Science.gov

Sample records for a4 parity violation

  1. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Souder, P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2015-12-22

    By comparing the cross sections for left- and right-handed electrons scattered from various unpolarized nuclear targets, the small parity-violating asymmetry can be measured. These asymmetry data probe a wide variety of important topics, including searches for new fundamental interactions and important features of nuclear structure that cannot be studied with other probes. A special feature of these experiments is that the results are interpreted with remarkably few theoretical uncertainties, which justifies pushing the experiments to the highest possible precision. To measure the small asymmetries accurately, a number of novel experimental techniques have been developed.

  3. R parity violation from discrete R symmetries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Takhistov, Volodymyr

    2014-12-15

    We consider supersymmetric extensions of the standard model in which the usual R or matter parity gets replaced by another R or non–R discrete symmetry that explains the observed longevity of the nucleon and solves the µ problem of MSSM. In order to identify suitable symmetries, we develop a novel method of deriving the maximal Z (R) N symmetry that satisfies a given set of constraints. We identify R parity violating (RPV) and conserving models that are consistent with precision gauge unification and also comment on their compatibility with a unified gauge symmetry such as the Pati–Salam group. Finally, wemore » provide a counter– example to the statement found in the recent literature that the lepton number violating RPV scenarios must have µ term and the bilinear κ L Hu operator of comparable magnitude.« less

  4. R-parity violation in SU(5)

    DOE PAGES

    Bajc, Borut; Di Luzio, Luca

    2015-07-23

    We show that judiciously chosen R-parity violating terms in the minimal renormalizable supersymmetric SU(5) are able to correct all the phenomenologically wrong mass relations between down quarks and charged leptons. The model can accommodate neutrino masses as well. One of the most striking consequences is a large mixing between the electron and the Higgsino. Finally, we show that this can still be in accord with data in some regions of the parameter space and possibly falsified in future experiments.

  5. Gravitational wave probes of parity violation in compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon H.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-03-01

    Is gravity parity violating? Given the recent observations of gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries, we develop a strategy to find an answer with current and future detectors. We identify the key signatures of parity violation in gravitational waves: amplitude birefringence in their propagation and a modified chirping rate in their generation. We then determine the optimal binaries to test the existence of parity violation in gravity, and prioritize the research in modeling that will be required to carry out such tests before detectors reach their design sensitivity.

  6. Chen Ning Yang, Weak Interactions, and Parity Violation

    Science.gov Websites

    absolute law of parity conservation had been violated." 2 "Yang overturned Paul ... Dirac's explained that symmetry laws generate the law of conservation. The law of right-left symmetry contributed to the formulation of the law of conservation of parity in 1924. Eventually, this law of conservation was

  7. Parity-Violation Energy of Biomolecules - IV: Protein Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faglioni, Francesco; Cuesta, Inmaculada García

    2011-06-01

    The parity-violation energy difference between enantiomeric forms of the same amino acid sequence, from the amyloid β-peptide involved in Alzheimer's desease, in both α-helix and β-sheet configurations, is investigated with ab-initio techniques. To this end, we develop an extension of the N2 computational scheme that selectively includes neighboring amino acids to preserve the relevant H-bonds. In agreement with previous speculations, it is found that the helical α structure is associated with larger parity-violation energy differences than the corresponding β form. Implications for the evolution of biological homochirality are discussed as well as the relative importance of various effects in determining the parity-violation energy.

  8. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, J.; Sucher, J.; Bhatia, A. K.; Feinberg, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in He in order to gain insight into the reliability of approximate calculations which are carried out for transitions in many-electron atoms. The contributions of the nearest-lying states are computed with a variety of wave functions, including very simple product wave functions, Hartree-Fock functions and Hylleraas-type wave functions with up to 84 parameters. It is found that values of the matrix elements of the parity-violating interaction can differ considerably from the values obtained from the good wave functions, even when these simple wave functions give accurate values for the matrix elements in question

  9. Tunneling and Parity Violation in Trisulfane (HSSSH): An Almost Ideal Molecule for Detecting Parity Violation in Chiral Molecules.

    PubMed

    Fábri, Csaba; Horný, Ľuboš; Quack, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the parity-violating energy difference Δpv E between the enantiomers of chiral molecules is a major challenge of current physical-chemical stereochemistry. An important step towards this goal is to identify suitable molecules for such experiments by means of theory. This step has been made by calculations for the complex dynamics of tunneling and electroweak quantum chemistry of parity violation in the "classic" molecule trisulfane, HSSSH, which satisfies the relevant conditions for experiments almost ideally, as the molecule is comparatively simple and parity violation clearly dominates over tunneling in the ground state. At the same time, the barrier for stereomutation is easily overcome by the S-H infrared chromophore. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks chirality preference when participating in the weak force,more » which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40?years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u???C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.« less

  11. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not1, 2. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks’ chirality preference when participating in the weakmore » force, which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron–quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u-C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.« less

  12. Measurement of parity violation in electron-quark scattering.

    PubMed

    2014-02-06

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks' chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u - C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  13. Constraints on parity violating conformal field theories in d = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Subham Dutta; David, Justin R.; Prakash, Shiroman

    2017-11-01

    We derive constraints on three-point functions involving the stress tensor, T, and a conserved U(1) current, j, in 2+1 dimensional conformal field theories that violate parity, using conformal collider bounds introduced by Hofman and Maldacena. Conformal invariance allows parity-odd tensor-structures for the 〈 T T T〉 and 〈 jjT〉 correlation functions which are unique to three space-time dimensions. Let the parameters which determine the 〈 T T T〉 correlation function be t 4 and α T , where α T is the parity-violating contribution. Similarly let the parameters which determine 〈 jjT〉 correlation function be a 2, and α J , where α J is the parity-violating contribution. We show that the parameters ( t 4, α T ) and (a2, α J ) are bounded to lie inside a disc at the origin of the t 4 - α T plane and the a 2 - α J plane respectively. We then show that large N Chern-Simons theories coupled to a fundamental fermion/boson lie on the circle which bounds these discs. The `t Hooft coupling determines the location of these theories on the boundary circles.

  14. Parity and Time-Reversal Violation in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Studying the violation of parity and time-reversal invariance in atomic systems has proven to be a very effective means of testing the electroweak theory at low energy and searching for physics beyond it. Recent developments in both atomic theory and experimental methods have led to the ability to make extremely precise theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of these effects. Such studies are complementary to direct high-energy searches, and can be performed for only a fraction of the cost. We review the recent progress in the field of parity and time-reversal violation in atoms, molecules, and nuclei, and examine the implications for physics beyond the Standard Model, with an emphasis on possible areas for development in the near future.

  15. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking [1].

  16. Parity violation and the masslessness of the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1978-09-01

    It is proposed that the weak interaction be obtained by gauging the strong interaction chiral flavor group. The neutrinos are then four-component spinors. Pairs of right-handed neutrinos are allowed to condense into the vacuum. This produces maximal parity violation in both the quark and lepton sectors of the weak interaction, keeps the neutrinos massless, and also leads to the conventional Weinberg mixing pattern. The approach also in principle provides a way of calculating the Cabibbo angle. 11 references.

  17. Nuclear Spin Dependent Parity Violation in Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, Sidney; Altuntas, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Demille, David

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects arise from the exchange of the Z0 boson between electrons and the nucleus and from the interaction of electrons with the nuclear anapole moment, a parity-odd magnetic moment. The anapole moment grows as A2/3 of the nucleus,while the Z0 coupling is independent of A. We study NSD-PV effects using diatomic molecules, where signals are dramatically amplified by bringing rotational levels of opposite parity close to degeneracy in a strong magnetic field. Using a Stark-interference technique, we measure the NSD-PV interaction matrix element. We present results that demonstrate statistical sensitivity to NSD-PV effects surpassing that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement, using the test system 138Ba19F. We also discuss improvements on investigations of systematics due to non-reversing stray E-fields, Enr together with B-field inhomogeneities, and short-term prospects for measuring the nuclear anapole moment of 137Ba. In the long term, our technique is sufficiently general and sensitive to enable measurements across a broad range of nuclei.

  18. Nuclear Spin Dependent Parity Violation in Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Emine; Cahn, Sidney; Demille, David; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects arise from exchange of the Z0 boson between electrons and the nucleus, and from interaction of electrons with the nuclear anapole moment, a parity-odd magnetic moment. The latter scales with nucleon number of the nucleus A as A 2 / 3 , whereas the Z0 coupling is independent of A. Thus the former is the dominant source of NSD-PV for nuclei with A >= 20. We study NSD-PV effects using diatomic molecules, where signals are dramatically amplified by bringing rotational levels of opposite parity close to degeneracy in a strong magnetic field. The NSD-PV interaction matrix element is measured using a Stark-interference technique. We present results that demonstrate statistical sensitivity to NSD-PV effects surpassing that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement, using the test system 138 Ba19 F. We report our progress on measuring and cancelling systematic effects due to combination of non-reversing stray E-fields, Enr with B-field inhomogeneities. Short-term prospects for measuring the nuclear anapole moment of 137 Ba19 F are discussed. In the long term, our technique is sufficiently general and sensitive to enable measurements across a broad range of nuclei.

  19. Nuclear Spin Dependent Parity Violation in Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Emine; Cahn, Sidney; Demille, David

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects arise from exchange of the Z0 boson between electrons and the nucleus, and from interaction of electrons with the nuclear anapole moment, a parity-odd magnetic moment. The latter scales with nucleon number of the nucleus A as A2/3 , whereas the Z0 coupling is independent of A. Thus the former is the dominant source of NSD-PV for nuclei with A >= 20 . We study NSD-PV effects using diatomic molecules, where signals are dramatically amplified by bringing rotational levels of opposite parity close to degeneracy in a strong magnetic field. The NSD-PV interaction matrix element is measured using a Stark-interference technique. We present results that demonstrate statistical sensitivity to NSD-PV effects surpassing that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement, using the test system 138Ba19F. We report our progress on measuring and cancelling systematic effects due to combination of non-reversing stray E-fields, Enr with B-field inhomogeneities. Short-term prospects for measuring the nuclear anapole moment of 137Ba19F are discussed. In the long term, our technique is sufficiently general and sensitive to enable measurements across a broad range of nuclei.

  20. Nuclear Spin Dependent Parity Violation in Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney; Demille, David; Kozlov, Mikhail; Paolino, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects arise from exchange of the Z0 boson between electrons and the nucleus, and from interaction of electrons with the nuclear anapole moment, a parity-odd magnetic moment. The latter scales with nucleon number of the nucleus A as A 2 / 3 , whereas the Z0 coupling is independent of A. Thus the former is the dominant source of NSD-PV for nuclei with A >= 20. We study NSD-PV effects using diatomic molecules, where signals are dramatically amplified by bringing rotational levels of opposite parity close to degeneracy in a strong magnetic field. Using a Stark-interference technique we measure the NSD-PV interaction matrix element. We present results that demonstrate statistical sensitivity to NSD-PV effects surpassing that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement, using the test system 138Ba19F. We also discuss investigations of systematics due to non-reversing stray E-fields, Enr together with B-field inhomogeneities, and short-term prospects for measuring the nuclear anapole moment of 137Ba. In the long term, our technique is sufficiently general and sensitive to enable measurements across a broad range of nuclei.

  1. Analysis tools for discovering strong parity violation at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backović, Mihailo; Ralston, John P.

    2011-07-01

    Several arguments suggest parity violation may be observable in high energy strong interactions. We introduce new analysis tools to describe the azimuthal dependence of multiparticle distributions, or “azimuthal flow.” Analysis uses the representations of the orthogonal group O(2) and dihedral groups DN necessary to define parity completely in two dimensions. Classification finds that collective angles used in event-by-event statistics represent inequivalent tensor observables that cannot generally be represented by a single “reaction plane.” Many new parity-violating observables exist that have never been measured, while many parity-conserving observables formerly lumped together are now distinguished. We use the concept of “event-shape sorting” to suggest separating right- and left-handed events, and we discuss the effects of transverse and longitudinal spin. The analysis tools are statistically robust, and can be applied equally to low or high multiplicity events at the Tevatron, RHIC or RHIC Spin, and the LHC.

  2. Parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in e→ p scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Averett, T.; Baylac, M.; Burtin, E.; Calarco, J.; Cates, G. D.; Cavata, C.; Chai, Z.; Chang, C. C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Coman, M.; Dale, D.; Deur, A.; Djawotho, P.; Epstein, M. B.; Escoffier, S.; Ewell, L.; Falletto, N.; Finn, J. M.; Fissum, K.; Fleck, A.; Frois, B.; Frullani, S.; Gao, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gasparian, A.; Gerstner, G. M.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.; Hansen, O.; Hersman, F.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holtrop, M.; Humensky, T. B.; Incerti, S.; Iodice, M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jardillier, J.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M. K.; Jorda, J.; Jutier, C.; Kahl, W.; Kelly, J. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, M. S.; Kominis, I.; Kooijman, E.; Kramer, K.; Kumar, K. S.; Kuss, M.; Lerose, J.; de Leo, R.; Leuschner, M.; Lhuillier, D.; Liang, M.; Liyanage, N.; Lourie, R.; Madey, R.; Malov, S.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Marie, F.; Markowitz, P.; Martino, J.; Mastromarino, P.; McCormick, K.; McIntyre, J.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Milbrath, B.; Miller, G. W.; Mitchell, J.; Morand, L.; Neyret, D.; Pedrisat, C.; Petratos, G. G.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Price, J. S.; Prout, D.; Punjabi, V.; Pussieux, T.; Quéméner, G.; Ransome, R. D.; Relyea, D.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Rutledge, G. A.; Rutt, P. M.; Rvachev, M.; Sabatie, F.; Saha, A.; Souder, P. A.; Spradlin, M.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Templon, J.; Teresawa, T.; Thompson, J.; Tieulent, R.; Todor, L.; Tonguc, B. T.; Ulmer, P. E.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vlahovic, B.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Woo, R.; Xu, W.; Younus, I.; Zhang, C.

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from protons. Significant contributions to this asymmetry could arise from the contributions of strange form factors in the nucleon. The measured asymmetry is A= -15.05±0.98 (stat) ±0.56 (syst) ppm at the kinematic point < θlab > =12.3° and < Q2 > =0.477 (GeV/c)2 . Based on these data as well as data on electromagnetic form factors, we extract the linear combination of strange form factors GsE +0.392 GsM = 0.014±0.020±0.010 , where the first error arises from this experiment and the second arises from the electromagnetic form factor data. This paper provides a full description of the special experimental techniques employed for precisely measuring the small asymmetry, including the first use of a strained GaAs crystal and a laser-Compton polarimeter in a fixed target parity-violation experiment.

  3. Atomic parity violation as a probe of new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Rosner, J.L.

    Effects of physics beyond the standard model on electroweak observables ares studied using the Peskin-Takeuchi isospin-conserving, {ital S}, and -breaking, {ital T}, parametrization of new'' quantum loop corrections. Experimental constraints on {ital S} and {ital T} are presented. Atomic parity-violating experiments are shown to be particularly sensitive to {ital S} with existing data giving {ital S}={minus}2.7{plus minus}2.0{plus minus}1.1. That constraint has important implications for generic technicolor models which predict {ital S}{approx equal}0.1{ital N}{sub {ital T}}{ital N}{sub {ital D}} ({ital N}{sub {ital T}} is the number of technicolors, {ital N}{sub {ital D}} is the number of technidoublets).

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Parity-violating gravitational coupling of electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Parthasarathi; Gupta, Soumitra Sen

    1999-12-01

    A manifestly gauge-invariant formulation of the coupling of the Maxwell theory with an Einstein-Cartan geometry is given, where the spacetime torsion originates from a massless Kalb-Ramond field augmented by suitable U(1) Chern-Simons terms. We focus on the situation where the torsion violates parity, and relate it to earlier proposals for gravitational parity violation.

  5. Scrutinizing R -parity violating interactions in light of RK(*) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diganta; Hati, Chandan; Kumar, Girish; Mahajan, Namit

    2017-11-01

    The LHCb has measured the ratios of B →K*μ+μ- to B →K*e+e- branching fractions in two dilepton invariant mass squared bins, which deviate from the standard model predictions by approximately 2.5 σ . These new measurements strengthen the hint of lepton flavor universality breaking which was observed earlier in B →K ℓ+ℓ- decays. In this work we explore the possibility of explaining these anomalies within the framework of R -parity violating interactions. In this framework, b →s ℓ+ℓ- transitions are generated through tree and one loop diagrams involving exchange of down-type right-handed squarks, up-type left-handed squarks and left-handed sneutrinos. We find that the tree level contributions are not enough to explain the anomalies, but at one loop, simultaneous explanation of the deviations in B →K*ℓ+ ℓ- and B →K ℓ+ℓ- is feasible for a parameter space of the Yukawa couplings that is consistent with the bounds coming from B →K(*)ν ν ¯ and D0→μ+μ- decays and Bs-B¯s mixing.

  6. Can R-parity violation hide vanilla supersymmetry at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masaki; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    Current experimental constraints on a large parameter space in supersymmetric models rely on the large missing energy signature. This is usually provided by the lightest neutralino which stability is ensured by R-parity. However, if R-parity is violated, the lightest neutralino decays into the standard model particles and the missing energy cut is not efficient anymore. In particular, the U DD type R-parity violation induces the neutralino decay to three quarks which potentially leads to the most difficult signal to be searched at hadron colliders. In this paper, we study the constraints on R-parity violating supersymmetric models using a same-sign dilepton and a multijet signatures. We show that the gluino and squarks lighter than TeV are already excluded in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model with the R-parity violation if their masses are approximately equal. We also analyze constraints in a simplified model with the R-parity violation. We compare how the R-parity violation changes some of the observables typically used to distinguish a supersymmetric signal from standard model backgrounds.

  7. Testing parity-violating physics from cosmic rotation power reconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-02-22

    We study the reconstruction of the cosmic rotation power spectrum produced by parity-violating physics, with an eye to ongoing and near future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments such as BICEP Array, CMBS4, LiteBIRD and Simons Observatory. In addition to the inflationary gravitational waves and gravitational lensing, measurements of other various effects on CMB polarization open new window into the early Universe. One of these is anisotropies of the cosmic polarization rotation which probes the Chern-Simons term generally predicted by string theory. The anisotropies of the cosmic rotation are also generated by the primordial magnetism and in the Standard Model extentionmore » framework. The cosmic rotation anisotropies can be reconstructed as quadratic in CMB anisotropies. However, the power of the reconstructed cosmic rotation is a CMB four-point correlation and is not directly related to the cosmic-rotation power spectrum. Understanding all contributions in the four-point correlation is required to extract the cosmic rotation signal. Here, assuming inflationary motivated cosmic-rotation models, we employ simulation to quantify each contribution to the four-point correlation and find that (1) a secondary contraction of the trispectrum increases the total signal-to-noise, (2) a bias from the lensing-induced trispectrum is significant compared to the statistical errors in, e.g., LiteBIRD and CMBS4-like experiments, (3) the use of a realization-dependent estimator decreases the statistical errors by 10%–20%, depending on experimental specifications, and (4) other higher-order contributions are negligible at least for near future experiments.« less

  8. Quark-hadron duality constraints on $$\\gamma Z$$ box corrections to parity-violating elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2015-12-08

    We examine the interference \\gamma Z box corrections to parity-violating elastic electron--proton scattering in the light of the recent observation of quark-hadron duality in parity-violating deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron, and the approximate isospin independence of duality in the electromagnetic nucleon structure functions down to Q 2 \\approx 1 GeV 2. Assuming that a similar behavior also holds for the \\gamma Z proton structure functions, we find that duality constrains the γ Z box correction to the proton's weak charge to be Re V γ Z V = (5.4 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10 -3 at the kinematics of the Qmore » weak experiment. Within the same model we also provide estimates of the γ Z corrections for future parity-violating experiments, such as MOLLER at Jefferson Lab and MESA at Mainz.« less

  9. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; ...

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  10. Violation of interest-rate parity: a Polish example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przystawa, Jerzy; Wolf, Marek

    2000-09-01

    The mechanism of the so-called “Bagsik Oscillator” is presented and discussed. In essence, it is a repeated exploitation of arbitrage opportunities that resulted from a marked departure from the interest-rate parity relationship between the local Polish currency and the western currencies.

  11. Computational estimation of parity violation effects in a metal-organic framework containing DABCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeva, Irina V.; Kozlova, Svetlana G.

    2017-11-01

    It was previously suggested that a metal-organic framework [Zn2(C8H4O4)2·C6H12N2] could be a possible candidate for observation of parity violation effects related to tunneling of C6H12N2 (DABCO) fragment between chiral twisted states. We have performed relativistic four-component and two-component calculations of parity violating energy (PVE) term for twisted isomers of isolated DABCO molecule and [Zn2DABCO]4+ cation. We also discuss the nature of PVE in these systems with the help of analysis of individual atomic contributions to PVE and visualization of electron chirality density.

  12. Parity Violation in Proton-Proton Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yuan, V.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mischke, R. E.; Nagle, D. E.; Talaga, R. L.; McDonald, A. B.

    1986-05-01

    Results of a measurement of parity nonconservation in the anti p-p total cross sections at 800-MeV are presented. The dependence of transmission on beam properties and correction for systematic errors are discussed. The measured longitudinal asymmetry is A{sub L} = (+2.4 +- 1.1(statistical) +- 0.1(systematic)) x 10{sup -7}. A proposed experiment at 230 MeV is discussed.

  13. Breit interaction contribution to parity violating potentials in chiral molecules containing light nuclei.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert

    2008-10-21

    The importance of the Breit interaction for an accurate prediction of parity violating energy differences between enantiomers is studied within electroweak quantum chemical frameworks. Besides two-electron orbit-orbit and spin-spin coupling contributions, the Breit interaction gives rise to the spin-other-orbit coupling term of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The present numerical study demonstrates that neglect of this latter term leads in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to relative deviations in the parity violating potential (V(pv)) by about 10%, whereas further relativistic corrections accounted for within a four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Coulomb (DHFC) framework remain smaller, below 5%. Thus, the main source of discrepancy between previous one-component based (coupled perturbed) Hartree-Fock (HF) and four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock results for parity violating potentials in H(2)O(2) is the neglect of the Breit contribution in DHFC. In heavier homologs of hydrogen peroxide the relative contribution of the spin-other-orbit coupling term to V(pv) decreases with increasing nuclear charge, whereas other relativistic effects become increasingly important. As shown for the H(2)X(2) (X = O,S,Se,Te,Po) series of molecules and for CHBrClF, to a good approximation these other relativistic influences on V(pv) can be accounted for in one-component based HF calculations with the help of relativistic enhancement factors proposed earlier in the theory of atomic parity violation.

  14. Parity-violating hybridization in heavy Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yao; Coleman, Piers

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a simple model to describe the formation of heavy Weyl semimetals in noncentrosymmetric heavy fermion compounds under the influence of a parity-mixing, onsite hybridization. A key aspect of interaction-driven heavy Weyl semimetals is the development of surface Kondo breakdown, which is expected to give rise to a temperature-dependent reconfiguration of the Fermi arcs and the Weyl cyclotron orbits which connect them via the chiral bulk states. Our theory predicts a strong temperature-dependent transformation in the quantum oscillations at low temperatures. In addition to the effects of surface Kondo breakdown, the renormalization effects in heavy Weyl semimetals will appear in a variety of thermodynamic and transport measurements.

  15. Probing gravitational parity violation with gravitational waves from stellar-mass black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yang, Huan

    2018-05-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational-wave events has offered us unique test beds of gravity in the strong and dynamical field regime. One possible modification to General Relativity is the gravitational parity violation that arises naturally from quantum gravity. Such parity violation gives rise to the so-called amplitude birefringence in gravitational waves, in which one of the circularly polarized modes is amplified while the other one is suppressed during their propagation. In this paper, we study how well one can measure gravitational parity violation via the amplitude birefringence effect of gravitational waves sourced by stellar-mass black hole binaries. We choose Chern-Simons gravity as an example and work within an effective field theory formalism to ensure that the approximate theory is well posed. We consider gravitational waves from both individual sources and stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds. Regarding bounds from individual sources, we estimate such bounds using a Fisher analysis and carry out Monte Carlo simulations by randomly distributing sources over their sky location and binary orientation. We find that the bounds on the scalar field evolution in Chern-Simons gravity from the recently discovered gravitational-wave events are too weak to satisfy the weak Chern-Simons approximation, while aLIGO with its design sensitivity can place meaningful bounds. Regarding bounds from stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds, we set the threshold signal-to-noise ratio for detection of the parity-violation mode as 5 and estimate projected bounds with future detectors assuming that signals are consistent with no parity violation. In an ideal situation in which all the source parameters and binary black hole merger-rate history are known a priori, we find that a network of two third-generation detectors is able to place bounds that are comparable to or slightly stronger than binary pulsar bounds. In a more realistic situation in which one does not have

  16. First Observation of the Parity Violating Asymmetry in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Younus, Imran; /Syracuse U.

    This thesis reports on the E158 experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), which has made the first observation of the parity non-conserving asymmetry in Moller scattering. Longitudinally polarized 48 GeV electrons are scattered off unpolarized (atomic) electrons in a liquid hydrogen target with an average Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry in this process is proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}), where sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} gives the weak mixing angle. The thesis describes the experiment in detail, with a particular focus on the design and construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter. This calorimeter was the primarymore » detector in the experiment used to measure the flux of the scattered Moller electrons and eP electrons. It employed the quartz fiber calorimetry technique, and was built at Syracuse University. The preliminary results from the first experimental data taken in spring 2002 give A{sub PV} = -151.9 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 32.5(syst) parts per billion. This in turn gives sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2371 {+-} 0.0025 {+-} 0.0027, which is consistent with the Standard Model prediction (0.2386 {+-} 0.0006).« less

  17. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetries in Electron-Deuteron Scattering in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Diancheng; Pan, Kai; Subedi, Ramesh R.; ...

    2013-08-22

    We report on parity-violating asymmetries in the nucleon resonance region measured using 5 - 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons scattering off an unpolarized deuterium target. These results are the first parity-violating asymmetry data in the resonance region beyond the Δ(1232), and provide a verification of quark-hadron duality in the nucleon electroweak γ Z interference structure functions at the (10-15)% level. The results are of particular interest to models relevant for calculating the γ Z box-diagram corrections to elastic parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  18. Experiments probing parity violation using electrons at GeV energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2016-03-01

    Sixty years after the first discovery of parity violation in electroweak interactions, parityviolating electron scattering (PVES) has become a tool not only in establishing the Standard Model of electroweak physics and studying the subatomic structure of the nucleon, but also in exploring possible new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will review progress of PVES using GeV-energy electron beams focusing on recent results from Jefferson Lab. At the end of the talk, I'd like to keep the prospective that as we progress more and more towards a thorough understanding of electroweak physics, we may also want to investigate how parity violation could affect our everyday life.

  19. Observation of parity violation in the Ω→ΛK decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hypercp Collaboration; Lu, L. C.; Burnstein, R. A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chen, Y. C.; Choong, W.-S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E. C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gustafson, H. R.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C. M.; Jones, T. D.; Kaplan, D. M.; Longo, M. J.; Luebke, W.; Luk, K.-B.; Nelson, K. S.; Park, H. K.; Perroud, J.-P.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H. A.; Volk, J.; White, C. G.; White, S. L.; Zyla, P.

    2005-06-01

    The α decay parameter in the process Ω→ΛK has been measured from a sample of 4.50 million unpolarized Ω decays recorded by the HyperCP (E871) experiment at Fermilab and found to be [1.78±0.19(stat)±0.16(syst)]×10. This is the first unambiguous evidence for a nonzero α decay parameter, and hence parity violation, in the Ω→ΛK decay.

  20. Long-lived particle searches in R-parity violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwane, Nosiphiwo

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we study the constraints on MSSM R-Parity violating decays when the lightest superpartner (LSP) is moderately long lived. In this scenario the LSP vertex displacement may be observed at the LHC. We compute limits on the RPV Yukawa couplings for which the vertex displacement signature maybe used. We then use ATLAS and CMS displaced vertex, meta-stable and prompt decay searches to rule out a region of sparticle masses.

  1. Demonstration of a Sensitive Method to Measure Nuclear-Spin-Dependent Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus, and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. We demonstrate measurements of NSD-PV that use an enhancement of the effect in diatomic molecules, here using the test system 138Ba 19. Our sensitivity surpasses that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement. We show that systematic errors can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. We measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with total uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz , for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei including 137Ba in 137BaF, where |W |/(2 π )≈5 Hz is expected.

  2. Gas Electron Multipler (GEM) detectors for parity-violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, John; Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Solid Collaboration; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The JLab Parity Violation In Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment will use the upgraded 12 GeV beam and proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in DIS of polarized electrons with high precision in order to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Unlike many prior Parity-Violating Electron Scattering (PVES) experiments, PVDIS is a single-particle tracking experiment. Furthermore the experiment's high luminosity combined with the SoLID spectrometer's open configuration creates high-background conditions. As such, the PVDIS experiment has the most demanding tracking detector needs of any PVES experiment to date, requiring precision detectors capable of operating at high-rate conditions in PVDIS's full production luminosity. Developments in large-area GEM detector R&D and SoLID simulations have demonstrated that GEMs provide a cost-effective solution for PVDIS's tracking needs. The integrating-detector-based JLab Measurement Of Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction (MOLLER) experiment requires high-precision tracking for acceptance calibration. Large-area GEMs will be used as tracking detectors for MOLLER as well. The conceptual designs of GEM detectors for the PVDIS and MOLLER experiments will be presented.

  3. Novel Soft-Pion Theorem for Long-Range Nuclear Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Guo, Feng-Kun; Seng, Chien-Yeah

    2018-05-01

    The parity-odd effect in the standard model weak neutral current reveals itself in the long-range parity-violating nuclear potential generated by the pion exchanges in the Δ I =1 channel with the parity-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant hπ1 . Despite decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, the size of this coupling constant is still not well understood. In this Letter, we derive a soft-pion theorem relating hπ1 and the neutron-proton mass splitting induced by an artificial parity-even counterpart of the Δ I =1 weak Lagrangian and demonstrate that the theorem still holds exact at the next-to-leading order in the chiral perturbation theory. A considerable amount of simplification is expected in the study of hπ1 by using either lattice or other QCD models following its reduction from a parity-odd proton-neutron-pion matrix element to a simpler spectroscopic quantity. The theorem paves the way to much more precise calculations of hπ1, and thus a quantitative test of the strangeness-conserving neutral current interaction of the standard model is foreseen.

  4. Novel Soft-Pion Theorem for Long-Range Nuclear Parity Violation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xu; Guo, Feng-Kun; Seng, Chien-Yeah

    2018-05-04

    The parity-odd effect in the standard model weak neutral current reveals itself in the long-range parity-violating nuclear potential generated by the pion exchanges in the ΔI=1 channel with the parity-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant h_{π}^{1}. Despite decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, the size of this coupling constant is still not well understood. In this Letter, we derive a soft-pion theorem relating h_{π}^{1} and the neutron-proton mass splitting induced by an artificial parity-even counterpart of the ΔI=1 weak Lagrangian and demonstrate that the theorem still holds exact at the next-to-leading order in the chiral perturbation theory. A considerable amount of simplification is expected in the study of h_{π}^{1} by using either lattice or other QCD models following its reduction from a parity-odd proton-neutron-pion matrix element to a simpler spectroscopic quantity. The theorem paves the way to much more precise calculations of h_{π}^{1}, and thus a quantitative test of the strangeness-conserving neutral current interaction of the standard model is foreseen.

  5. Difference in direct charge-parity violation between charged and neutral B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-W; Unno, Y; Hou, W-S; Chang, P; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C-C; Chistov, R; Cho, I-S; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujikawa, M; Furukawa, K; Gabyshev, N; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikutani, E; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mimashi, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ogawa, Y; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shidara, T; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yoshida, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2008-03-20

    Equal amounts of matter and antimatter are predicted to have been produced in the Big Bang, but our observable Universe is clearly matter-dominated. One of the prerequisites for understanding this elimination of antimatter is the nonconservation of charge-parity (CP) symmetry. So far, two types of CP violation have been observed in the neutral K meson (K(0)) and B meson (B(0)) systems: CP violation involving the mixing between K(0) and its antiparticle (and likewise for B(0) and ), and direct CP violation in the decay of each meson. The observed effects for both types of CP violation are substantially larger for the B(0) meson system. However, they are still consistent with the standard model of particle physics, which has a unique source of CP violation that is known to be too small to account for the matter-dominated Universe. Here we report that the direct CP violation in charged B(+/-)-->K(+/-)pi(0) decay is different from that in the neutral B(0) counterpart. The direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, (that is, the difference between the number of observed B(-)-->K(-)pi(0) event versus B(+)-->K(+) pi(0) events, normalized to the sum of these events) is measured to be about +7%, with an uncertainty that is reduced by a factor of 1.7 from a previous measurement. However, the asymmetry for versus B(0)-->K(+)pi(-) is at the -10% level. Although it is susceptible to strong interaction effects that need further clarification, this large deviation in direct CP violation between charged and neutral B meson decays could be an indication of new sources of CP violation-which would help to explain the dominance of matter in the Universe.

  6. Line Shifts in Rotational Spectra of Polyatomic Chiral Molecules Caused by the Parity Violating Electroweak Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohner, J.; Quack, M.

    2009-06-01

    Are findings in high-energy physics of any importance in molecular spectroscopy ? The answer is clearly `yes'. Energies of enantiomers were considered as exactly equal in an achiral environment, e.g. the gas phase. Today, however, it is well known that this is not valid. The violation of mirror-image symmetry (suggested theoretically and confirmed experimentally in 1956/57) was established in the field of nuclear, high-energy, and atomic physics since then, and it is also the cause for a non-zero energy difference between enantiomers. We expect today that the violation of mirror-image symmetry (parity violation) influences chemistry of chiral molecules as well as their spectroscopy. Progress has been made in the quantitative theoretical prediction of possible spectroscopic signatures of molecular parity violation. The experimental confirmation of parity violation in chiral molecules is, however, still open. Theoretical studies are helpful for the planning and important for a detailed analysis of rovibrational and tunneling spectra of chiral molecules. We report results on frequency shifts in rotational, vibrational and tunneling spectra of some selected chiral molecules which are studied in our group. If time permits, we shall also discuss critically some recent claims of experimental observations of molecular parity violation in condensed phase systems. T. D. Lee, C. N. Yang, Phys. Rev., 104, 254 (1956) C. S. Wu, E. Ambler, R. W. Hayward, D. D. Hoppes, R. P. Hudson, Phys. Rev., 105, 1413 (1957) M. Quack, Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 28, 571 (1989) Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 41, 4618 (2002) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Chimia, 59, 530 (2005) M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Ann Rev. Phys. Chem. 59, 741 (2008) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, 3807 (2000) M. Quack, J. Stohner, J. Chem. Phys., 119, 11228 (2003) J. Stohner, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 385 (2004) M. Gottselig, M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 373 (2004) R. Berger, G

  7. Planck intermediate results. XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0fdg31 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the harmonic analysis and α = 0fdg35 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.

  8. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    DOE PAGES

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-31

    Here, we discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √s = 8 TeV and first results from collisions at √s = 13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach ofmore » these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, m t ~ ≃ 500–700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that new searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.« less

  9. Planck intermediate results: XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peakmore » stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0°310°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the harmonic analysis and α = 0°350°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.« less

  10. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2015-04-01

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is mirror symmetry, also called ``parity symmetry''. It implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering played a key role in establishing, and now testing, the Standard Model of particle physics. One particular set of the quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the vector-electron axial-vector-quark weak couplings, called C2 q's, measured directly only once in the past 40 years. We report here on a new measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, that has yielded a specific combination 2C2 u -C2 d five times more precise than the earlier result. (Here u and d stand respectively for the up and the down quarks.) These results are the first evidence, at more than the 95% confidence level, that the C2 q's are non-zero as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new interactions beyond the Standard Model, particularly on those whose laws change when the quark chirality is flipped between left and right. In today's particle physics research that is focused on colliders such as the LHC, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. In addition to deep inelastic scattering, we will report on measurement of the asymmetry in the nucleon resonance region. These data exhibit for the first time that the quark-hadron duality may work for electroweak observables at the (10--15)% level throughout the whole resonance region. At the end I will give a brief outlook on the future PVDIS program using the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV beam, which will not only provide more precise measurement of C2 q, but also for sin2 θW and for

  11. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; ...

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry A PV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. A PV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (R n). The result A PV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions R n-R p = 0.33 -0.18 +0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  12. Measurement of the neutron radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering.

    PubMed

    Abrahamyan, S; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Aniol, K; Armstrong, D S; Armstrong, W; Averett, T; Babineau, B; Barbieri, A; Bellini, V; Beminiwattha, R; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Bielarski, T; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Carter, P; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Hen, O; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; De Leo, R; de Jager, K; Deconinck, W; Decowski, P; Deng, X; Deur, A; Dutta, D; Etile, A; Flay, D; Franklin, G B; Friend, M; Frullani, S; Fuchey, E; Garibaldi, F; Gasser, E; Gilman, R; Giusa, A; Glamazdin, A; Gomez, J; Grames, J; Gu, C; Hansen, O; Hansknecht, J; Higinbotham, D W; Holmes, R S; Holmstrom, T; Horowitz, C J; Hoskins, J; Huang, J; Hyde, C E; Itard, F; Jen, C-M; Jensen, E; Jin, G; Johnston, S; Kelleher, A; Kliakhandler, K; King, P M; Kowalski, S; Kumar, K S; Leacock, J; Leckey, J; Lee, J H; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Lubinsky, N; Mammei, J; Mammoliti, F; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; McCreary, A; McNulty, D; Mercado, L; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R W; Mihovilovic, M; Muangma, N; Muñoz-Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Nuruzzaman, N; Oh, Y; Palmer, A; Parno, D; Paschke, K D; Phillips, S K; Poelker, B; Pomatsalyuk, R; Posik, M; Puckett, A J R; Quinn, B; Rakhman, A; Reimer, P E; Riordan, S; Rogan, P; Ron, G; Russo, G; Saenboonruang, K; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Silwal, R; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Souder, P A; Sperduto, M L; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Sulkosky, V; Sutera, C M; Tobias, W A; Troth, W; Urciuoli, G M; Waidyawansa, B; Wang, D; Wexler, J; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yim, V; Zana, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, P

    2012-03-16

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry A(PV) in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. A(PV) is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (R(n)). The result A(PV)=0.656±0.060(stat)±0.014(syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions R(n)-R(p)=0.33(-0.18)(+0.16) fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  13. Six-quark decays of the Higgs boson in supersymmetry with R-parity violation.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda M; Kaplan, David E; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2007-11-23

    Both electroweak precision measurements and simple supersymmetric extensions of the standard model prefer a mass of the Higgs boson less than the experimental lower limit (on a standard-model-like Higgs boson) of 114 GeV. We show that supersymmetric models with R parity violation and baryon-number violation have a significant range of parameter space in which the Higgs boson dominantly decays to six jets. These decays are much more weakly constrained by current CERN LEP analyses and would allow for a Higgs boson mass near that of the Z. In general, lighter scalar quark and other superpartner masses are allowed. The Higgs boson would potentially be discovered at hadron colliders via the appearance of new displaced vertices.

  14. Measurement of the Parity Violating Asymmetry in Elastic Electron Scattering off 208Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) was carried out in order to provide a model-independent measurement of the RMS radius √ of the neutron distribution in the 208Pb nucleus. The parity-violating scattering asymmetry for longitudinally polarized 1.06 GeV electrons from an unpolarized 208Pb target was measured at Q2 = 0.00880 GeV2. This measurement was performed by the PREX collaboration in Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA, between March and June, 2010. The electron detectors used in this measurement were designed and fabricated by University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Smith College. The resulting parity-violating asymmetry was measured as APV = 656±60(stat.)±14(sys.) ppb. This asymmetry extrapolates to a difference in radii between the nuclear neutron and proton distributions of √<$$2\\atop{n}$$>-√<$$2\\atop{p}$$>=0.33$$+0.16\\atop{-0.18}$$ fm.« less

  15. Development of a Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter for Precision Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Valerie M.

    2013-10-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments allow for testing the Standard Model at low energy accelerators. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments, like the P2 experiment at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, and the MOLLER and SoLID experiments at Jefferson Lab will measure observables predicted by the Standard Model to high precision. In order to make these measurements, we will need to determine the polarization of the electron beam to sub-percent precision. The present way of measuring the polarization, with Møller scattering in iron foils or using Compton laser backscattering, will not easily be able to reach this precision. The novel Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter presents a non-invasive way to measure the electron polarization by scattering the electron beam off of atomic hydrogen gas polarized in a 7 Tesla solenoidal magnetic trap. This apparatus is expected to be operational by 2016 in Mainz. Currently, simulations of the polarimeter are used to develop the detection system at College of William & Mary, while the hydrogen trap and superconducting solenoid magnet are being developed at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. I will discuss the progress of the design and development of this novel polarimeter system. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  16. Measuring nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation with molecules: Experimental methods and analysis of systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. It has been proposed to study NSD-PV effects using an enhancement of the observable effect in diatomic molecules [D. DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 023003 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.023003]. Here we demonstrate highly sensitive measurements of this type, using the test system 138Ba19F. We show that systematic errors associated with our technique can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. With ˜170 h of data, we measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei.

  17. Improving the hadron physics of non-Standard-Model decays: example bounds on R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daub, J. T.; Dreiner, H. K.; Hanhart, C.; Kubis, B.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the example of selected decays driven by R-parity-violating supersymmetric operators, we demonstrate how strong final-state interactions can be controlled quantitatively with high precision, thus allowing for a more accurate extraction of effective parameters from data. In our examples we focus on the lepton-flavor-violating decays τ → μπ + π - . InR-parityviolationthesecanariseduetotheproductoftwocouplings. We find bounds that are an order of magnitude stronger than previous ones.

  18. R D ( * ) anomaly: A possible hint for natural supersymmetry with R -parity violation

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bhupal Dev, P. S.; Soni, Amarjit

    2017-11-15

    Recently, several B-physics experiments have reported an appreciable deviation from the standard model (SM) in the tree-level observables R D(*); the combined weighted average now stands at ≈4σ. We first show the anomaly necessarily implies model-independent collider signals of the form pp → bτν that should be expeditiously searched for at ATLAS/CMS as a complementary test of the anomaly. Next we suggest a possible interconnection of the anomaly with the radiative stability of the standard model Higgs boson and point to a minimal effective supersymmetric scenario with R-parity violation as the underlying cause. In conclusion, we also comment on themore » possibility of simultaneously explaining the recently reported R K(*) anomaly in this setup.« less

  19. R D ( * ) anomaly: A possible hint for natural supersymmetry with R -parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bhupal Dev, P. S.; Soni, Amarjit

    Recently, several B-physics experiments have reported an appreciable deviation from the standard model (SM) in the tree-level observables R D(*); the combined weighted average now stands at ≈4σ. We first show the anomaly necessarily implies model-independent collider signals of the form pp → bτν that should be expeditiously searched for at ATLAS/CMS as a complementary test of the anomaly. Next we suggest a possible interconnection of the anomaly with the radiative stability of the standard model Higgs boson and point to a minimal effective supersymmetric scenario with R-parity violation as the underlying cause. In conclusion, we also comment on themore » possibility of simultaneously explaining the recently reported R K(*) anomaly in this setup.« less

  20. Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering in Hall C at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Mark Macrae; Keppel, Cynthia; Paschke, Kent

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of parity-violation in inclusive electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) from a proton or deuteron target can be used to study the flavor structure of the nucleon. While valence quark parton distribution functions (PDF) can be probed in high- x measurements such as with the proposed SoLID spectrometer, complementary measurements are possible at moderate x 0.1 where the sea quarks may still play a significant role. In particular, such measurements would provide a cleanly interpretable measurement of the strange quark PDF. These measurements are possible with the upgraded CEBAF accelerator at JLab and do not require significant new experimental hardware. The prospects and potential impacts of such a measurement will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177 and DE-FG02-07ER41522.

  1. A demonstration that electroweak theory can violate parity automatically (leptonic case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, C.

    2018-02-01

    We bring to light an electroweak model which has been reappearing in the literature under various guises.1-5 In this model, weak isospin is shown to act automatically on states of only a single chirality (left). This is achieved by building the model exclusively from the raising and lowering operators of the Clifford algebra ℂl(4). That is, states constructed from these ladder operators mimic the behaviour of left- and right-handed electrons and neutrinos under unitary ladder operator symmetry. This ladder operator symmetry is found to be generated uniquely by su(2)L and u(1)Y. Crucially, the model demonstrates how parity can be maximally violated, without the usual step of introducing extra gauge and extra Higgs bosons, or ad hoc projectors.

  2. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Luis

    2012-05-01

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z 0 boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, conducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.62 GeV 2. The measured asymmetry was used to set newmore » constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (G s E,M ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of A PV = -23.803±} 0.778 (stat)± 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in G s E + 0.517G s M = 0.003± 0.010 (stat)± 0.004 (syst)± 0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.009 GeV 2. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the 208Pb nucleus. The Z 0 boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for finding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the experimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.« less

  3. Measurement of the Parity-Violating directional Gamma-ray Asymmetry in Polarized Neutron Capture on ^35Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2012-03-01

    The NPDGamma experiment aims to measure the parity-odd correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of the emitted photon in neutron-proton capture. A parity violating asymmetry (to be measured to 10-8) from this process can be directly related to the strength of the hadronic weak interaction between nucleons. As part of the commissioning runs on the Fundamental Neutron Physics beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL, the gamma-ray asymmetry from the parity-violating capture of cold neutrons on ^35Cl was measured, primarily to check for systematic effects and false asymmtries. The current precision from existing world measurements on this asymmetry is at the level of 10-6 and we believe we can improve it. The analysis methodology as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  4. Parity violation constraints using cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from 2006 and 2007 observations by the QUaD polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Wu, E Y S; Ade, P; Bock, J; Bowden, M; Brown, M L; Cahill, G; Castro, P G; Church, S; Culverhouse, T; Friedman, R B; Ganga, K; Gear, W K; Gupta, S; Hinderks, J; Kovac, J; Lange, A E; Leitch, E; Melhuish, S J; Memari, Y; Murphy, J A; Orlando, A; Piccirillo, L; Pryke, C; Rajguru, N; Rusholme, B; Schwarz, R; O'Sullivan, C; Taylor, A N; Thompson, K L; Turner, A H; Zemcov, M

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 degrees +/-0.82 degrees (random) +/-0.5 degrees (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200violating interactions to <2 x 10;{-43} GeV (68% confidence limit). This is the best constraint to date on electrodynamic parity violation on cosmological scales.

  5. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaefer, Daniela

    Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature μμℓ (with ℓ = e, or μ) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures eeℓ and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LLmore » $$\\bar{E}$$-operator with one dominant coupling λ 122. An LL$$\\bar{E}$$-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∫ L dt = 360 ± 23 pb -1. No evident is observed, while 0.41 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a μμℓ signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) and the lightest chargino ($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$ in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, μ > 0: M($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) ~> 115-128 GeV and M($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$) ~> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, μ < 0: ($$\\tilde{X}$$$0\\atop{1}$$) ~> 101-114 GeV and M($$\\tilde{X}$$$±\\atop{1}$$) ~> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m 0, m 1/2, A 0, tanβ, and μ. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A 0 gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan β denotes the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs fields and μ, finally, represents

  6. The parity-violating asymmetry in the 3He(n,p)3H reaction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Viviani, R. Schiavilla, L. Girlanda, A. Kievsky, L.E. Marcucci

    2010-10-01

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction 3He(n,p)3H at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the {2S+1}L_J=1S_0 and 3S_1 states in the incoming n-3He channel to states with J=0 and 1 in the outgoing p-3H channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channelmore » nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH "best values" set, range from -9.44 to -2.48 in units of 10^{-8}, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions, and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.« less

  7. Quark-hadron duality and parity violating asymmetry of electroweak reactions in the {delta} region

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, K.; Sato, T.; Lee, T.-S.H.

    2005-08-01

    A dynamical model [T. Sato and T.-S. H. Lee, Phys. Rev. C 54, 2660 (1996); 63, 055201 (2001); T. Sato, D. Uno, and T.-S. H. Lee, ibid. 67, 065201 (2003)] of electroweak pion production reactions in the {delta}(1232) region has been extended to include the neutral current contributions for examining the local quark-hadron duality in neutrino-induced reactions and for investigating how the axial N-{delta} form factor can be determined by the parity violating asymmetry of N(e{sup {yields}},e{sup '}) reactions. We first show that the recent data of (e,e{sup '}) structure functions F{sub 1} and F{sub 2}, which exhibit the quark-hadronmore » duality, are in good agreement with our predictions. For possible future experimental tests, we then predict that the structure functions F{sub 1},F{sub 2}, and F{sub 3} for ({nu},e) and ({nu},{nu}{sup '}) processes also show the similar quark-hadron duality. The spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of (e,e{sup '}) have also been calculated from our model. It is found that the local quark-hadron duality is not seen in the calculated g{sub 1} and g{sub 2}, while our results for g{sub 1} and some polarization observables associated with the exclusive p(e{sup {yields}},e{sup '}{pi}) and p{sup {yields}}(e{sup {yields}},e{sup '}{pi}) reactions are in reasonably good agreement with the recent data. In the study of parity violating asymmetry A of N(e{sup {yields}},e{sup '}) reactions, the relative importance between the nonresonant mechanisms and the {delta} excitation is investigated by taking into account the unitarity condition. Predictions are made for using the data of A to test the axial N-{delta} form factors determined previously in the studies of N({nu}{sub {mu}},{mu}{sup -}{pi}) reactions. The predicted asymmetry A are also compared with the parton model predictions for future experimental investigations of quark-hadron duality.« less

  8. The ascent of parity-violation: exochirality in the solar system and beyond

    PubMed

    MacDermott

    2000-01-01

    We review recent developments stemming from Stephen Mason's work on the origin of homochirality, focusing in particular on the parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers. We summarize results of calculations of the PVED--both our own and those of other groups--which show that the natural enantiomers are indeed favoured by the weak force in most cases. The PVED has become important not only to explain the selection of the L-amino acids in the origin of life, but also as a "molecular footprint" of fundamental physics, leading to proposals to derive values of the Weinberg angle from future spectroscopic measurements of the PVED. The new field of exochirality--chirality outside the Earth--is now taking off, with reports of excesses of L-amino acids in meteorites, and proposals to look for homochirality as a signature of life on other planets and even in other solar systems. If it was indeed the PVED that determined life's handedness, we would expect to find L-amino acids rather than D everywhere in the universe.

  9. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in 4He

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Huffman, P. R.; Markoff, D. M.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E.

    2005-01-01

    In the meson exchange model of weak nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, the exchange of virtual mesons between the nucleons is parameterized by a set of weak meson exchange amplitudes. The strengths of these amplitudes from theoretical calculations are not well known, and experimental measurements of parity-violating (PV) observables in different nuclear systems have not constrained their values. Transversely polarized cold neutrons traveling through liquid helium experience a PV spin rotation due to the weak interaction with an angle proportional to a linear combination of these weak meson exchange amplitudes. A measurement of the PV neutron spin rotation in helium (φPV (n,α)) would provide information about the relative strengths of the weak meson exchange amplitudes, and with the longitudinal analyzing power measurement in the p + α system, allow the first comparison between isospin mirror systems in weak NN interaction. An earlier experiment performed at NIST obtained a result consistent with zero: φPV (n,α) = (8.0 ±14(stat) ±2.2(syst)) ×10−7 rad / m[1]. We describe a modified apparatus using a superfluid helium target to increase statistics and reduce systematic effects in an effort to reach a sensitivity goal of 10−7 rad/m. PMID:27308122

  10. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  11. Search for top squarks in R-parity-violating supersymmetry using three or more leptons and b-tagged jets.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Glushkov, I; Gunnellini, P; Habib, S; Hauk, J; Hellwig, G; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Krämer, M; Krücker, D; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, F; Olzem, J; Perrey, H; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Riedl, C; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Sen, N; Stein, M; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Enderle, H; Erfle, J; Gebbert, U; Görner, M; Gosselink, M; Haller, J; Heine, K; Höing, R S; Kaussen, G; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Lange, J; Marchesini, I; Peiffer, T; Pietsch, N; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Schröder, M; Schum, T; Seidel, M; Sibille, J; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Troendle, D; Vanelderen, L; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Feindt, M; Guthoff, M; Hartmann, F; Hauth, T; Held, H; Hoffmann, K H; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Komaragiri, J R; Kornmayer, A; Lobelle Pardo, P; Martschei, D; Müller, Th; Niegel, M; Nürnberg, A; Oberst, O; Ott, J; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Röcker, S; Schilling, F-P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weiler, T; Zeise, M; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Kesisoglou, S; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Ntomari, E; Gouskos, L; Mertzimekis, T J; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Stiliaris, E; Aslanoglou, X; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Radics, B; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Karancsi, J; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Swain, S K; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Dhingra, N; Gupta, R; Kaur, M; Mehta, M Z; Mittal, M; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, J B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Saxena, P; Sharma, V; Shivpuri, R K; Banerjee, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dutta, S; Gomber, B; Jain, Sa; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Modak, A; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Abdulsalam, A; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Chatterjee, R M; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sudhakar, K; Wickramage, N; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Etesami, S M; Fahim, A; Hesari, H; Jafari, A; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Calabria, C; Chhibra, S S; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pacifico, N; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Singh, G; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Benvenuti, A C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Meneghelli, M; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Perrotta, A; Primavera, F; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Gonzi, S; Gori, V; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Tosi, S; Benaglia, A; De Guio, F; Di Matteo, L; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Lucchini, M T; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; De Cosa, A; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Bisello, D; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Galanti, M; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gozzelino, A; Kanishchev, K; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Montecassiano, F; Passaseo, M; Pazzini, J; Pegoraro, M; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Gabusi, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Nappi, A; Romeo, F; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Spiezia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Broccolo, G; Castaldi, R; D'Agnolo, R T; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Squillacioti, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Vernieri, C; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Grassi, M; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Meridiani, P; Micheli, F; Nourbakhsh, S; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Rahatlou, S; Soffi, L; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Casasso, S; Costa, M; Demaria, N; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Obertino, M M; Ortona, G; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Potenza, A; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Tamponi, U; Belforte, S; Candelise, V; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; La Licata, C; Marone, M; Montanino, D; Penzo, A; Schizzi, A; Zanetti, A; Chang, S; Kim, T Y; Nam, S K; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, J E; Kong, D J; Oh, Y D; Park, H; Son, D C; Kim, J Y; Kim, Zero J; Song, S; Choi, S; Gyun, D; Hong, B; Jo, M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Choi, M; Kim, J H; Park, C; Park, I C; Park, S; Ryu, G; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Goh, J; Kim, M S; Kwon, E; Lee, B; Lee, J; Lee, S; Seo, H; Yu, I; Grigelionis, I; Juodagalvis, A; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-de La Cruz, I; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Martínez-Ortega, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Villasenor-Cendejas, L M; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Casimiro Linares, E; Morelos Pineda, A; Reyes-Santos, M A; Krofcheck, D; Bell, A J; Butler, P H; Doesburg, R; Reucroft, S; Silverwood, H; Ahmad, M; Asghar, M I; Butt, J; Hoorani, H R; Khalid, S; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Qazi, S; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Bialkowska, H; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Brona, G; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Wolszczak, W; Almeida, N; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Kozlov, G; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Moisenz, P; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Zarubin, A; Evstyukhin, S; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Levchenko, P; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, An; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Erofeeva, M; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Spiridonov, A; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Mesyats, G; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Bunichev, V; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Markina, A; Obraztsov, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Ekmedzic, M; Krpic, D; Milosevic, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Battilana, C; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Domínguez Vázquez, D; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Merino, G; Navarro De Martino, E; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Soares, M S; Willmott, C; Albajar, C; de Trocóniz, J F; Brun, H; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Folgueras, S; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Piedra Gomez, J; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Graziano, A; Jorda, C; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bendavid, J; Benitez, J F; Bernet, C; Bianchi, G; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Bondu, O; Botta, C; Breuker, H; Camporesi, T; Cerminara, G; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Colafranceschi, S; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; David, A; De Roeck, A; De Visscher, S; Di Guida, S; Dobson, M; Dupont-Sagorin, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eugster, J; Funk, W; Georgiou, G; Giffels, M; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Giunta, M; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Hammer, J; Hansen, M; Harris, P; Hartl, C; Hinzmann, A; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Karavakis, E; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lee, Y-J; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malberti, M; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Nesvold, E; Orsini, L; Palencia Cortezon, E; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Quertenmont, L; Racz, A; Reece, W; Rolandi, G; Rovelli, C; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Santanastasio, F; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Segoni, I; Sekmen, S; Sharma, A; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Stoye, M; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wöhri, H K; Worm, S D; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lecomte, P; Lustermann, W; Marini, A C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Mohr, N; Moortgat, F; Nägeli, C; Nef, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Peruzzi, M; Ronga, F J; Rossini, M; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Starodumov, A; Stieger, B; Takahashi, M; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Urscheler, C; Wallny, R; Weber, H A; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Favaro, C; Ivova Rikova, M; Kilminster, B; Millan Mejias, B; Otiougova, P; Robmann, P; Snoek, H; Taroni, S; Tupputi, S; Verzetti, M; Cardaci, M; Chen, K H; Ferro, C; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Volpe, R; Yu, S S; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Dietz, C; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Kao, K Y; Lei, Y J; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Asavapibhop, B; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Ozpineci, A; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Günaydin, Y O; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Kreczko, L; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Basso, L; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Jackson, J; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Guneratne Bryer, A; Hall, G; Hatherell, Z; Hays, J; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Marrouche, J; Mathias, B; Nandi, R; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sparrow, A; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardle, N; Whyntie, T; Chadwick, M; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Heister, A; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Rohlf, J; Sperka, D; St John, J; Sulak, L; Alimena, J; Bhattacharya, S; Christopher, G; Cutts, D; Demiragli, Z; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Heintz, U; Kukartsev, G; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Luk, M; Narain, M; Segala, M; Sinthuprasith, T; Speer, T; Breedon, R; Breto, G; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Gardner, M; Houtz, R; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Mall, O; Miceli, T; Nelson, R; Pellett, D; Ricci-Tam, F; Rutherford, B; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Andreev, V; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Everaerts, P; Farrell, C; Felcini, M; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Takasugi, E; Traczyk, P; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Babb, J; Clare, R; Dinardo, M E; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Liu, H; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Paramesvaran, S; Sturdy, J; Sumowidagdo, S; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Andrews, W; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Mangano, B; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Petrucciani, G; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bellan, R; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Flowers, K; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lowette, S; Magaña Villalba, R; McColl, N; Pavlunin, V; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Kcira, D; Ma, Y; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Yang, Y; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Jang, D W; Liu, Y F; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Eggert, N; Gibbons, L K; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Lacroix, F; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Jung, K; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Wang, F; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Kaadze, K; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-11-27

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons and bottom-quark jets produced in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb(-1) collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No excess above the standard model expectations is observed. The results are interpreted in the context of supersymmetric models with signatures that have low missing transverse energy arising from light top-squark pair production with R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle. In two models with different R-parity-violating couplings, top squarks are excluded below masses of 1020 GeV and 820 GeV when the lightest supersymmetric particle has a mass of 200 GeV.

  12. Explaining a CMS e e j j excess with R -parity violating supersymmetry and implications for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Ben; Biswas, Sanjoy; Mondal, Subhadeep; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01

    A recent CMS search for the right-handed gauge boson WR reports an interesting deviation from the Standard Model. The search has been conducted in the e e j j channel and has shown a 2.8 σ excess around me e j j˜2 TeV . In this work, we explain the reported CMS excess with R -parity violating supersymmetry. We consider resonant selectron and sneutrino production, followed by the three body decays of the neutralino and chargino via an R -parity violating coupling. We fit the excess for slepton masses around 2 TeV. The scenario can further be tested in neutrinoless double beta decay (0 ν β β ) experiments. GERDA Phase-II will probe a significant portion of the good-fit parameter space.

  13. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q 2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c) 2. The asymmetry at Q 2=1.9 (GeV/c) 2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combinationmore » 2C 2u - C 2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q 2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first A PV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for A PV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.« less

  14. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling L = f(φ) ( − 1/4 F{sup 2} + γ/4 F ∼F ) between the inflaton φ and a vector field with vacuum expectation value  A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρ{sub A} does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, P{submore » ζ}(k) = P(k)[1+g{sub *}( k-circumflex ⋅Â){sup 2}], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, B{sub ζ}(k{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}) = ∑{sub L} c{sub L} P{sub L} ( k-circumflex {sub 1} ⋅  k-circumflex {sub 2}) P(k{sub 1}) P(k{sub 2}) + 2 perms , with c{sub 0}:c{sub 1}:c{sub 2}=2-3:1 (c{sub 1}≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c{sub 1} contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to (a{sub ℓ1m1}a{sup *}{sub ℓ2m2}), with |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g{sub *}, c{sub 0}, c{sub 1} and c{sub 2}), translate into the upper limit ρ{sub A} / ρ{sub φ} ∼< 10{sup −9} at 0γ=. We find that the

  15. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor F W(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius R W, and the point neutron radius R n, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm -1. We find F W($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from F W($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in R W from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius R n = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from R W. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find R n to be slightly smaller than R W because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of R n-R p = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where R p is the point proton radius.« less

  16. New Perspectives on the Search for a Parity Violation Effect in Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, F.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Shelkovnikov, A.; Daussy, C.; Amy-Klein, A.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquie, B.

    2013-06-01

    Parity violation (PV) effects have so far never been observed in chiral molecules. Originating from the weak interaction, PV should lead to frequency differences in the rovibrational spectra of the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule. However the smallness of the effect represents a very difficult experimental challenge. We propose to compare the rovibrational spectra (around 10 μm) of two enantiomers, recorded using the ultra-high resolution spectroscopy technique of Doppler-free two-photon Ramsey interferometry in a supersonic molecular beam. With an alternate beam of left- and right-handed molecules and thanks to our expertise in the control of the absolute frequency of the probe CO_2 lasers, we should reach a fractional sensitivity better around 10^{-15} (a few tens of millihertz), on the frequency difference between enantiomers. We will review our latest results on the high-resolution spectroscopy, either in cell or in a supersonic beam, of methyltrioxorhenium. B. Darquié, C. Stoeffler, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, S. Zrig, L. Guy, J. Crassous, P. Soulard, P. Asselin, T. R. Huet, P. Schwerdtfeger, R. Bast and T. Saue, Chirality 22, 870 (2010). C. Stoeffler, B. Darquié, A. Shelkovnikov, C. Daussy, A. Amy-Klein, C. Chardonnet, L. Guy, J. Crassous, T. R. Huet, P. Soulard and P. Asselin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 854 (2011). N. Saleh, S. Zrig, L. Guy, R. Bast, T. Saue, B. Darquié and J. Crassous, submitted to Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. (2013).

  17. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in 14NH3: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M.; Schneider, A.; Seyfang, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference ΔpvE between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν1 and ν3 fundamentals as well as the 2ν4 overtone of 14NH3, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν1, ν3, and 2ν4 levels in the context of previously known data for ν2 and its overtone, as well as ν4, and the ground state. Thus, now, 14N quadrupole coupling constants for all fundamentals and some overtones of 14NH3 are known and can be used for

  18. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M., E-mail: Martin@Quack.ch

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for eachmore » step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for

  19. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in (14)NH3: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Dietiker, P; Miloglyadov, E; Quack, M; Schneider, A; Seyfang, G

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon-absorption and stimulated emission-process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference ΔpvE between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν1 and ν3 fundamentals as well as the 2ν4 overtone of (14)NH3, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν1, ν3, and 2ν4 levels in the context of previously known data for ν2 and its overtone, as well as ν4, and the ground state. Thus, now, (14)N quadrupole coupling constants for all fundamentals and some overtones of (14)NH3 are known and can be used for

  20. A high-rate 10B-loaded liquid scintillation detector for parity-violation studies in neutron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J. D.; Bolton, R. D.; Crawford, B. E.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Hart, G. W.; Haseyama, T.; Frankle, C. M.; Iinuma, M.; Knudson, J. N.; Masaike, A.; Masuda, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Mitchell, G. E.; Penttilä, S. I.; Roberson, N. R.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E.; Shimizu, H. M.; Smith, D. A.; Stephenson, S. L.; Szymanski, J. J.; Yoo, S. H.; Yuan, V. W.

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a large-area 10B-loaded liquid scintillation detector for parity-violation studies in neutron resonances with high instantaneous neutron fluxes from the LANSCE short-pulse spallation source. The detector has an efficiency of 95%, 85% and 71% at neutron energies of 10, 100 and 1000 eV, respectively. The neutron mean capture time in the detector is (416±5) ns. We describe the detector and the current-mode signal processing system, that can handle neutron rates up to 500 MHz.

  1. The particle spectrum of parity-violating Poincaré gravitational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karananas, Georgios K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the physical spectrum of the gravitational theory based on the Poincaré group with terms that are at most quadratic in tetrad and spin connection, allowing for the presence of parity-even as well as parity-odd invariants. We determine restrictions on the parameters of the action so that all degrees of freedom propagate and are neither ghosts nor tachyons. We show that the addition of parity non-conserving invariants extends the healthy parameter space of the theory. To accomplish our goal, we apply the weak field approximation around flat spacetime and in order to facilitate the analysis, we separate the bilinear action for the excitations into completely independent spin sectors. For this purpose, we employ the spin-projection operator formalism and extend the original basis built previously, to be able to handle the parity-odd pieces.

  2. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W ± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W ±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb -1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of moremore » than 27. In addition, these high Q 2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly M W/√s=0.16.« less

  3. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of π - near the Delta 0 resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; ...

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive π - production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the Δ 0 resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBχPT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d Δ - that characterizes the parity-violating γNΔ coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d Δ - in a model benchmarked by themore » large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A γ - = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A γ - = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to V ud/V us. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-Δ axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.« less

  4. A Gamma Polarimeter for Neutron Polarization Measurement in a Liquid Deuterium Target for Parity Violation in Polarized Neutron Capture on Deuterium.

    PubMed

    Komives, A; Sint, A K; Bowers, M; Snow, M

    2005-01-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating gamma asymmetry in n-D capture would yield information on N-N parity violation independent of the n-p system. Since cold neutrons will depolarize in a liquid deuterium target in which the scattering cross section is much larger than the absorption cross section, it will be necessary to quantify the loss of polarization before capture. One way to do this is to use the large circular polarization of the gamma from n-D capture and analyze the circular polarization of the gamma in a gamma polarimeter. We describe the design of this polarimeter.

  5. Measuring the Weak Charge of the Proton and the Hadronic Parity Violation of the N → Δ Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Leacock, John D.

    2012-10-16

    Qweak will determine the weak charge of the proton, Q p{sub W}, via an asymmetry measurement of parity-violating elastic electron-proton scattering at low four momentum transfer to a precision of 4%. Q p W has a firm Standard Model prediction and is related to the weak mixing angle, sin 2 Φ W, a well-defined Standard Model parameter. Qweak will probe a subset of new physics to the TeV mass scale and test the Standard Model. The details of how this measurement was performed and the analysis of the 25% elastic dataset will be presented in this thesis. Also, an analysismore » of an auxiliary measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in the N → Δ transition is presented. It is used as a systematic inelastic background correction in the elastic analysis and to extract information about the hadronic parity violation through the low energy constant, d Δ. The elastic asymmetry at Q 2 = 0.0252 ± 0.0007 GeV 2 was measured to be A ep = -265 ± 40 ± 22 ± 68 ppb (stat., sys., and blinding). Extrapolated to Q 2 = 0, the value of the proton's weak charge was measured to be Q p W = 0.077 ± 0.019 (stat. and sys.) ± 0.026 (blinding). This is within 1 σ of the Standard Model prediction of Q p W = 0.0705 ± 0.0008. The N → Δ inelastic asymmetry at Q 2 = 0.02078 ± 0.0005 GeV 2 and W = 1205 MeV was measured to be A inel = -3.03 ± 0.65 ± 0.73 ± 0.07 ppm (stat., sys., and blinding). This result constrains the low energy constant to be d Δ = 5.8 ± 22g π, and, if the result of the G0 experiment is included, d Δ = 5.8 ± 17g π. This result rules out suggested large values of d Δ motivated by radiative hyperon decays. The elastic measurement is the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton while the inelastic measurement is only the second measurement of the neutral current excitation of the Δresonance. It is currently the best constraint for the low energy constant, d Δ.« less

  6. First Direct Measurement of the Parity-Violating Coupling of the Z0 to the s Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Koya; Abe, Kenji; Abe, T.; Adam, I.; Akimoto, H.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barklow, T. L.; Bauer, J. M.; Bellodi, G.; Berger, R.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Calcaterra, A.; Cassell, R.; Chou, A.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Convery, M. R.; Cook, V.; Cowan, R. F.; Crawford, G.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Groot, N.; de Sangro, R.; Dong, D. N.; Doser, M.; Dubois, R.; Erofeeva, I.; Eschenburg, V.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fernandez, J. P.; Flood, K.; Frey, R.; Hart, E. L.; Hasuko, K.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Huffer, M. E.; Huynh, X.; Iwasaki, M.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Kofler, R. R.; Kroeger, R. S.; Langston, M.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Lin, C.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; McKemey, A. K.; Messner, R.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Morii, M.; Muller, D.; Murzin, V.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nesom, G.; Oishi, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Serbo, V. V.; Shapiro, G.; Sinev, N. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Staengle, H.; Stahl, A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, A.; Swartz, M.; Taylor, F. E.; Thom, J.; Torrence, E.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Verdier, R.; Wagner, D. L.; Waite, A. P.; Walston, S.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittlin, J. L.; Woods, M.; Wright, T. R.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.

    2000-12-01

    We present the first direct measurement of As, the parity-violating coupling of the Z0 boson to the strange quark, using ~550 000 e+e--->Z0-->hadrons events recorded by the SLC Large Detector with a polarized e- beam. We tagged Z0-->ss¯ events by the absence of B or D hadrons and the presence in each hemisphere of a high momentum K+/- or K0s. Fitting the polar angle distributions of the strangeness-signed thrust axis gave As = 0.895+/-0.066\\(stat\\)+/-0.062\\(syst\\). The analyzing power and uu¯+dd¯ background were constrained using the data, greatly reducing any model dependence.

  7. Search for R -parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.

    Results are reported from a search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. Here, the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb –1. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair productionmore » cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μm an 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2–30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.« less

  8. Implications of R parity violating Yukawa couplings in {delta}S=1 semileptonic decays of K mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Azeem; Tahir, Farida; Haseeb, Mahnaz Q.

    2007-12-01

    We present a class of constraints on products and combinations of Yukawa couplings for R parity violating (Re{sub p}) and lepton flavor conserving as well as violating semileptonic decays of K mesons into light pseudoscalar mesons along with two charged leptons at 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} levels. We compare the constraints obtained by semileptonic rare decays with pure leptonic rare decays and find that most of these bounds are now improved over the existing ones. We also study the forward-backward asymmetry in the decays of K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -} (l=e and {mu}) in the absence of tensor terms. The asymmetrymore » is found to be up to O(10{sup -3}) (O(10{sup -1})) for the electron and muon modes, respectively. The asymmetry is found to be as large as O(10{sup -1}) in the case of K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}.« less

  9. Search for R -parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-01-25

    Results are reported from a search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. Here, the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb –1. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair productionmore » cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μm an 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2–30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.« less

  10. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  11. Searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Fernandez Perez Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Qazi, S.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Benhabib, L.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y.-T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Randall, S.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    Results are presented from searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 . No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R -parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. These limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R -parity-violating couplings.

  12. Helical ordering in the ground state of spin-one color superconductors as a consequence of parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, Tomas

    We investigate spin-one color superconductivity of a single quark flavor using the Ginzburg-Landau theory. First we examine the classic analysis of Bailin and Love and show that by restricting to the so-called inert states, it misses the true ground state in a part of the phase diagram. This suggests the use of the more general, noninert states, in particular, within three-flavor quark matter where the color neutrality constraint imposes stress on the spin-one pairing and may disfavor the symmetric color-spin-locked state. In the second part of the paper we show that, in analogy to some ferromagnetic materials, lack of space-inversionmore » symmetry leads to a new term in the Ginzburg-Landau functional, which favors a spatially nonuniform long-range ordering with a spiral structure. In color superconductors, this new parity-violating term is a tiny effect of weak-interaction physics. The modified phase diagram is determined and the corresponding ground states for all the phases constructed. At the end, we estimate the coefficient of the new term in the free energy functional, and discuss its relevance for the phenomenology of dense quark matter.« less

  13. Parity Violating electron scattering from Hydrogen and Helium-4 and Strangness in the nucleon: Results from HAPPEX-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffit, Bryan

    2006-11-01

    The quark-antiquark pairs that form the sea within the nucleon are well established within quantum chromodynamics. Several recent and ongoing experiments are motivated by determining how this sea, containing contributions from all quark flavors, plays a role in affecting the nucleon's overall properties. Of particular interest is the possible strange quark contribution to the nucleon's electric and magnetic form factors. The recently completed HAPPEX asymmetry measurements take advantage of parity violation in elastic electron scattering to probe the strange quark effects. The measurement using a hydrogen target is sensitive to a linear combination of GE^s and GM^s, the contribution to the electric and magnetic form factors due to strange quarks, respectively, whereas scattering from a spinless helium target cleanly isolates GE^s. The combination of the two measurements therefore allows these form factors to be separately determined. Final results will be presented from the complete data set, obtained in runs in 2004 and 2005, yielding results of unprecedented precision.

  14. A Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Aluminum and its Contribution to a Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, Joshua Allen

    2016-05-01

    The Q_weak experiment, which ran at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, made a precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, Q^p_W. The weak charge is extracted via a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering from hydrogen at low momentum transfer (Q^2=0.025 GeV^2). This result is directly related to the electroweak mixing angle, sin^2(Theta_W), a fundamental parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics. This provides a precision test sensitive to new, as yet unknown, fundamental physics. This dissertation focuses on two central corrections to the Q_weak measurement: the target window contribution and sub-percent determination of themore » electron beam polarization. The aluminum target windows contribute approximately 30% of the measured asymmetry. Removal of this background requires precise measurements of both the elastic electron-aluminum scattering rate and its parity-violating asymmetry. The results reported here are the most precise measurement of the Q_weak target dilution and asymmetry to date. The parity-violating asymmetry for the aluminum alloy was found to be 1.6174 +/- 0.0704 (stat.) +/- 0.0113 (sys.) parts-per-million. The first sub-percent precision polarization measurements made from the Hall C Moller polarimeter are also reported, with systematic uncertainties of 0.84%.« less

  15. The lepton flavor violating exclusive b bar → s bar ℓi- ℓj+ decays in SUSY without R-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jin-Huan; Song, Jia-Jia; Wang, Ru-Min; Yang, Ya-Dong

    2018-05-01

    Inspired by the recent anomaly measurements of the lepton-flavor violating decays h → μτ and the lepton flavor non-universality in decays b bar → s bar ℓ-ℓ+, we investigate the lepton flavor violating exclusive b bar → s bar ℓi- ℓj+ (i ≠ j and ℓ = e , μ , τ) decays within supersymmetry. Relevant R-parity violating couplings are constrained by using the latest experimental upper limits on the branching ratios of Bs → ℓi- ℓj+ and B →K (*) ℓi- ℓ j + flavor changing neutral current processes, and we find that all relevant branching ratios are very sensitive to the moduli of the squark and sneutrino exchange coupling products. In addition, the constrained lepton number violating effects on the dilepton invariant mass spectra, the single lepton polarization asymmetries and the differential forward-backward asymmetries are also studied. These lepton-flavor violating B decays could be used for the search of lepton flavor violation at the running LHC and the forthcoming Belle-II.

  16. Searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    Results are presented from searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced inmore » $pp$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb -1. No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. Finally, these limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R-parity-violating couplings.« less

  17. Searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-12-29

    Results are presented from searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced inmore » $pp$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb -1. No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. Finally, these limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R-parity-violating couplings.« less

  18. The fall of parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Paul

    1982-05-01

    The historical background behind the discovery of the violation of parity by T. D. Lee and [N. Yand is described. The experimental techniques used by Chien-Shiung Wu, Ernst Ambler, and their collaborators at the Cryogenic Physics Laboratory of the NBS to first demonstrate the violation of parity are also described. (AIP)

  19. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Gecit, F. H.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozcan, M.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; Cms Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1±, χ˜1± →ℓ± + jj , top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i , j , k ≤ 2), where i , j , k correspond to the three generations.

  20. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-21

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, $$ \\mathrm{ \\tilde{t} \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1,\\, \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1 \\to \\ell^\\pm+jj } $$, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling $$\\lambda^{\\prime}_{ijk}$$ $$(i,j,k \\leq 2)$$, where $i,j,k$ correspond to the three generations.« less

  1. Search for B - L R -parity-violating top squarks in s = 13 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2018-02-06

    A search is presented for the direct pair production of the stop, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, that decays through an R -parity-violating coupling to a final state with two leptons and two jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-jet. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb -1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s = 13TeV , collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess is observed over the Standard Model background, and exclusion limits are set on stopmore » pair production at a 95% confidence level. Lower limits on the stop mass are set between 600 GeV and 1.5 TeV for branching ratios above 10% for decays to an electron or muon and a b-quark.« less

  2. Search for B - L R -parity-violating top squarks in s = 13 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.

    A search is presented for the direct pair production of the stop, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, that decays through an R -parity-violating coupling to a final state with two leptons and two jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-jet. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb -1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s = 13TeV , collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess is observed over the Standard Model background, and exclusion limits are set on stopmore » pair production at a 95% confidence level. Lower limits on the stop mass are set between 600 GeV and 1.5 TeV for branching ratios above 10% for decays to an electron or muon and a b-quark.« less

  3. Search for B -L R -parity-violating top squarks in √{s }=13 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, K.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, Y. S.; Christodoulou, V.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czekierda, S.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Maria, A.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vasconcelos Corga, K.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delporte, C.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Devesa, M. R.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Bello, F. A.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Clemente, W. K.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Petrillo, K. F.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Dodsworth, D.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, A.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducourthial, A.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dulsen, C.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Duvnjak, D.; Dyndal, M.; Dziedzic, B. S.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; El Kosseifi, R.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Epland, M. B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Estrada Pastor, O.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fabiani, V.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; García Pascual, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geisen, J.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Geßner, G.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiacomi, N.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugliarelli, G.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gkountoumis, P.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Gama, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gottardo, C. A.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, C.; Gray, H. M.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Grummer, A.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, W.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gurbuz, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutelman, B. J.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Guzik, M. P.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Han, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havener, L. B.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heer, S.; Heidegger, K. K.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Held, A.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herr, H.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Herwig, T. C.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Higashino, S.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hildebrand, K.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hils, M.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hiti, B.; Hladik, O.; Hoad, X.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, S.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hostiuc, A.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hunter, R. F. H.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hyneman, R.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Iltzsche, F.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Isacson, M. F.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jacobs, R. M.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Janus, P. A.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jelinskas, A.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S. D.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kay, E. F.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kellermann, E.; Kempster, J. J.; Kendrick, J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khodinov, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kilby, C. R.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; Kirchmeier, D.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitali, V.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klingl, T.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Köhler, N. M.; Koi, T.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotwal, A.; Koulouris, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kourlitis, E.; Kouskoura, V.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozakai, C.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krauss, D.; Kremer, J. A.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M. C.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulinich, Y. P.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kupfer, T.; Kuprash, O.; Kurashige, H.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurth, M. G.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; La Ruffa, F.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lack, D. P. J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lammers, S.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lanfermann, M. C.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Langenberg, R. J.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Lapertosa, A.; Laplace, S.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Lau, T. S.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Lazzaroni, M.; Le, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Quilleuc, E. P.; Leblanc, M.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, B.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lerner, G.; Leroy, C.; Les, R.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, D.; Li, B.; Li, Changqiao; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limosani, A.; Lin, K.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linck, R. A.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lionti, A. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. K. K.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo, C. Y.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E. M.; Loch, P.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loesle, A.; Loew, K. M.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Longo, L.; Looper, K. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lu, Y. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lutz, M. S.; Luzi, P. M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Lyu, F.; Lyubushkin, V.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Y.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; MacDonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Madysa, N.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A. S.; Magerl, V.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majersky, O.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mankinen, K. H.; Mann, A.; Manousos, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mansour, J. D.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; Marceca, G.; March, L.; Marchese, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Martensson, M. U. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, C. B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Mason, L. H.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Maznas, I.; Mazza, S. M.; Mc Fadden, N. C.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McClymont, L. I.; McDonald, E. F.; McFayden, J. A.; McHedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McNamara, P. C.; McNicol, C. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meehan, S.; Megy, T. J.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meideck, T.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melini, D.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Mellenthin, J. D.; Melo, M.; Meloni, F.; Melzer, A.; Menary, S. B.; Meng, L.; Meng, X. T.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Merlassino, C.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Miano, F.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Millar, D. A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Minegishi, Y.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirto, A.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mizukami, A.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mlynarikova, M.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mogg, P.; Mohapatra, S.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, S.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moschovakos, P.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, H. J.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, M. E.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Newman, P. R.; Ng, T. Y.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nishu, N.; Nisius, R.; Nitsche, I.; Nitta, T.; Nobe, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nomura, M. A.; Nooney, T.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Connor, K.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oppen, H.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasner, J. M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearson, B.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Peri, F.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, F. H.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Podberezko, P.; Poettgen, R.; Poggi, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pohl, D.; Pokharel, I.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Ponomarenko, D.; Pontecorvo, L.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Portillo Quintero, D. M.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potti, H.; Poulsen, T.; Poveda, J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proklova, N.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puri, A.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rashid, T.; Raspopov, S.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravinovich, I.; Rawling, J. H.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rettie, S.; Reynolds, E.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ripellino, G.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocco, E.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Bosca, S.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sampsonidou, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, C. O.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sano, Y.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schildgen, L. K.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Sciandra, A.; Sciolla, G.; Scornajenghi, M.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Senkin, S.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherafati, N.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, L.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Søgaard, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Sopczak, A.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Sottocornola, S.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapf, B. S.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Stegler, M.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, Dms; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Tahirovic, E.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, A. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tian, Y.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A search is presented for the direct pair production of the stop, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, that decays through an R -parity-violating coupling to a final state with two leptons and two jets, at least one of which is identified as a b -jet. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=13 TeV , collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess is observed over the Standard Model background, and exclusion limits are set on stop pair production at a 95% confidence level. Lower limits on the stop mass are set between 600 GeV and 1.5 TeV for branching ratios above 10% for decays to an electron or muon and a b -quark.

  4. Commissioning of the NPDGamma Detector Array: Counting Statistics in Current Mode Operation and Parity Violation in the Capture of Cold Neutrons on B 4 C and (27) Al.

    PubMed

    Gericke, M T; Bowman, J D; Carlini, R D; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dabaghyan, M; Desai, D; Freedman, S J; Gentile, T R; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hersman, F W; Ino, T; Ishimoto, S; Jones, G L; Lauss, B; Leuschner, M B; Losowski, B; Mahurin, R; Masuda, Y; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Ramsay, W D; Santra, S; Seo, P-N; Sharapov, E I; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S; Yuan, V; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma γ-ray detector has been built to measure, with high accuracy, the size of the small parity-violating asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons by protons. The high cold neutron flux at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source and control of systematic errors require the use of current mode detection with vacuum photodiodes and low-noise solid-state preamplifiers. We show that the detector array operates at counting statistics and that the asymmetries due to B4C and (27)Al are zero to with- in 2 × 10(-6) and 7 × 10(-7), respectively. Boron and aluminum are used throughout the experiment. The results presented here are preliminary.

  5. A Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton through Parity Violating Electron Scattering using the Qweak Apparatus: A 21% Result

    SciTech Connect

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha

    2013-08-01

    After a decade of preparations, the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab is making the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q^p_W. This quantity is suppressed in the Standard Model making a good candidate for search for new physics beyond the SM at the TeV scale. Operationally, we measure a small (about -0.200 ppm) parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering in integrating mode while flipping the helicity of the electrons 1000 times per second. Commissioning took place Fall 2010, and we finished taking data in early summer 2012. This dissertation is based on the data taken onmore » an initial two weeks period (Wien0). It will provide an overview of the Qweak apparatus, description of the data acquisition and analysis software systems, and final analysis and results from the Wien0 data set. The result is a 16% measurement of the parity violating electron-proton scattering asymmetry, A = -0.2788 +/- 0.0348 (stat.) +/- 0.0290 (syst.) ppm at Q^2 = 0.0250 +/- 0.0006 (GeV)^2. From this a 21% measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q_w^p(msr)= +0.0952 +/- 0.0155 (stat.) +/- 0.0131 (syst.) +/- 0.0015 (theory) is extracted. From this a 2% measurement of the weak mixing angle, sin^2theta_W(msr)= +0.2328 +/- 0.0039 (stat.) +/- 0.0033 (syst.) +/- 0.0004 (theory) and improved constraints on isoscalar/isovector effective coupling constants of the weak neutral hadronic currents are extracted. These results deviate from the Standard Model by one standard deviation. The Wien0 results are a proof of principle of the Qweak data analysis and a highlight of the road ahead for obtaining full results.« less

  6. Compton Scattering Polarimetry for the Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge Through Measurements of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry of 1H(e,e')p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, Juan Carlos

    The Standard Model has been a theory with the greatest success in describing the fundamental interactions of particles. As of the writing of this dissertation, the Standard Model has not been shown to make a false prediction. However, the limitations of the Standard Model have long been suspected by its lack of a description of gravity, nor dark matter. Its largest challenge to date, has been the observation of neutrino oscillations, and the implication that they may not be massless, as required by the Standard Model. The growing consensus is that the Standard Model is simply a lower energy effective field theory, and that new physics lies at much higher energies. The Qweak Experiment is testing the Electroweak theory of the Standard Model by making a precise determination of the weak charge of the proton (Qpw). Any signs of "new physics" will appear as a deviation to the Standard Model prediction. The weak charge is determined via a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry of the electron-proton interaction via elastic scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of an un-polarized proton target. The experiment required that the electron beam polarization be measured to an absolute uncertainty of 1 %. At this level the electron beam polarization was projected to contribute the single largest experimental uncertainty to the parity-violating asymmetry measurement. This dissertation will detail the use of Compton scattering to determine the electron beam polarization via the detection of the scattered photon. I will conclude the remainder of the dissertation with an independent analysis of the blinded Qweak.

  7. Parity Violation in DIS region with SoLID at the upgraded 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; SoLID Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In this talk, an overview of PVDIS future experiment by using a Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) at Jefferson Lab (JLab) Hall A with the 12 GeV upgrade, along with a brief description of the proposed SoLID spectrometer is discussed. We will obtain data with high statistic and large kinematic coverage for Bjorken 0.3 < x < 0.7 and in the momentum transfer Q2 range 2 - 10 GeV2 by a polarized electron beam scattering on unpolarized deuteron and proton targets. A measurement of PVDIS in deuteron aims to extract fundamental coupling constants C1 q ,C2 q as well as the weak mixing angle sin2θw with a high precision. This measurement can also access QCD physics of searching for charge asymmetry violation in PDF's and higher-twist effects with quark-quark correlations. In addition, the proton target experiment can be a powerful probe of the d / u ratio at high x without any nuclear correction. The designed SoLID spectrometer with its unique feature of high luminosity and large acceptance provides an opportunity to probe physics beyond the Standard Model.

  8. Prospects for a Measurement of Parity-Violating Photoproduction of π^± on the Δ-resonance Using the G^0 Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffery W.

    2002-04-01

    Recent calculations of parity-violating (PV) electroproduction asymmetries for the NarrowΔ transition and for quasi-elastic electron scattering on the deuteron have led theorists to consider the photoproduction limit of these processes. In the case of the NarrowΔ transition, it has been proposed that the PV π^± photoproduction asymmetry A_γ^± might be of order 10-6, from a model based on hyperon weak radiative decays. An accurate measurement of A_γ^± would tightly constrain that model, at the same time reducing the dominant theoretical uncertainty in calculations of the PV NarrowΔ asymmetry at non-zero Q^2. Estimates for the G^0 experiment at Jefferson Lab for a measurement of A_γ^± will be presented. A measurement of π^- production from deuterium should yield a 47% measurement of A_γ^±, assuming the best theory estimate for A_γ^±. This measurement would be parasitic to a low-energy run that is already planned. Improvements to this accuracy would require tuning the spectrometer for maximum acceptance of pions and/or luminosity upgrades for photoproduction. Possibilities for such improvements will be discussed.

  9. Molecular parity violation via comets?

    PubMed

    Meierhenrich, U; Thiemann, W H; Rosenbauer, H

    1999-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations referring to the origin of homochirality are reviewed and integrated into the hitherto known state of the art. Attention is directed to an extraterrestrial scenario, which describes the interaction of circularly polarized synchrotron radiation with interstellar organic matter. Following this Bonner-Rubenstein hypothesis, optically active molecules could be transferred to Earth via comets. We plan to identify any enantiomeric enhancement in organic molecules of the cometary matter in situ. The present preliminary experimental study intends to optimize gas-chromatographic conditions for the separation of racemates into their enantiomer constituents on the surface of the comet 46P/Wirtanen. Underivatized racemic pairs of alcohols, diols, and phenyl-substituted amines have been separated with the help of a stationary trifluoroacetyl-cyclodextrin phase. We are still developing a technique that will enable us to detect any enantiomeric enhancement of specific simple organic molecules both in cometary or Martian matter in situ and in meteorites found on Earth. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Search for Scalar Top Quark Pair-Production in Scenario with Violated R-parity in pp¯ Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via R p-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and b-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton (ll, lτ, ττ) events withmore » lower p T threshold (8 GeV/c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The Z → ττ event, where one τ-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the lepton plus track trigger and τ identification. The data sample of 72 pb -1, collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a τ signal from Z → ττ events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 pb -1. The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c 2 at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark (LQ 3) assuming a 100% branching for the LQ 3 → τb decay mode.« less

  11. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry parameter αb and the helicity amplitudes for the decay Λb0→J/ψΛ0 with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guan, L.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Heisterkamp, S.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Ideal, E.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kitamura, T.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Le, B. T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, M.; Maeno, T.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J. A.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Matricon, P.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; McFayden, J. A.; McHedlidze, G.; McLaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Moeller, V.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novakova, J.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'Grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Ohshima, T.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petteni, M.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reinsch, A.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramania, Hs.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    A measurement of the parity-violating decay asymmetry parameter, αb, and the helicity amplitudes for the decay Λb0→J/ψ(μ+μ-)Λ0(pπ-) is reported. The analysis is based on 1400 Λb0 and Λ ¯b0 baryons selected in 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. By combining the Λb0 and Λ ¯b0 samples under the assumption of CP conservation, the value of αb is measured to be 0.30±0.16(stat)±0.06(syst). This measurement provides a test of theoretical models based on perturbative QCD or heavy-quark effective theory.

  12. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2004-02-06

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1.

  13. Contribution to the G 0 violation of parity experience: calculation and simulation of radiative corrections and the background noise study; Contribution a l'experience G0 de violation de la parite : calcul et simulation des corrections radiatives et etude du bruit de fond (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Guler, Hayg

    2003-12-17

    In the framework of quantum chromodynamics, the nucleon is made of three valence quarks surrpounded by a sea of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. Only the only lightest quarks (u, d and s) contribute significantly to the nucleon properties. In Go we using the property of weak interaction to violate parity symmetry, in order to determine separately the contributions of the three types of quarks to nucleon form factors. The experiment, which takes place at Thomas Jefferson laboratory (USA), aims at measuring parity violation asymmetry in electron-proton scattering. By doing several measurements at different momentum squared of the exchanged photons andmore » for different kinematics (forward angle when the proton is detected and backward angle it will be the electron) will permit to determine separately strange quarks electric and magnetic contributions to nucleon form factors. To extract an asymmetry with small errors, it is necessary to correct all the beam parameters, and to have high enough counting rates in detectors. A special electronics was developed to treat information coming from 16 scintillator pairs for each of the 8 sectors of the Go spectrometer. A complete calculation of radiative corrections has been clone and Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT program has permitted to determine the shape of the experimental spectra including inelastic background. This work will allow to do a comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations based on the Standard Model.« less

  14. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying tomore » $$\\overline{b}$$$\\overline{s}$$ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m $$\\overline{t}$$ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  15. Search for $R$-parity violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 13 TeV using b jets in a final state with a single lepton, many jets, and high sum of large-radius jet masses

    SciTech Connect

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    Results are reported from a search for physics beyond the standard model in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 13 TeV. The search uses a signature of a single lepton, large jet and bottom quark jet multiplicities, and high sum of large-radius jet masses, without any requirement on the missing transverse momentum in an event. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$$^{-1}$$ recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. No significant excess beyond the prediction from standard model processes is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of upper limits on the production cross section for $R$-parity violating supersymmetric extensions of the standard model using a benchmark model of gluino pair production, in which each gluino decays promptly via $$ {\\mathrm{\\widetilde{g}}} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{t} \\mathrm{b} \\mathrm{s} $$. Gluinos with a mass below 1610 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  16. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-06-10

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying tomore » $$\\overline{b}$$$\\overline{s}$$ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m $$\\overline{t}$$ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  17. Measurement of the parity violating 6S-7S transition amplitude in cesium achieved within 2×10-13 atomic-unit accuracy by stimulated-emission detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M. A.

    2005-04-01

    We exploit the process of asymmetry amplification by stimulated emission which provides an original method for parity violation (PV) measurements in a highly forbidden atomic transition. The method involves measurements of a chiral, transient, optical gain of a cesium vapor on the 7S-6P3/2 transition, probed after it is excited by an intense, linearly polarized, collinear laser, tuned to resonance for one hyperfine line of the forbidden 6S-7S transition in a longitudinal electric field. We report here a 3.5-fold increase of the one-second-measurement sensitivity and subsequent reduction by a factor of 3.5 of the statistical accuracy compared with our previous result [J. Guéna , Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 143001 (2003)]. Decisive improvements to the setup include an increased repetition rate, better extinction of the probe beam at the end of the probe pulse, and, for the first time to our knowledge, the following: a polarization-tilt magnifier, quasisuppression of beam reflections at the cell windows, and a Cs cell with electrically conductive windows. We also present real-time tests of systematic effects and consistency checks on the data, as well as a 1% accurate measurement of the electric field seen by the atoms, from atomic signals. PV measurements performed in seven different vapor cells agree within the statistical error. Our present result is compatible with the more precise result of Wood within our present relative statistical accuracy of 2.6%, corresponding to a 2×10-13 atomic-unit uncertainty in E1pv . Theoretical motivations for further measurements are emphasized and we give a brief overview of a recent proposal that would allow the uncertainty to be reduced to the 0.1% level by creating conditions where asymmetry amplification is much greater.

  18. Overview: Parity Violation and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlini, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The fields of nuclear and particle physics have undertaken extensive programs of research to search for evidence of new phenomena via the precision measurement of observables that are well predicted within the standard model of electroweak interaction. It is already known that the standard model is incomplete as it does not include gravity and dark matter/energy and therefore likely the low energy approximation of a more complex theory. This talk will be an overview of the motivation, experimental methods and status of some of these efforts (past and future) related to precision in-direct searches that are complementary to the direct searches underway at the Large Hadron Collider. This abstract is for the invited talk associated with the Mini-symposium titled ``Electro-weak Physics and Fundamental Symmetries'' organized by Julie Roche.

  19. Separation of the 1+ /1- parity doublet in 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, J.; Stumpf, C.; Scheck, M.; Pietralla, N.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D. M.; Glodariu, T.; Haxton, W.; Idini, A.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Raut, R.; Romig, C.; Roth, R.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wagner, J.; Weller, H. R.; Zamfir, N.-V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2015-02-01

    The (J , T) = (1 , 1) parity doublet in 20Ne at 11.26 MeV is a good candidate to study parity violation in nuclei. However, its energy splitting is known with insufficient accuracy for quantitative estimates of parity violating effects. To improve on this unsatisfactory situation, nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using linearly and circularly polarized γ-ray beams were used to determine the energy difference of the parity doublet ΔE = E (1-) - E (1+) = - 3.2(± 0.7) stat(-1.2+0.6)sys keV and the ratio of their integrated cross sections Is,0(+) /Is,0(-) = 29(± 3) stat(-7+14)sys. Shell-model calculations predict a parity-violating matrix element having a value in the range 0.46-0.83 eV for the parity doublet. The small energy difference of the parity doublet makes 20Ne an excellent candidate to study parity violation in nuclear excitations.

  20. Nuclear spin dependence of time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Vladimir; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.

    2018-06-01

    The spin structure of parity violating and time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering is discussed. The explicit relations between these effects are presented in terms of functions nuclear spins and neutron partial widths of p -wave resonances.

  1. Technology and techniques for parity experiments at Mainz: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbach, Juergen

    2016-03-01

    For almost 20 years the Mainz accelerator facility MAMI delivered polarized electron beam to the parity violation experiment A4 that measured the contributions of strange sea quarks to the proton electromagnetic factors. Parity violation asymmetries were of the order of A ~5 ppm. Currently the A1 collaboration carries out single spin asymmetry measurements at MAMI (A ~20 ppm) to prepare for a measurement of neutron skin depth on lead (A ~1 ppm). For such high precision experiments active stabilization and precise determination of beam parameters like current, energy, position, and angle are essential requirements in addition to precision electron beam polarimetry. For the future P2 experiment at the planned superconducting accelerator MESA in Mainz the requirements for beam quality will be even higher. P2 will measure the weak mixing angle with 0.15 percent total uncertainty and, in addition, the neutron skin depth of lead as well as parity violation in electron scattering off 12C. A tiny asymmetry of only -0.03 ppm creates the needs to combine digital feedback with feedforward stabilizations along with new polarimetry developments like a hydro-Moller and a double-Mott polarimeter to meet the goals for systematic uncertainty. This talk gives an overview of our experience with polarimetry, analog feedbacks and compensation techniques for apparative asymmetries at the A4 experiment. It finally leads to the requirements and new techniques for the pioneering P2 experiment at MESA. First results from beam tests currently carried out at the existing MAMI accelerator, employing high speed analog/digital conversion and FPGAs for control of beam parameters, will be presented. Supported by the cluster of excellence PRISMA and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB1044.

  2. The Parity Theorem Shuffle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Parity Theorem states that any permutation can be written as a product of transpositions, but no permutation can be written as a product of both an even number and an odd number of transpositions. Most proofs of the Parity Theorem take several pages of mathematical formalism to complete. This article presents an alternative but equivalent…

  3. Parity in knot theory

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2010-06-29

    In this work we study knot theories with a parity property for crossings: every crossing is declared to be even or odd according to a certain preassigned rule. If this rule satisfies a set of simple axioms related to the Reidemeister moves, then certain simple invariants solving the minimality problem can be defined, and invariant maps on the set of knots can be constructed. The most important example of a knot theory with parity is the theory of virtual knots. Using the parity property arising from Gauss diagrams we show that even a gross simplification of the theory of virtualmore » knots, namely, the theory of free knots, admits simple and highly nontrivial invariants. This gives a solution to a problem of Turaev, who conjectured that all free knots are trivial. In this work we show that free knots are generally not invertible, and provide invariants which detect the invertibility of free knots. The passage to ordinary virtual knots allows us to strengthen known invariants (such as the Kauffman bracket) using parity considerations. We also discuss other examples of knot theories with parity. Bibliography: 27 items.« less

  4. Volkswagen Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information on EPA's issued notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to Volkswagen. The NOV alleges software that circumvents EPA emissions standards for certain air pollutants.

  5. Long-lived stop at the LHC with or without R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, L.; Dradi, F., E-mail: laura.covi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: federico.dradi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We consider scenarios of gravitino LSP and DM with stop NLSP both within R-parity conserving and R-parity violating supersymmetry (RPC and RPV SUSY, respectively). We discuss cosmological bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the gravitino abundance and then concentrate on the signals of long-lived stops at the LHC as displaced vertices or metastable particles. Finally we discuss how to distinguish R-parity conserving and R-parity breaking stop decays if they happen within the detector and how to suppress SM backgrounds.

  6. The Fall of Parity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Physicists had assumed that the world is distinguishable from its mirror image and constructed theories to ensure that the corresponding mathematical property (parity) is conserved in all subatomic processes. However, a scientific experiment demonstrated an intrinsic handedness to at least one physical process. The experiment, equipment, and…

  7. Two- and Three-Dimensional Probes of Parity in Primordial Gravity Waves.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2017-06-02

    We show that three-dimensional information is critical to discerning the effects of parity violation in the primordial gravity-wave background. If present, helical gravity waves induce parity-violating correlations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) between parity-odd polarization B modes and parity-even temperature anisotropies (T) or polarization E modes. Unfortunately, EB correlations are much weaker than would be naively expected, which we show is due to an approximate symmetry resulting from the two-dimensional nature of the CMB. The detectability of parity-violating correlations is exacerbated by the fact that the handedness of individual modes cannot be discerned in the two-dimensional CMB, leading to a noise contribution from scalar matter perturbations. In contrast, the tidal imprints of primordial gravity waves fossilized into the large-scale structure of the Universe are a three-dimensional probe of parity violation. Using such fossils the handedness of gravity waves may be determined on a mode-by-mode basis, permitting future surveys to probe helicity at the percent level if the amplitude of primordial gravity waves is near current observational upper limits.

  8. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat sample...

  9. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat sample...

  10. Fourth Generation Parity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Soni, Amarjit

    2013-01-01

    We present a very simple 4th-generation (4G) model with an Abelian gauge interaction under which only the 4G fermions have nonzero charge. The U(1) gauge symmetry can have a Z_2 residual discrete symmetry (4G-parity), which can stabilize the lightest 4G particle (L4P). When the 4G neutrino is the L4P, it would be a neutral and stable particle and the other 4G fermions would decay into the L4P leaving the trace of missing energy plus the standard model fermions. Because of the new symmetry, the 4G particle creation and decay modes are different from those of the sequential 4G model, andmore » the 4G particles can be appreciably lighter than typical experimental bounds.« less

  11. Protecting quantum memories using coherent parity check codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffe, Joschka; Headley, David; Chancellor, Nicholas; Horsman, Dominic; Kendon, Viv

    2018-07-01

    Coherent parity check (CPC) codes are a new framework for the construction of quantum error correction codes that encode multiple qubits per logical block. CPC codes have a canonical structure involving successive rounds of bit and phase parity checks, supplemented by cross-checks to fix the code distance. In this paper, we provide a detailed introduction to CPC codes using conventional quantum circuit notation. We demonstrate the implementation of a CPC code on real hardware, by designing a [[4, 2, 2

  12. Nuclear spin dependence of time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Gudkov, Vladimir; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.

    2018-06-11

    In this study, the spin structure of parity violating and time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering is discussed. The explicit relations between these effects are presented in terms of functions nuclear spins and neutron partial widths of p-wave resonances.

  13. Nuclear spin dependence of time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Vladimir; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.

    In this study, the spin structure of parity violating and time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron scattering is discussed. The explicit relations between these effects are presented in terms of functions nuclear spins and neutron partial widths of p-wave resonances.

  14. Parity at the Planck scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2018-06-01

    We explore the possibility that well known properties of the parity operator, such as its idempotency and unitarity, might break down at the Planck scale. Parity might then do more than just swap right and left polarized states and reverse the sign of spatial momentum k: it might generate superpositions of right and left handed states, as well as mix momenta of different magnitudes. We lay down the general formalism, but also consider the concrete case of the Planck scale kinematics governed by κ-Poincaré symmetries, where some of the general features highlighted appear explicitly. We explore some of the observational implications for cosmological fluctuations. Different power spectra for right handed and left handed tensor modes might actually be a manifestation of deformed parity symmetry at the Planck scale. Moreover, scale-invariance and parity symmetry appear deeply interconnected.

  15. Stochastic-master-equation analysis of optimized three-qubit nondemolition parity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornberg, L.; Barzanjeh, Sh.; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2014-03-01

    We analyzea direct parity measurement of the state of three superconducting qubits in circuit quantum electrodynamics. The parity is inferred from a homodyne measurement of the reflected and transmitted microwave radiation, and the measurement is direct in the sense that the parity is measured without the need for any quantum circuit operations or for ancilla qubits. Qubits are coupled to two resonant-cavity modes, allowing the steady state of the emitted radiation to satisfy the necessary conditions to act as a pointer state for the parity. However, the transient dynamics violates these conditions, and we analyze this detrimental effect and show that it can be overcome in the limit of a weak measurement signal. Our analysis shows that, with a moderate degree of postselection, it is possible to achieve postmeasurement states with fidelity of order 95%. We believe that this type of measurement could serve as a benchmark for future error correction protocols in a scalable architecture.

  16. Radio frequency charge parity meter.

    PubMed

    Schroer, M D; Jung, M; Petersson, K D; Petta, J R

    2012-10-19

    We demonstrate a total charge parity measurement by detecting the radio frequency signal that is reflected by a lumped-element resonator coupled to a single InAs nanowire double quantum dot. The high frequency response of the circuit is used to probe the effects of the Pauli exclusion principle at interdot charge transitions. Even parity charge transitions show a striking magnetic field dependence that is due to a singlet-triplet transition, while odd parity transitions are relatively insensitive to a magnetic field. The measured response agrees well with cavity input-output theory, allowing accurate measurements of the interdot tunnel coupling and the resonator-charge coupling rate g(c)/2π~17 MHz.

  17. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  18. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-15

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  19. Solar neutrino masses and mixing from bilinear R-parity broken supersymmetry: Analytical versus numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, M.; Hirsch, M.; Porod, W.; Romão, J.; Valle, J.

    2003-07-01

    We give an analytical calculation of solar neutrino masses and mixing at one-loop order within bilinear R-parity breaking supersymmetry, and compare our results to the exact numerical calculation. Our method is based on a systematic perturbative expansion of R-parity violating vertices to leading order. We find in general quite good agreement between the approximate and full numerical calculations, but the approximate expressions are much simpler to implement. Our formalism works especially well for the case of the large mixing angle Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution, now strongly favored by the recent KamLAND reactor neutrino data.

  20. The role of CP violating scatterings in baryogenesis—case study of the neutron portal

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander

    Many baryogenesis scenarios invoke the charge parity (CP) violating out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy particle in order to explain the baryon asymmetry. Such scenarios will in general also allow CP violating scatterings. We study the effect of these CP violating scatterings on the final asymmetry in a neutron portal scenario. We solve the Boltzmann equations governing the evolution of the baryon number numerically and show that the CP violating scatterings play a dominant role in a significant portion of the parameter space.

  1. Parity & Untreated Dental Caries in US Women

    PubMed Central

    Russell, S.L.; Ickovics, J.R.; Yaffee, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    While parity (number of children) reportedly is related to tooth loss, the relationship between parity and dental caries has not been extensively investigated. We used path analysis to test a theoretical model that specified that parity influences dental caries levels through dental care, psycho- social factors, and dental health damaging behaviors in 2635 women selected from the NHANES III dataset. We found that while increased parity was not associated with a greater level of total caries (DFS), parity was related to untreated dental caries (DS). The mechanisms by which parity is related to caries, however, remain undefined. Further investigation is warranted to determine if disparities in dental caries among women are due to differences in parity and the likely changes that parallel these reproductive choices. PMID:20631092

  2. Parity & untreated dental caries in US women.

    PubMed

    Russell, S L; Ickovics, J R; Yaffee, R A

    2010-10-01

    While parity (number of children) reportedly is related to tooth loss, the relationship between parity and dental caries has not been extensively investigated. We used path analysis to test a theoretical model that specified that parity influences dental caries levels through dental care, psycho- social factors, and dental health damaging behaviors in 2635 women selected from the NHANES III dataset. We found that while increased parity was not associated with a greater level of total caries (DFS), parity was related to untreated dental caries (DS). The mechanisms by which parity is related to caries, however, remain undefined. Further investigation is warranted to determine if disparities in dental caries among women are due to differences in parity and the likely changes that parallel these reproductive choices.

  3. Bounds on Time Reversal Violation From Polarized Neutron Capture With Unpolarized Targets.

    PubMed

    Davis, E D; Gould, C R; Mitchell, G E; Sharapov, E I

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed constraints on parity-odd time-reversal noninvariant interactions derived from measurements of the energy dependence of parity-violating polarized neutron capture on unpolarized targets. As previous authors found, a perturbation in energy dependence due to a parity (P)-odd time (T)-odd interaction is present. However, the perturbation competes with T-even terms which can obscure the T-odd signature. We estimate the magnitudes of these competing terms and suggest strategies for a practicable experiment.

  4. CP violation in h → ττ and LFV h → μτ

    SciTech Connect

    Hayreter, Alper; He, Xiao-Gang; Valencia, German

    The CMS Collaboration has reported a possible lepton flavor violating (LFV) signal . Whereas this does not happen in the standard model (SM), we point out that new physics responsible for this type of decay would, in general, also produce charge-parity (CP) violation in . We estimate the size of this effect in a model independent manner and find that a large asymmetry, of order 25%, is allowed by current constraints.

  5. CP violation in h → ττ and LFV h → μτ

    DOE PAGES

    Hayreter, Alper; He, Xiao-Gang; Valencia, German

    2016-06-30

    The CMS Collaboration has reported a possible lepton flavor violating (LFV) signal . Whereas this does not happen in the standard model (SM), we point out that new physics responsible for this type of decay would, in general, also produce charge-parity (CP) violation in . We estimate the size of this effect in a model independent manner and find that a large asymmetry, of order 25%, is allowed by current constraints.

  6. Towards a complete A4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; de Anda, Francisco J.; de Medeiros Varzielas, Ivo; King, Stephen F.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a renormalisable model based on A 4 family symmetry with an SU(5) grand unified theory (GUT) which leads to the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with a ℤ9 × ℤ6 symmetry provides the fermion mass hierarchy in both the quark and lepton sectors, while ℤ {4/ R } symmetry is broken to ℤ {2/ R }, identified as usual R-parity. Proton decay is highly sup-pressed by these symmetries. The strong CP problem is solved in a similar way to the Nelson-Barr mechanism. We discuss both the A 4 and SU(5) symmetry breaking sectors, including doublet-triplet splitting, Higgs mixing and the origin of the μ term. The model provides an excellent fit (better than one sigma) to all quark and lepton (including neu-trino) masses and mixing with spontaneous CP violation. With the A 4 vacuum alignments, (0, 1, 1) and (1, 3, 1), the model predicts the entire PMNS mixing matrix with no free pa-rameters, up to a relative phase, selected to be 2π/3 from a choice of the nine complex roots of unity, which is identified as the leptogenesis phase. The model predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy with leptonic angles θ{13/ ι } ≈ 8.7∘, θ{12/ ι } ≈ 34∘, θ{23/ ι } ≈ 46∘ and an oscillation phase δ ι ≈ - 87∘.

  7. Two Coils Resonant Ramsey's Method for the Measurement of Time Reversal Invariance Violation in Neutron Transmission.

    PubMed

    Loukachevitch, V V; Aldushchenkov, A V

    2005-01-01

    It is proposed within the framework of Ramsey's method to register two-dimensional spectra, depending on the neutron phase and neutron energy, for measuring parity (P) and time (T) violating amplitudes of the interaction of polarized neutrons with polarized (139)La nuclei in region of the p-wave resonance. The form of the phase spectrum and corresponding expressions for the asymmetries are obtained on the basis of a formalism of a spin density matrix. It is shown that the ratio of the P,T,-violating to P-violating imaginary amplitudes can be obtained from the measurements of the neutron phase spectrum with polarized and unpolarized (139)La target.

  8. Lorentz-violating gravitoelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2010-09-15

    The well-known analogy between a special limit of general relativity and electromagnetism is explored in the context of the Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. An analogy is developed for the minimal standard-model extension that connects a limit of the CPT-even component of the electromagnetic sector to the gravitational sector. We show that components of the post-Newtonian metric can be directly obtained from solutions to the electromagnetic sector. The method is illustrated with specific examples including static and rotating sources. Some unconventional effects that arise for Lorentz-violating electrostatics and magnetostatics have an analog in Lorentz-violating post-Newtonian gravity. In particular, we show that evenmore » for static sources, gravitomagnetic fields arise in the presence of Lorentz violation.« less

  9. Probing the standard model and beyond with CP violation and particle cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastio, Michael Paul

    We discuss topics related to CP violation and particle cosmology. First, we present some developments in improving the extraction of the CP violating parameter gamma from the decay B+/- → DK+/- followed by the subsequent decay D → KS pi +pi--. The mixing of the final state kaon is an additional CP violating effect which should be taken into account in the extraction of gamma, and we discuss how this should be done. We also discuss the optimization of phase space binning needed to extract gamma from these decays in a model independent way. Next, we discuss some cosmological constraints on R-parity violating, Minimally Flavor Violating (MFV) Supersymmetry (SUSY). Finally, we show that oribtally excited dark matter cannot persist over cosmic timescales for various model independent reasons.

  10. Parity-time-symmetric teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra'di, Y.; Sounas, D. L.; Alù, A.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    We show that electromagnetic plane waves can be fully "teleported" through thin, nearly fully reflective sheets, assisted by a pair of parity-time-symmetric lossy and active sheets in front and behind the screen. The proposed structure is able to almost perfectly absorb incident waves over a wide range of frequency and incidence angles, while waves having a specific frequency and incidence angle are replicated behind the structure in synchronization with the input signal. It is shown that the proposed structure can be designed to teleport waves at any desired frequency and incidence angle. Furthermore, we generalize the proposed concept to the case of teleportation of electromagnetic waves over electrically long distances, enabling full absorption at one surface and the synthesis of the same signal at another point located electrically far away from the first surface. The physical principle behind this selective teleportation is discussed, and similarities and differences with tunneling and cloaking concepts based on PT symmetry are investigated. From the application point of view, the proposed structure works as an extremely selective filter, both in frequency and spatial domains.

  11. Lorentz violation and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2007-08-01

    This work explores the theoretical and experimental aspects of Lorentz violation in gravity. A set of modified Einstein field equations is derived from the general Lorentz-violating Standard-Model Extension (SME). Some general theoretical implications of these results are discussed. The experimental consequences for weak-field gravitating systems are explored in the Earth- laboratory setting, the solar system, and beyond. The role of spontaneous Lorentz-symmetry breaking is discussed in the context of the pure-gravity sector of the SME. To establish the low-energy effective Einstein field equations, it is necessary to take into account the dynamics of 20 coefficients for Lorentz violation. As an example, the results are compared with bumblebee models, which are general theories of vector fields with spontaneous Lorentz violation. The field equations are evaluated in the post- newtonian limit using a perfect fluid description of matter. The post-newtonian metric of the SME is derived and compared with some standard test models of gravity. The possible signals for Lorentz violation due to gravity-sector coefficients are studied. Several new effects are identified that have experimental implications for current and future tests. Among the unconventional effects are a new type of spin precession for a gyroscope in orbit and a modification to the local gravitational acceleration on the Earth's surface. These and other tests are expected to yield interesting sensitivities to dimensionless gravity- sector coefficients.

  12. Mental Health Insurance Parity and Provider Wages.

    PubMed

    Golberstein, Ezra; Busch, Susan H

    2017-06-01

    Policymakers frequently mandate that employers or insurers provide insurance benefits deemed to be critical to individuals' well-being. However, in the presence of private market imperfections, mandates that increase demand for a service can lead to price increases for that service, without necessarily affecting the quantity being supplied. We test this idea empirically by looking at mental health parity mandates. This study evaluated whether implementation of parity laws was associated with changes in mental health provider wages. Quasi-experimental analysis of average wages by state and year for six mental health care-related occupations were considered: Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists; Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors; Marriage and Family Therapists; Mental Health Counselors; Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers; and Psychiatrists. Data from 1999-2013 were used to estimate the association between the implementation of state mental health parity laws and the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and average mental health provider wages. Mental health parity laws were associated with a significant increase in mental health care provider wages controlling for changes in mental health provider wages in states not exposed to parity (3.5 percent [95% CI: 0.3%, 6.6%]; p<.05). Mental health parity laws were associated with statistically significant but modest increases in mental health provider wages. Health insurance benefit expansions may lead to increased prices for health services when the private market that supplies the service is imperfect or constrained. In the context of mental health parity, this work suggests that part of the value of expanding insurance benefits for mental health coverage was captured by providers. Given historically low wage levels of mental health providers, this increase may be a first step in bringing mental health provider wages in line with parallel

  13. Testing R-parity with geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Matti, Cyril; Nelson, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete classification of the vacuum geometries of all renormalizable superpotentials built from the fields of the electroweak sector of the MSSM. In addition to the Severi and affine Calabi-Yau varieties previously found, new vacuum manifolds are identified; we thereby investigate the geometrical implication of theories which display a manifest matter parity (or R-parity) via the distinction between leptonic and Higgs doublets, and of the lepton number assignment of the right-handed neutrino fields.

  14. Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    of epidermal growth factor and estrogen receptor expression in the parous mammary epithelium (Musey et al., ; Thordarson et al., 1995). Similar to...hormone and growth factor receptor levels are decreased as a result of parity has been previously proposed ( Thordarson et al., 1995). In support of...consequence of parity ( Thordarson et al., 1995). The identification of IGF-1, PTN, Ob and TSHR, however, are novel mitogenic pathways, whose association

  15. Parity and the medicalization of addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ken; Miller, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Parity, the idea that insurance coverage for the treatment of addiction should be on a par with insurance coverage for the treatment of other medical illnesses, is not a new idea, but the path to achieving "real parity" has been a long, hard and complex journey. Action by Congress to pass major parity legislation in 2008 was a huge step forward, but does not mean that parity has been achieved. Parity has required a paradigm shift in the understanding of addiction as a biological illness: many developments of science and policy changes by professional organizations and governmental entities have contributed to that paradigm shift. Access to adequate treatment for patients must acknowledge the paradigm shift reflected in parity as it has evolved to the current point: that this biological illness is widespread, that it is important that it be treated effectively, that appropriate third party payment for physician-provided or physician-supervised addiction treatment is critical for addiction medicine to become a part of the mainstream of our nation's healthcare delivery system, and that medical specialty care provides the most effective and cost effective benefit to patients and therefore to our society.

  16. Parity partners in the baryon resonance spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ya; Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D.; ...

    2017-07-28

    Here, we describe a calculation of the spectrum of flavor-SU(3) octet and decuplet baryons, their parity partners, and the radial excitations of these systems, made using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector x vector contact interaction as the foundation for the relevant few-body equations. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking generates nonpointlike diquarks within these baryons and hence, using the contact interaction, flavor-antitriplet scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and flavor-sextet axial-vector quark-quark correlations can all play active roles. The model yields reasonable masses for all systems studied and Faddeev amplitudes for ground states and associated parity partners that sketch a realistic picture of theirmore » internal structure: ground-state, even-parity baryons are constituted, almost exclusively, from like-parity diquark correlations, but orbital angular momentum plays an important role in the rest-frame wave functions of odd-parity baryons, whose Faddeev amplitudes are dominated by odd-parity diquarks.« less

  17. Parity partners in the baryon resonance spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ya; Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D.

    Here, we describe a calculation of the spectrum of flavor-SU(3) octet and decuplet baryons, their parity partners, and the radial excitations of these systems, made using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector x vector contact interaction as the foundation for the relevant few-body equations. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking generates nonpointlike diquarks within these baryons and hence, using the contact interaction, flavor-antitriplet scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and flavor-sextet axial-vector quark-quark correlations can all play active roles. The model yields reasonable masses for all systems studied and Faddeev amplitudes for ground states and associated parity partners that sketch a realistic picture of theirmore » internal structure: ground-state, even-parity baryons are constituted, almost exclusively, from like-parity diquark correlations, but orbital angular momentum plays an important role in the rest-frame wave functions of odd-parity baryons, whose Faddeev amplitudes are dominated by odd-parity diquarks.« less

  18. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... General IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10 Violations... action to be taken. The types of actions that would normally be taken when a violation has occurred that...

  19. Learn About FCA Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about EPA's issued notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. and FCA US LLC. The NOV alleges that FCA installed software that circumvents EPA emissions standards for certain air pollutants.

  20. Flavor violating Higgs decays

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kopp, Joachim; Zupan, Jure

    2013-03-01

    We study a class of nonstandard interactions of the newly discovered 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance that are especially interesting probes of new physics: flavor violating Higgs couplings to leptons and quarks. These interaction can arise in many frameworks of new physics at the electroweak scale such as two Higgs doublet models, extra dimensions, or models of compositeness. We rederive constraints on flavor violating Higgs couplings using data on rare decays, electric and magnetic dipole moments, and meson oscillations. We confirm that flavor violating Higgs boson decays to leptons can be sizeable with, e.g., h → τμ and h → τemore » branching ratios of (10%) perfectly allowed by low energy constraints. We estimate the current LHC limits on h → τμ and h → τe decays by recasting existing searches for the SM Higgs in the ττ channel and find that these bounds are already stronger than those from rare tau decays. We also show that these limits can be improved significantly with dedicated searches and we outline a possible search strategy. Flavor violating Higgs decays therefore present an opportunity for discovery of new physics which in some cases may be easier to access experimentally than flavor conserving deviations from the Standard Model Higgs framework.« less

  1. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations or...

  2. Constraining spacetime nonmetricity with Lorentz-violation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi; Lehnert, Ralf; Snow, W. M.; Xu, Rui

    2018-01-01

    In this report, we will give the first constraints on in-matter nonmetricity. We will show how the effective-field-theory (EFT) toolbox developed for the study of Lorentz violation (LV) can be employed for investigations of the “effective LV” background caused by nonmetricity, a geometric object extending the notion of a Riemannian manifold. The idea is to probe for the effects of spacetime nonmetricity sourced by liquid 4He with polarized slow neutrons. We present the first constraints on isotropic and parity-odd nonmetricity components. Further constraints on anisotropic nonmetricity components within this EFT framework may be feasible with proper experimental techniques in the near future.

  3. Parity and risk of hemorrhagic strokes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sun-Young; Bae, Hee-Joon; Park, Byung-Joo; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2010-05-04

    The association between parity and risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) remains to be clarified. This study assessed the association of parity with the overall risk of HS and compared its contribution to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We used a database from a nationwide multicenter case-control study, in which 471 female cases with incident HS were matched at 1:2 with 942 community or hospital controls. A total of 459 HS cases and 918 controls with information on parity were included. Parity was categorized as 0-1, 2, 3, and >or=4. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. As potential confounders, age, history of hypertension, history of diabetes, family history of stroke, smoking status, alcohol consumption, educational status, age at menarche, and use of oral contraceptives were included in the models. Compared with nullipara and unipara, women with parity of 2, 3, and >or=4 had significantly higher risk for total HS, ICH, and SAH, respectively. Each additional parity increased the ORs of HS (adjusted OR for total HS = 1.27 [95% CI 1.14-1.41]; adjusted OR for SAH = 1.34 [95% CI 1.13-1.58]; adjusted OR for ICH = 1.27 [95% CI 1.08-1.48]). Likelihood ratio test for trends showed a significantly increased risk with increasing parity for total HS and for both types of HS (p(trend) < 0.05 in all analyses). Increased number of childbirths may be related to an increased risk of both intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  4. Experiments on the origin of molecular chirality by parity non-conservation during beta-decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments are described to test a theory for the origin of optical activity wherein the longitudinally polarized electrons resulting from parity violation during radioactive beta-decay, and their resulting circularly polarized bremsstrahlung, might interact asymmetrically with organic matter to yield optically active products. The historical background to this subject is briefly reviewed. Our experiments involve subjecting a number of racemic and optically active amino acid samples to a beta-radiation source for a period of 1.34 years (total dose: 411 Mrads), then examining them for any asymmetric effects by means of optical rotatory dispersion and analytical gas chromatography.

  5. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power.

    PubMed

    Snow, W M; Anderson, E; Barrón-Palos, L; Bass, C D; Bass, T D; Crawford, B E; Crawford, C; Dawkins, J M; Esposito, D; Fry, J; Gardiner, H; Gan, K; Haddock, C; Heckel, B R; Holley, A T; Horton, J C; Huffer, C; Lieffers, J; Luo, D; Maldonado-Velázquez, M; Markoff, D M; Micherdzinska, A M; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Sarsour, M; Santra, S; Sharapov, E I; Swanson, H E; Walbridge, S B; Zhumabekova, V

    2015-05-01

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10(-7) rad/m.

  6. Institutions, Politics, and Mental Health Parity

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Elaine M.; Uggen, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Mental health parity laws require insurers to extend comparable benefits for mental and physical health care. Proponents argue that by placing mental health services alongside physical health services, such laws can help ensure needed treatment and destigmatize mental illness. Opponents counter that such mandates are costly or unnecessary. The authors offer a sociological account of the diffusion and spatial distribution of state mental health parity laws. An event history analysis identifies four factors as especially important: diffusion of law, political ideology, the stability of mental health advocacy organizations and the relative health of state economies. Mental health parity is least likely to be established during times of high state unemployment and under the leadership of conservative state legislatures. PMID:24353902

  7. Gravitational parity anomaly with and without boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkov, Maxim; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we consider gravitational parity anomaly in three and four dimensions. We start with a re-computation of this anomaly on a 3D manifold without boundaries and with a critical comparison of our results to the previous calculations. Then we compute the anomaly on 4D manifolds with boundaries with local bag boundary conditions. We find, that gravitational parity anomaly is localized on the boundary and contains a gravitational Chern-Simons terms together with a term depending of the extrinsic curvature. We also discuss the main properties of the anomaly, as the conformal invariance, relations between 3D and 4D anomalies, etc.

  8. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  9. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  10. Justification of a "Crucial" Experiment: Parity Nonconservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Allan; Smokler, Howard

    1981-01-01

    Presents history, nature of evidence evaluated, and philosophical questions to justify the view that experiments on parity nonconservation were "crucial" experiments in the sense that they decided unambiguously and within a short period of time for the appropriate scientific community, between two or more competing theories or classes of theories.…

  11. Nonlinear parity readout with a microwave photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöndorf, M.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2018-04-01

    Robust high-fidelity parity measurement is an important operation in many applications of quantum computing. In this work we show how in a circuit QED architecture, one can measure parity in a single shot at very high contrast by taking advantage of the nonlinear behavior of a strongly driven microwave cavity coupled to one or multiple qubits. We work in a nonlinear dispersive regime treated in an exact dispersive transformation. We show that appropriate tuning of experimental parameters leads to very high contrast in the cavity and therefore to a high-efficiency parity readout with a microwave photon counter or another amplitude detector. These tuning conditions are based on nonlinearity and are hence more robust than previously described linear tuning schemes. In the first part of the paper we show in detail how to achieve this for two-qubit parity measurements and extend this to N qubits in the second part of the paper. We also study the quantum nondemolition character of the protocol.

  12. Systemic sclerosis, birth order and parity.

    PubMed

    Russo, Paul A J; Lester, Susan; Roberts-Thomson, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    A recent study identified increasing birth order to be a risk factor for the development of systemic sclerosis (SSc). This finding supports the theory that transplacental microchimerism may be a key pathological event in the initiation of SSc. We investigated the relationship between birth order and parity and the age of onset of SSc in South Australia. A retrospective analysis of patient data in the South Australian Scleroderma Register was performed. Data were obtained from a mailed questionnaire. Control data was collected prospectively using a similar questionnaire. The relationship between birth order, family size or parity and risk of subsequent development of SSc was analyzed by mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and eighty-seven index probands were identified and compared with 457 controls. Controls were well matched for gender, but not for age. No statistically significant relationship was identified between SSc and birth order, parity in females, family size, age at first pregnancy in females or gender of first child in parous females. Our data suggests that parity, age at first pregnancy and the gender of the first child are not relevant factors in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SSc. Birth order and family size in both genders also appears irrelevant. These results argue against microchimerism as being relevant in the pathogenesis of SSc and add further support to the theory that stochastic events may be important in the etiopathogenesis of SSc. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Obstacles to Gender Parity in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohatynskyj, Marta; Davidson, Valerie; Stiver, Warren; Hayward, Maren

    2008-01-01

    Low rates of women's enrolment in engineering programs has been identified as a global problem within the general concern to enable women to attain parity in education in all areas. A Western women in engineering meta-narrative is identified which contains a complex of obstacles that typify the situation of Western women. The question is asked…

  14. Parity Effects on Maternal Attitudes During Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Karen D.; Self, Patricia A.

    In this study, which investigates the association of parity and maternal attitudes during pregnancy, a 30-item questionnaire was completed by 17 primiparous and 33 multiparous mothers in their 8th month of pregnancy at the Obstetrics-Gynocology Clinic at a university medical center. Measures were obtained on five scales: quality of available…

  15. RETRACTED: Measurement of parity violation in the capture of polarized neutrons on 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, S.

    2014-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of Author and agreed by the Editors. The author unwittingly used certain data from a collaboration that he was not entitled to use. The author would like to apologize for this error, which was made in good faith. As a consequence, pages 37-60 originally occupied by the retracted article are missing from the printed issue. The publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause.

  16. Precision determination of weak charge of {sup 133}Cs from atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, S. G.; School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad District 188300

    2010-08-01

    We discuss results of the most accurate to-date test of the low-energy electroweak sector of the standard model of elementary particles. Combining previous measurements with our high-precision calculations we extracted the weak charge of the {sup 133}Cs nucleus, Q{sub W}=-73.16(29){sub exp}(20){sub th}[S. G. Porsev, K. Beloy, and A. Derevianko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 181601 (2009)]. The result is in perfect agreement with Q{sub W}{sup SM} predicted by the standard model, Q{sub W}{sup SM}=-73.16(3), and confirms energy dependence (or running) of the electroweak interaction and places constraints on a variety of new physics scenarios beyond the standard model. In particular, wemore » increase the lower limit on the masses of extra Z-bosons predicted by models of grand unification and string theories. This paper provides additional details to the earlier paper. We discuss large-scale calculations in the framework of the coupled-cluster method, including full treatment of single, double, and valence triple excitations. To determine the accuracy of the calculations we computed energies, electric-dipole amplitudes, and hyperfine-structure constants. An extensive comparison with high-accuracy experimental data was carried out.« less

  17. Negatively valenced expectancy violation predicts emotionality: A longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, B Ann; Manning, Mark

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that negatively valenced expectancy violations about the quality of 1's life would predict negative emotionality. We tested this hypothesis in a 4-wave longitudinal study of breast cancer survivors. The findings showed that higher levels of negatively valenced expectancy violation, at earlier time points, were associated with greater negative emotionality, at later time points. Implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing parity... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section...

  19. Behavioral health insurance parity for federal employees.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H; Frank, Richard G; Burnam, M Audrey; Huskamp, Haiden A; Ridgely, M Susan; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Young, Alexander S; Barry, Colleen L; Azzone, Vanessa; Busch, Alisa B; Azrin, Susan T; Moran, Garrett; Lichtenstein, Carolyn; Blasinsky, Margaret

    2006-03-30

    To improve insurance coverage of mental health and substance-abuse services, the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program offered mental health and substance-abuse benefits on a par with general medical benefits beginning in January 2001. The plans were encouraged to manage care. We compared seven FEHB plans from 1999 through 2002 with a matched set of health plans that did not have benefits on a par with mental health and substance-abuse benefits (parity of mental health and substance-abuse benefits). Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we compared the claims patterns of matched pairs of FEHB and control plans by examining the rate of use, total spending, and out-of-pocket spending among users of mental health and substance-abuse services. The difference-in-differences analysis indicated that the observed increase in the rate of use of mental health and substance-abuse services after the implementation of the parity policy was due almost entirely to a general trend in increased use that was observed in comparison health plans as well as FEHB plans. The implementation of parity was associated with a statistically significant increase in use in one plan (+0.78 percent, P<0.05) a significant decrease in use in one plan (-0.96 percent, P<0.05), and no significant difference in use in the other five plans (range, -0.38 percent to +0.23 percent; P>0.05 for each comparison). For beneficiaries who used mental health and substance-abuse services, spending attributable to the implementation of parity decreased significantly for three plans (range, -201.99 dollars to -68.97 dollars; P<0.05 for each comparison) and did not change significantly for four plans (range, -42.13 dollars to +27.11 dollars; P>0.05 for each comparison). The implementation of parity was associated with significant reductions in out-of-pocket spending in five of seven plans. When coupled with management of care, implementation of parity in insurance benefits for behavioral health care

  20. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... violation or possible violation of subsections 27 (a), (b), (c) or (d) of the Office of Federal Procurement... disclosure of proprietary or source selection information is the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement...) and (2) for Headquarters activities is the Agency Ethics Official (Designated Agency Ethics Official...

  1. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 903.104-7 Section 903.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL... disclosure of proprietary or source selection information is the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement...

  2. Relationship between parity and bone mass in postmenopausal women according to number of parities and age.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Behzad; Heidari, Parnaz; Nourooddini, Haj Ghorban; Hajian-Tilaki, Karim Ollah

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of multiple pregnancies on postmenopausal bone mineral density (BMD). BMD at the femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method. Diagnosis of osteoporosis (OP) was confirmed by World Health Organization criteria. Women were stratified according to number of parity as < 3, 4-7, and > 7 parity groups as well as in age groups of < 65 and 65 in age groups of < 65 and > or = 65 years. BMD values and frequency of OP were compared across the groups according to age. Multiple logistic regression analysis with calculation of adjusted odds ratio (OR) was used for association. A total of 264 women with mean age of 63 +/- 8.7 and mean menopausal duration of 15.8 +/- 10.2 years were studied. LS-OP and FN-OP were observed in 28% and 58.3% of women, respectively. There were significant differences in BMD values across different parity groups at both sites of LS and FN (p = 0.011 and p = 0.036, respectively). Parity 4-7 (vs. < or = 3) increased BMD nonsignificantly, but > 7 significantly decreased LS-BMD and FN-BMD as compared with 0-7 parity (p = 0.006 and p = 0.009, respectively). Parity > 7 increased the risk of LS-OP by OR = 1.81 (95% CI 1.03-3.1, p = 0.037) and FN-OP by OR = 1.67 (95% CI 0.97-2.8, p = 0.063). In addition, women with high parity had lower BMD decline at LS and FN by age (> or = 65 vs. < 65 years) by 1.3% (p = 0.77) and -10.1% (p = 0.009) as compared with 0-7 parity group by -9.5% (p = 0.001) and -15% (p = 0.0001), respectively. Parity > 7 is associated with spinal trabecular bone loss in younger postmenopausal women as well as an osteoprotective effect against age-related bone loss, which counteracts the early negative effect. Therefore, parity should not be considered as a risk factor for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  3. Can we communicate gravidity and parity better?

    PubMed

    Creinin, Mitchell D; Simhan, Hyagriv N

    2009-03-01

    Communication of gravidity and parity is a typical part of any written or oral presentation related to an obstetric or gynecologic patient. The ostensible purpose of including this information at the beginning of a discussion of a woman's care is to provide a quick context of the patient from a reproductive standpoint. Unfortunately, the systems in use for describing gravidity, parity, and reproductive outcomes are without clear epidemiologic, biologic, or clinical basis. In description of parous events, births and abortions easily can be confused in the gray zone of 20 to 24 weeks, and terminology used often fails to take into account the clinical context. In this article, we discuss the pitfalls of current systems used for describing a woman's reproductive history and recommend new and simple nomenclature to enhance our ability to communicate properly.

  4. Gender Parity in Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sangeeta; Burns, Karen E A; Machado, Flavia R; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E; Cook, Deborah J; Calfee, Carolyn S; Ware, Lorraine B; Burnham, Ellen L; Kissoon, Niranjan; Marshall, John C; Mancebo, Jordi; Finfer, Simon; Hartog, Christiane; Reinhart, Konrad; Maitland, Kathryn; Stapleton, Renee D; Kwizera, Arthur; Amin, Pravin; Abroug, Fekri; Smith, Orla; Laake, Jon H; Shrestha, Gentle S; Herridge, Margaret S

    2017-08-15

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. These documents inform and shape patient care around the world. In this Perspective we discuss the importance of diversity on guideline panels, the disproportionately low representation of women on critical care guideline panels, and existing initiatives to increase the representation of women in corporations, universities, and government. We propose five strategies to ensure gender parity within critical care medicine.

  5. Charged pions tagged with polarized photons probing strong C P violation in a chiral-imbalance medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya; Harada, Masayasu; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Ouyang, Ruiwen

    2017-06-01

    It is expected that in a hot QCD system, a local parity-odd domain can be produced due to nonzero chirality, which is induced from the difference of winding numbers carried by the gluon topological configuration (QCD sphaleron). This local domain is called the chiral-imbalance medium, characterized by nonzero chiral chemical potential, which can be interpreted as the time variation of the strong C P phase. We find that the chiral chemical potential generates the parity breaking term in the electromagnetic form factor of charged pions. Heavy ion collision experiments could observe the phenomenological consequence of this parity-odd form factor through the elastic scattering of a pion and a photon in the medium. Then we quantify the asymmetry rate of the parity violation by measuring the polarization of the photon associated with the pion, and discuss how it could be measured in a definite laboratory frame. We roughly estimate the typical size of the asymmetry, just by picking up the pion resonant process, and find that the signal can be sufficiently larger than possible background events from parity-breaking electroweak process. Our findings might provide a novel possibility to make a manifest detection for the remnant of the strong C P violation.

  6. The fate of the littlest Higgs model with T -parity under 13 TeV LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dercks, Daniel; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid; Reuter, Jürgen; Shim, So Young

    2018-05-01

    We exploit all LHC available Run 2 data at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV for searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We scrutinize the allowed parameter space of Little Higgs models with the concrete symmetry of T -parity by providing comprehensive analyses of all relevant production channels of heavy vectors, top partners, heavy quarks and heavy leptons and all phenomenologically relevant decay channels. Constraints on the model, particularly the symmetry breaking scale f, will be derived from the signatures of jets and missing energy or leptons and missing energy. Besides the symmetric case, we also study the case of T-parity violation. Furthermore, we give an extrapolation to the LHC high-luminosity phase at 14 TeV as well.

  7. CP Violation (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    Raven, G.

    2018-05-23

    Existence of antimatter is a consequence of the combination of special relativity and quantum mechanics. No 'primordial' antimatter's observed, need CP violation. CP broken by the charged weak interaction. The weak and mass eigenstates of quarks are different, and this difference is described by the CKM matrix. There is a clear (and unexplained!) hierarchical structure to the CKM matrix...with 3 (or more families, one can have a complex phase(s) in the CKM matrix, and this allows for CP violation! Measurements show that CKM describes the dominant (only?) source of CP violation (at the EW scale). But it doesn't explain the matter--antimatter asymmetry of the universe.

  8. Symmetry Violation in Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, Murray

    1982-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * SU(3) × SU(3) SYMMETRY * VIOLATION OF SU(3) × SU(3) IN STRONG INTERACTIONS * POSSIBLE CONNECTIONS OF STRONG VIOLATION WITH WEAK AND ELECTROMAGNETIC EFFECTS * SCALE INVARIANCE AND THE DILATION OPERATOR * THE BREAKING OF SCALE INVARIANCE * RELATION BETWEEN VIOLATIONS OF SCALE INVARIANCE AND OF SU(3) × SU(3) * REFERENCES *Note: Much of the work presented in the next two sections was done this summer in collaboration with Lowell Brown. It is based partly on the pioneering research of Kastrup, Mack, Wess, Kenneth Wilson, and others. *In this section and the next, our particle states are normalized to one particle per unit volume.

  9. New parity, same old attitude towards psychotherapy?

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2010-03-01

    Full parity of health insurance benefits for treatment of mental illness, including substance use disorders, is a major achievement. However, the newly-published regulations implementing the legislation strongly endorse aggressive managed care as a way of containing costs for the new equality of coverage. Reductions in "very long episodes of out-patient care," hospitalization, and provider fees, along with increased utilization, are singled out as achievements of managed care. Medical appropriateness as defined by expert medical panels is to be the basis of authorizing care, though clinicians are familiar with a history of insurance companies' application of "medical necessity" to their own advantage. The regulations do not single out psychotherapy for attention, but long-term psychotherapy geared to the needs of each patient appears to be at risk. The author recommends that the mental health professions strongly advocate for the growing evidence base for psychotherapy including long-term therapy for complex mental disorders; respect for the structure and process of psychotherapy individualized to patients' needs; awareness of the costs of aggressive managed care in terms of money, time, administrative burden, and interference with the therapy; and recognition of the extensive training and experience required to provide psychotherapy as well as the stresses and demands of the work. Parity in out-of-network benefits could lead to aggressive management of care given by non-network practitioners. Since a large percentage of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals stay out of networks, implementation of parity for out-of-network providers will have to be done in a way that respects the conditions under which they would be willing and able to provide services, especially psychotherapy, to insured patients. The shortage of psychiatrists makes this an important access issue for the insured population in need of care.

  10. State Parity Laws and Access to Treatment for Substance Use Disorder in the United States: Implications for Federal Parity Legislation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hefei; Cummings, Janet R.; Hockenberry, Jason M.; Gaydos, Laura M.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Context The passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) and the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) incorporated parity for substance use disorder (SUD) into federal legislation. Yet prior research provides us with scant evidence as to whether federal parity legislation will hold the potential for improving access to SUD treatment. Objective This study examined the effect of state-level SUD parity laws on state-aggregate SUD treatment rates from 2000 to 2008, to shed light on the impact of the recent federal-level SUD parity legislation. Design A quasi-experimental study design using a two-way (state and year) fixed-effect method Setting and Participants All known specialty SUD treatment facilities in the United States Interventions State-level SUD parity laws between 2000 and 2008 Main Outcome Measures State-aggregate SUD treatment rates in: (1) all specialty SUD treatment facilities, and (2) specialty SUD treatment facilities accepting private insurance Results The implementation of any SUD parity law increased the treatment rate by 9 percent (p<0.01) in all specialty SUD treatment facilities and by 15 percent (p<0.05) in facilities accepting private insurance. Full parity and parity-if-offered (i.e., parity only if SUD coverage is offered) increased SUD treatment rate by 13 percent (p<0.05) and 8 percent (p<0.05) in all facilities, and by 21 percent (p<0.05) and 10 percent (p<0.05) in those accepting private insurance. Conclusions We found a positive effect of the implementation of state SUD parity legislation on access to specialty SUD treatment. Furthermore, the positive association was more pronounced in states with more comprehensive parity laws. Our findings suggest that federal parity legislation holds the potential to improve access to SUD treatment. PMID:24154931

  11. CP violating scalar Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Cid, A.; Hernández-Sánchez, J.; Keus, V.; King, S. F.; Moretti, S.; Rojas, D.; Sokołowska, D.

    2016-12-01

    We study an extension of the Standard Model (SM) in which two copies of the SM scalar SU(2) doublet which do not acquire a Vacuum Expectation Value (VEV), and hence are inert, are added to the scalar sector. We allow for CP-violation in the inert sector, where the lightest inert state is protected from decaying to SM particles through the conservation of a Z 2 symmetry. The lightest neutral particle from the inert sector, which has a mixed CP-charge due to CP-violation, is hence a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. We discuss the new regions of DM relic density opened up by CP-violation, and compare our results to the CP-conserving limit and the Inert Doublet Model (IDM). We constrain the parameter space of the CP-violating model using recent results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and DM direct and indirect detection experiments.

  12. Deterministic entanglement of superconducting qubits by parity measurement and feedback.

    PubMed

    Ristè, D; Dukalski, M; Watson, C A; de Lange, G; Tiggelman, M J; Blanter, Ya M; Lehnert, K W; Schouten, R N; DiCarlo, L

    2013-10-17

    The stochastic evolution of quantum systems during measurement is arguably the most enigmatic feature of quantum mechanics. Measuring a quantum system typically steers it towards a classical state, destroying the coherence of an initial quantum superposition and the entanglement with other quantum systems. Remarkably, the measurement of a shared property between non-interacting quantum systems can generate entanglement, starting from an uncorrelated state. Of special interest in quantum computing is the parity measurement, which projects the state of multiple qubits (quantum bits) to a state with an even or odd number of excited qubits. A parity meter must discern the two qubit-excitation parities with high fidelity while preserving coherence between same-parity states. Despite numerous proposals for atomic, semiconducting and superconducting qubits, realizing a parity meter that creates entanglement for both even and odd measurement results has remained an outstanding challenge. Here we perform a time-resolved, continuous parity measurement of two superconducting qubits using the cavity in a three-dimensional circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and phase-sensitive parametric amplification. Using postselection, we produce entanglement by parity measurement reaching 88 per cent fidelity to the closest Bell state. Incorporating the parity meter in a feedback-control loop, we transform the entanglement generation from probabilistic to fully deterministic, achieving 66 per cent fidelity to a target Bell state on demand. These realizations of a parity meter and a feedback-enabled deterministic measurement protocol provide key ingredients for active quantum error correction in the solid state.

  13. Superconducting parity effect across the Anderson limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlaic, Sergio; Pons, Stéphane; Zhang, Tianzhen; Assouline, Alexandre; Zimmers, Alexandre; David, Christophe; Rodary, Guillemin; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Roditchev, Dimitri; Aubin, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    How small can superconductors be? For isolated nanoparticles subject to quantum size effects, P.W. Anderson in 1959 conjectured that superconductivity could only exist when the electronic level spacing δ is smaller than the superconducting gap energy Δ. Here we report a scanning tunnelling spectroscopy study of superconducting lead (Pb) nanocrystals grown on the (110) surface of InAs. We find that for nanocrystals of lateral size smaller than the Fermi wavelength of the 2D electron gas at the surface of InAs, the electronic transmission of the interface is weak; this leads to Coulomb blockade and enables the extraction of electron addition energy of the nanocrystals. For large nanocrystals, the addition energy displays superconducting parity effect, a direct consequence of Cooper pairing. Studying this parity effect as a function of nanocrystal volume, we find the suppression of Cooper pairing when the mean electronic level spacing overcomes the superconducting gap energy, thus demonstrating unambiguously the validity of the Anderson criterion. PMID:28240294

  14. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions...

  15. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions...

  16. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions...

  17. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions...

  18. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions...

  19. Speeded Recognition of Ungrammaticality: Double Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy E.; Biederman, Irving

    1979-01-01

    The speed at which sentences with various kinds of violations could be rejected was studied. Compatible with the sequential model was the finding that noun-verb and adjective-noun double violations did not result in shorter reaction times than noun-verb single violations, although double violations were judged less acceptable. (Author/RD)

  20. State parity laws and access to treatment for substance use disorder in the United States: implications for federal parity legislation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hefei; Cummings, Janet R; Hockenberry, Jason M; Gaydos, Laura M; Druss, Benjamin G

    2013-12-01

    The passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the 2010 Affordable Care Act incorporated parity for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment into federal legislation. However, prior research provides us with scant evidence as to whether federal parity legislation will hold the potential for improving access to SUD treatment. To examine the effect of state-level SUD parity laws on state-aggregate SUD treatment rates and to shed light on the impact of the recent federal SUD parity legislation. We conducted a quasi-experimental study using a 2-way (state and year) fixed-effect method. We included all known specialty SUD treatment facilities in the United States and examined treatment rates from October 1, 2000, through March 31, 2008. Our main source of data was the National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services, which provides facility-level information on specialty SUD treatment. State-level SUD parity laws during the study period. State-aggregate SUD treatment rates in (1) all specialty SUD treatment facilities and (2) specialty SUD treatment facilities accepting private insurance. The implementation of any SUD parity law increased the treatment rate by 9% (P < .001) in all specialty SUD treatment facilities and by 15% (P = .02) in facilities accepting private insurance. Full parity and parity only if SUD coverage is offered increased the SUD treatment rate by 13% (P = .02) and 8% (P = .04), respectively, in all facilities and by 21% (P = .03) and 10% (P = .04), respectively, in facilities accepting private insurance. We found a positive effect of the implementation of state SUD parity legislation on access to specialty SUD treatment. Furthermore, the positive association is more pronounced in states with more comprehensive parity laws. Our findings suggest that federal parity legislation holds the potential to improve access to SUD treatment.

  1. Cosmological CPT violation and CMB polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of testing Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry with cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We consider two kinds of Chern-Simons (CS) term, electromagnetic CS term and gravitational CS term, and study their effects on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. By combining current CMB polarization measurements, the seven-year WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003 and BICEP observations, we obtain a tight constraint on the rotation angle Δα = -2.28±1.02 deg (1 σ), indicating a 2.2 σ detection of the CPT violation. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. After adding the QUaD polarization data, the constraint becomes -1.34 < Δα < 0.82 deg at 95% confidence level. When comparing with the effect of electromagnetic CS term, the gravitational CS term could only generate TB and EB power spectra with much smaller amplitude. Therefore, the induced parameter epsilon can not be constrained from the current polarization data. Furthermore, we study the capabilities of future CMB measurements, Planck and CMBPol, on the constraints of Δα and epsilon. We find that the constraint of Δα can be significantly improved by a factor of 15. Therefore, if this rotation angle effect can not be taken into account properly, the constraints of cosmological parameters will be biased obviously. For the gravitational CS term, the future Planck data still can not constrain epsilon very well, if the primordial tensor perturbations are small, r < 0.1. We need the more accurate CMBPol experiment to give better constraint on epsilon.

  2. Parents' Child Care Experience: Effects of Sex and Parity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Andrew R.; Glanville, Bradley B.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 94 couples to determine effects on child care experience associated with gender, parity, and various other demographic variables. As expected, women had higher scores than men. Experience was a linear function of parity for men, but not for women, and was unrelated to attitudes toward women. Implications for child care responsibility are…

  3. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  4. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  5. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  6. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  7. 47 CFR 51.207 - Local dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Local dialing parity. 51.207 Section 51.207... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.207 Local dialing parity. A LEC shall permit telephone exchange service customers within a local calling area to dial the same number of digits to make a local...

  8. Parity and cobordism of free knots

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2012-02-28

    A simple invariant is constructed which obstructs a free knot to be truncated. In particular, this invariant provides an obstruction to the truncatedness of curves immersed in two-dimensional surfaces. A curve on an oriented two-dimensional surface S{sub g} is referred to as truncated (null-cobordant) if there exists a three-dimensional manifold M with boundary S{sub g} and a smooth proper map of a two-disc to M such that the image of the boundary of the disc coincides with the curve. The problem of truncatedness for free knots is solved in this paper using the notion of parity recently introduced by themore » author. Bibliography: 12 titles.« less

  9. B Physics and CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    These lectures present the phenomenology of B meson decays and their impact on our understanding of CP violation in the quark sector, with an emphasis on measurements made at the e+e- B factories. Some of the relevant theoretical ideas such as the Operator Product Expansion and Heavy Quark Symmetry are introduced, and applications to the determination of CKM matrix elements given. The phenomenon of B flavor oscillations is reviewed, and the mechanisms for and current status of CP violation in the B system is given. The status of rare B decays is also discussed.

  10. Parity and Overweight/Obesity in Peruvian Women.

    PubMed

    Huayanay-Espinoza, Carlos A; Quispe, Renato; Poterico, Julio A; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Bazo-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Miranda, J Jaime

    2017-10-19

    The rise in noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors in developing countries may have changed or intensified the effect of parity on obesity. We aimed to assess this association in Peruvian women using data from a nationally representative survey. We used data from Peru's Demographic and Health Survey, 2012. Parity was defined as the number of children ever born to a woman. We defined overweight as having a body mass index (BMI, kg/m 2 ) of 25.0 to 29.9 and obesity as a BMI ≥30.0. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the association between parity and BMI and BMI categories, by area of residence and age, adjusting for confounders. Data from 16,082 women were analyzed. Mean parity was 2.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.17-2.33) among rural women and 1.40 (95% CI, 1.36-1.43) among urban women. Mean BMI was 26.0 (standard deviation, 4.6). We found evidence of an association between parity and BMI, particularly in younger women; BMI was up to 4 units higher in rural areas and 2 units higher in urban areas. An association between parity and BMI categories was observed in rural areas as a gradient, being highest in younger women. We found a positive association between parity and overweight/obesity. This relationship was stronger in rural areas and among younger mothers.

  11. Phenomenology of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubisz, Jay; Meade, Patrick

    2005-02-01

    Little Higgs models offer an interesting approach to weakly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking without fine-tuning. The original little Higgs models were plagued by strong constraints from electroweak precision data which required a fine-tuning to be reintroduced. An economical solution to this problem is to introduce a discrete symmetry (analogous to R-parity of SUSY) called T-parity. T-parity not only eliminates most constraints from electroweak precision data, but it also leads to a promising dark matter candidate. In this paper we investigate the dark matter candidate in the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. An upper bound on the symmetry breaking scale f≲1.8 TeV naturally arises from calculating the relic density. We begin the study of the LHC phenomenology of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. We find that the model offers an interesting collider signature that has a generic missing energy signal which could “fake” SUSY at the LHC. We also investigate the properties of the heavy partner of the top quark which is common to all littlest Higgs models, and how its properties are modified with the introduction of T-parity. We include an appendix with a list of Feynman rules specific to the littlest Higgs with T-parity to facilitate further study.

  12. Implementation of mental health parity: lessons from california.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Margo L; Lake, Timothy K; Williams, Susan R; Buck, Jeffrey A

    2009-12-01

    This article reports the experiences of health plans, providers, and consumers with California's mental health parity law and discusses implications for implementation of the 2008 federal parity law. This study used a multimodal data collection approach to assess the first five years of California's parity implementation (from 2000 to 2005). Telephone interviews were conducted with 68 state-level stakeholders, and in-person interviews were conducted with 77 community-based stakeholders. Six focus groups included 52 providers, and six included 32 consumers. A semistructured interview protocol was used. Interview notes and transcripts were coded to facilitate analysis. Health plans eliminated differential benefit limits and cost-sharing requirements for certain mental disorders to comply with the law, and they used managed care to control costs. In response to concerns about access to and quality of care, the state expanded oversight of health plans, issuing access-to-care regulations and conducting focused studies. California's parity law applied to a limited list of psychiatric diagnoses. Health plan executives said they spent considerable resources clarifying which diagnoses were covered at parity levels and concluded that the limited diagnosis list was unnecessary with managed care. Providers indicated that the diagnosis list had unintended consequences, including incentives to assign a more severe diagnosis that would be covered at parity levels, rather than a less severe diagnosis that would not be covered at such levels. The lack of consumer knowledge about parity was widely acknowledged, and consumers in the focus groups requested additional information about parity. Experiences in California suggest that implementation of the 2008 federal parity law should include monitoring health plan performance related to access and quality, in addition to monitoring coverage and costs; examining the breadth of diagnoses covered by health plans; and mounting a campaign

  13. Benign violations: making immoral behavior funny.

    PubMed

    McGraw, A Peter; Warren, Caleb

    2010-08-01

    Humor is an important, ubiquitous phenomenon; however, seemingly disparate conditions seem to facilitate humor. We integrate these conditions by suggesting that laughter and amusement result from violations that are simultaneously seen as benign. We investigated three conditions that make a violation benign and thus humorous: (a) the presence of an alternative norm suggesting that the situation is acceptable, (b) weak commitment to the violated norm, and (c) psychological distance from the violation. We tested the benign-violation hypothesis in the domain of moral psychology, where there is a strong documented association between moral violations and negative emotions, particularly disgust. Five experimental studies show that benign moral violations tend to elicit laughter and amusement in addition to disgust. Furthermore, seeing a violation as both wrong and not wrong mediates behavioral displays of humor. Our account is consistent with evolutionary accounts of laughter, explains humor across many domains, and suggests that humor can accompany negative emotion.

  14. KCBX Notice of Violation - April 28, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    US EPA issued a Notice of Violation (NOV) to KCBX Terminals Company on April 28, 2015 asserting that KCBX's petroleum coke piles in Chicago are sources of fugitive emissions which violate the Clean Air Act and Illinois State Implementation Plan.

  15. Aperture Mask for Unambiguous Parity Determination in Long Wavelength Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a new parity pupil mask design that allows users to unambiguously determine the image space coordinate system of all the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) science instruments by using two out-of-focus images. This is an improvement over existing mask designs that could not completely eliminate the coordinate system parity ambiguity at a wavelength of 5.6 microns. To mitigate the problem of how the presence of diffraction artifacts can obscure the pupil mask detail, this innovation has been created with specifically designed edge features so that the image space coordinate system parity can be determined in the presence of diffraction, even at long wavelengths.

  16. Parity-expanded variational analysis for nonzero momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Finn M.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. Selim; Menadue, Benjamin J.; Owen, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the use of variational analysis techniques in lattice QCD has been demonstrated to be successful in the investigation of the rest-mass spectrum of many hadrons. However, due to parity mixing, more care must be taken for investigations of boosted states to ensure that the projected correlation functions provided by the variational analysis correspond to the same states at zero momentum. In this paper we present the parity-expanded variational analysis (PEVA) technique, a novel method for ensuring the successful and consistent isolation of boosted baryons through a parity expansion of the operator basis used to construct the correlation matrix.

  17. Parity-time–symmetric optoelectronic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    An optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is a hybrid microwave and photonic system incorporating an amplified positive feedback loop to enable microwave oscillation to generate a high-frequency and low–phase noise microwave signal. The low phase noise is ensured by the high Q factor of the feedback loop enabled by the use of a long and low-loss optical fiber. However, an OEO with a long fiber loop would have a small free spectral range, leading to a large number of closely spaced oscillation modes. To ensure single-mode oscillation, an ultranarrowband optical filter must be used, but such an optical filter is hard to implement and the stability is poor. Here, we use a novel concept to achieve single-mode oscillation without using an ultranarrowband optical filter. The single-mode operation is achieved based on parity-time (PT) symmetry by using two identical feedback loops, with one having a gain and the other having a loss of the same magnitude. The operation is analyzed theoretically and verified by an experiment. Stable single-mode oscillation at an ultralow phase noise is achieved without the use of an ultranarrowband optical filter. The use of PT symmetry in an OEO overcomes the long-existing mode-selection challenge that would greatly simplify the implementation of OEOs for ultralow–phase noise microwave generation. PMID:29888325

  18. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  19. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  20. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  1. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  2. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  3. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  4. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  5. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  6. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and...

  7. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart...

  8. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  9. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  10. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  11. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  12. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  13. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  14. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a...

  15. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  16. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  17. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  18. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  19. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  20. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the...

  1. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the...

  2. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  3. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  4. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United...

  6. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  7. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  8. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  9. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  10. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of this...

  11. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  12. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  13. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  14. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  15. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  16. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  17. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Enforcement § 75.51 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  18. Noise-tolerant parity learning with one quantum bit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Daniel K.; Rhee, June-Koo K.; Lee, Soonchil

    2018-03-01

    Demonstrating quantum advantage with less powerful but more realistic devices is of great importance in modern quantum information science. Recently, a significant quantum speedup was achieved in the problem of learning a hidden parity function with noise. However, if all data qubits at the query output are completely depolarized, the algorithm fails. In this work, we present a quantum parity learning algorithm that exhibits quantum advantage as long as one qubit is provided with nonzero polarization in each query. In this scenario, the quantum parity learning naturally becomes deterministic quantum computation with one qubit. Then the hidden parity function can be revealed by performing a set of operations that can be interpreted as measuring nonlocal observables on the auxiliary result qubit having nonzero polarization and each data qubit. We also discuss the source of the quantum advantage in our algorithm from the resource-theoretic point of view.

  19. Association of secondary sex ratio with smoking and parity.

    PubMed

    Beratis, Nicholas G; Asimacopoulou, Aspasia; Varvarigou, Anastasia

    2008-03-01

    To assess the sex ratio in offspring of smoking and nonsmoking mothers in relationship to parity. Prospective study. University hospital. The authors studied 2,108 term singleton neonates born between 1993 and 2002, 665 from smoking mothers and 1,443 from nonsmoking mothers. A prospective recording of maternal age, parity and smoking status, and gender of neonates delivered over a 10-year period. Secondary sex ratio in regard to maternal smoking and parity. The offspring sex ratio in the total sample studied was 1.09; in the offspring of smoking and nonsmoking mothers, it was 1.26 and 1.03, respectively, a statistically significant difference. In the offspring of smoking women who had parity 1, 2, and >or=3, it was 1.47, 1.35, and 0.92, whereas in those of nonsmoking women, it was 1.04, 1.00, and 1.03, respectively (the differences of the parity 1 and 2 groups between the offspring of smoking and nonsmoking mothers were statistically significant). Logistic regression analysis showed that the possibility of a boy being delivered by a mother who smoked was significantly greater in primiparous women than in women who had parity >or=3, independent of the maternal age. Conversely, parity did not affect significantly the sex ratio in the offspring of nonsmoking women. The findings suggest that among women who smoked, significantly more male than female offspring are born from primiparous women, whereas women who had parity >or=3 gave birth to more female offspring; biparous women give birth to significantly more male offspring, but the offspring sex ratio declined with the number of cigarettes when the mothers smoked >or=10 cigarettes per day.

  20. [Obesity in Brazilian women: association with parity and socioeconomic status].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Regicely Aline Brandão; Benicio, Maria Helena D'Aquino

    2015-05-01

    To determine the influence of reproductive history on the prevalence of obesity in Brazilian women and the possible modifying effect of socioeconomic variables on the association between parity and excess weight. A retrospective analysis of complex sample data collected as part of the 2006 Brazilian National Survey on Demography and Health, which included a group representative of women of childbearing age in Brazil was conducted. The study included 11 961 women aged 20 to 49 years. The association between the study factor (parity) and the outcome of interest (obesity) was tested using logistic regression analysis. The adjusted effect of parity on obesity was assessed in a multiple regression model containing control variables: age, family purchasing power, as defined by the Brazilian Association of Research Enterprises (ABEP), schooling, and health care. Significance level was set at below 0.05. The prevalence of obesity in the study population was 18.6%. The effect of parity on obesity was significant (P for trend < 0.001). Unadjusted analysis showed a positive association of obesity with parity and age. Family purchase power had a significant odds ratio for obesity only in the unadjusted analysis. In the adjusted model, this variable did not explain obesity. The present findings suggest that parity has an influence on obesity in Brazilian women of childbearing age, with higher prevalence in women vs. without children.

  1. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plusmore » minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.« less

  2. Bell violation in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Panda, Sudhakar; Singh, Rajeev

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we have studied the possibility of setting up Bell's inequality violating experiment in the context of cosmology, based on the basic principles of quantum mechanics. First we start with the physical motivation of implementing the Bell inequality violation in the context of cosmology. Then to set up the cosmological Bell violating test experiment we introduce a model independent theoretical framework using which we have studied the creation of new massive particles by implementing the WKB approximation method for the scalar fluctuations in the presence of additional time-dependent mass contribution in the cosmological perturbation theory. Here for completeness we compute the total number density and the energy density of the newly created particles in terms of the Bogoliubov coefficients using the WKB approximation method. Next using the background scalar fluctuation in the presence of a new time-dependent mass contribution, we explicitly compute the expression for the one point and two point correlation functions. Furthermore, using the results for a one point function we introduce a new theoretical cosmological parameter which can be expressed in terms of the other known inflationary observables and can also be treated as a future theoretical probe to break the degeneracy amongst various models of inflation. Additionally, we also fix the scale of inflation in a model-independent way without any prior knowledge of primordial gravitational waves. Also using the input from a newly introduced cosmological parameter, we finally give a theoretical estimate for the tensor-to-scalar ratio in a model-independent way. Next, we also comment on the technicalities of measurements from isospin breaking interactions and the future prospects of newly introduced massive particles in a cosmological Bell violating test experiment. Further, we cite a precise example of this setup applicable in the context of string theory motivated axion monodromy model. Then we comment

  3. Parity generator and parity checker in the modified trinary number system using savart plate and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amal K.

    2010-09-01

    The parity generators and the checkers are the most important circuits in communication systems. With the development of multi-valued logic (MVL), the proposed system with parity generators and checkers is the most required using the recently developed optoelectronic technology in the modified trinary number (MTN) system. This system also meets up the tremendous needs of speeds by exploiting the savart plates and spatial light modulators (SLM) in the optical tree architecture (OTA).

  4. Effect of parity on healthy promotion lifestyle behavior in women.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Hakan; Nazik, Evşen; Özdemir, Funda; Gül, Şule; Tezel, Ayfer; Narin, Raziye

    2015-01-01

    Health-promoting lifestyle behaviors are not only for the prevention of a disease or discomfort, but are also behaviors that aim to improve the individual's general health and well-being. Nurses have an important position in the development of healthy lifestyle behaviors in women. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of parity on health-promoting lifestyle behaviors in women. This descriptive and cross-sectional survey was performed in Adana, Turkey. This study was conducted with 352 women. The questionnaire consisted of two parts; the first part consisted of questions that assessed the socio-demographic and obstetric characteristics, and the second part employed the "Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile Scale" (HPLP). Data analysis included percentage, arithmetic average, and ANOVA tests. The results revealed that 24.1% of the women had no parity, 13.6% had one parity, 30.7% had two parities, 14.6% had three parities, and 17% had four and above parities. The mean total HPLP was 126.66±18.12 (interpersonal support subscale, 24.46±4.02; nutrition subscale, 21.59±3.92; self-actualization subscale, 24.42±4.30; stress management subscale, 18.73±3.81; health responsibility subscale, 21.75±4.31; and exercise subscale, 15.71±4.22). The health behavior of women was moderate. A statistically significant correlation was found between the number of parities and the Health Responsibility, Nutrition, Interpersonal Support, which is the subscale of the HPLP Scale.

  5. A search for squarks of Rp-violating SUSY at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R. D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Barschke, R.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H. J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M. J.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Cocks, S.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Cousinou, M. C.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davis, C. L.; Delcourt, B.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Dirkmann, M.; Dixon, P.; di Nezza, P.; Dlugosz, W.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Fahr, A. B.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gaede, F.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Glazov, A.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Griffiths, R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hampel, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladky, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Holtom, T.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kander, M.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kaufmann, O.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langenegger, U.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Lehner, F.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindström, G.; Lindstroem, M.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Lohmander, H.; Lomas, J. W.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, G.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H. U.; Martyniak, J.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merz, T.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P. O.; Migliori, A.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moeck, J.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, D.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Niggli, H.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Palmen, P.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pawletta, H.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riepenhausen, F.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleif, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Specka, A.; Spiekermann, J.; Spielman, S.; Spitzer, H.; Squinabol, F.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Steiner, H.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stößlein, U.; Stolze, K.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taševský, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Theissen, J.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Vandenplas, D.; van Esch, P.; van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walther, A.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; West, L. R.; Wilksen, T.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G. G.; Wittek, C.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Zuber, K.; Zurnedden, M.

    1996-03-01

    A search for squarks of R-parity violating supersymmetry is performed in ep collisions at HERA using H1 1994 e + data. Direct single production of squarks of each generation by e +-quark fusion via a Yukawa coupling λ' is considered. All possible R-parity violating decays and gauge decays of the squarks are taken into account. No significant deviation from the Standard Model predictions is found in the various multi-lepton and multi-jet final states studied and exclusion limits are derived. At 95% confidence level, the existence of first generation squarks is excluded for masses up to 240 GeV for coupling values λ'≳√4 πα em. The limits obtained are shown to be only weakly dependent on the free parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Stop squarks are excluded for masses up to 138 GeV for coupling λ'×cos θ t to e +d pairs ≳0.1×√4 πα em, where θ t is the mass mixing angle. Light stop squarks are furthermore searched for through pair production in γ-gluon fusion processes. No signal is observed and exclusion limits are derived. Masses in the range 9 to 24.4 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for λ'×cos θ t>10-4.

  6. Search for lepton flavour violation in the eμ continuum with the ATLAS detector in √{s} = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bona, M.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Drevermann, H.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Düren, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fasching, D.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flammer, J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Fopma, J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gieraltowski, G. F.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grabski, V.; Grafström, P.; Grah, C.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Green, B.; Greenfield, D.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grognuz, J.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Gruwe, M.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guindon, S.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gusakov, Y.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, C. J.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayden, D.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heldmann, M.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N. P.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmes, A.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Homma, Y.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horazdovsky, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horton, K.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hott, T.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hruska, I.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Ichimiya, R.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Idzik, M.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Imbault, D.; Imhaeuser, M.; Ince, T.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Ionescu, G.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishii, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D. K.; Jankowski, E.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jeremie, A.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, L. G.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joseph, J.; Ju, X.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz, M.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karr, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Kazi, S. I.; Keates, J. R.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kelly, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kenney, C. J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Ketterer, C.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kilvington, G.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, P. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G. P.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiver, A. M.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klaiber-Lodewigs, J.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Koenig, S.; König, S.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolachev, G. M.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kollefrath, M.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kootz, A.; Koperny, S.; Kopikov, S. V.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasel, O.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruth, A.; Kubota, T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kundu, N.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuykendall, W.; Kuze, M.; Kuzhir, P.; Kvasnicka, O.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laisne, E.; Lamanna, M.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Landsman, H.; Lane, J. L.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Lapin, V. V.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Lau, W.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorato, A.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Maner, C.; Le Menedeu, E.; Leahu, M.; Lebedev, A.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lesser, J.; Lester, C. G.; Leung Fook Cheong, A.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Lewandowska, M.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Lifshitz, R.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipinsky, L.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, M.; Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Lockwitz, S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.; Lu, L.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Luijckx, G.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundquist, J.; Lungwitz, M.; Lupi, A.; Lynn, D.; Lys, J.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Macana Goia, J. A.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Mader, W. F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Magalhaes Martins, P. J.; Magnoni, L.; Magradze, E.; Magrath, C. A.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Manabe, A.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchesotti, M.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marin, A.; Marino, C. P.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, Z.; Martens, F. K.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F. F.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Maß, M.; Massa, I.; Massaro, G.; Massol, N.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathes, M.; Matricon, P.; Matsumoto, H.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mattravers, C.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mayne, A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzoni, E.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; McGlone, H.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mclaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meinhardt, J.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Meng, Z.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meuser, S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Miele, P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikulec, B.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Miller, R. J.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Miyazaki, K.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Moisseev, A. M.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moneta, L.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Moorhead, G. F.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morin, J.; Morita, Y.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morone, MC; Morris, J. D.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muijs, A.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murakami, K.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, S.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nomoto, H.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Norton, P. R.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nozka, L.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nyman, T.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohska, T. K.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orellana, F.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Øye, O. K.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Paoloni, A.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Paramonov, A.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Peric, I.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, O.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickford, A.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rajek, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Ramstedt, M.; Randrianarivony, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rensch, B.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodier, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandoval, T.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Savva, P.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark (tilde{t}) in the e ± μ ∓ continuum using 2.1 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in √{s}=7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95 % C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m_{tilde{t}}). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp→ eμX, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m_{tilde{t}}=95 GeV to 30 fb for m_{tilde{t}}=1000 GeV.

  7. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  8. Nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Fengcheng; Martin, Ivar

    Recent experiments indicate that superconductivity in Bi 2Se 3 intercalated with Cu, Nb, or Sr is nematic with rotational symmetry breaking. Motivated by this observation, we present a model study of nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations. Additionally, we show that odd-parity fluctuations in the two-component E u representation of D 3d crystal point group can generate attractive interaction in both the even-parity s-wave and odd-parity E-u pairing channels, but repulsive interaction in other odd-parity pairing channels. Coulomb repulsion can suppress s-wave pairing relative to E u pairing, and thus the latter can have a higher critical temperature.more » E u pairing has two distinct phases: a nematic phase and a chiral phase, both of which can be realized in our model. Finally, when s-wave and E u pairings have similar instability temperature, we find an intermediate phase in which both types of pairing coexist.« less

  9. Sex, Parity, and Scars: A Meta-analytic Review.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Clare; Oxenham, Marc F

    2018-01-01

    The ability to identify whether a female has been pregnant or has given birth has significant implications for forensic investigations and bioarcheological research. The meaning of "scars of parturition," their causes, and their significance are a matter of contention, with a substantial literature of re-evaluations and tests of the relationship between pelvic scarring and parity. The aim of this study was to use meta-analytic techniques (the methodological approach) to test whether pelvic scarring, namely dorsal pubic pitting and the preauricular groove, is a predictor of parity and sex. Meta-analyses indicated that neither dorsal pubic pitting nor the preauricular groove are predictors of parity status, while dorsal pubic pitting is a moderate predictor of sex. A weak relationship between dorsal pubic pitting and parity was identified, but this is believed to be a product of the moderate relationship with sex. This calls into question whether any causal relationship between parity and pelvic scarring exists. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Fengcheng; Martin, Ivar

    2017-10-09

    Recent experiments indicate that superconductivity in Bi 2Se 3 intercalated with Cu, Nb, or Sr is nematic with rotational symmetry breaking. Motivated by this observation, we present a model study of nematic and chiral superconductivity induced by odd-parity fluctuations. Additionally, we show that odd-parity fluctuations in the two-component E u representation of D 3d crystal point group can generate attractive interaction in both the even-parity s-wave and odd-parity E-u pairing channels, but repulsive interaction in other odd-parity pairing channels. Coulomb repulsion can suppress s-wave pairing relative to E u pairing, and thus the latter can have a higher critical temperature.more » E u pairing has two distinct phases: a nematic phase and a chiral phase, both of which can be realized in our model. Finally, when s-wave and E u pairings have similar instability temperature, we find an intermediate phase in which both types of pairing coexist.« less

  11. The impact of parity on major depression treatment quality in the Federal Employees' Health Benefits Program after parity implementation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Alisa B; Huskamp, Haiden A; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Young, Alexander S; Goldman, Howard; Frank, Richard G

    2006-06-01

    Since the 1990s, parity laws have been implemented to reduce inequities in mental health coverage compared with that for general medical conditions. It is unclear if parity under managed care is associated with improvements in mental health treatment quality. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent but often undetected and undertreated and thus could potentially benefit from parity implementation. The objective of this study was to examine the association between parity implementation and changes in MDD treatment quality in the Federal Employees' Health Benefits (FEHB) Program. We conducted retrospective analyses of insurance claims data. Logistic regression models estimated quality changes for MDD-diagnosed enrollees from pre- to postparity. Subjects included MDD-diagnosed FEHB insured enrollees, aged 18-64, across multiple states and 6 FEHB plans before (1999-2000) and after (2001-2002) parity implementation. Measures included receipt of any antidepressant or psychotherapy within a given calendar year of diagnosis; receipt of appropriate psychotherapy frequency/intensity and duration; and pharmacotherapy duration during acute-phase treatment episodes. Postparity, several plans improved significantly in the likelihood of receiving antidepressant medication. In the acute-phase episodes, the greatest improvement was seen in the likelihood of follow up >or=4 months. Few or no other changes were observed in the acute-phase treatment intensity or duration quality measures. Parity under managed care was associated with modest improvements. The observed improvements were consistent with secular trends in MDD treatment. Whereas mental health parity is an important policy goal, these results highlight its limitations: improving the financing of care may not be sufficient to improve quality.

  12. CP violation in the B system.

    PubMed

    Gershon, T; Gligorov, V V

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation is crucial to understand the asymmetry between matter and antimatter that exists in the Universe. Dramatic experimental progress has been made, in particular in measurements of the behaviour of particles containing the b quark, where CP violation effects are predicted by the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism that is embedded in the standard model. The status of these measurements and future prospects for an understanding of CP violation beyond the standard model are reviewed.

  13. Lorentz violation and Faddeev-Popov ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, B.

    2006-02-15

    We consider how Lorentz-violating interactions in the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector will affect scalar QED. The behavior depends sensitively on whether the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. If the symmetry is not broken, Lorentz violations in the ghost sector are unphysical, but if there is spontaneous breaking, radiative corrections will induce Lorentz-violating and gauge-dependent terms in other sectors of the theory.

  14. National trends in drinking water quality violations.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Maura; Wu, Haowei; Lall, Upmanu

    2018-02-27

    Ensuring safe water supply for communities across the United States is a growing challenge in the face of aging infrastructure, impaired source water, and strained community finances. In the aftermath of the Flint lead crisis, there is an urgent need to assess the current state of US drinking water. However, no nationwide assessment has yet been conducted on trends in drinking water quality violations across several decades. Efforts to reduce violations are of national concern given that, in 2015, nearly 21 million people relied on community water systems that violated health-based quality standards. In this paper, we evaluate spatial and temporal patterns in health-related violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act using a panel dataset of 17,900 community water systems over the period 1982-2015. We also identify vulnerability factors of communities and water systems through probit regression. Increasing time trends and violation hot spots are detected in several states, particularly in the Southwest region. Repeat violations are prevalent in locations of violation hot spots, indicating that water systems in these regions struggle with recurring issues. In terms of vulnerability factors, we find that violation incidence in rural areas is substantially higher than in urbanized areas. Meanwhile, private ownership and purchased water source are associated with compliance. These findings indicate the types of underperforming systems that might benefit from assistance in achieving consistent compliance. We discuss why certain violations might be clustered in some regions and strategies for improving national drinking water quality.

  15. Controlled parity switch of persistent currents in quantum ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Michele; Bardyn, Charles-Edouard; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of persistent currents for a fixed number of noninteracting fermions in a periodic quantum ladder threaded by Aharonov-Bohm and transverse magnetic fluxes Φ and χ . We show that the coupling between ladder legs provides a way to effectively change the ground-state fermion-number parity, by varying χ . Specifically, we demonstrate that varying χ by 2 π (one flux quantum) leads to an apparent fermion-number parity switch. We find that persistent currents exhibit a robust 4 π periodicity as a function of χ , despite the fact that χ →χ +2 π leads to modifications of order 1 /N of the energy spectrum, where N is the number of sites in each ladder leg. We show that these parity-switch and 4 π periodicity effects are robust with respect to temperature and disorder, and outline potential physical realizations using cold atomic gases and photonic lattices, for bosonic analogs of the effects.

  16. Spin and parity measurement of the Λ(1405) baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bellis, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Dey, B.; Djalali, C.; Dugger, M.; Dupré, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Griffioen, K. A.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McCracken, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Smith, E. S.; Sokhan, D.; Smith, G. D.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Williams, M.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Ziegler, V.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    A determination of the spin and parity of the Λ(1405) is presented using photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The reaction γ+p→K++Λ(1405) is analyzed in the decay channel Λ(1405)→Σ ++π-, where the decay distribution to Σ+π- and the variation of the Σ+ polarization with respect to the Λ(1405) polarization direction determines the parity. The Λ(1405) is produced, in the energy range 2.55parity JP=1/2-, as expected by most theories.

  17. Effect of insurance parity on substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Azzone, Vanessa; Frank, Richard G; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Burnam, M Audrey

    2011-02-01

    This study examined the impact of insurance parity on the use, cost, and quality of substance abuse treatment. The authors compared substance abuse treatment spending and utilization from 1999 to 2002 for continuously enrolled beneficiaries covered by Federal Employees Health Benefit (FEHB) plans, which require parity coverage of mental health and substance use disorders, with spending and utilization among beneficiaries in a matched set of health plans without parity coverage. Logistic regression models estimated the probability of any substance abuse service use. Conditional on use, linear models estimated total and out-of-pocket spending. Logistic regression models for three quality indicators for substance abuse treatment were also estimated: identification of adult enrollees with a new substance abuse diagnosis, treatment initiation, and treatment engagement. Difference-in-difference estimates were computed as (postparity - preparity) differences in outcomes in plans without parity subtracted from those in FEHB plans. There were no significant differences between FEHB and non-FEHB plans in rates of change in average utilization of substance abuse services. Conditional on service utilization, the rate of substance abuse treatment out-of-pocket spending declined significantly in the FEHB plans compared with the non-FEHB plans (mean difference=-$101.09, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-$198.06 to -$4.12), whereas changes in total plan spending per user did not differ significantly. With parity, more patients had new diagnoses of a substance use disorder (difference-in-difference risk=.10%, CI=.02% to .19%). No statistically significant differences were found for rates of initiation and engagement in substance abuse treatment. Findings suggest that for continuously enrolled populations, providing parity of substance abuse treatment coverage improved insurance protection but had little impact on utilization, costs for plans, or quality of care.

  18. Neuro-parity pattern recognition system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Van Alstine, Rollin G.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Yue, Yong

    2000-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring a process and determining its condition. Initial data is sensed, a first set of virtual data is produced by applying a system state analyzation to the initial data, a second set of virtual data is produced by applying a neural network analyzation to the initial data and a parity space analyzation is applied to the first and second set of virtual data and also to the initial data to provide a parity space decision about the condition of the process. A logic test can further be applied to produce a further system decision about the state of the process.

  19. Quark and lepton mixing as manifestations of violated mirror symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatlov, I. T., E-mail: dyatlov@thd.pnpi.spb.ru

    2015-06-15

    The existence of heavy mirror analogs of ordinary fermions would provide deeper insight into the gedanken paradox appearing in the Standard Model upon direct parity violation and consisting in a physical distinguishability of left- and right-hand coordinate frames. Arguments are presented in support of the statement that such mirror states may also be involved in the formation of observed properties of the system of Standard Model quarks and leptons—that is, their mass spectra and their weak-mixing matrices: (i) In the case of the involvement of mirror generations, the quark mixing matrix assumes the experimentally observed form. It is determined bymore » the constraints imposed by weak SU(2) symmetry and by the quark-mass hierarchy. (ii) Under the same conditions and upon the involvement of mirror particles, the lepton mixing matrix (neutrino mixing) may become drastically different from its quark analog—the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix; that is, it may acquire properties suggested by experimental data. This character of mixing is also indicative of an inverse mass spectrum of Standard Model neutrinos and their Dirac (not Majorana) nature.« less

  20. Lorentz violation and perpetual motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, Christopher; Foster, Brendan Z.; Jacobson, Ted; Wall, Aron C.

    2007-05-01

    We show that any Lorentz-violating theory with two or more propagation speeds is in conflict with the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics. We do this by identifying a classical energy-extraction method, analogous to the Penrose process, which would decrease the black hole entropy. Although the usual definitions of black hole entropy are ambiguous in this context, we require only very mild assumptions about its dependence on the mass. This extends the result found by Dubovsky and Sibiryakov, which uses the Hawking effect and applies only if the fields with different propagation speeds interact just through gravity. We also point out instabilities that could interfere with their black hole perpetuum mobile, but argue that these can be neglected if the black hole mass is sufficiently large.

  1. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  2. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  3. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  4. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  5. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with the...

  6. 10 CFR 72.84 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 72.84 Section 72.84 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  7. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  8. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  9. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  10. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor, unless...

  11. Lorentz and diffeomorphism violations in linearized gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    Lorentz and diffeomorphism violations are studied in linearized gravity using effective field theory. A classification of all gauge-invariant and gauge-violating terms is given. The exact covariant dispersion relation for gravitational modes involving operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed, and various special limits are discussed.

  12. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prohibited by law or lawful regulation * * * shall be fined for not more than $500.00 or imprisoned not more... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 801-940) is a violation of Article 92 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. ...

  13. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  14. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  15. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  16. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  17. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense is...

  18. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a...

  19. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a...

  20. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a...

  1. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a...

  2. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a...

  3. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be...

  4. 10 CFR 216.9 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 216.9 Section 216.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.9 Violations. Any person who willfully furnishes false information or conceals any...

  5. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who...

  6. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended; or (3) A...

  7. Lorentz violation and deep inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Lunghi, E.; Vieira, A. R.

    2017-03-28

    We study the effects of quark-sector Lorentz violation on deep inelastic electron–proton scattering. Here, we show that existing data can be used to establish first constraints on numerous coefficients for Lorentz violation in the quark sector at an estimated sensitivity of parts in a million.

  8. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may... Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended; or (3...

  9. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  10. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  11. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  12. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  13. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or...

  14. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  15. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  16. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  17. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES... violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy...

  18. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... observing violators of this or other regulations must report the activity, time, and location to the Ft...

  19. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... observing violators of this or other regulations must report the activity, time, and location to the Ft...

  20. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... observing violators of this or other regulations must report the activity, time, and location to the Ft...

  1. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... observing violators of this or other regulations must report the activity, time, and location to the Ft...

  2. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... observing violators of this or other regulations must report the activity, time, and location to the Ft...

  3. EnviroSafe Finding of Violation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document outlines the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reissuing an enclosed Finding of Violation (FOV) to Enviro-Safe Refrigerants, Inc. (you). We find that you have violated the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. § 7413(a) (the CAA).

  4. Public Notification - RTCR Treatment Technique Violation Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    When a PWS receives a Treatment Technique Violation following an RTCR Level 1 or Level 2 assessment, it must issue a public notice to inform consumers of that violation. This template can be used as a guide to prepare that public notice.

  5. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799, and...

  6. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799, and...

  7. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799, and...

  8. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799, and...

  9. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests, and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order...

  10. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests, and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order...

  11. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests, and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order...

  12. Experiments on the origin of molecular chirality by parity non-conservation during beta-decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments are described to test a theory for the origin of optical activity wherein the longitudinally polarized electrons resulting from parity violation during radioactive beta decay, and their resulting circularly polarized Bremsstrahlung, might interact asymmetrically with organic matter to yield optically active products. Experiments involve subjecting a number of racemic and optically active amino acid samples to irradiation in a 61700 Ci90SR-90Y beta radiation source for a period of 1.34 years, then examining them for any asymmetric effects by means of optical rotatory dispersion and analytical gas chromatography. In the cases of D,L-leucine, norleucine, norvaline and proline as solids, of D,L-leucine in solution and of D,L-tyrosine in alkaline solution no optical rotation was observed during CRD measurements in the 250-630 nm spectral region. While slight differences were noted in the percent radiolysis of solid D- (12.7%) and L-leucine (16.2%) as determined by GC, no enrichment of either enantiomer was found.

  13. Asymptotic violation of Bell inequalities and distillability.

    PubMed

    Masanes, Lluís

    2006-08-04

    A multipartite quantum state violates a Bell inequality asymptotically if, after jointly processing by general local operations an arbitrarily large number of copies of it, the result violates the inequality. In the bipartite case we show that asymptotic violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality is equivalent to distillability. Hence, bound entangled states do not violate it. In the multipartite case we consider the complete set of full-correlation Bell inequalities with two dichotomic observables per site. We show that asymptotic violation of any of these inequalities by a multipartite state implies that pure-state entanglement can be distilled from it, although the corresponding distillation protocol may require that some of the parties join into several groups. We also obtain the extreme points of the set of distributions generated by measuring N quantum systems with two dichotomic observables per site.

  14. A System for Traffic Violation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aliane, Nourdine; Fernandez, Javier; Mata, Mario; Bemposta, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the framework and components of an experimental platform for an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) aimed at providing drivers with a feedback about traffic violations they have committed during their driving. The system is able to detect some specific traffic violations, record data associated to these faults in a local data-base, and also allow visualization of the spatial and temporal information of these traffic violations in a geographical map using the standard Google Earth tool. The test-bed is mainly composed of two parts: a computer vision subsystem for traffic sign detection and recognition which operates during both day and nighttime, and an event data recorder (EDR) for recording data related to some specific traffic violations. The paper covers firstly the description of the hardware architecture and then presents the policies used for handling traffic violations. PMID:25421737

  15. A system for traffic violation detection.

    PubMed

    Aliane, Nourdine; Fernandez, Javier; Mata, Mario; Bemposta, Sergio

    2014-11-24

    This paper describes the framework and components of an experimental platform for an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) aimed at providing drivers with a feedback about traffic violations they have committed during their driving. The system is able to detect some specific traffic violations, record data associated to these faults in a local data-base, and also allow visualization of the spatial and temporal information of these traffic violations in a geographical map using the standard Google Earth tool. The test-bed is mainly composed of two parts: a computer vision subsystem for traffic sign detection and recognition which operates during both day and nighttime, and an event data recorder (EDR) for recording data related to some specific traffic violations. The paper covers firstly the description of the hardware architecture and then presents the policies used for handling traffic violations.

  16. 76 FR 14566 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... 9000-AL88 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity AGENCY: Department of Defense... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to implement section 1347 of the ``Small Business Jobs Act of 2010.'' Section... acquisition will be restricted to small businesses participating in the 8(a), HUBZone, or service-disabled...

  17. 76 FR 26220 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Federal Acquisition Regulation; Socioeconomic Program Parity AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General... expectation exists (see 19.502-3 as to partial set-asides). Although past acquisition history of an item or...

  18. Alignments of parity even/odd-only multipoles in CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Ralston, John P.; Weltman, Amanda

    2017-12-01

    We compare the statistics of parity even and odd multipoles of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky from Planck full mission temperature measurements. An excess power in odd multipoles compared to even multipoles has previously been found on large angular scales. Motivated by this apparent parity asymmetry, we evaluate directional statistics associated with even compared to odd multipoles, along with their significances. Primary tools are the Power tensor and Alignment tensor statistics. We limit our analysis to the first 60 multipoles i.e. l = [2, 61]. We find no evidence for statistically unusual alignments of even parity multipoles. More than one independent statistic finds evidence for alignments of anisotropy axes of odd multipoles, with a significance equivalent to ∼2σ or more. The robustness of alignment axes is tested by making Galactic cuts and varying the multipole range. Very interestingly, the region spanned by the (a)symmetry axes is found to broadly contain other parity (a)symmetry axes previously observed in the literature.

  19. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  20. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  1. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  2. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN...

  3. 7 CFR 989.61 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Above parity situations. 989.61 Section 989.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... administration and enforcement of the order, shall continue in effect irrespective of whether the estimated...

  4. 7 CFR 993.53 - Above parity situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Above parity situations. 993.53 Section 993.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... of this part relating to administration shall continue in effect irrespective of whether the...

  5. Parity and risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, M; Heliövaara, M; Impivaara, O; Knekt, P; Jula, A

    2011-06-01

    Hip fracture risk was assessed according to parity among postmenopausal women. Compared with nulliparous women, the fracture risk was lower in women with three or more births. Parity was assessed for long-term prediction of hip fracture in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women (n= 2,028) aged 45 or over with no history of hip fracture were studied. From 1978 to 1980, all of them had participated in a comprehensive health survey based on a nationally representative population sample. Emerging cases of hip fracture were identified from the National Hospital Discharge Register during a follow-up period extending up to 17 years. The risk of hip fracture was lower among parous women compared with nulliparous women. The model adjusted for age showed a significant inverse association between parity as a continuous variable and the risk of hip fracture [RR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.90] per an increment of one standard deviation (2.4 births). Adjusted for age, menopausal age, level of education, body mass index, vitamin D status, alcohol consumption, smoking history, leisure time physical activity, and self-rated health, the relative risk was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.32-0.79) for women with three or more births and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.55-1.32) for women with one to two births as compared with nulliparous women. Parity, three or more births in particular, predicts a lowered risk of hip fracture in the long run.

  6. 12 CFR 560.220 - Alternative Mortgage Transaction Parity Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Act. (a) Applicable housing creditors. A housing creditor that is not a commercial bank, a credit... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternative Mortgage Transaction Parity Act. 560.220 Section 560.220 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  7. An Analysis of Shuttle Crew Scheduling Violations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristol, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    From the early years of the Space Shuttle program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle crews have had a timeline of activities to guide them through their time on-orbit. Planners used scheduling constraints to build timelines that ensured the health and safety of the crews. If a constraint could not be met it resulted in a violation. Other agencies of the federal government also have scheduling constraints to ensure the safety of personnel and the public. This project examined the history of Space Shuttle scheduling constraints, constraints from Federal agencies and branches of the military and how these constraints may be used as a guide for future NASA and private spacecraft. This was conducted by reviewing rules and violations with regard to human aerospace scheduling constraints, environmental, political, social and technological factors, operating environment and relevant human factors. This study includes a statistical analysis of Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) related violations to determine if these were a significant producer of constraint violations. It was hypothesized that the number of SCSC violations caused by EVA activities were a significant contributor to the total number of violations for Shuttle/ISS missions. Data was taken from NASA data archives at the Johnson Space Center from Space Shuttle/ISS missions prior to the STS-107 accident. The results of the analysis rejected the null hypothesis and found that EVA violations were a significant contributor to the total number of violations. This analysis could help NASA and commercial space companies understand the main source of constraint violations and allow them to create constraint rules that ensure the safe operation of future human private and exploration missions. Additional studies could be performed to evaluate other variables that could have influenced the scheduling violations that were analyzed.

  8. 9 CFR 88.6 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.6 Violations and penalties. (a) The Secretary is authorized to... equine transported in violation of the regulations of this part will be considered a separate violation...

  9. 48 CFR 903.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Violations 903.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. (a) Potential anti-competitive practices, such as described in 48 CFR 3.301, and antitrust law violations as described in 48 CFR 3.303, evidenced in...

  10. 48 CFR 903.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Violations 903.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. (a) Potential anti-competitive practices, such as described in FAR 3.301, and antitrust law violations as described in FAR 3.303, evidenced in bids...

  11. Lorentz-violating electrodynamics and the cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2007-07-06

    Possible Lorentz-violating effects in the cosmic microwave background are studied. We provide a systematic classification of renormalizable and nonrenormalizable operators for Lorentz violation in electrodynamics and use polarimetric observations to search for the associated violations.

  12. Flavor physics and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paoti; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, Wei-Shu

    2017-11-01

    We currently live in the age of the CKM paradigm. The 3 × 3 matrix that links (d , s , b) quarks to (u , c , t) in the charged current weak interaction, being complex and nominally with 18 parameters, can be accounted for by just 3 rotation angles and one CP violating (CPV) phase, with unitarity and the CKM phases triumphantly tested at the B factories. But the CKM picture is unsatisfactory and has too many parameters. The main aim of Flavor Physics and CP violation (FPCP) studies is the pursuit to uncover New Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Two highlights of LHC Run 1 period are the CPV phase ϕs of Bs mixing and Bs →μ+μ- decay, which were found to be again consistent with SM, though the saga is yet unfinished. We also saw the emergence of the P5‧ angular variable anomaly in B0 →K∗0μ+μ- decay and R K (∗) anomaly in B →K (∗)μ+μ- to B →K (∗)e+e- rate ratios, and the BaBar anomaly in B →D (∗) τν decays, which suggest possible New Physics in these flavor processes, pointing to extra Z‧, charged Higgs, or leptoquarks. Charmless hadronic, semileptonic, purely leptonic and radiative B decays continue to offer various further windows on New Physics. Away from B physics, the rare K → πνν decays and ε‧ / ε in the kaon sector, μ → e transitions, muon g - 2 and electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron, τ → μγ , μμμ , eee, and a few charm physics probes, offer broadband frontier windows on New Physics. Lastly, flavor changing neutral transitions involving the top quark t and the 125 GeV Higgs boson h, such as t → ch and h → μτ, offer a new window into FPCP, while a new Z‧ related or inspired by the P5‧ anomaly, could show up in analogous top quark processes, perhaps even link with low energy phenomena such as muon g - 2 or rare kaon processes. In particular, we advocate the potential new SM, the two Higgs doublet model without discrete symmetries to control flavor violation, as SM2. As we are

  13. New limit on possible long-range parity-odd interactions of the neutron from neutron-spin rotation in liquid 4He.

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Snow, W M

    2013-02-22

    Various theories beyond the standard model predict new particles with masses in the sub-eV range with very weak couplings to ordinary matter. A parity-odd interaction between polarized nucleons and unpolarized matter proportional to g(V)g(A)s · p is one such possibility, where s[over →] and p[over →] are the spin and the momentum of the polarized nucleon, and g(V) and g(A) are the vector and axial vector couplings of an interaction induced by the exchange of a new light vector boson. We report a new experimental upper bound on such possible long-range parity-odd interactions of the neutron with nucleons and electrons from a recent search for parity violation in neutron spin rotation in liquid ^{4}He. Our constraint on the product of vector and axial vector couplings of a possible new light vector boson is g(V) g(A)(n) ≤ 10(-32) for an interaction range of 1 m. This upper bound is more than 7 orders of magnitude more stringent than the existing laboratory constraints for interaction ranges below 1 m, corresponding to a broad range of vector boson masses above 10(-6) eV. More sensitive searches for a g(V) g(A)(n) coupling could be performed using neutron spin rotation measurements in heavy nuclei or through analysis of experiments conducted to search for nucleon-nucleon weak interactions and nuclear anapole moments.

  14. Judging Children's Participatory Parity from Social Justice and the Political Ethics of Care Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozalek, Vivienne

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a model for judging children's participatory parity in different social spaces. The notion of participatory parity originates in Nancy Fraser's normative theory for social justice, where it concerns the participatory status of adults. What, then, constitutes participatory parity for children? How should we judge the extent to…

  15. 7 CFR 5.5 - Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cases where preliminary marketing season average price data are used in estimating the adjusted base... parity price data. 5.5 Section 5.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINATION OF PARITY PRICES § 5.5 Publication of season average, calendar year, and parity price data. (a) New adjusted...

  16. 7 CFR 5.1 - Parity index and index of prices received by farmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parity index and index of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity index and index of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity index and related indices... farmers, interest, taxes, and farm wage rates, as revised May 1976 and published in the May 28, 1976, and...

  17. Probing Low-Mass Vector Bosons with Parity Nonconservation and Nuclear Anapole Moment Measurements in Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Stadnik, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    In the presence of P -violating interactions, the exchange of vector bosons between electrons and nucleons induces parity-nonconserving (PNC) effects in atoms and molecules, while the exchange of vector bosons between nucleons induces anapole moments of nuclei. We perform calculations of such vector-mediated PNC effects in Cs, Ba+ , Yb, Tl, Fr, and Ra+ using the same relativistic many-body approaches as in earlier calculations of standard-model PNC effects, but with the long-range operator of the weak interaction. We calculate nuclear anapole moments due to vector-boson exchange using a simple nuclear model. From measured and predicted (within the standard model) values for the PNC amplitudes in Cs, Yb, and Tl, as well as the nuclear anapole moment of 133Cs, we constrain the P -violating vector-pseudovector nucleon-electron and nucleon-proton interactions mediated by a generic vector boson of arbitrary mass. Our limits improve on existing bounds from other experiments by many orders of magnitude over a very large range of vector-boson masses.

  18. CP violations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriemma, Giulio

    2003-12-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter that is evident in our part of the Universe is one of the open questions in cosmology, because the CPT symmetry between matter and antimatter seems to be absolutely conserved at microscopic level. We repeat here the classical proofs which exclude the viability of a Universe baryon symmetric on the average, or the observed asymmetry as an initial conditions. The current understanding is that the asymmetry should have been dynamically generated before nucleosynthesis, by B, C, and CP violating processes, acting out of thermodynamical equilibrium, as suggested by Sakharov in the 70's. The physical realizations of these conditions would be possible, in principle, also in the framework of the Standard Model of elementary particles, but the present limits on the mass of the higgs particle exclude this possibility. Finally we present the model of baryogenesis through leptogenesis, which is allowed by a minimal extension of the Standard Model, which has the appeal of being testable in future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  19. Lorentz violations in multifractal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-05-01

    Using the recent observation of gravitational waves (GW) produced by a black-hole merger, we place a lower bound on the energy above which a multifractal spacetime would display an anomalous geometry and, in particular, violations of Lorentz invariance. In the so-called multifractional theory with q-derivatives, we show that the deformation of dispersion relations is much stronger than in generic quantum-gravity approaches (including loop quantum gravity) and, contrary to the latter, present observations on GWs can place very strong bounds on the characteristic scales at which spacetime deviates from standard Minkowski. The energy at which multifractal effects should become apparent is E_{*}>10^{14} {GeV} (thus improving previous bounds by 12 orders of magnitude) when the exponents in the measure are fixed to their central value 1 / 2. We also estimate, for the first time, the effect of logarithmic oscillations in the measure (corresponding to a discrete spacetime structure) and find that they do not change much the bounds obtained in their absence, unless the amplitude of the oscillations is fine tuned. This feature, unavailable in known quantum-gravity scenarios, may help the theory to avoid being ruled out by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, for which E_{*}> 10^{17} {GeV} or greater.

  20. Electroshock Experiment at Albany Violates Ethics Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, R. Jeffrey

    1977-01-01

    Reports the University of New York at Albany has been charged with violations of federal and state regulations for not obtaining approval of an ethics committee to conduct research on human subjects. (SL)

  1. 76 FR 18467 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Eastern Daylight Savings Time on April 18, 2011. ADDRESSES: Submit comments by any of the following... proposed rule addressing Pattern of Violations (POV). This extension gives commenters additional time to...

  2. Search for violations of quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, John; Hagelin, John S.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; ...

    1984-07-01

    The treatment of quantum effects in gravitational fields indicates that pure states may evolve into mixed states, and Hawking has proposed modification of the axioms of field theory which incorporate the corresponding violation of quantum mechanics. In this study we propose a modified hamiltonian equation of motion for density matrices and use it to interpret upper bounds on the violation of quantum mechanics in different phenomenological situations. We apply our formalism to the K 0-K 0 system and to long baseline neutron interferometry experiments. In both cases we find upper bounds of about 2 × 10 -21 GeV on contributionsmore » to the single particle “hamiltonian” which violate quantum mechanical coherence. We discuss how these limits might be improved in the future, and consider the relative significance of other successful tests of quantum mechanics. Finally, an appendix contains model estimates of the magnitude of effects violating quantum mechanics.« less

  3. Lorentz violation, gravitoelectromagnetic field and Bhabha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2018-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry is a fundamental symmetry in the Standard Model (SM) and in General Relativity (GR). This symmetry holds true for all models at low energies. However, at energies near the Planck scale, it is conjectured that there may be a very small violation of Lorentz symmetry. The Standard Model Extension (SME) is a quantum field theory that includes a systematic description of Lorentz symmetry violations in all sectors of particle physics and gravity. In this paper, SME is considered to study the physical process of Bhabha Scattering in the Gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM) theory. GEM is an important formalism that is valid in a suitable approximation of general relativity. A new nonminimal coupling term that violates Lorentz symmetry is used in this paper. Differential cross-section for gravitational Bhabha scattering is calculated. The Lorentz violation contributions to this GEM scattering cross-section are small and are similar in magnitude to the case of the electromagnetic field.

  4. Baryogenesis in Lorentz-violating gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Solomon, Adam R.

    2017-10-01

    Lorentz-violating theories of gravity typically contain constrained vector fields. We show that the lowest-order coupling of such vectors to U (1)-symmetric scalars can naturally give rise to baryogenesis in a manner akin to the Affleck-Dine mechanism. We calculate the cosmology of this new mechanism, demonstrating that a net B - L can be generated in the early Universe, and that the resulting baryon-to-photon ratio matches that which is presently observed. We discuss constraints on the model using solar system and astrophysical tests of Lorentz violation in the gravity sector. Generic Lorentz-violating theories can give rise to the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry without violating any current bounds.

  5. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  6. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to the...

  7. Higgs C P violation from vectorlike quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Dawson, S.; Zhang, Yue

    2015-10-20

    We explore CP violating aspects in the Higgs sector of models where new vectorlike quarks carry Yukawa couplings mainly to the third generation quarks of the Standard Model. We point out that in the simplest model, Higgs CP violating interactions only exist in the hWW channel. At low energy, we nd that rare B decays can place similarly strong constraints as those from electric dipole moments on the source of CP violation. These observations offer a new handle to discriminate from other Higgs CP violating scenarios such as scalar sector extensions of the Standard Model, and imply an interesting futuremore » interplay among limits from different experiments.« less

  8. 32 CFR 770.58 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire § 770.58 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Portsmouth Naval Shipyard without the...

  9. 32 CFR 770.58 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire § 770.58 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Portsmouth Naval Shipyard without the...

  10. 32 CFR 770.58 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire § 770.58 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Portsmouth Naval Shipyard without the...

  11. 32 CFR 770.58 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire § 770.58 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Portsmouth Naval Shipyard without the...

  12. 32 CFR 770.58 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire § 770.58 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Portsmouth Naval Shipyard without the...

  13. Notice of Violation Hercules Inc., Hattiesburg, Mississippi

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter dated November 20, 2008 from Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality to Hercules, Inc. in Hattiesburg, Mississippi about a review of Hercules' impounding basin response package and the apparent violations.

  14. Redefining commercial vehicle permitting and credentialing violations.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze enforcement and adjudication of common commercial vehicle tax, credentialing, and safety offenses. This study examined violations of the International Fuel Tax Agreement and the Kentucky Intrastate Tax, Kent...

  15. 32 CFR 806b.3 - Violation penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAM Overview of the Privacy Act Program § 806b.3 Violation penalties. An individual may file a civil law suit against the Air Force for failing to comply with the Privacy Act. The courts may find an...

  16. 32 CFR 806b.3 - Violation penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAM Overview of the Privacy Act Program § 806b.3 Violation penalties. An individual may file a civil law suit against the Air Force for failing to comply with the Privacy Act. The courts may find an...

  17. 32 CFR 806b.3 - Violation penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAM Overview of the Privacy Act Program § 806b.3 Violation penalties. An individual may file a civil law suit against the Air Force for failing to comply with the Privacy Act. The courts may find an...

  18. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be... agency that the person intentionally— (a) Affixed a label bearing a “Made in America” inscription, or an...

  19. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be... agency that the person intentionally— (a) Affixed a label bearing a “Made in America” inscription, or an...

  20. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be... agency that the person intentionally— (a) Affixed a label bearing a “Made in America” inscription, or an...

  1. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be... agency that the person intentionally— (a) Affixed a label bearing a “Made in America” inscription, or an...

  2. Violations of Management Principles within Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, Andrew F.; Sikula, John P.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of effective management commonly violated by educational institutions include: (1) unity of command; (2) division or specialization of labor; (3) delegation of authority; and (4) authority equal to responsibility. (JMF)

  3. Odd-frequency triplet pairing in mixed-parity superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuoco, Mario; Gentile, Paola; Noce, Canio; Romano, Alfonso; Annunziata, Gaetano; Linder, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    We show that mixed-parity superconductors may exhibit equal-spin pair correlations that are odd-in-time and can be tuned by means of an applied field. The direction and the amplitude of the pair correlator in the spin space turn out to be strongly dependent on the symmetry of the order parameter, and thus provide a tool to identify different types of singlet-triplet mixed configurations. We suggest that odd-in-time spin-polarized pair correlations can be generated without magnetic inhomogeneities in superconducting/ferromagnetic hybrids with non-centrosymmetric superconductor or when parity mixing is induced at the interface. Paola Gentile, Canio Noce, Alfonso Romano, Gaetano Annunziata, Jacob Linder, Mario Cuoco, arXiv:1109.4885

  4. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Cheng, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit widemore » vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.« less

  5. Study of odd parity configurations in neutral tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Abid; Jabeen, S.; Wajid, Abdul

    2018-05-01

    The ground configuration of neutral tungsten is 5d46s2. The first excited configurations in the odd parity system are 5d36s2 (6p+7p+5f+6f)+5d46s6p. Further excitation leads to large number of configurations. However the configuration 5d56p belonging to the odd parity was obtained by doubly exciting the 5d46s6p configuration. Relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) and least squares fitted (LSF) parametric calculations were carried out to interpret the observed spectrum recorded on a 1.5-m Wadsworth spectrograph at our laboratory in the wavelength region 2300Å to 4500Å. We confirmed the earlier reported ground configuration 5d46s2 and excited configuration 5d46s6p. Almost fifty new transitions establishing 22 energy levels belonging to the configuration 5d36s26p have been identified.

  6. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  7. Non-Hermitian photonics based on parity-time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; El-Ganainy, Ramy; Ge, Li

    2017-12-01

    Nearly one century after the birth of quantum mechanics, parity-time symmetry is revolutionizing and extending quantum theories to include a unique family of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. While conceptually striking, experimental demonstration of parity-time symmetry remains unexplored in quantum electronic systems. The flexibility of photonics allows for creating and superposing non-Hermitian eigenstates with ease using optical gain and loss, which makes it an ideal platform to explore various non-Hermitian quantum symmetry paradigms for novel device functionalities. Such explorations that employ classical photonic platforms not only deepen our understanding of fundamental quantum physics but also facilitate technological breakthroughs for photonic applications. Research into non-Hermitian photonics therefore advances and benefits both fields simultaneously.

  8. Parity doublet structures in doubly-odd 216Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragati, Â.; Deo, A. Y.; Tandel, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, S. S.; Chakraborty, S.; Rai, S.; Wahid, S. G.; Kumar, S.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bala, Indu; Garg, Ritika; Jain, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    Parity doublet structures are established in 216Fr, which lies at the lower boundary of enhanced octupole collectivity in the trans-lead region. The newly identified levels are established as the simplex partner of a previously reported band leading to parity doublets with small (˜55 keV) average energy splitting, a feature typical of nuclei with near-static octupole deformation. The observed levels do not follow a regular pattern of rotational bands, indicating low quadrupole collectivity. However, enhanced octupole correlations are evident from the small energy splitting and large B(E1)/B(E2) values. Staggering in E1 transition energies and B(E1)/B(E2) ratios is noted. The enhancement of octupole correlations in 216Fr is attributed to the availability of a neutron orbital with a K = 3/2 component.

  9. Exploring CP violation in the MSSM.

    PubMed

    Arbey, Alexandre; Ellis, John; Godbole, Rohini M; Mahmoudi, Farvah

    We explore the prospects for observing CP violation in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with six CP-violating parameters, three gaugino mass phases and three phases in trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters, using the CPsuperH code combined with a geometric approach to maximise CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We also implement CP-conserving constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics and the upper limits on the cosmological dark matter density and spin-independent scattering. We study possible values of observables within the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), the CPX scenario and a variant of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). We find values of the CP-violating asymmetry [Formula: see text] in [Formula: see text] decay that may be as large as 3 %, so future measurements of [Formula: see text] may provide independent information about CP violation in the MSSM. We find that CP-violating MSSM contributions to the [Formula: see text] meson mass mixing term [Formula: see text] are in general below the present upper limit, which is dominated by theoretical uncertainties. If these could be reduced, [Formula: see text] could also provide an interesting and complementary constraint on the six CP-violating MSSM phases, enabling them all to be determined experimentally, in principle. We also find that CP violation in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] couplings can be quite large, and so may offer interesting prospects for future [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] colliders.

  10. 14 CFR § 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1214.404 Section § 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799, and...

  11. Successful attack on permutation-parity-machine-based neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Luís F; Ruttor, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    An algorithm is presented which implements a probabilistic attack on the key-exchange protocol based on permutation parity machines. Instead of imitating the synchronization of the communicating partners, the strategy consists of a Monte Carlo method to sample the space of possible weights during inner rounds and an analytic approach to convey the extracted information from one outer round to the next one. The results show that the protocol under attack fails to synchronize faster than an eavesdropper using this algorithm.

  12. Grid-Parity Solar Power for Department of Defense Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    MW DC. Installed capacity of panels. Capacity of 1 MW DC. Capacity = 998.4 kWp DC. Photovoltaic Peak Capacity ( Power Delivered). PVSyst... Photovoltaic Annual Output ( Power Delivered) The power delivered to Camp Roberts should match or exceed results simulated using the University of Geneva...FINAL REPORT Grid-Parity Solar Power for Department of Defense Installations ESTCP Project EW-201134 FEBRUARY 2014 John Bender

  13. Expectancy violations promote learning in young children

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Aimee E.; Feigenson, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Children, including infants, have expectations about the world around them, and produce reliable responses when these expectations are violated. However, little is known about how such expectancy violations affect subsequent cognition. Here we tested the hypothesis that violations of expectation enhance children’s learning. In four experiments we compared 3- to 6-year-old children’s ability to learn novel words in situations that defied versus accorded with their core knowledge of object behavior. In Experiments 1 and 2 we taught children novel words following one of two types of events. One event violated expectations about the spatiotemporal or featural properties of objects (e.g., an object appeared to magically change locations). The other event was almost identical, but did not violate expectations (e.g., an object was visibly moved from one location to another). In both experiments we found that children robustly learned when taught after the surprising event, but not following the expected event. In Experiment 3 we ruled out two alternative explanations for our results. Finally, in Experiment 4, we asked whether surprise affects children’s learning in a targeted or a diffuse way. We found that surprise only enhanced children’s learning about the entity that had behaved surprisingly, and not about unrelated objects. Together, these experiments show that core knowledge – and violations of expectations generated by core knowledge – shapes new learning. PMID:28254617

  14. Neutrinos as the messengers of CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Liubomir Anguelov

    CPT violation has the potential to explain all three existing neutrino oscillation signals without enlarging the neutrino sector. CPT violation in the Dirac mass terms of the three neutrino flavors preserves Lorentz invariance, but generates in dependent masses for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This specific signature can be motivated by braneworld scenarios with extra dimensions, where neutrinos are the natural messengers for Standard Model physics of CPT violation in the bulk. A simple model of maximal CPT violation is sufficient to explain the exisiting neutrino data, while accommodating the recent results from the KamLAND experiment and making dramatic predictions for the ongoing MiniBooNE experiment. In addition, the model fits the existing SuperKamiokande data, at least as well as the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillation models. Another attractive feature of the presented model is that it provides a new promising mechanism for baryogenesis, which obviates two of the three Sakharov conditions necessary to generate the baryon asymmetry of the universe. CPT-violating scenarios can give new insights about the possible nature of neutrinos. Majorana neutrino masses are still allowed, but in general, there are no longer Majorana neutrinos in the conventional sense. However, CPT-violating models still have interesting consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay. Compared to the usual case, while the larger mass scale (from LSND) may appear, a greater degree of suppression can also occur.

  15. Extended Quantum Field Theory, Index Theory, and the Parity Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lukas; Szabo, Richard J.

    2018-06-01

    We use techniques from functorial quantum field theory to provide a geometric description of the parity anomaly in fermionic systems coupled to background gauge and gravitational fields on odd-dimensional spacetimes. We give an explicit construction of a geometric cobordism bicategory which incorporates general background fields in a stack, and together with the theory of symmetric monoidal bicategories we use it to provide the concrete forms of invertible extended quantum field theories which capture anomalies in both the path integral and Hamiltonian frameworks. Specialising this situation by using the extension of the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem to manifolds with corners due to Loya and Melrose, we obtain a new Hamiltonian perspective on the parity anomaly. We compute explicitly the 2-cocycle of the projective representation of the gauge symmetry on the quantum state space, which is defined in a parity-symmetric way by suitably augmenting the standard chiral fermionic Fock spaces with Lagrangian subspaces of zero modes of the Dirac Hamiltonian that naturally appear in the index theorem. We describe the significance of our constructions for the bulk-boundary correspondence in a large class of time-reversal invariant gauge-gravity symmetry-protected topological phases of quantum matter with gapless charged boundary fermions, including the standard topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimensions.

  16. Association between parity and risk of suicide among parous women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2010-04-06

    There are limited empirical data to support the theory of a protective effect of parenthood against suicide, as proposed by Durkheim in 1897. I conducted this study to examine whether there is an association between parity and risk of death from suicide among women. The study cohort consisted of 1,292,462 women in Taiwan who had a first live birth between Jan. 1, 1978, and Dec. 31, 1987. The women were followed up from the date of their first birth to Dec. 31, 2007. Their vital status was ascertained by means of linking records with data from a computerized mortality database. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios of death from suicide associated with parity. There were 2252 deaths from suicide during 32 464 187 person-years of follow-up. Suicide-related mortality was 6.94 per 100,000 person-years. After adjustment for age at first birth, marital status, years of schooling and place of delivery, the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.68) among women with two live births and 0.40 (95% CI 0.35-0.45) among those with three or more live births, compared with women who had one live birth. I observed a significantly decreasing trend in adjusted hazard ratios of suicide with increasing parity. This study provides evidence to support Durkheim's hypothesis that parenthood confers a protective effect against suicide.

  17. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δ CP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δ CP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizablemore » bias in the extracted δ CP value.« less

  18. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; ...

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δ CP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δ CP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizablemore » bias in the extracted δ CP value.« less

  19. Search for lepton flavour violation in the eμ continuum with the ATLAS detector in $$\\sqrt{s} = 7~\\mbox{TeV}$$ pp collisions at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2012-06-14

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark (more » $$\\sim\\atop{t}$$) in the e ±μ ∓ continuum using 2.1 fb 1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in √s = 7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95 % C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m$$_t^-$$). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp→eμX, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m$$_t^-$$ = 95 GeV to 30 fb for m$$_t^-$$ = 1000 GeV.« less

  20. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 703.104-10.1...

  1. 48 CFR 2903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of standards of conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations of standards of conduct. 2903.104-7 Section 2903.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2903...

  2. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 703.104-10.1...

  3. Migrant Farmworker Housing Regulation Violations in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Weir, Maria; Chen, Haiying; Summers, Phillip; Pelletier, Lori E.; Galván, Leonardo; Bischoff, Werner E.; Mirabelli, Maria C.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The quality of housing provided to migrant farmworkers is often criticized, but few studies have investigated these housing conditions. This analysis examines housing regulation violations experienced by migrant farmworkers in North Carolina, and the associations of camp characteristics with the presence of housing violations. Methods Data were collected in183 eastern North Carolina migrant farmworker camps in 2010. Housing regulation violations for the domains of camp, sleeping room, bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, and general housing, as well as total violations were assessed using North Carolina Department of Labor standards. Results Violations of housing regulations were common, ranging from 4 to 22 per camp. Housing regulation violations were common in all domains; the mean number of camp violations was 1.6, of sleeping room violations was 3.8, of bathroom violations was 4.5, of kitchen violations was 2.3, of laundry room violations was 1.2, and of general housing violations was 3.1. The mean number of total housing violations was 11.4. Several camp characteristics were consistently associated with the number of violations; camps with workers having H-2A visas, with North Carolina Department of Labor Certificates of Inspection posted, and assessed early in the season had fewer violations. Conclusions These results argue for regulatory changes to improve the quality of housing provided to migrant farmworkers, including stronger regulations and the more vigorous enforcement of existing regulations. PMID:22237961

  4. Design of parity generator and checker circuit using electro-optic effect of Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Chanderkanta; Amphawan, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Parity is an extra bit which is used to add in digital information to detect error at the receiver end. It can be even and odd parity. In case of even parity, the number of one's will be even included the parity and reverse in the case of odd parity. The circuit which is used to generate the parity at the transmitter side, called the parity generator and the circuit which is used to detect the parity at receiver side is called as parity checker. In this paper, an even and odd parity generator and checker circuits are designed using electro-optic effect inside lithium niobate based Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZIs). The MZIs structures collectively show powerful capability in switching an input optical signal to a desired output port from a collection of output ports. The paper constitutes a mathematical description of the proposed device and thereafter simulation using MATLAB. The study is verified using beam propagation method (BPM).

  5. Higher gravidity and parity are associated with increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome among rural Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Akter, Shamima; Jesmin, Subrina; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Islam, Md Majedul; Khatun, Most Tanzila; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Akashi, Hidechika; Mizutani, Taro

    2013-01-01

    Parity increases the risk for coronary heart disease; however, its association with metabolic syndrome among women in low-income countries is still unknown. This study investigates the association between parity or gravidity and metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,219 women aged 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parity and gravidity and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables. Subjects with the highest gravidity (> = 4) had 1.66 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest gravidity (0-1) (P trend = 0.02). A similar association was found between parity and metabolic syndrome (P(trend) = 0.04), i.e., subjects in the highest parity (> = 4) had 1.65 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest parity (0-1). This positive association of parity and gravidity with metabolic syndrome was confined to pre-menopausal women (P(trend) <0.01). Among the components of metabolic syndrome only high blood pressure showed positive association with parity and gravidity (P(trend) = 0.01 and <0.001). Neither Parity nor gravidity was appreciably associated with other components of metabolic syndrome. Multi parity or gravidity may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome.

  6. Higher Gravidity and Parity Are Associated with Increased Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Rural Bangladeshi Women

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Shamima; Jesmin, Subrina; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Islam, Md. Majedul; Khatun, Most. Tanzila; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Akashi, Hidechika; Mizutani, Taro

    2013-01-01

    Background Parity increases the risk for coronary heart disease; however, its association with metabolic syndrome among women in low-income countries is still unknown. Objective This study investigates the association between parity or gravidity and metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,219 women aged 15–75 years from rural Bangladesh. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parity and gravidity and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables. Results Subjects with the highest gravidity (> = 4) had 1.66 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest gravidity (0-1) (P trend = 0.02). A similar association was found between parity and metabolic syndrome (P trend = 0.04), i.e., subjects in the highest parity (> = 4) had 1.65 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest parity (0-1). This positive association of parity and gravidity with metabolic syndrome was confined to pre-menopausal women (P trend <0.01). Among the components of metabolic syndrome only high blood pressure showed positive association with parity and gravidity (P trend = 0.01 and <0.001). Neither Parity nor gravidity was appreciably associated with other components of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Multi parity or gravidity may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. PMID:23936302

  7. The relationship between parity and overweight varies with household wealth and national development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sonia A; Yount, Kathryn M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2007-02-01

    Recent studies support a positive relationship between parity and overweight among women of developing countries; however, it is unclear whether these effects vary by household wealth and national development. Our objective was to determine whether the association between parity and overweight [body mass index (BMI) > or =25 kg/m(2)] in women living in developing countries varies with levels of national human development and/or household wealth. We used data from 28 nationally representative, cross-sectional surveys conducted between 1996 and 2003 (n = 275 704 women, 15-49 years). The relationship between parity and overweight was modelled using logistic regression, controlling for several biological and sociodemographic factors and national development, as reflected by the United Nations' Human Development Index. We also modelled the interaction between parity and national development, and the three-way interaction between parity, household wealth and national development. Parity had a weak, positive association with overweight, which varied by household wealth and national development. Among the poorest women and women in the second tertile of household wealth, parity was positively related to overweight only in the most developed countries. Among the wealthiest women, parity was positively related to overweight regardless of the level of national development. As development increases, the burden of parity-related overweight shifts to include poor as well as wealthy women. In the least-developed countries, programmes to prevent parity-related overweight should target wealthy women, whereas such programmes should be provided to all women in more developed countries.

  8. Pompage optique et violation de parité dans l'atome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, M.-A.

    Between the original Kastler work about polarization of the Hg vapour fluorescence (1936) and the parity violation experiment in Cesium [5], we notice a relationship in the methods of investigation and in the nature of the physical problems under consideration : an illustration of the richness of the research field pioneered by Alfred Kastler. This paper adopts a phenomenological description of the Cesium parity violation experiment, without reference to electroweak theory. This allows to shed light on the peculiar features of our experiment which seem to contradict the optical pumping lore. When the 6S-7S forbidden transition in Cesium is excited, the electronic spin orientation of the 7S state exhibits two anomalies : the first one can be associated with a breakdown of a rotational invariance of the atom-radiation field system by the external dc electric field, the second one, much more fundamental, is a right-left asymmetry, Le. a manifestation of a parity violation not accounted for by conventional QED. The interpretation of this new optical pumping effect involves the introduction of three different dipole moments : the strongly suppressed magnetic dipole, an electric dipole induced by the Stark field and one directed along the spin momentum indicating the presence of the parity violating, but Tconserving, electron-nucleus interaction. When the transition is excited, the radiation field is absorbed coherently by these transition dipoles. The breakdown of the usual optical pumping rules can be explained in terms of interference between the amplitudes associated with two different dipoles. In particular, the interference of the Stark dipole with the PV dipole leads to a component of the 7S spin orientation which behaves under mirror symmetry as a polar vector, and not as an axial vector as one would normally expect for an angular momentum type quantity. Basically, the experiment consists in studying the effects upon the properties of the fluorescence light

  9. Perspectives: parity--prelude to a fifth cycle of reform.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H

    2002-09-01

    Based on 2000 Carl Taube Lecture at the NIMH Mental Health Economics Meeting. This perspective article examines the relationship between a policy of parity in financing mental health services and the future of reform in service delivery. Applying theories of static and dynamic efficiency to an understanding of parity and the evolution of mental health services, drawing upon Burton Weisbrod s concept of the health care quadrilemma . Each of four cycles of reform in mental health services have contended with issues of static and dynamic efficiency. Each cycle was associated with static efficiency in the management and financing of services, and each was associated with a set of new treatment technologies intended to improve dynamic efficiency. Each reform proved ultimately unsuccessful primarily because of the failure of the treatment technologies to prevent future patient chronicity or to achieve sustained recovery. Recent advances in treatment technology and management of care can permit an unprecedented level of efficiency consistent with a policy of improved access to mainstream health and social welfare resources, including insurance coverage. This policy of so-called financing parity can improve current mental health service delivery, but it may also portend a future fifth cycle of reform. If new technologies continue to advance as full technologies - simple to deliver and producing true recovery - and mainstream resources are made available, then the specialty mental health services may contract dramatically in favor of effective care and treatment of mental illness in primary care and other mainstream settings. Predicting the future of health care is speculative, but it may be easier using the Weisbrod formulation to understand the process of mental health reform. Over-reliance on administrative techniques for building static efficiency and false optimism about dynamic efficiency from new technology have stymied previous reforms. All the same, a fifth cycle

  10. The Relationship between Gravidity and Parity and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinghui; Zheng, Yingye; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The influence of hormonal changes caused by pregnancy has been well studied in relation to colorectal cancer risk, but the association remains undefined. The purpose of this investigation was to examine in a case-control study the relationship between differences in gravidity and parity and colorectal cancer risk and if the association varied by microsatellite instability (MSI), a feature more common in women. Methods The study population included incident colorectal cancer patients (n = 1014), aged 50–74 years, diagnosed in 1998–2002 in Washington state and controls (n = 1064) randomly selected from population lists. All study subjects completed telephone interviews to ascertain prior pregnancies, live births, and other covariates. Case tissue samples were obtained for MSI analyses. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for age, family history of colorectal cancer, body mass index (BMI), education, endoscopy screening, oral contraceptive use, hormone therapy use, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results There was an approximate 30%–50% reduction in risk of colon cancer associated with gravidity, which was attenuated in the analysis with parity. Increasing gravidity and parity were associated with a suggestion of a decreasing trend in risk for rectal cancer (p for trend = 0.07). Compared with women who had equal numbers of pregnancies and live births, women who were nulligravid and nulliparous had a 40%–60% increased risk of colon cancer. There was a suggestion of a reduced risk of both colon and rectal cancer associated with one more pregnancy than live birth. There was a suggestion of an increased risk of MSI-high tumors with nulligravidity and nulliparity. Conclusions These results confirm the importance of pregnancy events in the etiology of colon and rectal cancer. PMID:19575687

  11. The relationship between gravidity and parity and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wernli, Karen J; Wang, Yinghui; Zheng, Yingye; Potter, John D; Newcomb, Polly A

    2009-07-01

    The influence of hormonal changes caused by pregnancy has been well studied in relation to colorectal cancer risk, but the association remains undefined. The purpose of this investigation was to examine in a case-control study the relationship between differences in gravidity and parity and colorectal cancer risk and if the association varied by microsatellite instability (MSI), a feature more common in women. The study population included incident colorectal cancer patients (n = 1014), aged 50-74 years, diagnosed in 1998-2002 in Washington state and controls (n = 1064) randomly selected from population lists. All study subjects completed telephone interviews to ascertain prior pregnancies, live births, and other covariates. Case tissue samples were obtained for MSI analyses. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for age, family history of colorectal cancer, body mass index (BMI), education, endoscopy screening, oral contraceptive use, hormone therapy use, smoking, and alcohol consumption. There was an approximate 30%-50% reduction in risk of colon cancer associated with gravidity, which was attenuated in the analysis with parity. Increasing gravidity and parity were associated with a suggestion of a decreasing trend in risk for rectal cancer (p for trend = 0.07). Compared with women who had equal numbers of pregnancies and live births, women who were nulligravid and nulliparous had a 40%-60% increased risk of colon cancer. There was a suggestion of a reduced risk of both colon and rectal cancer associated with one more pregnancy than live birth. There was a suggestion of an increased risk of MSI-high tumors with nulligravidity and nulliparity. These results confirm the importance of pregnancy events in the etiology of colon and rectal cancer.

  12. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV.

  13. 78 FR 5055 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ...The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is revising the Agency's existing regulation for pattern of violations (POV). MSHA has determined that the existing regulation does not adequately achieve the intent of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) that the POV provision be used to address mine operators who have demonstrated a disregard for the health and safety of miners. Congress included the POV provision in the Mine Act so that mine operators would manage health and safety conditions at mines and find and fix the root causes of significant and substantial (S&S) violations, protecting the health and safety of miners. The final rule simplifies the existing POV criteria, improves consistency in applying the POV criteria, and more effectively achieves the Mine Act's statutory intent. It also encourages chronic safety violators to comply with the Mine Act and MSHA's health and safety standards.

  14. Casimir force in a Lorentz violating theory

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail

    2006-08-01

    We study the effects of the minimal extension of the standard model including Lorentz violation on the Casimir force between two parallel conducting plates in the vacuum. We provide explicit solutions for the electromagnetic field using scalar field analogy, for both the cases in which the Lorentz violating terms come from the CPT-even or CPT-odd terms. We also calculate the effects of the Lorentz violating terms for a fermion field between two parallel conducting plates and analyze the modifications of the Casimir force due to the modifications of the Dirac equation. In all cases under consideration, the standard formulas formore » the Casimir force are modified by either multiplicative or additive correction factors, the latter case exhibiting different dependence on the distance between the plates.« less

  15. Lepton flavor violation induced by dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Ferreira, C. P.; Goertz, Florian; Guzzo, M. M.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Santos, A. C. O.

    2018-04-01

    Guided by gauge principles we discuss a predictive and falsifiable UV complete model where the Dirac fermion that accounts for the cold dark matter abundance in our Universe induces the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays μ →e γ and μ →e e e as well as μ -e conversion. We explore the interplay between direct dark matter detection, relic density, collider probes and lepton flavor violation to conclusively show that one may have a viable dark matter candidate yielding flavor violation signatures that can be probed in the upcoming experiments. In fact, keeping the dark matter mass at the TeV scale, a sizable LFV signal is possible, while reproducing the correct dark matter relic density and meeting limits from direct-detection experiments.

  16. Communication Strength of Correlations Violating Monogamy Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłobus, Waldemar; Oszmaniec, Michał; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Grudka, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    In any theory satisfying the no-signaling principle correlations generated among spatially separated parties in a Bell-type experiment are subject to certain constraints known as monogamy relations. Recently, in the context of the black hole information loss problem it was suggested that these monogamy relations might be violated. This in turn implies that correlations arising in such a scenario must violate the no-signaling principle and hence can be used to send classical information between parties. Here, we study the amount of information that can be sent using such correlations. To this aim, we first provide a framework associating them with classical channels whose capacities are then used to quantify the usefulness of these correlations in sending information. Finally, we determine the minimal amount of information that can be sent using signaling correlations violating the monogamy relation associated to the chained Bell inequalities.

  17. Single-mode Laser by Parity-time Symmetry Breaking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-21

    solenoid -like Pds5B that reside in direct proximity to Wapl and the Smc3-Scc1 in- teraction interface (fig. S13), implying that Wapl and Pds5 control the...accepted 26 September 2014 10.1126/science.1256904 REPORTS ◥ OPTICS Single-mode laser by parity-time symmetry breaking Liang Feng,1* Zi Jing Wong,1...Ren-Min Ma,1* Yuan Wang,1,2 Xiang Zhang1,2† Effective manipulation of cavity resonant modes is crucial for emission control in laser physics and

  18. Performance of Low-Density Parity-Check Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the simulated performance of each of the nine accumulate-repeat-4-jagged-accumulate (AR4JA) low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes [3] when used in conjunction with binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK), quadrature PSK (QPSK), 8-PSK, 16-ary amplitude PSK (16- APSK), and 32-APSK.We also report the performance under various mappings of bits to modulation symbols, 16-APSK and 32-APSK ring scalings, log-likelihood ratio (LLR) approximations, and decoder variations. One of the simple and well-performing LLR approximations can be expressed in a general equation that applies to all of the modulation types.

  19. The development of product parity sensitivity in children with mathematics learning disability and in typical achievers.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Avital; Henik, Avishai

    2013-02-01

    Parity helps us determine whether an arithmetic equation is true or false. The current research examines the development of sensitivity to parity cues in multiplication in typically achieving (TA) children (grades 2, 3, 4 and 6) and in children with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD, grades 6 and 8), via a verification task. In TA children the onset of parity sensitivity was observed at the beginning of 3rd grade, whereas in children with MLD it was documented only in 8th grade. These results suggest that children with MLD develop parity aspects of number sense, though later than TA children. To check the plausibility of equations, children used mainly the multiplication parity rule rather than familiarity with even products. Similar to observations in adults, parity sensitivity was largest for problems with two even operands, moderate for problems with one even and one odd operand, and smallest for problems with two odd operands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. What Does Mental Health Parity Really Mean for the Care of People with Serious Mental Illness?

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John; Manderscheid, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Parity of mental health and substance abuse insurance benefits with medical care benefits, as well as parity in their management, are major ongoing concerns for adults with serious mental illness (SMI). The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 guaranteed this parity of benefits and management in large private insurance plans and privately managed state Medicaid plans, but only if the benefits were offered at all. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 extended parity to all persons receiving insurance through the state health insurance marketplaces, through the state Medicaid Expansions, and through new individual and small group plans. This article presents an analysis of how accessible parity has become for adults with SMI at both the system and personal levels several years after these legislative changes have been implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electromagnet Design for an Experimental Search for CP Violation in Positronium Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersburg, Ryan; Henning, Reyco; Bartram, Chelsea

    2015-04-01

    The 3-photon decay of spin-aligned triplet positronium could be used to search for a charge conjugation and parity (CP) symmetry violation. This CP violation would manifest as a nonzero angular correlation (S-> .k1 -->) (S-> .k1 --> ×k2 -->) between the three decay photons' momentum vectors (|k1 --> | > |k2 --> | > |k3 --> |) and the triplet positronium spin (S->). Current limits on this correlation are at the ~10-3 level; therefore, we propose an experiment to improve this limit. In our experiment, the positronium is spin-polarized by a uniform magnetic field from a conventional electromagnet, and the photons are detected by a segmented NaI gamma detector array with large angular acceptance. This talk discusses the design of this unique electromagnet, which requires good field uniformity for the positronium source and a novel yoke design to minimize fringe field effects for the NaI array's PMTs. This project was supported by the Gillian T. Cell Senior Thesis Research Award in the College of Arts & Sciences, administered by Honors Carolina.

  2. Search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D 0 → e ±μ ∓

    DOE PAGES

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; ...

    2016-01-19

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D 0 →e ±μ ∓ is made with a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb -1 of proton–proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Candidate D 0 mesons are selected using the decay D *+ → D 0π + and the D 0 →e ±μ ∓ branching fraction is measured using the decay mode D 0 → K -π + as a normalization channel. No significant excess of D 0→e ±μ ∓ candidates over the expected background is seen, and amore » limit is set on the branching fraction, B(D 0→e ±μ ∓ ) < 1.3 × 10 -8, at 90% confidence level. This is an order of magnitude lower than the previous limit and it further constrains the parameter space in some leptoquark models and in supersymmetric models with R-parity violation.« less

  3. Alternative theories of gravity and Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Foster, Joshua; Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2017-01-01

    General relativity has achieved many successes, including the prediction of experimental results. However, its incompatibility with quantum theory remains an obstacle. By extending the foundational properties of general relativity, alternative theories of gravity can be constructed. In this talk, we focus on fermion couplings in the weak-gravity limit of certain alternative theories of gravity. Under suitable experimental circumstances, some of these couplings match terms appearing in the gravitational SME, which is a general framework describing violations of local Lorentz invariance. Existing limits on Lorentz violation can therefore be used to constrain certain Lorentz-invariant alternative theories of gravity.

  4. Psychological contract types as moderator in the breach-violation and violation-burnout relationships.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Amber; Raja, Usman; Darr, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the relationships between perceived psychological contract breach, felt violation, and burnout in a sample (n = 361) of employees from various organizations in Pakistan. The moderating role of contract types in these relationships was also tested. Findings supported a positive association between perceived psychological contract breach and felt violation and both were positively related to burnout. Transactional and relational contracts moderated the felt violation-burnout relationship. Scores on relational contract type tended to be higher than for transactional contract type showing some contextual influence.

  5. Measuring molecular parity nonconservation using nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Eills, J.; Blanchard, J. W.; Bougas, L.; ...

    2017-10-30

    Here, the weak interaction does not conserve parity and therefore induces energy shifts in chiral enantiomers that should in principle be detectable in molecular spectra. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the expected shifts are small and in spectra of a mixture of enantiomers, the energy shifts are not resolvable. We propose a nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment in which we titrate the chirality (enantiomeric excess) of a solvent and measure the diasteriomeric splitting in the spectra of a chiral solute in order to search for an anomalous offset due to parity nonconservation (PNC). We present a proof-of-principle experiment in which we search formore » PNC in the 13C resonances of small molecules, and use the 1H resonances, which are insensitive to PNC, as an internal reference. We set a constraint on molecular PNC in 13C chemical shifts at a level of 10 –5 ppm, and provide a discussion of important considerations in the search for molecular PNC using NMR spectroscopy.« less

  6. The effect of parity on morphological evolution among phrynosomatid lizards.

    PubMed

    Oufiero, C E; Gartner, G E A

    2014-11-01

    The shift from egg laying to live-bearing is one of the most well-studied transitions in evolutionary biology. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of this transition on morphological evolution. Here, we evaluated the effect of reproductive mode on the morphological evolution of 10 traits, among 108 species of phrynosomatid lizards. We assess whether the requirement for passing shelled eggs through the pelvic girdle has led to morphological constraints in oviparous species and whether long gestation times in viviparous species have led to constraints in locomotor morphology. We fit models to the data that vary both in their tempo (strength and rate of selection) and mode of evolution (Brownian or Ornstein-Uhlenbeck) and estimates of trait optima. We found that most traits are best fit by a generalized multipeak OU model, suggesting differing trait optima for viviparous vs. oviparous species. Additionally, rates (σ(2) ) of both pelvic girdle and forelimb trait evolution varied with parity; viviparous species had higher rates. Hindlimb traits, however, exhibited no difference in σ(2) between parity modes. In a functional context, our results suggest that the passage of shelled eggs constrains the morphology of the pelvic girdle, but we found no evidence of morphological constraint of the locomotor apparatus in viviparous species. Our results are consistent with recent lineage diversification analyses, leading to the conclusion that transitions to viviparity increase both lineage and morphological diversification. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Parity-time symmetry breaking in magnetic systems

    DOE PAGES

    Galda, Alexey; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2016-07-14

    The understanding of out-of-equilibrium physics, especially dynamic instabilities and dynamic phase transitions, is one of the major challenges of contemporary science, spanning the broadest wealth of research areas that range from quantum optics to living organisms. By focusing on nonequilibrium dynamics of an open dissipative spin system, we introduce a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach, in which non-Hermiticity reflects dissipation and deviation from equilibrium. The imaginary part of the proposed spin Hamiltonian describes the effects of Gilbert damping and applied Slonczewski spin-transfer torque. In the classical limit, our approach reproduces Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski dynamics of a large macrospin. Here, we reveal the spin-transfer torque-drivenmore » parity-time symmetry-breaking phase transition corresponding to a transition from precessional to exponentially damped spin dynamics. Micromagnetic simulations for nanoscale ferromagnetic disks demonstrate the predicted effect. These findings can pave the way to a general quantitative description of out-of-equilibrium phase transitions driven by spontaneous parity-time symmetry breaking.« less

  8. Parity and risk of lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Jessica K; Asomaning, Kofi; Kraft, Peter; Johnson, Bruce E; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C

    2010-03-01

    Patterns of lung cancer incidence suggest that gender-associated factors may influence lung cancer risk. Given the association of parity with risk of some women's cancers, the authors hypothesized that childbearing history may also be associated with lung cancer. Women enrolled in the Lung Cancer Susceptibility Study at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts) between 1992 and 2004 (1,004 cases, 848 controls) were available for analysis of the association between parity and lung cancer risk. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After results were controlled for age and smoking history, women with at least 1 child had 0.71 times the odds of lung cancer as women without children (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval: 0.52, 0.97). A significant linear trend was found: Lung cancer risk decreased with increasing numbers of children (P < 0.001). This inverse association was stronger in never smokers (P = 0.12) and was limited to women over age 50 years at diagnosis (P = 0.17). Age at first birth was not associated with risk. The authors observed a protective association between childbearing and lung cancer, adding to existing evidence that reproductive factors may moderate lung cancer risk in women.

  9. Measuring molecular parity nonconservation using nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eills, J.; Blanchard, J. W.; Bougas, L.

    Here, the weak interaction does not conserve parity and therefore induces energy shifts in chiral enantiomers that should in principle be detectable in molecular spectra. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the expected shifts are small and in spectra of a mixture of enantiomers, the energy shifts are not resolvable. We propose a nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment in which we titrate the chirality (enantiomeric excess) of a solvent and measure the diasteriomeric splitting in the spectra of a chiral solute in order to search for an anomalous offset due to parity nonconservation (PNC). We present a proof-of-principle experiment in which we search formore » PNC in the 13C resonances of small molecules, and use the 1H resonances, which are insensitive to PNC, as an internal reference. We set a constraint on molecular PNC in 13C chemical shifts at a level of 10 –5 ppm, and provide a discussion of important considerations in the search for molecular PNC using NMR spectroscopy.« less

  10. A-4 scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of galactic sources, extragalactic sources and gamma bursts with the A-4 instrument at energy 1 energies of between 0.1 to 10 MeV are discussed. Aximuthal scans are presented. The Crab Nebula and its spectrum and the spectrum of Cygnus Z-1 are described.

  11. 7 CFR 3202.8 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certification of a biobased product constitutes a violation of this part. (4) USDA BioPreferred Program Web site... remove the product information from the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site and actively communicate the..., resume use of the certification mark. USDA will also restore the product information to the USDA Bio...

  12. 7 CFR 3202.8 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certification of a biobased product constitutes a violation of this part. (4) USDA BioPreferred Program Web site... remove the product information from the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site and actively communicate the..., resume use of the certification mark. USDA will also restore the product information to the USDA Bio...

  13. 7 CFR 3202.8 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certification of a biobased product constitutes a violation of this part. (4) USDA BioPreferred Program Web site... remove the product information from the USDA BioPreferred Program Web site and actively communicate the..., resume use of the certification mark. USDA will also restore the product information to the USDA Bio...

  14. Student Attitudes on Academic Integrity Violations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Russell K.; Berry, Priscilla; Thornton, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Cheating is a continual dilemma on university campuses, and academic integrity violations have reached epidemic proportions according to current literature. The rapid growth of computer technologies and their application in education has provided unethical students, and otherwise ethical students, with new tools for their cheating activities.…

  15. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... determines that disqualification would result in a serious health risk, the disqualification may be waived...

  16. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... determines that disqualification would result in a serious health risk, the disqualification may be waived...

  17. KCBX Notice of Violation - June 3, 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice, or NOV, issued by US EPA to KCBX Terminals Company on June 3, 2014, asserts that KCBX's pet coke (petroleum coke) piles in Chicago are sources of fugitive emissions which violate the Clean Air Act and Illinois State Implementation Plan.

  18. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common Provisions...

  19. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common Provisions...

  20. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common Provisions...

  1. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common Provisions...

  2. A Test of the Abstinence Violation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruderman, Audrey J.

    According to the abstinence violation effect, highly controlled drinkers tend to overindulge following an initial slip. To investigate this relapse model, 47 male college students, ranging in age from 21 to 46, were assigned either to an unrestrained or a restrained drinker group according to their scores on the Restrained Drinking Scale. Subjects…

  3. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE PAGES

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales M S above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass M H+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenariosmore » with a charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale M H± to the scale M S. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  4. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales M S above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass M H+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenariosmore » with a charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale M H± to the scale M S. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  5. 14 CFR 1204.1006 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1204.1006 Section 1204.1006 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITY AND POLICY Inspection of Persons and Personal Effects at NASA Installations or on NASA Property; Trespass or...

  6. Japanese Listeners' Perceptions of Phonotactic Violations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fais, Laurel; Kajikawa, Sachiyo; Werker, Janet; Amano, Shigeaki

    2005-01-01

    The canonical form for Japanese words is (Consonant)Vowel(Consonant) Vowel[approximately]. However, a regular process of high vowel devoicing between voiceless consonants and word-finally after voiceless consonants results in consonant clusters and word-final consonants, apparent violations of that phonotactic pattern. We investigated Japanese…

  7. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... States Secret Service when an office/division fails to properly secure classified information. Upon... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of...

  8. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are... of disqualification from CSFP at least 15 days before the effective date of disqualification. The...

  9. 14 CFR 1221.115 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1221.115 Section 1221.115 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA Program Identifiers, NASA Flags...

  10. 14 CFR 1221.115 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1221.115 Section 1221.115 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA Program Identifiers, NASA Flags...

  11. 14 CFR 1204.1006 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1204.1006 Section 1204.1006 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITY AND POLICY Inspection of Persons and Personal Effects at NASA Installations or on NASA Property; Trespass or...

  12. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... violation of this section, or has been involved in a motor vehicle accident or collision resulting in property damage, personal injury, or death. (d) In the absence of an applicable tribal traffic code, the provisions of state traffic laws applicable in the state where a Court of Indian Offenses is located shall...

  13. Lorentz violating Julia-Toulouse mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis; Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

    2007-03-01

    We study a Lorentz invariance violating extension for the pure photonic sector of the standard model. A phenomenological proposal is made for the condensation of topological defects in the presence of a constant rank-m tensor in the context of the Julia-Toulouse mechanism. Possible physical consequences leading to direct measurable effects over the confining properties of the elementary particles are explored.

  14. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP...

  15. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP...

  16. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP...

  17. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP...

  18. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP...

  19. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1... Directorate of Defense Trade Controls; (2) To import or attempt to import any defense article whenever a... from the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls; (3) To conspire to export, import, reexport or cause to...

  20. Violation of Bell's inequalities in quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. D.; Walls, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    An optical field produced by intracavity four-wave mixing is shown to exhibit the following nonclassical features: photon antibunching, squeezing, and violation of Cauchy-Schwarz and Bell's inequalities. These intrinsic quantum mechanical effects are shown to be associated with the nonexistence of a positive normalizable Glauber-Sudarshan P function.

  1. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  2. Multiparity evaluation of calving ease and stillbirth with separate genetic effects by parity.

    PubMed

    Wiggans, G R; Cole, J B; Thornton, L L M

    2008-08-01

    Evaluations that analyze first and later parities as correlated traits were developed separately for calving ease (CE) from over 15 million calving records of Holsteins, Brown Swiss, and Holstein-Brown Swiss crossbreds and for stillbirth (SB) from 7.4 million of the Holstein CE records. Calving ease was measured on a scale of 1 (no difficulty) to 5 (difficult birth); SB status was designated as live or dead within 48 h. Scores for CE and SB were transformed separately for each trait by parity (first or later) and calf sex (male or female) and converted to a unit standard deviation scale. For variance component estimation, Holstein data were selected for the 2,968 bulls with the most records as sire or maternal grandsire (MGS). Six samples were selected by herd; samples ranged in size from 97,756 to 146,138 records. A multiparity sire-MGS model was used to calculate evaluations separately for CE and for SB with first and later parities as correlated traits. Fixed effects were year-season, calf sex, and sire and MGS birth years; random effects were herd-year interaction, sire, and MGS. For later parities, sex effects were separated by parity. The genetic correlation between first and later parities was 0.79 for sire and 0.81 for MGS for CE, and 0.83 for sire and 0.74 for MGS for SB. For national CE evaluations, which also include Brown Swiss, a fixed effect for breed was added to the model. Correlations between solutions on the underlying scale from the January 2008 USDA CE evaluation with those from the multiparity analysis for CE were 0.89 and 0.91 for first- and later-parity sire effects and 0.71 and 0.88 for first- and later-parity MGS effects; the larger value for later parity reflects that later parities comprised 64% of the data. Corresponding correlations for SB were 0.81 and 0.82 for first- and later-parity sire effects and 0.46 and 0.83 for first- and later-parity MGS effects, respectively. Correlations were higher when only bulls with a multiparity

  3. Prototype Rail Crossing Violation Warning Application Project Report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-09-05

    This report is the Project Report for the Rail Crossing Violation Warning (RCVW) safety application developed for the project on Rail Crossing Violation Warning Application and Infrastructure Connection, providing a means for equipped connected vehic...

  4. 45 CFR 1640.4 - Violation of agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF FEDERAL LAW TO LSC RECIPIENTS § 1640.4 Violation of agreement. (a) A violation of the agreement... negligence allowed the employee or board member to engage in the activities which led to the conviction or...

  5. 29 CFR 530.203 - Outstanding violations and open investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outstanding violations and open investigations. 530.203... Employer Certificates § 530.203 Outstanding violations and open investigations. A homework certificate will... subject of an open investigation. ...

  6. 29 CFR 530.203 - Outstanding violations and open investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outstanding violations and open investigations. 530.203... Employer Certificates § 530.203 Outstanding violations and open investigations. A homework certificate will... subject of an open investigation. ...

  7. 29 CFR 530.203 - Outstanding violations and open investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outstanding violations and open investigations. 530.203... Employer Certificates § 530.203 Outstanding violations and open investigations. A homework certificate will... subject of an open investigation. ...

  8. 29 CFR 530.203 - Outstanding violations and open investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outstanding violations and open investigations. 530.203... Employer Certificates § 530.203 Outstanding violations and open investigations. A homework certificate will... subject of an open investigation. ...

  9. 29 CFR 530.203 - Outstanding violations and open investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outstanding violations and open investigations. 530.203... Employer Certificates § 530.203 Outstanding violations and open investigations. A homework certificate will... subject of an open investigation. ...

  10. 48 CFR 203.806 - Processing suspected violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... violations. 203.806 Section 203.806 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST.... Report suspected violations to the address at PGI 203.8(a). ...

  11. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation of...

  12. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The... these laws. (b) The master and/or owner of a vessel that is operated, navigated, or used in violation of...

  13. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The... these laws. (b) The master and/or owner of a vessel that is operated, navigated, or used in violation of...

  14. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The... these laws. (b) The master and/or owner of a vessel that is operated, navigated, or used in violation of...

  15. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The... these laws. (b) The master and/or owner of a vessel that is operated, navigated, or used in violation of...

  16. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The... these laws. (b) The master and/or owner of a vessel that is operated, navigated, or used in violation of...

  17. 41 CFR 302-17.11 - Violation of service agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violation of service agreement. 302-17.11 Section 302-17.11 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation....11 Violation of service agreement. In the event the employee violates the terms of the service...

  18. 24 CFR 30.55 - Interstate Land Sales violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interstate Land Sales violations... Sales violations. (a) General. The Assistant Secretary for Housing-Federal Housing Commissioner, or his... materially violates any provision of the Interstate Land Sales Full Disclosure Act (15 U.S.C. 1701 et seq...

  19. 24 CFR 30.55 - Interstate Land Sales violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interstate Land Sales violations... Sales violations. (a) General. The Assistant Secretary for Housing-Federal Housing Commissioner, or his... materially violates any provision of the Interstate Land Sales Full Disclosure Act (15 U.S.C. 1701 et seq...

  20. 48 CFR 1303.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Antitrust Violations 1303.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. Suspected anti-competitive practices and antitrust law violations, as described in FAR 3.301 and FAR 3.303, shall be reported to the Contract Law Division, by the HCO. A copy of the report shall be sent to the Procurement Executive...

  1. 24 CFR 30.55 - Interstate Land Sales violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interstate Land Sales violations... Sales violations. (a) General. The Assistant Secretary for Housing-Federal Housing Commissioner, or his... materially violates any provision of the Interstate Land Sales Full Disclosure Act (15 U.S.C. 1701 et seq...

  2. 15 CFR 701.6 - Violations, penalties, and remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations, penalties, and remedies. 701.6 Section 701.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... COUNTRIES OR FOREIGN FIRMS § 701.6 Violations, penalties, and remedies. (a) Willful violation of the Defense...

  3. 41 CFR 302-17.11 - Violation of service agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violation of service agreement. 302-17.11 Section 302-17.11 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation....11 Violation of service agreement. In the event the employee violates the terms of the service...

  4. 10 CFR 160.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 160.5 Section 160.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) TRESPASSING ON COMMISSION PROPERTY § 160.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either §§ 160.3 or 160.4 shall, upon conviction, be punishable by...

  5. 10 CFR 860.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 860.5 Section 860.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY § 860.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either § 860.3 or § 860.4 shall, upon conviction, be guilty of an infraction...

  6. 10 CFR 160.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 160.5 Section 160.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) TRESPASSING ON COMMISSION PROPERTY § 160.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either §§ 160.3 or 160.4 shall, upon conviction, be punishable by...

  7. 10 CFR 160.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 160.5 Section 160.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) TRESPASSING ON COMMISSION PROPERTY § 160.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either §§ 160.3 or 160.4 shall, upon conviction, be punishable by...

  8. 10 CFR 860.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 860.5 Section 860.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY § 860.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either § 860.3 or § 860.4 shall, upon conviction, be guilty of an infraction...

  9. 10 CFR 860.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 860.5 Section 860.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY § 860.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either § 860.3 or § 860.4 shall, upon conviction, be guilty of an infraction...

  10. 10 CFR 160.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 160.5 Section 160.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) TRESPASSING ON COMMISSION PROPERTY § 160.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either §§ 160.3 or 160.4 shall, upon conviction, be punishable by...

  11. 10 CFR 860.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 860.5 Section 860.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY § 860.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either § 860.3 or § 860.4 shall, upon conviction, be guilty of an infraction...

  12. 10 CFR 860.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 860.5 Section 860.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY § 860.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either § 860.3 or § 860.4 shall, upon conviction, be guilty of an infraction...

  13. 10 CFR 160.5 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations and penalties. 160.5 Section 160.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) TRESPASSING ON COMMISSION PROPERTY § 160.5 Violations and penalties. (a) Whoever willfully violates either §§ 160.3 or 160.4 shall, upon conviction, be punishable by...

  14. 10 CFR 824.6 - Preliminary notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preliminary notice of violation. 824.6 Section 824.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.6 Preliminary notice of violation. (a) In order to begin a proceeding to...

  15. 10 CFR 824.7 - Final notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... whether the person violated or is continuing to violate a classified information security requirement. (b... classified information security requirement, the Director may issue to the person a final notice of violation... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION...

  16. 32 CFR 634.32 - Traffic violation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic violation reports. 634.32 Section 634.32... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Traffic Supervision § 634.32 Traffic violation reports. (a) Most traffic violations occurring on DOD installations (within the UNITED STATES or its...

  17. 49 CFR 384.209 - Notification of traffic violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation), in any type of vehicle, the... State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation), the... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of traffic violations. 384.209...

  18. 10 CFR 824.7 - Final notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... whether the person violated or is continuing to violate a classified information security requirement. (b... classified information security requirement, the Director may issue to the person a final notice of violation... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION...

  19. 10 CFR 824.6 - Preliminary notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preliminary notice of violation. 824.6 Section 824.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.6 Preliminary notice of violation. (a) In order to begin a proceeding to...

  20. 45 CFR 1640.4 - Violation of agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violation of agreement. 1640.4 Section 1640.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION APPLICATION OF FEDERAL LAW TO LSC RECIPIENTS § 1640.4 Violation of agreement. (a) A violation of the agreement...