inmore » Tl also provides comparison to other PNC work in the 6{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} {yields} 7{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in Tl. We will present current results for Tl with comments on systematic errors. We will also discuss prospects for future work in atomic PNC with this method, including studies of isotopically enriched samples of high Z atoms (e.g. Pb) in which we expect measurement of ratios of PNC in different isotopes to be less affected by uncertainties in atomic calculations and more sensitive to electroweak physics.« less

  18. Search for parity violation in {sup 93}Nb neutron resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Bowman, J.D.; Frankle, C.M.

    1999-02-01

    A new search has been performed for parity violation in the compound nuclear states of {sup 94}Nb by measuring the helicity dependence of the neutron total cross section. Transmission measurements on a thick niobium target were performed by the time-of-flight method at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center with a longitudinally polarized neutron beam in the energy range 32 to 1000 eV. A total of 18 {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 93}Nb were studied with none exhibiting a statistically significant parity-violating longitudinal asymmetry. An upper limit of 1.0{times}10{sup {minus}7} eV (95{percent} confidence level) was obtained for the weak spreading widthmore » {Gamma}{sub w} in {sup 93}Nb. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less

  19. Electroweak charge density distributions with parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ren, Zhongzhou; Xu, Chang; Xu, Renli

    2013-11-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering (PVS) is an accurate and model-independent way to investigate the weak-charge density distributions of nuclei. In this paper, we study parity-violating electron scattering with the Helm model where the effects of spin-orbit currents on nuclear weak skins are taken into account. The conditions of two PVS measurements to constrain the surface thickness σW of Helm weak-charge densities are investigated. According to the plane wave Born approximation, Apv is expressed in terms of parameters of the corresponding Helm charge and weak-charge densities. After fitting the results of Apv calculated from the phase-shift analysis method where the Coulomb distortion effects are incorporated, an empirical formula in terms of Helm model parameters for calculating Apv is obtained. If two PVS measurements with different scattering angles are carried out, the modeled weak-charge density distributions with two parameters could be extracted from this empirical formula.

  20. Precision tests of parity violation over cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan P.; Keating, Brian G.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization power spectrum by the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR experiments have demonstrated new precision tools for probing fundamental physics. Regardless of origin, the detection of sub-μK CMB polarization represents a technological tour de force. Yet more information may be latent in the CMB's polarization pattern. Because of its tensorial nature, CMB polarization may also reveal parity-violating physics via a detection of cosmic polarization rotation. Although current CMB polarimeters are sensitive enough to measure one degree-level polarization rotation with >5σ statistical significance, they lack the ability to differentiate this effect from a systematic instrumental polarization rotation. Here, we motivate the search for cosmic polarization rotation from current CMB data as well as independent radio galaxy and quasar polarization measurements. We argue that an improvement in calibration accuracy would allow the unambiguous measurement of parity- and Lorentz-violating effects. We describe the CalSat space-based polarization calibrator that will provide stringent control of systematic polarization angle calibration uncertainties to 0.05° - an order of magnitude improvement over current CMB polarization calibrators. CalSat-based calibration could be used with current CMB polarimeters searching for B-mode polarization, effectively turning them into probes of cosmic parity violation, `for free' - I.e. without the need to build dedicated instruments.

  1. Atomic Parity Violation and Related Physics in Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri Robert

    Atomic parity violation has been observed in the 408 nm 1 S0→3D1 forbidden transition of ytterbium. The parity violating amplitude is 8.7(1.4)e-10 ea0, two orders of magnitude larger than in cesium, where the most precise experiments to date have been performed. This is in accordance with theoretical predictions and constitutes the largest atomic parity violating amplitude yet observed. This also opens the way to future measurements of neutron skins and anapole moments by comparing parity-violating amplitudes for various isotopes and hyperfine components of the transition. We present a detailed description of the observation. Linearly polarized 408 nm light interacts with ytterbium atoms in crossed electric (E) and magnetic fields (B). The probability of the 1 S0→3D1 transition contains a parity-violating term, proportional to E'B[( E'xE B], arising from interference between the amplitudes of transitions induced by the electroweak interaction and the Stark effect ((E' is the optical electric field). The transition probability is detected by measuring the population of the metastable 3P0 state, to which 65% of the atoms excited to the 3D1 state spontaneously decay. The population of the 3P0 state is determined by resonantly exciting the atoms with 649 nm light to the 3S1 state and collecting the fluorescence resulting from its decay. Systematic corrections due to imperfections in the applied electric and magnetic fields are determined in auxiliary experiments. The statistical uncertainty is dominated by parasitic frequency excursions of the 408-nm excitation light due to imperfect stabilization of the optical reference with respect to the atomic resonance. The present uncertainties are 9% statistical and 8% systematic. Methods of improving the accuracy for the future experiments are discussed. We further present a measurement of the dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of ytterbium's 3D1 state. The polarizabilities were measured by analyzing the spectral

  2. Radiative corrections and parity violating electron-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S. Barkanova; A. Aleksejevs; P.G. Blunden

    2002-11-01

    Radiative corrections to the parity-violating asymmetry measured in elastic electron-proton scattering are analyzed in the framework of the Standard Model. We include the complete set of one-loop contributions to one quark current amplitudes. The contribution of soft photon emission to the asymmetry is also calculated, giving final results free of infrared divergences. The one quark radiative corrections, when combines with previous work on many quark effects and recent SAMPLE experimental data, are used to place some new constraints on electroweak form factors of the nucleon.

  3. Constraining long-range parity violation in gravitation using high resolution spectroscopy of chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bargueno, Pedro; Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca; Perez de Tudela, Ricardo

    2008-11-15

    New bounds on long-range parity violation in gravitation are reported from inconclusive searches of parity violating energy differences (PVED) in chiral molecules. In particular, it is found that Leitner-Okubo-Hari Dass's {alpha}{sub 2} (or A{sub 2}) parameter is constrained by current experimental searches of PVED between molecular enantiomers. The possibility of constraining other parameters which parametrize the strength of contact parity violation in gravity, as well as other long-range parity violating potentials will be briefly commented.

  4. Measurement of Parity Violation in np Capture: the NPDGamma Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Page, Shelley A.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R. D.; Case, T.; Chupp, T. E.; Coulter, K. P.; Dabaghyan, M.; Desai, D.; Freedman, S. J.; Gentile, T. R.; Gericke, M. T.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hersman, F. W.; Ino, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Jones, G. L.; Lauss, B.; Leuschner, M. B.; Losowski, B.; Mahurin, R.; Masuda, Y.; Mitchell, G. S.; Nann, H.; Penttila, S. I.; Ramsay, W. D.; Santra, S.; Seo, P.-N.; Sharapov, E. I.; Smith, T. B.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Yuan, V.; Zhu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma experiment will measure the parity-violating directional gamma ray asymmetry Aγ in the reaction n→+p→d+γ. Ultimately, this will constitute the first measurement in the neutron-proton system that is sensitive enough to challenge modern theories of nuclear parity violation, providing a theoretically clean determination of the weak pion-nucleon coupling. A new beam-line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) delivers pulsed cold neutrons to the apparatus, where they are polarized by transmission through a large volume polarized 3He spin filter and captured in a liquid para-hydrogen target. The 2.2 MeV gamma rays from the capture reaction are detected in an array of CsI(Tl) scintillators read out by vacuum photodiodes operated in current mode. We will complete commissioning of the apparatus and carry out a first measurement at LANSCE in 2004–05, which would provide a statistics-limited result for Aγ accurate to a standard uncertainty of ±5 × 10−8 level or better, improving on existing measurements in the neutron-proton system by a factor of 4. Plans to move the experiment to a reactor facility, where the greater flux would enable us to make a measurement with a standard uncertainty of ±1 × 10−8, are actively being pursued for the longer term. PMID:27308121

  5. A New Strangeness Fit to World Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    A global experimental effort to determine the strangeness content of nuclei, including experiments such as G0, SAMPLE, HAPPEx, and A4, have presented results on the precision frontier for parity-violating electron scattering. In particular, the kinematics of these experiments are in the low momentum-transfer region (Q2 < 1), to allow more robust extrapolation to the static (Q2 = 0) properties of the nucleon. The combination of these results into a global fit presents a new opportunity to comment on the globally observed strangeness content in nuclei. The process for constructing this fit faces certain challenges, with electromagnetic form factor model dependence standing out in particular. A novel fit including the most recent data for 1H, 2H, and 4He target parity-violating electron scattering experiments will also be presented, suggesting small but non-zero electromagnetic strangeness contributions. U.S. Department of Energy grant #DE-FG02-07ER41522

  6. Parity violating superfluidity in ultra-cold atoms with artificial non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li; Seo, Kangjun; Sá de Melo, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the creation of parity violating Fermi superfluids in the presence of non-Abelian gauge fields realized by artificial spin-orbit coupling and crossed Zeeman fields. Unlike the case in particle physics where the parity violation is driven by weak interaction, the parity breaking is due to the effects of non-Abelian gauge fields on the kinetic energy in our system. We analyze the signatures of parity violation on the excitation spectrum of the system in normal and superfluid phases, as well as ground state properties such as the spin-resolved momentum distribution, and excitation properties such as the spin-dependent spectral function and density of states.

  7. Parity-violating nuclear force as derived from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W.-Y. P.; Wen Chihyi

    2008-08-15

    Parity-violating nuclear force, as may be accessed from parity-violation studies in nuclear systems, represents an area of nonleptonic weak interactions that has been the subject of experimental investigations for several decades. In the simple meson-exchange picture, a parity-violating nuclear force may be parametrized as arising from the exchange of {pi},{rho},{omega}, or other mesons with strong meson-nucleon coupling at one vertex and weak parity-violating meson-nucleon coupling at the other vertex. The QCD sum rule method allows for a fairly complicated, but nevertheless straightforward, leading-order loop-contribution determination of the various parity-violating MNN couplings starting from QCD (with the nontrivial vacuum) and Glashow-Salam-Weinbergmore » electroweak theory. We continue our earlier investigation of the parity-violating {pi}NN coupling (by Henley, Hwang, and Kisslinger) to other parity-violating couplings. Our predictions are in reasonable overall agreement with the results estimated on phenomenological grounds, such as in the now classic paper of Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein, in the global experimental fit of Adelberger and Haxton, or the effective field theory thinking of Ramsey-Musolf and Page.« less

  8. Parity violation in top quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kao

    1995-02-01

    The leading weak corrections to the production of top quark pairs via q overlineq → t overlinet in p overlinep collisions are evaluated. The chromoanapole form factor of the top quark and effects of parity violation are studied in the Standard Model (SM) and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM). The parity violation effect in q overlineq → g → t overlinet from the SM weak corrections is found to be very small. In the MSSM, the effects of parity violation can be enhanced for tan β≜ {ν2}/{ν1}> {m t}/{m b}.

  9. Testing parity-violating physics from cosmic rotation power reconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-02-22

    We study the reconstruction of the cosmic rotation power spectrum produced by parity-violating physics, with an eye to ongoing and near future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments such as BICEP Array, CMBS4, LiteBIRD and Simons Observatory. In addition to the inflationary gravitational waves and gravitational lensing, measurements of other various effects on CMB polarization open new window into the early Universe. One of these is anisotropies of the cosmic polarization rotation which probes the Chern-Simons term generally predicted by string theory. The anisotropies of the cosmic rotation are also generated by the primordial magnetism and in the Standard Model extentionmore » framework. The cosmic rotation anisotropies can be reconstructed as quadratic in CMB anisotropies. However, the power of the reconstructed cosmic rotation is a CMB four-point correlation and is not directly related to the cosmic-rotation power spectrum. Understanding all contributions in the four-point correlation is required to extract the cosmic rotation signal. Here, assuming inflationary motivated cosmic-rotation models, we employ simulation to quantify each contribution to the four-point correlation and find that (1) a secondary contraction of the trispectrum increases the total signal-to-noise, (2) a bias from the lensing-induced trispectrum is significant compared to the statistical errors in, e.g., LiteBIRD and CMBS4-like experiments, (3) the use of a realization-dependent estimator decreases the statistical errors by 10%–20%, depending on experimental specifications, and (4) other higher-order contributions are negligible at least for near future experiments.« less

  10. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; ...

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  11. Buffer-gas Cooling of Methyltrioxorhenium, a Parity Violation Candidate Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kenneth; Drayna, Garrett; Hallas, Christian; Eibenberger, Sandra; Patterson, David

    2016-05-01

    Chiral compounds containing heavy-metal centers have been suggested as promising candidates for studying parity violation in molecular spectra, due to the strong dependence of the parity violating energy difference with atomic number. Buffer gas cooled molecular samples exhibit low internal temperature and low velocity in the laboratory frame, making them an attractive source for high precision molecular spectroscopy. We demonstrate here the first buffer gas cooling of an organo-metallic compound, CH3ReO3 (MTO). Although MTO is not chiral, it is a precursor to chiral rhenium compounds which are proposed as attractive candidates, due to their stability and low sublimation points, in the search for parity violation in molecular spectra. We propose methods to extend this source into a slow, high flux beam for ultra-high precision spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Quark-hadron duality constraints on $$\\gamma Z$$ box corrections to parity-violating elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2015-12-08

    We examine the interference \\gamma Z box corrections to parity-violating elastic electron--proton scattering in the light of the recent observation of quark-hadron duality in parity-violating deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron, and the approximate isospin independence of duality in the electromagnetic nucleon structure functions down to Q 2 \\approx 1 GeV 2. Assuming that a similar behavior also holds for the \\gamma Z proton structure functions, we find that duality constrains the γ Z box correction to the proton's weak charge to be Re V γ Z V = (5.4 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10 -3 at the kinematics of the Qmore » weak experiment. Within the same model we also provide estimates of the γ Z corrections for future parity-violating experiments, such as MOLLER at Jefferson Lab and MESA at Mainz.« less

  13. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep-inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  14. Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in a Liquid Parahydrogen Target

    PubMed Central

    Markoff, Diane M.

    2005-01-01

    Our understanding of hadronic parity violation is far from clear despite nearly 50 years of theoretical and experimental progress. Measurements of low-energy parity-violating observables in nuclear systems are the only accessible means to study the flavor-conserving weak hadronic interaction. To reduce the uncertainties from nuclear effects, experiments in the few and two-body system are essential. The parity-violating rotation of the transverse neutron polarization vector about the momentum axis as the neutrons traverse a target material has been measured in heavy nuclei and few nucleon systems using reactor cold neutron sources. We describe here an experiment to measure the neutron spin-rotation in a parahydrogen target (n-p system) using pulsed cold-neutrons from the fundamental symmetries beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PMID:27308123

  15. Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in a Liquid Parahydrogen Target.

    PubMed

    Markoff, Diane M

    2005-01-01

    Our understanding of hadronic parity violation is far from clear despite nearly 50 years of theoretical and experimental progress. Measurements of low-energy parity-violating observables in nuclear systems are the only accessible means to study the flavor-conserving weak hadronic interaction. To reduce the uncertainties from nuclear effects, experiments in the few and two-body system are essential. The parity-violating rotation of the transverse neutron polarization vector about the momentum axis as the neutrons traverse a target material has been measured in heavy nuclei and few nucleon systems using reactor cold neutron sources. We describe here an experiment to measure the neutron spin-rotation in a parahydrogen target (n-p system) using pulsed cold-neutrons from the fundamental symmetries beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. Limits on mixing angle and mass of Z prime using. Delta. rho. and atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahanthappa, K.T.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    1991-05-01

    We discuss the effect of an extra neutral boson {ital Z}{prime} on atomic parity violation. Using the limit on {Delta}{rho} from the Collider Detector at Fermilab and CERN LEP experiments and limits on {Delta}{ital Q}{sub {ital W}} from the experiment of Noecker, Masterson, and Wieman on atomic parity violation, we obtain limits on the mixing angle of {ital Z}{prime} with the canonical {ital Z} and the mass of {ital Z}{prime}. Eleven models with an extra {ital Z}{prime} have been analyzed. The limits obtained are comparable to the corresponding limits extracted from the {ital Z}-decay experiments at LEP.

  17. Limits on mixing angle and mass of Z' using Δρ and atomic parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, K. T.; Mohapatra, P. K.

    1991-05-01

    We discuss the effect of an extra neutral boson Z' on atomic parity violation. Using the limit on Δρ from the Collider Detector at Fermilab and CERN LEP experiments and limits on ΔQW from the experiment of Noecker, Masterson, and Wieman on atomic parity violation, we obtain limits on the mixing angle of Z' with the canonical Z and the mass of Z'. Eleven models with an extra Z' have been analyzed. The limits obtained are comparable to the corresponding limits extracted from the Z-decay experiments at LEP.

  18. Large N{sub c} expansion and the parity-violating {pi}, N, {delta} couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shilin

    2009-06-01

    In the limit of large N{sub c} we first consider the N{sub c} ordering of the various parity-violating {pi}, N, {delta} couplings. Then we derive the relations among these couplings and consistency relations from the stability of these couplings under the chiral loop corrections with and without the mass splitting between N and {delta}. Especially we find that h{sub {delta}}=-(3/{radical}(5))h{sub {pi}} in the large N{sub c} limit, which correctly reproduces the relative sign and magnitude of the Desplanques-Donoghue-Holstein values for these parity-violating couplings.

  19. Search for supersymmetric particles with R-parity violation in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Kim, H. Y.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in e +e - interactions at the Z peak have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In a data sample collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP up to 1993, and corresponding to almost two million hadronic Z decays, no signal was observed. As a result, supersymmetric particle masses and couplings are at least as well constrained as under the usual assumption of R-parity conservation.

  20. Parity Violation in Proton-Proton Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yuan, V.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mischke, R. E.; Nagle, D. E.; Talaga, R. L.; McDonald, A. B.

    1986-05-01

    Results of a measurement of parity nonconservation in the anti p-p total cross sections at 800-MeV are presented. The dependence of transmission on beam properties and correction for systematic errors are discussed. The measured longitudinal asymmetry is A{sub L} = (+2.4 +- 1.1(statistical) +- 0.1(systematic)) x 10{sup -7}. A proposed experiment at 230 MeV is discussed.

  1. Parity violating asymmetry in the radiative capture of polarized neutrons by protons

    SciTech Connect

    Craver, B.A.; Kim, Y.E.; Tubis, A.

    1975-01-01

    A parity violating effect of interest in the n + p $Yields$ d + $gamma$ reaction is the asymmetry $alpha$ in the photon angular distribution with respect to an initial neutron polarization. Calculations of $alpha$, using a two-nucleon Reid soft core potential, are reported. The calculations, exact with respect to the strong interaction, are facilitated by Green's function techniques. (6 figures, 2 tables) (SDF)

  2. Opportunities for parity violating electron scattering experiments at the planned MESA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    We suggest to start an accelerator physics project called the Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) as an extension to our experimental facilities. MESA may allow to introduce an innovative internal target regime based on the ERL principle. A second mode of operation will be to use an external polarized electron beam for parity violating experiments.

  3. Parity violation in neutron resonances of {sup 103}Rh

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.A.; Bowman, J.D.; Penttila, S.I.

    1999-10-01

    Parity nonconservation (PNC) was studied in p-wave neutron resonances of {sup 103}Rh in the neutron energy range 30 to 490 eV. The helicity dependence of the neutron total cross section of rhodium was determined by capture measurements with the time-of-flight method at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A total of 32 p-wave resonances were studied and statistically significant longitudinal asymmetries were observed for resonances at E{sub n}=44.5, 110.8, 321.6, and 432.9 eV. A statistical analysis treating the PNC matrix elements as random variables yields a weak spreading width {Gamma}{sub w}=(1.42{sub {minus}0.59}{sup +1.21}){times}10{sup {minus}7}&hthinsp;eV.more » {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less

  4. Parity-violating hybridization in heavy Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yao; Coleman, Piers

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a simple model to describe the formation of heavy Weyl semimetals in noncentrosymmetric heavy fermion compounds under the influence of a parity-mixing, onsite hybridization. A key aspect of interaction-driven heavy Weyl semimetals is the development of surface Kondo breakdown, which is expected to give rise to a temperature-dependent reconfiguration of the Fermi arcs and the Weyl cyclotron orbits which connect them via the chiral bulk states. Our theory predicts a strong temperature-dependent transformation in the quantum oscillations at low temperatures. In addition to the effects of surface Kondo breakdown, the renormalization effects in heavy Weyl semimetals will appear in a variety of thermodynamic and transport measurements.

  5. The Parity Violating Proton Asymmetry from Neutron Capture on Helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    While hadronic parity violation was observed almost 60 years ago in compound nuclei with large nuclear enhancements, a systematic characterization of weak interactions among strongly bound systems is still forthcoming. New theoretical frameworks, experimental facilities, and advanced technology have rejuvenated efforts to map out this ``complexity frontier'' of the Standard Model. A critical measurement in this campaign, the n-3He experiment, was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to obtain a specific combination of the five isospin-dependent couplings which characterize the hadronic weak interaction. We report the parity violating asymmetry from this experiment, the most precise hadronic asymmetry ever measured. This work was supported by the DOE, NSF, NSERC, and CONACYT.

  6. Observation of parity violation in the Ω→ΛK decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hypercp Collaboration; Lu, L. C.; Burnstein, R. A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chen, Y. C.; Choong, W.-S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E. C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gustafson, H. R.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C. M.; Jones, T. D.; Kaplan, D. M.; Longo, M. J.; Luebke, W.; Luk, K.-B.; Nelson, K. S.; Park, H. K.; Perroud, J.-P.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H. A.; Volk, J.; White, C. G.; White, S. L.; Zyla, P.

    2005-06-01

    The α decay parameter in the process Ω→ΛK has been measured from a sample of 4.50 million unpolarized Ω decays recorded by the HyperCP (E871) experiment at Fermilab and found to be [1.78±0.19(stat)±0.16(syst)]×10. This is the first unambiguous evidence for a nonzero α decay parameter, and hence parity violation, in the Ω→ΛK decay.

  7. Demonstration of a Sensitive Method to Measure Nuclear-Spin-Dependent Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus, and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. We demonstrate measurements of NSD-PV that use an enhancement of the effect in diatomic molecules, here using the test system 138Ba 19. Our sensitivity surpasses that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement. We show that systematic errors can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. We measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with total uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz , for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei including 137Ba in 137BaF, where |W |/(2 π )≈5 Hz is expected.

  8. Demonstration of a Sensitive Method to Measure Nuclear-Spin-Dependent Parity Violation.

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B; DeMille, David

    2018-04-06

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z^{0} boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus, and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. We demonstrate measurements of NSD-PV that use an enhancement of the effect in diatomic molecules, here using the test system ^{138}Ba^{19}F. Our sensitivity surpasses that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement. We show that systematic errors can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. We measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with total uncertainty δW/(2π)<0.7  Hz, for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei including ^{137}Ba in ^{137}BaF, where |W|/(2π)≈5  Hz is expected.

  9. Gas Electron Multipler (GEM) detectors for parity-violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, John; Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Solid Collaboration; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The JLab Parity Violation In Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment will use the upgraded 12 GeV beam and proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in DIS of polarized electrons with high precision in order to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Unlike many prior Parity-Violating Electron Scattering (PVES) experiments, PVDIS is a single-particle tracking experiment. Furthermore the experiment's high luminosity combined with the SoLID spectrometer's open configuration creates high-background conditions. As such, the PVDIS experiment has the most demanding tracking detector needs of any PVES experiment to date, requiring precision detectors capable of operating at high-rate conditions in PVDIS's full production luminosity. Developments in large-area GEM detector R&D and SoLID simulations have demonstrated that GEMs provide a cost-effective solution for PVDIS's tracking needs. The integrating-detector-based JLab Measurement Of Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction (MOLLER) experiment requires high-precision tracking for acceptance calibration. Large-area GEMs will be used as tracking detectors for MOLLER as well. The conceptual designs of GEM detectors for the PVDIS and MOLLER experiments will be presented.

  10. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-04-26

    The RHIC spin program is now fully underway. Several runs have been successfully completed and are producing exciting first results. Luminosity and polarization have improved remarkably and promising advances toward the higher RHIC energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV have been made. At this energy in particular, it will become possible to perform measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries. Parity violation occurs in weak interactions, and in combination with the unique polarization capabilities at RHIC fascinating new opportunities arise. In particular, parity-violating single- and double-spin asymmetries give new insights into nucleon structure by allowing probes of up and down sea andmore » anti-quark polarizations. Such measurements at RHIC are a DOE performance milestone for the year 2013 and are also supported by a very large effort from RIKEN. With transverse polarization, charged-current interactions may be sensitive to the Sivers effect. Parity-violating effects at RHIC have been proposed even as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. With the era of measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries at RHIC now rapidly approaching, we had proposed a small workshop that would bring together the main experts in both theory and experiment. We are very happy that this worked out. The whole workshop contained 17 formal talks, both experiment (10) and theory (7), and many fruitful discussions. The physics motivations for, the planned measurements were reviewed first. The RHIC machine prospects regarding polarized 500 GeV running were discussed, as well as the plans by the RHIC experiments for the vital upgrades of their detectors needed for the W physics program. We also had several talks on the topic of ''semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering'', which provides different access to related physics observables. On the theory side, new calculations were presented, for example in terms of QCD all-order resummations of perturbation theory. Also, new

  11. Difference in direct charge-parity violation between charged and neutral B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-W; Unno, Y; Hou, W-S; Chang, P; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C-C; Chistov, R; Cho, I-S; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujikawa, M; Furukawa, K; Gabyshev, N; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikutani, E; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mimashi, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ogawa, Y; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shidara, T; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yoshida, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2008-03-20

    Equal amounts of matter and antimatter are predicted to have been produced in the Big Bang, but our observable Universe is clearly matter-dominated. One of the prerequisites for understanding this elimination of antimatter is the nonconservation of charge-parity (CP) symmetry. So far, two types of CP violation have been observed in the neutral K meson (K(0)) and B meson (B(0)) systems: CP violation involving the mixing between K(0) and its antiparticle (and likewise for B(0) and ), and direct CP violation in the decay of each meson. The observed effects for both types of CP violation are substantially larger for the B(0) meson system. However, they are still consistent with the standard model of particle physics, which has a unique source of CP violation that is known to be too small to account for the matter-dominated Universe. Here we report that the direct CP violation in charged B(+/-)-->K(+/-)pi(0) decay is different from that in the neutral B(0) counterpart. The direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, (that is, the difference between the number of observed B(-)-->K(-)pi(0) event versus B(+)-->K(+) pi(0) events, normalized to the sum of these events) is measured to be about +7%, with an uncertainty that is reduced by a factor of 1.7 from a previous measurement. However, the asymmetry for versus B(0)-->K(+)pi(-) is at the -10% level. Although it is susceptible to strong interaction effects that need further clarification, this large deviation in direct CP violation between charged and neutral B meson decays could be an indication of new sources of CP violation-which would help to explain the dominance of matter in the Universe.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0fdg31 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the harmonic analysis and α = 0fdg35 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.

  13. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    DOE PAGES

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-31

    Here, we discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √s = 8 TeV and first results from collisions at √s = 13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach ofmore » these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, m t ~ ≃ 500–700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that new searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.« less

  14. Planck intermediate results: XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peakmore » stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0°310°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the harmonic analysis and α = 0°350°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.« less

  15. Electroweak radiative corrections and parity-violating electron-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkanova, Svetlana

    Radiative corrections to the parity-violating asymmetry measured in elastic electron-proton scattering are analyzed in the framework of the Standard Model. The new method of constrained differential renormalization is used. We include the complete set of one-loop contributions to one quark current amplitudes. The contribution of soft photon emission to the asymmetry is also calculated, giving final results free of infrared divergences. The proper combination of single-quark parameters corresponding to specific corrections for the proton and neutron is included. A partially computerized procedure developed and tested specifically for electron-proton scattering can be relatively easy modified for any electroweak processes. It can be expanded to accommodate the Minimal Super Symmetric Model as well. Computerizing some stages of the calculations allowed retaining the momentum dependence, neglected in previous works. In addition to an extensive analysis of the kinematical dependence of electroweak radiative corrections, the dependence on some poorly constrained parameters of the Standard Model was carefully analyzed. Precise numerical evaluations were performed for a variety of lepton-nucleon scattering experiments at different momentum transfers: SAMPLE I, II and SAMPLE III (MIT-Bates) experiments, as well as HAPPEX I and II (Jefferson Lab), G0 (JLab), A4 (MAMI) and Qweak (JLab). Special attention is paid to the SAMPLE experiment, where one quark radiative corrections, when combined with previous work on many quark effects and recent experimental data, are used to place some new constraints on electroweak form factors of the nucleon. The other major result of this work is the analytical momentum-dependent expressions derived for the leading diagrams, which were singled out numerically. Substituting the relevant kinematics parameters into these user-friendly expressions gives the applicable radiative corrections to a very good approximation.

  16. A high-rate detection system to study parity violation with polarized epithermal neutrons at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, J.N.; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.E.

    1995-07-01

    We describe an apparatus for studies of parity violation in neutron-nucleus scattering. This experiment requires longitudinally polarized neutrons from the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center over the energy-range from 1 to 1000 eV, the ability to reverse the neutron spin without otherwise affecting the apparatus, the ability to detect neutrons at rates up to 500 MHz, and an appropriate data acquisition system. We will discuss the neutron polarizer, fast neutron spin reverser, detector for transmitted neutrons, and high rate data acquisition system.

  17. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; ...

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry A PV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. A PV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (R n). The result A PV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions R n-R p = 0.33 -0.18 +0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  18. SLAC E158: An Experiment to Measure Parity Violation in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael B

    2000-08-15

    The E158 experiment at SLAC will make the first measurement of parity violation in Moller scattering. The left-right cross-section asymmetry (ALR) in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam with unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target will be measured. This will give a precise measurement of the weak mixing angle, with delta(sin{sup 2} theta{sub W}{sup eff}) {approximately} 0.0008 (at Q{sup 2} = 0.03GeV{sup 2}).

  19. γZ box corrections to weak charges of heavy nuclei in atomic parity violation.

    PubMed

    Blunden, P G; Melnitchouk, W; Thomas, A W

    2012-12-28

    We present a new dispersive formulation of the γZ box radiative corrections to weak charges of bound protons and neutrons in atomic parity violation measurements on heavy nuclei such as 133Cs and 213Ra. We evaluate for the first time a small but important additional correction arising from Pauli blocking of nucleons in a heavy nucleus. Overall, we find a significant shift in the γZ correction to the weak charge of 133Cs, approximately 4 times larger than the current uncertainty on the value of sin2 θ(W), but with a reduced error compared to earlier estimates.

  20. Search for parity- and time-and-parity-violation effects in lead monofluoride (PbF): Ab initio molecular study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Kudashov, A. D.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The relativistic coupled-clusters method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and nonvariational one-center restoration technique is applied to evaluation of parameters of the spin-rotational effective Hamiltonian in lead monofluoride to study the effects of violation of time-reversal invariance (T ) and space parity (P ) in PbF. The obtained hyperfine structure constants, A||=9942 MHz and A⊥=-7174 MHz, are stable with respect to the improvement of the correlation treatment, and they are in very good agreement with the experimental data, A||=10 147 MHz and A⊥=-7264 MHz [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.022508; A. N. Petrov, L. V. Skripnikov, A. V. Titov, and R. J. Mawhorter, Phys. Rev. A 88, 010501(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.010501]. This is essential to the important task of verifying the value of effective electric field Eeff=40 GV/cm, the parameter of P -odd interaction WP=-1213 Hz, and the parameter of T ,P -odd pseudoscalar-scalar electron-nucleus interaction WT ,P=91 kHz, which are of primary interest in the Brief Report.

  1. Electroweak radiative corrections to parity-violating electroexcitation of the Delta

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Maekawa; Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Barry Holstein

    2001-12-01

    We analyze the degree to which parity-violating (PV) electroexcitation of the {Delta}(1232)$ resonance may be used to extract the weak neutral axial vector transition form factors. We find that the axial vector electroweak radiative corrections are large and theoretically uncertain, thereby modifying the nominal interpretation of the PV asymmetry in terms of the weak neutral form factors. We also show that, in contrast to the situation for elastic electron scattering, the axial N {yields} {Delta} PV asymmetry does not vanish at the photon point as a consequence of a new term entering the radiative corrections. We argue that an experimentalmore » determination of these radiative corrections would be of interest for hadron structure theory, possibly shedding light on the violation of Hara's theorem in weak, radiative hyperon decays.« less

  2. Measuring nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation with molecules: Experimental methods and analysis of systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. It has been proposed to study NSD-PV effects using an enhancement of the observable effect in diatomic molecules [D. DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 023003 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.023003]. Here we demonstrate highly sensitive measurements of this type, using the test system 138Ba19F. We show that systematic errors associated with our technique can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. With ˜170 h of data, we measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei.

  3. Measurement of the Strange Quark Contribution to Proton Structure through Parity Violating Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Kazutaka

    2006-05-01

    The G0 (G-Zero) forward angle experiment completed in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) has measured the parity violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering over a Q2 range of 0.12 < Q2 < 1.0 (GeV/c)2. A linear combination of the strange electric (GsE) and magnetic (GsM) form factors calculated from these asymmetries indicate a non-zero contribution of the strange quark to the charge and magnetization structure of the proton in the above kinematic range at a 89% confidence level. The results show a previously unmeasured Q2 dependence of the strange form factors. Combining the G0 resultsmore » with previous parity violating experiments show that at Q2 = 0.1 (GeV/c)2 GsM = 0.62+-0.31 GsE = -0.013+-0.028 At intermediate Q2 of about 0.23 (GeV/c)2, a consistent value of GsM is seen compared to previous experiments, together with a measurement that may imply a negative value of GsE. For Q2 above 0.5 (GeV/c)2 a consistently positive value for the linear combination of the strange form factors is seen.« less

  4. Measurement of the Parity Violating Asymmetry in Elastic Electron Scattering off 208Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) was carried out in order to provide a model-independent measurement of the RMS radius √ of the neutron distribution in the 208Pb nucleus. The parity-violating scattering asymmetry for longitudinally polarized 1.06 GeV electrons from an unpolarized 208Pb target was measured at Q2 = 0.00880 GeV2. This measurement was performed by the PREX collaboration in Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA, between March and June, 2010. The electron detectors used in this measurement were designed and fabricated by University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Smith College. The resulting parity-violating asymmetry was measured as APV = 656±60(stat.)±14(sys.) ppb. This asymmetry extrapolates to a difference in radii between the nuclear neutron and proton distributions of √<$$2\\atop{n}$$>-√<$$2\\atop{p}$$>=0.33$$+0.16\\atop{-0.18}$$ fm.« less

  5. Development of a Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter for Precision Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Valerie M.

    2013-10-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments allow for testing the Standard Model at low energy accelerators. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments, like the P2 experiment at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, and the MOLLER and SoLID experiments at Jefferson Lab will measure observables predicted by the Standard Model to high precision. In order to make these measurements, we will need to determine the polarization of the electron beam to sub-percent precision. The present way of measuring the polarization, with Møller scattering in iron foils or using Compton laser backscattering, will not easily be able to reach this precision. The novel Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter presents a non-invasive way to measure the electron polarization by scattering the electron beam off of atomic hydrogen gas polarized in a 7 Tesla solenoidal magnetic trap. This apparatus is expected to be operational by 2016 in Mainz. Currently, simulations of the polarimeter are used to develop the detection system at College of William & Mary, while the hydrogen trap and superconducting solenoid magnet are being developed at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. I will discuss the progress of the design and development of this novel polarimeter system. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  6. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to the nuclear charge densities, which have been accurately measured with electron scattering, the knowledge of neutron densities still lack precision. Previous model-dependent hadron experiments suggest the difference between the neutron radius, R n, of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius, R p, to be in the order of several percent. To accurately obtain the difference, R n-R p, which is essentially a neutron skin, the Jefferson Lab Lead ( 208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb at an energy of 1.06 GeV and a scatteringmore » angle of 5° . Since Z 0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of R n with respect to R p. PREX was conducted at the Jefferson lab experimental Hall A, from March to June 2010. The experiment collected a final data sample of 2x 10 7 helicity-window quadruplets. The measured parity-violating electroweak asymmetry A PV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.014 (syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions, R n-R p = 0.33 +0.16 -0.18 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin as expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus. The value of the neutron radius of 208Pb has important implications for models of nuclear structure and their application in atomic physics and astrophysics such as atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) and neutron stars.« less

  7. Search for Mixing and Charge Parity Violation in Neutral Charm Mesons through Semileptonic B Meson Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Adam Christopher Schramm

    We present the measurement of mixing and Charge Parity violation parameters in the D(nothing)0(nothing) meson system using the decay. ¯B→μ-D*+ X. D*+→D(nothing)0(nothing) π+. D(nothing)0→K π and charge conjugate decays using the full Run I dataset collected by the LHCb Collaboration at the LHC at CERN from 2011 to 2012. By fitting the time dependent ratio of "Wrong Sign" D(nothing)0(nothing) decays to "Right Sign" D(nothing)0(nothing) decays, we extract the parameters sensitive to mixing and charge parity violation. The resulting mixing fit yields. R(nothing)D = (3.48+/-0.11+/-0.01)x10-3. y(apostrophe) = (4.60+/-3.50+/-0.18)x10-3. x'2= (0.28+/-3.10+/-0.11)x10-4. The results for the no Direct CP Violation fits are. R(nothing)D=(3.48+/-0.11+/-0.01)x10-3. y'+=(2.79+/-3.99+/-1.17)x10-3. x'2+=(1.94+/-3.47 +/- 0.98)x10-4. y'-=(6.51+/-4.17+/-1.66)x10-3. x'2-=(-1.53+/-4.26+/-1.68)x10-4. The results for the All CP Violation allowed fit are. R(nothing)D+ = (3.38 +/-0.15+/-0.06)x10-3. y'+=(5.81 +/-5.02+/-0.32)x10-3. x'2+=(-0.19+/-4.44+/-0.31)x10-4. R(nothing)D-= (3.60+/-0.15+/-0.07)x10-3. y'-=(3.32+/-4.87+/-0.40)x10-3. x'2-=(0.79+/-4.33+/-0.38)x10-4. The results are consistent with CP symmetry. We provide the LHCb average of Wrong Sign searches, and predictions of the world averages of the underlying physics parameters with the inclusion of this result.

  8. Precision determination of electroweak coupling from atomic parity violation and implications for particle physics.

    PubMed

    Porsev, S G; Beloy, K; Derevianko, A

    2009-05-08

    We carry out high-precision calculation of parity violation in a cesium atom, reducing theoretical uncertainty by a factor of 2 compared to previous evaluations. We combine previous measurements with calculations and extract the weak charge of the 133Cs nucleus, QW=-73.16(29)expt(20)theor. The result is in agreement with the standard model (SM) of elementary particles. This is the most accurate to-date test of the low-energy electroweak sector of the SM. In combination with the results of high-energy collider experiments, we confirm the energy dependence (or "running") of the electroweak force over an energy range spanning 4 orders of magnitude (from approximately 10 MeV to approximately 100 GeV). Additionally, our result places constraints on a variety of new physics scenarios beyond the SM. In particular, we increase the lower limit on the masses of extra Z bosons predicted by models of grand unification and string theories.

  9. Computation of neutrino masses in R-parity violating supersymmetry: SOFTSUSY3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Hanussek, M.

    2012-03-01

    The program SOFTSUSY can calculate tree-level neutrino masses in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with real couplings. At tree-level, only one neutrino acquires a mass, in contradiction with neutrino oscillation data. Here, we describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program which includes one-loop R-parity violating effects' contributions to neutrino masses and mixing. Including the one-loop effects refines the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking calculation, and may result in up to three massive, mixed neutrinos. This paper serves as a manual to the neutrino mass prediction mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Program summaryProgram title: SOFTSUSY Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 93 291 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 288 618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Fortran Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux 4.x Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 232 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix at one-loop level in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the renormalisation group equations must be consistent with a high or weak-scale boundary condition on supersymmetry breaking parameters and R-parity violating parameters, as well as a weak-scale boundary condition on gauge couplings, Yukawa couplings and the Higgs potential parameters. Solution method: Nested iterative algorithm

  10. A Preliminary Measurement of the Left-Right Parity-Violating ep Asymmetry at E158

    SciTech Connect

    Biesiada, J.

    2005-04-11

    This thesis investigates the parity-violating ep asymmetry based on the Run I data produced in Spring of 2002 by the E158 experiment, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main scientific objective of the experiment is the precision measurement of the weak mixing angle of the Standard Model. The ep asymmetry is an important background in the experiment and theoretically interesting in its own right, providing insights into the structure of the proton. The analysis centers upon identifying systematic error and consistency. The definite measurement of the ep asymmetry will await the final reprocessing of the data set duringmore » the Fall of 2002.« less

  11. R D ( * ) anomaly: A possible hint for natural supersymmetry with R -parity violation

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bhupal Dev, P. S.; Soni, Amarjit

    2017-11-15

    Recently, several B-physics experiments have reported an appreciable deviation from the standard model (SM) in the tree-level observables R D(*); the combined weighted average now stands at ≈4σ. We first show the anomaly necessarily implies model-independent collider signals of the form pp → bτν that should be expeditiously searched for at ATLAS/CMS as a complementary test of the anomaly. Next we suggest a possible interconnection of the anomaly with the radiative stability of the standard model Higgs boson and point to a minimal effective supersymmetric scenario with R-parity violation as the underlying cause. In conclusion, we also comment on themore » possibility of simultaneously explaining the recently reported R K(*) anomaly in this setup.« less

  12. A demonstration that electroweak theory can violate parity automatically (leptonic case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, C.

    2018-02-01

    We bring to light an electroweak model which has been reappearing in the literature under various guises.1-5 In this model, weak isospin is shown to act automatically on states of only a single chirality (left). This is achieved by building the model exclusively from the raising and lowering operators of the Clifford algebra ℂl(4). That is, states constructed from these ladder operators mimic the behaviour of left- and right-handed electrons and neutrinos under unitary ladder operator symmetry. This ladder operator symmetry is found to be generated uniquely by su(2)L and u(1)Y. Crucially, the model demonstrates how parity can be maximally violated, without the usual step of introducing extra gauge and extra Higgs bosons, or ad hoc projectors.

  13. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Luis

    2012-05-01

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z 0 boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, conducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.62 GeV 2. The measured asymmetry was used to set newmore » constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (G s E,M ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of A PV = -23.803±} 0.778 (stat)± 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in G s E + 0.517G s M = 0.003± 0.010 (stat)± 0.004 (syst)± 0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.009 GeV 2. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the 208Pb nucleus. The Z 0 boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for finding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the experimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.« less

  14. High Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of Trisulfane Hsssh: a Candidate for Detecting Parity Violation in Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Bolotova, Irina; Chen, Ziqiu; Fábri, Csaba; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg; Zindel, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    The measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ_{pv}{E} between the enantiomers of chiral molecules is among the major current challenges in high resolution spectroscopy and physical-chemical stereochemistry. Theoretical predictions have recently identified dithiine^{b} and trisulfane as suitable candidates for such experiments. We report the first successful high-resolution analyses of the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of trisulfane. A band centered at 861.0292 cm^{-1} can be assigned unambiguously to the chiral trans conformer by means of ground state combination differences in comparison with known pure rotational spectra. A second band near 864.698 cm^{-1} is tentatively assigned to the cis conformer by comparison with theory. M. Quack , Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy, Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.,John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722. S. Albert, I. Bolotova, Z. Chen, C. Fábri, L. Horný, M. Quack, G. Seyfang and D. Zindel, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys.18, 21976-21993 (2016). C. Fábri, L. Horný and M. Quack, ChemPhysChem16, 3584-3589 (2015). M. Liedtke, K. M. T. Yamada, G. Winnewisser and J. Hahn, J.Mol.Struct.413, 265-270 (1997).

  15. Probing the Strangeness Content of the Proton and the Neutron Radius of Lead-208 using Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silwal, Rupesh

    Precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-hadron scattering has been an extremely useful tool to study the structure of the hadrons. This thesis reports work on two such measurements: the measurement of the strange form-factors (FFs), GsE and GsM , by the Hall A Proton Parity Experiment (HAPPEX)-III collaboration, and the first direct measurement of the nucleon skin thickness in a heavy nucleus by the Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) collaboration. In HAPPEX-III, the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized protons was measured at an average four-momentum transfer squared, , of 0.624 GeV2. A parity-violating asymmetry, A PV, of -23.80 +/- 0.78(stat) +/- 0.36(syst) parts-per-million (ppm) was measured, which corresponds to a linear combination of the strange FFs, GsE+0.517GsM = 0.003 +/- 0.010(stat) +/- 0.004(syst) +/-0.009(ff). The errors stat and syst are experimental statistical and systematic errors respectively. The error ff arises due to limits on precision of the electromagnetic FFs and radiative corrections. This result is consistent with zero contribution from the strange quarks to the proton FFs. Combined with the existing data on strange FFs, this result constrains the contribution of the strange FFs to the nucleon FFs to a few percent of the nucleon FFs. In PREX, the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized 208Pb was measured at an average of 0.0088 GeV2. A parity-violating asymmetry, APV, of 656 +/- 60(stat) +/- 14(syst) parts-per-billion (ppb) was measured, which corresponds to a difference between the neutron and proton distribution radii in the 208Pb nucleus of Rn - R p = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm. This result is the first electroweak evidence supporting the existence of a neutron skin in a neutron-rich nucleus. One class of systematic uncertainty that both of these experiments were sensitive to is the

  16. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaefer, Daniela

    2006-10-27

    Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature μμℓ (with ℓ = e, or μ) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures eeℓ and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LLmore » $$\\bar{E}$$-operator with one dominant coupling λ 122. An LL$$\\bar{E}$$-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∫ L dt = 360 ± 23 pb -1. No evident is observed, while 0.41 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a μμℓ signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) and the lightest chargino ($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$ in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, μ > 0: M($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) ~> 115-128 GeV and M($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$) ~> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, μ < 0: ($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) ~> 101-114 GeV and M($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$) ~> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m 0, m 1/2, A 0, tanβ, and μ. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A 0 gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan β denotes the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs fields and μ, finally, represents

  17. Parity-violating asymmetry in the He3(n⃗,p)H3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, M.; Schiavilla, R.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2010-10-01

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction He3(n⃗,p)H3 at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the 2S+1LJ=1S0 and 3S1 states in the incoming n-He3 channel to states with J=0 and 1 in the outgoing p-H3 channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH “best values” set, range from -9.44 to -2.48 in units of 10-8, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.

  18. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling Script L = f(phi) ( - 1/4 F2 + γ/4 F ~F ) between the inflaton phi and a vector field with vacuum expectation value A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρA does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, Pζ(k) = P(k)[1+g*(hat kṡÂ)2], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, Bζ(k1, k2, k3) = ∑L cL PL (hat k1 ṡ hat k2) P(k1) P(k2) + 2 perms , with c0:c1:c2=2-3:1 (c1≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c1 contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to langleal1m1a*l2m2rangle, with |l1 - l2| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |l1 - l2| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g*, c0, c1 and c2), translate into the upper limit ρA / ρphi lesssim 10-9 at 0γ=. We find that the upper limit on the vector energy density becomes much more stringent as γ grows.

  19. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lunch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb -1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  20. High Resolution GHZ and Thz (ftir) Spectroscopy and Theory of Parity Violation and Tunneling for 1,2-DITHIINE (C4H4S2) as a Candidate for Measuring the Parity Violating Energy Difference Between Enantiomers of Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Bolotova, Irina; Chen, Ziqiu; Fábri, Csaba; Horny, Lubos; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg; Zindel, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We report high resolution spectroscopic results for 1,2-dithiine-(1,2-dithia-3,5-cyclohexadiene,C4H4S2) in the Gigahertz and Terahertz spectroscopic ranges and exploratory theoretical calculations of parity violation and tunneling processes in view of a possible experimental determination of the parity violating energy difference ΔpvE in this chiral molecule. Theory predicts that the parity violating energy difference in the ground state (ΔpvE≃11x10-11(hc) wn)is in principle measurable as it is much larger than the calculated tunneling splitting for the symmetrical potential Δ±E≃10-24(hc) wn. With a planar transition state for stereomutation at about 2500 wn tunneling splittings become appreciable above 2300 wn. This makes levels of well defined parity accessible to parity selection by available powerful infrared lasers and thus useful for one of the existing experimental approaches towards molecular parity violation. The new GHz spectra lead to greatly improved ground state rotational parameters for 1,2-dithiine. These are used as starting point for the first successful analyses of high resolution interferometric Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, THz) spectra for the fundamentals ν17 (1308.873 wn or 39.23903 THz), ν22 (623.094 wn or 18.67989 THz) and ν3 (1544.900 wn or 46.314937 THz) for which highly accurate spectroscopic parameters are reported. The results are discussed in relation to current efforts to measure ΔpvE.a-. M. Quack , Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy, Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.,John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722 S. Albert, I. Bolotova, Z. Chen, C. Fábri, L. Horny, M. Quack, G. Seyfang and D. Zindel,Proceedings of the 20th Symposium on Atomic, Cluster and Surface Physics (SASP 2016), Innsbruck University Press, 2016, pp. 127-130, ISBN:978-3-903122-04-8. and to be published P. Dietiker, E. Miloglyadov, M

  1. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess with R-parity violating supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ran; Huang, Li; Li, Tianjun; Zhu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    We propose a supersymmetric explanation of the diphoton excess in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with the leptonic R-parity violation. In our model, sneutrino serves as the 750 GeV resonance and produced through quark-antiquark annihilation. With introducing appropriate trilinear soft parameters, we show that the diphoton branching ratio is significantly enhanced compared with the conventional MSSM. For current dijet and W-pair LHC constraints, we can successfully fit the observed diphoton signal rate in sizeable parameter regions, the resulting parameter space strongly favor the masses of light smuon and stau within the range from 375-500 GeV, which depends on the choice of electroweakino masses and soft trilinear terms. While after taking into account the compatibility of diphoton excess between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV LHC, only the coupling involved with the second generation quarks is survived. In this case, the corresponding parameter space favors a narrow mass range of smuon and stau with mμ˜1,τ˜1 ∈ [375, 390]GeV. Even if the 750 GeV diphoton excesses were not confirmed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, we point out that our proposal can still be used to explain the current and future tentative diphoton excesses.

  2. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in 4He

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Huffman, P. R.; Markoff, D. M.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E.

    2005-01-01

    In the meson exchange model of weak nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, the exchange of virtual mesons between the nucleons is parameterized by a set of weak meson exchange amplitudes. The strengths of these amplitudes from theoretical calculations are not well known, and experimental measurements of parity-violating (PV) observables in different nuclear systems have not constrained their values. Transversely polarized cold neutrons traveling through liquid helium experience a PV spin rotation due to the weak interaction with an angle proportional to a linear combination of these weak meson exchange amplitudes. A measurement of the PV neutron spin rotation in helium (φPV (n,α)) would provide information about the relative strengths of the weak meson exchange amplitudes, and with the longitudinal analyzing power measurement in the p + α system, allow the first comparison between isospin mirror systems in weak NN interaction. An earlier experiment performed at NIST obtained a result consistent with zero: φPV (n,α) = (8.0 ±14(stat) ±2.2(syst)) ×10−7 rad / m[1]. We describe a modified apparatus using a superfluid helium target to increase statistics and reduce systematic effects in an effort to reach a sensitivity goal of 10−7 rad/m. PMID:27308122

  3. Measurement Of Neutron Radius In Lead By Parity Violating Scattering Flash ADC DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zafar

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation reports the experiment PREx, a parity violation experiment which is designed to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. PREx is performed in hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from March 19th to June 21st. Longitudionally polarized electrons at energy 1 GeV scattered at and angle of θ lab = 5.8 ° from the Lead target. Beam corrected pairty violaing counting rate asymmetry is (A corr= 594 ± 50(stat) ± 9(syst))ppb at Q 2 = 0.009068GeV 2. This dissertation also presents the details of Flash ADC Data Acquisition(FADC DAQ) system for Moller polarimetry in Hall A ofmore » Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The Moller polarimeter measures the beam polarization to high precision to meet the specification of the PREx(Lead radius experiment). The FADC DAQ is part of the upgrade of Moller polarimetery to reduce the systematic error for PREx. The hardware setup and the results of the FADC DAQ analysis are presented« less

  4. Search for top squarks in R-parity-violating supersymmetry using three or more leptons and b-tagged jets.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Glushkov, I; Gunnellini, P; Habib, S; Hauk, J; Hellwig, G; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Krämer, M; Krücker, D; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, F; Olzem, J; Perrey, H; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Riedl, C; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Sen, N; Stein, M; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Enderle, H; Erfle, J; Gebbert, U; Görner, M; Gosselink, M; Haller, J; Heine, K; Höing, R S; Kaussen, G; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Lange, J; Marchesini, I; Peiffer, T; Pietsch, N; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Schröder, M; Schum, T; Seidel, M; Sibille, J; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Troendle, D; Vanelderen, L; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Feindt, M; Guthoff, M; Hartmann, F; Hauth, T; Held, H; Hoffmann, K H; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Komaragiri, J R; Kornmayer, A; Lobelle Pardo, P; Martschei, D; Müller, Th; Niegel, M; Nürnberg, A; Oberst, O; Ott, J; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Röcker, S; Schilling, F-P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weiler, T; Zeise, M; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Kesisoglou, S; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Ntomari, E; Gouskos, L; Mertzimekis, T J; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Stiliaris, E; Aslanoglou, X; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Radics, B; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Karancsi, J; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Swain, S K; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Dhingra, N; Gupta, R; Kaur, M; Mehta, M Z; Mittal, M; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, J B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Saxena, P; Sharma, V; Shivpuri, R K; Banerjee, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dutta, S; Gomber, B; Jain, Sa; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Modak, A; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Abdulsalam, A; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Chatterjee, R M; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sudhakar, K; Wickramage, N; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Etesami, S M; Fahim, A; Hesari, H; Jafari, A; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Calabria, C; Chhibra, S S; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pacifico, N; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Singh, G; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Benvenuti, A C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Meneghelli, M; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Perrotta, A; Primavera, F; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Gonzi, S; Gori, V; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Tosi, S; Benaglia, A; De Guio, F; Di Matteo, L; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Lucchini, M T; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; De Cosa, A; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Bisello, D; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Galanti, M; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gozzelino, A; Kanishchev, K; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Montecassiano, F; Passaseo, M; Pazzini, J; Pegoraro, M; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Gabusi, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Nappi, A; Romeo, F; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Spiezia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Broccolo, G; Castaldi, R; D'Agnolo, R T; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Squillacioti, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Vernieri, C; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Grassi, M; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Meridiani, P; Micheli, F; Nourbakhsh, S; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Rahatlou, S; Soffi, L; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Casasso, S; Costa, M; Demaria, N; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Obertino, M M; Ortona, G; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Potenza, A; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Tamponi, U; Belforte, S; Candelise, V; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; La Licata, C; Marone, M; Montanino, D; Penzo, A; Schizzi, A; Zanetti, A; Chang, S; Kim, T Y; Nam, S K; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, J E; Kong, D J; Oh, Y D; Park, H; Son, D C; Kim, J Y; Kim, Zero J; Song, S; Choi, S; Gyun, D; Hong, B; Jo, M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Choi, M; Kim, J H; Park, C; Park, I C; Park, S; Ryu, G; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Goh, J; Kim, M S; Kwon, E; Lee, B; Lee, J; Lee, S; Seo, H; Yu, I; Grigelionis, I; Juodagalvis, A; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-de La Cruz, I; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Martínez-Ortega, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Villasenor-Cendejas, L M; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Casimiro Linares, E; Morelos Pineda, A; Reyes-Santos, M A; Krofcheck, D; Bell, A J; Butler, P H; Doesburg, R; Reucroft, S; Silverwood, H; Ahmad, M; Asghar, M I; Butt, J; Hoorani, H R; Khalid, S; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Qazi, S; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Bialkowska, H; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Brona, G; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Wolszczak, W; Almeida, N; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Kozlov, G; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Moisenz, P; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Zarubin, A; Evstyukhin, S; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Levchenko, P; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, An; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Erofeeva, M; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Spiridonov, A; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Mesyats, G; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Bunichev, V; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Markina, A; Obraztsov, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Ekmedzic, M; Krpic, D; Milosevic, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Battilana, C; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Domínguez Vázquez, D; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Merino, G; Navarro De Martino, E; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Soares, M S; Willmott, C; Albajar, C; de Trocóniz, J F; Brun, H; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Folgueras, S; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Piedra Gomez, J; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Graziano, A; Jorda, C; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bendavid, J; Benitez, J F; Bernet, C; Bianchi, G; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Bondu, O; Botta, C; Breuker, H; Camporesi, T; Cerminara, G; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Colafranceschi, S; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; David, A; De Roeck, A; De Visscher, S; Di Guida, S; Dobson, M; Dupont-Sagorin, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eugster, J; Funk, W; Georgiou, G; Giffels, M; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Giunta, M; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Hammer, J; Hansen, M; Harris, P; Hartl, C; Hinzmann, A; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Karavakis, E; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lee, Y-J; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malberti, M; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Nesvold, E; Orsini, L; Palencia Cortezon, E; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Quertenmont, L; Racz, A; Reece, W; Rolandi, G; Rovelli, C; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Santanastasio, F; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Segoni, I; Sekmen, S; Sharma, A; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Stoye, M; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wöhri, H K; Worm, S D; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lecomte, P; Lustermann, W; Marini, A C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Mohr, N; Moortgat, F; Nägeli, C; Nef, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Peruzzi, M; Ronga, F J; Rossini, M; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Starodumov, A; Stieger, B; Takahashi, M; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Urscheler, C; Wallny, R; Weber, H A; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Favaro, C; Ivova Rikova, M; Kilminster, B; Millan Mejias, B; Otiougova, P; Robmann, P; Snoek, H; Taroni, S; Tupputi, S; Verzetti, M; Cardaci, M; Chen, K H; Ferro, C; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Volpe, R; Yu, S S; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Dietz, C; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Kao, K Y; Lei, Y J; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Asavapibhop, B; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Ozpineci, A; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Günaydin, Y O; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Kreczko, L; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Basso, L; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Jackson, J; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Guneratne Bryer, A; Hall, G; Hatherell, Z; Hays, J; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Marrouche, J; Mathias, B; Nandi, R; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sparrow, A; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardle, N; Whyntie, T; Chadwick, M; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Heister, A; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Rohlf, J; Sperka, D; St John, J; Sulak, L; Alimena, J; Bhattacharya, S; Christopher, G; Cutts, D; Demiragli, Z; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Heintz, U; Kukartsev, G; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Luk, M; Narain, M; Segala, M; Sinthuprasith, T; Speer, T; Breedon, R; Breto, G; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Gardner, M; Houtz, R; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Mall, O; Miceli, T; Nelson, R; Pellett, D; Ricci-Tam, F; Rutherford, B; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Andreev, V; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Everaerts, P; Farrell, C; Felcini, M; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Takasugi, E; Traczyk, P; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Babb, J; Clare, R; Dinardo, M E; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Liu, H; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Paramesvaran, S; Sturdy, J; Sumowidagdo, S; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Andrews, W; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Mangano, B; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Petrucciani, G; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bellan, R; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Flowers, K; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lowette, S; Magaña Villalba, R; McColl, N; Pavlunin, V; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Kcira, D; Ma, Y; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Yang, Y; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Jang, D W; Liu, Y F; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Eggert, N; Gibbons, L K; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Lacroix, F; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Jung, K; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Wang, F; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Kaadze, K; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-11-27

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons and bottom-quark jets produced in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb(-1) collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No excess above the standard model expectations is observed. The results are interpreted in the context of supersymmetric models with signatures that have low missing transverse energy arising from light top-squark pair production with R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle. In two models with different R-parity-violating couplings, top squarks are excluded below masses of 1020 GeV and 820 GeV when the lightest supersymmetric particle has a mass of 200 GeV.

  5. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  6. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q 2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c) 2. The asymmetry at Q 2=1.9 (GeV/c) 2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combinationmore » 2C 2u - C 2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q 2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first A PV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for A PV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.« less

  7. Spontaneous CP violation in A4 flavor symmetry and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a simple renormalizable model for the spontaneous CP violation based on SU(2)L×U(1)Y×A4 symmetry in a radiative seesaw mechanism, which can be guaranteed by an extra Z2 symmetry. In our model CP is spontaneously broken at high energies, after the breaking of flavor symmetry, by a complex vacuum expectation value of the A4 triplet and gauge-singlet scalar field. We show that the spontaneously generated CP phase could become a natural source of leptogenesis, and also investigate CP violation at low energies in the lepton sector and show how the CP phases in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata formalism could arise through a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism. As a numerical study, interestingly, we show that the normal mass hierarchy favors relatively large values of θ13, large deviations from maximality of θ23<π/4, and the Dirac-CP phase 0°≤δCP≤50° and 300°≤δCP≤360°. For the inverted hierarchy case, the experimentally measured values of θ13 favors θ23>π/4 and discrete values of δCP around 100°, 135°, 255°, and 300°. Finally, with a successful leptogenesis our numerical results give more predictive values on the Dirac CP phase: for the normal mass hierarchy 1°≲δCP≲10° and for inverted one δCP˜100°, 135°, 300°.

  8. Galileogenesis: A new cosmophenomenological zip code for reheating through R-parity violating coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an idea of leptogenesis scenario in higher derivative gravity induced DBI Galileon framework aka Galileogenesis in presence of one-loop R-parity violating couplings in the background of a low energy effective supergravity setup derived from higher dimensional string theory framework. We have studied extensively the detailed feature of reheating constraints and the cosmophenomenological consequences of thermal gravitino dark matter in light of PLANCK and PDG data. Finally, we have also established a direct cosmophenomenological connection among dark matter relic abundance, reheating temperature and tensor-to-scalar ratio in the context of DBI Galileon inflation. Higher order correction terms in the gravity sector are introduced in the effective action as a perturbative correction to the Einstein-Hilbert counterpart coming from the computation of Conformal Field Theory disk amplitude at the two loop level [34-36]. The matter sector encounters the effect of N=1, D=4 supergravity motivated DBI Galileon interaction which is embedded in the D3 brane. Additionally, we have considered the effect of R-parity violating interactions [37-40] in the matter sector which provide a convenient framework for quantifying quark and lepton-flavor violating effects. The low energy UV protective effective action for the proposed cosmophenomenological model is described by [31,32]: S=∫d4x √{-g}[K(Φ,X)-G(Φ,X)□Φ+B1R+(B2RRαβγδ-4B3RRαβ+B4R2)+B5] where the model dependent characteristic functions K(Φ,X) and G(Φ,X) are the implicit functions of Galileon and its kinetic counterpart is X=-1/2 >g∂μΦ∂νΦ. Additionally, Bi∀i are the self-coupling constants of graviton degrees of freedom appearing via dimensional reduction from higher dimensional string theory. Specifically B5 be the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. In general, B2≠B3≠B4 which implies that the quadratic curvature terms originated from two loop correction to the

  9. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling L = f(φ) ( − 1/4 F{sup 2} + γ/4 F ∼F ) between the inflaton φ and a vector field with vacuum expectation value  A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρ{sub A} does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, P{submore » ζ}(k) = P(k)[1+g{sub *}( k-circumflex ⋅Â){sup 2}], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, B{sub ζ}(k{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}) = ∑{sub L} c{sub L} P{sub L} ( k-circumflex {sub 1} ⋅  k-circumflex {sub 2}) P(k{sub 1}) P(k{sub 2}) + 2 perms , with c{sub 0}:c{sub 1}:c{sub 2}=2-3:1 (c{sub 1}≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c{sub 1} contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to (a{sub ℓ1m1}a{sup *}{sub ℓ2m2}), with |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g{sub *}, c{sub 0}, c{sub 1} and c{sub 2}), translate into the upper limit ρ{sub A} / ρ{sub φ} ∼< 10{sup −9} at 0γ=. We find that the

  10. Constraints on parity violation from ACTpol and forecasts for forthcoming CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Diego; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We use the ACTpol published cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data to constrain cosmological birefringence, a tracer of parity violation beyond the standard model of particle physics. To this purpose, we employ all the polarized ACTpol spectra, including the cross-correlations between temperature anisotropy and B mode polarization (TB) and between E mode and B mode (EB), which are most sensitive to the effect. We build specific, so-called D-estimators for birefringence and assess their performances and error budgets by using realistic Monte Carlo simulations based on the experimental characteristics provided by the ACTpol collaboration. We determine the optimal multipole range for our analysis to be 250 < ℓ < 3025 over which we find a null result for the uniform birefringence angle α = 0.29 ° ± 0.28 ° (stat.) ± 0.5 ° (syst.), the latter uncertainty being the estimate published by the ACTpol team on their global systematic error budget. We show that this result holds consistently when other multipole ranges are considered. Finally, we forecast the capability of several forthcoming ground based, balloon and space borne CMB experiments to constrain the birefringence angle, showing, e.g., that the proposed post-Planck COrE satellite mission could in principle constrain α at a level of 10 arcsec, provided that all systematics are under control. Under the same circumstances, we find the COrE constraints to be at least 2 or 3 times better than what could ideally be achieved by the other experiments considered.

  11. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C.-M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Quinn, B.; Kumar, K. S.; McNulty, D.; Mercado, L.; Riordan, S.; Wexler, J.; Michaels, R. W.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2012-03-01

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(q¯), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn of 208Pb from the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) parity-violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer q¯=0.475 fm-1. We find FW(q¯)=0.204±0.028(exp)±0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW(q¯). We find RW=5.826±0.181(exp)±0.027(model)fm. Here the experimental error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a “weak charge skin” where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn=5.751±0.175(exp)±0.026(model)±0.005(strange)fm from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. Finally, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp=0.302±0.175(exp)±0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.

  12. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor F W(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius R W, and the point neutron radius R n, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm -1. We find F W($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from F W($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in R W from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius R n = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from R W. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find R n to be slightly smaller than R W because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of R n-R p = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where R p is the point proton radius.« less

  13. Parity Violation in Neutron-Proton Capture -- The NPD Gamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, M. T.; Bowman, James D; Greene, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter {rho}{sub t}) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclearmore » Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction {rvec n} + p {yields} d + {gamma}. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5 x 10{sup -8} and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1 {+-} 2.1 stat. {+-} 0.2 sys.) x 10{sup -7}. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.« less

  14. Enhancement of parity violating mixing in halo nuclei and the problem of neutron weak parity nonconserving potential constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M. S.; Toledo Piza, A. F. R. de; Vorov, O. K.

    1999-12-01

    We consider the parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing in the ground state of exotic (halo) nuclei caused by the PNC weak interaction between outer neutron and nucleons within the nuclear interior. For the nucleus {sup 11}Be as an example of a typical nucleus with a neutron halo, we use an analytical model for the external neutron wave functions to estimate the scale of the PNC mixing. The amplitude of the PNC mixing in the halo state is found to be an order of magnitude bigger than that of typical PNC mixing between the ''normal'' nuclear states in nearby nuclei. The enhancedmore » PNC mixing in a halo cloud is proportional to the neutron weak PNC potential constant g{sub n}{sup W} only. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.« less

  15. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M., E-mail: Martin@Quack.ch

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for eachmore » step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for

  16. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from 4He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Averett, T.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P. Y.; Burtin, E.; Cahoon, J.; Cates, G. D.; Chang, C. C.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Decowski, P.; Deepa, D.; Ferdi, C.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Finn, J. M.; Frullani, S.; Fuoti, K.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Gorbenko, V.; Grames, J. M.; Hansknecht, J.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Humensky, T. B.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lambert, D.; Laviolette, P.; Lerose, J.; Lhuillier, D.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; McCormick, K.; Meekins, D. G.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz-Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Neyret, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Poelker, M.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Qiang, Y.; Reitz, B.; Roche, J.; Saha, A.; Singh, J.; Snyder, R.; Souder, P. A.; Subedi, R.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vacheret, A.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from He4 at an average scattering angle ⟨θlab⟩=5.7° and a four-momentum transfer Q2=0.091GeV2. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon GEs can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of APV=(6.72±0.84(stat)±0.21(syst))×10-6 yields a value of GEs=-0.038±0.042(stat)±0.010(syst), consistent with zero.

  17. Parity Violation in elastic electron scattering : A first measurment of the parity-violating Asymmetry at Q 2 = 0.631 GeV/c 2 at Backward Angle.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Stephanie L.

    2007-05-01

    The goal of Experiment E04-115 (the G0 backward angle measurement) at Jefferson Lab is to investigate the contributions of strange quarks to the fundamental properties of the nucleon. The experiment measures parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium at backward angles at Q 2 = 0.631 (GeV/c) 2 and Q 2 = 0.232 (GeV/c) 2. The backward angle measurement represents the second phase of the G0 experiment. The first phase, Experiment E00-006 (the G0 forward angle experiment), measured parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen at forward angles over a Q 2more » range of 0.1-1.0 (GeV/c) 2. The experiments used a polarized electron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium liquid targets. From these measurements, along with the electromagnetic form factors, one can extract the contribution of the strange quark to the proton's charge and magnetization distributions. This thesis represents a fi« less

  18. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W ± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W ±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb -1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of moremore » than 27. In addition, these high Q 2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly M W/√s=0.16.« less

  19. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of π - near the Delta 0 resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; ...

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive π - production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the Δ 0 resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBχPT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d Δ - that characterizes the parity-violating γNΔ coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d Δ - in a model benchmarked by themore » large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A γ - = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A γ - = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to V ud/V us. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-Δ axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.« less

  20. Determination of the weak charge of the proton through parity violating asymmetry measurements in the elastic e+p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Adesh

    2014-12-01

    The Qweak experiment has taken data to make a 2.5% measurement of parity violating elastic e+p asymmetry in the four momentum transfer region of 0.0250 (GeV/c) 2. This asymmetry is proportional to the weak charge of the proton, which is related to the weak mixing angle, sin 2(theta_W). The final Qweak measurement will provide the most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle below the Z 0 pole to test the Standard Model prediction. A description of the experimental apparatus is provided in this dissertation. The experiment was carried out using a longitudinally polarized electron beam of up to 180more » microampere on a 34.5 cm long unpolarized liquid hydrogen target. The Qweak target is not only the world's highest cryogenic target ever built for a parity experiment but also is the least noisy target. This dissertation provides a detailed description of this target and presents a thorough analysis of the target performance. Statistical analysis of Run 1 data, collected between Feb - May 2011, is done to extract a blinded parity violating asymmetry of size -299.7 ± 13.4 (stat.) ± 17.2 (syst.) ± 68 (blinding) parts-per-billion. This resulted in a preliminary proton's weak charge of value 0.0865 ± 0.0085, a 9% measurement. Based on this blinded asymmetry, the weak mixing angle was determined to be sin 2(theta_W) = 0.23429 ± 0.00211.« less

  1. A Gamma Polarimeter for Neutron Polarization Measurement in a Liquid Deuterium Target for Parity Violation in Polarized Neutron Capture on Deuterium

    PubMed Central

    Komives, A.; Sint, A. K.; Bowers, M.; Snow, M.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating gamma asymmetry in n-D capture would yield information on N-N parity violation independent of the n-p system. Since cold neutrons will depolarize in a liquid deuterium target in which the scattering cross section is much larger than the absorption cross section, it will be necessary to quantify the loss of polarization before capture. One way to do this is to use the large circular polarization of the gamma from n-D capture and analyze the circular polarization of the gamma in a gamma polarimeter. We describe the design of this polarimeter. PMID:27308125

  2. Order Alpha-G Corrections to the Parity-Violating Electron-Proton Potential in the Weinberg - Salam Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Bryan Washburn

    We have calculated the one-loop ((alpha)G(,F)) corrections to the (G(,F)) lowest-order parity-violating electron-proton potential at low q('2) (LOE) near sin('2)(theta)(,W) = .23. There are 133 Feynman diagrams in the (standard) Weinberg-Salam theory of electro-weak interactions with one doublet of Higgs' and 3 generations of quarks and leptons. We neglect strong interaction effects inside the proton. Our renormalization procedure is gauge invariant and we find many corrections to the LOE unconsidered by previous authors which are as large or larger than the ones that can be found in the literature. In the end there are many cancellations and the results (to 3% accuracy) are; (i) box diagrams with one Z and an A (photon) give (TURN)27% correction to C(,2P) for sin('2)(theta)(,W) = .23, (ii) a Z-A mixing counterterm correction which blows up logarithmically for large Higgs' mass M(,H) gives (TURN)37% correction to both C(,1P) and C(,2P) for M(,H) = 100 TeV. and sin('2)(theta)(,W) = .23, (iii) the 'large log' corrections and 'box graphs with 2 heavy bosons' cancel with previously unconsidered contributions which turn out to be quite large. The sum of all contributions besides (i) and (ii) is negligible. As a check on our results, we calculate many counterterm parameters and Green's functions rather than just matrix elements. We use the Ward identities which come from the fundamental SU(2)(,L)X U(1) symmetry of the theory to check the correctness of this very long calculation. We comment on the possibility of measuring these ((alpha)G(,F)) corrections in parity-violating effects in atomic hydrogen and review the theoretical and experimental situation for parity-violations in atoms. Since they come from the deepest part of the gauge theory--higher-order processes, renormalizability and the method of spontaneous symmetry breaking--a precise measurement of these one-loop corrections is of fundamental importance to modern physics.

  3. A stripper bias amplifier for improving the energy resolution of polarized proton beams for parity violation measurements at TUNL

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, W.S.; Roberson, N.R.; Scarlett, C.Y.

    1995-10-01

    A series of measurements of parity violation in medium-mass nuclei are currently being planned at TUNL. The measurements will be of longitudinal analyzing powers in (p, {alpha}) resonance reactions. Although considerable enhancements are predicted, the expected experimental asymmetries are still small (ranging from 10{sup -4}-10{sup -6}). Measurements of this precision will require precise control of beam characteristics including energy, position, and polarization direction. A high voltage amplifier has been installed in the terminal of the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator which applies a bias voltage of up to {plus_minus}350 V to the carbon stripper foil. Energy corrections of {plus_minus}700 eVmore » can be made by sending a signal to the amplifier via an optical fiber attached to the accelerator column. The stripper bias amplifier reduces energy fluctuations due to terminal voltage changes by an order of magnitude.« less

  4. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from {sup 4}He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Averett, Todd

    2005-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from {sup 4}He at an average scattering angle {theta}{sub lab} = 5.7 degrees and a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.091 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G{sub E}{sup s} can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A{sub PV} = 6.72 {+-} 0.84 (stat) {+-} 0.21 (syst) parts per million yields a value of G{sub E}{sup s} = -0.038 {+-} 0.042 (stat) {+-} 0.010 (syst), consistent with zero.

  5. The G0 experiment: Apparatus for parity-violating electron scattering measurements at forward and backward angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androić, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arvieux, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Averett, T. D.; Bailey, S. L.; Batigne, G.; Beck, D. H.; Beise, E. J.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bimbot, L.; Birchall, J.; Biselli, A.; Bosted, P.; Breuer, H.; Brindza, P.; Capuano, C. L.; Carlini, R. D.; Carr, R.; Chant, N.; Chao, Y.-C.; Clark, R.; Coppens, A.; Covrig, S. D.; Cowley, A.; Dale, D.; Davis, C. A.; Ellis, C.; Falk, W. R.; Fenker, H.; Finn, J. M.; Forest, T.; Franklin, G.; Frascaria, R.; Furget, C.; Gaskell, D.; Gericke, M. T. W.; Grames, J.; Griffioen, K. A.; Grimm, K.; Guillard, G.; Guillon, B.; Guler, H.; Gustafsson, K.; Hannelius, L.; Hansknecht, J.; Hasty, R. D.; Hawthorne Allen, A. M.; Horn, T.; Ito, T. M.; Johnston, K.; Jones, M.; Kammel, P.; Kazimi, R.; King, P. M.; Kolarkar, A.; Korkmaz, E.; Korsch, W.; Kox, S.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laszewski, R.; Lee, L.; Lenoble, J.; Liatard, E.; Liu, J.; Lung, A.; MacLachlan, G. A.; Mammei, J.; Marchand, D.; Martin, J. W.; Mack, D. J.; McFarlane, K. W.; McKee, D. W.; McKeown, R. D.; Merchez, F.; Mihovilovic, M.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Moffit, B.; Morlet, M.; Muether, M.; Musson, J.; Nakahara, K.; Neveling, R.; Niccolai, S.; Nilsson, D.; Ong, S.; Page, S. A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Phillips, S. K.; Pillot, P.; Pitt, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Porcelli, T. A.; Quéméner, G.; Quinn, B. P.; Ramsay, W. D.; Rauf, A. W.; Real, J.-S.; Ries, T.; Roche, J.; Roos, P.; Rutledge, G. A.; Schaub, J.; Secrest, J.; Seva, T.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G. R.; Spayde, D. T.; Stepanyan, S.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tieulent, R.; van de Wiele, J.; van Oers, W. T. H.; Versteegen, M.; Voutier, E.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wells, S. P.; Warren, G.; Williamson, S. E.; Woo, R. J.; Wood, S. A.; Yan, C.; Yun, J.; Zeps, V.

    2011-08-01

    In the G0 experiment, performed at Jefferson Lab, the parity-violating elastic scattering of electrons from protons and quasi-elastic scattering from deuterons is measured in order to determine the neutral weak currents of the nucleon. Asymmetries as small as 1 part-per-million in the scattering of a polarized electron beam are determined using a dedicated apparatus. It consists of specialized beam monitoring and control systems, a cryogenic hydrogen (or deuterium) target, and a superconducting, toroidal magnetic spectrometer equipped with plastic scintillation and aerogel Cherenkov detectors, as well as fast readout electronics for the measurement of individual events. The overall design and performance of this experimental system is discussed.

  6. Search for R -parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-01-25

    Results are reported from a search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. Here, the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb –1. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair productionmore » cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μm an 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2–30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.« less

  7. Calculations of the neutron skin and its effect in atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Derevianko, A.; School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052

    2009-03-15

    We perform calculations for the neutron skin of nuclei and its contribution to atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) in many isotopes of Cs, Ba, Sm, Dy, Yb, Tl, Pb, Bi, Fr, and Ra. Three problems are addressed: (i) neutron-skin-induced errors to single-isotope PNC, (ii) the possibility of measuring neutron skin using atomic PNC, and (iii) neutron-skin-induced errors for ratios of PNC effects in different isotopes. In the latter case the correlations in the neutron skin values for different isotopes lead to cancellations of the errors; this makes the isotopic ratio method a competitive tool in a search for new physics beyondmore » the standard model.« less

  8. Parity violation in neutron resonances in {sup 107,109}Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L.

    1999-02-01

    Parity nonconservation (PNC) was studied in {ital p}-wave resonances in Ag by measuring the helicity dependence of the neutron total cross section. Transmission measurements on natural Ag were performed in the energy range 32 to 422 eV with the time-of-flight method at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A total of 15 {ital p}-wave neutron resonances were studied in {sup 107}Ag and nine {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 109}Ag. Statistically significant asymmetries were observed for eight resonances in {sup 107}Ag and for four resonances in {sup 109}Ag. An analysis treating the PNC matrix elements asmore » random variables yields a weak spreading width of {Gamma}{sub w}=(2.67{sub {minus}1.21}{sup +2.65}){times}10{sup {minus}7} eV for {sup 107}Ag and {Gamma}{sub w}=(1.30{sub {minus}0.74}{sup +2.49}){times}10{sup {minus}7} eV for {sup 109}Ag. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}« less

  9. Searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Fernandez Perez Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Qazi, S.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Benhabib, L.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y.-T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Randall, S.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    Results are presented from searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 . No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R -parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. These limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R -parity-violating couplings.

  10. Towards a Precision Measurement of Parity-Violating e-p Elastic Scattering at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Q-weak experiment is to make a measurement of the proton's weak charge Q W p = 1 - 4 sin 2(θ W2(θW2(θWWp by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer Q2 = 0.026 (GeV/c)2 and forward angles (8 degrees). The anticipated size of the asymmetry, based on the SM, is about 230 parts per billion (ppb). With the proposed accuracy, the experiment may probe new physics beyond Standard Model at the TeV scale. This thesis focuses on my contributions to the experiment, including track reconstruction for momentum transfer determination ofmore » the scattering process, and the focal plane scanner, a detector I designed and built to measure the flux profile of scattered electrons on the focal plane of the Q-weak spectrometer to assist in the extrapolation of low beam current tracking results to high beam current. Preliminary results from the commissioning and the first run period of the Q-weak experiment are reported and discussed.« less

  11. A measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the neutron capture on 3He at the SNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Latiful; n-3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studies of parity violating (PV) observables in hadronic systems offer a unique probe of nucleon structure, complementary to other probes of low-energy non-perturbative QCD. The n-3He experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL measures the PV asymmetry of the recoil proton momentum k-> with respect to the neutron spin σ-> in the reaction n +3 He -> p + T + 764 keV . This asymmetry is sensitive to the isospin-conserving and isospin-changing (ΔI = 0, 1) channels of the Hadronic Weak Interaction, and is expected to be extremely small ( 10-7). The experiment will determine this PV asymmetry with the statistical sensitivity of the order of 10-8. Challenges like beam fluctuation, pedestal and background subtraction, instrumental interference, detector correlations and many others must be considered very carefully in the analysis to achieve this precision. I will discuss the data analysis and a method to extract the value for the PV asymmetry.

  12. Potential use of a Kerr Cell in polarized electron accelerator sources for experiments in parity-violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of parity-violation in electron scattering has evolved to measuring sub-part-per-million asymmetries with a precision better than 10 parts-per-billion. Future experiments will be significantly more demanding, the MOLLER experiment will measure a 35.6 ppb asymmetry to 0.73 ppb. Currently, the laser beam that produces the electron beam, has its helicity reversed using a Pockels Cell. This device is a birefringent crystal to which an opposite high voltage is applied for each polarization state. The time that it takes the crystal to admit the voltage change and stabilize thereafter is too long for future experiments and the cell induces unacceptably large changes in the beam correlated with the polarization, due to piezo-electric and piezo-optical phenomena. A potential solution is the use of a Kerr Cell instead. Such a device, containing a Kerr liquid, should allow the polarization to be reversed more rapidly and with significantly reduced correlation between the polarization and other changes to the beam. The Kerr effect is weak and a useful cell would likely require significantly higher voltages and unsavory chemicals. In this presentation the Kerr Cell will be introduced, barriers to using this technology will be discussed and first data available will be presented.

  13. Helical ordering in the ground state of spin-one color superconductors as a consequence of parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, Tomas

    2008-12-15

    We investigate spin-one color superconductivity of a single quark flavor using the Ginzburg-Landau theory. First we examine the classic analysis of Bailin and Love and show that by restricting to the so-called inert states, it misses the true ground state in a part of the phase diagram. This suggests the use of the more general, noninert states, in particular, within three-flavor quark matter where the color neutrality constraint imposes stress on the spin-one pairing and may disfavor the symmetric color-spin-locked state. In the second part of the paper we show that, in analogy to some ferromagnetic materials, lack of space-inversionmore » symmetry leads to a new term in the Ginzburg-Landau functional, which favors a spatially nonuniform long-range ordering with a spiral structure. In color superconductors, this new parity-violating term is a tiny effect of weak-interaction physics. The modified phase diagram is determined and the corresponding ground states for all the phases constructed. At the end, we estimate the coefficient of the new term in the free energy functional, and discuss its relevance for the phenomenology of dense quark matter.« less

  14. A simultaneous explanation of the large phase in Bs- Bmacr smixing and B→ππ/πK puzzles in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Chatterjee, Kalyan Brata; Nandi, Soumitra

    2008-11-01

    Recent data on B meson mixings and decays are, in general, in accord with the standard model expectations, except showing a few hiccups: (i) a large phase in Bs mixing, (ii) a significant difference (>3.5σ) between CP-asymmetries in B±→π0K± and Bd→π∓K± channels, and (iii) a larger than expected branching ratio in Bd→π0π0 channel. We show that selective baryon-number violating Yukawa couplings in R-parity violating supersymmetry can reconcile all the measurements.

  15. Light Gluinos in Hiding: Reconstructing R-Parity Violating Decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Raklev, A.R.; /Stockholm U., OKC; Salam, G.P.

    2012-04-19

    If gluinos exist with masses less than 200 GeV, they are copiously produced at the Tevatron, but still may not have been discovered if they decay through baryon number violating operators. We show that using cuts on jet substructure can enable a discovery with existing data and even determine the gluino's mass. This contribution has demonstrated that the Tevatron can discover new light colored particles that decay into complicated hadronic final states, by using events where these particles are produced at high p{sub T} and their boosted decay products are collimated. The recently developed techniques using jet substructure can effectivelymore » separate signal from background, allowing the new particle to appear as a jet-mass resonance. This work is a proof-of-principle, but there is significantly more work to be done. Neither of the Tevatron's two detectors have calorimetry that is as finely segmented as the LHC detectors, where most studies have been done so far, and this may reduce the jet mass resolution and restrict the Tevatron reach. Some of this resolution loss may be recovered by using tracking information, particularly at CDF [99]. On the theoretical side, the optimal cuts and jet-size for a given mass have not been determined, nor have other jet algorithms such as Cambridge/Aachen been studied. Switching to a more inclusive analysis may also improve sensitivity. The primary challenge is to keep signal efficiency high due to the low number of gluinos in the high p{sub T} tail, e.g. with m{sub {tilde g}} = 150 GeV we see 18% of gluinos with p{sub T} > 350 GeV reconstructed using R = 1.0. Therefore it may be beneficial to search for one narrow gluino candidate jet with tight constraints recoiling against another wide jet-size gluino candidate jet. The application of loose substructure cuts to the jets of the ordinary di-jet search is also interesting. If the squarks become light enough that associated squark-gluino production or squark pair production

  16. A Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Aluminum and its Contribution to a Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, Joshua Allen

    2016-05-01

    The Q_weak experiment, which ran at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, made a precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, Q^p_W. The weak charge is extracted via a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering from hydrogen at low momentum transfer (Q^2=0.025 GeV^2). This result is directly related to the electroweak mixing angle, sin^2(Theta_W), a fundamental parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics. This provides a precision test sensitive to new, as yet unknown, fundamental physics. This dissertation focuses on two central corrections to the Q_weak measurement: the target window contribution and sub-percent determination of themore » electron beam polarization. The aluminum target windows contribute approximately 30% of the measured asymmetry. Removal of this background requires precise measurements of both the elastic electron-aluminum scattering rate and its parity-violating asymmetry. The results reported here are the most precise measurement of the Q_weak target dilution and asymmetry to date. The parity-violating asymmetry for the aluminum alloy was found to be 1.6174 +/- 0.0704 (stat.) +/- 0.0113 (sys.) parts-per-million. The first sub-percent precision polarization measurements made from the Hall C Moller polarimeter are also reported, with systematic uncertainties of 0.84%.« less

  17. The lepton flavor violating exclusive b bar → s bar ℓi- ℓj+ decays in SUSY without R-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jin-Huan; Song, Jia-Jia; Wang, Ru-Min; Yang, Ya-Dong

    2018-05-01

    Inspired by the recent anomaly measurements of the lepton-flavor violating decays h → μτ and the lepton flavor non-universality in decays b bar → s bar ℓ-ℓ+, we investigate the lepton flavor violating exclusive b bar → s bar ℓi- ℓ j + (i ≠ j and ℓ = e , μ , τ) decays within supersymmetry. Relevant R-parity violating couplings are constrained by using the latest experimental upper limits on the branching ratios of Bs → ℓi- ℓ j + and B →K (*) ℓi- ℓj+ flavor changing neutral current processes, and we find that all relevant branching ratios are very sensitive to the moduli of the squark and sneutrino exchange coupling products. In addition, the constrained lepton number violating effects on the dilepton invariant mass spectra, the single lepton polarization asymmetries and the differential forward-backward asymmetries are also studied. These lepton-flavor violating B decays could be used for the search of lepton flavor violation at the running LHC and the forthcoming Belle-II.

  18. Searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-12-29

    Results are presented from searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced inmore » $pp$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb -1. No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. Finally, these limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R-parity-violating couplings.« less

  19. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Gecit, F. H.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozcan, M.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; Cms Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1±, χ˜1± →ℓ± + jj , top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i , j , k ≤ 2), where i , j , k correspond to the three generations.

  20. Parity-violating photon circular polarization in p +d →3He+γ with pion-less effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematollahi, H.; Bayegan, S.; Mahboubi, N.; Arani, M. Moeini

    2018-01-01

    The nonleptonic weak interaction in the few-nucleon system at very low energies is studied with the calculation of the photon circular polarization in the p d →3Heγ reaction (Pγp d). For very low energies, one may treat the pion as heavy and integrate it out from the QCD symmetry-based model-independent effective field theory, leaving only short-range strong interactions which are introduced in term of pionless effective field theory formulation. We investigate a complete set of the parity-violating electromagnetic transitions in the p d →3Heγ process. In this paper the interferences of strong, electromagnetic, Coulomb, and parity-violating weak interactions are presented with the calculation of a full set of appropriate diagrams at the leading order. We have obtained energy-dependent Pγp d results as a function of the laboratory energy values 0.5 ≤ELab≤3 MeV in terms of the low-energy coupling constants. The contributions of the initial S - and P -wave proton-deuteron systems have been considered to make the final 3He ground state in this energy region.

  1. Cross Section and Parity-Violating Spin Asymmetries of W± Boson Production in Polarized p+p Collisions at s=500GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Togawa, M.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2011-02-01

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries ALe+=-0.86-0.14+0.30 and ALe-=0.88-0.71+0.12 are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s=500GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e± come mainly from the decay of W± and Z0 bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W± to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W± boson production cross sections for the e± channels of σ(pp→W+X)×BR(W+→e+νe)=144.1±21.2(stat)-10.3+3.4(syst)±21.6(norm)pb, and σ(pp→W-X)×BR(W-→e-ν¯e)=31.7±12.1(stat)-8.2+10.1(syst)±4.8(norm)pb.

  2. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-21

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, $$ \\mathrm{ \\tilde{t} \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1,\\, \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1 \\to \\ell^\\pm+jj } $$, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling $$\\lambda^{\\prime}_{ijk}$$ $$(i,j,k \\leq 2)$$, where $i,j,k$ correspond to the three generations.« less

  3. Search for B -L R -parity-violating top squarks in √{s }=13 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, K.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, Y. S.; Christodoulou, V.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czekierda, S.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Maria, A.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vasconcelos Corga, K.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delporte, C.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Devesa, M. R.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Bello, F. A.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Clemente, W. K.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Petrillo, K. F.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Dodsworth, D.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, A.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducourthial, A.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dulsen, C.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Duvnjak, D.; Dyndal, M.; Dziedzic, B. S.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; El Kosseifi, R.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Epland, M. B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Estrada Pastor, O.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fabiani, V.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; García Pascual, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geisen, J.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Geßner, G.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiacomi, N.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugliarelli, G.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gkountoumis, P.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Gama, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gottardo, C. A.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, C.; Gray, H. M.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Grummer, A.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, W.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gurbuz, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutelman, B. J.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Guzik, M. P.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Han, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havener, L. B.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heer, S.; Heidegger, K. K.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Held, A.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herr, H.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Herwig, T. C.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Higashino, S.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hildebrand, K.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hils, M.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hiti, B.; Hladik, O.; Hoad, X.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, S.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hostiuc, A.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hunter, R. F. H.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hyneman, R.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Iltzsche, F.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Isacson, M. F.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jacobs, R. M.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Janus, P. A.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jelinskas, A.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S. D.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kay, E. F.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kellermann, E.; Kempster, J. J.; Kendrick, J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khodinov, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kilby, C. R.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; Kirchmeier, D.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitali, V.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klingl, T.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Köhler, N. M.; Koi, T.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotwal, A.; Koulouris, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kourlitis, E.; Kouskoura, V.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozakai, C.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krauss, D.; Kremer, J. A.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M. C.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulinich, Y. P.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kupfer, T.; Kuprash, O.; Kurashige, H.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurth, M. G.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; La Ruffa, F.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lack, D. P. J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lammers, S.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lanfermann, M. C.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Langenberg, R. J.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Lapertosa, A.; Laplace, S.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Lau, T. S.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Lazzaroni, M.; Le, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Quilleuc, E. P.; Leblanc, M.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, B.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lerner, G.; Leroy, C.; Les, R.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, D.; Li, B.; Li, Changqiao; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limosani, A.; Lin, K.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linck, R. A.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lionti, A. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. K. K.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo, C. Y.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E. M.; Loch, P.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loesle, A.; Loew, K. M.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Longo, L.; Looper, K. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lu, Y. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lutz, M. S.; Luzi, P. M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Lyu, F.; Lyubushkin, V.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Y.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; MacDonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Madysa, N.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A. S.; Magerl, V.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majersky, O.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mankinen, K. H.; Mann, A.; Manousos, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mansour, J. D.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; Marceca, G.; March, L.; Marchese, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Martensson, M. U. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, C. B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Mason, L. H.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Maznas, I.; Mazza, S. M.; Mc Fadden, N. C.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McClymont, L. I.; McDonald, E. F.; McFayden, J. A.; McHedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McNamara, P. C.; McNicol, C. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meehan, S.; Megy, T. J.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meideck, T.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melini, D.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Mellenthin, J. D.; Melo, M.; Meloni, F.; Melzer, A.; Menary, S. B.; Meng, L.; Meng, X. T.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Merlassino, C.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Miano, F.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Millar, D. A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Minegishi, Y.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirto, A.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mizukami, A.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mlynarikova, M.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mogg, P.; Mohapatra, S.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, S.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moschovakos, P.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, H. J.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, M. E.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Newman, P. R.; Ng, T. Y.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nishu, N.; Nisius, R.; Nitsche, I.; Nitta, T.; Nobe, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nomura, M. A.; Nooney, T.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Connor, K.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oppen, H.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasner, J. M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearson, B.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Peri, F.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, F. H.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Podberezko, P.; Poettgen, R.; Poggi, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pohl, D.; Pokharel, I.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Ponomarenko, D.; Pontecorvo, L.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Portillo Quintero, D. M.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potti, H.; Poulsen, T.; Poveda, J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proklova, N.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puri, A.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rashid, T.; Raspopov, S.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravinovich, I.; Rawling, J. H.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rettie, S.; Reynolds, E.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ripellino, G.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocco, E.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Bosca, S.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sampsonidou, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, C. O.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sano, Y.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schildgen, L. K.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Sciandra, A.; Sciolla, G.; Scornajenghi, M.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Senkin, S.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherafati, N.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, L.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Søgaard, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Sopczak, A.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Sottocornola, S.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapf, B. S.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Stegler, M.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, Dms; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Tahirovic, E.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, A. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tian, Y.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A search is presented for the direct pair production of the stop, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, that decays through an R -parity-violating coupling to a final state with two leptons and two jets, at least one of which is identified as a b -jet. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=13 TeV , collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess is observed over the Standard Model background, and exclusion limits are set on stop pair production at a 95% confidence level. Lower limits on the stop mass are set between 600 GeV and 1.5 TeV for branching ratios above 10% for decays to an electron or muon and a b -quark.

  4. Search for B - L R -parity-violating top squarks in s = 13 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2018-02-06

    A search is presented for the direct pair production of the stop, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, that decays through an R -parity-violating coupling to a final state with two leptons and two jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-jet. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb -1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s = 13TeV , collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess is observed over the Standard Model background, and exclusion limits are set on stopmore » pair production at a 95% confidence level. Lower limits on the stop mass are set between 600 GeV and 1.5 TeV for branching ratios above 10% for decays to an electron or muon and a b-quark.« less

  5. Compton Scattering Polarimetry for the Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge Through Measurements of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry of 1H(e,e')p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, Juan Carlos

    The Standard Model has been a theory with the greatest success in describing the fundamental interactions of particles. As of the writing of this dissertation, the Standard Model has not been shown to make a false prediction. However, the limitations of the Standard Model have long been suspected by its lack of a description of gravity, nor dark matter. Its largest challenge to date, has been the observation of neutrino oscillations, and the implication that they may not be massless, as required by the Standard Model. The growing consensus is that the Standard Model is simply a lower energy effective field theory, and that new physics lies at much higher energies. The Qweak Experiment is testing the Electroweak theory of the Standard Model by making a precise determination of the weak charge of the proton (Qpw). Any signs of "new physics" will appear as a deviation to the Standard Model prediction. The weak charge is determined via a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry of the electron-proton interaction via elastic scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of an un-polarized proton target. The experiment required that the electron beam polarization be measured to an absolute uncertainty of 1 %. At this level the electron beam polarization was projected to contribute the single largest experimental uncertainty to the parity-violating asymmetry measurement. This dissertation will detail the use of Compton scattering to determine the electron beam polarization via the detection of the scattered photon. I will conclude the remainder of the dissertation with an independent analysis of the blinded Qweak.

  6. Compton Scattering Polarimetry for the Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge Through Measurements of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry of 1H(e,e')p

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The Standard Model has been a theory with the greatest success in describing the fundamental interactions of particles. As of the writing of this dissertation, the Standard Model has not been shown to make a false prediction. However, the limitations of the Standard Model have long been suspected by its lack of a description of gravity, nor dark matter. Its largest challenge to date, has been the observation of neutrino oscillations, and the implication that they may not be massless, as required by the Standard Model. The growing consensus is that the Standard Model is simply a lower energy effectivemore » field theory, and that new physics lies at much higher energies. The Q weak Experiment is testing the Electroweak theory of the Standard Model by making a precise determination of the weak charge of the proton (Q p w). Any signs of "new physics" will appear as a deviation to the Standard Model prediction. The weak charge is determined via a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry of the electron-proton interaction via elastic scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of an un-polarized proton target. The experiment required that the electron beam polarization be measured to an absolute uncertainty of 1%. At this level the electron beam polarization was projected to contribute the single largest experimental uncertainty to the parity-violating asymmetry measurement. This dissertation will detail the use of Compton scattering to determine the electron beam polarization via the detection of the scattered photon. I will conclude the remainder of the dissertation with an independent analysis of the blinded Q weak.« less

  7. A Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton through Parity Violating Electron Scattering using the Qweak Apparatus: A 21% Result

    SciTech Connect

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha

    2013-08-01

    After a decade of preparations, the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab is making the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q^p_W. This quantity is suppressed in the Standard Model making a good candidate for search for new physics beyond the SM at the TeV scale. Operationally, we measure a small (about -0.200 ppm) parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering in integrating mode while flipping the helicity of the electrons 1000 times per second. Commissioning took place Fall 2010, and we finished taking data in early summer 2012. This dissertation is based on the data taken onmore » an initial two weeks period (Wien0). It will provide an overview of the Qweak apparatus, description of the data acquisition and analysis software systems, and final analysis and results from the Wien0 data set. The result is a 16% measurement of the parity violating electron-proton scattering asymmetry, A = -0.2788 +/- 0.0348 (stat.) +/- 0.0290 (syst.) ppm at Q^2 = 0.0250 +/- 0.0006 (GeV)^2. From this a 21% measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q_w^p(msr)= +0.0952 +/- 0.0155 (stat.) +/- 0.0131 (syst.) +/- 0.0015 (theory) is extracted. From this a 2% measurement of the weak mixing angle, sin^2theta_W(msr)= +0.2328 +/- 0.0039 (stat.) +/- 0.0033 (syst.) +/- 0.0004 (theory) and improved constraints on isoscalar/isovector effective coupling constants of the weak neutral hadronic currents are extracted. These results deviate from the Standard Model by one standard deviation. The Wien0 results are a proof of principle of the Qweak data analysis and a highlight of the road ahead for obtaining full results.« less

  8. Search for R -parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Susa, T.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Chistov, R.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Results are reported from a search for R -parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV . The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb-1 . This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair production cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μ m and 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2-30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.

  9. Search for parity and time reversal violating effects in HgH: Relativistic coupled-cluster study.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Sudip; Pathak, Himadri; Nayak, Malaya K; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2016-03-28

    The high effective electric field (Eeff) experienced by the unpaired electron in an atom or a molecule is one of the key ingredients in the success of electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment and its precise calculation requires a very accurate theory. We, therefore, employed the Z-vector method in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework and found that HgH has a very large Eeff value (123.2 GV/cm) which makes it a potential candidate for the next generation eEDM experiment. Our study also reveals that it has a large scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) P,T-violating interaction constant, Ws = 284.2 kHz. To judge the accuracy of the obtained results, we have calculated parallel and perpendicular magnetic hyperfine structure (HFS) constants and compared with the available experimental values. The results of our calculation are found to be in nice agreement with the experimental values. Therefore, by looking at the HFS results, we can say that both Eeff and Ws values are also very accurate. Further, We have derived the relationship between these quantities and the ratio which will help to get model independent value of eEDM and S-PS interaction constant.

  10. Parity Violation in DIS region with SoLID at the upgraded 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; The SoLID Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In this talk, an overview of PVDIS future experiment by using a Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) at Jefferson Lab (JLab) Hall A with the 12 GeV upgrade, along with a brief description of the proposed SoLID spectrometer is discussed. We will obtain data with high statistic and large kinematic coverage for Bjorken 0.3 < x < 0.7 and in the momentum transfer Q2 range 2 - 10 GeV2 by a polarized electron beam scattering on unpolarized deuteron and proton targets. A measurement of PVDIS in deuteron aims to extract fundamental coupling constants C1 q ,C2 q as well as the weak mixing angle sin2θw with a high precision. This measurement can also access QCD physics of searching for charge asymmetry violation in PDF's and higher-twist effects with quark-quark correlations. In addition, the proton target experiment can be a powerful probe of the d / u ratio at high x without any nuclear correction. The designed SoLID spectrometer with its unique feature of high luminosity and large acceptance provides an opportunity to probe physics beyond the Standard Model.

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy of the chiral metal complex [CpRe(CH₃)(CO)(NO)]: a potential candidate for probing parity violation.

    PubMed

    Medcraft, Chris; Wolf, Robert; Schnell, Melanie

    2014-10-20

    Heavy-metal containing chiral compounds have been suggested as promising candidates for studying parity-violation effects. We report herein the broadband rotational spectroscopy study of the chiral complex [CpRe(CH3)(CO)(NO)] in the gas phase. The spectra obtained are very rich due to the two rhenium isotopologues ((185)Re and (187)Re), hyperfine structure arising from the rhenium and nitrogen nuclei, and the asymmetry of the chiral complex. Since rhenium is located very close to the molecular center of mass, the rotational constants for the two rhenium isotopologues are very similar. However they can be differentiated by their characteristic nuclear quadrupole hyperfine splitting patterns. Comparison with calculated nuclear quadrupole coupling constants shows that all-electron relativistic basis sets are necessary for a correct description of the rhenium atom in this type of complex. The present study is an important step towards future precision studies on chiral molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. LCAO-based theoretical study of PbTiO3 crystal to search for parity and time reversal violating interaction in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    An experiment towards the search for the interaction of the Schiff moment (S) of the 207Pb nuclei with electrons in PbTiO3 crystal which violates the time reversal (T) and space parity (P) symmetries was proposed by Mukhamedjanov and Sushkov [Phys. Rev. A 72, 034501 (2005)]. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of the Schiff moment requires knowledge of an electronic density gradient parameter (usually designated as X) on the Pb nucleus in the crystal, which is determined by the electronic structure of the crystal. Here we propose a theoretical approach to calculate the properties in solids which are directly sensitive to the changes of valence electron densities in atomic cores but not in the valence spatial regions (Mössbauer parameters, hyperfine structure (HFS) constants, parameters of T,P-odd Hamiltonians, etc. [L. V. Skripnikov and A. V. Titov, Phys. Rev. A 91, 042504 (2015)]). It involves constructing the crystalline orbitals via the linear combination of atomic orbitals and employs a two-step concept of calculating such properties that was earlier proposed by us for the case of heavy-atom molecules. The application of the method to the PbTiO3 crystal results in the energy shift, Δ ɛ = 0 . 82 × 1 0 6 /S ( 207 Pb ) e aB 3 eV , due to the T,P-odd interactions. The value is compared to the corresponding parameter in diatomic molecules (TlF, RaO, PbO), which have been proposed and used in the past decades in the search for the nuclear Schiff moment. We also present the calculation of the electric field gradient at the Pb nucleus in PbTiO3 for the comparison with other solid-state electronic structure approaches.

  13. LCAO-based theoretical study of PbTiO3 crystal to search for parity and time reversal violating interaction in solids.

    PubMed

    Skripnikov, L V; Titov, A V

    2016-08-07

    An experiment towards the search for the interaction of the Schiff moment (S) of the (207)Pb nuclei with electrons in PbTiO3 crystal which violates the time reversal (T) and space parity (P) symmetries was proposed by Mukhamedjanov and Sushkov [Phys. Rev. A 72, 034501 (2005)]. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of the Schiff moment requires knowledge of an electronic density gradient parameter (usually designated as X) on the Pb nucleus in the crystal, which is determined by the electronic structure of the crystal. Here we propose a theoretical approach to calculate the properties in solids which are directly sensitive to the changes of valence electron densities in atomic cores but not in the valence spatial regions (Mössbauer parameters, hyperfine structure (HFS) constants, parameters of T,P-odd Hamiltonians, etc. [L. V. Skripnikov and A. V. Titov, Phys. Rev. A 91, 042504 (2015)]). It involves constructing the crystalline orbitals via the linear combination of atomic orbitals and employs a two-step concept of calculating such properties that was earlier proposed by us for the case of heavy-atom molecules. The application of the method to the PbTiO3 crystal results in the energy shift, Δε=0.82×10(6)S((207)Pb)eaB (3)eV, due to the T,P-odd interactions. The value is compared to the corresponding parameter in diatomic molecules (TlF, RaO, PbO), which have been proposed and used in the past decades in the search for the nuclear Schiff moment. We also present the calculation of the electric field gradient at the Pb nucleus in PbTiO3 for the comparison with other solid-state electronic structure approaches.

  14. Recovery Act - Measurement of Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering and Studies of the Nucleon Spin Structure at JLab 6 and 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2016-03-10

    The program proposed contains two ingredients which aim to address aspects of two of the three research frontiers of nuclear science as identified in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan. The first topic, a test of the current Standard Model, is an ongoing project focusing on measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in ~e-2H deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS). The PVDIS measurement is complementary to other completed or ongoing low- to medium-energy tests of the Standard Model. As the first, exploratory, step, an experiment using a 6 GeV electron beam will be carried out from October to December 2009 at the Thomasmore » Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Meanwhile, a program using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam is being planned. The PVDIS program as a whole will provide the first precision data on the axial quark neutral-weak coupling constants. This will either put the current Standard Model to a test that has never been done before, or reveal information on where to look for New Physics beyond the current Standard Model. The PVDIS program will also provide results on hadronic physics effects such as charge symmetry violation. The second part of the proposed program uses spin observables to address the research frontier concerning QCD and structure of the nucleon. An experiment using the JLab 6 GeV beam in 2001 showed that, contrary to predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), while the valence up quark’s spin is parallel to the nucleon’s spin, the valence down quark’s spin is not. In order to test the limit of QCD in describing the nucleon spin structure to a region beyond the 6 GeV kinematics, this measurement will be extended to a more energetic, “deeper” valence quark region using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam with a polarized 3He target. Although the two topics of the proposed program appear to focus on different physics, for the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam, both will utilize a new, yet-to-be-built large acceptance

  15. A simultaneous explanation of the large phase in B{sub s}-B{sub s}mixing and B{yields}{pi}{pi}/{pi}K puzzles in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Chatterjee, Kalyan Brata; Nandi, Soumitra

    2008-11-01

    Recent data on B meson mixings and decays are, in general, in accord with the standard model expectations, except showing a few hiccups: (i) a large phase in B{sub s} mixing, (ii) a significant difference (>3.5{sigma}) between CP-asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}} and B{sub d}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}} channels, and (iii) a larger than expected branching ratio in B{sub d}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel. We show that selective baryon-number violating Yukawa couplings in R-parity violating supersymmetry can reconcile all the measurements.

  16. A4 and CP symmetry and a model with maximal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Lu, Jun-Nan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2016-12-01

    We study a second CP symmetry compatible with the A4 flavor group, which interchanges the representations 1‧ and 1″. We analyze the lepton mixing patterns arising from the A4 and CP symmetry broken to residual subgroups Z3 and Z2 × CP in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors respectively. One phenomenologically viable mixing pattern is found, and it predicts maximal atmospheric mixing angle as well as maximal Dirac CP phase, trivial Majorana phases and the correlation sin2 ⁡θ12cos2 ⁡θ13 = 1 / 3. We construct a concrete model based on the A4 and CP symmetry, the above interesting mixing pattern is achieved, the observed charged lepton mass hierarchy is reproduced, and the reactor mixing angle θ13 is of the correct order.

  17. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2004-02-06

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1.

  18. Contribution to the G 0 violation of parity experience: calculation and simulation of radiative corrections and the background noise study; Contribution a l'experience G0 de violation de la parite : calcul et simulation des corrections radiatives et etude du bruit de fond (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Guler, Hayg

    2003-12-17

    In the framework of quantum chromodynamics, the nucleon is made of three valence quarks surrpounded by a sea of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. Only the only lightest quarks (u, d and s) contribute significantly to the nucleon properties. In Go we using the property of weak interaction to violate parity symmetry, in order to determine separately the contributions of the three types of quarks to nucleon form factors. The experiment, which takes place at Thomas Jefferson laboratory (USA), aims at measuring parity violation asymmetry in electron-proton scattering. By doing several measurements at different momentum squared of the exchanged photons andmore » for different kinematics (forward angle when the proton is detected and backward angle it will be the electron) will permit to determine separately strange quarks electric and magnetic contributions to nucleon form factors. To extract an asymmetry with small errors, it is necessary to correct all the beam parameters, and to have high enough counting rates in detectors. A special electronics was developed to treat information coming from 16 scintillator pairs for each of the 8 sectors of the Go spectrometer. A complete calculation of radiative corrections has been clone and Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT program has permitted to determine the shape of the experimental spectra including inelastic background. This work will allow to do a comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations based on the Standard Model.« less

  19. Investigations of the Space Parity Violation and Interference Effects in the Fragment Angular Distributions of 235U, 233U, and 239Pu Fission by Resonance Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V.E.; Gagarski, A.M.; Guseva, I.S.

    2005-05-24

    Investigations of the space parity nonconserving (PNC) asymmetry of 233U, 235U, and 239Pu fission fragment emission and parity conserving (PC) interference effects of left-right and forward-backward asymmetries were carried out on the neutron beams of the reactor IBR-30 (JINR, Dubna) over the range of neutron energies from 0.02 eV to about 100 eV. All experimental results obtained have been found to be in a good mutual accordance within the frames of modern theoretical conceptions about the mechanisms of PNC and PC effects forming in fission process induced by slow neutrons. In case of the P-even interference effects of asymmetry themore » evident mutual well-marked irregularities in their neutron energy dependencies up to about 100 eV were observed. It is connected with the interference of s, p-resonances at fission compound stage according to modern theory. As a remarkable result of the PNC effect measurements the resonance behavior of the PNC asymmetry coefficients in the low neutron energy region (En < 2 eV) was observed. Unfortunately, the statistical accuracy of the PNC effect measurements is not enough for observation of these resonance effects in other cases of more high energies. Results of simultaneous analysis of all three asymmetry effects for all three nuclei are presented. The satisfactory combined description of the experimental points is received. As a result of theoretical evaluation of these data main parameters and the estimates of nuclear matrix elements of the weak interaction for some p-resonances in the low energy range were extracted.« less

  20. Search for $R$-parity violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 13 TeV using b jets in a final state with a single lepton, many jets, and high sum of large-radius jet masses

    SciTech Connect

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-12-24

    Results are reported from a search for physics beyond the standard model in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 13 TeV. The search uses a signature of a single lepton, large jet and bottom quark jet multiplicities, and high sum of large-radius jet masses, without any requirement on the missing transverse momentum in an event. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$$^{-1}$$ recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. No significant excess beyond the prediction from standard model processes is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of upper limits on the production cross section for $R$-parity violating supersymmetric extensions of the standard model using a benchmark model of gluino pair production, in which each gluino decays promptly via $$ {\\mathrm{\\widetilde{g}}} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{t} \\mathrm{b} \\mathrm{s} $$. Gluinos with a mass below 1610 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  1. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-06-10

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying tomore » $$\\overline{b}$$$\\overline{s}$$ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m $$\\overline{t}$$ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  2. The Parity Theorem Shuffle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Parity Theorem states that any permutation can be written as a product of transpositions, but no permutation can be written as a product of both an even number and an odd number of transpositions. Most proofs of the Parity Theorem take several pages of mathematical formalism to complete. This article presents an alternative but equivalent…

  3. Parity in knot theory

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2010-06-29

    In this work we study knot theories with a parity property for crossings: every crossing is declared to be even or odd according to a certain preassigned rule. If this rule satisfies a set of simple axioms related to the Reidemeister moves, then certain simple invariants solving the minimality problem can be defined, and invariant maps on the set of knots can be constructed. The most important example of a knot theory with parity is the theory of virtual knots. Using the parity property arising from Gauss diagrams we show that even a gross simplification of the theory of virtualmore » knots, namely, the theory of free knots, admits simple and highly nontrivial invariants. This gives a solution to a problem of Turaev, who conjectured that all free knots are trivial. In this work we show that free knots are generally not invertible, and provide invariants which detect the invertibility of free knots. The passage to ordinary virtual knots allows us to strengthen known invariants (such as the Kauffman bracket) using parity considerations. We also discuss other examples of knot theories with parity. Bibliography: 27 items.« less

  4. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Foreword; Part I. Basics of CP Violation: 1. Prologue; 2. Prelude: C, P and T in classical dynamics; 3. C, P and T in non-relativistic quantum mechanics; 4. C, P and T in relativistic quantum theories; 5. The arrival of strange particles; 6. Quantum mechanics of neutral particles; Part II. Theory and Experiments: 7. The quest for CP violation in K decays - a marathon; 8. The KM implementation of CP violation; 9. The theory of KL → ππ decays; 10. Paradigmatic discoveries in B physics; 11. Let the drama unfold - B CP phenomenology; 12. Rare K and B decays - almost perfect laboratories; 13. CPT violation - could it be in K and B decays?; 14. CP violation in charm decays - the dark horse; 15. The strong CP problem; Part III. Looking Beyond the Standard Model: 16. Quest for CP violation in the neutrino sector; 17. Possible corrections to the KM ansatz: right-handed currents and non-minimal Higgs dynamics; 18. CP violation without nonperturbative dynamics - top quarks and charged leptons; 19. SUSY - providing shelter for Higgs dynamics; 20. Minimal flavour violation and extra dimensions; 21. Baryogenesis in the universe; Part IV. Summary: 22. Summary and perspectives; References; Index.

  5. Preparation Contextuality Powers Parity-Oblivious Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Robert W.; Buzacott, D. H.; Keehn, A. J.; Toner, Ben; Pryde, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In a noncontextual hidden variable model of quantum theory, hidden variables determine the outcomes of every measurement in a manner that is independent of how the measurement is implemented. Using a generalization of this notion to arbitrary operational theories and to preparation procedures, we demonstrate that a particular two-party information-processing task, “parity-oblivious multiplexing,” is powered by contextuality in the sense that there is a limit to how well any theory described by a noncontextual hidden variable model can perform. This bound constitutes a “noncontextuality inequality” that is violated by quantum theory. We report an experimental violation of this inequality in good agreement with the quantum predictions. The experimental results also provide the first demonstration of 2-to-1 and 3-to-1 quantum random access codes.

  6. Long-lived stop at the LHC with or without R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, L.; Dradi, F., E-mail: laura.covi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: federico.dradi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We consider scenarios of gravitino LSP and DM with stop NLSP both within R-parity conserving and R-parity violating supersymmetry (RPC and RPV SUSY, respectively). We discuss cosmological bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the gravitino abundance and then concentrate on the signals of long-lived stops at the LHC as displaced vertices or metastable particles. Finally we discuss how to distinguish R-parity conserving and R-parity breaking stop decays if they happen within the detector and how to suppress SM backgrounds.

  7. Volkswagen Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information on EPA's issued notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to Volkswagen. The NOV alleges software that circumvents EPA emissions standards for certain air pollutants.

  8. Nuclear Parity with China?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    first nuclear test ban agreements? Is the United States seeking to gain relative advantage under the guise of nuclear parity? Caroline Ziemke- Dickens ...87 See Charles Clover, “Spectre of Putin’s return sours ties with US,” Financial Times (January 3, 2011), 2. Clover cites a...New Era. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998. A-2 Clover, Charles . “Spectre of Putin’s return sours ties with US.” Financial Times

  9. Two- and Three-Dimensional Probes of Parity in Primordial Gravity Waves.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2017-06-02

    We show that three-dimensional information is critical to discerning the effects of parity violation in the primordial gravity-wave background. If present, helical gravity waves induce parity-violating correlations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) between parity-odd polarization B modes and parity-even temperature anisotropies (T) or polarization E modes. Unfortunately, EB correlations are much weaker than would be naively expected, which we show is due to an approximate symmetry resulting from the two-dimensional nature of the CMB. The detectability of parity-violating correlations is exacerbated by the fact that the handedness of individual modes cannot be discerned in the two-dimensional CMB, leading to a noise contribution from scalar matter perturbations. In contrast, the tidal imprints of primordial gravity waves fossilized into the large-scale structure of the Universe are a three-dimensional probe of parity violation. Using such fossils the handedness of gravity waves may be determined on a mode-by-mode basis, permitting future surveys to probe helicity at the percent level if the amplitude of primordial gravity waves is near current observational upper limits.

  10. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat sample...

  11. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat sample...

  12. Radiative B decays in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Otto C.W.; Vaidya, Rishikesh D.

    2005-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of all the contributions at the leading log order to the branching ratio of the inclusive radiative decay B{yields}X{sub s}+{gamma} in the framework of supersymmetry without R parity. The relevant set of four-quark operators involved in QCD running are extended from six (within the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model) to 24, with also many new contributions to the Wilson coefficients of (chromo)magnetic penguins for either chiral structure. We present complete analytical results here without any a priori assumptions on the form of R-parity violation. Mass-eigenstate expressions are given; hence the results aremore » free from the commonly adopted mass-insertion approximation. In the numerical analysis, we focus here only on the influence of the trilinear {lambda}{sub ijk}{sup '} couplings and report on the possibility of a few orders of magnitude improvement for the bounds on a few combinations of the {lambda}{sup '} couplings. Our study shows that the Wilson coefficients of the current-current operators due to R-parity violation dominate over the direct contributions to the penguins. However, the interplay of various contributions is complicated due to the QCD corrections which we elaborate here.« less

  13. Testing parity with atomic radiative capture of μ(-).

    PubMed

    McKeen, David; Pospelov, Maxim

    2012-06-29

    The next generation of "intensity frontier" facilities will bring a significant increase in the intensity of subrelativistic beams of μ(-). We show that the use of these beams in combination with thin targets of Z~30 elements opens up the possibility of testing parity-violating interactions of muons with nuclei via direct radiative capture of muons into atomic 2S orbitals. Since atomic capture preserves longitudinal muon polarization, the measurements of the gamma ray angular asymmetry in the single photon 2S(1/2)-1S(1/2) transition will offer a direct test of parity. We calculate the probability of atomic radiative capture taking into account the finite size of the nucleus to show that this process can dominate over the usual muonic atom cascade and that the as-yet unobserved single photon 2S(1/2)-1S(1/2) transition in muonic atoms can be detected in this way using current muon facilities.

  14. Parity fluctuations in stellar dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D. L.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of the solar butterfly diagram from sunspot records suggest persistent fluctuations in parity, away from the overall, approximately dipolar pattern. A simple mean-field dynamo model is used with a solar-like rotation law and perturbed α effect. The parity of the magnetic field relative to the rotational equator can demonstrate can be described as resonance behavior, while the magnetic energy behaves in a more or less expected way. Possible applications of this effect are discussed in the context of various deviations of the solar magnetic field from dipolar symmetry, as reported from analyses of archival sunspot data. The model produces fluctuations in field parity, and hence in the butterfly diagram, that are consistent with observed fluctuaions in solar behavior.

  15. Aging, rule-violation checking strategies, and strategy combination: An EEG study in arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Hinault, Thomas; Lemaire, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    In arithmetic, rule-violation checking strategies are used while participants solve problems that violate arithmetic rules, like the five rule (i.e., products of problems including five as an operand end with either five or zero; e.g., 5×14=70) or the parity rule (i.e., when at least one of the two operands is even, the product is also even; otherwise the product is odd; e.g., 4×13=52). When problems violate both rules, participants use strategy combination and have better performance on both-rule than on one-rule violation problems (i.e., five or parity rule). Aging studies found that older adults efficiently use one-rule violation checking strategies but have difficulties to combine two strategies. To better understand these aging effects, we used EEG and found important age-related changes while participants used rule-violation checking strategies. We compared participants' performance while they verified arithmetic problems that differ in number and type of violated rule. More specifically, both-rule violation problems elicited larger negativity than one-rule violation problems between 600 and 800ms. Five-rule violation problems differed from parity-rule violation problems between 1100 and 1200ms. Moreover, rule-violation checking strategies and strategy combination involved delta, theta, and lower alpha frequencies. Age-related changes in ERPs and frequency were associated with less efficient strategy combination. Moreover, efficient use of one-rule violation checking strategies in older adults was associated with changes in ERPs and frequency. These findings contribute to further our understanding of age-related changes and invariance in arithmetic strategies, and in combination of arithmetic strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single Spin Asymmetries from the Mainz A4 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baunack, S.

    2005-06-01

    The A4 collaboration at the MAMI accelerator in Mainz measures single spin asymmetries in the cross section of elastic scattering of polarized electrons off unpolarized protons. The electrons can be polarized longitudinally as well as transversely. Longitudinal polarization leads to a parity violating (PV) asymmetry from which the contribution of strange sea quarks to the vector form factors of the proton can be derived. Transverse polarization leads to an azimuthal ϕ-dependent asymmetry which gives acces to the imaginary part of the 2 γ-exchange amplitude. Measurements at forward angles θ=(35±5)° and two different momentum transfers Q 2 of 0.23 ( and 0.11 ( have been performed so far. Measurements at backward angles θ=(145±5)° are in preparation.

  17. A parity checker circuit based on microelectromechanical resonator logic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Li, Ren; Younis, Mohammad I.; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based logic computation has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its dynamic mode of operation, ultra-low power consumption, and potential for reprogrammable and reversible computing. Here we demonstrate a 4-bit parity checker circuit by utilizing recently developed logic gates based on MEMS resonators. Toward this, resonance frequencies of shallow arch shaped micro-resonators are electrothermally tuned by the logic inputs to constitute the required logic gates for the proposed parity checker circuit. This study demonstrates that by utilizing MEMS resonator based logic elements, complex digital circuits can be realized.

  18. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-15

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  19. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  20. Dynamical matter-parity breaking and gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jonas; Weniger, Christoph; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2010-11-01

    Scenarios where gravitinos with GeV masses makeup dark matter are known to be in tension with high reheating temperatures, as required by e.g. thermal leptogenesis. This tension comes from the longevity of the NLSPs (next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle), which can destroy the successful predictions of the standard primordial nucleosynthesis. However, a small violation of matter parity can open new decay channels for the NLSP, avoiding the BBN (standard primordial nucleosynthesis) problems, while being compatible with experimental cosmic-ray constraints. In this paper, we propose a model where matter parity, which we assume to be embedded in the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, is broken dynamically in a hidden sector at low-scales. This can naturally explain the smallness of the matter parity breaking in the visible sector. We discuss the dynamics of the corresponding pseudo Nambu-Goldstone modes of B-L breaking in the hidden sector, and we comment on typical cosmic-ray and collider signatures in our model.

  1. Parity of publication for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Rampuri, Riaz; Ragunathan, Thivvia; Young, Allan H

    2016-09-01

    There is an established disparity between physical and mental healthcare. Parity of research outputs has not been assessed internationally across influential medical journals. To assess parity of publication between physical and mental health, and within psychiatry. Four major medical disciplines were identified and their relative burden estimated. All publications from the highest-impact general medical journals in 2001, 2006 and 2011 were categorised accordingly. The frequency of psychiatry, cardiology, oncology and respiratory medicine articles were compared with the expected proportion (given illness burdens). Six subspecialties within psychiatry were also compared. Psychiatry was consistently and substantially underrepresented; other specialties were overrepresented. Dementia and psychosis demonstrated overrepresentation, with addiction and anxiety disorders represented proportionately and other disorders underrepresented. The underrepresentation of mood disorders increased more recently. There appears to be an important element of disparity of esteem; further action is required to achieve equivalence between mental and physical health research publications. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  2. Parity anomaly in four dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkov, M.; Vassilevich, D.

    2017-07-01

    In an analogy to the odd-dimensional case we define the parity anomaly as the part of the one-loop effective action for fermions associated with spectral asymmetry of the Dirac operator. This quantity is computed directly on four-dimensional manifolds with a boundary and related to the Chern-Simons current on the boundary. Despite a quite unusual Chern-Simons level obtained, the action is gauge invariant and passes all consistency checks.

  3. The role of CP violating scatterings in baryogenesis—case study of the neutron portal

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Many baryogenesis scenarios invoke the charge parity (CP) violating out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy particle in order to explain the baryon asymmetry. Such scenarios will in general also allow CP violating scatterings. We study the effect of these CP violating scatterings on the final asymmetry in a neutron portal scenario. We solve the Boltzmann equations governing the evolution of the baryon number numerically and show that the CP violating scatterings play a dominant role in a significant portion of the parameter space.

  4. Constraints on a Parity-Conserving Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oers, Willem T. H.

    Time-reversal-invariance non-conservation has for the first time been unequivocally demonstrated in a direct measurement at CPLEAR. One then can ask the question: What about tests of time-reversal-invariance in systems other than the kaon system? Tests of time-reversal-invariance can be distinguished as belonging to two classes: the first one deals with parity violating (P-odd)/time-reversal-invariance-odd (T-odd) interactions, while the second one deals with P-even/T-odd interactions (assuming CPT conservation this implies C-conjugation non-conservation). Limits on a P-odd/T-odd interaction follow from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron (with a present upper limit of 6 × 10-26 e.cm [95% C.L.]). It provides a limit on a P-odd/T-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant which is less than 10-4 times the weak interaction strength. Experimental limits on a P-even/T-odd interaction are much less stringent. Following the standard approach of describing the nucleon-nucleon interaction in terms of meson exchanges it can be shown that only charged rho-meson exchange and A1-meson exchange can lead to a P-even/T-odd interaction. The better constraints stem from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and from measurements of charge-symmetry breaking in neutron-proton elastic scattering. The latter experiments were executed at TRIUMF (497 and 347 MeV) and at IUCF (183 MeV). Weak decay experiments may provide limits which will possibly be comparable. All other experiments, like gamma decay experiments, detailed balance experiments, polarization-analyzing power difference determinations, and five-fold correlation experiments with polarized incident nucleons and aligned nuclear targets, have been shown to be at least an order of magnitude less sensitive. The question then emerges: is there room for further experimentation?

  5. Constraints of a Parity-Conserving Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oers, Willem T. H.

    2002-09-01

    Time-Reversal-Invariance non-conservation has for the first time been unequivocally demonstrated in a direct measurement at CPLEAR. One then can ask the question: What about tests of time-reversal-invariance in systems other than the kaon system? Tests of time-reversal-invariance can be distinguished as belonging to two classes: the first one deals with time-reversal-invariance-non-conserving (T-odd)/parity violating (P-odd) interactions, while the second one deals with T-odd/P-even interactions (assuming CPT conservation this implies C-conjugation non-conservation). Limits on a T-odd/P-odd interaction follow from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron (< 8 × 10-26 e.cm [95% C.L.]). It provides a limit on a T-odd/P-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant which is less than 10-4 times the weak interaction strength. Experimental limits on a T-odd/P-even interaction are much less stringent. Following the standard approach of describing the nucleon-nucleon interaction in terms of meson exchanges, it can be shown that only charged ρ-meson exchange and A1-meson exchange can lead to a T-odd/P-even interaction. The better constraints stem from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and from measurements of charge-symmetry breaking in neutron-proton elastic scattering. The latter experiments were executed at TRIUMF (497 and 347 MeV) and at IUCF (183 MeV). All other experiments, like detailed balance experiments, polarization - analyzing power difference determinations, and five-fold correlation experiments with polarized incident nucleons and aligned nuclear targets, have been shown to be at least an order of magnitude less sensitive. Is there room for further experimentation?

  6. Constraining PCP Violating Varying Alpha Theory through Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin

    2012-06-06

    In this report we have studied the implication of a parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating interaction in varying alpha theory. Due to this interaction, the state of photon polarization can change when it passes through a strong background magnetic field. We have calculated the optical rotation and ellipticity of the plane of polarization of an electromagnetic wave and tested our results against different laboratory experiments. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter {beta} and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. By analyzing the laboratory experimental data, we found the most stringent constraints on our model parameters to be 1 {le}more » {omega} {le} 10{sup 13} GeV{sup 2} and -0.5 {le} {beta} {le} 0.5. We also found that with the existing experimental input parameters it is very difficult to detect the ellipticity in the near future.« less

  7. Derivation of Dark Matter Parity from Lepton Parity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ernest

    2015-07-03

    It is shown that in extensions of the standard model of quarks and leptons where the additive lepton number L is broken by two units, so that Z_{2} lepton parity, i.e., (-1)L which is either even or odd, remains exactly conserved, there is the possibility of stable dark matter without additional symmetry. This applies to many existing simple models of Majorana neutrino mass with dark matter, including some radiative models. Several well-known examples are discussed. This new insight leads to the construction of a radiative type II seesaw model of neutrino mass with dark matter where the dominant decay of the doubly charged Higgs boson ξ++ is into W+W+ instead of the expected li+lj+ lepton pairs for the well-known tree-level model.

  8. CP violation in h → ττ and LFV h → μτ

    SciTech Connect

    Hayreter, Alper; He, Xiao-Gang; Valencia, German

    2016-06-30

    The CMS Collaboration has reported a possible lepton flavor violating (LFV) signal . Whereas this does not happen in the standard model (SM), we point out that new physics responsible for this type of decay would, in general, also produce charge-parity (CP) violation in . We estimate the size of this effect in a model independent manner and find that a large asymmetry, of order 25%, is allowed by current constraints.

  9. Parity nonconservation in ytterbium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2011-07-15

    We consider parity nonconservation (PNC) in singly ionized ytterbium (Yb{sup +}) arising from the neutral current weak interaction. We calculate the PNC electric dipole transition amplitude (E1{sub PNC}) and the properties associated with it using relativistic coupled-cluster theory. E1{sub PNC} for the [4f{sup 14}] {sup 2}6s{yields}[4f{sup 14}] {sup 2}5d{sub 3/2} transition in Yb{sup +} has been evaluated to within an accuracy of 5%. The improvement of this result is possible. It therefore appears that this ion is a promising candidate for testing the standard model of particle physics.

  10. Cosmological signatures of supersymmetry with spontaneously broken R parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.; Masiero, A.; Valle, J. W. F.

    1991-08-01

    We discuss mechanisms of spontaneous R parity breaking provided by nonzero sneutrino vacuum expectation values (VEVs) = νR, = νL with (νL<<νL). With the standard SU (2) ⊗ U (1) gauge structure this is associated with the existence of a majoron. The majoron, J, is mostly an isosinglet sneutrino (V~R) which does not contribute to Z0 decay. The assumption that the lightest supersymmetric particle - neutralino - is responsible for the observed dark matter in the Universe implies that R parity violation is extremel weak. Lower limits on neutralino lifetime τχ are imposed by the decays χ-->νL+q+q¯ and χ-->νL+e-+e- which produce diffuse X-ray radiation and high energy positrons in our Galaxy. The main neutralino decay channel χ-->ν+J can produce a detectable monoenergetic neutrino flux, with the number of neutrino events up to ~ 103 events per 1 kiloton per year in underground detectors. The gamma-ray line produces by the decay χ-->ν+γ decay can be detectable in the case of large mχ and νR. Bitnet address: VALLE@EVALUN11; Decnet address: 16444::VALLE.

  11. The political evolution of mental health parity.

    PubMed

    Barry, Colleen L

    2006-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of the mental health parity debate in American politics, with a focus on how interest groups and politicians have attempted to influence perceptions about treatment effectiveness and the cost of benefit expansion. When parity laws are in place, they require health plans operating in the private health insurance market to provide an equivalent level of coverage for mental health and general medical care. Business and insurance industry groups oppose parity due to cost concerns. The mental health community has framed parity as an antidiscrimination measure that would achieve greater insurance equity across disease groups. The role of personal experience with mental illness among lawmakers and others in framing the parity debate is also considered.

  12. Causality violation and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kengo; Ishibashi, Akihiro

    1996-09-01

    We show that singularities necessarily occur when a boundary of causality violating sets exists in a spacetime under physically suitable assumptions, except for the global causality condition in the Hawking - Penrose singularity theorems. Instead of the global causality condition, we impose some restrictions on the causality violating sets to show the occurrence of singularities.

  13. The Search for Fundamental Symmetry Violation in Radium Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Matthew; Bishof, Michael; Bailey, Kevin; Greene, John; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Rabga, Tenzin; Ready, Roy; Singh, Jaideep

    2017-09-01

    Electric dipole moments (EDMs) are signatures of time-reversal, parity, and charge-parity (CP) violation, which makes them a sensitive probe of expected new physics beyond the Standard Model. Due to its large nuclear octupole deformation and high atomic mass, the radioactive Ra-225 isotope is a favorable EDM case; it is particularly sensitive to CP-violating interactions in the nuclear medium. We have developed a cold-atom approach of measuring the atomic EDM of atoms held stationary in an optical dipole trap, which we have used to place the only upper limit on the EDM of radium, |d(225Ra)|<1.4×23 e-cm. This is not only the first time laser-cooled atoms have been used to measure an EDM, but also the first time the EDM of any octupole deformed species has been measured. We will present results on a new approach to spin detection that we expect to improve our EDM sensitivity by a factor of 20. Combined with upcoming improvements to our electric field generation, the next measurement should be competitive with the best neutron EDM result, in terms of sensitivity to CP-violating interactions. The Search for Fudamental Symmetry Violation in Radium Nuclei. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Towards a complete A4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; de Anda, Francisco J.; de Medeiros Varzielas, Ivo; King, Stephen F.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a renormalisable model based on A 4 family symmetry with an SU(5) grand unified theory (GUT) which leads to the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with a ℤ9 × ℤ6 symmetry provides the fermion mass hierarchy in both the quark and lepton sectors, while ℤ {4/ R } symmetry is broken to ℤ {2/ R }, identified as usual R-parity. Proton decay is highly sup-pressed by these symmetries. The strong CP problem is solved in a similar way to the Nelson-Barr mechanism. We discuss both the A 4 and SU(5) symmetry breaking sectors, including doublet-triplet splitting, Higgs mixing and the origin of the μ term. The model provides an excellent fit (better than one sigma) to all quark and lepton (including neu-trino) masses and mixing with spontaneous CP violation. With the A 4 vacuum alignments, (0, 1, 1) and (1, 3, 1), the model predicts the entire PMNS mixing matrix with no free pa-rameters, up to a relative phase, selected to be 2π/3 from a choice of the nine complex roots of unity, which is identified as the leptogenesis phase. The model predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy with leptonic angles θ{13/ ι } ≈ 8.7∘, θ{12/ ι } ≈ 34∘, θ{23/ ι } ≈ 46∘ and an oscillation phase δ ι ≈ - 87∘.

  15. Parity-time-symmetric teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra'di, Y.; Sounas, D. L.; Alù, A.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    We show that electromagnetic plane waves can be fully "teleported" through thin, nearly fully reflective sheets, assisted by a pair of parity-time-symmetric lossy and active sheets in front and behind the screen. The proposed structure is able to almost perfectly absorb incident waves over a wide range of frequency and incidence angles, while waves having a specific frequency and incidence angle are replicated behind the structure in synchronization with the input signal. It is shown that the proposed structure can be designed to teleport waves at any desired frequency and incidence angle. Furthermore, we generalize the proposed concept to the case of teleportation of electromagnetic waves over electrically long distances, enabling full absorption at one surface and the synthesis of the same signal at another point located electrically far away from the first surface. The physical principle behind this selective teleportation is discussed, and similarities and differences with tunneling and cloaking concepts based on PT symmetry are investigated. From the application point of view, the proposed structure works as an extremely selective filter, both in frequency and spatial domains.

  16. The pill, parity, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spector, T D; Roman, E; Silman, A J

    1990-06-01

    We report on a case-control study investigating the relationship of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use and parity to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Women with RA were compared with 2 separate control groups, women with osteoarthritis (OA) and women randomly selected from a population-based electoral register. Nulliparity was found to be a risk factor for the development of RA, with age-adjusted odds ratios of 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.03) versus the OA control group and 1.83 (95% CI 1.03-3.06) versus the population control group. Use of OCPs before the age of 35 was negatively associated with RA (odds ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.29-1.12 versus the OA control group; odds ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.30-1.17 versus the population control group). Some evidence of a duration-response effect was seen, although the numbers were small. The 2 variables were also multiplicative, with nulliparous non-OCP users having a 4-fold risk of RA compared with parous OCP users. These findings suggest that pregnancy and OCP use have a "protective effect" on the development of RA, although the mechanism remains unclear.

  17. Optical signatures of parity anomaly in a gapped graphene-like system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C X; Qiu, X G

    2017-05-24

    Parity anomaly refers to the violation of coordinate reflection symmetry induced by the quantum fluctuations. It is proposed to exist in a graphene-like system with a finite bare mass for Dirac fermions, and manifests itself as a parity-violating quantum correction to the current of each species of fermions. Coulomb interaction greatly increases the fermion mass, and produces various types of excitons. Of particular interest is the ρ-exciton, which is directly connected to parity anomaly and can be generated by absorbing a specific photon. The exciton is a particle-hole bound state, and can be regarded as condensed-matter analogue of meson composed of quark-anti-quark pair. By virtue of this correspondence, we analyze the optical conductivity and calculate the mass of ρ-exciton by employing the Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov sum rule method that is widely used in the studies of hadron phenomenology. We show that ρ-exciton leads to a sharp peak in the optical conductivity, which is observable in optical experiments. Moreover, we study the impact of scalar-like excitons on two-photon processes by computing the decay amplitude, and also find peaks in the Raman spectra.

  18. Lorentz-violating gravitoelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2010-09-15

    The well-known analogy between a special limit of general relativity and electromagnetism is explored in the context of the Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. An analogy is developed for the minimal standard-model extension that connects a limit of the CPT-even component of the electromagnetic sector to the gravitational sector. We show that components of the post-Newtonian metric can be directly obtained from solutions to the electromagnetic sector. The method is illustrated with specific examples including static and rotating sources. Some unconventional effects that arise for Lorentz-violating electrostatics and magnetostatics have an analog in Lorentz-violating post-Newtonian gravity. In particular, we show that evenmore » for static sources, gravitomagnetic fields arise in the presence of Lorentz violation.« less

  19. Causality violation and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriele, Marcus

    The relation between causality violation and the existence of singularities in general relativity is explored. A generalization of the singularity theorem of Hawking and Penrose (1970) to a wide class of spacetimes with causality violations is found. The generalization is the only one that preserves the original idea of the theorem and does not demand further conditions on the energy momentum tensor. By quoting an example of Newman (1989a) it is shown that the generalization is unlikely to be extended. A similar generalization for a theorem of Hawking (1967) asserting the occurrence of a singularity in the past of a trapped point was also found. Every compact component of the boundary of the chronology violating set contains almost closed incomplete null geodesics. Moreover, it is not a C2 submanifold. As a consequence chronology violation that does not extend to infinity causes singularities.

  20. Causality violation and singularities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriele, M.

    1990-09-01

    The author explores the relation between causality violation and the existence of singularities in general relativity. The main results are: I. A generalization of the singularity theorem of Hawking and Penrose (1970) to a wide class of spacetimes with causality violations. This generalization is the only one that preserves the original idea of the theorem and does not demand further conditions on the energy momentum tensor. By quoting an example of Newman (1989) the author shows that the generalization is unlikely to be extended. II. A similar generalization for a theorem of Hawking (1967) asserting the occurrence of a singularity in the past of a trapped point. III. Every compact component of the boundary of the chronology violating set contains almost closed incomplete null geodesics. Moreover, it is not a C2-submanifold. As a consequence chronology violation that does not extend to infinity causes singularities.

  1. Automaticity in Stimulus-Parity Synaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Dumbalska, Tsvetomira; Duta, Mihaela D.; Nation, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Automaticity is a defining characteristic of synaesthesia. Here, we assess for automaticity in stimulus-parity synaesthesia; a subtype that has been documented only 3 times in the literature. Synaesthete R experiences many (nonnumerical) stimuli as being odd or even. She described a toy shape-sorter, which paired odd shapes with even colour slots (and vice versa) and relayed difficulties with the incongruency created by this simple toy. Inspired by this anecdote, we devised a computerised task in which Synaesthete R (and 10 control participants) indicated the location of a target shape, which was presented on a coloured bar. Synaesthete R (but not control participants) was faster to report the location of target shapes presented on colours of congruent synaesthetic parity, relative to target shapes presented on colours of incongruent synaesthetic parity. These results constitute the first objective demonstration as to the automatic nature of associations in stimulus-parity synaesthesia. PMID:29147548

  2. Parity partners in the baryon resonance spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ya; Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D.; ...

    2017-07-28

    Here, we describe a calculation of the spectrum of flavor-SU(3) octet and decuplet baryons, their parity partners, and the radial excitations of these systems, made using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector x vector contact interaction as the foundation for the relevant few-body equations. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking generates nonpointlike diquarks within these baryons and hence, using the contact interaction, flavor-antitriplet scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and flavor-sextet axial-vector quark-quark correlations can all play active roles. The model yields reasonable masses for all systems studied and Faddeev amplitudes for ground states and associated parity partners that sketch a realistic picture of theirmore » internal structure: ground-state, even-parity baryons are constituted, almost exclusively, from like-parity diquark correlations, but orbital angular momentum plays an important role in the rest-frame wave functions of odd-parity baryons, whose Faddeev amplitudes are dominated by odd-parity diquarks.« less

  3. Lorentz violation and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2007-08-01

    This work explores the theoretical and experimental aspects of Lorentz violation in gravity. A set of modified Einstein field equations is derived from the general Lorentz-violating Standard-Model Extension (SME). Some general theoretical implications of these results are discussed. The experimental consequences for weak-field gravitating systems are explored in the Earth- laboratory setting, the solar system, and beyond. The role of spontaneous Lorentz-symmetry breaking is discussed in the context of the pure-gravity sector of the SME. To establish the low-energy effective Einstein field equations, it is necessary to take into account the dynamics of 20 coefficients for Lorentz violation. As an example, the results are compared with bumblebee models, which are general theories of vector fields with spontaneous Lorentz violation. The field equations are evaluated in the post- newtonian limit using a perfect fluid description of matter. The post-newtonian metric of the SME is derived and compared with some standard test models of gravity. The possible signals for Lorentz violation due to gravity-sector coefficients are studied. Several new effects are identified that have experimental implications for current and future tests. Among the unconventional effects are a new type of spin precession for a gyroscope in orbit and a modification to the local gravitational acceleration on the Earth's surface. These and other tests are expected to yield interesting sensitivities to dimensionless gravity- sector coefficients.

  4. Causality violations and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriele, Marcus

    1990-06-01

    We announce and justify two theorems (proofs will appear in Refs. 1 and 2): i) A generalization of the singularity theorem of Hawking and Penrose [3] to space-times with chronology violations. Although it is impossible to remove the chronology condition completely the announced theorem is in a well defined sense optimal: the chronology condition is replaced by a strictly weaker condition that cannot be removed because of counter examples, ii) If the chronology violating setV has compact closure and the strong energy and generic conditions hold, thenV is generated by incomplete null geodesics. It follows that if the region of causality violation does not extend to infinity thenV contains singularities.

  5. Are Causality Violations Undesirable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Hunter

    2008-11-01

    Causality violations are typically seen as unrealistic and undesirable features of a physical model. The following points out three reasons why causality violations, which Bonnor and Steadman identified even in solutions to the Einstein equation referring to ordinary laboratory situations, are not necessarily undesirable. First, a space-time in which every causal curve can be extended into a closed causal curve is singularity free—a necessary property of a globally applicable physical theory. Second, a causality-violating space-time exhibits a nontrivial topology—no closed timelike curve (CTC) can be homotopic among CTCs to a point, or that point would not be causally well behaved—and nontrivial topology has been explored as a model of particles. Finally, if every causal curve in a given space-time passes through an event horizon, a property which can be called “causal censorship”, then that space-time with event horizons excised would still be causally well behaved.

  6. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power.

    PubMed

    Snow, W M; Anderson, E; Barrón-Palos, L; Bass, C D; Bass, T D; Crawford, B E; Crawford, C; Dawkins, J M; Esposito, D; Fry, J; Gardiner, H; Gan, K; Haddock, C; Heckel, B R; Holley, A T; Horton, J C; Huffer, C; Lieffers, J; Luo, D; Maldonado-Velázquez, M; Markoff, D M; Micherdzinska, A M; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Sarsour, M; Santra, S; Sharapov, E I; Swanson, H E; Walbridge, S B; Zhumabekova, V

    2015-05-01

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10(-7) rad/m.

  7. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Bass, T. D.

    2015-05-15

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10{sup −7} rad/m.

  8. CP violation and vacuum alignment in technicolor theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rador, Tonguc

    2002-09-01

    In this work we show that the violation of the combined symmetry of charge conjugation and parity (CP) can be understood in technicolor theories that aim at an explanation of the dynamics of breaking of electroweak symmetries and mass generation for matter. The mechanism we use is vacuum alignment. Vacuum alignment can be understood as the lifting by a perturbation of the vacuum state degeneracy of a theory which admits a spontaneously broken global symmetry. Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs when the ground state of a theory does not have the full symmetry of the hamiltonian. In such a theory, one defines the CP operator with respect to a standard vacuum which is chosen from among the degenerate ones in the absence of the perturbation. Since, in the presence of a perturbation, vacuum alignment determines which of the degenerate vacua (not necessarily the standard choice) will yield the smallest vacuum energy, this mechanism can alter the CP structure of a theory. CP violation in the standard model of particle physics occurs in two different ways. One stems from the rich vacuum structure of the theory of quark interactions; this form is called strong CP violation. The other is due to the presence of a complex number in the standard model Lagrangian; this form is called weak CP violation. In nature only the weak form has been observed. The absence of strong CP violation presents a challenge because theoretically one expects this effect to be large. We show that both the absence of strong CP violation and the presence of weak CP violation can be explained via vacuum alignment within the context of technicolor theories without arbitrary fine tuning of the parameters. We also show that one popular variant of technicolor theories, known as topcolor assisted technicolor (proposed to explain the fact that the top quark is very much heavier than the other quarks) is strongly constrained by experimental data on mixing effects of neutral B-mesons.

  9. Flavor violating Higgs decays

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kopp, Joachim; Zupan, Jure

    2013-03-01

    We study a class of nonstandard interactions of the newly discovered 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance that are especially interesting probes of new physics: flavor violating Higgs couplings to leptons and quarks. These interaction can arise in many frameworks of new physics at the electroweak scale such as two Higgs doublet models, extra dimensions, or models of compositeness. We rederive constraints on flavor violating Higgs couplings using data on rare decays, electric and magnetic dipole moments, and meson oscillations. We confirm that flavor violating Higgs boson decays to leptons can be sizeable with, e.g., h → τμ and h → τemore » branching ratios of (10%) perfectly allowed by low energy constraints. We estimate the current LHC limits on h → τμ and h → τe decays by recasting existing searches for the SM Higgs in the ττ channel and find that these bounds are already stronger than those from rare tau decays. We also show that these limits can be improved significantly with dedicated searches and we outline a possible search strategy. Flavor violating Higgs decays therefore present an opportunity for discovery of new physics which in some cases may be easier to access experimentally than flavor conserving deviations from the Standard Model Higgs framework.« less

  10. Learn About FCA Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about EPA's issued notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. and FCA US LLC. The NOV alleges that FCA installed software that circumvents EPA emissions standards for certain air pollutants.

  11. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations or...

  12. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10 Violations...

  13. Gravitational parity anomaly with and without boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkov, Maxim; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we consider gravitational parity anomaly in three and four dimensions. We start with a re-computation of this anomaly on a 3D manifold without boundaries and with a critical comparison of our results to the previous calculations. Then we compute the anomaly on 4D manifolds with boundaries with local bag boundary conditions. We find, that gravitational parity anomaly is localized on the boundary and contains a gravitational Chern-Simons terms together with a term depending of the extrinsic curvature. We also discuss the main properties of the anomaly, as the conformal invariance, relations between 3D and 4D anomalies, etc.

  14. Obstacles to Gender Parity in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohatynskyj, Marta; Davidson, Valerie; Stiver, Warren; Hayward, Maren

    2008-01-01

    Low rates of women's enrolment in engineering programs has been identified as a global problem within the general concern to enable women to attain parity in education in all areas. A Western women in engineering meta-narrative is identified which contains a complex of obstacles that typify the situation of Western women. The question is asked…

  15. Systemic sclerosis, birth order and parity.

    PubMed

    Russo, Paul A J; Lester, Susan; Roberts-Thomson, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    A recent study identified increasing birth order to be a risk factor for the development of systemic sclerosis (SSc). This finding supports the theory that transplacental microchimerism may be a key pathological event in the initiation of SSc. We investigated the relationship between birth order and parity and the age of onset of SSc in South Australia. A retrospective analysis of patient data in the South Australian Scleroderma Register was performed. Data were obtained from a mailed questionnaire. Control data was collected prospectively using a similar questionnaire. The relationship between birth order, family size or parity and risk of subsequent development of SSc was analyzed by mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and eighty-seven index probands were identified and compared with 457 controls. Controls were well matched for gender, but not for age. No statistically significant relationship was identified between SSc and birth order, parity in females, family size, age at first pregnancy in females or gender of first child in parous females. Our data suggests that parity, age at first pregnancy and the gender of the first child are not relevant factors in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SSc. Birth order and family size in both genders also appears irrelevant. These results argue against microchimerism as being relevant in the pathogenesis of SSc and add further support to the theory that stochastic events may be important in the etiopathogenesis of SSc. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Nonlinear parity readout with a microwave photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöndorf, M.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2018-04-01

    Robust high-fidelity parity measurement is an important operation in many applications of quantum computing. In this work we show how in a circuit QED architecture, one can measure parity in a single shot at very high contrast by taking advantage of the nonlinear behavior of a strongly driven microwave cavity coupled to one or multiple qubits. We work in a nonlinear dispersive regime treated in an exact dispersive transformation. We show that appropriate tuning of experimental parameters leads to very high contrast in the cavity and therefore to a high-efficiency parity readout with a microwave photon counter or another amplitude detector. These tuning conditions are based on nonlinearity and are hence more robust than previously described linear tuning schemes. In the first part of the paper we show in detail how to achieve this for two-qubit parity measurements and extend this to N qubits in the second part of the paper. We also study the quantum nondemolition character of the protocol.

  17. One plus two-body random matrix ensembles with parity: Density of states and parity ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Manan; Srivastava, P. C.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2011-06-15

    One plus two-body embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices with parity [EGOE(1+2)-{pi}] generated by a random two-body interaction (modeled by GOE in two-particle spaces) in the presence of a mean field for spinless identical fermion systems is defined, generalizing the two-body ensemble with parity analyzed by Papenbrock and Weidenmueller [Phys. Rev. C 78, 054305 (2008)], in terms of two mixing parameters and a gap between the positive ({pi}=+) and negative ({pi}=-) parity single-particle (sp) states. Numerical calculations are used to demonstrate, using realistic values of the mixing parameters appropriate for some nuclei, that the EGOE(1+2)-{pi} ensemble generates Gaussian formmore » (with corrections) for fixed parity eigenvalue densities (i.e., state densities). The random matrix model also generates many features in parity ratios of state densities that are similar to those predicted by a method based on the Fermi-gas model for nuclei. We have also obtained, by applying the formulation due to Chang et al. [Ann. Phys. (NY) 66, 137 (1971)], a simple formula for the spectral variances defined over fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) spaces, where m{sub 1} is the number of fermions in the positive parity sp states and m{sub 2} is the number of fermions in the negative parity sp states. Similarly, using the binary correlation approximation, in the dilute limit, we have derived expressions for the lowest two-shape parameters. The smoothed densities generated by the sum of fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) Gaussians with lowest two-shape corrections describe the numerical results in many situations. The model also generates preponderance of positive parity ground states for small values of the mixing parameters, and this is a feature seen in nuclear shell-model results.« less

  18. General minimal flavor violation

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Alexander L.; Perez, Gilad; YITP, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3840

    2009-10-01

    A model independent study of the minimal flavor violation (MFV) framework is presented, where the only sources of flavor breaking at low energy are the up and down Yukawa matrices. Two limits are identified for the Yukawa coupling expansion: linear MFV, where it is truncated at the leading terms, and nonlinear MFV, where such a truncation is not possible due to large third generation Yukawa couplings. These are then resummed to all orders using nonlinear {sigma}-model techniques familiar from models of collective breaking. Generically, flavor-diagonal CP violating (CPV) sources in the UV can induce O(1) CPV in processes involving thirdmore » generation quarks. Because of a residual U(2) symmetry, the extra CPV in B{sub d}-B{sub d} mixing is bounded by CPV in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing. If operators with right-handed light quarks are subdominant, the extra CPV is equal in the two systems, and is negligible in processes involving only the first two generations. We find large enhancements in the up-type sector, both in CPV in D-D mixing and in top flavor violation.« less

  19. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  20. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  1. Parity Non-Conservation Measurements with Photons at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Advanced Photon Science Research Center, JAERI, Kizu 619-0215; Kawase, K.

    2005-11-21

    The asymmetries in the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) processes with a circular polarized photon beam are shown to be a good tool for studying the parity non-conservation (PNC) in nuclei. The PNC asymmetry measurements both in exciting the parity doublet states and in exciting the discrete states near the ground states with parity mixing are discussed.

  2. RETRACTED: Measurement of parity violation in the capture of polarized neutrons on 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, S.

    2014-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of Author and agreed by the Editors. The author unwittingly used certain data from a collaboration that he was not entitled to use. The author would like to apologize for this error, which was made in good faith. As a consequence, pages 37-60 originally occupied by the retracted article are missing from the printed issue. The publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause.

  3. Cruzan: no rights violated.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    1990-01-01

    In its September/October 1990 issue, the Hastings Center Report published six brief essays with a short introduction by Courtney S. Campbell under the collective title of "Cruzan: clear and convincing?" These articles present a range of responses from participants, parents, constitutional scholars, and caregivers to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health (June 25, 1990). Legal scholar John A. Robertson argues that Cruzan was rightly decided, not because persons like Nancy Cruzan in a persistent vegetative state should be sustained indefinitely, but because sustaining them does not violate any party's constitutional rights.

  4. Excited negative parity bands in 160Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Curien, D.; Dedes, I.; Mazurek, K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Rajbanshi, S.; Bisoi, A.; de Angelis, G.; Bhattacharya, Soumik; Bhattacharyya, S.; Biswas, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Das Gupta, S.; Dey, B.; Goswami, A.; Mondal, D.; Pandit, D.; Palit, R.; Roy, T.; Singh, R. P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.

    2018-03-01

    Negative parity rotational bands in {} 70160Yb{}90 nucleus have been studied. They were populated in the 148Sm(16O, 4n)160Yb reaction at 90 MeV. The gamma-coincidence data have been collected using Indian National Gamma Array composed of twenty Compton suppressed clover germanium (Ge) detectors. Double gating on triple gamma coincidence data were selectively used to develop the decay scheme for these negative parity bands by identifying and taking care of the multiplet transitions. The even- and odd-spin negative parity bands in 160Yb have been studied by comparing the reduced transition probability ratios with the similar bands in neighbouring even-even rare earth nuclei. It is concluded that the concerned odd-spin and even-spin bands are not signature partners and that their structures are compatible with those of the ‘pear-shape’ and ‘pyramid-shape’ oscillations, respectively, the octupole shapes superposed with the quadrupole shape of the ground-state.

  5. The "parity" anomaly on an unorientable manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Edward

    2016-11-01

    The "parity" anomaly—more accurately described as an anomaly in time-reversal or reflection symmetry—arises in certain theories of fermions coupled to gauge fields and/or gravity in a spacetime of odd dimension. This anomaly has traditionally been studied on orientable manifolds only, but recent developments involving topological superconductors have made it clear that one can get more information by asking what happens on an unorientable manifold. In this paper, we give a full description of the "parity" anomaly for fermions coupled to gauge fields and gravity in 2 +1 dimensions on a possibly unorientable spacetime. We consider an application to topological superconductors and another application to M theory. The application to topological superconductors involves using knowledge of the "parity" anomaly as an ingredient in constructing gapped boundary states of these systems and in particular in gapping the boundary of a ν =16 system in a topologically trivial fashion. The application to M theory involves showing the consistency of the path integral of an M theory membrane on a possibly unorientable worldvolume. In the past, this has been done only in the orientable case.

  6. New Implications of Lorentz Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colladay, Don

    2004-01-01

    In this proceedings, I summarize two recently discovered theoretical implications that Lorentz violation has on physical systems. First, I discuss new models for neutrino oscillations in which relatively simple combinations of Lorentz-violating parameters can mimic the major features of the current neutrino oscillation data. Second, I will present results on Yang-Mills instantons in Lorentz-violating background fields. An explicit solution is presented for unit winding number in SU(2).

  7. State Parity Laws and Access to Treatment for Substance Use Disorder in the United States: Implications for Federal Parity Legislation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hefei; Cummings, Janet R.; Hockenberry, Jason M.; Gaydos, Laura M.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Context The passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) and the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) incorporated parity for substance use disorder (SUD) into federal legislation. Yet prior research provides us with scant evidence as to whether federal parity legislation will hold the potential for improving access to SUD treatment. Objective This study examined the effect of state-level SUD parity laws on state-aggregate SUD treatment rates from 2000 to 2008, to shed light on the impact of the recent federal-level SUD parity legislation. Design A quasi-experimental study design using a two-way (state and year) fixed-effect method Setting and Participants All known specialty SUD treatment facilities in the United States Interventions State-level SUD parity laws between 2000 and 2008 Main Outcome Measures State-aggregate SUD treatment rates in: (1) all specialty SUD treatment facilities, and (2) specialty SUD treatment facilities accepting private insurance Results The implementation of any SUD parity law increased the treatment rate by 9 percent (p<0.01) in all specialty SUD treatment facilities and by 15 percent (p<0.05) in facilities accepting private insurance. Full parity and parity-if-offered (i.e., parity only if SUD coverage is offered) increased SUD treatment rate by 13 percent (p<0.05) and 8 percent (p<0.05) in all facilities, and by 21 percent (p<0.05) and 10 percent (p<0.05) in those accepting private insurance. Conclusions We found a positive effect of the implementation of state SUD parity legislation on access to specialty SUD treatment. Furthermore, the positive association was more pronounced in states with more comprehensive parity laws. Our findings suggest that federal parity legislation holds the potential to improve access to SUD treatment. PMID:24154931

  8. Induced parity nonconserving interaction and enhancement of two-nucleon parity nonconserving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V.V.; Vorov, O.K.

    1995-03-01

    The two-nucleon parity nonconserving (PNC) interaction induced by the single-particle PNC weak potential and the two-nucleon residual strong interaction is considered. An approximate analytical formula for this induced PNC interaction (IPNCI) between proton and neutron is derived [[ital Q]([bold r][sigma][sub [ital p

  9. Observation of Direct CP Violation in $$K_{S,L} \\to \\pi \\pi$$ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Shawhan, Peter Sven

    1999-12-01

    This thesis concerns the fundamental symmetry properties of elementary particle interactions. Specifically, it is an experimental investigation of the slight violation of CP symmetry (the combination of charge conjugation and parity inversion) by the weak force. We have used data from the KTeV experiment, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), to compare the decay rates of the short- and long-lived neutral K mesons (more » $$K_S$$ and $$K_L$$) to $$\\pi^+\\pi^-$$ and $$\\pi^0\\pi^0$$ final states. From this comparison, we find that the \\direct" CP-violation parameter Re($$\\epsilon^{\\prime}$$/$$\\epsilon$$) is equal to (28.0 $$\\pm$$ 3.0 $$\\pm$$ 2.8)$$\\pm$$ $$10^{-4}$$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This nonzero result definitively establishes the existence of CP violation in a decay process« less

  10. Superconducting parity effect across the Anderson limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlaic, Sergio; Pons, Stéphane; Zhang, Tianzhen; Assouline, Alexandre; Zimmers, Alexandre; David, Christophe; Rodary, Guillemin; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Roditchev, Dimitri; Aubin, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    How small can superconductors be? For isolated nanoparticles subject to quantum size effects, P.W. Anderson in 1959 conjectured that superconductivity could only exist when the electronic level spacing δ is smaller than the superconducting gap energy Δ. Here we report a scanning tunnelling spectroscopy study of superconducting lead (Pb) nanocrystals grown on the (110) surface of InAs. We find that for nanocrystals of lateral size smaller than the Fermi wavelength of the 2D electron gas at the surface of InAs, the electronic transmission of the interface is weak; this leads to Coulomb blockade and enables the extraction of electron addition energy of the nanocrystals. For large nanocrystals, the addition energy displays superconducting parity effect, a direct consequence of Cooper pairing. Studying this parity effect as a function of nanocrystal volume, we find the suppression of Cooper pairing when the mean electronic level spacing overcomes the superconducting gap energy, thus demonstrating unambiguously the validity of the Anderson criterion. PMID:28240294

  11. Cherenkov Detectors for Precision Parity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Tyler; Prex Collaboration; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Fused silica Cherenkov detectors are ideal for measuring high-rate fluxes of charged particles. The parity program at Jefferson Lab relies on these detectors to measure cross section asymmetries, some of which are predicted to be on the order of tens of parts per billion. Given the required precision of such experiments, it is important that the resolution of these detectors is minimized. Detectors must be optimized while conforming to the physics and engineering constraints of a specific experiment. Two upcoming JLab experiments that will utilize Cherenkov detectors are the Lead (Pb) Radius EXperiment (PREX) and Measurement Of a Lepton-Lepton Electroweak Reaction (MOLLER). PREX will constrain the neutron equation of state by measuring the neutron skin thickness of 208Pb. MOLLER will test the Standard Model by providing the most precise low-energy measurement of the weak mixing angle. Several detector prototypes have been designed, tested, and simulated to meet the demands of PREX and MOLLER. Presented here is a summary of ongoing work to design state-of-the-art Cherenkov detectors for precision parity experiments.

  12. State parity laws and access to treatment for substance use disorder in the United States: implications for federal parity legislation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hefei; Cummings, Janet R; Hockenberry, Jason M; Gaydos, Laura M; Druss, Benjamin G

    2013-12-01

    The passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the 2010 Affordable Care Act incorporated parity for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment into federal legislation. However, prior research provides us with scant evidence as to whether federal parity legislation will hold the potential for improving access to SUD treatment. To examine the effect of state-level SUD parity laws on state-aggregate SUD treatment rates and to shed light on the impact of the recent federal SUD parity legislation. We conducted a quasi-experimental study using a 2-way (state and year) fixed-effect method. We included all known specialty SUD treatment facilities in the United States and examined treatment rates from October 1, 2000, through March 31, 2008. Our main source of data was the National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services, which provides facility-level information on specialty SUD treatment. State-level SUD parity laws during the study period. State-aggregate SUD treatment rates in (1) all specialty SUD treatment facilities and (2) specialty SUD treatment facilities accepting private insurance. The implementation of any SUD parity law increased the treatment rate by 9% (P < .001) in all specialty SUD treatment facilities and by 15% (P = .02) in facilities accepting private insurance. Full parity and parity only if SUD coverage is offered increased the SUD treatment rate by 13% (P = .02) and 8% (P = .04), respectively, in all facilities and by 21% (P = .03) and 10% (P = .04), respectively, in facilities accepting private insurance. We found a positive effect of the implementation of state SUD parity legislation on access to specialty SUD treatment. Furthermore, the positive association is more pronounced in states with more comprehensive parity laws. Our findings suggest that federal parity legislation holds the potential to improve access to SUD treatment.

  13. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for anything of value; or (2) Obtaining or giving anyone a competitive advantage in the award of a... GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations or...

  14. Studies of parity and time reversal symmetries in neutron scattering from165Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, D. G.; Gould, C. R.; Koster, J. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Seagondollar, L. W.; Soderstrum, J. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Zhu, X.

    1988-12-01

    We describe searches for parity and time reversal violations in the scattering of polarized neutrons from polarized and aligned165Ho targets. We have completed a search with 7.1 and 11.0 MeV neutrons for PoddTodd terms in the elastic scattering forward amplitude of the form s. ( I×K), where s is the neutron spin, I is the target spin and k is the neutron momentum vector. The target was a single crystal of holmium, polarized horizontally along its b axis by a 1 Tesla magnetic field. The neutrons were polarized vertically. Differences in the neutron transmission were measured for neutrons with spins parallel (antiparallel) to I×k. The P,T violating analyzing powers were found to be consistent with zero at the few 10-3 level: ρP,T(7.1 MeV)=-0.88 (±2.02) x 10-3, ρP,T(11.0 MeV)=-0.4 (±2.88) x 10-3. We have also attempted to find enhancements with MeV neutrons in P-violation due to the term s k. We are preparing an aligned target cryostat for investigations of PevenTodd terms {bd(Ik)(I×k)s} in neutron scattering. The target will be a single crystal cylinder of165Ho cooled to 100 mK in a bath of liquid helium and rotated by a shaft from a room temperature stepping motor. The cylinder will be oriented vertically and the alignment ( c) axis oriented horizontally. Warming or rotation of the sample allows one to separate effects that mimic the sought-after time reversal violating term.

  15. Measurement of parity non-conservation in cesium using two-pathway coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Yao De George; Choi, Jungu; Elliott, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Atomic parity violation measurements provide a way to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. They can provide constraints on conjectures of a massive Z' boson or a light boson, or searches of dark energy. Using the two-pathway coherent control techniques developed by our group, we plan a new measurement of EPNC on the cesium 6S -> 7S transition. We coherently interfere a 2-photon transition with the Stark and PNC transition to amplify and extract the PNC amplitude. This should result in much smaller systematic effects as compared to those of previous measurements of EPNC. Previously, we have measured the magnetic dipole transition moment on the same 6S -> 7S transition to about 0.4% uncertainty. We discuss improvements made to the system to date and our plans for further upgrades towards an EPNC measurement. Key systematics and how we plan to overcome them will also be detailed. NSF Grant: PHY-1607603.

  16. CP-violating effect of the Th nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment: accurate many-body study of ThO.

    PubMed

    Skripnikov, L V; Petrov, A N; Titov, A V; Flambaum, V V

    2014-12-31

    Investigations of CP violation in the hadron sector may be done using measurements in the ThO molecule. Recent measurements in this molecule improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Another time-reversal (T) and parity (P)-violating effect in 229ThO is induced by the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. We perform nuclear and molecular calculations to express this effect in terms of the strength constants of T, P-odd nuclear forces, neutron EDM, QCD vacuum angle θ, quark EDM, and chromo-EDM.

  17. Parity-time-symmetric quantum critical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Yuto; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic non-conservative systems with parity-time (PT) symmetric gain-loss structures can exhibit unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking that accompanies spectral singularity. Recent studies on PT symmetry in optics and weakly interacting open quantum systems have revealed intriguing physical properties, yet many-body correlations still play no role. Here by extending the idea of PT symmetry to strongly correlated many-body systems, we report that a combination of spectral singularity and quantum criticality yields an exotic universality class which has no counterpart in known critical phenomena. Moreover, we find unconventional low-dimensional quantum criticality, where superfluid correlation is anomalously enhanced owing to non-monotonic renormalization group flows in a PT-symmetry-broken quantum critical phase, in stark contrast to the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless paradigm. Our findings can be experimentally tested in ultracold atoms and predict critical phenomena beyond the Hermitian paradigm of quantum many-body physics.

  18. 12 CFR 560.220 - Alternative Mortgage Transaction Parity Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternative Mortgage Transaction Parity Act... LENDING AND INVESTMENT Alternative Mortgage Transactions § 560.220 Alternative Mortgage Transaction Parity... union, or a federal savings association, may make an alternative mortgage transaction as defined at 12 U...

  19. On Design of Parity Preserving Reversible Adder Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghparast, Majid; Bolhassani, Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this paper novel parity preserving reversible logic blocks are presented and verified. Then, we present cost-effective parity preserving reversible implementations of Full Adder, 4:2 Compressor, Binary to BCD converter, and BCD adder using these blocks. The proposed parity preserving reversible BCD adder is designed by cascading the presented 4-digit parity preserving reversible Full Adder and a parity preserving reversible Binary to BCD Converter. In this design, instead of realizing the detection and correction unit, we design a Binary to BCD converter that its inputs are the output of parity preserving binary adder, and its output is a parity preserving BCD digit. In addition, several theorems on the numbers of garbage outputs, constant inputs, quantum cost and delay of the designs have been presented to show its optimality. In the presented circuits, the delay and the quantum cost are reduced by deriving designs based on the proposed parity preserving reversible blocks. The advantages of the proposed designs over the existing ones are quantitatively described and analysed. All the scales are in the Nano-metric area.

  20. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  1. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  2. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  3. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  4. Poincare gauge theory of gravity: Friedman cosmology with even and odd parity modes: Analytic part

    SciTech Connect

    Baekler, Peter; Hehl, Friedrich W.; Nester, James M.

    2011-01-15

    We propose a cosmological model in the framework of the Poincare gauge theory of gravity (PG). The gravitational Lagrangian is quadratic in both curvature and torsion. In our specific model, the Lagrangian contains (i) the curvature scalar R and the curvature pseudoscalar X linearly and quadratically (including an RX term) and (ii) pieces quadratic in the torsion vector V and the torsion axial vector A (including a VA term). We show generally that in quadratic PG models we have nearly the same number of parity conserving terms ('world') and of parity violating terms ('shadow world'). This offers new perspectives inmore » cosmology for the coupling of gravity to matter and antimatter. Our specific model generalizes the fairly realistic ''torsion cosmologies'' of Shie-Nester-Yo (2008) and Chen et al. (2009). With a Friedman type ansatz for an orthonormal coframe and a Lorentz connection, we derive the two field equations of PG in an explicit form and discuss their general structure in detail. In particular, the second field equation can be reduced to first order ordinary differential equations for the curvature pieces R(t) and X(t). Including these along with certain relations obtained from the first field equation and curvature definitions, we present a first order system of equations suitable for numerical evaluation. This is deferred to the second, numerical part of this paper.« less

  5. Nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fengcheng; Martin, Ivar

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments indicate that superconductivity in Bi2Se3 intercalated with Cu, Nb, or Sr is nematic with rotational symmetry breaking. Motivated by this observation, we present a model study of nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations. We show that odd-parity fluctuations in the two-component Eu representation of D3 d crystal point group can generate attractive interaction in both the even-parity s -wave and odd-parity Eu pairing channels, but repulsive interaction in other odd-parity pairing channels. Coulomb repulsion can suppress s -wave pairing relative to Eu pairing, and thus the latter can have a higher critical temperature. Eu pairing has two distinct phases: a nematic phase and a chiral phase, both of which can be realized in our model. When s -wave and Eu pairings have similar instability temperature, we find an intermediate phase in which both types of pairing coexist.

  6. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user: (1... with the terms of the contract. (4) Filing a false claim. (5) Misusing an authorization. (b) Effect of...

  7. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.42 Violation procedures. (a) Scope. This section prescribes the regulations dealing with contract violations... contract violation has occurred. (b) Determination by contracting officer. On notification that a contract...

  8. Leading singularities of the two-loop six-particle maximally helicity violating amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2008-11-01

    We use the leading singularity technique to determine the planar six-particle two-loop maximally helicity violating amplitude in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory in terms of a simple basis of integrals. Our result for the parity-even part of the amplitude agrees with the one recently presented in . The parity-odd part of the amplitude is a new result. The leading singularity technique reduces the determination of the amplitude to finding the solution to a system of linear equations. The system of equations is easily found by computing residues. We present the complete system of equations, which determines the whole amplitude, and solve the two-by-two blocks analytically. Larger blocks are solved numerically in order to test the Anastasiou Bern Dixon Kosower/Bern Dixon Smirnov iterative structure.

  9. Implementation of mental health parity: lessons from california.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Margo L; Lake, Timothy K; Williams, Susan R; Buck, Jeffrey A

    2009-12-01

    This article reports the experiences of health plans, providers, and consumers with California's mental health parity law and discusses implications for implementation of the 2008 federal parity law. This study used a multimodal data collection approach to assess the first five years of California's parity implementation (from 2000 to 2005). Telephone interviews were conducted with 68 state-level stakeholders, and in-person interviews were conducted with 77 community-based stakeholders. Six focus groups included 52 providers, and six included 32 consumers. A semistructured interview protocol was used. Interview notes and transcripts were coded to facilitate analysis. Health plans eliminated differential benefit limits and cost-sharing requirements for certain mental disorders to comply with the law, and they used managed care to control costs. In response to concerns about access to and quality of care, the state expanded oversight of health plans, issuing access-to-care regulations and conducting focused studies. California's parity law applied to a limited list of psychiatric diagnoses. Health plan executives said they spent considerable resources clarifying which diagnoses were covered at parity levels and concluded that the limited diagnosis list was unnecessary with managed care. Providers indicated that the diagnosis list had unintended consequences, including incentives to assign a more severe diagnosis that would be covered at parity levels, rather than a less severe diagnosis that would not be covered at such levels. The lack of consumer knowledge about parity was widely acknowledged, and consumers in the focus groups requested additional information about parity. Experiences in California suggest that implementation of the 2008 federal parity law should include monitoring health plan performance related to access and quality, in addition to monitoring coverage and costs; examining the breadth of diagnoses covered by health plans; and mounting a campaign

  10. Aperture Mask for Unambiguous Parity Determination in Long Wavelength Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a new parity pupil mask design that allows users to unambiguously determine the image space coordinate system of all the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) science instruments by using two out-of-focus images. This is an improvement over existing mask designs that could not completely eliminate the coordinate system parity ambiguity at a wavelength of 5.6 microns. To mitigate the problem of how the presence of diffraction artifacts can obscure the pupil mask detail, this innovation has been created with specifically designed edge features so that the image space coordinate system parity can be determined in the presence of diffraction, even at long wavelengths.

  11. Anomalous Lorentz and CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2018-01-01

    If there exists Lorentz and CPT violation in nature, then it is crucial to discover and understand the underlying mechanism. In this contribution, we discuss one such mechanism which relies on four-dimensional chiral gauge theories defined over a spacetime manifold with topology ℛ3 × S 1 and periodic spin structure for the compact dimension. It can be shown that the effective gauge-field action contains a local Chern-Simons-like term which violates Lorentz and CPT invariance. For arbitrary Abelian U(1) gauge fields with trivial holonomies in the compact direction, this anomalous Lorentz and CPT violation has recently been established perturbatively with a Pauli-Villars-type regularization and nonperturbatively with a lattice regularization based on Ginsparg-Wilson fermions.

  12. Noise-tolerant parity learning with one quantum bit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Daniel K.; Rhee, June-Koo K.; Lee, Soonchil

    2018-03-01

    Demonstrating quantum advantage with less powerful but more realistic devices is of great importance in modern quantum information science. Recently, a significant quantum speedup was achieved in the problem of learning a hidden parity function with noise. However, if all data qubits at the query output are completely depolarized, the algorithm fails. In this work, we present a quantum parity learning algorithm that exhibits quantum advantage as long as one qubit is provided with nonzero polarization in each query. In this scenario, the quantum parity learning naturally becomes deterministic quantum computation with one qubit. Then the hidden parity function can be revealed by performing a set of operations that can be interpreted as measuring nonlocal observables on the auxiliary result qubit having nonzero polarization and each data qubit. We also discuss the source of the quantum advantage in our algorithm from the resource-theoretic point of view.

  13. Outlier Detection In Linear Regression Using Standart Parity Space Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa Durdag, Utkan; Hekimoglu, Serif

    2013-04-01

    Despite all technological advancements, outliers may occur due to some mistakes in engineering measurements. Before estimation of unknown parameters, aforementioned outliers must be detected and removed from the measurements. There are two main outlier detection methods: the conventional tests based on least square approach (e.g. Baarda, Pope etc.) and the robust tests (e.g. Huber, Hampel etc.) are used to identify outliers in a set of measurement. Standart Parity Space Approach is one of the important model-based Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) technique that usually uses in Control Engineering. In this study the standart parity space method is used for outlier detection in linear regression. Our main goal is to compare success of two approaches of standart parity space method and conventional tests in linear regression through the Monte Carlo simulation with each other. The least square estimation is the most common estimator as known and it minimizes the sum of squared residuals. In standart parity space approach to eliminate unknown vector, the measurement vector projected onto the left null space of the coefficient matrix. Thus, the orthogonal condition of parity vector is satisfied and only the effects of noise vector noticed. The residual vector is derived from two cases that one is absence of an outlier; the other is occurrence of an outlier. Its likelihood function is used for determining the detection decision function for global Test. Localization decision function is calculated for each column of parity matrix and the maximum one of these values is accepted as an outlier. There are some results obtained from two different intervals that one of them is between 3σ and 6σ (small outlier) the other one is between 6σ and 12σ (large outlier) for outlier generator when the number of unknown parameter is chosen 2 and 3. The measure success rates (MSR) of Baarda's method is better than the standart parity space method when the confidence intervals are

  14. Parity and the Association With Diabetes in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Fowler-Brown, Angela G.; de Boer, Ian H.; Catov, Janet M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Kamineni, Aruna; Kuller, Lewis H.; Siscovick, David S.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship of parity with diabetes and markers of glucose homeostasis in older women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used data from the female participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a longitudinal cohort of adults aged ≥65 years. These data included an assessment of parity (baseline) and fasting serum levels of glucose, insulin, and medication use (baseline and follow-up). We estimated both the cross-sectional relationship of parity with baseline diabetes and the relationship of parity with incident diabetes. RESULTS In unadjusted analyses, women with grand multiparity (≥5 live births) had a higher prevalence of diabetes at baseline compared with those with fewer births and with nulliparous women (25 vs. 12 vs. 15%; P < 0.001). In regression models controlling for age and race, grand multiparity was associated with increased prevalence of diabetes (prevalence ratio 1.57 [95% CI 1.20–2.06]); with addition of demographic and clinical factors to the model, the association was attenuated (1.33 [1.00–1.77]). In final models that included body anthropometrics, the association was no longer significant (1.21 [0.86–1.49]). In those without diabetes at baseline, parity was not associated with incident diabetes or with fasting glucose; however, there was a modest association of parity with fasting insulin and homeostasis assessment model of insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS Grand multiparity is associated with diabetes in elderly women in cross-sectional analyses. This relationship seems to be confounded and/or mediated by variation in body weight and sociodemographic factors by parity status. In older nondiabetic women, higher parity does not pose an ongoing risk of developing diabetes. PMID:20424225

  15. Velocity Requirements for Causality Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, Giovanni

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for β →1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two oscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  16. Physicist sentenced for export violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-08-01

    J Reece Roth, a retired University of Tennessee plasma physicist convicted of violating the American Arms Export Control Act, is planning to appeal against a four-year prison sentence handed down last month. "It's an appeal against everything, including the verdict and the sentence," says his lawyer Thomas Dundon.

  17. Novel designs of nanometric parity preserving reversible compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoaei, Soghra; Haghparast, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Reversible logic is a new field of study that has applications in optical information processing, low power CMOS design, DNA computing, bioinformatics, and nanotechnology. Low power consumption is a basic issue in VLSI circuits today. To prevent the distribution of errors in the quantum circuit, the reversible logic gates must be converted into fault-tolerant quantum operations. Parity preserving is used to realize fault tolerant in this circuits. This paper proposes a new parity preserving reversible gate. We named it NPPG gate. The most significant aspect of the NPPG gate is that it can be used to produce parity preserving reversible full adder circuit. The proposed parity preserving reversible full adder using NPPG gate is more efficient than the existing designs in term of quantum cost and it is optimized in terms of number of constant inputs and garbage outputs. Compressors are of importance in VLSI and digital signal processing applications. Effective VLSI compressors reduce the impact of carry propagation of arithmetic operations. They are built from the full adder blocks. We also proposed three new approaches of parity preservation reversible 4:2 compressor circuits. The third design is better than the previous two in terms of evaluation parameters. The important contributions have been made in the literature toward the design of reversible 4:2 compressor circuits; however, there are not efforts toward the design of parity preservation reversible 4:2 compressor circuits. All the scales are in the nanometric criteria.

  18. KCBX Notice of Violation - April 28, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    US EPA issued a Notice of Violation (NOV) to KCBX Terminals Company on April 28, 2015 asserting that KCBX's petroleum coke piles in Chicago are sources of fugitive emissions which violate the Clean Air Act and Illinois State Implementation Plan.

  19. 43 CFR 12.820 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... concerning a failure to comply with the clause at § 12.830, Buy American Act—Construction Materials, shall be...-Construction Materials § 12.820 Violations. Violation of the Buy American Act in the performance of a...

  20. Parity generator and parity checker in the modified trinary number system using savart plate and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amal K.

    2010-09-01

    The parity generators and the checkers are the most important circuits in communication systems. With the development of multi-valued logic (MVL), the proposed system with parity generators and checkers is the most required using the recently developed optoelectronic technology in the modified trinary number (MTN) system. This system also meets up the tremendous needs of speeds by exploiting the savart plates and spatial light modulators (SLM) in the optical tree architecture (OTA).

  1. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant: (1... the terms of the contract. (4) Filing a false claim. (5) Misusing authorizations for payment. (b...

  2. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract violations. Contract violations, determinations and appeals will be handled in accordance with the terms of the... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture...

  3. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  4. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  5. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  6. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  7. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court...

  8. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  9. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  10. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  11. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  12. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  13. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  14. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  15. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  16. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  17. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  18. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  19. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  20. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  1. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Violations. 127.1 Section 127.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1 Violations. (a) Without first obtaining the required license or other written approval from the Directorate...

  2. 76 FR 5719 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...) used in the review to identify mines with a pattern of S&S violations would be posted on MSHA's website..., MSHA would review: (1) Citations for significant and substantial violations; (2) Orders under section 104(b) of the Act for not abating significant and substantial violations; (3) Citations and withdrawal...

  3. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  4. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  5. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  6. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  7. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  8. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United...

  9. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  10. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  11. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  12. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  13. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  14. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  15. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  16. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  17. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  18. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  19. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  20. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the...

  1. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court...

  2. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of this...

  3. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  4. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  5. Effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity sows.

    PubMed

    Hoving, L L; Soede, N M; Graat, E A M; Feitsma, H; Kemp, B

    2010-10-01

    An impaired reproductive performance in second parity compared to first parity sows, decreases reproductive efficiency and, perhaps, longevity of sows. This study aims to quantify the effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity sows, i.e. pregnancy rate as well as litter size. Measures of sow development (live weight at first insemination, farrowing and weaning) and reproduction (total number of piglets born, weaning to insemination interval, lactation period, number piglets weaned) were recorded on two experimental farms. Logistic regression analysis was done for the binary outcome 'non-pregnancy from first insemination after first weaning' (yes/no). General linear regression analysis was used for litter size from 1st insemination in second parity. Repeat breeders were omitted from the analysis on litter size in second parity, since a prolonged period between weaning and conception can positively influence litter size. Farms differed significantly in measures of sow live weight development and therefore data were analyzed per farm. Compared with gilts from farm A, gilts from farm B were older and heavier at: first insemination (275±0.9 days and 145±0.8kg for farm B vs. 230±0.6 days and 124±0.5kg for farm A), first farrowing (resp. 189±1.1 vs. 181±0.9kg) and first weaning (resp. 165±1.1 vs. 156±0.9kg). Weight loss during pregnancy was similar for both farms (resp. 24.9±0.7 and 23.7±1.0kg). Gilts from farm A, however, gained more weight in the period between first insemination and first weaning compared with gilts from farm B (resp. 36.1±0.8 and 20.9±1.3kg). Non-pregnancy in second parity was 11% for farm A and 15% for farm B. Litter sizes in first and second parity were, respectively, 10.7±0.1 and 11.6±0.2 for farm A and 11.8±0.1 and 11.6±0.1 for farm B. Variables associated with non-pregnancy and litter size in second parity differed between farms. On farm A, mainly sow live weight

  6. Effect of parity on healthy promotion lifestyle behavior in women.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Hakan; Nazik, Evşen; Özdemir, Funda; Gül, Şule; Tezel, Ayfer; Narin, Raziye

    2015-01-01

    Health-promoting lifestyle behaviors are not only for the prevention of a disease or discomfort, but are also behaviors that aim to improve the individual's general health and well-being. Nurses have an important position in the development of healthy lifestyle behaviors in women. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of parity on health-promoting lifestyle behaviors in women. This descriptive and cross-sectional survey was performed in Adana, Turkey. This study was conducted with 352 women. The questionnaire consisted of two parts; the first part consisted of questions that assessed the socio-demographic and obstetric characteristics, and the second part employed the "Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile Scale" (HPLP). Data analysis included percentage, arithmetic average, and ANOVA tests. The results revealed that 24.1% of the women had no parity, 13.6% had one parity, 30.7% had two parities, 14.6% had three parities, and 17% had four and above parities. The mean total HPLP was 126.66±18.12 (interpersonal support subscale, 24.46±4.02; nutrition subscale, 21.59±3.92; self-actualization subscale, 24.42±4.30; stress management subscale, 18.73±3.81; health responsibility subscale, 21.75±4.31; and exercise subscale, 15.71±4.22). The health behavior of women was moderate. A statistically significant correlation was found between the number of parities and the Health Responsibility, Nutrition, Interpersonal Support, which is the subscale of the HPLP Scale.

  7. Possible violations of spacetime symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The identification of symmetries has played a fundamental role in our understanding of physical phenomena. Nevertheless, in most cases such symmetries constitute only a zeroth-order approximation and they need to be broken so that the predictions of the theory are consistent with experimental observation. In particular, the almost sacred CPT and Lorentz symmetries, which are certainly part of the fundamental ideas of modern physics, need to be probed experimentally. Recently, such efforts have been intensified because different theoretical approaches aiming to understand the microstructure of space-time suggest the possibility that such symmetries could present minute violations. Up to now, and with increasing experimental sensitivities, no signs of violation have been found. Nevertheless, we observe that even the persistence of such negative results will have a profound impact. On one hand, they will provide those symmetries with a firm experimental basis. On the other, they will set stringent experimental bounds to be compared with the possible emergence of such violations in quantum gravity models based upon a discrete structure of space. We present a very general perspective of the research on Lorentz symmetry breaking, together with a review of a few specific topics.

  8. Nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Fengcheng; Martin, Ivar

    2017-10-09

    Recent experiments indicate that superconductivity in Bi 2Se 3 intercalated with Cu, Nb, or Sr is nematic with rotational symmetry breaking. Motivated by this observation, we present a model study of nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations. Additionally, we show that odd-parity fluctuations in the two-component E u representation of D 3d crystal point group can generate attractive interaction in both the even-parity s-wave and odd-parity E-u pairing channels, but repulsive interaction in other odd-parity pairing channels. Coulomb repulsion can suppress s-wave pairing relative to E u pairing, and thus the latter can have a higher critical temperature.more » E u pairing has two distinct phases: a nematic phase and a chiral phase, both of which can be realized in our model. Finally, when s-wave and E u pairings have similar instability temperature, we find an intermediate phase in which both types of pairing coexist.« less

  9. Nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Fengcheng; Martin, Ivar

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments indicate that superconductivity in Bi2Se3 intercalated with Cu, Nb, or Sr is nematic with rotational symmetry breaking. Motivated by this observation, we present a model study of nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations. We show that odd-parity fluctuations in the two-component E-u representation of D-3d crystal point group can generate attractive interaction in both the even-parity s-wave and odd-parity E-u pairing channels, but repulsive interaction in other odd-parity pairing channels. Coulomb repulsion can suppress s-wave pairing relative to E-u pairing, and thus the latter can have a higher critical temperature. E-u pairing has two distinct phases:more » a nematic phase and a chiral phase, both of which can be realized in our model. When s-wave and E-u pairings have similar instability temperature, we find an intermediate phase in which both types of pairing coexist.« less

  10. Odd-parity superconductivity in bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasuharu; Yanase, Youichi

    2017-08-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) causes spin-valley locking, giving rise to unconventional optical, transport, and superconducting properties. In this paper, we propose exotic superconductivity in bilayer group-IV TMDCs by symmetry control. The sublattice-dependent "hidden" spin-orbit coupling arising from local inversion symmetry breaking in the crystal structure may stabilize the odd-parity superconductivity by purely s -wave local pairing interaction. The stability of the odd-parity superconducting state depends on the bilayer stacking. The 2 Hb stacking in MoX2 and WX2 (X =S ,Se) favors the odd-parity superconductivity due to interlayer quantum interference. On the other hand, the odd-parity superconductivity is suppressed by the 2 Ha stacking of NbSe2. Calculating the phase diagram of the tight-binding model derived from first-principles band calculations, we conclude that the intercalated bilayer MoS2 and WS2 are candidates for a new class of odd-parity superconductors by spin-orbit coupling.

  11. Search for lepton flavour violation in theeμcontinuum with the ATLAS detector in [Formula: see text]ppcollisions at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Aleppo, M; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Bachy, G; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, D; Bartsch, V; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Battistoni, G; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, G; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bona, M; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Boorman, G; Booth, C N; Booth, P; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Brambilla, E; Branchini, P; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Bright-Thomas, P G; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Buira-Clark, D; Buis, E J; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caccia, M; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camard, A; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capriotti, D; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carpentieri, C; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernandez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Cataldi, G; Cataneo, F; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cavallari, A; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cazzato, A; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheplakov, A; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, M V; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciba, K; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, P J; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Clifft, R W; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coe, P; Coelli, S; Cogan, J G; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Coluccia, R; Comune, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Conidi, M C; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Crescioli, F; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cuneo, S; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czirr, H; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dahlhoff, A; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Damiani, D S; Danielsson, H O; Dankers, R; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Daum, C; Dauvergne, J P; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davies, M; Davison, A R; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Taille, C; De la Torre, H; de Mora, L; De Nooij, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; de Saintignon, P; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; Dean, S; Dedovich, D V; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Deile, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delpierre, P; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirkoz, B; Deng, J; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Devetak, E; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Micco, B; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diblen, F; Diehl, E B; Dietl, H; Dietrich, J; Dietzsch, T A; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Doan, T K O; Dobbs, M; Dobinson, R; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dodd, J; Dogan, O B; Doglioni, C; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Dohmae, T; Donadelli, M; Donega, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Dowell, J D; Doxiadis, A D; Doyle, A T; Drasal, Z; Drees, J; Drevermann, H; Dris, M; Drohan, J G; Dubbert, J; Dubbs, T; Dube, S; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Dührssen, M; Duerdoth, I P; Duflot, L; Dufour, M-A; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Dydak, F; Dzahini, D; Düren, M; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Edwards, C A; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evangelakou, D; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Facius, K; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falou, A C; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farley, J; Farooque, T; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fasching, D; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Favareto, A; Fayard, L; Fazio, S; Febbraro, R; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W; Fehling-Kaschek, M; Feligioni, L; Fellmann, D; Felzmann, C U; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Fernandes, B; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrara, V; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, A; Ferrer, M L; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Ferretto Parodi, A; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filippas, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, G; Fischer, P; Fisher, M J; Fisher, S M; Flammer, J; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleckner, J; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Flick, T; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Föhlisch, F; Fonseca Martin, T; Fopma, J; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Fournier, D; Fowler, A J; Fowler, K; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Frank, T; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; Freestone, J; French, S T; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Gallas, E J; Gallas, M V; Gallo, V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galyaev, E; Gan, K K; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garberson, F; Garcia-Sciveres, M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia, H; Garonne, V; Garvey, J; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gaur, B; Gauthier, L; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gee, C N P; Geerts, D A A; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Gemmell, A; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; George, M; George, S; Gerlach, P; Gershon, A; Geweniger, C; Ghazlane, H; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gieraltowski, G F; Gilchriese, M; Gillberg, D; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Ginzburg, J; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giorgi, F M; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Giugni, D; Giusti, P; Gjelsten, B K; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glazov, A; Glitza, K W; Glonti, G L; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goebel, M; Göpfert, T; Goeringer, C; Gössling, C; Göttfert, T; Goldfarb, S; Goldin, D; Golling, T; Golovnia, S N; Gomes, A; Gomez Fajardo, L S; Gonçalo, R; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J; Gonella, L; Gonzalez, S; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Silva, M L; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Gornicki, E; Gorokhov, S A; Gosdzik, B; Gosselink, M; Gostkin, M I; Gouanère, M; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grabski, V; Grafström, P; Grah, C; Grahn, K-J; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Grau, N; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Grebenyuk, O G; Green, B; Greenfield, D; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griesmayer, E; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grinstein, S; Grishkevich, Y V; Grivaz, J-F; Grognuz, J; Groh, M; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Gruwe, M; Grybel, K; Guest, D; Guicheney, C; Guida, A; Guindon, S; Guler, H; Gunther, J; Guo, B; Guo, J; Gusakov, Y; Gushchin, V N; Gutierrez, A; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Hadley, D R; Haefner, P; Hahn, F; Haider, S; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haller, J; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, C J; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hare, G A; Harenberg, T; Harper, D; Harrington, R D; Harris, O M; Harrison, K; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawes, B M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, D; Hayakawa, T; Hayden, D; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; He, M; Head, S J; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heinemann, B; Heisterkamp, S; Helary, L; Heldmann, M; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Hemperek, T; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henrichs, A; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Henry-Couannier, F; Hensel, C; Henß, T; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Herrberg, R; Hershenhorn, A D; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hessey, N P; Hidvegi, A; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirsch, F; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hohlfeld, M; Holder, M; Holmes, A; Holmgren, S O; Holy, T; Holzbauer, J L; Homma, Y; Hooft van Huysduynen, L; Horazdovsky, T; Horn, C; Horner, S; Horton, K; Hostachy, J-Y; Hott, T; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howarth, J; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hruska, I; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Huang, G S; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibbotson, M; Ibragimov, I; Ichimiya, R; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Idzik, M; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Imbault, D; Imhaeuser, M; Ince, T; Inigo-Golfin, J; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Ionescu, G; Irles Quiles, A; Ishii, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Issever, C; Istin, S; Itoh, Y; Ivashin, A V; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, B; Jackson, J N; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M R; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakubek, J; Jana, D K; Jankowski, E; Jansen, E; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jarlskog, G; Jeanty, L; Jen-La Plante, I; Jenni, P; Jeremie, A; Jež, P; Jézéquel, S; Jha, M K; Ji, H; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joergensen, M D; Joffe, D; Johansen, L G; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johnert, S; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T J; Joram, C; Jorge, P M; Joseph, J; Ju, X; Juranek, V; Jussel, P; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kadlecik, P; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kaiser, S; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinin, S; Kalinovskaya, L V; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kanno, T; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kaplon, J; Kar, D; Karagounis, M; Karagoz, M; Karnevskiy, M; Karr, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasmi, A; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, M; Kataoka, Y; Katsoufis, E; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kayl, M S; Kazanin, V A; Kazarinov, M Y; Kazi, S I; Keates, J R; Keeler, R; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Kekelidze, G D; Kelly, M; Kennedy, J; Kenney, C J; Kenyon, M; Kepka, O; Kerschen, N; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Kessoku, K; Ketterer, C; Khalil-Zada, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Kharchenko, D; Khodinov, A; Khomich, A; Khoo, T J; Khoriauli, G; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kilvington, G; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Kim, P C; Kim, S H; Kimura, N; Kind, O; King, B T; King, M; King, R S B; Kirk, J; Kirsch, G P; Kirsch, L E; Kiryunin, A E; Kisielewska, D; Kittelmann, T; Kiver, A M; Kiyamura, H; Kladiva, E; Klaiber-Lodewigs, J; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klemetti, M; Klier, A; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Klioutchnikova, T; Klok, P F; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kluge, T; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Knecht, N S; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koblitz, B; Kocian, M; Kocnar, A; Kodys, P; Köneke, K; König, A C; Koenig, S; König, S; Köpke, L; Koetsveld, F; Koevesarki, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Kohn, F; Kohout, Z; Kohriki, T; Koi, T; Kolachev, G M; Kolanoski, H; Kolesnikov, V; Koletsou, I; Koll, J; Kollar, D; Kollefrath, M; Kolya, S D; Komar, A A; Komaragiri, J R; Kondo, T; Kono, T; Kononov, A I; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kootz, A; Koperny, S; Kopikov, S V; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Korotkov, V A; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotov, S; Kotov, V M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Koutsman, A; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T Z; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kral, V; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasel, O; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J; Kreisel, A; Krejci, F; Kretzschmar, J; Krieger, N; Krieger, P; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumshteyn, Z V; Kruth, A; Kubota, T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuhl, T; Kuhn, D; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kummer, C; Kuna, M; Kundu, N; Kunkle, J; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurata, M; Kurochkin, Y A; Kus, V; Kuykendall, W; Kuze, M; Kuzhir, P; Kvasnicka, O; Kvita, J; Kwee, R; La Rosa, A; La Rotonda, L; Labarga, L; Labbe, J; Lablak, S; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Laisne, E; Lamanna, M; Lampen, C L; Lampl, W; Lancon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Landsman, H; Lane, J L; Lange, C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Lapin, V V; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Larner, A; Lassnig, M; Lau, W; Laurelli, P; Lavorato, A; Lavrijsen, W; Laycock, P; Lazzaro, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Maner, C; Le Menedeu, E; Leahu, M; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, H; Lee, J S H; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, M; Legendre, M; LeGeyt, B C; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehmacher, M; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lendermann, V; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzen, G; Lenzi, B; Leonhardt, K; Leontsinis, S; Leroy, C; Lessard, J-R; Lesser, J; Lester, C G; Leung Fook Cheong, A; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Lewandowska, M; Lewis, G H; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, H; Li, S; Li, X; Liang, Z; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Lichard, P; Lichtnecker, M; Lie, K; Liebig, W; Lifshitz, R; Limbach, C; Limosani, A; Limper, M; Lin, S C; Linde, F; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lipinsky, L; Lipniacka, A; Liss, T M; Lissauer, D; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, C; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, J B; Liu, M; Liu, S; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Livermore, S S A; Lleres, A; Lloyd, S L; Lobodzinska, E; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Lockwitz, S; Loddenkoetter, T; Loebinger, F K; Loginov, A; Loh, C W; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Lombardo, V P; Long, R E; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Losada, M; Loscutoff, P; Lo Sterzo, F; Losty, M J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Loureiro, K F; Love, J; Love, P A; Lowe, A J; Lu, F; Lu, J; Lu, L; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, D; Ludwig, I; Ludwig, J; Luehring, F; Luijckx, G; Lumb, D; Luminari, L; Lund, E; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Lundberg, J; Lundquist, J; Lungwitz, M; Lupi, A; Lynn, D; Lys, J; Lytken, E; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Macana Goia, J A; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Maček, B; Machado Miguens, J; Mackeprang, R; Madaras, R J; Mader, W F; Maenner, R; Maeno, T; Mättig, P; Mättig, S; Magalhaes Martins, P J; Magnoni, L; Magradze, E; Magrath, C A; Mahalalel, Y; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Mal, P; Malecki, Pa; Malecki, P; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, V; Malyukov, S; Mameghani, R; Mamuzic, J; Manabe, A; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Mandrysch, R; Maneira, J; Mangeard, P S; Mann, A; Manning, P M; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansoulie, B; Mapelli, A; Mapelli, L; March, L; Marchand, J F; Marchese, F; Marchesotti, M; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marin, A; Marino, C P; Marroquim, F; Marshall, Z; Martens, F K; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, A J; Martin, B; Martin, B; Martin, F F; Martin, J P; Martin, T A; Martin Dit Latour, B; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V; Martyniuk, A C; Marx, M; Marzano, F; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Maß, M; Massa, I; Massaro, G; Massol, N; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mathes, M; Matricon, P; Matsumoto, H; Matsunaga, H; Matsushita, T; Mattravers, C; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mayne, A; Mazini, R; Mazur, M; Mazzanti, M; Mazzoni, E; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McCubbin, N A; McFarlane, K W; Mcfayden, J A; McGlone, H; Mchedlidze, G; Mclaughlan, T; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Meade, A; Mechnich, J; Mechtel, M; Medinnis, M; Meera-Lebbai, R; Meguro, T; Mehdiyev, R; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meinhardt, J; Meirose, B; Melachrinos, C; Mellado Garcia, B R; Mendoza Navas, L; Meng, Z; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mercurio, K M; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meuser, S; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer, J; Meyer, T C; Meyer, W T; Miao, J; Michal, S; Micu, L; Middleton, R P; Miele, P; Migas, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikulec, B; Mikuž, M; Miller, D W; Miller, R J; Mills, W J; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Milstein, D; Minaenko, A A; Miñano Moya, M; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mirabelli, G; Misawa, S; Misiejuk, A; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Mitsui, S; Miyagawa, P S; Miyazaki, K; Mjörnmark, J U; Moa, T; Moed, S; Moeller, V; Mönig, K; Möser, N; Mohapatra, S; Mohn, B; Mohr, W; Moisseev, A M; Moles-Valls, R; Molina-Perez, J; Moneta, L; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montesano, S; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Moorhead, G F; Mora Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Morais, A; Morange, N; Morel, J; Morello, G; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morii, M; Morin, J; Morita, Y; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morone, M C; Morris, J D; Moser, H G; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Mudrinic, M; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, K; Müller, T A; Muenstermann, D; Muijs, A; Muir, A; Munwes, Y; Murakami, K; Murray, W J; Mussche, I; Musto, E; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nadal, J; Nagai, K; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Nanava, G; Napier, A; Nash, M; Nation, N R; Nattermann, T; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nderitu, S K; Neal, H A; Nebot, E; Nechaeva, P Yu; Negri, A; Negri, G; Nektarijevic, S; Nelson, A; Nelson, S; Nelson, T K; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newman, P R; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nicolas, L; Nicoletti, G; Nicquevert, B; Niedercorn, F; Nielsen, J; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, H; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nishiyama, T; Nisius, R; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nomoto, H; Nordberg, M; Nordkvist, B; Norton, P R; Notz, D; Novakova, J; Nozaki, M; Nožička, M; Nozka, L; Nugent, I M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A-E; Nunes Hanninger, G; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; Nyman, T; O'Brien, B J; O'Neale, S W; O'Neil, D C; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Odier, J; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohshima, T; Ohska, T K; Okada, S; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olchevski, A G; Oliveira, M; Oliveira Damazio, D; Oliver Garcia, E; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Omachi, C; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Ordonez, G; Oreglia, M J; Orellana, F; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlov, I; Oropeza Barrera, C; Orr, R S; Ortega, E O; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Osuna, C; Otero Y Garzon, G; Ottersbach, J P; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, S; Øye, O K; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pacheco Pages, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, E; Paige, F; Pajchel, K; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Panuskova, M; Paolone, V; Paoloni, A; Papadelis, A; Papadopoulou, Th D; Paramonov, A; Park, W; Parker, M A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Patel, N; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pecsy, M; Pedraza Morales, M I; Peleganchuk, S V; Peng, H; Pengo, R; Penson, A; Penwell, J; Perantoni, M; Perez, K; Perez Cavalcanti, T; Perez Codina, E; Pérez García-Estañ, M T; Perez Reale, V; Peric, I; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Perrodo, P; Persembe, S; Perus, A; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, O; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petschull, D; Petteni, M; Pezoa, R; Pfeifer, B; Phan, A; Phillips, A W; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickford, A; Piec, S M; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinder, A; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, B; Pirotte, O; Pizio, C; Placakyte, R; Plamondon, M; Plano, W G; Pleier, M-A; Poblaguev, A; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poghosyan, T; Pohl, M; Polci, F; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polini, A; Poll, J; Polychronakos, V; Pomarede, D M; Pomeroy, D; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Portell Bueso, X; Porter, R; Pospelov, G E; Pospisil, S; Potekhin, M; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Potter, K P; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; Prell, S; Pretzl, K; Pribyl, L; Price, D; Price, L E; Prichard, P M; Prieur, D; Primavera, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Psoroulas, S; Ptacek, E; Purdham, J; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Pylypchenko, Y; Qian, J; Qian, W; Qin, Z; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Quinonez, F; Raas, M; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radics, B; Rador, T; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rahimi, A M; Rahm, D; Rajagopalan, S; Rajek, S; Rammensee, M; Rammes, M; Ramstedt, M; Randrianarivony, K; Rauscher, F; Rauter, E; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I; Reljic, D; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renaud, A; Renkel, P; Rensch, B; Rescia, S; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richards, A; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieke, S; Rijpstra, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Rios, R R; Riu, I; Rivoltella, G; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robinson, M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Roda Dos Santos, D; Rodier, S; Rodriguez, D; Rodriguez Garcia, Y; Roe, A; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rojo, V; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romeo, G; Romero Maltrana, D; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rose, M; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosenberg, E I; Rosendahl, P L; Rosselet, L; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rossi, L; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rottländer, I; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubinskiy, I; Ruckert, B; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, G; Rühr, F; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Rumiantsev, V; Rumyantsev, L; Runge, K; Runolfsson, O; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Rust, D R; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruwiedel, C; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Ryan, P; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Rzaeva, S; Saavedra, A F; Sadeh, I; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvachua Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Samset, B H; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandhu, P; Sandoval, T; Sandstroem, R; Sandvoss, S; Sankey, D P C; Sansoni, A; Santamarina Rios, C; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarri, F; Sartisohn, G; Sasaki, O; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, J B; Savard, P; Savine, A Y; Savinov, V; Savu, D O; Savva, P; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scallon, O; Scannicchio, D A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schäfer, U; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schamov, A G; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, M P; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitz, M; Schöning, A; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schroeder, C; Schroer, N; Schuh, S; Schultes, J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, J W; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwierz, R; Schwindling, J; Scott, W G; Searcy, J; Sedykh, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; Sellden, B; Sellers, G; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, C; Shaw, K; Sherman, D; Sherwood, P; Shibata, A; Shimizu, S; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Short, D; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siebel, A; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simmons, B; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinnari, L A; Skovpen, K; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Sloan, T J; Smakhtin, V; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snuverink, J; Snyder, S; Soares, M; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Sondericker, J; Soni, N; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sorbi, M; Sosebee, M; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiriti, E; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steele, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockmanns, T; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strang, M; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Stupak, J; Sturm, P; Soh, D A; Su, D; Subramania, Hs; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Suhr, C; Suita, K; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Swedish, S; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taga, A; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Tatarkhanov, M; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terwort, M; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Tevlin, C M; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokunaga, K; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tonazzo, A; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torchiani, I; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Traynor, D; Trefzger, T; Treis, J; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Twomey, M S; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Typaldos, D; Tyrvainen, H; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urkovsky, E; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valderanis, C; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Poel, E; van der Ster, D; Van Eijk, B; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vovenko, A S; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wakabayashi, J; Walbersloh, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Wastie, R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xaplanteris, L; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Yabsley, B; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, W-M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zalite, Yo K; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, A V; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zolnierowski, Y; Zsenei, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    This paper presents a search for the t -channel exchange of an R -parity violating scalar top quark ([Formula: see text]) in the e ± μ ∓ continuum using 2.1 fb -1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in [Formula: see text] pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R -parity-violating couplings at 95 % C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass ([Formula: see text]). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp → eμX , through the t -channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for [Formula: see text] to 30 fb for [Formula: see text].

  12. Molecules as Quantum Shapes and how they Violate P and T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, A. P.; Simoni, A.; Witt, D. M.

    A geometric shape is a rigid shape in n-dimensional Euclidean space. These shapes commonly occur in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in molecular physics, and collective models of nuclei. Abelian and non-Abelian generalizations of the vacuum angle of gauge theories are realized in the quantum theory of shapes. In this paper, such generalizations are presented in the language of modern quantum physics and it is shown that parity, { P}, and time reversal, { T}, are violated in certain of these quantum theories. However, the combined symmetry { {PT}} of parity composed with time reversal generally remains a good symmetry, just as in gauge theories. The exceptions are the quantum theories of staggered conformations which can violate only { T}. The mechanism responsible for the loss of these symmetries is a generalization of the vacuum angle mechanism for the same effect. An important result of the present analysis is the demonstration that geometric shapes, molecules in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and nuclei in the collective model description furnish concrete systems which upon quantization discriminate between left- and right-handed coordinates even though this distinction is entirely absent in their classical descriptions.

  13. Spin and parity measurement of the Λ(1405) baryon

    DOE PAGES

    Moriya, Kei; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2014-02-28

    A determination of the spin and parity of the Λ(1405) is presented using photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The reaction γ+p→K ++Λ(1405) is analyzed in the decay channel Lambda(1405)→Σ ++π, where the decay distribution to Σ +pi- and the variation of the Σ + polarization with respect to the Λ(1405) polarization direction determines the parity. The Λ(1405) is produced, in the energy range 2.55 c.m. K+<0.9, with polarization P=0.45±0.02(stat)±0.07(syst). The analysis shows that the decays are in S wave, with the Σ + polarized such that the Λ(1405) has spin-parity J P=1/2-, as expected by mostmore » theories.« less

  14. Dynamics of Localized Structures in Systems with Broken Parity Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, J.; Camelin, P.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2016-04-01

    A great variety of nonlinear dissipative systems are known to host structures having a correlation range much shorter than the size of the system. The dynamics of these localized structures (LSs) has been investigated so far in situations featuring parity symmetry. In this Letter we extend this analysis to systems lacking this property. We show that the LS drifting speed in a parameter varying landscape is not simply proportional to the parameter gradient, as found in parity preserving situations. The symmetry breaking implies a new contribution to the velocity field which is a function of the parameter value, thus leading to a new paradigm for LSs manipulation. We illustrate this general concept by studying the trajectories of the LSs found in a passively mode-locked laser operated in the localization regime. Moreover, the lack of parity affects significantly LSs interactions which are governed by asymmetrical repulsive forces.

  15. The connection between Dirac dynamic and parity symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado Villalobos, C. H.; Bueno Rogerio, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Dirac spinors are important objects in the current literature, the algebraic structure presented in the text-books is a general method to write it, however, not unique. The purpose of the present work is to show an alternative approach to construct Dirac spinors, considering the interchange between the Lorentz representation space (1/2, 0) and (0, 1/2) made by the magic of Pauli matrices and not by parity, as was commonly thought. As is well known, the parity operator is related with the Dirac dynamics, as can be seen in Sperança L. D., Int. J. Mod. Phys. D, 2 (2014) 1444003. The major focus is to establish the relation between the Dirac dynamics with the parity operator, i.e., the reverse path shown in the paper by Sperança.

  16. Effect of nuclear quadrupole moments on parity nonconservation in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Harabati, C.

    2017-07-01

    Nuclei with spin I ≥1 have a weak quadrupole moment which leads to tensor contribution to the parity nonconserving interaction between nuclei and electrons. We calculate this contribution for atoms of current experiment interest Yb+, Fr, and Ra+. We have also performed order of magnitude estimates and found strong enhancement of the weak quadrupole effects due to the close levels of opposite parity in many lanthanoids (e.g., Nd, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Pr, Sm) and Ra. Another possibility is to measure the parity-nonconservation (PNC) transitions between the hyperfine components of the ground state of Bi. Since nuclear weak charge is dominated by neutrons this opens a way of measuring quadrupole moments of neutron distribution in nuclei.

  17. Reciprocal and unidirectional scattering of parity-time symmetric structures

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, G.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time symmetry is of great interest. The reciprocal and unidirectional features are intriguing besides the symmetry phase transition. Recently, the reciprocal transmission, unidirectional reflectionless and invisibility are intensively studied. Here, we show the reciprocal reflection/transmission in -symmetric system is closely related to the type of symmetry, that is, the axial (reflection) symmetry leads to reciprocal reflection (transmission). The results are further elucidated by studying the scattering of rhombic ring form coupled resonators with enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The nonreciprocal phase shift induced by the magnetic flux and gain/loss break the parity and time-reversal symmetry but keep the parity-time symmetry. The reciprocal reflection (transmission) and unidirectional transmission (reflection) are found in the axial (reflection) -symmetric ring centre. The explorations of symmetry and asymmetry from symmetry may shed light on novel one-way optical devices and application of -symmetric metamaterials. PMID:26876806

  18. Mental health parity legislation: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed Central

    Pacula, R L; Sturm, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether state-level parity legislation has led to an increase in utilization of mental health services. DATA SOURCES: Healthcare For Communities (HCC), a multi-site nationally representative study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that tracks health care system changes for mental health and substance abuse treatment. Information on state-level parity legislation was provided by state offices of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI); local and state market data come from the Area Resource File; information on other health mandates from Blue Cross/Blue Shield. STUDY DESIGN: Two-stage regressions are used to estimate the effect of state parity legislation on use of any mental health services, use of specialty mental health services, and number of specialty visits in the past year. In the first stage, we predicted the probability that a state decides to pass parity legislation as a function of state health care market indicators and previous legislative activity. The fitted probability is used in the second stage to determine the effect of this legislation on access and utilization. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: State parity legislation is not associated with a significant increase in any of our measures of mental health services utilization. These results are robust to various specifications of the models. CONCLUSIONS: Those states that are able to pass parity legislation do not experience significant increases in the utilization of mental health services. This may be due in part to a loss of coverage for those people most at risk for mental health disorders. The results could be very different, however, if strong federal legislation were passed. PMID:10778814

  19. Neuro-parity pattern recognition system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Van Alstine, Rollin G.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Yue, Yong

    2000-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring a process and determining its condition. Initial data is sensed, a first set of virtual data is produced by applying a system state analyzation to the initial data, a second set of virtual data is produced by applying a neural network analyzation to the initial data and a parity space analyzation is applied to the first and second set of virtual data and also to the initial data to provide a parity space decision about the condition of the process. A logic test can further be applied to produce a further system decision about the state of the process.

  20. Lifetime of the 2798 keV state of 21Na and its relevance for parity mixing detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, M.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Seuthe, S.; Waanders, F. B.; Rolfs, C.

    1989-11-01

    The mean lifetime of the unbound level E x(J π)=2798 ( {1}/{2}-) keV of 21Na, corresponding to the Ep=384 V, Jπ= {1}/{2}-20Ne (p, γ) 21Na resonance, has been measured with the Doppler shift attenuation method as τ m=19±6 fs. On this basis, the irregular analyzing power A‧ for the 20Ne(p, γ) 21Na reaction with longitudinally polarized protons, can be related to the matrix element the parity violating interaction between the lowest {1}/{2}- and {1}/{2}+ levels of 21Na:A‧≈10 -4. A me ement of this analyzing power requires the availability of intense polarized proton beams.

  1. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  2. Combined effect of coherent Z exchange and the hyperfine interaction in the atomic parity-nonconserving interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Safronova, M.S.; Safronova, U.I.

    2003-06-01

    The nuclear spin-dependent parity-nonconserving (PNC) interaction arising from a combination of the hyperfine interaction and the coherent, spin-independent, PNC interaction from Z exchange is evaluated using many-body perturbation theory. For the 6s{sub 1/2}-7s{sub 1/2} transition in {sup 133}Cs, we obtain a result that is about 40% smaller than that found previously by Bouchiat and Piketty [Phys. Lett. B 269, 195 (1991)]. Applying this result to {sup 133}Cs leads to an increase in the experimental value of nuclear anapole moment and exacerbates differences between constraints on PNC meson coupling constants obtained from the Cs anapole moment and those obtained from othermore » nuclear parity violating experiments. Nuclear spin-dependent PNC dipole matrix elements, including contributions from the combined weak-hyperfine interaction, are also given for the 7s{sub 1/2}-8s{sub 1/2} transition in {sup 211}Fr and for transitions between ground-state hyperfine levels in K, Rb, Cs, Ba{sup +}, Au, Tl, Fr, and Ra{sup +}.« less

  3. CP violation in the B system.

    PubMed

    Gershon, T; Gligorov, V V

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation is crucial to understand the asymmetry between matter and antimatter that exists in the Universe. Dramatic experimental progress has been made, in particular in measurements of the behaviour of particles containing the b quark, where CP violation effects are predicted by the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism that is embedded in the standard model. The status of these measurements and future prospects for an understanding of CP violation beyond the standard model are reviewed.

  4. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING...) of the act. [42 FR 37202, July 20, 1977] Trade Practices ...

  5. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...) of the act. [42 FR 37202, July 20, 1977] Trade Practices ...

  6. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING...) of the act. [42 FR 37202, July 20, 1977] Trade Practices ...

  7. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...) of the act. [42 FR 37202, July 20, 1977] Trade Practices ...

  8. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  9. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  10. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...) of the act. [42 FR 37202, July 20, 1977] Trade Practices ...

  11. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION... customer to presubscribe, at a minimum, to one telecommunications carrier for all interLATA toll calls and...

  12. Parity quantum numbers in the density matrix renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Yu-Chin

    2012-07-01

    In strongly correlated systems, numerical algorithms taking parity quantum numbers into account are used not only for accelerating computation by reducing the Hilbert space but also for particular manipulations such as the level spectroscopy (LS) method. By comparing energy differences among different parity quantum numbers, the LS method is a crucial technique used in identifying quantum critical points of Gaussian and Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless- (BKT) type quantum phase transitions. These transitions that occur in many one-dimensional systems are usually difficult to study numerically. Although the LS method is an effective strategy to locate critical points, it has lacked an algorithm that can manage large systems with parity quantum numbers. Here a parity density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is discussed. The LS method is used with the DMRG in the S=2 XXZ spin chain with uniaxial anisotropy. Quantum critical points of BKT and Gaussian transitions can be located well. Thus, the LS method becomes a very powerful tool for BKT and Gaussian transitions. In addition, Oshikawa's hypothesis in 1992 on the presence of an intermediate phase in the present model is supported by DMRG.

  13. 77 FR 12930 - Federal Acquisition Regulation: Socioeconomic Program Parity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... 9000-AL88 Federal Acquisition Regulation: Socioeconomic Program Parity AGENCY: Department of Defense... 2010 that clarifies that there is no order of precedence among the small business socioeconomic contracting programs. Accordingly, this final rule amends the FAR to clarify the existence of socioeconomic...

  14. 76 FR 26220 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 19 [FAC 2005-50; FAR Case 2011-004; Docket 2011-0004; Sequence 1] RIN 9000-AL88 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General...

  15. 76 FR 14566 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Parts 13 and 19 [FAC 2005-50; FAR Case 2011-004; Item V; Docket 2011-0004, Sequence 1] RIN 9000-AL88 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity AGENCY: Department of Defense...

  16. Parity and Prestige in English Secondary Education Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Olive Banks' work Parity and Prestige in English Secondary Education made a major and distinctive contribution to the literature on the historical development of secondary education. Her work exemplified a close relationship between sociology and history, examined a vital and enduring theme that continues to be relevant and pervasive, helped to…

  17. Experiments on the origin of molecular chirality by parity non-conservation during beta-decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments are described to test a theory for the origin of optical activity wherein the longitudinally polarized electrons resulting from parity violation during radioactive beta decay, and their resulting circularly polarized Bremsstrahlung, might interact asymmetrically with organic matter to yield optically active products. Experiments involve subjecting a number of racemic and optically active amino acid samples to irradiation in a 61700 Ci90SR-90Y beta radiation source for a period of 1.34 years, then examining them for any asymmetric effects by means of optical rotatory dispersion and analytical gas chromatography. In the cases of D,L-leucine, norleucine, norvaline and proline as solids, of D,L-leucine in solution and of D,L-tyrosine in alkaline solution no optical rotation was observed during CRD measurements in the 250-630 nm spectral region. While slight differences were noted in the percent radiolysis of solid D- (12.7%) and L-leucine (16.2%) as determined by GC, no enrichment of either enantiomer was found.

  18. Nuclear β Decay with Lorentz Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility of Lorentz-invariance violation in weak-decay processes. We present a general approach that entails modifying the W-boson propagator by adding a Lorentz-violating tensor to it. We describe the effects of Lorentz violation on nuclear β decay in this scenario. In particular we show the expression for a first-forbidden transition with a spin change of two. Using data from an old experiment on the rotational invariance of yttrium-90, we derive several bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters of the order of 10-6-10-8.

  19. National trends in drinking water quality violations.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Maura; Wu, Haowei; Lall, Upmanu

    2018-02-27

    Ensuring safe water supply for communities across the United States is a growing challenge in the face of aging infrastructure, impaired source water, and strained community finances. In the aftermath of the Flint lead crisis, there is an urgent need to assess the current state of US drinking water. However, no nationwide assessment has yet been conducted on trends in drinking water quality violations across several decades. Efforts to reduce violations are of national concern given that, in 2015, nearly 21 million people relied on community water systems that violated health-based quality standards. In this paper, we evaluate spatial and temporal patterns in health-related violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act using a panel dataset of 17,900 community water systems over the period 1982-2015. We also identify vulnerability factors of communities and water systems through probit regression. Increasing time trends and violation hot spots are detected in several states, particularly in the Southwest region. Repeat violations are prevalent in locations of violation hot spots, indicating that water systems in these regions struggle with recurring issues. In terms of vulnerability factors, we find that violation incidence in rural areas is substantially higher than in urbanized areas. Meanwhile, private ownership and purchased water source are associated with compliance. These findings indicate the types of underperforming systems that might benefit from assistance in achieving consistent compliance. We discuss why certain violations might be clustered in some regions and strategies for improving national drinking water quality.

  20. Strong cosmic censorship and causality violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kengo; Ishibashi, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    We investigate the instability of the Cauchy horizon caused by causality violation in the compact vacuum universe with the topology B×S1×R, which Moncrief and Isenberg considered. We show that if the occurrence of curvature singularities are restricted to the boundary of the causality-violating region, the whole segments of the boundary become curvature singularities. This implies that strong cosmic censorship holds in the spatially compact vacuum space-time in the case of causality violation. This also suggests that causality violation cannot occur for a compact universe.

  1. Measurement of branching fractions and CP violation parameters in B→ωK decays with first evidence of CP violation in B0→ωKs0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobanova, V.; Dalseno, J.; Kiesling, C.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Ban, Y.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; He, X. H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peng, T.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fractions and charge-parity-(CP-)violating parameters in B→ωK decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×106 BB ¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e3ex" - collider. We obtain the branching fractions B(B0→ωK0)=(4.5±0.4(stat)±0.3(syst))×10-6,B(B+→ωK+)=(6.8±0.4(stat)±0.4(syst))×10-6 which are in agreement with their respective current world averages. For the CP-violating parameters, we obtain AωKS0=-0.36±0.19(stat)±0.05(syst),SωKS0=+0.91±0.32(stat)±0.05(syst),AωK+=-0.03±0.04(stat)±0.01(syst), where A and S represent the direct and mixing-induced CP asymmetry, respectively. We find no evidence of CP violation in the decay channel B+→ωK+; however, we obtain the first evidence of CP violation in the B0→ωKS0 decay channel at the level of 3.1 standard deviations.

  2. Judging Children's Participatory Parity from Social Justice and the Political Ethics of Care Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozalek, Vivienne

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a model for judging children's participatory parity in different social spaces. The notion of participatory parity originates in Nancy Fraser's normative theory for social justice, where it concerns the participatory status of adults. What, then, constitutes participatory parity for children? How should we judge the extent to…

  3. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cases where preliminary marketing season average price data are used in estimating the adjusted base... parity price data. 5.5 Section 5.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted...

  4. 7 CFR 5.1 - Parity index and index of prices received by farmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parity index and index of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity index and index of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity index and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the index of prices paid by...

  5. Probing Low-Mass Vector Bosons with Parity Nonconservation and Nuclear Anapole Moment Measurements in Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Stadnik, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    In the presence of P -violating interactions, the exchange of vector bosons between electrons and nucleons induces parity-nonconserving (PNC) effects in atoms and molecules, while the exchange of vector bosons between nucleons induces anapole moments of nuclei. We perform calculations of such vector-mediated PNC effects in Cs, Ba+ , Yb, Tl, Fr, and Ra+ using the same relativistic many-body approaches as in earlier calculations of standard-model PNC effects, but with the long-range operator of the weak interaction. We calculate nuclear anapole moments due to vector-boson exchange using a simple nuclear model. From measured and predicted (within the standard model) values for the PNC amplitudes in Cs, Yb, and Tl, as well as the nuclear anapole moment of 133Cs, we constrain the P -violating vector-pseudovector nucleon-electron and nucleon-proton interactions mediated by a generic vector boson of arbitrary mass. Our limits improve on existing bounds from other experiments by many orders of magnitude over a very large range of vector-boson masses.

  6. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations. Anyone...

  7. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations. Anyone...

  8. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations. Anyone...

  9. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations. Anyone...

  10. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations. Anyone...

  11. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  12. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  13. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  14. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  15. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  16. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  17. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  18. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  19. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  20. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  1. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND... order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2...

  2. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND... order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2...

  3. 22 CFR 127.11 - Past violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.11 Past violations. (a) Presumption of denial. Pursuant to section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act... or deemed ineligible in this manner since the effective date of the Arms Export Control Act (Public...

  4. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  5. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  6. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  7. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  8. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  9. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  10. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  11. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  12. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING... court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended...

  13. 10 CFR 54.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 54.41 Section 54.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General... violation of the provisions of the following acts— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. (2) Title...

  14. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject to...

  15. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject to...

  16. 14 CFR § 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1214.704 Section § 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject to...

  17. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject to...

  18. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject to...

  19. Lorentz violation and deep inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Lunghi, E.; Vieira, A. R.

    2017-03-28

    We study the effects of quark-sector Lorentz violation on deep inelastic electron–proton scattering. Here, we show that existing data can be used to establish first constraints on numerous coefficients for Lorentz violation in the quark sector at an estimated sensitivity of parts in a million.

  20. 10 CFR 9.90 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 9.90 Section 9.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Enforcement § 9.90 Violations. (a) An injunction or other... regulations issued thereunder, may be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and upon conviction may be fined up to...

  1. 10 CFR 9.90 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 9.90 Section 9.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Enforcement § 9.90 Violations. (a) An injunction or other... regulations issued thereunder, may be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and upon conviction may be fined up to...

  2. 10 CFR 9.90 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 9.90 Section 9.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Enforcement § 9.90 Violations. (a) An injunction or other... regulations issued thereunder, may be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and upon conviction may be fined up to...

  3. 10 CFR 9.90 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 9.90 Section 9.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Enforcement § 9.90 Violations. (a) An injunction or other... regulations issued thereunder, may be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and upon conviction may be fined up to...

  4. 10 CFR 9.90 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 9.90 Section 9.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Privacy Act Regulations Enforcement § 9.90 Violations. (a) An injunction or other... regulations issued thereunder, may be guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and upon conviction may be fined up to...

  5. 10 CFR 72.84 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 72.84 Section 72.84 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  6. 10 CFR 72.84 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 72.84 Section 72.84 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  7. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended; or (3) A...

  8. EnviroSafe Finding of Violation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document outlines the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reissuing an enclosed Finding of Violation (FOV) to Enviro-Safe Refrigerants, Inc. (you). We find that you have violated the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. § 7413(a) (the CAA).

  9. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  10. Lorentz and diffeomorphism violations in linearized gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    Lorentz and diffeomorphism violations are studied in linearized gravity using effective field theory. A classification of all gauge-invariant and gauge-violating terms is given. The exact covariant dispersion relation for gravitational modes involving operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed, and various special limits are discussed.

  11. Public Notification - RTCR Treatment Technique Violation Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    When a PWS receives a Treatment Technique Violation following an RTCR Level 1 or Level 2 assessment, it must issue a public notice to inform consumers of that violation. This template can be used as a guide to prepare that public notice.

  12. An Analysis of Shuttle Crew Scheduling Violations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristol, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    From the early years of the Space Shuttle program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle crews have had a timeline of activities to guide them through their time on-orbit. Planners used scheduling constraints to build timelines that ensured the health and safety of the crews. If a constraint could not be met it resulted in a violation. Other agencies of the federal government also have scheduling constraints to ensure the safety of personnel and the public. This project examined the history of Space Shuttle scheduling constraints, constraints from Federal agencies and branches of the military and how these constraints may be used as a guide for future NASA and private spacecraft. This was conducted by reviewing rules and violations with regard to human aerospace scheduling constraints, environmental, political, social and technological factors, operating environment and relevant human factors. This study includes a statistical analysis of Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) related violations to determine if these were a significant producer of constraint violations. It was hypothesized that the number of SCSC violations caused by EVA activities were a significant contributor to the total number of violations for Shuttle/ISS missions. Data was taken from NASA data archives at the Johnson Space Center from Space Shuttle/ISS missions prior to the STS-107 accident. The results of the analysis rejected the null hypothesis and found that EVA violations were a significant contributor to the total number of violations. This analysis could help NASA and commercial space companies understand the main source of constraint violations and allow them to create constraint rules that ensure the safe operation of future human private and exploration missions. Additional studies could be performed to evaluate other variables that could have influenced the scheduling violations that were analyzed.

  13. Six-point next-to-maximally helicity-violating amplitude in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosower, D. A.; Roiban, R.; Vergu, C.

    2011-03-01

    We present an integral representation for the parity-even part of the two-loop six-point planar next-to-maximally helicity-violating amplitude in terms of Feynman integrals which have simple transformation properties under the dual conformal symmetry. We probe the dual conformal properties of the amplitude numerically, subtracting the known infrared divergences. We find that the subtracted amplitude is invariant under dual conformal transformations, confirming existing conjectures through two-loop order. We also discuss the all-loop structure of the six-point next-to-maximally helicity-violating amplitude and give a parametrization whose dual conformal invariant building blocks have a simple physical interpretation.

  14. Parity doublet structures in doubly-odd 216Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragati, Â.; Deo, A. Y.; Tandel, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, S. S.; Chakraborty, S.; Rai, S.; Wahid, S. G.; Kumar, S.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bala, Indu; Garg, Ritika; Jain, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    Parity doublet structures are established in 216Fr, which lies at the lower boundary of enhanced octupole collectivity in the trans-lead region. The newly identified levels are established as the simplex partner of a previously reported band leading to parity doublets with small (˜55 keV) average energy splitting, a feature typical of nuclei with near-static octupole deformation. The observed levels do not follow a regular pattern of rotational bands, indicating low quadrupole collectivity. However, enhanced octupole correlations are evident from the small energy splitting and large B(E1)/B(E2) values. Staggering in E1 transition energies and B(E1)/B(E2) ratios is noted. The enhancement of octupole correlations in 216Fr is attributed to the availability of a neutron orbital with a K = 3/2 component.

  15. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  16. Unidirectional zero reflection as gauged parity-time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, James; Sun, Yong; Xiao, Shiyi; Zhang, Liwen; Fitzgerald, Richard; Rotter, Stefan; Chen, Hong; Li, Jensen

    2017-12-01

    We introduce here the concept of establishing parity-time (PT)-symmetry through a gauge transformation involving a shift of the mirror plane for the parity operation. The corresponding unitary transformation on the system’s constitutive matrix allows us to generate and explore a family of equivalent PT-symmetric systems. We further derive that unidirectional zero reflection for a reciprocal two-port system can always be associated with a passively gauged PT-symmetry. We demonstrate this experimentally using a microstrip transmission-line with magnetoelectric coupling. This study allows us to use bianisotropy as a practical route to realise and explore exceptional point behaviour of PT-symmetric or generally non-Hermitian systems.

  17. Non-Hermitian photonics based on parity-time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; El-Ganainy, Ramy; Ge, Li

    2017-12-01

    Nearly one century after the birth of quantum mechanics, parity-time symmetry is revolutionizing and extending quantum theories to include a unique family of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. While conceptually striking, experimental demonstration of parity-time symmetry remains unexplored in quantum electronic systems. The flexibility of photonics allows for creating and superposing non-Hermitian eigenstates with ease using optical gain and loss, which makes it an ideal platform to explore various non-Hermitian quantum symmetry paradigms for novel device functionalities. Such explorations that employ classical photonic platforms not only deepen our understanding of fundamental quantum physics but also facilitate technological breakthroughs for photonic applications. Research into non-Hermitian photonics therefore advances and benefits both fields simultaneously.

  18. Effects of parity nonconservation in a molecule of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, D. V.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Andreev, O. Yu; Labzowsky, L. N.; Plunien, G.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the calculation of parity nonconserving (PNC) effects in the diatomic homonuclear molecule of oxygen O2. For this purpose the magnetic dipole transition b{}1{{{Σ }}}g+≤ftarrow X{}3{{{Σ }}}g- was considered. It was believed that the weak electron-electron interaction prevails over the weak interaction of electrons with nuclei in this case. This idea appeared not to be justified for molecular oxygen. As it turns out from our calculations, the parity nonconservation degree for the weak electron-nucleus interaction is of the order {{ P }}{{eN}}=1.4\\cdot {10}-11 and for the weak electron-electron interaction is by two orders smaller {{ P }}{{ee}}=1.1\\cdot {10}-13. Nevertheless, a PNC experiment for the observation of the weak electron-nucleus interaction looks sufficiently feasible (previously, such experiments were carried out only with atoms).

  19. Bose-Hubbard model with occupation-parity couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kuei; Bolech, C. J.

    2014-02-01

    We study a Bose-Hubbard model having on-site repulsion, nearest-neighbor tunneling, and ferromagneticlike coupling between occupation parities of nearest-neighbor sites. For a uniform system in any dimension at zero tunneling, we obtain an exact phase diagram characterized by Mott-insulator (MI) and pair liquid phases and regions of phase separation of two MIs. For a general trapped system in one and two dimensions with finite tunneling, we perform quantum Monte Carlo and Gutzwiller mean-field calculations, both of which show the evolution of the system, as the parity coupling increases, from a superfluid to wedding-cake-structure MIs with their occupations jumping by 2. We also identify an exotic pair superfluid at relatively large tunneling strength. Our model ought to effectively describe recent findings in imbalanced Fermi gases in two-dimensional optical lattices and also potentially apply to an anisotropic version of bilinear-biquadratic spin systems.

  20. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Cheng, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip

    2016-02-02

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit widemore » vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.« less

  1. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Cheng, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2016-02-02

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  2. Odd-frequency triplet pairing in mixed-parity superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuoco, Mario; Gentile, Paola; Noce, Canio; Romano, Alfonso; Annunziata, Gaetano; Linder, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    We show that mixed-parity superconductors may exhibit equal-spin pair correlations that are odd-in-time and can be tuned by means of an applied field. The direction and the amplitude of the pair correlator in the spin space turn out to be strongly dependent on the symmetry of the order parameter, and thus provide a tool to identify different types of singlet-triplet mixed configurations. We suggest that odd-in-time spin-polarized pair correlations can be generated without magnetic inhomogeneities in superconducting/ferromagnetic hybrids with non-centrosymmetric superconductor or when parity mixing is induced at the interface. Paola Gentile, Canio Noce, Alfonso Romano, Gaetano Annunziata, Jacob Linder, Mario Cuoco, arXiv:1109.4885

  3. Novel Parity-Preserving Designs of Reversible 4-Bit Comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xue-mei; Chen, Fu-long; Wang, Hong-tao; Sun, Yun-xiang; Guo, Liang-min

    2014-04-01

    Reversible logic has attracted much attention in recent years especially when the calculation with minimum energy consumption is considered. This paper presents two novel approaches for designing reversible 4-bit comparator based on parity-preserving gates, which can detect any fault that affects no more than a single logic signal. In order to construct the comparator, three variable EX-OR gate (TVG), comparator gate (CPG), four variable EX-OR gate block (FVGB) and comparator gate block (CPGB) are designed, and they are parity-preserving and reversible. Their quantum equivalent implementations are also proposed. The design of two comparator circuits is completed by using existing reversible gates and the above new reversible circuits. All these comparators have been modeled and verified in Verilog hardware description language (Verilog HDL). The Quartus II simulation results indicate that their circuits' logic structures are correct. The comparative results are presented in terms of quantum cost, delay and garbage outputs.

  4. Successful attack on permutation-parity-machine-based neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Luís F; Ruttor, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    An algorithm is presented which implements a probabilistic attack on the key-exchange protocol based on permutation parity machines. Instead of imitating the synchronization of the communicating partners, the strategy consists of a Monte Carlo method to sample the space of possible weights during inner rounds and an analytic approach to convey the extracted information from one outer round to the next one. The results show that the protocol under attack fails to synchronize faster than an eavesdropper using this algorithm.

  5. Flavor physics and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paoti; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, Wei-Shu

    2017-11-01

    We currently live in the age of the CKM paradigm. The 3 × 3 matrix that links (d , s , b) quarks to (u , c , t) in the charged current weak interaction, being complex and nominally with 18 parameters, can be accounted for by just 3 rotation angles and one CP violating (CPV) phase, with unitarity and the CKM phases triumphantly tested at the B factories. But the CKM picture is unsatisfactory and has too many parameters. The main aim of Flavor Physics and CP violation (FPCP) studies is the pursuit to uncover New Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Two highlights of LHC Run 1 period are the CPV phase ϕs of Bs mixing and Bs →μ+μ- decay, which were found to be again consistent with SM, though the saga is yet unfinished. We also saw the emergence of the P5‧ angular variable anomaly in B0 →K∗0μ+μ- decay and R K (∗) anomaly in B →K (∗)μ+μ- to B →K (∗)e+e- rate ratios, and the BaBar anomaly in B →D (∗) τν decays, which suggest possible New Physics in these flavor processes, pointing to extra Z‧, charged Higgs, or leptoquarks. Charmless hadronic, semileptonic, purely leptonic and radiative B decays continue to offer various further windows on New Physics. Away from B physics, the rare K → πνν decays and ε‧ / ε in the kaon sector, μ → e transitions, muon g - 2 and electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron, τ → μγ , μμμ , eee, and a few charm physics probes, offer broadband frontier windows on New Physics. Lastly, flavor changing neutral transitions involving the top quark t and the 125 GeV Higgs boson h, such as t → ch and h → μτ, offer a new window into FPCP, while a new Z‧ related or inspired by the P5‧ anomaly, could show up in analogous top quark processes, perhaps even link with low energy phenomena such as muon g - 2 or rare kaon processes. In particular, we advocate the potential new SM, the two Higgs doublet model without discrete symmetries to control flavor violation, as SM2. As we are

  6. Effect of dams' parity and age on daughters' milk yield in Norwegian Red cows.

    PubMed

    Storli, K S; Heringstad, B; Salte, R

    2014-10-01

    The effect of age and parity of dams on their daughters' milk yield is not well known. Lactation data from 276,000 cows were extracted from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System and analyzed using a linear animal model to estimate effects of parity and age within parity of dam. The 305-d milk yield of daughters decreased as parity of dam increased. Daughters of first-parity dams produced 149 kg more milk than did daughters of seventh-parity dams. We also observed an effect of age of dam within parity on 305-d milk yield of daughters in first lactation. Dams that were young at first calving gave birth to daughters with a higher milk yield compared with older dams within the same parity. The effect of age within parity of dam was highest for second-parity dams. Extensive use of heifers would have a systematic effect, and age and parity of dam should be included in the model when planning a future strategy. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Readout scheme for Majorana parity states using a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoving, Darryl; Gharavi, Kaveh; Baugh, Jonathan

    We propose and numerically study a scheme for reading out the parity state of a pair of Majorana bound states using a tunnel coupled quantum dot. The dot is coupled to one end of the topological wire but isolated from any reservoir, and is capacitively coupled to a charge sensor for measurement. The combined parity of the MBS-dot system is conserved and charge transfer between MBS and dot only occurs through resonant tunnelling. Resonance is controlled by the dot potential through a local gate and by the MBS splitting due to the overlap of the MBS pair wavefunctions. The latter splitting can be controlled by changing the position of the spatially separated, uncoupled MBS via a set of keyboard gates. Our simulations show that the oscillatory nature of the MBS splitting versus separation does not prevent high-fidelity readout. Indeed, the scheme can also be applied to measure the splitting versus separation, which would yield a clear signature of the topological state. With experimentally realistic parameters we find parity readout fidelities >99% should be feasible. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  8. How do delivery mode and parity affect pelvic organ prolapse?

    PubMed

    Yeniel, A Özgür; Ergenoglu, A Mete; Askar, Niyazi; Itil, Ismaıl Mete; Meseri, Reci

    2013-07-01

    To determine the association between mode of delivery, parity, and pelvic organ prolapse, as assessed by the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary referral center, Turkey. A total of 1964 women with benign gynecological disorders who presented between October 2009 and July 2011. Evaluation using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system and questionnaire assessing previous obstetrics and medical history. Difference in pelvic organ prolapse stages between nulliparous and multiparous women, impact of parity and mode of delivery. In the study population, 86.4, 7.2 and 6.4% had pelvic organ prolapse of stages 0-I, II, and III-IV, respectively, and 7.9% had significant prolapse beyond the hymen. The mean age, parity, and number of vaginal deliveries were significantly higher in the prolapse than in the non-prolapse group. Vaginal delivery was associated with an odds ratio of 2.92 (95% confidence interval 1.19-7.17) for prolapse when compared with nulliparity. Each vaginal delivery increased the risk of prolapse (odds ratio 1.23; 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.35) after controlling for all confounding factors. Cesarean delivery had no impact on the odds for prolapse. Vaginal delivery was an independent risk factor for prolapse, and additional vaginal deliveries significantly increased the risk. However, cesarean delivery had no effect on the development of prolapse in this material. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Nonlocal Parity Order in the Two-Dimensional Mott Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzini, Serena; Becca, Federico; Montorsi, Arianna

    2017-04-01

    The Mott insulator is characterized by having small deviations around the (integer) average particle density n , with pairs with n -1 and n +1 particles forming bound states. In one dimension, the effect is captured by a nonzero value of a nonlocal "string" of parities, which instead vanishes in the superfluid phase where density fluctuations are large. Here, we investigate the interaction induced transition from the superfluid to the Mott insulator, in the paradigmatic Bose Hubbard model at n =1 . By means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations and finite size scaling analysis on L ×M ladders, we explore the behavior of "brane" parity operators from one dimension (i.e., M =1 and L →∞ ) to two dimensions (i.e., M →∞ and L →∞ ). We confirm the conjecture that, adopting a standard definition, their average value decays to zero in two dimensions also in the insulating phase, evaluating the scaling factor of the "perimeter law" [S. P. Rath et al., Ann. Phys. (Berlin) 334, 256 (2013), 10.1016/j.aop.2013.04.006]. Upon introducing a further phase in the brane parity, we show that its expectation value becomes nonzero in the insulator, while still vanishing at the transition to the superfluid phase. These quantities are directly accessible to experimental measures, thus providing an insightful signature of the Mott insulator.

  10. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  11. Measurement of D0-D0 mixing parameters and search for CP violation using D0 → K+ π- decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dornan, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-12-20

    Measurements of charm mixing parameters from the decay-time-dependent ratio of D0 → K+ π- to D0 → K- π+ rates and the charge-conjugate ratio are reported. The analysis uses data, corresponding to 3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, from proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the limit of charge-parity (CP ) symmetry, the mixing parameters are determined to be x'2=(5.5±4.9)×10(-5), y'=(4.8±1.0)×10(-3), and RD=(3.568±0.066)×10(-3). Allowing for CP violation, the measurement is performed separately for D0 and D0 mesons yielding AD=(-0.7±1.9)%, for the direct CP-violating asymmetry, and 0.75<|q/p|<1.24 at the 68.3% confidence level, for the parameter describing CP violation in mixing. This is the most precise determination of these parameters from a single experiment and shows no evidence for CP violation.

  12. Baryogenesis in Lorentz-violating gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Solomon, Adam R.

    2017-10-01

    Lorentz-violating theories of gravity typically contain constrained vector fields. We show that the lowest-order coupling of such vectors to U (1)-symmetric scalars can naturally give rise to baryogenesis in a manner akin to the Affleck-Dine mechanism. We calculate the cosmology of this new mechanism, demonstrating that a net B - L can be generated in the early Universe, and that the resulting baryon-to-photon ratio matches that which is presently observed. We discuss constraints on the model using solar system and astrophysical tests of Lorentz violation in the gravity sector. Generic Lorentz-violating theories can give rise to the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry without violating any current bounds.

  13. Search for violations of quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, John; Hagelin, John S.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; ...

    1984-07-01

    The treatment of quantum effects in gravitational fields indicates that pure states may evolve into mixed states, and Hawking has proposed modification of the axioms of field theory which incorporate the corresponding violation of quantum mechanics. In this study we propose a modified hamiltonian equation of motion for density matrices and use it to interpret upper bounds on the violation of quantum mechanics in different phenomenological situations. We apply our formalism to the K 0-K 0 system and to long baseline neutron interferometry experiments. In both cases we find upper bounds of about 2 × 10 -21 GeV on contributionsmore » to the single particle “hamiltonian” which violate quantum mechanical coherence. We discuss how these limits might be improved in the future, and consider the relative significance of other successful tests of quantum mechanics. Finally, an appendix contains model estimates of the magnitude of effects violating quantum mechanics.« less

  14. Lorentz violation, gravitoelectromagnetic field and Bhabha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2018-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry is a fundamental symmetry in the Standard Model (SM) and in General Relativity (GR). This symmetry holds true for all models at low energies. However, at energies near the Planck scale, it is conjectured that there may be a very small violation of Lorentz symmetry. The Standard Model Extension (SME) is a quantum field theory that includes a systematic description of Lorentz symmetry violations in all sectors of particle physics and gravity. In this paper, SME is considered to study the physical process of Bhabha Scattering in the Gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM) theory. GEM is an important formalism that is valid in a suitable approximation of general relativity. A new nonminimal coupling term that violates Lorentz symmetry is used in this paper. Differential cross-section for gravitational Bhabha scattering is calculated. The Lorentz violation contributions to this GEM scattering cross-section are small and are similar in magnitude to the case of the electromagnetic field.

  15. Higgs C P violation from vectorlike quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Dawson, S.; Zhang, Yue

    2015-10-20

    We explore CP violating aspects in the Higgs sector of models where new vectorlike quarks carry Yukawa couplings mainly to the third generation quarks of the Standard Model. We point out that in the simplest model, Higgs CP violating interactions only exist in the hWW channel. At low energy, we nd that rare B decays can place similarly strong constraints as those from electric dipole moments on the source of CP violation. These observations offer a new handle to discriminate from other Higgs CP violating scenarios such as scalar sector extensions of the Standard Model, and imply an interesting futuremore » interplay among limits from different experiments.« less

  16. Violations of Management Principles within Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, Andrew F.; Sikula, John P.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of effective management commonly violated by educational institutions include: (1) unity of command; (2) division or specialization of labor; (3) delegation of authority; and (4) authority equal to responsibility. (JMF)

  17. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  18. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  19. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  20. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  1. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  2. Redefining commercial vehicle permitting and credentialing violations.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze enforcement and adjudication of common commercial vehicle tax, credentialing, and safety offenses. This study examined violations of the International Fuel Tax Agreement and the Kentucky Intrastate Tax, Kent...

  3. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; ...

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δ CP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δ CP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizablemore » bias in the extracted δ CP value.« less

  4. The relationship between parity and overweight varies with household wealth and national development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sonia A; Yount, Kathryn M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2007-02-01

    Recent studies support a positive relationship between parity and overweight among women of developing countries; however, it is unclear whether these effects vary by household wealth and national development. Our objective was to determine whether the association between parity and overweight [body mass index (BMI) > or =25 kg/m(2)] in women living in developing countries varies with levels of national human development and/or household wealth. We used data from 28 nationally representative, cross-sectional surveys conducted between 1996 and 2003 (n = 275 704 women, 15-49 years). The relationship between parity and overweight was modelled using logistic regression, controlling for several biological and sociodemographic factors and national development, as reflected by the United Nations' Human Development Index. We also modelled the interaction between parity and national development, and the three-way interaction between parity, household wealth and national development. Parity had a weak, positive association with overweight, which varied by household wealth and national development. Among the poorest women and women in the second tertile of household wealth, parity was positively related to overweight only in the most developed countries. Among the wealthiest women, parity was positively related to overweight regardless of the level of national development. As development increases, the burden of parity-related overweight shifts to include poor as well as wealthy women. In the least-developed countries, programmes to prevent parity-related overweight should target wealthy women, whereas such programmes should be provided to all women in more developed countries.

  5. Exploring CP violation in the MSSM.

    PubMed

    Arbey, Alexandre; Ellis, John; Godbole, Rohini M; Mahmoudi, Farvah

    We explore the prospects for observing CP violation in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with six CP-violating parameters, three gaugino mass phases and three phases in trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters, using the CPsuperH code combined with a geometric approach to maximise CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We also implement CP-conserving constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics and the upper limits on the cosmological dark matter density and spin-independent scattering. We study possible values of observables within the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), the CPX scenario and a variant of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). We find values of the CP-violating asymmetry [Formula: see text] in [Formula: see text] decay that may be as large as 3 %, so future measurements of [Formula: see text] may provide independent information about CP violation in the MSSM. We find that CP-violating MSSM contributions to the [Formula: see text] meson mass mixing term [Formula: see text] are in general below the present upper limit, which is dominated by theoretical uncertainties. If these could be reduced, [Formula: see text] could also provide an interesting and complementary constraint on the six CP-violating MSSM phases, enabling them all to be determined experimentally, in principle. We also find that CP violation in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] couplings can be quite large, and so may offer interesting prospects for future [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] colliders.

  6. Search for lepton flavour violation in the eμ continuum with the ATLAS detector in $$\\sqrt{s} = 7~\\mbox{TeV}$$ pp collisions at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2012-06-14

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark (more » $$\\sim\\atop{t}$$) in the e ±μ ∓ continuum using 2.1 fb 1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in √s = 7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95 % C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m$$_t^-$$). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp→eμX, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m$$_t^-$$ = 95 GeV to 30 fb for m$$_t^-$$ = 1000 GeV.« less

  7. 48 CFR 403.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Antitrust Violations 403.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. Contracting officers shall report the circumstances of suspected violations of antitrust laws to the Office of Inspector General in accordance with... antitrust violations. 403.303 Section 403.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 48 CFR 1403.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Antitrust Violations 1403.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. (a) Reports on suspected violations of antitrust laws as required by FAR 3.303 shall be prepared by the CO, reviewed by the SOL, and... antitrust violations. 1403.303 Section 1403.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  9. Is Maternal Parity an Independent Risk Factor for Birth Defects?

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Hao T.; Hoyt, Adrienne T.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Canfield, Mark A.; Case, Amy; McNeese, Melanie L.; Waller, Dorothy Kim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although associations between maternal parity and birth defects have been observed previously, few studies have focused on the possibility that parity is an independent risk factor for birth defects. We investigated the relation between levels of parity and a range of birth defects, adjusting each defect group for the same covariates. METHODS We included infants who had an estimated delivery date between 1997 and 2007 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multisite case-control study. Cases included infants or fetuses belonging to 38 phenotypes of birth defects (n = 17,908), and controls included infants who were unaffected by a major birth defect (n = 7173). Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for 12 covariates using logistic regression. RESULTS Compared with primiparous mothers, nulliparous mothers were more likely to have infants with amniotic band sequence, hydrocephaly, esophageal atresia, hypospadias, limb reduction deficiencies, diaphragmatic hernia, omphalocele, gastroschisis, tetralogy of Fallot, and septal cardiac defects, with significant ORs (1.2 to 2.3). Compared with primiparous mothers, multiparous mothers had a significantly increased risk of omphalocele, with an OR of 1.5, but had significantly decreased risk of hypospadias and limb reduction deficiencies, with ORs of 0.77 and 0.77. CONCLUSIONS Nulliparity was associated with an increased risk of specific phenotypes of birth defects. Most of the phenotypes associated with nulliparity in this study were consistent with those identified by previous studies. Research into biologic or environmental factors that are associated with nulliparity may be helpful in explaining some or all of these associations. PMID:22371332

  10. Performance of Low-Density Parity-Check Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the simulated performance of each of the nine accumulate-repeat-4-jagged-accumulate (AR4JA) low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes [3] when used in conjunction with binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK), quadrature PSK (QPSK), 8-PSK, 16-ary amplitude PSK (16- APSK), and 32-APSK.We also report the performance under various mappings of bits to modulation symbols, 16-APSK and 32-APSK ring scalings, log-likelihood ratio (LLR) approximations, and decoder variations. One of the simple and well-performing LLR approximations can be expressed in a general equation that applies to all of the modulation types.

  11. A parity breaking Ising chain Hamiltonian as a Brownian motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornu, F.; Hilhorst, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the translationally invariant but parity (left-right symmetry) breaking Ising chain Hamiltonian {\\cal H} =-{U_2}\\sumk sksk+1 - {U_3}\\sumk sksk+1sk+3 and let this system evolve by Kawasaki spin exchange dynamics. Monte Carlo simulations show that perturbations forcing this system off equilibrium make it act as a Brownian molecular motor which, in the lattice gas interpretation, transports particles along the chain. We determine the particle current under various different circumstances, in particular as a function of the ratio {U_3}/{U_2} and of the conserved magnetization M=\\sum_ksk . The symmetry of the U3 term in the Hamiltonian is discussed.

  12. The development of product parity sensitivity in children with mathematics learning disability and in typical achievers.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Avital; Henik, Avishai

    2013-02-01

    Parity helps us determine whether an arithmetic equation is true or false. The current research examines the development of sensitivity to parity cues in multiplication in typically achieving (TA) children (grades 2, 3, 4 and 6) and in children with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD, grades 6 and 8), via a verification task. In TA children the onset of parity sensitivity was observed at the beginning of 3rd grade, whereas in children with MLD it was documented only in 8th grade. These results suggest that children with MLD develop parity aspects of number sense, though later than TA children. To check the plausibility of equations, children used mainly the multiplication parity rule rather than familiarity with even products. Similar to observations in adults, parity sensitivity was largest for problems with two even operands, moderate for problems with one even and one odd operand, and smallest for problems with two odd operands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pompage optique et violation de parité dans l'atome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, M.-A.

    Between the original Kastler work about polarization of the Hg vapour fluorescence (1936) and the parity violation experiment in Cesium [5], we notice a relationship in the methods of investigation and in the nature of the physical problems under consideration : an illustration of the richness of the research field pioneered by Alfred Kastler. This paper adopts a phenomenological description of the Cesium parity violation experiment, without reference to electroweak theory. This allows to shed light on the peculiar features of our experiment which seem to contradict the optical pumping lore. When the 6S-7S forbidden transition in Cesium is excited, the electronic spin orientation of the 7S state exhibits two anomalies : the first one can be associated with a breakdown of a rotational invariance of the atom-radiation field system by the external dc electric field, the second one, much more fundamental, is a right-left asymmetry, Le. a manifestation of a parity violation not accounted for by conventional QED. The interpretation of this new optical pumping effect involves the introduction of three different dipole moments : the strongly suppressed magnetic dipole, an electric dipole induced by the Stark field and one directed along the spin momentum indicating the presence of the parity violating, but Tconserving, electron-nucleus interaction. When the transition is excited, the radiation field is absorbed coherently by these transition dipoles. The breakdown of the usual optical pumping rules can be explained in terms of interference between the amplitudes associated with two different dipoles. In particular, the interference of the Stark dipole with the PV dipole leads to a component of the 7S spin orientation which behaves under mirror symmetry as a polar vector, and not as an axial vector as one would normally expect for an angular momentum type quantity. Basically, the experiment consists in studying the effects upon the properties of the fluorescence light

  14. Behavioral Health Insurance Parity: Does Oregon’s Experience Presage the National Experience with the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act?

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, K. John; Gast, Samuel H.N.; Ridgely, M. Susan; Wallace, Neal; Jacuzzi, Natalie; Rieckmann, Traci; McFarland, Bentson H.; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act prohibits commercial group health plans from imposing spending and visit limitations for mental health and substance abuse services that are not imposed on medical-surgical benefits. Controversially, the Act also restricts the use of managed care tools that apply to the behavioral health benefit in ways that differ from their application to the medical-surgical benefit. The only precedent for this approach is Oregon’s state parity law, implemented in 2007. The goal of this study is to estimate the effect of Oregon’s parity law on expenditures for mental health and substance abuse treatment services. Methods We compared expenditures for individuals in four Oregon commercial plans from 2005 through 2008 to a matched group of commercially insured individuals in Oregon who were exempt from parity. Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we analyzed the effect of comprehensive parity on spending for mental health and substance abuse services. Results Increases in spending on mental health and substance abuse services following Oregon’s parity law were due almost entirely to a general trend observed among individuals with and without parity. Expenditures per enrollee for mental health and substance abuse services attributable to parity were positive but did not differ significantly from zero in any of the four plans (range: +$12.15 to +$25.49, p>0.05 for each comparison). Conclusion Behavioral health insurance parity that places restrictions on how plans manage mental health and substance abuse services can improve insurance protections without substantial increases in total costs. PMID:21890792

  15. The Boundary Violations Scale: An Empirical Measure of Intergenerational Boundary Violations in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden-Derdich, Debra A.; Estrada, Ana Ulloa; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Leonard, Stacie A.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a new measure to assess children's perceptions of intergenerational boundary violations in families. The Boundary Violations Scale is a theoretically derived instrument consisting of 12 items. Principal components analysis using data from 119 young adolescents from diverse ethnic backgrounds (i.e., 56%…

  16. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 703.104-10.1...

  17. 48 CFR 2903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of standards of conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations of standards of conduct. 2903.104-7 Section 2903.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2903...

  18. Migrant Farmworker Housing Regulation Violations in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Weir, Maria; Chen, Haiying; Summers, Phillip; Pelletier, Lori E.; Galván, Leonardo; Bischoff, Werner E.; Mirabelli, Maria C.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The quality of housing provided to migrant farmworkers is often criticized, but few studies have investigated these housing conditions. This analysis examines housing regulation violations experienced by migrant farmworkers in North Carolina, and the associations of camp characteristics with the presence of housing violations. Methods Data were collected in183 eastern North Carolina migrant farmworker camps in 2010. Housing regulation violations for the domains of camp, sleeping room, bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, and general housing, as well as total violations were assessed using North Carolina Department of Labor standards. Results Violations of housing regulations were common, ranging from 4 to 22 per camp. Housing regulation violations were common in all domains; the mean number of camp violations was 1.6, of sleeping room violations was 3.8, of bathroom violations was 4.5, of kitchen violations was 2.3, of laundry room violations was 1.2, and of general housing violations was 3.1. The mean number of total housing violations was 11.4. Several camp characteristics were consistently associated with the number of violations; camps with workers having H-2A visas, with North Carolina Department of Labor Certificates of Inspection posted, and assessed early in the season had fewer violations. Conclusions These results argue for regulatory changes to improve the quality of housing provided to migrant farmworkers, including stronger regulations and the more vigorous enforcement of existing regulations. PMID:22237961

  19. Tracking Quantum Jumps of Light with Repeated Single-Shot Parity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luyan; Petrenko, Andrei; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Sliwa, Katrina; Narla, Anirudh; Hatridge, Michael; Shankar, Shyam; Blumoff, Jacob; Frunzio, Luigi; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel; Schoelkopf, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) is required for a practical quantum computer because of the fragile nature of quantum information. A measurement-based QEC requires the measurement of error syndromes in a quantum non-demolition way and at a rate which is faster than errors occur. In a 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, we realize a parity measurement of a microwave field with about 90% fidelity by mapping its parity onto an ancilla qubit. The projective nature of the parity measurement onto a degenerate parity eigenspace, the cat states, is confirmed by Wigner tomography after a single parity measurement, showing 84% fidelity to ideal cats. The parity can therefore serve as an error syndrome for a recently proposed QEC scheme [Leghtas et.al. PRL (2013)]. We then demonstrate a tracking of quantum jumps of this error syndrome by repeated parity measurements. We will also discuss a quantum filter developed to mitigate the imperfections during the parity measurement for a best estimate of the photon state parity. The demonstrated extraction of error syndromes without perturbing the encoded information is essential for QEC. Current address: CQI, IIIS, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.

  20. Measuring molecular parity nonconservation using nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Eills, J.; Blanchard, J. W.; Bougas, L.; ...

    2017-10-30

    Here, the weak interaction does not conserve parity and therefore induces energy shifts in chiral enantiomers that should in principle be detectable in molecular spectra. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the expected shifts are small and in spectra of a mixture of enantiomers, the energy shifts are not resolvable. We propose a nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment in which we titrate the chirality (enantiomeric excess) of a solvent and measure the diasteriomeric splitting in the spectra of a chiral solute in order to search for an anomalous offset due to parity nonconservation (PNC). We present a proof-of-principle experiment in which we search formore » PNC in the 13C resonances of small molecules, and use the 1H resonances, which are insensitive to PNC, as an internal reference. We set a constraint on molecular PNC in 13C chemical shifts at a level of 10 –5 ppm, and provide a discussion of important considerations in the search for molecular PNC using NMR spectroscopy.« less

  1. Measuring molecular parity nonconservation using nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eills, J.; Blanchard, J. W.; Bougas, L.; Kozlov, M. G.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2017-10-01

    The weak interaction does not conserve parity and therefore induces energy shifts in chiral enantiomers that should in principle be detectable in molecular spectra. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the expected shifts are small and in spectra of a mixture of enantiomers, the energy shifts are not resolvable. We propose a nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment in which we titrate the chirality (enantiomeric excess) of a solvent and measure the diasteriomeric splitting in the spectra of a chiral solute in order to search for an anomalous offset due to parity nonconservation (PNC). We present a proof-of-principle experiment in which we search for PNC in the 13C resonances of small molecules, and use the 1H resonances, which are insensitive to PNC, as an internal reference. We set a constraint on molecular PNC in 13C chemical shifts at a level of 10-5 ppm, and provide a discussion of important considerations in the search for molecular PNC using NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Parity-time symmetry breaking in magnetic systems

    DOE PAGES

    Galda, Alexey; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2016-07-14

    The understanding of out-of-equilibrium physics, especially dynamic instabilities and dynamic phase transitions, is one of the major challenges of contemporary science, spanning the broadest wealth of research areas that range from quantum optics to living organisms. By focusing on nonequilibrium dynamics of an open dissipative spin system, we introduce a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach, in which non-Hermiticity reflects dissipation and deviation from equilibrium. The imaginary part of the proposed spin Hamiltonian describes the effects of Gilbert damping and applied Slonczewski spin-transfer torque. In the classical limit, our approach reproduces Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski dynamics of a large macrospin. Here, we reveal the spin-transfer torque-drivenmore » parity-time symmetry-breaking phase transition corresponding to a transition from precessional to exponentially damped spin dynamics. Micromagnetic simulations for nanoscale ferromagnetic disks demonstrate the predicted effect. These findings can pave the way to a general quantitative description of out-of-equilibrium phase transitions driven by spontaneous parity-time symmetry breaking.« less

  3. The effect of parity on morphological evolution among phrynosomatid lizards.

    PubMed

    Oufiero, C E; Gartner, G E A

    2014-11-01

    The shift from egg laying to live-bearing is one of the most well-studied transitions in evolutionary biology. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of this transition on morphological evolution. Here, we evaluated the effect of reproductive mode on the morphological evolution of 10 traits, among 108 species of phrynosomatid lizards. We assess whether the requirement for passing shelled eggs through the pelvic girdle has led to morphological constraints in oviparous species and whether long gestation times in viviparous species have led to constraints in locomotor morphology. We fit models to the data that vary both in their tempo (strength and rate of selection) and mode of evolution (Brownian or Ornstein-Uhlenbeck) and estimates of trait optima. We found that most traits are best fit by a generalized multipeak OU model, suggesting differing trait optima for viviparous vs. oviparous species. Additionally, rates (σ(2) ) of both pelvic girdle and forelimb trait evolution varied with parity; viviparous species had higher rates. Hindlimb traits, however, exhibited no difference in σ(2) between parity modes. In a functional context, our results suggest that the passage of shelled eggs constrains the morphology of the pelvic girdle, but we found no evidence of morphological constraint of the locomotor apparatus in viviparous species. Our results are consistent with recent lineage diversification analyses, leading to the conclusion that transitions to viviparity increase both lineage and morphological diversification. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. An Odd Parity Checker Prototype Using DNAzyme Finite State Machine.

    PubMed

    Eshra, Abeer; El-Sayed, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    A finite-state machine (FSM) is an abstract mathematical model of computation used to design both computer programs and sequential logic circuits. Considered as an abstract model of computation, FSM is weak; it has less computational power than some other models of computation such as the Turing machine. This paper discusses the finite-state automata based on Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) and different implementations of DNA FSMs. Moreover, a comparison was made to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of each kind of presented DNA FSMS. Since it is a major goal for nanoscince, nanotechnology and super molecular chemistry is to design synthetic molecular devices that are programmable and run autonomously. Programmable means that the behavior of the device can be modified without redesigning the whole structure. Autonomous means that it runs without externally mediated change to the work cycle. In this paper we present an odd Parity Checker Prototype Using DNAzyme FSM. Our paper makes use of a known design for a DNA nanorobotic device due to Reif and Sahu for executing FSM computations using DNAzymes. The main contribution of our paper is a description of how to program that device to do a FSM computation known as odd parity checking. We describe in detail finite state automaton built on 10-23 DNAzyme, and give its procedure of design and computation. The design procedure has two major phases: designing the language potential alphabet DNA strands, and depending on the first phase to design the DNAzyme possible transitions.

  5. Search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D 0 → e ±μ ∓

    DOE PAGES

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; ...

    2016-01-19

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D 0 →e ±μ ∓ is made with a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb -1 of proton–proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Candidate D 0 mesons are selected using the decay D *+ → D 0π + and the D 0 →e ±μ ∓ branching fraction is measured using the decay mode D 0 → K -π + as a normalization channel. No significant excess of D 0→e ±μ ∓ candidates over the expected background is seen, and amore » limit is set on the branching fraction, B(D 0→e ±μ ∓ ) < 1.3 × 10 -8, at 90% confidence level. This is an order of magnitude lower than the previous limit and it further constrains the parameter space in some leptoquark models and in supersymmetric models with R-parity violation.« less

  6. Prospects for Searching for Time-Reversal Violation In Pa-229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2017-09-01

    Certain pear-shaped nuclei are expected to have enhanced sensitivity to time-reversal and parity-violating interactions originating within the nuclear medium. In particular, Pa-229 is thought to be about 100,000 times more sensitive than Hg-199 which currently sets some of the most stringent limits for these types of interactions. Several challenges would first have to be addressed in order to take advantage of this discovery potential. First, there is not currently a significant source of Pa-229; however, there are plans to harvest Pa-229 from the FRIB beam dump. Second, the spin-5/2 nucleus of Pa-229 limits its coherence time while also making it sensitive to systematic effects related to local field gradients. On the other hand, this also gives Pa-229 an additional source of signal in the form of a magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM) which violates the same symmetries as an EDM but is not observable in spin-1/2 systems. Third, in order to compensate for the small atom numbers and short coherence times, the Pa-229 atoms would have to be probed with exceptionally large electric & magnetic fields that are only possible if Pa-229 is a part of a polar molecule or embedded inside of an optical crystal. I will present an our plans to test some of these concepts using stable Pr-141.

  7. Leptonic CP violation in Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Joshipura, Anjan S.; Rindani, Saurabh D.

    1991-07-01

    An SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y model containing exotic charged leptons can allow sizeable leptonic flavor violations (LFV) and hence rare Z decays into leptons of different flavors. The rates as well as CP-violating asymmetries are constrained using available limits on LFV and data from the CERN e+e- collider LEP on Z-->lili,li=e,μ,τ. Sizeable CP-violating rate asymmetries are theoretically possible in the model and are allowed by the former data. In contrast, the measured leptonic Z widths severely constrain these asymmetries. As a result, an experimental observation of the CP asymmetries in the model seems unlikely with less than 109 Z's.

  8. Lepton flavor violation induced by dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Ferreira, C. P.; Goertz, Florian; Guzzo, M. M.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Santos, A. C. O.

    2018-04-01

    Guided by gauge principles we discuss a predictive and falsifiable UV complete model where the Dirac fermion that accounts for the cold dark matter abundance in our Universe induces the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays μ →e γ and μ →e e e as well as μ -e conversion. We explore the interplay between direct dark matter detection, relic density, collider probes and lepton flavor violation to conclusively show that one may have a viable dark matter candidate yielding flavor violation signatures that can be probed in the upcoming experiments. In fact, keeping the dark matter mass at the TeV scale, a sizable LFV signal is possible, while reproducing the correct dark matter relic density and meeting limits from direct-detection experiments.

  9. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV.

  10. Limits on Pauli principle violation by nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, E.; Mohapatra, R.N.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1999-02-01

    We consider nuclei produced in core collapse supernovas and subjected to a high neutron flux. We show that an accelerator mass spectrometry experiment that searches for traces of anomalous iron isotopes could set limits of the order of 10{sup {minus}20}{endash}10{sup {minus}25} on (or perhaps discover) Pauli principle violation by neutrons. A similar search for anomalous Co isotopes could set limits in the range 10{sup {minus}13}{endash}10{sup {minus}18} on Pauli principle violation by protons. We show that existing data on oxygen can be used to set a limit of about 10{sup {minus}17} in one proposed model of such violation. {copyright} {ital 1999}more » {ital The American Physical Society}« less

  11. What If Quantum Theory Violates All Mathematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinger, Elemér Elad

    2017-09-01

    It is shown by using a rather elementary argument in Mathematical Logic that if indeed, quantum theory does violate the famous Bell Inequalities, then quantum theory must inevitably also violate all valid mathematical statements, and in particular, such basic algebraic relations like 0 = 0, 1 = 1, 2 = 2, 3 = 3, … and so on … An interest in that result is due to the following three alternatives which it imposes upon both Physics and Mathematics: Quantum Theory is inconsistent. Quantum Theory together with Mathematics are inconsistent. Mathematics is inconsistent. In this regard one should recall that, up until now, it is not known whether Mathematics is indeed consistent.

  12. Lightness of Higgs boson and spontaneous C P violation in the Lee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ying-nan; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2014-12-01

    We proposed a mechanism in which the lightness of Higgs boson and the smallness of charge parity (C P ) violation are correlated based on the Lee model, namely, the spontaneous C P -violation two-Higgs-doublet model. In this model, the mass of the lightest Higgs boson mh as well as the quantities K and J are ∝tβsξ in the limit tβsξ→0 (see text for definitions of tβ and ξ ), namely, the C P conservation limit. Here, K and J are the measures for C P -violation effects in scalar and Yukawa sectors, respectively. It is a new way to understand why the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC is light. We investigated the important constraints from both high energy LHC data and numerous low energy experiments, especially the measurements of electric dipole moments of electron and neutron as well as the quantities of B meson and kaon. Confronting all data, we found that this model is still viable. It should be emphasized that there is no standard-model limit for this scenario; thus it is always testable for future experiments. In order to pin down the Lee model, it is important to discover the extra neutral and charged Higgs bosons and measure their C P properties and the flavor-changing decays. At the LHC with √{s }=14 TeV , this scenario is favored if there is significant suppression in the b b ¯ decay channel or any vector boson fusion, V +H production channels. On the contrary, it will be disfavored if the signal strengths are standard-model-like more and more. It can be easily excluded at (3 - 5 )σ level with several fb-1 at future e+e- colliders, via accurately measuring the Higgs boson production cross sections.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Discrete Symmetries and CP Violation: From Experiment to Theory (Oxford Graduate Texts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fösel, A.

    2009-03-01

    Discrete Symmetries and CP Violation: From Experiment to Theory by Marco Sozzi discusses C(harge conjugation), P(arity) and T(ime reversal) discrete symmetries and of course CP symmetry in microscopic (atomic, nuclear and particle) physics. It includes a detailed description of key or representative experiments, and major achievements and recent developments are also mentioned. Though lots of excellent textbooks already exist which cover the basics of discrete symmetries and CP violation in theory and experiment, Sozzi has fully achieved the goal of presenting a book that describes the basics of this subject in detail, from an experimental point of view as well as from theory. He also succeeds in finding links between experiments and theory, leading to a better understanding of the subject. Besides, as an experimentalist, discrete symmetries and CP violation appear to the author as ideal subjects to convey the depth and excitement of experimental `beautiful' physics, which Marco S Sozzi - in my opinion - has managed to do brilliantly. Though mainly addressed to graduate students, the book may also be useful to undergraduates (by skipping some of the more advanced sections and utilizing the brief introduction to some topics in the appendices) and to young researchers looking for a wider modern overview of the issues related to CP symmetry. At the end of each chapter, further reading sections are conveniently provided for the reader to find relevant literature for further studies. Problems to solve at the end of each chapter act as 'little tests'. Unfortunately, their solutions are currently absent: perhaps a publication that includes them is planned in the near future. To conclude, the book succeeds in being a complete and self-consistent text describing in up-to-date detail the investigation of discrete symmetries in sub-atomic physics. It also emphasizes the concepts and ingenuity behind many delicate, careful, and by all means 'beautiful' experiments.

  14. What Oregon's Parity Law Can Tell Us about the Federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and Spending on Substance Abuse Treatment Servicesb

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, K. John; Ridgely, M. Susan; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Background The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) requires commercial group health plans offering coverage for mental health and substance abuse services to offer those services at a level that is no more restrictive than for medical-surgical services. The MHPAEA is notable in restricting the extent to which health plans can use managed care tools on the behavioral health benefit. The only precedent for this approach is Oregon's 2007 state parity law. This study aims to provide evidence on the effect of comprehensive parity on utilization and expenditures for substance abuse treatment services. Methods A difference-in-difference analysis compared individuals in five Oregon commercial plans (n=103,820) from 2005–2008 to comparison groups exempt from parity in Oregon (n=19,633) and Washington (n=39,447). The primary outcome measures were annual use and total expenditures. Results Spending for alcohol treatment services demonstrated statistically significant increase in comparison to the Oregon and Washington comparison groups. Spending on other drug abuse treatment services was not associated with statistically significant spending increases, and the effect of parity on overall spending (alcohol plus other drug abuse treatment services) was positive but not statistically significant from zero. Conclusions Oregon's experience suggests that behavioral health insurance parity that places restrictions on how plans manage the benefit may lead to increases in expenditures for alcohol treatment services but is unlikely to lead to increases in spending for other drug abuse treatment services. PMID:22382046

  15. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications. PMID:28098258

  16. Low Density Parity Check Codes: Bandwidth Efficient Channel Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Wai; Lin, Shu; Maki, Gary; Yeh, Pen-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Codes provide near-Shannon Capacity performance for NASA Missions. These codes have high coding rates R=0.82 and 0.875 with moderate code lengths, n=4096 and 8176. Their decoders have inherently parallel structures which allows for high-speed implementation. Two codes based on Euclidean Geometry (EG) were selected for flight ASIC implementation. These codes are cyclic and quasi-cyclic in nature and therefore have a simple encoder structure. This results in power and size benefits. These codes also have a large minimum distance as much as d,,, = 65 giving them powerful error correcting capabilities and error floors less than lo- BER. This paper will present development of the LDPC flight encoder and decoder, its applications and status.

  17. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications.

  18. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  19. Parity nonconservation in odd isotopes of single trapped atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Mandal, P.; Mukherjee, M.

    2011-03-15

    We have estimated the size of the light shifts due to parity-nonconservation (PNC) interactions in different isotopes of Ba{sup +} and Ra{sup +} ions based on the work of Fortson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2383 (1993)]. We have used the nuclear-spin-independent (NSI) amplitudes calculated earlier by us [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 163003 (2006); Phys. Rev. A 78, 050501(R) (2008)], and we have employed the third-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(3)] in this work to estimate the nuclear-spin-dependent (NSD) amplitudes in these ions. Ra{sup +} is found to be more favorable than Ba{sup +} for measuring both the NSI and NSD PNCmore » observables.« less

  20. Information Retrieval and Criticality in Parity-Time-Symmetric Systems.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Kohei; Ashida, Yuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-11-10

    By investigating information flow between a general parity-time (PT-)symmetric non-Hermitian system and an environment, we find that the complete information retrieval from the environment can be achieved in the PT-unbroken phase, whereas no information can be retrieved in the PT-broken phase. The PT-transition point thus marks the reversible-irreversible criticality of information flow, around which many physical quantities such as the recurrence time and the distinguishability between quantum states exhibit power-law behavior. Moreover, by embedding a PT-symmetric system into a larger Hilbert space so that the entire system obeys unitary dynamics, we reveal that behind the information retrieval lies a hidden entangled partner protected by PT symmetry. Possible experimental situations are also discussed.

  1. Information Retrieval and Criticality in Parity-Time-Symmetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Kohei; Ashida, Yuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-11-01

    By investigating information flow between a general parity-time (P T -)symmetric non-Hermitian system and an environment, we find that the complete information retrieval from the environment can be achieved in the P T -unbroken phase, whereas no information can be retrieved in the P T -broken phase. The P T -transition point thus marks the reversible-irreversible criticality of information flow, around which many physical quantities such as the recurrence time and the distinguishability between quantum states exhibit power-law behavior. Moreover, by embedding a P T -symmetric system into a larger Hilbert space so that the entire system obeys unitary dynamics, we reveal that behind the information retrieval lies a hidden entangled partner protected by P T symmetry. Possible experimental situations are also discussed.

  2. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  3. Optomechanically-induced transparency in parity-time-symmetric microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Jing, H.; Özdemir, Şahin K.; Geng, Z.; Zhang, Jing; Lü, Xin-You; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) and the associated slowing of light provide the basis for storing photons in nanoscale devices. Here we study OMIT in parity-time (PT)-symmetric microresonators with a tunable gain-to-loss ratio. This system features a sideband-reversed, non-amplifying transparency , i.e., an inverted-OMIT. When the gain-to-loss ratio is varied, the system exhibits a transition from a PT-symmetric phase to a broken-PT-symmetric phase. This PT-phase transition results in the reversal of the pump and gain dependence of the transmission rates. Moreover, we show that by tuning the pump power at a fixed gain-to-loss ratio, or the gain-to-loss ratio at a fixed pump power, one can switch from slow to fast light and vice versa. These findings provide new tools for controlling light propagation using nanofabricated phononic devices. PMID:26169253

  4. The Development of Product Parity Sensitivity in Children with Mathematics Learning Disability and in Typical Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotem, Avital; Henik, Avishai

    2013-01-01

    Parity helps us determine whether an arithmetic equation is true or false. The current research examines the development of sensitivity to parity cues in multiplication in typically achieving (TA) children (grades 2, 3, 4 and 6) and in children with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD, grades 6 and 8), via a verification task. In TA children…

  5. Is Gender Parity Imminent in the Professoriate? Lessons from One Canadian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Marnie; Gadbois, Shannon; Nichol, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    This article examined issues and implications associated with gender parity in the professoriate. The findings, based on the results from one Canadian institution's most recent women's committee report, emphasize the importance of monitoring progress toward gender parity by examining potential indicators of gender imbalances such as gender…

  6. Low energy supergravity: R-parity breaking and the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela S.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    1987-03-01

    We study the process of spontaneous R-parity breaking in minimal low energy supergravity models. We show that it is very hard to obtain models with heavy top quarks if one wants to preserve the radiative breaking of SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y without breaking R-parity. Fellow of Consejo National de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas.

  7. Engineering the parity of light-matter interaction in superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J.; Deppe, F.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Pogorzalek, S.; Xie, E.; Fedorov, K. G.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    In physics, parity describes intrinsic symmetries of quantum states and operators, which has manifold applications in the standard model, quantum information and field theory. The latter includes quantum electrodynamics, describing light-matter interaction predominantly with the odd-parity dipole operator because even-parity quadrupole interactions are strongly suppressed. We present a novel technique for the in-situ transformation of the interaction parity in superconducting quantum circuits. By coupling the odd Pauli operator σx to the quadrupole moment and the even operator σz to the dipole moment of a flux qubit, we can precisely engineer the interaction parity with spatially shaped microwave fields. Our highly symmetric sample architecture enables a complete parity inversion and the observation of longitudinal-coupling-induced transparency. By additional engineering the parity of participating quantum states, we can activate quadrupolar transitions similar to those in multielectron atoms. Our work paves the way towards parity based quantum simulation and physical applications based on longitudinal light-matter interaction. Supported by the German Research Foundation through FE 1564/1-1, the doctorate programs ExQM of the Elite Network of Bavaria, and the IMPRS Quantum Science and Technology.

  8. 45 CFR 146.136 - Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parity in mental health and substance use disorder... Benefits § 146.136 Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits. (a) Meaning of terms. For... health or substance use disorder benefits. Any condition defined by the plan as being or as not being a...

  9. 29 CFR 2590.712 - Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits... Requirements § 2590.712 Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits. (a) Meaning of terms. For... health or substance use disorder benefits. Any condition defined by the plan as being or as not being a...

  10. 45 CFR 147.160 - Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits. 147.160 Section 147.160 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS § 147.160 Parity in...

  11. Parity-related molecular signatures and breast cancer subtypes by estrogen receptor status.

    PubMed

    Rotunno, Melissa; Sun, Xuezheng; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark E; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Meltzer, Paul; Williams, Tyisha; Schneider, Sallie Smith; Jerry, D Joseph; Yang, Xiaohong R; Troester, Melissa A

    2014-07-08

    Relationships of parity with breast cancer risk are complex. Parity is associated with decreased risk of postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive breast tumors, but may increase risk for basal-like breast cancers and early-onset tumors. Characterizing parity-related gene expression patterns in normal breast and breast tumor tissues may improve understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this complex pattern of risk. We developed a parity signature by analyzing microRNA microarray data from 130 reduction mammoplasty (RM) patients (54 nulliparous and 76 parous). This parity signature, together with published parity signatures, was evaluated in gene expression data from 150 paired tumors and adjacent benign breast tissues from the Polish Breast Cancer Study, both overall and by tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status. We identified 251 genes significantly upregulated by parity status in RM patients (parous versus nulliparous; false discovery rate = 0.008), including genes in immune, inflammation and wound response pathways. This parity signature was significantly enriched in normal and tumor tissues of parous breast cancer patients, specifically in ER-positive tumors. Our data corroborate epidemiologic data, suggesting that the etiology and pathogenesis of breast cancers vary by ER status, which may have implications for developing prevention strategies for these tumors.

  12. Parity-related molecular signatures and breast cancer subtypes by estrogen receptor status

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Relationships of parity with breast cancer risk are complex. Parity is associated with decreased risk of postmenopausal hormone receptor–positive breast tumors, but may increase risk for basal-like breast cancers and early-onset tumors. Characterizing parity-related gene expression patterns in normal breast and breast tumor tissues may improve understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this complex pattern of risk. Methods We developed a parity signature by analyzing microRNA microarray data from 130 reduction mammoplasty (RM) patients (54 nulliparous and 76 parous). This parity signature, together with published parity signatures, was evaluated in gene expression data from 150 paired tumors and adjacent benign breast tissues from the Polish Breast Cancer Study, both overall and by tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status. Results We identified 251 genes significantly upregulated by parity status in RM patients (parous versus nulliparous; false discovery rate = 0.008), including genes in immune, inflammation and wound response pathways. This parity signature was significantly enriched in normal and tumor tissues of parous breast cancer patients, specifically in ER-positive tumors. Conclusions Our data corroborate epidemiologic data, suggesting that the etiology and pathogenesis of breast cancers vary by ER status, which may have implications for developing prevention strategies for these tumors. PMID:25005139

  13. 7 CFR 989.71 - Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity....71 Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity situations. In the event that the Secretary should find, during a crop year when reserve tonnage percentages have been designated and are in effect...

  14. 7 CFR 989.71 - Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity....71 Disposition of unsold reserve tonnage in above parity situations. In the event that the Secretary should find, during a crop year when reserve tonnage percentages have been designated and are in effect...

  15. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Publication of season average, calendar year, and... PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted... marketing season average basis as are practicable shall be published on or about January 31 of each year. In...

  16. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Publication of season average, calendar year, and... PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted... marketing season average basis as are practicable shall be published on or about January 31 of each year. In...

  17. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Publication of season average, calendar year, and... PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted... marketing season average basis as are practicable shall be published on or about January 31 of each year. In...

  18. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Publication of season average, calendar year, and... PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted... marketing season average basis as are practicable shall be published on or about January 31 of each year. In...

  19. Towards a heralded eigenstate-preserving measurement of multi-qubit parity in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huembeli, Patrick; Nigg, Simon E.

    2017-07-01

    Eigenstate-preserving multi-qubit parity measurements lie at the heart of stabilizer quantum error correction, which is a promising approach to mitigate the problem of decoherence in quantum computers. In this work we explore a high-fidelity, eigenstate-preserving parity readout for superconducting qubits dispersively coupled to a microwave resonator, where the parity bit is encoded in the amplitude of a coherent state of the resonator. Detecting photons emitted by the resonator via a current biased Josephson junction yields information about the parity bit. We analyze theoretically the measurement back action in the limit of a strongly coupled fast detector and show that in general such a parity measurement, while approximately quantum nondemolition is not eigenstate preserving. To remediate this shortcoming we propose a simple dynamical decoupling technique during photon detection, which greatly reduces decoherence within a given parity subspace. Furthermore, by applying a sequence of fast displacement operations interleaved with the dynamical decoupling pulses, the natural bias of this binary detector can be efficiently suppressed. Finally, we introduce the concept of a heralded parity measurement, where a detector click guarantees successful multi-qubit parity detection even for finite detection efficiency.

  20. Psychological contract types as moderator in the breach-violation and violation-burnout relationships.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Amber; Raja, Usman; Darr, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the relationships between perceived psychological contract breach, felt violation, and burnout in a sample (n = 361) of employees from various organizations in Pakistan. The moderating role of contract types in these relationships was also tested. Findings supported a positive association between perceived psychological contract breach and felt violation and both were positively related to burnout. Transactional and relational contracts moderated the felt violation-burnout relationship. Scores on relational contract type tended to be higher than for transactional contract type showing some contextual influence.

  1. Association between parity and breastfeeding with maternal high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Samantha J; Chiu, Christine L; Lujic, Sanja; Hennessy, Annemarie; Lind, Joanne M

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how parity and breastfeeding were associated with maternal high blood pressure, and how age modifies this association. Baseline data for 74,785 women were sourced from the 45 and Up Study, Australia. These women were 45 years of age or older, had an intact uterus, and had not been diagnosed with high blood pressure before pregnancy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between giving birth, breastfeeding, lifetime breastfeeding duration, and average breastfeeding per child with high blood pressure were estimated using logistic regression. The combination of parity and breastfeeding was associated with lower odds of having high blood pressure (adjusted OR, 0.89; 99% CI, 0.82-0.97; P < .001), compared with nulliparous women, whereas there was no significant difference between mothers who did not breastfeed and nulliparous women (adjusted OR, 1.06; 99% CI, 0.95-1.18; P = .20). Women who breastfed for longer than 6 months in their lifetime, or greater than 3 months per child, on average, had significantly lower odds of having high blood pressure when compared with parous women who never breastfed. The odds were lower with longer breastfeeding durations and were no longer significant in the majority of women over the age of 64 years. Women should be encouraged to breastfeed for as long as possible and a woman's breastfeeding history should be taken into account when assessing her likelihood of high blood pressure in later life. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maternal parity, fetal and childhood growth, and cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Romy; Rurangirwa, Akashi A; Williams, Michelle A; Hofman, Albert; Mackenbach, Johan P; Franco, Oscar H; Steegers, Eric A P; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-08-01

    We examined the associations of maternal parity with fetal and childhood growth characteristics and childhood cardiometabolic risk factors in a population-based prospective cohort study among 9031 mothers and their children. Fetal and childhood growth were repeatedly measured. We measured childhood anthropometrics, body fat distribution, left ventricular mass, blood pressure, blood lipids, and insulin levels at the age of 6 years. Compared with nulliparous mothers, multiparous mothers had children with higher third trimester fetal head circumference, length and weight growth, and lower risks of preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational-age at birth but a higher risk of large-size-for-gestational-age at birth (P<0.05). Children from multiparous mothers had lower rates of accelerated infant growth and lower levels of childhood body mass index, total fat mass percentage, and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol than children of nulliparous mothers (P<0.05). They also had a lower risk of childhood overweight (odds ratio, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.63–0.88]). The risk of childhood clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors was not statistically significantly different (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.64–1.05). Among children from multiparous mothers only, we observed consistent trends toward a lower risk of childhood overweight and lower cholesterol levels with increasing parity (P<0.05). In conclusion, offspring from nulliparous mothers have lower fetal but higher infant growth rates and higher risks of childhood overweight and adverse metabolic profile. Maternal nulliparity may have persistent cardiometabolic consequences for the offspring.

  3. Odd-parity topological superfluidity for fermions in a bond-centered square optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi-Fang; Hemmerich, Andreas; Liu, W. Vincent

    2017-11-01

    We propose a physical scheme for the realization of two-dimensional topological odd-parity superfluidity in a spin-independent bond-centered square optical lattice based upon interband fermion pairing. The D4 point-group symmetry of the lattice protects a quadratic band crossing, which allows one to prepare a Fermi surface of spin-up fermions with odd parity close to the degeneracy point. In the presence of spin-down fermions with even parity populating a different energetically well-separated band, odd-parity pairing is favored. Strikingly, as a necessary prerequisite for pairing, both Fermi surfaces can be tuned to match well. As a result, topological superfluid phases emerge in the presence of merely s -wave interaction. Due to the Z2 symmetry of these odd-parity superfluids, we infer their topological features simply from the symmetry and the Fermi-surface topology as confirmed numerically.

  4. Finite temperature behavior of the CPT-even and parity-even electrodynamics of the standard model extension

    SciTech Connect

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M. Jr; Rodrigues, Josberg S.

    2009-10-15

    In this work, we examine the finite temperature properties of the CPT-even and Lorentz-invariance-violating (LIV) electrodynamics of the standard model extension, represented by the term W{sub {alpha}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {phi}}F{sup {alpha}}{sup {nu}}F{sup {rho}}{sup {phi}}. We begin analyzing the Hamiltonian structure following the Dirac's procedure for constrained systems and construct a well-defined and gauge invariant partition function in the functional integral formalism. Next, we specialize for the nonbirefringent coefficients of the tensor W{sub {alpha}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {phi}}. In the sequel, the partition function is explicitly carried out for the parity-even sector of the tensor W{sub {alpha}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {phi}}. The modifiedmore » partition function is a power of the Maxwell's partition function. It is observed that the LIV coefficients induce an anisotropy in the black body angular energy density distribution. The Planck's radiation law, however, retains its frequency dependence and the Stefan-Boltzmann law keeps the usual form, except for a change in the Stefan-Boltzmann constant by a factor containing the LIV contributions.« less

  5. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the exercise of any power conferred by this title, the vessel, together with her tackle, apparel... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of such... knowingly obstructs or interferes with the exercise of any power conferred by this title, he shall be...

  6. 78 FR 11902 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration RIN 1219-AB73 Pattern of Violations AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of OMB approval of information collection requirements. SUMMARY: The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) requires this notice to set forth the...

  7. 76 FR 18467 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Part 104 RIN 1219-AB73 Pattern of Violations AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is extending the comment period on the...

  8. Brain mechanisms supporting violated expectations of pain.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V; Kraft, Robert A; Coghill, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    The subjective experience of pain is influenced by interactions between experiences, future predictions, and incoming afferent information. Expectations of high pain can exacerbate pain, whereas expectations of low pain during a consistently noxious stimulus can produce significant reductions in pain. However, the brain mechanisms associated with processing mismatches between expected and experienced pain are poorly understood, but are important for imparting salience to a sensory event to override erroneous top-down expectancy-mediated information. This investigation examined pain-related brain activation when expectations of pain were abruptly violated. After conditioning participants to cues predicting low or high pain, 10 incorrectly cued stimuli were administered across 56 stimulus trials to determine whether expectations would be less influential on pain when there is a high discordance between prestimulus cues and corresponding thermal stimulation. Incorrectly cued stimuli produced pain ratings and pain-related brain activation consistent with placebo analgesia, nocebo hyperalgesia, and violated expectations. Violated expectations of pain were associated with activation in distinct regions of the inferior parietal lobe, including the supramarginal and angular gyrus, and intraparietal sulcus, the superior parietal lobe, cerebellum, and occipital lobe. Thus, violated expectations of pain engage mechanisms supporting salience-driven sensory discrimination, working memory, and associative learning processes. By overriding the influence of expectations on pain, these brain mechanisms are likely engaged in clinical situations in which patients' unrealistic expectations of pain relief diminish the efficacy of pain treatments. Accordingly, these findings underscore the importance of maintaining realistic expectations to augment the effectiveness of pain management.

  9. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... determines that disqualification would result in a serious health risk, the disqualification may be waived...

  10. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... determines that disqualification would result in a serious health risk, the disqualification may be waived...

  11. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... the parents or caretakers of applicants or participants, to obtain or use CSFP benefits improperly...

  12. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... the parents or caretakers of applicants or participants, to obtain or use CSFP benefits improperly...

  13. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... the parents or caretakers of applicants or participants, to obtain or use CSFP benefits improperly...

  14. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  15. A Test of the Abstinence Violation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruderman, Audrey J.

    According to the abstinence violation effect, highly controlled drinkers tend to overindulge following an initial slip. To investigate this relapse model, 47 male college students, ranging in age from 21 to 46, were assigned either to an unrestrained or a restrained drinker group according to their scores on the Restrained Drinking Scale. Subjects…

  16. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales M S above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass M H+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenariosmore » with a charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale M H± to the scale M S. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  17. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale...

  18. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale...

  19. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his authorized...