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Sample records for a431 tumor xenografts

  1. ALA-PpIX variability quantitatively imaged in A431 epidermoid tumors using in vivo ultrasound fluorescence tomography and ex vivo assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Treatment monitoring of Aminolevunilic-acid (ALA) - Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) calls for superficial and subsurface imaging techniques. While superficial imagers exist for this purpose, their ability to assess PpIX levels in thick lesions is poor; additionally few treatment centers have the capability to measure ALA-induced PpIX production. An area of active research is to improve treatments to deeper and nodular BCCs, because treatment is least effective in these. The goal of this work was to understand the logistics and technical capabilities to quantify PpIX at depths over 1mm, using a novel hybrid ultrasound-guided, fiber-based fluorescence molecular spectroscopictomography system. This system utilizes a 633nm excitation laser and detection using filtered spectrometers. Source and detection fibers are collinear so that their imaging plane matches that of ultrasound transducer. Validation with phantoms and tumor-simulating fluorescent inclusions in mice showed sensitivity to fluorophore concentrations as low as 0.025μg/ml at 4mm depth from surface, as presented in previous years. Image-guided quantification of ALA-induced PpIX production was completed in subcutaneous xenograft epidermoid cancer tumor model A431 in nude mice. A total of 32 animals were imaged in-vivo, using several time points, including pre-ALA, 4-hours post-ALA, and 24-hours post-ALA administration. On average, PpIX production in tumors increased by over 10-fold, 4-hours post-ALA. Statistical analysis of PpIX fluorescence showed significant difference among all groups; p<0.05. Results were validated by exvivo imaging of resected tumors. Details of imaging, analysis and results will be presented to illustrate variability and the potential for imaging these values at depth.

  2. Anticancer effects of cantharidin in A431 human skin cancer (Epidermoid carcinoma) cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Chuan; Yu, Fu-Shun; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chen, Ya-Yin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Wen-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-03-01

    Cantharidin (CTD), a potential anticancer agent of Traditional Chinese Medicine has cytotxic effects in different human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effects of CTD on A431 human skin cancer (epidermoid carcinoma) cells in vitro and in A431 cell xenograft mouse model were examined. In vitro, A431 human skin cell were treated with CTD for 24 and 48 h. Cell phase distribution, ROS production, Ca 2+ release, Caspase activity and the level of apoptosis associated proteins were measured. In vivo, A431 cell xenograft mouse model were examined. CTD-induced cell morphological changes and decreased percentage of viable A431 cells via G0/G1 phase arrest and induced apoptosis. CTD-induced G0/G1 phase arrest through the reduction of protein levels of cyclin E, CDK6, and cyclin D in A431 cells. CTD-induced cell apoptosis of A431 cells also was confirm by DNA gel electrophoresis showed CTD-induced DNA fragmentation. CTD reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated release of cytochrome c, AIF and Endo G in A431 cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that CTD increased activity of caspase-8, -9 and -3. However, when cells were pretreated with specific caspase inhibitors activity was reduced and cell viability increased. CTD increased protein levels of death receptors such as DR4, DR5, TRAIL and levels of the active form of caspase-8, -9 and -3 in A431 cells. AIF and Endo G proteins levels were also enhanced by CTD. In vivo studies showed that CTD significantly inhibited A431 cell xenograft tumors in mice. Taken together, these in vitro and in vivo results provide insight into the mechanisms of CTD on cell growth and tumor production. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 723-738, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografted tumors maintain characteristic features of the original tumors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Beom; Hong, Hye Kyung; Choi, Yoon-La; Oh, Ensel; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jin, Juyoun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Lee, Woo Yong

    2014-04-01

    Despite significant improvements in colon cancer outcomes over the past few decades, preclinical development of more effective therapeutic strategies is still limited by the availability of clinically relevant animal models. To meet those clinical unmet needs, we generated a well-characterized in vivo preclinical platform for colorectal cancer using fresh surgical samples. Primary and metastatic colorectal tumor tissues (1-2 mm(3)) that originate from surgery were implanted into the subcutaneous space of nude mice and serially passaged in vivo. Mutation status, hematoxylin and eosin staining, short tandem repeat profiling, and array comparative genomic hybridization were used to validate the similarity of molecular characteristics between the patient tumors and tumors obtained from xenografts. From surgical specimens of 143 patients, 97 xenograft models were obtained in immunodeficient mice (establish rate = 67%). Thirty-nine xenograft models were serially expanded further in mice with a mean time to reach a size of 1000-1500 mm(3) of 90 ± 20 d. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a high degree of pathologic similarity including histologic architecture and expression of CEA, CK7, and CD20 between the patient and xenograft tumors. Molecular analysis showed that genetic mutations, genomic alterations, and gene expression patterns of each patient tumor were also well conserved in the corresponding xenograft tumor. Xenograft animal models derived from fresh surgical sample maintained the key characteristic features of the original tumors, suggesting that this in vivo platform can be useful for preclinical development of novel therapeutic approaches to colorectal cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibody treatment of human tumor xenografts elicits active anti-tumor immunity in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Meredith A.; Roche, Marly I.; Williams, Brent R.; Kim, Jae; Pageau, Steven C.; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts of the human anti-colorectal cancer cell line SW480 were used as a preclinical model to explore anti-tumor immunotherapies. Intratumor or systemic treatment of the mice with murine anti-SW480 serum, recombinant anti-SW480 polyclonal antibodies, or the anti-colorectal cancer monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, caused retardation or regression of SW480 tumor xenografts. Interestingly, when mice that had regressed their tumors were re-challenged with SW480 cells, these mice regressed the new tumors without further antibody treatment. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from mice that had regressed their tumors conferred anti-tumor immunity to naïve nude mice. Pilot experiments suggest that the transferred anti-tumor immunity is mediated by T cells of both γδ and αβ lineages. These results demonstrate that passive anti-tumor immunotherapy can elicit active immunity and support a role for extra-thymic γδ and αβ T cells in tumor rejection. Implications for potential immunotherapies include injection of tumor nodules in cancer patients with anti-tumor antibodies to induce anti-tumor T cell immunity. PMID:17920694

  5. Genetically Engineered Cancer Models, But Not Xenografts, Faithfully Predict Anticancer Drug Exposure in Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Combest, Austin J.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Sandison, Katie; Hanna, Suzan K.; Ross, Charlene; Habibi, Sohrab; Zamboni, Beth; Müller, Markus; Brunner, Martin; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rodent studies are a vital step in the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and are used in pharmacokinetic (PK), toxicology, and efficacy studies. Traditionally, anticancer drug development has relied on xenograft implantation of human cancer cell lines in immunocompromised mice for efficacy screening of a candidate compound. The usefulness of xenograft models for efficacy testing, however, has been questioned, whereas genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and orthotopic syngeneic transplants (OSTs) may offer some advantages for efficacy assessment. A critical factor influencing the predictability of rodent tumor models is drug PKs, but a comprehensive comparison of plasma and tumor PK parameters among xenograft models, OSTs, GEMMs, and human patients has not been performed. Methods. In this work, we evaluated the plasma and tumor dispositions of an antimelanoma agent, carboplatin, in patients with cutaneous melanoma compared with four different murine melanoma models (one GEMM, one human cell line xenograft, and two OSTs). Results. Using microdialysis to sample carboplatin tumor disposition, we found that OSTs and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors, whereas the GEMM model exhibited PK parameters similar to those seen in human tumors. Conclusions. The tumor PKs of carboplatin in a GEMM of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models. GEMMs show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral PKs and response in patients with solid tumors. PMID:22993143

  6. Complete Regression of Xenograft Tumors upon Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel via Π-Π Stacking Stabilized Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; van der Meel, Roy; Theek, Benjamin; Blenke, Erik Oude; Pieters, Ebel H.E.; Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; Ehling, Josef; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Storm, Gert; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with taxane-based chemotherapeutics, such as paclitaxel (PTX), is complicated by their narrow therapeutic index. Polymeric micelles are attractive nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery of PTX, as they can be tailored to encapsulate large amounts of hydrophobic drugs and achieve prolonged circulation kinetics. As a result, PTX deposition in tumors is increased while drug exposure to healthy tissues is reduced. However, many PTX-loaded micelle formulations suffer from low stability and fast drug release in the circulation, limiting their suitability for systemic drug targeting. To overcome these limitations, we have developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded micelles which are stable without chemical crosslinking and covalent drug attachment. These micelles are characterized by excellent loading capacity and strong drug retention, attributed to π-π stacking interaction between PTX and the aromatic groups of the polymer chains in the micellar core. The micelles are based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-b-p(HPMAm-Bz)) block copolymers, which improved the pharmacokinetics and the biodistribution of PTX, and substantially increased PTX tumor accumulation (by more than 2000%; as compared to Taxol® or control micellar formulations). Improved biodistribution and tumor accumulation were confirmed by hybrid μCT-FMT imaging using near-infrared labeled micelles and payload. The PTX-loaded micelles were well tolerated at different doses while they induced complete tumor regression in two different xenograft models (i.e. A431 and MDA-MB-468). Our findings consequently indicate that π-π stacking-stabilized polymeric micelles are promising carriers to improve the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs to tumors and to increase their therapeutic index. PMID:25831471

  7. Patient-derived xenograft in zebrafish embryos: a new platform for translational research in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Gaudenzi, Germano; Albertelli, Manuela; Dicitore, Alessandra; Würth, Roberto; Gatto, Federico; Barbieri, Federica; Cotelli, Franco; Florio, Tullio; Ferone, Diego; Persani, Luca; Vitale, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    Preclinical research on neuroendocrine tumors usually involves immortalized cell lines and few animal models. In the present study we described an in vivo model based on patient-derived xenografts of neuroendocrine tumor cells in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, allowing a rapid analysis of the angiogenic and invasive potential. Patient-derived neuroendocrine tumor cells were transplanted in 48 hours post-fertilization Tg(fli1a:EGFP) y1 zebrafish embryos that express enhanced green fluorescent protein in the entire vasculature. Neuroendocrine tumor cells, stained with CM-Dil, were injected into the subperidermal (perivitelline) space, close to the developing subintestinal venous plexus. A proper control group, represented by zebrafish injected with only D-PBS, was included in this study. Angiogenic and invasive potentials of each patient-derived xenograft were evaluated by both epifluorescence and confocal microscopes. Six out of eight neuroendocrine tumor samples were successfully transplanted in zebrafish embryos. Although the implanted tumor mass had a limited size (about 100 cells for embryos), patient-derived xenografts showed pro-angiogenic (5 cases) and invasive (6 cases) behaviors within 48 hours post injection. Patient-derived xenograft in zebrafish embryos appears to be a reliable in vivo preclinical model for neuroendocrine tumors, tumors with often limited cell availability. The rapidity of this procedure makes our model a promising platform to perform preclinical drug screening and opens a new scenario for personalized treatment in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET.

    PubMed

    Honndorf, Valerie S; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J

    2016-05-10

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1 mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting.

  9. Tumor-line specific causes of intertumor heterogeneity in blood supply in human melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Trude G; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Leinaas, Marit N; Rofstad, Einar K

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of most cancer treatments is strongly influenced by the tumor blood supply. The results of experimental studies using xenografted tumors to evaluate novel cancer treatments may therefore vary considerably depending on the blood supply of the specific tumor model being used. Mechanisms underlying intertumor heterogeneity in the blood supply of xenografted tumors derived from same tumor line are poorly understood, and were investigated here by using intravital microscopy to assess tumor blood supply and vascular morphology in human melanomas growing in dorsal window chambers in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Two melanoma lines, A-07 and R-18, were included in the study. These lines differed substantially in angiogenic profiles. Thus, when the expression of 84 angiogenesis-related genes was investigated with a quantitative PCR array, 25% of these genes showed more than a 10-fold difference in expression. Furthermore, A-07 tumors showed higher vascular density, higher vessel tortuosity, higher vessel diameters, shorter vessel segments, and more chaotic vascular architecture than R-18 tumors. Both lines showed large intertumor heterogeneity in blood supply. In the A-07 line, tumors with low microvascular density, long vessel segment, and high vessel tortuosity showed poor blood supply, whereas in the R-18 line, poor tumor blood supply was associated with low tumor arteriolar diameters. Thus, tumor-line specific causes of intertumor heterogeneity in blood supply were identified in human melanoma xenografts, and these tumor-line specific mechanisms were possibly a result of tumor-line specific angiogenic profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of histamine and serotonin antagonists on the growth of xenografted human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1981-12-01

    Four lines of human colorectal cancer were established and serially propagated as subcutaneous xenographs in immunosuppressed inbred CBA/Lac mice. Established xenografts were then used to investigate the influence of a serotonin antagonist (BW 501c) and a histamine H2 receptor antagonists (Cimetidine) on xenograft growth. The growth of each of the four tumor lines was significantly inhibited by BW 501c throughout the treatment, whereas the growth of only two tumor lines was significantly inhibited by Cimetidine treatment. The response of individual tumor lines was not predictable on the basis of either tumor histopathology or the natural growth rate of the untreated xenograft. A number of alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypotheses are suggested to explain the results. One hypothesis proposes that colorectal tumors are composed of subpopulations of tumor cells that are variously dependent on or independent of amine hormones. Another hypothesis is that tumor cells exhibit temporal changes in hormone sensitivity to amine hormones during treatment. Finally, it is suggested that serotonin and/or histamine H2 antagonists may be useful in preventing the repopulation of colorectal carcinomas following antineoplastic therapy with the use of conventional drugs.

  11. CABOZANTINIB IS EFFECTIVE IN A SUBSET OF XENOGRAFT GBM TUMORS AND AFFECTS MULTIPLE SIGNALING PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Arnold, Kimberly; Mueller, Claudius; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Poisson, Laila M.; Irtenkauf, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (blind field). METHODS: Neurospheres enriched in CSCs were cultured from resected GBM tumors. Sensitivity to cabozantinib was determined in vitro. Cells were treated (IC40) in triplicate, and cell lysates were analyzed by reverse phase protein microarrays (RPPAs). GBM CSCs were implanted intracranially into nude mice. Cabozantinib was administered by oral gavage at a dose of 60 mg/kg for 4 weeks (5 days/week) as a single agent or in combination with 40 mg/kg TMZ. Tumor growth and response to treatment were monitored by non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the Xenogen IVIS System (Caliper Life Sciences), and overall survival. RESULTS: Sensitivity to cabozantinib treatment varied for the different GBM CSCs. From 70 proteins and phosphoproteins measured, 29 distributed among several signaling pathways were significantly altered after treatment in both resistant and sensitive GBM CSCs, including Met, Ret, AKT, MAPK/ERK. Cabozantinib single agent treatment reduced GBM tumor growth and increased mouse survival in two xenograft lines. Cabozantinib monotherapy reduced tumor size, as measured by BLI, but had no significant effect on overall survival for another xenograft line, however, the combination treatment resulted in sensitization of these xenografts to TMZ treatment. RPPA confirmed downregulation of the described targets for XL184, including activated Met, VEGFR2 and Ret (in vitro). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the clinical experience, both sensitive and resistant GBMs are represented in our CSC xenografts. More extensive evaluation will likely identify baseline biomarkers which might be valuable in identifying potentially sensitive sub-populations for subsequent clinical trials. RPPA and next-gen sequencing (NGS) on terminal tumors is underway. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

  12. Prostate-targeted biodegradable nanoparticles loaded with androgen receptor silencing constructs eradicate xenograft tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Xie, Sheng-Xue; Huang, Yiling; Ling, Min; Liu, Jihong; Ran, Yali; Wang, Yanlin; Thrasher, J Brantley; Berkland, Cory; Li, Benyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the major cause of cancer death in men and the androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to play a critical role in the progression of the disease. Our previous reports showed that knocking down the expression of the AR gene using a siRNA-based approach in prostate cancer cells led to apoptotic cell death and xenograft tumor eradication. In this study, we utilized a biodegradable nanoparticle to deliver the therapeutic AR shRNA construct specifically to prostate cancer cells. Materials & methods The biodegradable nanoparticles were fabricated using a poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymer and the AR shRNA constructs were loaded inside the particles. The surface of the nanoparticles were then conjugated with prostate-specific membrane antigen aptamer A10 for prostate cancer cell-specific targeting. Results A10-conjugation largely enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles in both cell culture- and xenograft-based models. The efficacy of AR shRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles on AR gene silencing was confirmed in PC-3/AR-derived xenografts in nude mice. The therapeutic property of A10-conjugated AR shRNA-loaded nanoparticles was evaluated in xenograft models with different prostate cancer cell lines: 22RV1, LAPC-4 and LNCaP. Upon two injections of the AR shRNA-loaded nanoparticles, rapid tumor regression was observed over 2 weeks. Consistent with previous reports, A10 aptamer conjugation significantly enhanced xenograft tumor regression compared with nonconjugated nanoparticles. Discussion These data demonstrated that tissue-specific delivery of AR shRNA using a biodegradable nanoparticle approach represents a novel therapy for life-threatening prostate cancers. PMID:22583574

  13. Orthotopic xenografts of RCC retain histological, immunophenotypic and genetic features of tumors in patients

    PubMed Central

    Grisanzio, Chiara; Seeley, Apryle; Chang, Michelle; Collins, Michael; Di Napoli, Arianna; Cheng, Su-Chun; Percy, Andrew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Signoretti, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy with limited responsiveness to existing treatments. In vivo models of human cancer, including RCC, are critical for developing more effective therapies. Unfortunately, current RCC models do not accurately represent relevant properties of the human disease. The goal of this study was to develop clinically relevant animal models of RCC for preclinical investigations. We transplanted intact human tumor tissue fragments orthotopically in immunodeficient mice. The xenografts were validated by comparing the morphologic, phenotypic, and genetic characteristics of the kidney tumor tissues before and after implantation. Twenty kidney tumors were transplanted into mice. Successful tumor growth was detected in 19 cases (95%). The histopathologic and immunophenotypic features of the xenografts and those of the original tumors largely overlapped in all the cases. Evaluation of genetic alterations in a subset of 10 cases demonstrated that the grafts largely retained the genetic features of the pre-implantation RCC tissues. Indeed, primary tumors and corresponding grafts displayed identical VHL mutations. Moreover, an identical pattern of DNA copy amplification or loss was observed in 6 of 10 cases (60%). In summary, orthotopic engrafting of RCC tissue fragments can be successfully used to generate animal models that closely resemble RCC in patients. These models will be invaluable for in vivo preclinical drug testing, and for deeper understanding of kidney carcinogenesis. PMID:21710693

  14. Hedgehog signal inhibitor forskolin suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Oue, Takaharu; Uehara, Shuichiro; Fukuzawa, Masahiro

    2011-02-01

    We have previously reported that the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is activated in pediatric malignancies. In this study, we examined the effect of the Hh signal inhibitor forskolin on the growth of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in vivo and in vitro and thereby elucidated the possibility of considering Hh signaling pathway as a therapeutic target for RMS. We evaluated the messenger RNA expressions of Hh signal mediators in 3 human RMS cell lines using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method. The effect of forskolin on the tumor cell proliferation was investigated using WST-1 assay (Dojindo Co, Kumamoto, Japan). We inoculated 10(7) tumor cells into the back of nude mice to create RMS xenograft tumor models. Forskolin was subcutaneously administered in the region around the tumor, and the effect on the tumor growth was evaluated. The messenger RNA expression of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1, the marker of Hh signaling activation, was expressed at various levels in RMS cell lines. The proliferation of RMS cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by forskolin. Similarly, in the xenograft model, tumor growth was also significantly reduced by forskolin treatment. Our findings suggest that the Hh signaling pathway plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of RMS and that this pathway can be considered to be a potential molecular target of new treatment strategies for RMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R.; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

    2014-04-01

    Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

  16. Novel anti-angiogenic effects of formononetin in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Kathy Ka-Wai; Law, Pui-Ching; Ko, Joshua Ka-Shun

    2012-12-01

    Formononetin is a novel herbal isoflavonoid isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, a medicinal plant that possesses antitumorigenic properties. Our previous findings demonstrated that formononetin initiates growth-inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activities in human colon cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to further examine the potential of formononetin in controlling angiogenesis and tumor cell invasiveness in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenografts. The results showed that formononetin downregulated the expression of the key pro-angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases. We also discovered that the invasiveness of metastatic colon cancer cells was alleviated following drug treatment. The potential anti-angiogenic effect of formononetin was examined in nude mouse xenografts. The tumor size and the number of proliferating cells were reduced in the tumor tissues obtained from the formononetin-treated group. The serum VEGF level was also reduced in the drug-treated animals when compared to the controls. These findings suggest that formononetin inhibits angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion, and thus support its use in the treatment of advanced and metastatic colon cancers.

  17. Transcriptomic alterations in human prostate cancer cell LNCaP tumor xenograft modulated by dietary phenethyl isothiocyanate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temporal growth of tumor xenografts in mice on a control diet was compared to mice supplemented daily with 3 µmol/g of the cancer preventive compound phenethyl isothiocyanate. Phenethyl isothiocyanate decreased the rate of tumor growth. The effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate on tumor growth were ex...

  18. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  19. Serotonergic system antagonists target breast tumor initiating cells and synergize with chemotherapy to shrink human breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gwynne, William D; Hallett, Robin M; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Bojovic, Bojana; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Aarts, Craig; Dias, Kay; Bane, Anita; Hassell, John A

    2017-05-09

    Breast tumors comprise an infrequent tumor cell population, termed breast tumor initiating cells (BTIC), which sustain tumor growth, seed metastases and resist cytotoxic therapies. Hence therapies are needed to target BTIC to provide more durable breast cancer remissions than are currently achieved. We previously reported that serotonergic system antagonists abrogated the activity of mouse BTIC resident in the mammary tumors of a HER2-overexpressing model of breast cancer. Here we report that antagonists of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) biosynthesis and activity, including US Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved antidepressants, targeted BTIC resident in numerous breast tumor cell lines regardless of their clinical or molecular subtype. Notably, inhibitors of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), required for 5-HT biosynthesis in select non-neuronal cells, the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and several 5-HT receptors compromised BTIC activity as assessed by functional sphere-forming assays. Consistent with these findings, human breast tumor cells express TPH1, 5-HT and SERT independent of their molecular or clinical subtype. Exposure of breast tumor cells ex vivo to sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), reduced BTIC frequency as determined by transplanting drug-treated tumor cells into immune-compromised mice. Moreover, another SSRI (vilazodone; Viibryd) synergized with chemotherapy to shrink breast tumor xenografts in immune-compromised mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and inducing their apoptosis. Collectively our data suggest that antidepressants in combination with cytotoxic anticancer therapies may be an appropriate treatment regimen for testing in clinical trials.

  20. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  1. Systemic miRNA-7 delivery inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in murine xenograft glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Babae, Negar; Bourajjaj, Meriem; Liu, Yijia; Van Beijnum, Judy R; Cerisoli, Francesco; Scaria, Puthupparampil V; Verheul, Mark; Van Berkel, Maaike P; Pieters, Ebel H E; Van Haastert, Rick J; Yousefi, Afrouz; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Storm, Gert; Berezikov, Eugene; Cuppen, Edwin; Woodle, Martin; Schaapveld, Roel Q J; Prevost, Gregoire P; Griffioen, Arjan W; Van Noort, Paula I; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2014-08-30

    Tumor-angiogenesis is the multi-factorial process of sprouting of endothelial cells (EC) into micro-vessels to provide tumor cells with nutrients and oxygen. To explore miRNAs as therapeutic angiogenesis-inhibitors, we performed a functional screen to identify miRNAs that are able to decrease EC viability. We identified miRNA-7 (miR-7) as a potent negative regulator of angiogenesis. Introduction of miR-7 in EC resulted in strongly reduced cell viability, tube formation, sprouting and migration. Application of miR-7 in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay led to a profound reduction of vascularization, similar to anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib. Local administration of miR-7 in an in vivo murine neuroblastoma tumor model significantly inhibited angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, systemic administration of miR-7 using a novel integrin-targeted biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles that targets both EC and tumor cells, strongly reduced angiogenesis and tumor proliferation in mice with human glioblastoma xenografts. Transcriptome analysis of miR-7 transfected EC in combination with in silico target prediction resulted in the identification of OGT as novel target gene of miR-7. Our study provides a comprehensive validation of miR-7 as novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic miRNA that can be systemically delivered to both EC and tumor cells and offers promise for miR-7 as novel anti-tumor therapeutic.

  2. Optimal Design for Informative Protocols in Xenograft Tumor Growth Inhibition Experiments in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were (i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth and (ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules, and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e., control versus treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e., "short" and "long" studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 g of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped 3 days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected.

  3. Optimal design for informative protocols in xenograft tumor growth inhibition experiments in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth; ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e. control vs treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e. “short” and “long” studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 grams of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped three days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  4. Changes in tumor cell heterogeneity after chemotherapy treatment in a xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Welker, Alessandra M; Jaros, Brian D; An, Min; Beattie, Christine E

    2017-07-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with limited treatments and poor patient survival. GBM tumors are heterogeneous containing a complex mixture of dividing cells, differentiated cells, and cancer stem cells. It is unclear, however, how these different cell populations contribute to tumor growth or whether they exhibit differential responses to chemotherapy. Here we set out to address these questions using a zebrafish xenograft transplant model (Welker et al., 2016). We found that a small population of differentiated vimentin-positive tumor cells, but a majority of Sox2-positive putative cancer stem cells, were dividing during tumor growth. We also observed co-expression of Sox2 and GFAP, another suggested marker of glioma cancer stem cells, indicating that the putative cancer stem cells in GBM9 tumors expressed both of these markers. To determine how these different tumor cell populations responded to chemotherapy, we treated animals with temozolomide (TMZ) and assessed these cell populations immediately after treatment and 5 and 10days after treatment cessation. As expected we found a significant decrease in dividing cells after treatment. We also found a significant decrease in vimentin-positive cells, but not in Sox2 or GFAP-positive cells. However, the Sox2-positive cells significantly increased 5days after TMZ treatment. These data support that putative glioma cancer stem cells are more resistant to TMZ treatment and may contribute to tumor regrowth after chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Serotonergic system antagonists target breast tumor initiating cells and synergize with chemotherapy to shrink human breast tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gwynne, William D; Hallett, Robin M; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Bojovic, Bojana; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Aarts, Craig; Dias, Kay; Bane, Anita; Hassell, John A

    2017-01-01

    Breast tumors comprise an infrequent tumor cell population, termed breast tumor initiating cells (BTIC), which sustain tumor growth, seed metastases and resist cytotoxic therapies. Hence therapies are needed to target BTIC to provide more durable breast cancer remissions than are currently achieved. We previously reported that serotonergic system antagonists abrogated the activity of mouse BTIC resident in the mammary tumors of a HER2-overexpressing model of breast cancer. Here we report that antagonists of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) biosynthesis and activity, including US Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved antidepressants, targeted BTIC resident in numerous breast tumor cell lines regardless of their clinical or molecular subtype. Notably, inhibitors of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), required for 5-HT biosynthesis in select non-neuronal cells, the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and several 5-HT receptors compromised BTIC activity as assessed by functional sphere-forming assays. Consistent with these findings, human breast tumor cells express TPH1, 5-HT and SERT independent of their molecular or clinical subtype. Exposure of breast tumor cells ex vivo to sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), reduced BTIC frequency as determined by transplanting drug-treated tumor cells into immune-compromised mice. Moreover, another SSRI (vilazodone; Viibryd) synergized with chemotherapy to shrink breast tumor xenografts in immune-compromised mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and inducing their apoptosis. Collectively our data suggest that antidepressants in combination with cytotoxic anticancer therapies may be an appropriate treatment regimen for testing in clinical trials. PMID:28404880

  6. Lapatinib in Combination With Radiation Diminishes Tumor Regrowth in HER2+ and Basal-Like/EGFR+ Breast Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Sambade, Maria J.; Kimple, Randall J.; Camp, J. Terese

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lapatinib, a dual epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/HER2 kinase inhibitor, can radiosensitize EGFR+ or HER2+ breast cancer xenografts. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing xenografts of basal-like/EGFR+ SUM149 and HER2+ SUM225 breast cancer cells were treated with lapatinib and fractionated radiotherapy and tumor growth inhibition correlated with alterations in ERK1 and AKT activation by immunohistochemistry. Results: Basal-like/EGFR+ SUM149 breast cancer tumors were completely resistant to treatment with lapatinib alone but highly growth impaired with lapatinib plus radiotherapy, exhibiting an enhancement ratio average of 2.75 and a fractional tumor product ratio average of 2.20 during the study period.more » In contrast, HER2+ SUM225 breast cancer tumors were highly responsive to treatment with lapatinib alone and yielded a relatively lower enhancement ratio average of 1.25 during the study period with lapatinib plus radiotherapy. Durable tumor control in the HER2+ SUM225 model was more effective with the combination treatment than either lapatinib or radiotherapy alone. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that radiosensitization by lapatinib correlated with ERK1/2 inhibition in the EGFR+ SUM149 model and with AKT inhibition in the HER2+ SUM225 model. Conclusion: Our data suggest that lapatinib combined with fractionated radiotherapy may be useful against EGFR+ and HER2+ breast cancers and that inhibition of downstream signaling to ERK1/2 and AKT correlates with sensitization in EGFR+ and HER2+ cells, respectively.« less

  7. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and is Upregulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Evan C.; Karl, Taylor A.; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K.; O’Brien, Catherine A.; Longacre, Teri A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.; Rothenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. Methods An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib following injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. Results KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice, compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5-associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cell lines. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44+ cells indicated that KIT may promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT+ colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in

  8. Astaxanthin Inhibits PC-3 Xenograft Prostate Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaofeng; Yu, Haining; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shen, Shengrong

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most common malignancy in men, is a major cause of cancer deaths. A better understanding of the mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression may identify actionable targets to improve treatment of this patient group. As a dietary carotenoid, astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects against inflammation, cardiovascular disease, oxidative damage, or different cancer sites. This study used intragastric administration of astaxanthin to detect its role on tumor proliferation, apoptosis, microRNA (miRNA) overexpression, and microbacteria composition change by establishing androgen-independent PCa cell PC-3 xenograft nude mice. Nude mice were inoculated with androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells subcutaneously. The intervention was started when tumors reached 0.5–0.6 cm in diameter. Mice were intragastrically administered 100 mg/kg astaxanthin (HA), 25 mg/kg astaxanthin (LA), or olive oil (TC). The results showed that 100 mg/kg astaxanthin significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the TC group, with an inhibitory rate of 41.7%. A decrease of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as well as an increase of cleaved caspase-3 were observed in HA-treated tumors, along with increasing apoptotic cells, obtained by TUNEL assay. The HA significantly elevated the levels of tumor suppressors miR-375 and miR-487b in tumor tissues and the amount of Lactobacillus sp. and Lachnospiraceae in mice stools, while there was no significant difference between LA and TC groups. These results provide a promising regimen to enhance the therapeutic effect in a dietary supplement manner. PMID:28282880

  9. Astaxanthin Inhibits PC-3 Xenograft Prostate Tumor Growth in Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaofeng; Yu, Haining; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shen, Shengrong

    2017-03-08

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most common malignancy in men, is a major cause of cancer deaths. A better understanding of the mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression may identify actionable targets to improve treatment of this patient group. As a dietary carotenoid, astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects against inflammation, cardiovascular disease, oxidative damage, or different cancer sites. This study used intragastric administration of astaxanthin to detect its role on tumor proliferation, apoptosis, microRNA (miRNA) overexpression, and microbacteria composition change by establishing androgen-independent PCa cell PC-3 xenograft nude mice. Nude mice were inoculated with androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells subcutaneously. The intervention was started when tumors reached 0.5-0.6 cm in diameter. Mice were intragastrically administered 100 mg/kg astaxanthin (HA), 25 mg/kg astaxanthin (LA), or olive oil (TC). The results showed that 100 mg/kg astaxanthin significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the TC group, with an inhibitory rate of 41.7%. A decrease of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as well as an increase of cleaved caspase-3 were observed in HA-treated tumors, along with increasing apoptotic cells, obtained by TUNEL assay. The HA significantly elevated the levels of tumor suppressors miR-375 and miR-487b in tumor tissues and the amount of Lactobacillus sp. and Lachnospiraceae in mice stools, while there was no significant difference between LA and TC groups. These results provide a promising regimen to enhance the therapeutic effect in a dietary supplement manner.

  10. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  11. Effects of Combining Rapamycin and Resveratrol on Apoptosis and Growth of TSC2-Deficient Xenograft Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S.; Sun, Yang; Schwartz, Naomi S.; Li, Chenggang; Yu, Jane J.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare neoplastic metastatic disease affecting women of childbearing age. LAM is caused by hyperactivation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) as a consequence of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1/2 inactivation. Clinically, LAM results in cystic lung destruction. mTORC1 inhibition using rapamycin analogs (rapalogs) is partially effective in reducing disease progression and improving lung function. However, cessation of treatment results in continued progression of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of the combination of rapamycin treatment with resveratrol, an autophagy inhibitor, in the TSC2-null xenograft tumor model. We determined that this combination inhibits phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 signaling and activates apoptosis. Therefore, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol may be an effective clinical strategy for treatment of LAM and other diseases with mTORC1 hyperactivation. PMID:25844891

  12. Mass spectrometric imaging of red fluorescent protein in breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Heeren, Ron M A; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters.

  13. Human Xenografts Are Not Rejected in a Naturally Occurring Immunodeficient Porcine Line: A Human Tumor Model in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T.; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P.; Kerrigan, Maureen A.; Pyle, Marla M.; Dekkers, Jack C.M.; Wyatt, Carol R.; Rowland, Robert R.R.; Anderson, David E.; Bossmann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans. PMID:23514746

  14. Imaging Tiny Hepatic Tumor Xenografts via Endoglin-Targeted Paramagnetic/Optical Nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihui; Gao, Xihui; Zhang, Yunfei; Chang, Wenju; Li, Jianhui; Li, Xinwei; Du, Qin; Li, Cong

    2018-05-23

    Surgery is the mainstay for treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it is a great challenge for surgeons to identify HCC in its early developmental stage. The diagnostic sensitivity for a tiny HCC with a diameter less than 1.0 cm is usually as low as 10-33% for computed tomography (CT) and 29-43% for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although MRI is the preferred imaging modality for detecting HCC, with its unparalleled spatial resolution for soft tissue, the commercially available contrast agent, such as Gd 3+ -DTPA, cannot accurately define HCC because of its short circulation lifetime and lack of tumor-targeting specificity. Endoglin (CD105), a type I membrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed both in HCC cells and in the endothelial cells of neovasculature, which are abundant at the tumor periphery. In this work, a novel single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide-based aptamer was screened by systematic evolution of ligands in an exponential enrichment assay and showed a high binding affinity ( K D = 98 pmol/L) to endoglin. Conjugating the aptamers and imaging reporters on a G5 dendrimer created an HCC-targeting nanoprobe that allowed the successful visualization of orthotopic HCC xenografts with diameters as small as 1-4 mm. Significantly, the invasive tumor margin was clearly delineated, with a tumor to normal ratio of 2.7 by near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and 2.1 by T 1 -weighted MRI. This multimodal nanoprobe holds promise not only for noninvasively defining tiny HCC by preoperative MRI but also for guiding tumor excision via intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging, which will probably gain benefit for the patient's therapeutic response and improve the survival rate.

  15. Irradiation combined with SU5416: Microvascular changes and growth delay in a human xenograft glioblastoma tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Schuuring, Janneke; Department of Neurology, Groene Hart Hospital, Gouda; Bussink, Johan

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, whenmore » combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone.« less

  16. Cabozantinib Is Active against Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Xenografts Carrying Different KIT Mutations.

    PubMed

    Gebreyohannes, Yemarshet K; Schöffski, Patrick; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Vreys, Lise; Cornillie, Jasmien; Vanleeuw, Ulla; Aftab, Dana T; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Sciot, Raf; Wozniak, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    In the majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), oncogenic signaling is driven by KIT mutations. Advanced GIST is treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as imatinib. Acquired resistance to TKI is mainly caused by secondary KIT mutations, but can also be attributed to a switch of KIT dependency to another receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). We tested the efficacy of cabozantinib, a novel TKI targeting KIT, MET, AXL, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of GIST, carrying different KIT mutations. NMRI nu/nu mice (n = 52) were bilaterally transplanted with human GIST: UZLX-GIST4 (KIT exon 11 mutation, imatinib sensitive), UZLX-GIST2 (KIT exon 9, imatinib dose-dependent resistance), or UZLX-GIST9 (KIT exon 11 and 17 mutations, imatinib resistant). Mice were grouped as control (untreated), imatinib (50 mg/kg/bid), and cabozantinib (30 mg/kg/qd) and treated orally for 15 days. Cabozantinib resulted in significant tumor regression in UZLX-GIST4 and -GIST2 and delayed tumor growth in -GIST9. In all three models, cabozantinib inhibited the proliferative activity, which was completely absent in UZLX-GIST4 and significantly reduced in -GIST2 and -GIST9. Increased apoptotic activity was observed only in UZLX-GIST4. Cabozantinib inhibited the KIT signaling pathway in UZLX-GIST4 and -GIST2. In addition, compared with both control and imatinib, cabozantinib significantly reduced microvessel density in all models. In conclusion, cabozantinib showed antitumor activity in GIST PDX models through inhibition of tumor growth, proliferation, and angiogenesis, in both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant models. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2845-52. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Proscillaridin A is cytotoxic for glioblastoma cell lines and controls tumor xenograft growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Denicolaï, Emilie; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Tchoghandjian, Aurélie; Carré, Manon; Colin, Carole; Jiglaire, Carine Jiguet; Mercurio, Sandy; Beclin, Christophe; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2014-11-15

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumor in adults. Because of molecular and cellular heterogeneity, high proliferation rate and significant invasive ability, prognosis of patients is poor. Recent therapeutic advances increased median overall survival but tumor recurrence remains inevitable. In this context, we used a high throughput screening approach to bring out novel compounds with anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties for glioblastoma treatment. Screening of the Prestwick chemical library® of 1120 molecules identified proscillaridin A, a cardiac glycoside inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump, with most significant effects on glioblastoma cell lines. In vitro effects of proscillaridin A were evaluated on GBM6 and GBM9 stem-like cell lines and on U87-MG and U251-MG cell lines. We showed that proscillaridin A displayed cytotoxic properties, triggered cell death, induced G2/M phase blockade in all the glioblastoma cell lines and impaired GBM stem self-renewal capacity even at low concentrations. Heterotopic and orthotopic xenotransplantations were used to confirm in vivo anticancer effects of proscillaridin A that both controls xenograft growth and improves mice survival. Altogether, results suggest that proscillaridin A is a promising candidate as cancer therapies in glioblastoma. This sustains previous reports showing that cardiac glycosides act as anticancer drugs in other cancers.

  18. Novel LIMK2 Inhibitor Blocks Panc-1 Tumor Growth in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Roni; Haklai, Roni; Elad-Tzfadia, Galit; Wolfson, Haim J.; Carmeli, Shmuel; Kloog, Yoel

    2014-01-01

    LIM kinases (LIMKs) are important cell cytoskeleton regulators that play a prominent role in cancer manifestation and neuronal diseases. The LIMK family consists of two homologues, LIMK1 and LIMK2, which differ from one another in expression profile, intercellular localization, and function. The main substrate of LIMK is cofilin, a member of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) protein family. When phosphorylated by LIMK, cofilin is inactive. LIMKs play a contributory role in several neurodevelopmental disorders and in cancer growth and metastasis. We recently reported the development and validation of a novel LIMK inhibitor, referred to here as T56-LIMKi, using a combination of computational methods and classical biochemistry techniques. Here we report that T56-LIMKi inhibits LIMK2 with high specificity, and shows little or no cross-reactivity with LIMK1. We found that T56-LIMKi decreases phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin) levels and thus inhibits growth of several cancerous cell lines, including those of pancreatic cancer, glioma and schwannoma. Because the most promising in-vitro effect of T56-LIMKi was observed in the pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the inhibitor on a nude mouse Panc-1 xenograft model. T56-LIMKi reduced tumor size and p-cofilin levels in the Panc-1 tumors, leading us to propose T56-LIMKi as a candidate drug for cancer therapy. PMID:25593987

  19. Novel LIMK2 Inhibitor Blocks Panc-1 Tumor Growth in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rak, Roni; Haklai, Roni; Elad-Tzfadia, Galit; Wolfson, Haim J; Carmeli, Shmuel; Kloog, Yoel

    2014-01-01

    LIM kinases (LIMKs) are important cell cytoskeleton regulators that play a prominent role in cancer manifestation and neuronal diseases. The LIMK family consists of two homologues, LIMK1 and LIMK2, which differ from one another in expression profile, intercellular localization, and function. The main substrate of LIMK is cofilin, a member of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) protein family. When phosphorylated by LIMK, cofilin is inactive. LIMKs play a contributory role in several neurodevelopmental disorders and in cancer growth and metastasis. We recently reported the development and validation of a novel LIMK inhibitor, referred to here as T56-LIMKi, using a combination of computational methods and classical biochemistry techniques. Here we report that T56-LIMKi inhibits LIMK2 with high specificity, and shows little or no cross-reactivity with LIMK1. We found that T56-LIMKi decreases phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin) levels and thus inhibits growth of several cancerous cell lines, including those of pancreatic cancer, glioma and schwannoma. Because the most promising in-vitro effect of T56-LIMKi was observed in the pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the inhibitor on a nude mouse Panc-1 xenograft model. T56-LIMKi reduced tumor size and p-cofilin levels in the Panc-1 tumors, leading us to propose T56-LIMKi as a candidate drug for cancer therapy.

  20. Tumor radioimmunoimaging of chimeric antibody in nude mice with hepatoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Liu, Kang-Da; Zhou, Ge; Xue, Qiong; Chen, Shao-Liang; Tang, Zhao-You

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To study the radioimmunoimaging (RAII) using the human/mouse chimeric Ab to evaluate its targeting activity in animal models. METHODS: To chimeric Ab was labeled with 131I. RAII was performed at different intervals after injection of radio-labeled Abs in nude mice with human hepatoma xenograft, and tissue distribution of radioactivity was measured. Comparison was made in the chimeric Ab between the single segment Ab and previous murine mAb against HBxAg. RESULTS: The experimental objects developed tumor-positive image after 2 days of radio-labeled Abs injection, and the peak accumulation of radioactivity fell on the 7th day. The tumor/liver ratioactivity of the chimeric Ab, single segment Ab, anti-HBx mAb, and the control group was 281 ± 0.21, 2.44 ± 0.16, 4.60 ± 0.19, and 0.96 ± 0.14, respectively. CONCLUSION: The genetic engineering Abs have a considerable targeting activity which can be used as a novel humanized vector in the targeting treatment of liver cancer. PMID:11819217

  1. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Anja; Schumacher, Udo

    2017-01-01

    Background Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities. Methods The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model “Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool” (CaTSiT) to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model. Results According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels’ geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor’s therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior. Conclusion Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry

  2. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-Nan; Xie, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Yi-Xiong; Cao, Jin-Ping; Cao, Pei-Rang; Chen, Qing-Jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-09-27

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit ( Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo.

  3. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  4. Establishment and characterization of intraperitoneal xenograft models by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel

    PubMed Central

    YAO, YUQIN; ZHOU, YONGJUN; SU, XIAOLAN; DAI, LEI; YU, LIN; DENG, HONGXIN; GOU, LANTU; YANG, JINLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a feasible intraperitoneal (i.p.) xenograft model in nude mice is a good strategy to evaluate the antitumor effect of drugs in vivo. However, the manipulation of human cancer cells in establishing a stable peritoneal carcinomatosis model in nude mice is problematic. In the present study, the ovarian and colorectal peritoneal tumor models were successfully established in nude mice by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel. In ovarian tumor models, the mean number tumor nodes was significantly higher in the experimental group (intraperitoneal tumor cell co-injection with ECM gel) compared with the PBS control group on the 30th day (21.0±3.0 vs. 3.6±2.5; P<0.05). The same results were observed in the colorectal peritoneal tumor models on the 28th day. The colorectal peritoneal tumor model was further used to evaluate the chemotherapy effect of irinotecan (CPT-11). The mean weight of peritoneal tumor nodes in CPT-11 treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group (0.81±0.16 vs. 2.18±0.21 g; P<0.05). The results confirmed the value of these i.p. xenograft models in nude mice as efficient and feasible tools for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26788149

  5. Pentastatin-1, a collagen IV derived 20-mer peptide, suppresses tumor growth in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Koskimaki, Jacob E; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Tang, Benjamin C; Hammers, Hans; Watkins, D Neil; Pili, Roberto; Popel, Aleksander S

    2010-02-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of neovasculature from a pre-existing vascular network. Progression of solid tumors including lung cancer is angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a bioinformatics-based methodology to identify endogenous anti-angiogenic peptide sequences, and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and migration assays. One family of peptides with high activity is derived from the alpha-fibrils of type IV collagen. Based on the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the alpha5 fibril of type IV collagen, pentastatin-1, to suppress vessel growth in an angioreactor-based directed in vivo angiogenesis assay (DIVAA). In addition, pentastatin-1 suppressed tumor growth with intraperitoneal peptide administration in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft model in nude mice using the NCI-H82 human cancer cell line. Pentastatin-1 decreased the invasion of vessels into angioreactors in vivo in a dose dependent manner. The peptide also decreased the rate of tumor growth and microvascular density in vivo in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model. The peptide treatment significantly decreased the invasion of microvessels in angioreactors and the rate of tumor growth in the xenograft model, indicating potential treatment for angiogenesis-dependent disease, and for translational development as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  6. TOPK inhibitor induces complete tumor regression in xenograft models of human cancer through inhibition of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yo; Park, Jae-Hyun; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Hisada, Shoji; Alachkar, Houda; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-10-22

    TOPK (T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase) is highly and frequently transactivated in various cancer tissues, including lung and triple-negative breast cancers, and plays an indispensable role in the mitosis of cancer cells. We report the development of a potent TOPK inhibitor, OTS964 {(R)-9-(4-(1-(dimethylamino)propan-2-yl)phenyl)-8-hydroxy-6-methylthieno[2,3-c]quinolin-4(5H)-one}, which inhibits TOPK kinase activity with high affinity and selectivity. Similar to the knockdown effect of TOPK small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), this inhibitor causes a cytokinesis defect and the subsequent apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro as well as in xenograft models of human lung cancer. Although administration of the free compound induced hematopoietic adverse reactions (leukocytopenia associated with thrombocytosis), the drug delivered in a liposomal formulation effectively caused complete regression of transplanted tumors without showing any adverse reactions in mice. Our results suggest that the inhibition of TOPK activity may be a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of various human cancers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) of radiation-induced re-oxygenation in sensitive and resistant head and neck tumor xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, Sina; Rodríguez Troncoso, Joel; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Currently, anatomical assessment of tumor volume performed several weeks after completion of treatment is the clinical standard to determine whether a cancer patient has responded to a treatment. However, functional changes within the tumor could potentially provide information regarding treatment resistance or response much earlier than anatomical changes. We have used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to assess the short and long-term re-oxygenation kinetics of a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in response to radiation therapy. First, we injected UM-SCC-22B cell line into the flank of 50 mice to grow xenografts. Once the tumor volume reached 200 mm3 (designated as Day 1), the mice were distributed into radiation and control groups. Members of radiation group underwent a clinical dose of radiation of 2 Gy/day on Days 1, 4, 7, and 10 for a cumulative dose of 8 Gy. DRS spectra of these tumors were collected for 14 days during and after therapy, and the collected spectra of each tumor were converted to its optical properties using a lookup table-base inverse model. We found statistically significant differences in tumor growth rate between two groups which is in indication of the sensitivity of this cell line to radiation. We further acquired significantly different contents of hemoglobin and scattering magnitude and size in two groups. The scattering has previously been associated with necrosis. We furthermore found significantly different time-dependent changes in vascular oxygenation and tumor hemoglobin concentration in post-radiation days.

  8. Patient-derived tumor xenografts of lung squamous cell carcinoma alter long non-coding RNA profile but not responsiveness to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dapeng; Luo, Peng; Zhang, Ju; Ye, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qi; Li, Ming; Zhou, Hangcheng; Xie, Mingran; Wang, Baolong

    2018-06-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC), the second most common type of lung cancer, has received limited attention. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTXs) are useful preclinical models to reproduce the diverse heterogeneity of cancer, but it is important to identify potential variations during their establishment. A total of 18 PDTXs were established from 37 the surgical specimens and 16 were serially passaged to third generation. Second- and third-generation xenografts had a faster growth rate in mice. The tumor implantation success rate was associated with poorer differentiation, larger tumor volume and higher expression of Ki-67. The xenografts largely retained histological and key immunophenotypic features (including p53, p63, cytokeratin5/6, and E-cadherin). However, increased Ki-67 expression was identified in partial xenografts. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and mRNA expression in third-generation xenografts differed from that of matched primary tumors. Gene Ontology and pathway analysis showed that mRNAs involved in cell cycle, and metabolism regulation were generally upregulated in xenografts, while those associated with immune responses were typically downregulated. Furthermore, the responses of xenografts to cisplatin were consistent with clinical outcome. In the present study, PDTXs of SCC were successfully established, and closely resembled their original tumor regarding their immunophenotype and response to cisplatin. Overall, PDTXS of LSCC altered the lncRNA profile and increased the proliferative activity of cancer cells, whilst retaining responsiveness to cisplatin.

  9. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.ed

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5more » Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.« less

  10. Are special read alignment strategies necessary and cost-effective when handling sequencing reads from patient-derived tumor xenografts?

    PubMed

    Tso, Kai-Yuen; Lee, Sau Dan; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Yip, Kevin Y

    2014-12-23

    Patient-derived tumor xenografts in mice are widely used in cancer research and have become important in developing personalized therapies. When these xenografts are subject to DNA sequencing, the samples could contain various amounts of mouse DNA. It has been unclear how the mouse reads would affect data analyses. We conducted comprehensive simulations to compare three alignment strategies at different mutation rates, read lengths, sequencing error rates, human-mouse mixing ratios and sequenced regions. We also sequenced a nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft and a cell line to test how the strategies work on real data. We found the "filtering" and "combined reference" strategies performed better than aligning reads directly to human reference in terms of alignment and variant calling accuracies. The combined reference strategy was particularly good at reducing false negative variants calls without significantly increasing the false positive rate. In some scenarios the performance gain of these two special handling strategies was too small for special handling to be cost-effective, but it was found crucial when false non-synonymous SNVs should be minimized, especially in exome sequencing. Our study systematically analyzes the effects of mouse contamination in the sequencing data of human-in-mouse xenografts. Our findings provide information for designing data analysis pipelines for these data.

  11. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  12. High resolution digital autoradiographic and dosimetric analysis of heterogeneous radioactivity distribution in xenografted prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Timmermand, Oskar V; Nilsson, Jenny; Strand, Sven-Erik; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2016-12-01

    The first main aim of this study was to illustrate the absorbed dose rate distribution from 177 Lu in sections of xenografted prostate cancer (PCa) tumors using high resolution digital autoradiography (DAR) and compare it with hypothetical identical radioactivity distributions of 90 Y or 7 MeV alpha-particles. Three dosimetry models based on either dose point kernels or Monte Carlo simulations were used and evaluated. The second and overlapping aim, was to perform DAR imaging and dosimetric analysis of the distribution of radioactivity, and hence the absorbed dose rate, in tumor sections at an early time point after injection during radioimmunotherapy using 177 Lu-h11B6, directed against the human kallikrein 2 antigen. Male immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice, aged 6-8 w, were inoculated by subcutaneous injection of ∼10 7 LNCaP cells in a 200 μl suspension of a 1:1 mixture of medium and Matrigel. The antibody h11B6 was conjugated with the chelator CHX-A″-DTPA after which conjugated h11B6 was mixed with 177 LuCl 3 . The incubation was performed at room temperature for 2 h, after which the labeling was terminated and the solution was purified on a NAP-5 column. About 20 MBq 177 Lu-h11B6 was injected intravenously in the tail vein. At approximately 10 h postinjection (hpi), the mice were sacrificed and one tumor was collected from each of the five animals and cryosectioned into 10 μm thick slices. The tumor slices were measured and imaged using the DAR MicroImager system and the M3Vision software. Then the absorbed dose rate was calculated using a dose point kernel generated with the Monte Carlo code gate v7.0. The DAR system produced high resolution images of the radioactivity distribution, close to the resolution of single PCa cells. The DAR images revealed a pronounced heterogeneous radioactivity distribution, i.e., count rate per area, in the tumors, indicated by the normalized intensity variations along cross sections as mean ± SD: 0.15 ± 0.15, 0.20 ± 0

  13. Long-term fluorescence lifetime imaging of a genetically encoded sensor for caspase-3 activity in mouse tumor xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdeva, Victoria; Kazachkina, Natalia I.; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2018-03-01

    Caspase-3 is known for its role in apoptosis and programmed cell death regulation. We detected caspase-3 activation in vivo in tumor xenografts via shift of mean fluorescence lifetimes of a caspase-3 sensor. We used the genetically encoded sensor TR23K based on the red fluorescent protein TagRFP and chromoprotein KFP linked by 23 amino acid residues (TagRFP-23-KFP) containing a specific caspase cleavage DEVD motif to monitor the activity of caspase-3 in tumor xenografts by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging-Forster resonance energy transfer. Apoptosis was induced by injection of paclitaxel for A549 lung adenocarcinoma and etoposide and cisplatin for HEp-2 pharynx adenocarcinoma. We observed a shift in lifetime distribution from 1.6 to 1.9 ns to 2.1 to 2.4 ns, which indicated the activation of caspase-3. Even within the same tumor, the lifetime varied presumably due to the tumor heterogeneity and the different depth of tumor invasion. Thus, processing time-resolved fluorescence images allows detection of both the cleaved and noncleaved states of the TR23K sensor in real-time mode during the course of several weeks noninvasively. This approach can be used in drug screening, facilitating the development of new anticancer agents as well as improvement of chemotherapy efficiency and its adaptation for personal treatment.

  14. The Somatostatin Analog Rhenium Re-188-P2045 Inhibits the Growth of AR42J Pancreatic Tumor-xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carol A.; Azure, Michael T.; Adams, Christopher T.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    P2045 is a peptide analog of somatostatin with picomolar affinity for the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) upregulated in some pancreatic tumors. Studies were conducted in rat AR42J pancreatic tumor-xenograft mice to determine if Re-188-P2045 could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer in an animal model. Methods Re-188-P2045 was intravenously administered every 3 days for 16 days to nude mice with AR42J tumor-xenografts that were ≈ 20 mm3 at study initiation. Tumor volumes were recorded throughout the dosing period. At necropsy all tissues were assessed for levels of radioactivity and evaluated for histological abnormalities. Clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were determined from terminal blood samples. The affinity of non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 for somatostatin receptors was compared in human NCI-H69 and rat AR42J tumor-cell membranes expressing predominantly SSTR2. Results In the 1.85 and 5.55 mBq groups tumor growth was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion. In the 11.1 mBq group tumor growth was completely inhibited throughout the dosing period and for 12 days after the last administered dose. The radioactivity level in tumors 4 hours post-injection was 10%ID/g, which was 2-fold higher than in the kidneys. Re-188-P2045 was well tolerated in all dose-groups with no adverse clinical, histological, or hematological findings. The non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 bound more avidly (0.2 nM) to SSTR2 in human than rat tumor membranes suggesting that these studies are relevant to human studies. Conclusion Re-188-P2045 is a promising therapeutic candidate for patients with somatostatin-receptor-positive cancer. PMID:25359879

  15. Polyphenols in brewed green tea inhibit prostate tumor xenograft growth by localizing to the tumor and decreasing oxidative stress and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Susanne M.; Wang, Piwen; Said, Jonathan; Magyar, Clara; Castor, Brandon; Doan, Ngan; Tosity, Carmen; Moro, Aune; Gao, Kun; Li, Luyi; Heber, David

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in various animal models that the oral administration of green tea (GT) extracts in drinking water can inhibit tumor growth, but the effects of brewed GT on factors promoting tumor growth, including oxidant damage of DNA and protein, angiogenesis, and DNA methylation, have not been tested in an animal model. To explore these potential mechanisms, brewed GT was administered instead of drinking water to male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with androgen-dependent human LAPC4 prostate cancer cell subcutaneous xenografts. Tumor volume was decreased significantly in mice consuming GT, and tumor size was significantly correlated with GT polyphenol (GTP) content in tumor tissue. There was a significant reduction in hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. GT consumption significantly reduced oxidative DNA and protein damage in tumor tissue as determined by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio and protein carbonyl assay, respectively. Methylation is known to inhibit antioxidative enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTp1) to permit reactive oxygen species promotion of tumor growth. GT inhibited tumor 5-cytosine DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) mRNA and protein expression significantly, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth by reactivation of antioxidative enzymes. This study advances our understanding of tumor growth inhibition by brewed GT in an animal model by demonstrating tissue localization of GTPs in correlation with inhibition of tumor growth. Our results suggest that the inhibition of tumor growth is due to GTP-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress and angiogenesis in the LAPC4 xenograft prostate tumor in SCID mice. PMID:22405694

  16. Therapeutic cure against human tumor xenografts in nude mice by a microtubule stabilization agent, fludelone, via parenteral or oral route.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Chao; Dong, Huajin; Zhang, Xiuguo; Tong, William P; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2005-10-15

    Epothilones, 16-membered macrolides isolated from a myxobacterium in soil, exert their antitumor effect, like Taxol, by induction of microtubule polymerization and microtubule stabilization. They are effective against tumor cells that are resistant to Taxol or vinblastine. We recently designed, via molecular editing and total synthesis, a new class of epothilones represented by 26-trifluoro-(E)-9,10-dehydro-12,13-desoxy-epothilone B (Fludelone), which has emerged as a lead candidate for clinical development. Treatment of nude mice bearing MX-1 human mammary carcinoma xenografts (as large as 3.4% body weight) with Fludelone (6-hour i.v. infusion, 25 mg/kg, q3d x 5, q3d x 4) led to complete disappearance and de facto "cure" (i.e., remission without a relapse for over 15% of the average life span of 2 years). The toxicities induced by bolus i.v. injection could be avoided through prolonged i.v. infusion, which allowed for a 10-fold increase in maximal tolerated dose. Complete remission of MX-1 xenografts was achieved with only one third of this maximal tolerated dose. Parallel studies with Taxol and Fludelone [20 mg/kg, 6-hour i.v. infusion (q2d x 4) x3] against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma xenografts revealed that both drugs achieved tumor remission; however, all Taxol-treated mice relapsed in approximately 1.3 months, whereas the Fludelone-treated mice were cured without any relapse for over 7 months. Furthermore, tumor remission was achieved by Fludelone against SK-OV-3 (ovary), PC-3 (prostate), and the Taxol-resistant CCRF-CEM/Taxol (leukemia) xenograft tumors. Most remarkably, p.o. administration of Fludelone (30 mg/kg, q2d x 7, q2d x 9, q2d x 5) against MX-1 xenografts achieved a nonrelapsing cure for as long as 8.4 months. The above results indicate that Fludelone is a highly promising compound for cancer chemotherapeutics.

  17. Spatial and temporal mapping of heterogeneity in liposome uptake and microvascular distribution in an orthotopic tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ekdawi, Sandra N; Stewart, James M P; Dunne, Michael; Stapleton, Shawn; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Dou, Yannan N; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2015-06-10

    Existing paradigms in nano-based drug delivery are currently being challenged. Assessment of bulk tumor accumulation has been routinely considered an indicative measure of nanomedicine potency. However, it is now recognized that the intratumoral distribution of nanomedicines also impacts their therapeutic effect. At this time, our understanding of the relationship between the bulk (i.e., macro-) tumor accumulation of nanocarriers and their intratumoral (i.e., micro-) distribution remains limited. Liposome-based drug formulations, in particular, suffer from diminished efficacy in vivo as a result of transport-limiting properties, combined with the heterogeneous nature of the tumor microenvironment. In this report, we perform a quantitative image-based assessment of macro- and microdistribution of liposomes. Multi-scalar assessment of liposome distribution was enabled by a stable formulation which co-encapsulates an iodinated contrast agent and a near-infrared fluorescence probe, for computed tomography (CT) and optical microscopy, respectively. Spatio-temporal quantification of tumor uptake in orthotopic xenografts was performed using CT at the bulk tissue level, and within defined sub-volumes of the tumor (i.e., rim, periphery and core). Tumor penetration and relative distribution of liposomes were assessed by fluorescence microscopy of whole tumor sections. Microdistribution analysis of whole tumor images exposed a heterogeneous distribution of both liposomes and tumor vasculature. Highest levels of liposome uptake were achieved and maintained in the well-vascularized tumor rim over the study period, corresponding to a positive correlation between liposome and microvascular density. Tumor penetration of liposomes was found to be time-dependent in all regions of the tumor however independent of location in the tumor. Importantly, a multi-scalar comparison of liposome distribution reveals that macro-accumulation in tissues (e.g., blood, whole tumor) may not reflect

  18. The B-Raf status of tumor cells may be a significant determinant of both antitumor and anti-angiogenic effects of pazopanib in xenograft tumor models.

    PubMed

    Gril, Brunilde; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yong; Anwar, Talha; Ileva, Lilia; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Steeg, Patricia S

    2011-01-01

    Pazopanib is an FDA approved Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor inhibitor. We previously reported that it also inhibits tumor cell B-Raf activity in an experimental brain metastatic setting. Here, we determine the effects of different B-Raf genotypes on pazopanib efficacy, in terms of primary tumor growth and anti-angiogenesis. A panel of seven human breast cancer and melanoma cell lines harboring different mutations in the Ras-Raf pathway was implanted orthotopically in mice, and tumor growth, ERK1/2, MEK1/2 and AKT activation, and blood vessel density and permeability were analyzed. Pazopanib was significantly inhibitory to xenografts expressing either exon 11 mutations of B-Raf, or HER2 activated wild type B-Raf; no significant inhibition of a xenograft expressing the common V600E B-Raf mutation was observed. Decreased pMEK staining in the responsive tumors confirmed that B-Raf was targeted by pazopanib. Interestingly, pazopanib inhibition of tumor cell B-Raf also correlated with its anti-angiogenic activity, as quantified by vessel density and area. In conclusion, using pazopanib, tumor B-Raf status was identified as a significant determinant of both tumor growth and angiogenesis.

  19. The B-Raf Status of Tumor Cells May Be a Significant Determinant of Both Antitumor and Anti-Angiogenic Effects of Pazopanib in Xenograft Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Gril, Brunilde; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yong; Anwar, Talha; Ileva, Lilia; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter; Liewehr, David J.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2011-01-01

    Pazopanib is an FDA approved Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor inhibitor. We previously reported that it also inhibits tumor cell B-Raf activity in an experimental brain metastatic setting. Here, we determine the effects of different B-Raf genotypes on pazopanib efficacy, in terms of primary tumor growth and anti-angiogenesis. A panel of seven human breast cancer and melanoma cell lines harboring different mutations in the Ras-Raf pathway was implanted orthotopically in mice, and tumor growth, ERK1/2, MEK1/2 and AKT activation, and blood vessel density and permeability were analyzed. Pazopanib was significantly inhibitory to xenografts expressing either exon 11 mutations of B-Raf, or HER2 activated wild type B-Raf; no significant inhibition of a xenograft expressing the common V600E B-Raf mutation was observed. Decreased pMEK staining in the responsive tumors confirmed that B-Raf was targeted by pazopanib. Interestingly, pazopanib inhibition of tumor cell B-Raf also correlated with its anti-angiogenic activity, as quantified by vessel density and area. In conclusion, using pazopanib, tumor B-Raf status was identified as a significant determinant of both tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:21998674

  20. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors,more » genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.« less

  1. AZD1152, a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase, inhibits human tumor xenograft growth by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Heaton, Simon P; Wedge, Stephen R; Keen, Nicholas J; Crafter, Claire; Foster, John R; Brady, Madeleine C; Bigley, Alison; Brown, Elaine; Byth, Kate F; Barrass, Nigel C; Mundt, Kirsten E; Foote, Kevin M; Heron, Nicola M; Jung, Frederic H; Mortlock, Andrew A; Boyle, F Thomas; Green, Stephen

    2007-06-15

    In the current study, we examined the in vivo effects of AZD1152, a novel and specific inhibitor of Aurora kinase activity (with selectivity for Aurora B). The pharmacodynamic effects and efficacy of AZD1152 were determined in a panel of human tumor xenograft models. AZD1152 was dosed via several parenteral (s.c. osmotic mini-pump, i.p., and i.v.) routes. AZD1152 potently inhibited the growth of human colon, lung, and hematologic tumor xenografts (mean tumor growth inhibition range, 55% to > or =100%; P < 0.05) in immunodeficient mice. Detailed pharmacodynamic analysis in colorectal SW620 tumor-bearing athymic rats treated i.v. with AZD1152 revealed a temporal sequence of phenotypic events in tumors: transient suppression of histone H3 phosphorylation followed by accumulation of 4N DNA in cells (2.4-fold higher compared with controls) and then an increased proportion of polyploid cells (>4N DNA, 2.3-fold higher compared with controls). Histologic analysis showed aberrant cell division that was concurrent with an increase in apoptosis in AZD1152-treated tumors. Bone marrow analyses revealed transient myelosuppression with the drug that was fully reversible following cessation of AZD1152 treatment. These data suggest that selective targeting of Aurora B kinase may be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of a range of malignancies. In addition to the suppression of histone H3 phosphorylation, determination of tumor cell polyploidy and apoptosis may be useful biomarkers for this class of therapeutic agent. AZD1152 is currently in phase I trials.

  2. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [ 18 F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R 2 >0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95xenograft tumor radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Xenograft tumors derived from malignant pleural effusion of the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer as models to explore drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunhua; Zhang, Feifei; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wang, Guan; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wen, Danyi; Lu, Shun

    2018-05-09

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions show dramatic responses to specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, after 10-12 months, secondary mutations arise that confer resistance. We generated a murine xenograft model using patient-derived NSCLC cells isolated from the pleural fluid of two patients with NSCLC to investigate the mechanisms of resistance against the ALK- and EGFR-targeted TKIs crizotinib and osimertinib, respectively. Genotypes of patient biopsies and xenograft tumors were determined by whole exome sequencing (WES), and patients and xenograft-bearing mice received targeted treatment (crizotinib or osimertinib) accordingly. Xenograft mice were also treated for prolonged periods to identify whether the development of drug resistance and/or treatment responses were associated with tumor size. Finally, the pathology of patients biopsies and xenograft tumors were compared histologically. The histological characteristics and chemotherapy responses of xenograft tumors were similar to the actual patients. WES showed that the genotypes of the xenograft and patient tumors were similar (an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK (EML4-ALK) gene fusion (patient/xenograft: CTC15035 EML4-ALK ) and EGFR L858R and T790M mutations (patient/xenograft: CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M )). After continuous crizotinib or osimertinib treatment, WES data suggested that acquired ALK E1210K mutation conferred crizotinib resistance in the CTC15035 EML4-ALK xenograft, while decreased frequencies of EGFR L858R and T790M mutations plus the appearance of v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) G7V mutations and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit type 2 alpha (PIK3C2A) A86fs frame shift mutations led to osimertinib resistance in the CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M xenografts. We successfully developed a new method of generating

  4. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin, indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when combined with a four-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Finally, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the CSC hypothesis for cancer relapse, an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings, and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients.

  5. Stereotactic intracranial implantation and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of tumor xenografts in a mouse model system of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Brian C; Dorsey, Jay F; Benci, Joseph L; Joh, Daniel Y; Kao, Gary D

    2012-09-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a high-grade primary brain cancer with a median survival of only 14.6 months in humans despite standard tri-modality treatment consisting of surgical resection, post-operative radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are clearly needed to improve patient survival and quality of life. The development of more effective treatment strategies would be aided by animal models of GBM that recapitulate human disease yet allow serial imaging to monitor tumor growth and treatment response. In this paper, we describe our technique for the precise stereotactic implantation of bio-imageable GBM cancer cells into the brains of nude mice resulting in tumor xenografts that recapitulate key clinical features of GBM. This method yields tumors that are reproducible and are located in precise anatomic locations while allowing in vivo bioluminescent imaging to serially monitor intracranial xenograft growth and response to treatments. This method is also well-tolerated by the animals with low perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  6. Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Michal T.; Noble, Charles O.; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Drummond, Daryl; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Yamashita, Yoji; Kullberg, Erika; Forsayeth, John; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors. PMID:17652269

  7. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition in a preclinical xenograft tumor model of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korets, Sharmilee Bansal; Musa, Fernanda; Curtin, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Schneider, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Up to 70% of endometrioid endometrial cancers carry PTEN gene deletions that can upregulate mTOR activity. Investigational mTOR kinase inhibitors may provide a novel therapeutic approach for these tumors. Using a xenograft tumor model of endometrial cancer, we assessed the activity of mTOR and downstream effector proteins in the mTOR translational control pathway after treatment with a dual mTOR Complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) catalytic inhibitor (PP242) compared to that of an allosteric mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor (everolimus, RAD001). Methods Grade 3 endometrioid endometrial cancer cells (AN3CA) were xenografted into nude mice. Animals were treated with PP242; PP242 and carboplatin; carboplatin; RAD001; RAD001 and carboplatin. Mean tumor volume was compared across groups by ANOVA. Immunoblot analysis was performed to assess mTORC1/2 activity using P-Akt, P-S6 and P-4E-BP1. Results The mean tumor volume of PP242 + carboplatin was significantly lower than in all other treatment groups, P<0.001 (89% smaller). The RAD001 + carboplatin group was also smaller, but this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.097). Immunoblot analysis of tumor lysates treated with PP242 demonstrated inhibition of activated P-Akt. Conclusions Catalytic mTORC1/2 inhibition demonstrates clear efficacy in tumor growth control that is enhanced by the addition of a DNA damage agent, carboplatin. Targeting mTORC1/2 leads to inhibition of Akt activation and strong downregulation of effectors of mTORC1, resulting in downregulation of protein synthesis. Based on this study, mTORC1/2 kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation as a potential treatment for endometrial cancer. PMID:24316308

  8. Dll4 Blockade Potentiates the Anti-Tumor Effects of VEGF Inhibition in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kiersten Marie; Seshadri, Mukund; Ciamporcero, Eric; Adelaiye, Remi; Gillard, Bryan; Sotomayor, Paula; Attwood, Kristopher; Shen, Li; Conroy, Dylan; Kuhnert, Frank; Lalani, Alshad S.; Thurston, Gavin; Pili, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4) is highly expressed in vascular endothelium and has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. Blockade of the Dll4-Notch pathway in preclinical cancer models has been associated with non-productive angiogenesis and reduced tumor growth. Given the cross-talk between the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Delta-Notch pathways in tumor angiogenesis, we examined the activity of a function-blocking Dll4 antibody, REGN1035, alone and in combination with anti-VEGF therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Results Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing patient-derived clear cell RCC xenografts were treated with REGN1035 and in combination with the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib or the VEGF blocker ziv-aflibercept. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses were carried out, as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations pre and 24 hours and 2 weeks post treatment. Single agent treatment with REGN1035 resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition (36–62%) that was equivalent to or exceeded the single agent anti-tumor activity of the VEGF pathway inhibitors sunitinib (38–54%) and ziv-aflibercept (46%). Importantly, combination treatments with REGN1035 plus VEGF inhibitors resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects (72–80% growth inhibition), including some tumor regression. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a marked decrease in tumor perfusion in all treatment groups. Interestingly, anti-tumor efficacy of the combination of REGN1035 and ziv-aflibercept was also observed in a sunitinib resistant ccRCC model. Conclusions Overall, these findings demonstrate the potent anti-tumor activity of Dll4 blockade in RCC patient-derived tumors and a combination benefit for the simultaneous targeting of the Dll4 and VEGF signaling pathways, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this treatment modality in RCC. PMID:25393540

  9. Correlation of FMISO simulations with pimonidazole-stained tumor xenografts: A question of O{sub 2} consumption?

    SciTech Connect

    Wack, L. J., E-mail: linda-jacqueline.wack@med.uni

    Purpose: To compare a dedicated simulation model for hypoxia PET against tumor microsections stained for different parameters of the tumor microenvironment. The model can readily be adapted to a variety of conditions, such as different human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft tumors. Methods: Nine different HNSCC tumor models were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Tumors were excised and immunoflourescently labeled with pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342, and CD31, providing information on hypoxia, perfusion, and vessel distribution, respectively. Hoechst and CD31 images were used to generate maps of perfused blood vessels on which tissue oxygenation and the accumulation of themore » hypoxia tracer FMISO were mathematically simulated. The model includes a Michaelis–Menten relation to describe the oxygen consumption inside tissue. The maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} was chosen as the parameter for a tumor-specific optimization as it strongly influences tracer distribution. M{sub 0} was optimized on each tumor slice to reach optimum correlations between FMISO concentration 4 h postinjection and pimonidazole staining intensity. Results: After optimization, high pixel-based correlations up to R{sup 2} = 0.85 were found for individual tissue sections. Experimental pimonidazole images and FMISO simulations showed good visual agreement, confirming the validity of the approach. Median correlations per tumor model varied significantly (p < 0.05), with R{sup 2} ranging from 0.20 to 0.54. The optimum maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} differed significantly (p < 0.05) between tumor models, ranging from 2.4 to 5.2 mm Hg/s. Conclusions: It is feasible to simulate FMISO distributions that match the pimonidazole retention patterns observed in vivo. Good agreement was obtained for multiple tumor models by optimizing the oxygen consumption rate, M{sub 0}, whose optimum value differed significantly between tumor models.« less

  10. Role of host microenvironment in angiogenesis and microvascular functions in human breast cancer xenografts: mammary fat pad versus cranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Monsky, Wayne L; Mouta Carreira, Carla; Tsuzuki, Yoshikazu; Gohongi, Takeshi; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2002-04-01

    The host microenvironment differs between primary and metastatic sites, affecting gene expression and various physiological functions. Here we show the differences in the physiological parameters between orthotopic primary and metastatic breast tumor xenografts using intravital microscopy and reveal the relationship between angiogenic gene expression and microvascular functions in vivo. ZR75-1, a human estrogen-dependent mammary carcinoma, was implanted into the mammary fat pad (primary site) of ovariectomized SCID female mice carrying estrogen pellets. The same tumor line was also grown in the cranial window (metastasis site). When tumors reached the diameter of 2.5 mm, angiogenesis, hemodynamics, and vascular permeability were measured by intravital microscopy, and expression of angiogenic growth factors was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. ZR75-1 tumors grown in the mammary fat pad had higher microvascular permeability but lower vascular density than the same tumors grown in the cranial window (2.5- and 0.7-fold, respectively). There was no significant difference in RBC velocity, vessel diameter, blood flow rate, and shear rate between two sites. The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, and angiopoietin-1 mRNA tended to be higher in the mammary fat pad tumors than in the cranial tumors (1.5-, 1.5-, 3-, and 2-fold, respectively). The primary breast cancer exhibited higher vascular permeability, but the cranial tumor showed more angiogenesis, suggesting that the cranial environment is leakage resistant but proangiogenic. Collectively, host microenvironment is an important determinant of tumor gene expression and microvascular functions, and, thus, orthotopic breast tumor models should be useful for obtaining clinically relevant information.

  11. Monitoring Sunitinib-Induced Vascular Effects to Optimize Radiotherapy Combined with Soy Isoflavones in Murine Xenograft Tumor1

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Gilda Gali; Singh-Gupta, Vinita; Al-Bashir, Areen K; Yunker, Christopher K; Joiner, Michael C; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Abrams, Judith; Haacke, E Mark

    2011-01-01

    Using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to monitor vascular changes induced by sunitinib within a murine xenograft kidney tumor, we previously determined a dose that caused only partial destruction of blood vessels leading to “normalization” of tumor vasculature and improved blood flow. In the current study, kidney tumors were treated with this dose of sunitinib to modify the tumor microenvironment and enhance the effect of kidney tumor irradiation. The addition of soy isoflavones to this combined antiangiogenic and radiotherapy approach was investigated based on our studies demonstrating that soy isoflavones can potentiate the radiation effect on the tumors and act as antioxidants to protect normal tissues from treatment-induced toxicity. DCE-MRI was used to monitor vascular changes induced by sunitinib and schedule radiation when the uptake and washout of the contrast agent indicated regularization of blood flow. The combination of sunitinib with tumor irradiation and soy isoflavones significantly inhibited the growth and invasion of established kidney tumors and caused marked aberrations in the morphology of residual tumor cells. DCE-MRI studies demonstrated that the three modalities, sunitinib, radiation, and soy isoflavones, also exerted antiangiogenic effects resulting in increased uptake and clearance of the contrast agent. Interestingly, DCE-MRI and histologic observations of the normal contralateral kidneys suggest that soy could protect the vasculature of normal tissue from the adverse effects of sunitinib. An antiangiogenic approach that only partially destroys inefficient vessels could potentially increase the efficacy and delivery of cytotoxic therapies and radiotherapy for unresectable primary renal cell carcinoma tumors and metastatic disease. PMID:21461174

  12. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis ofmore » tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.« less

  13. Scaffold-integrated microchips for end-to-end in vitro tumor cell attachment and xenograft formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Kohl, Nathaniel; Shanbhang, Sachin; Parekkadan, Biju

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic technologies have substantially advanced cancer research by enabling the isolation of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The characterization of isolated CTCs has been limited due to the difficulty in recovering and growing isolated cells with high fidelity. Here, we present a strategy that uses a 3D scaffold, integrated into a microfludic device, as a transferable substrate that can be readily isolated after device operation for serial use in vivo as a transplanted tissue bed. Hydrogel scaffolds were incorporated into a PDMS fluidic chamber prior to bonding and were rehydrated in the chamber after fluid contact. The hydrogel matrix completely filled the fluid chamber, significantly increasing the surface area to volume ratio, and could be directly visualized under a microscope. Computational modeling defined different flow and pressure regimes that guided the conditions used to operate the chip. As a proof of concept using a model cell line, we confirmed human prostate tumor cell attachment in the microfluidic scaffold chip, retrieval of the scaffold en masse, and serial implantation of the scaffold to a mouse model with preserved xenograft development. With further improvement in capture efficiency, this approach can offer an end-to-end platform for the continuous study of isolated cancer cells from a biological fluid to a xenograft in mice.

  14. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro. PMID:28422711

  15. A xenograft model reveals that PU.1 functions as a tumor suppressor for multiple myeloma in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Nao; Endo, Shinya; Ueno, Shikiko

    We previously demonstrated that PU.1 expression is down-regulated in the majority of myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells from patients. We introduced the tet-off system into the human myeloma cell lines U266 and KMS12PE that conditionally express PU.1 and demonstrated that PU.1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells in vitro. Here, we established a mouse xenograft model of myeloma using these cell lines to analyze the effects of PU.1 on the phenotype of myeloma cells in vivo. When doxycycline was added to the drinking water of mice engrafted with these myeloma cells, all mice had continuous growth ofmore » subcutaneous tumors and could not survived more than 65 days. In contrast, mice that were not exposed to doxycycline did not develop subcutaneous tumors and survived for at least 100 days. We next generated mice engrafted with subcutaneous tumors 5–10 mm in diameter that were induced by exposure to doxycycline. Half of the mice stopped taking doxycycline-containing water, whereas the other half kept taking the water. Although the tumors in the mice taking doxycycline continued to grow, tumor growth in the mice not taking doxycycline was significantly suppressed. The myeloma cells in the tumors of the mice not taking doxycycline expressed PU.1 and TRAIL and many of such cells were apoptotic. Moreover, the expression of a cell proliferation marker Ki67 was significantly decreased in tumors from the mice not taking doxycycline, compared with that of tumors from the mice continuously taking doxycycline. The present data strongly suggest that PU.1 functions as a tumor suppressor of myeloma cells in vivo. - Highlights: • PU.1 suppresses xenograft myeloma cell growth and prolongs survival periods of mice. • PU.1 induces TRAIL expression and apoptosis in myeloma cells in vivo. • PU.1 suppresses Ki67 expression in myeloma cells in vivo. • Up-regulation of PU.1 is a promising strategy for generating anti-myeloma agents.« less

  16. A Dual Tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET Imaging of an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Ong, Lai-Chun; Ranganath, Sudhir H; Zheng, Lin; Kee, Irene; Zhan, Wenbo; Yu, Sidney; Chow, Pierce K H; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of low grade glioma has been a challenge to clinicians. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using 18F-FDG as a radio-tracer has limited utility in this area because of the high background in normal brain tissue. Other radiotracers such as 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) could provide better contrast between tumor and normal brain tissue but with high incidence of false positives. In this study, the potential application of a dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET is investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of PET imaging for low grade glioma diagnosis based on a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice with and without orthotopic glioma xenografts from U87 MG-luc2 glioma cell line are used for the study. The animals are subjected to 18F-FCH and 18F-FDG PET imaging, and images acquired from two separate scans are superimposed for analysis. The 18F-FCH counts are subtracted from the merged images to identify the tumor. Micro-CT, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), histology and measurement of the tumor diameter are also conducted for comparison. Results show that there is a significant contrast in 18F-FCH uptake between tumor and normal brain tissue (2.65 ± 0.98), but with a high false positive rate of 28.6%. The difficulty of identifying the tumor by 18F-FDG only is also proved in this study. All the tumors can be detected based on the dual tracer technique of 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET imaging in this study, while the false-positive caused by 18F-FCH can be eliminated. Dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET imaging has the potential to improve the visualization of low grade glioma. 18F-FCH delineates tumor areas and the tumor can be identified by subtracting the 18F-FCH counts. The sensitivity was over 95%. Further studies are required to evaluate the possibility of applying this technique in clinical trials.

  17. A Dual Tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET Imaging of an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Sudhir H.; Zheng, Lin; Kee, Irene; Zhan, Wenbo; Yu, Sidney; Chow, Pierce K. H.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of low grade glioma has been a challenge to clinicians. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using 18F-FDG as a radio-tracer has limited utility in this area because of the high background in normal brain tissue. Other radiotracers such as 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) could provide better contrast between tumor and normal brain tissue but with high incidence of false positives. In this study, the potential application of a dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET is investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of PET imaging for low grade glioma diagnosis based on a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice with and without orthotopic glioma xenografts from U87 MG-luc2 glioma cell line are used for the study. The animals are subjected to 18F-FCH and 18F-FDG PET imaging, and images acquired from two separate scans are superimposed for analysis. The 18F-FCH counts are subtracted from the merged images to identify the tumor. Micro-CT, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), histology and measurement of the tumor diameter are also conducted for comparison. Results show that there is a significant contrast in 18F-FCH uptake between tumor and normal brain tissue (2.65 ± 0.98), but with a high false positive rate of 28.6%. The difficulty of identifying the tumor by 18F-FDG only is also proved in this study. All the tumors can be detected based on the dual tracer technique of 18F-FCH/ 18F-FDG-PET imaging in this study, while the false-positive caused by 18F-FCH can be eliminated. Dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET imaging has the potential to improve the visualization of low grade glioma. 18F-FCH delineates tumor areas and the tumor can be identified by subtracting the 18F-FCH counts. The sensitivity was over 95%. Further studies are required to evaluate the possibility of applying this technique in clinical trials. PMID:26844770

  18. Tumor-specific novel taxoid-monoclonal antibody conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao; Geng, Xudong; Wu, Xinyuan; Qu, Chuanxing; Borella, Christopher P; Xie, Hongsheng; Wilhelm, Sharon D; Leece, Barbara A; Bartle, Laura M; Goldmacher, Victor S; Chari, Ravi V J

    2002-12-19

    Taxoids bearing methyldisulfanyl(alkanoyl) groups for taxoid-antibody immunoconjugates were designed, synthesized and their activities evaluated. A highly cytotoxic C-10 methyldisulfanylpropanoyl taxoid was conjugated to monoclonal antibodies recognizing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressed in human squamous cancers. These conjugates were shown to possess remarkable target-specific antitumor activity in vivo against EGFR-expressing A431 tumor xenografts in severe combined immune deficiency mice, resulting in complete inhibition of tumor growth in all the treated mice.

  19. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 Technology-Based Xenograft Tumors as Candidate Reference Materials for Multiple EML4-ALK Rearrangements Testing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rongxue; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Yang, Xin; Li, Ziyang; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Jinming

    2017-09-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase (EML4-ALK) rearrangement is an important biomarker that plays a pivotal role in therapeutic decision making for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Ensuring accuracy and reproducibility of EML4-ALK testing by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing requires reliable reference materials for monitoring assay sensitivity and specificity. Herein, we developed novel reference materials for various kinds of EML4-ALK testing. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to edit various NSCLC cell lines containing EML4-ALK rearrangement variants 1, 2, and 3a/b. After s.c. inoculation, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from xenografts were prepared and tested for suitability as candidate reference materials by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing. Sample validation and commutability assessments showed that all types of FFPE samples derived from xenograft tumors have typical histological structures, and EML4-ALK testing results were similar to the clinical ALK-positive NSCLC specimens. Among the four methods for EML4-ALK detection, the validation test showed 100% concordance. Furthermore, these novel FFPE reference materials showed good stability and homogeneity. Without limitations on variant types and production, our novel FFPE samples based on CRISPR/Cas9 editing and xenografts are suitable as candidate reference materials for the validation, verification, internal quality control, and proficiency testing of EML4-ALK detection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracellular domain shedding influences specific tumor uptake and organ distribution of the EGFR PET tracer 89Zr-imgatuzumab.

    PubMed

    Pool, Martin; Kol, Arjan; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Gerdes, Christian A; de Jong, Steven; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T

    2016-10-18

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging revealed a mismatch between in vivo epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and EGFR antibody tracer tumor uptake. Shed EGFR ectodomain (sEGFR), which is present in cancer patient sera, can potentially bind tracer and therefore influence tracer kinetics. To optimize EGFR-PET, we examined the influence of sEGFR levels on tracer kinetics and tumor uptake of EGFR monoclonal antibody 89Zr-imgatuzumab in varying xenograft models. Human cancer cell lines A431 (EGFR overexpressing, epidermoid), A549 and H441 (both EGFR medium expressing, non-small cell lung cancer) were xenografted in mice. Xenografted mice received 10, 25 or 160 μg 89Zr-imgatuzumab, co-injected with equal doses 111In-IgG control. MicroPET scans were made 24, 72 and 144 h post injection, followed by biodistribution analysis. sEGFR levels in liver and plasma samples were determined by ELISA. 89Zr-imgatuzumab uptake in A431 tumors was highest (29.8 ± 5.4 %ID/g) in the 160 μg dose group. Contrary, highest uptake in A549 and H441 tumors was found at the lowest (10 μg) 89Zr-imgatuzumab dose. High 89Zr-imgatuzumab liver accumulation was found in A431 xenografted mice, which decreased with antibody dose increments. 89Zr-imgatuzumab liver uptake in A549 and H441 xenografted mice was low at all doses. sEGFR levels in liver and plasma of A431 bearing mice were up to 1000-fold higher than levels found in A549, H441 and non-tumor xenografted mice. 89Zr-imgatuzumab effectively visualizes EGFR-expressing tumors. High sEGFR levels can redirect 89Zr-imgatuzumab to the liver, in which case tumor visualization can be improved by increasing tracer antibody dose.

  2. Cisplatin and photodynamic therapy exert synergistic inhibitory effects on small-cell lung cancer cell viability and xenograft tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, You-Shuang; Peng, Yin-Bo; Yao, Min

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer that shows an overall 5-year survival rate below 10%. Although chemotherapy using cisplatin has been proven effective in SCLC treatment, conventional dose of cisplatin causes adverse side effects. Photodynamic therapy, a form of non-ionizing radiation therapy, is increasingly used alone or in combination with other therapeutics in cancer treatment. Herein, we aimed to address whether low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can effectively induce SCLC cell death by using in vitro cultured human SCLC NCI-H446 cells and in vivo tumor xenograft model.more » We found that both cisplatin and PDT showed dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in NCI-H446 cells. Importantly, co-treatment with low dose cisplatin (1 μM) and PDT (1.25 J/cm{sup 2}) synergistically inhibited cell viability and cell migration. We further showed that the combined therapy induced a higher level of intracellular ROS in cultured NCI-H446 cells. Moreover, the synergistic effect by cisplatin and PDT was recapitulated in tumor xenograft as revealed by a more robust increase in the staining of TUNEL (a marker of cell death) and decrease in tumor volume. Taken together, our findings suggest that low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can be an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of SCLC patients.« less

  3. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and Is Up-Regulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Evan C; Karl, Taylor A; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K; O'Brien, Catherine A; Longacre, Teri A; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R; Clarke, Michael F; Rothenberg, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 DM colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib after injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5 associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cells. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44(+) cells indicated that KIT can promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT(+) colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in mice. KIT and

  4. Antibody-directed neutralization of annexin II (ANX II) inhibits neoangiogenesis and human breast tumor growth in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meena; Blackman, Marc R; Sharma, Mahesh C

    2012-02-01

    Activation of the fibrinolytic pathway has long been associated with human breast cancer. Plasmin is the major end product of the fibrinolytic pathway and is critical for normal physiological functions. The mechanism by which plasmin is generated in breast cancer is not yet fully described. We previously identified annexin II (ANX II), a fibrinolytic receptor, in human breast tumor tissue samples and observed a strong positive correlation with advanced stage cancer (Sharma et al., 2006a). We further demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) binds to ANX II in invasive breast cancer MDA-MB231cells, which leads to plasmin generation (Sharma et al., 2010). We hypothesize that ANX II-dependent plasmin generation in breast tumor is necessary to trigger the switch to neoangiogenesis, thereby stimulating a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Our immunohistochemical studies of human breast tumor tissues provide compelling evidence of a strong positive correlation between ANX II expression and neoangiogenesis, and suggest that ANX II is a potential target to slow or inhibit breast tumor growth by inhibiting neoangiogenesis. We now report that administration of anti-ANX II antibody potently inhibits the growth of human breast tumor in a xenograft model. Inhibition of tumor growth is at least partly due to attenuation of neoangiogenic activity within the tumor. In vitro studies demonstrate that anti-ANX II antibody inhibits angiogenesis on three dimensional matrigel cultures by eliciting endothelial cell (EC) death likely due to apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that selective disruption of the fibrinolytic activity of ANX II may provide a novel strategy for specific inhibition of neoangiogenesis in human breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@yahoo.d; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas aftermore » IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.« less

  6. Combined magnetic resonance and optical imaging of head and neck tumor xenografts using Gadolinium-labelled phosphorescent polymeric nanomicelles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The overall objective of this study was to develop a nanoparticle formulation for dual modality imaging of head and neck cancer. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of polymeric phospholipid-based nanomicelles encapsulating near-infrared (NIR) phosphorescent molecules of Pt(II)-tetraphenyltetranaphthoporphyrin [Pt(TPNP)] and surface functionalized with gadolinium [Pt(TPNP)-Gd] for combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and NIR optical imaging applications. Methods Dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy and MR relaxometric measurements were performed to characterize the optical and magnetic properties of nanoparticles in vitro. Subsequently, in vivo imaging experiments were carried out using nude mice bearing primary patient tumor-derived human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts. Results The nanomicelles were ~100 nm in size and stable in aqueous suspension. T1-weighted MRI and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) measurements carried out at 4.7 T revealed enhancement in the tumor immediately post injection with nanomicelles, particularly in the tumor periphery which persisted up to 24 hours post administration. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs) generated from 3D T1-weighted images also demonstrated visible enhancement in contrast within the tumor, liver and blood vessels. NIR optical imaging performed (in vivo and ex vivo) following completion of MRI at the 24 h time point confirmed tumor localization of the nanoparticles. The large spectral separation between the Pt(TPNP) absorption (~700 nm) and phosphorescence emission (~900 nm) provided a dramatic decrease in the level of background, resulting in high contrast optical (NIR phosphorescence) imaging. Conclusions In conclusion, Pt(TPNP)-Gd nanomicelles exhibit a high degree of tumor-avidity and favorable imaging properties that allow for combined MR and optical imaging of head and neck tumors. Further investigation into the potential of Pt

  7. Filamentous, mixed micelles of triblock copolymers enhance tumor localization of indocyanine green in a murine xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hee; Mount, Christopher W; Dulken, Benjamin W; Ramos, Jenelyn; Fu, Caroline J; Khant, Htet A; Chiu, Wah; Gombotz, Wayne R; Pun, Suzie H

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric micelles formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers can be used to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs for tumor-delivery applications. Filamentous carriers with high aspect ratios offer potential advantages over spherical carriers, including prolonged circulation times. In this work, mixed micelles comprised of poly (ethylene oxide)-poly-[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate]-poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO-PHB-PEO) and Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) were used to encapsulate a near-infrared fluorophore. The micelle formulations were assessed for tumor accumulation after tail vein injection to xenograft tumor-bearing mice by non-invasive optical imaging. The mixed micelle formulation that facilitated the highest tumor accumulation was shown by cryo-electron microscopy to be filamentous in structure compared to spherical structures of pure PF-127 micelles. In addition, increased dye loading efficiency and dye stability was attained in this mixed micelle formulation compared to pure PEO-PHB-PEO micelles. Therefore, the optimized PEO-PHB-PEO/PF-127 mixed micelle formulation offers advantages for cancer delivery over micelles formed from the individual copolymer components. PMID:22118658

  8. Evaluation of anti-tumorigenic activity of BP3B against colon cancer with patient-derived tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Youn; Kim, Jinhee; Ha Thi, Huyen Trang; Bang, Ok-Sun; Lee, Won-Suk; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-11-18

    KIOM-CRC#BP3B (BP3B) is a novel herbal prescription that is composed of three plant extracts. Our preliminary study identified that BP3B exhibited potent anti-proliferative activity against various types of cancer cell lines in vitro. Because the in vivo anti-tumor effect of BP3B is not evaluated before clinical trial, we want to test it using patient's samples. To confirm the in vivo anti-cancer effect of BP3B, we used genetically characterized patient-derived colon tumor xenograft (PDTX) mouse model. Anti-cancer activity was evaluated with apoptosis, proliferation, angiogenesis and histological analysis. Oral administration of BP3B significantly inhibited the tumor growth in two PDTX models. Furthermore, TUNEL assay showed that BP3B induced apoptosis of tumor tissues, which was associated with degradation of PARP and Caspase 8 and activation of Caspase 3. We also observed that BP3B inhibited cancer cell proliferation by down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and induction of p27 proteins. Inhibition of angiogenesis in BP3B-treated group was observed with immunofluorescence staining using CD31 and Tie-2 antibodies. These findings indicated that BP3B has a strong growth-inhibitory activity against colon cancer in in vivo model and will be a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of refractory colon cancer.

  9. Effects of histone deacetylase inhibitory prodrugs on epigenetic changes and DNA damage response in tumor and heart of glioblastoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Nataly; Nudelman, Abraham; Rozic, Gabriela; Cutts, Suzanne M; Rephaeli, Ada

    2017-08-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitory prodrugs of butyric (AN7) and valproic (AN446) acids, which release the active acids upon metabolic degradation, were studied examining their differential effects on the viability, HDAC inhibitory activity and the DNA damage response (DDR), in glioblastoma cell and normal human astrocytes (NHAs). In xenografts of glioblastoma, AN7 or AN446 given or the combination of each of them with Dox augmented the anticancer activity of Dox and protected the heart from its toxicity. In order to determine the processes underlying these opposing effects, the changes induced by these treatments on the epigenetic landscape, the DDR, and fibrosis were compared in tumors and hearts of glioblastoma xenografts. The potency of AN7 and AN446 as HDAC inhibitors was correlated with their effects on the viability of the cancer and non-cancer cells. The prodrugs affected the epigenetic landscape and the DDR in a tissue-specific and context-dependent manner. Findings suggest that the selectivity of the prodrugs could be attributed to their different effects on histone modification patterns in normal vs. transformed tissues. Further studies are warranted to substantiate the potential of AN446 as a new anticancer drug for glioblastoma patients.

  10. HeLa cell line xenograft tumor as a suitable cervical cancer model: growth kinetic characterization and immunohistochemistry array.

    PubMed

    Arjomandnejad, Motahareh; Muhammadnejad, Ahad; Haddadi, Mahnaz; Sherkat-Khameneh, Narjes; Rismanchi, Sanaz; Amanpour, Saeid; Muhammadnejad, Samad

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the seventh most common malignancy in both genders combined and the third most common cancer in women. Despite significant progress in treatments, cervical cancer is not completely curable. Therefore, further research is necessary in this area. Animal models are one of the most practical tools in the field of cancer research. The present study aimed to characterize the growth behavior and surface markers of HeLa cells after heterotopic and systemic inoculation to athymic nude mice. Ten 6-week old female athymic C57BL/6 nude mice were used in this study. HeLa cells were inoculated into the flank or tail vein. The tumor volume was calculated and growth curves were drawn. Tumor-bearing mice were sacrificed and the lesions obtained after harvesting were analyzed in a pathology lab. Subsequently, one slide per tumor was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and other slides were stained immunohistochemically by cytokeratins (CK), vimentin, P53, CD34, and Ki-67. Tumor take rate, mean doubling time and latency period were 94.4%, 5.29 ± 3.57 days and 15.27 days, respectively. H&E results revealed highly malignant hyperchromatin epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical examination of the heterotopic tumors indicated greater expression of CK and less expression of vimentin compared to the metastatic ones. Sixty percent of cells were P53-positive and more than 80% were Ki-67-positive. CD34 expression indicated the intensity of angiogenesis in tumor. This study represents a comprehensive description of a HeLa xenograft model for in vivo investigations, enabling researchers to assess new treatments for cervical cancer.

  11. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K.; Siddik, Zahid H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT) relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC). When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin), proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1) and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF), all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3) in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity. PMID:29311914

  12. Molecular Pathology of Patient Tumors, Patient-Derived Xenografts, and Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Qian, Wubin; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Likun; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has generated abundant genomic data for human cancers of various histopathology types and enabled exploring cancer molecular pathology per big data approach. We developed a new algorithm based on most differentially expressed genes (DEG) per pairwise comparisons to calculate correlation coefficients to be used to quantify similarity within and between cancer types. We systematically compared TCGA cancers, demonstrating high correlation within types and low correlation between types, thus establishing molecular specificity of cancer types and an alternative diagnostic method largely equivalent to histopathology. Different coefficients for different cancers in study may reveal that the degree of the within-type homogeneity varies by cancer types. We also performed the same calculation using the TCGA-derived DEGs on patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of different histopathology types corresponding to the TCGA types, as well as on cancer cell lines. We, for the first time, demonstrated highly similar patterns for within- and between-type correlation between PDXs and patient samples in a systematic study, confirming the high relevance of PDXs as surrogate experimental models for human diseases. In contrast, cancer cell lines have drastically reduced expression similarity to both PDXs and patient samples. The studies also revealed high similarity between some types, for example, LUSC and HNSCC, but low similarity between certain subtypes, for example, LUAD and LUSC. Our newly developed algorithm seems to be a practical diagnostic method to classify and reclassify a disease, either human or xenograft, with better accuracy than traditional histopathology. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4619-26. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Interstitial laser photochemotherapy with new anthrapyrazole drugs for the treatment of xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Paiva, M B; Saxton, R E; Letts, G A; Chung, P S; Soudant, J; Vanderwerf, Q; Castro, D J

    1995-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with lasers and new dyes has gained popularity in recent years as a minimally invasive technique with high tumoricidal effects in vitro and in some cancer patients. However, because new laser dyes are not FDA approved at present, the clinical evaluation of PDT may be years away. During the past 6 years we have used laser alone for photothermal ablation in both preclinical studies and in a large number of patients with an observed 60% tumor response rate. The 40% treatment failure led us to explore the possibility of combined therapy with lasers and standard chemotherapeutic drugs. We have recently tested a promising preclinical alternative using implantation of a bare 600-microns KTP 532 laser fiberoptic in multiple tumor sites 30 min after intratumor injection of the anthrapyrazole DUP-941. As a control, this drug was injected in 3 sites of P3 human squamous cell tumor transplants in nude mice, which led to tumor stasis without regression. Similar 400-600 mm3 tumors exposed to laser illumination alone (0.8 W for 5 sec) at multiple sites resulted in tumor regrowth after 10 weeks in 80% of the animals. However, combining interstitial laser illumination with intratumor DUP-941 injections led to complete tumor regression in 85% of the mice. We propose that intratumor drug injection followed by interstitial laser fiberoptic treatment represents a potentially useful new method for tumor ablation in advanced cancer patients.

  14. Human tumor xenografts in mouse as a model for evaluating therapeutic efficacy of monoclonal antibodies or antibody-drug conjugate targeting receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Wang, Wei; Yao, Hang-Ping; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Ming-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases by therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates has met with tremendous success in clinical oncology. Currently, numerous therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are under preclinical development. The potential for moving candidate antibodies into clinical trials relies heavily on therapeutic efficacy validated by human tumor xenografts in mice. Here we describe methods used to determine therapeutic efficacy of monoclonal antibodies or antibody-drug conjugates specific to human receptor tyrosine kinase using human tumor xenografts in mice as the model. The end point of the study is to determine whether treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a monoclonal antibody or antibody-drug conjugates results in significant delay of tumor growth.

  15. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    PubMed

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  16. Biodistribution and Safety Assessment of Bladder Cancer Specific Recombinant Oncolytic Adenovirus in Subcutaneous Xenografts Tumor Model in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Zhiping; Tian, Hongwei; Qi, Meijiao; Zhai, Zhenxing; Li, Shuwen; Li, Renju; Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Wenyun; Fu, Shenjun; Lu, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Ronald; Guo, Yinglu; Zhou, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    Background The previous works about safety evaluation for constructed bladder tissue specific adenovirus are poorly documented. Thus, we investigated the biodistribution and body toxicity of bladder specific oncolytic adenovirus Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A (APU-E1A) and Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A-AR (APU-E1A-AR), providing meaningful information prior to embarking on human clinical trials. Materials and Method Conditionally replicate recombinant adenovirus (CRADs) APU-E1A, APU-EIA-AR were constructed with bladder tissue specific Uroplakin II (UP II) promoter to induce the expression of Ad5E1A gene and E1A-AR fusing gene, and PSCAE was inserted at upstream of promoter to enhance the function of promoter. Based on the cytopathic and anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer, these CRADs were intratumorally injected into subcutaneous xenografts tumor in nude mice. We then determined the toxicity through general health and behavioral assessment, hepatic and hematological toxicity evaluation, macroscopic and microscopic postmortem analyses. The spread of the transgene E1A of adenovirus was detected with RT-PCR and Western blot. Virus replication and distribution were examined with APU-LUC administration and Luciferase Assay. Results General assessment and body weight of the animals did not reveal any alteration in general behavior. The hematological alterations of groups which were injected with 5×108 pfu or higher dose (5×109 pfu) of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR showed no difference in comparison with PBS group, and only slight increased transaminases in contrast to PBS group at 5×109 pfu of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR were observed. E1A transgene did not disseminate to organs outside of xenograft tumor. Virus replication was not detected in other organs beside tumor according to Luciferase Assay. Conclusions Our study showed that recombinant adenovirus APU-E1A-AR and APU-E1A appear safe with 5×107 pfu and 5×108 pfu intratumorally injection in mice, without any discernable effects on general health

  17. Biodistribution and safety assessment of bladder cancer specific recombinant oncolytic adenovirus in subcutaneous xenografts tumor model in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Zhiping; Tian, Hongwei; Qi, Meijiao; Zhai, Zhenxing; Li, Shuwen; Li, Renju; Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Wenyun; Fu, Shenjun; Lu, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Ronald; Guo, Yinglu; Zhou, Liqun

    2012-04-01

    The previous works about safety evaluation for constructed bladder tissue specific adenovirus are poorly documented. Thus, we investigated the biodistribution and body toxicity of bladder specific oncolytic adenovirus Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A (APU-E1A) and Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A-AR (APU-E1A-AR), providing meaningful information prior to embarking on human clinical trials. Conditionally replicate recombinant adenovirus (CRADs) APU-E1A, APU-EIA-AR were constructed with bladder tissue specific UroplakinII(UPII) promoter to induce the expression of Ad5E1A gene and E1A-AR fusing gene, and PSCAE was inserted at upstream of promoter to enhance the function of promoter. Based on the cytopathic and anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer, these CRADs were intratumorally injected into subcutaneous xenografts tumor in nude mice. We then determined the toxicity through general health and behavioral assessment, hepatic and hematological toxicity evaluation, macroscopic and microscopic postmortem analyses. The spread of the transgene E1A of adenovirus was detected with RT-PCR and Western blot. Virus replication and distribution were examined with APU-LUC administration and Luciferase Assay. General assessment and body weight of the animals did not reveal any alteration in general behavior. The hematological alterations of groups which were injected with 5x10(8) pfu or higher dose (5x10(9) pfu) of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR showed no difference in comparison with PBS group, and only slight increased transaminases in contrast to PBS group at 5x10(9) pfu of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR were observed. E1A transgene did not disseminate to organs outside of xenograft tumor. Virus replication was not detected in other organs beside tumor according to Luciferase Assay. Our study showed that recombinant adenovirus APU-E1A-AR and APU-E1A appear safe with 5x10(7) pfu and 5x10(8) pfu intratumorally injection in mice, without any discernable effects on general health and behavior.

  18. Oxygen-dependent regulation of tumor growth and metastasis in human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yttersian Sletta, Kristine; Tveitarås, Maria K; Lu, Ning; Engelsen, Agnete S T; Reed, Rolf K; Garmann-Johnsen, Annette; Stuhr, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is relevant for tumor growth, metabolism, resistance to chemotherapy and metastasis. We have previously shown that hyperoxia, using hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), attenuates tumor growth and shifts the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET) in the DMBA-induced mammary tumor model. This study describes the effect of HBOT on tumor growth, angiogenesis, chemotherapy efficacy and metastasis in a triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer model, and evaluates tumor growth using a triple positive BT-474 breast cancer model. 5 x 105 cancer cells were injected s.c. in the groin area of NOD/SCID female mice. The BT-474 group was supplied with Progesterone and Estradiol pellets 2-days prior to tumor cell injection. Mice were divided into controls (1 bar, pO2 = 0.2 bar) or HBOT (2.5 bar, pO2 = 2.5 bar, 90 min, every third day until termination of the experiments). Treatment effects were determined by assessment of tumor growth, proliferation (Ki67-staining), angiogenesis (CD31-staining), metastasis (immunostaining), EMT markers (western blot), stromal components collagen type I, Itgb1 and FSP1 (immunostaining) and chemotherapeutic efficacy (5FU). HBOT significantly suppressed tumor growth in both the triple positive and negative tumors, and both MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 showed a decrease in proliferation after HBOT. No differences were found in angiogenesis or 5FU efficacy between HBOT and controls. Nevertheless, HBOT significantly reduced both numbers and total area of the metastastatic lesions, as well as reduced expression of N-cadherin, Axl and collagen type I measured in the MDA-MB-231 model. No change in stromal Itgb1 and FSP1 was found in either tumor model. Despite the fact that behavior and prognosis of the triple positive and negative subtypes of cancer are different, the HBOT had a similar suppressive effect on tumor growth, indicating that they share a common oxygen dependent anti-tumor mechanism. Furthermore, HBOT significantly reduced the

  19. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showedmore » that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.« less

  20. Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography of Response to Anti-cancer Therapy in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Chamming's, Foucauld; Le-Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Fitoussi, Victor; Redheuil, Alban; Assayag, Franck; Pidial, Laetitia; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Cuénod, Charles-André; Fournier, Laure S

    2016-04-01

    Our objective was to determine if supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) can detect changes in stiffness of a breast cancer model under therapy. A human invasive carcinoma was implanted in 22 mice. Eleven were treated with an anti-angiogenic therapy and 11 with glucose for 24 d. Tumor volume and stiffness were assessed during 2 wk before treatment and 0, 7, 12, 20 and 24 d after the start of therapy using SSWE. Pathology was assessed after 12 and 24 d of treatment. We found that response to therapy was associated with early softening of treated tumors only, resulting in a significant difference from non-treated tumors after 12 d of treatment (p = 0.03). On pathology, large areas of necrosis were observed at 12 d in treated tumors. Although treatment was still effective, treated tumors subsequently stiffened during a second phase of the treatment (days 12-24), with a small amount of necrosis observed on pathology on day 24. In conclusion, SSWE was able to measure changes in the stiffness of tumors in response to anti-cancer treatment. However, stiffness changes associated with good response to treatment may change over time, and increased stiffness may also reflect therapy efficacy. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Hu, Chia-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2013-01-01

    ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Tumor Xenografts Treated with the Ectopic ATP Synthase Inhibitor Citreoviridin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Hu, Chia-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2013-01-01

    ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy. PMID:23990911

  3. PPMP, a novel tubulin-depolymerizing agent against esophageal cancer in patient-derived tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yuqiao; Liu, Kangdong; Wu, Qiong; Oi, Naomi; Chen, Hanyong; Reddy, Kanamata; Jiang, Yanan; Yao, Ke; Li, Haitao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Saleem, Mohammad; Ma, Wei-Ya; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-24

    Esophageal cancer is one of the least studied and deadliest cancers worldwide with a poor prognosis due to limited options for treatment. Chemotherapy agents such as the microtubule-targeting compounds are the mainstay of palliation for advanced esophageal cancer treatment. However, the toxicity and side effects of tubulin-binding agents (TBAs) have promoted the development of novel, more potent but less toxic TBAs. Herein, we identified 2-[4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]-5-[(2-methylprop-2-en-1-yl)oxy] phenol (PPMP) as a novel TBA for esophageal cancer treatment. PPMP markedly inhibited tubulin polymerization, and decreased viability and anchorage-independent growth of esophageal cancer cell lines, effects that were accompanied by G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Importantly, we produced patient-derived esophageal cancer xenografts to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PPMP in a setting that best mimics the clinical context in patients with esophageal cancer. Overall, we identified PPMP as a novel microtubule-destabilizing compound and as a new therapeutic agent against esophageal carcinoma.

  4. GPR55 receptor antagonist decreases glycolytic activity in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michel; Catazaro, Jonathan; Singh, Nagendra S; Wnorowski, Artur; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Powers, Robert; Wainer, Irving W

    2017-11-15

    The Warburg effect is a predominant metabolic pathway in cancer cells characterized by enhanced glucose uptake and its conversion to l-lactate and is associated with upregulated expression of HIF-1α and activation of the EGFR-MEK-ERK, Wnt-β-catenin, and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways. (R,R')-4'-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol ((R,R')-MNF) significantly reduces proliferation, survival, and motility of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells through inhibition of the GPR55 receptor. We examined (R,R')-MNF's effect on glycolysis in PANC-1 cells and tumors. Global NMR metabolomics was used to elucidate differences in the metabolome between untreated and (R,R')-MNF-treated cells. LC/MS analysis was used to quantify intracellular concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate, carnitine, and l-lactate. Changes in target protein expression were determined by Western blot analysis. Data was also obtained from mouse PANC-1 tumor xenografts after administration of (R,R')-MNF. Metabolomics data indicate that (R,R')-MNF altered fatty acid metabolism, energy metabolism, and amino acid metabolism and increased intracellular concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate and carnitine while reducing l-lactate content. The cellular content of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and hexokinase 2 was reduced consistent with diminished PI3K-AKT signaling and glucose metabolism. The presence of the GLUT8 transporter was established and found to be attenuated by (R,R')-MNF. Mice treated with (R,R')-MNF had significant accumulation of l-lactate in tumor tissue relative to vehicle-treated mice, together with reduced levels of the selective l-lactate transporter MCT4. Lower intratumoral levels of EGFR, pyruvate kinase M2, β-catenin, hexokinase 2, and p-glycoprotein were also observed. The data suggest that (R,R')-MNF reduces glycolysis in PANC-1 cells and tumors through reduced expression and function at multiple controlling sites in the glycolytic pathway. © 2017 UICC.

  5. Establishment of Patient-Derived Tumor Xenograft Models of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer for Preclinical Evaluation of Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joyce F; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Zeng, Qing; Zhou, Shan; Ivanova, Elena; Huang, Wei; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Selfors, Laura M; Shen, Yiping; Pritchard, Colin C; Zheng, Mei; Adleff, Vilmos; Papp, Eniko; Piao, Huiying; Novak, Marian; Fotheringham, Susan; Wulf, Gerburg M; English, Jessie; Kirschmeier, Paul T; Velculescu, Victor E; Paweletz, Cloud; Mills, Gordon B; Livingston, David M; Brugge, Joan S; Matulonis, Ursula A; Drapkin, Ronny

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with high rates of recurrence and eventual resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Model systems that allow for accurate and reproducible target discovery and validation are needed to support further drug development in this disease. Experimental Design: Clinically annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were generated from tumor cells isolated from the ascites or pleural fluid of patients undergoing clinical procedures. Models were characterized by IHC and by molecular analyses. Each PDX was luciferized to allow for reproducible in vivo assessment of intraperitoneal tumor burden by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Plasma assays for CA125 and human LINE-1 were developed as secondary tests of in vivo disease burden. Results: Fourteen clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models were generated. Luciferized PDX models retain fidelity to both the nonluciferized PDX and the original patient tumor, as demonstrated by IHC, array CGH, and targeted and whole-exome sequencing analyses. Models demonstrated diversity in specific genetic alterations and activation of PI3K signaling pathway members. Response of luciferized PDX models to standard-of-care therapy could be reproducibly monitored by BLI or plasma markers. Conclusions: We describe the establishment of a collection of 14 clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models in which orthotopic tumor burden in the intraperitoneal space can be followed by standard and reproducible methods. This collection is well suited as a platform for proof-of-concept efficacy and biomarker studies and for validation of novel therapeutic strategies in ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1263-73. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Local Delivery of Cannabinoid-Loaded Microparticles Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Torres, Sofía; García-Taboada, Elena; Aberturas, María del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) – the two major ingredients of marijuana – have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1∶1 w:w) of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies. PMID:23349970

  7. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Hernán Pérez de la Ossa, Dolores; Lorente, Mar; Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Torres, Sofía; García-Taboada, Elena; Aberturas, María Del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús; Velasco, Guillermo; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w) of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  8. Aspirin induces apoptosis in vitro and inhibits tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in a nude mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    HOSSAIN, MOHAMMAD AKBAR; KIM, DONG HWAN; JANG, JUNG YOON; KANG, YONG JUNG; YOON, JEONG-HYUN; MOON, JEON-OK; CHUNG, HAE YOUNG; KIM, GI-YOUNG; CHOI, YUNG HYUN; COPPLE, BRYAN L.; KIM, NAM DEUK

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, including colon, prostate, breast and leukemia. Among them, aspirin, a classical NSAID, shows promise in cancer therapy in certain types of cancers. We hypothesized that aspirin might affect the growth of liver cancer cells since liver is the principal site for aspirin metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the effects of aspirin on the HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line in vitro and the HepG2 cell xenograft model in BALB/c nude mice. We found that treatment with aspirin inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis involving both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as measured by DNA ladder formation, alteration in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of the caspase activities and related protein expressions. In vivo antitumor activity assay also showed that aspirin resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition compared to the control. Oral administration of aspirin (100 mg/kg/day) caused a significant reduction in the growth of HepG2 tumors in nude mice. These findings suggest that aspirin may be used as a promising anticancer agent against liver cancer. PMID:22179060

  9. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides

  10. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tessier, A G; Yahya, A; Larocque, M P; Fallone, B G; Syme, A

    2014-09-07

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm(3) voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy

  11. A potent combination of the novel PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941, with imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts: long-lasting responses after treatment withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Floris, Giuseppe; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sciot, Raf; Li, Haifu; Friedman, Lori; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Vermaelen, Peter; Deroose, Christophe M.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oncogenic signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is sustained via PI3K/AKT pathway. We used a panel of six GIST xenograft models to assess efficacy of GDC-0941 as single agent or in combination with imatinib (IMA). Experimental design Nude mice (n=136) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying divers KIT mutations. Mice were orally dosed over four weeks, grouped as follows: A) control; B) GDC-0941; C) IMA and D) GDC+IMA treatments. Xenografts re-growth after treatment discontinuation was assessed in group C and D for additional four weeks. Tumor response was assessed by volume measurements, micro-PET imaging, histopathology and immunoblotting. Moreover genomic alterations in PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway were evaluated. Results In all models, GDC-0941 caused tumor growth stabilization, inhibiting tumor cells proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. Under GDC+IMA, profound tumor regression, superior to either treatment alone, was observed. This effect was associated with the best histologic response, a nearly complete proliferation arrest and increased apoptosis. Tumor re-growth assays confirmed superior activity of GDC+IMA over IMA; in three out of six models tumor volume remained reduced and stable even after treatment discontinuation. A positive correlation between response to GDC+IMA and PTEN loss, both on gene and protein levels, was found. Conclusion GDC+IMA has significant antitumor efficacy in GIST xenografts, inducing more substantial tumor regression, apoptosis and durable effects than IMA. Notably, after treatment withdrawal, tumor regression was sustained in tumors exposed to GDC+IMA, which was not observed under IMA. Assessment of PTEN status may represent a useful predictive biomarker for patient selection. PMID:23231951

  12. A potent combination of the novel PI3K Inhibitor, GDC-0941, with imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts: long-lasting responses after treatment withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Floris, Giuseppe; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sciot, Raf; Li, Haifu; Friedman, Lori; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Vermaelen, Peter; Deroose, Christophe M; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Oncogenic signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is sustained via PI3K/AKT pathway. We used a panel of six GIST xenograft models to assess efficacy of GDC-0941 as single agent or in combination with imatinib (IMA). Nude mice (n = 136) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying diverse KIT mutations. Mice were orally dosed over four weeks, grouped as follows: (A) control; (B) GDC-0941; (C) imatinib, and (D) GDC+IMA treatments. Xenografts regrowth after treatment discontinuation was assessed in groups C and D for an additional four weeks. Tumor response was assessed by volume measurements, micro-PET imaging, histopathology, and immunoblotting. Moreover, genomic alterations in PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway were evaluated. In all models, GDC-0941 caused tumor growth stabilization, inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, but did not induce apoptosis. Under GDC+IMA, profound tumor regression, superior to either treatment alone, was observed. This effect was associated with the best histologic response, a nearly complete proliferation arrest and increased apoptosis. Tumor regrowth assays confirmed superior activity of GDC+IMA over imatinib; in three of six models, tumor volume remained reduced and stable even after treatment discontinuation. A positive correlation between response to GDC+IMA and PTEN loss, both on gene and protein levels, was found. GDC+IMA has significant antitumor efficacy in GIST xenografts, inducing more substantial tumor regression, apoptosis, and durable effects than imatinib. Notably, after treatment withdrawal, tumor regression was sustained in tumors exposed to GDC+IMA, which was not observed under imatinib. Assessment of PTEN status may represent a useful predictive biomarker for patient selection.

  13. Intermittent Metronomic Drug Schedule Is Essential for Activating Antitumor Innate Immunity and Tumor Xenograft Regression12

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Sheng; Doloff, Joshua C; Waxman, David J

    2014-01-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CPA) is widely associated with antiangiogenesis; however, recent studies implicate other immune-based mechanisms, including antitumor innate immunity, which can induce major tumor regression in implanted brain tumor models. This study demonstrates the critical importance of drug schedule: CPA induced a potent antitumor innate immune response and tumor regression when administered intermittently on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule but not with the same total exposure to activated CPA administered on an every 3-day schedule or using a daily oral regimen that serves as the basis for many clinical trials of metronomic chemotherapy. Notably, the more frequent metronomic CPA schedules abrogated the antitumor innate immune and therapeutic responses. Further, the innate immune response and antitumor activity both displayed an unusually steep dose-response curve and were not accompanied by antiangiogenesis. The strong recruitment of innate immune cells by the 6-day repeating CPA schedule was not sustained, and tumor regression was abolished, by a moderate (25%) reduction in CPA dose. Moreover, an ∼20% increase in CPA dose eliminated the partial tumor regression and weak innate immune cell recruitment seen in a subset of the every 6-day treated tumors. Thus, metronomic drug treatment must be at a sufficiently high dose but also sufficiently well spaced in time to induce strong sustained antitumor immune cell recruitment. Many current clinical metronomic chemotherapeutic protocols employ oral daily low-dose schedules that do not meet these requirements, suggesting that they may benefit from optimization designed to maximize antitumor immune responses. PMID:24563621

  14. A combination of p53-activating APR-246 and phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody potently inhibits tumor development in hormone-dependent mutant p53-expressing breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Hyder, Salman M

    2018-01-01

    Background Between 30 and 40% of human breast cancers express a defective tumor suppressor p53 gene. Wild-type p53 tumor suppressor protein promotes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor–dependent angiogenesis, whereas mutant p53 protein (mtp53) lacks these functions, resulting in tumor cell survival and metastasis. Restoration of p53 function is therefore a promising drug-targeted strategy for combating mtp53-expressing breast cancer. Methods In this study, we sought to determine whether administration of APR-246, a small-molecule drug that restores p53 function, in combination with 2aG4, an antibody that targets phosphatidylserine residues on tumor blood vessels and disrupts tumor vasculature, effectively inhibits advanced hormone-dependent breast cancer tumor growth. Results APR-246 reduced cell viability in mtp53-expressing BT-474 and T47-D human breast cancer cells in vitro, and significantly induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, APR-246 did not reduce cell viability in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express wild-type p53. We next examined APR-246’s anti-tumor effects in vivo using BT-474 and T47-D tumor xenografts established in female nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with APR-246 and/or 2aG4 and tumor volume followed over time. Tumor growth was more effectively suppressed by combination treatment than by either agent alone, and combination therapy completely eradicated some tumors. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tumor tissue sections demonstrated that combination therapy more effectively induced apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation in tumor xenografts than either agent alone. Importantly, combination therapy dramatically reduced the density of blood vessels, which serve as the major route for tumor metastasis, in tumor xenografts compared with either agent alone. Conclusion Based on our findings, we contend that breast tumor growth might effectively be controlled by simultaneous

  15. Combined magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and histology imaging strategy in a human breast tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Amstalden van Hove, Erika R.; Chughtai, Kamila; Raman, Venu; Winnard, Paul T.; Heeren, Ron; Artemov, Dmitri; Glunde, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Applications of molecular imaging in cancer and other diseases frequently require combining in vivo imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance and optical imaging, with ex vivo optical, fluorescence, histology, and immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging, to investigate and relate molecular and biological processes to imaging parameters within the same region of interest. We have developed a multimodal image reconstruction and fusion framework that accurately combines in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), ex vivo brightfield and fluorescence microscopic imaging, and ex vivo histology imaging. Ex vivo brightfield microscopic imaging was used as an intermediate modality to facilitate the ultimate link between ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI/MRSI. Tissue sectioning necessary for optical and histology imaging required generation of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction module for 2D ex vivo optical and histology imaging data. We developed an external fiducial marker based 3D reconstruction method, which was able to fuse optical brightfield and fluorescence with histology imaging data. Registration of 3D tumor shape was pursued to combine in vivo MRI/MRSI and ex vivo optical brightfield and fluorescence imaging data. This registration strategy was applied to in vivo MRI/MRSI, ex vivo optical brightfield/fluorescence, as well as histology imaging data sets obtained from human breast tumor models. 3D human breast tumor data sets were successfully reconstructed and fused with this platform. PMID:22945331

  16. [Establishment of a human bladder cancer cell line stably co-expressing hSPRY2 and luciferase genes and its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Jin, Yipeng; Yin, Zhaoyang; Qi, Siyong; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Yu, Jiyun; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-01

    Objective To establish a human bladder cancer cell line stably co-expressing human sprouty2 (hSPRY2) and luciferase (Luc) genes simultaneously, and develop its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice. Methods The hSPRY2 and Luc gene segments were amplified by PCR, and were cloned into lentiviral vector pCDH and pLVX respectively to produce corresponding lentivirus particles. The J82 human bladder cancer cells were infected with these two kinds of lentivirus particles, and then further screened by puromycin and G418. The expressions of hSPRY2 and Luc genes were detected by bioluminescence, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. The screened J82-hSPRY2/Luc cells were injected subcutaneously into BALB/c nude mice, and the growth of tumor was monitored dynamically using in vivo fluorescence imaging system. Results J82-hSPRY2/Luc cell line stably expressing hSPRY2 and Luc genes was established successfully. Bioluminescence, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis validated the expressions of hSPRY2 and Luc genes. The in vivo fluorescence imaging system showed obvious fluorescence in subcutaneous tumor xenograft in nude mice. Conclusion The J82-hSPRY2/Luc bladder cancer cell line and its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice have been established successfully.

  17. Development of [11C]vemurafenib employing a carbon-11 carbonylative Stille coupling and preliminary evaluation in mice bearing melanoma tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Slobbe, Paul; Windhorst, Albert D; Adamzek, Kevin; Bolijn, Marije; Schuit, Robert C; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Poot, Alex J

    2017-06-13

    Over the last decade kinase inhibitors have witnessed tremendous growth as anti-cancer drugs. Unfortunately, despite their promising clinical successes, a large portion of patients does not benefit from these targeted therapeutics. Vemurafenib is a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of melanomas specifically expressing the BRAFV600E mutation. The aim of this study was to develop vemurafenib as PET tracer to determine its potential for identification of tumors sensitive to vemurafenib treatment. Therefore, vemurafenib was labeled with carbon-11 and analyzed for its tumor targeting potential in melanoma xenografts Colo829 (BRAFV600E) and MeWo (BRAFwt) using autoradiography on tissue sections, in vitro tumor cell uptake studies and biodistribution studies in xenografted athymic nu/nu mice. [11C]vemurafenib was synthesized in 21 ± 4% yield (decay corrected, calculated from [11C]CO) in > 99% radiochemical purity and a specific activity of 55 ± 18 GBq/μmol. Similar binding of [11C]vemurafenib was shown during autoradiography and cellular uptake studies in both cell lines. Plasma metabolite analysis demonstrated > 95% intact [11C]vemurafenib in vivo at 45 minutes after injection, indicating excellent stability. Biodistribution studies confirmed the in vitro results, showing similar tumor-to-background ratios in both xenografts models. These preliminary results suggest that identification of BRAFV600E mutations in vivo using PET with [11C]vemurafenib will be challenging.

  18. Development of [11C]vemurafenib employing a carbon-11 carbonylative Stille coupling and preliminary evaluation in mice bearing melanoma tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Slobbe, Paul; Windhorst, Albert D.; Adamzek, Kevin; Bolijn, Marije; Schuit, Robert C.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; Poot, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade kinase inhibitors have witnessed tremendous growth as anti-cancer drugs. Unfortunately, despite their promising clinical successes, a large portion of patients does not benefit from these targeted therapeutics. Vemurafenib is a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of melanomas specifically expressing the BRAFV600E mutation. The aim of this study was to develop vemurafenib as PET tracer to determine its potential for identification of tumors sensitive to vemurafenib treatment. Therefore, vemurafenib was labeled with carbon-11 and analyzed for its tumor targeting potential in melanoma xenografts Colo829 (BRAFV600E) and MeWo (BRAFwt) using autoradiography on tissue sections, in vitro tumor cell uptake studies and biodistribution studies in xenografted athymic nu/nu mice. [11C]vemurafenib was synthesized in 21 ± 4% yield (decay corrected, calculated from [11C]CO) in > 99% radiochemical purity and a specific activity of 55 ± 18 GBq/μmol. Similar binding of [11C]vemurafenib was shown during autoradiography and cellular uptake studies in both cell lines. Plasma metabolite analysis demonstrated > 95% intact [11C]vemurafenib in vivo at 45 minutes after injection, indicating excellent stability. Biodistribution studies confirmed the in vitro results, showing similar tumor-to-background ratios in both xenografts models. These preliminary results suggest that identification of BRAFV600E mutations in vivo using PET with [11C]vemurafenib will be challenging. PMID:28418885

  19. Setting up a wide panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts of non-small cell lung cancer by improving the preanalytical steps.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Marius; Nunes, Manoel; Blot, Lydia; Hofman, Véronique; Long-Mira, Elodie; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Vénissac, Nicolas; Mouroux, Jérôme; Vrignaud, Patricia; Hofman, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the ongoing need to improve therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) there has been increasing interest in developing reliable preclinical models to test novel therapeutics. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) are considered to be interesting candidates. However, the establishment of such model systems requires highly specialized research facilities and introduces logistic challenges. We aimed to establish an extensive well-characterized panel of NSCLC xenograft models in the context of a long-distance research network after careful control of the preanalytical steps. One hundred fresh surgically resected NSCLC specimens were shipped in survival medium at room temperature from a hospital-integrated biobank to animal facilities. Within 24 h post-surgery, tumor fragments were subcutaneously xenografted into immunodeficient mice. PDX characterization was performed by histopathological, immunohistochemical, aCGH and next-generation sequencing approaches. For this model system, the tumor take rate was 35%, with higher rates for squamous carcinoma (60%) than for adenocarcinoma (13%). Patients for whom PDX tumors were obtained had a significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients for whom no PDX tumors (P = 0.039) were obtained. We established a large panel of PDX NSCLC models with a high frequency of mutations (29%) in EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, BRAF, PTEN, and PI3KCA genes and with gene amplification (20%) of c-MET and FGFR1. This new patient-derived NSCLC xenograft collection, established regardless of the considerable time required and the distance between the clinic and the animal facilities, recapitulated the histopathology and molecular diversity of NSCLC and provides stable and reliable preclinical models for human lung cancer research. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. MicroRNA-627 Mediates the Epigenetic Mechanisms of Vitamin D to Suppress Proliferation of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells and Growth of Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Padi, Sathish K.R.; Zhang, Qunshu; Rustum, Youcef M; Morrison, Carl; Guo, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer by unclear mechanisms. We investigated the effects of calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the active form of vitamin D) on levels of different microRNAs (miRs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells from humans and xenograft tumors in mice. Methods Expression of microRNAs in CRC cell lines was examined using the Ambion mirVana miRNA Bioarray. The effects of calcitriol on expression of miR-627 and cell proliferation were determined by real-time PCR and WST-1 assay, respectively; growth of colorectal xenograft tumors was examined in nude mice. Real-time PCR was used to analyze levels of miR-627 in human colon adenocarcinoma samples and non-tumor colon mucosa tissues (controls). Results In HT-29 cells, miR-627 was the only microRNA significantly upregulated by calcitriol. Jumonji domain containing 1A (JMJD1A), which encodes a histone demethylase, was found to be a target of miR-627. By downregulating JMJD1A, miR-627 increased methylation of histone H3K9 and suppressed expression of proliferative factors such as GDF15. Calcitriol induced expression of miR-627, which downregulated JMJD1A and suppressed growth of xenograft tumors from HCT-116 cells in nude mice. Overexpression of miR-627 prevented proliferation of CRC cell lines in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Conversely, blocking the activity of miR-627 inhibited the tumor suppressive effects of calcitriol in cultured CRC cells and in mice. Levels of miR-627 were decreased in human colon adenocarcinoma samples, compared with controls. Conclusions miR-627 mediates tumor-suppressive epigenetic activities of vitamin D on CRC cells and xenograft tumors in mice. The mRNA that encodes the histone demethylase JMJD1A is a direct target of miR-627. Reagents designed to target JMJD1A or its mRNA, or increase the function of miR-627, might have the same antitumor activities of vitamin D without the hypercalcemic side effects. PMID:23619147

  1. FXR controls the tumor suppressor NDRG2 and FXR agonists reduce liver tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Schüler, Julia; Schulz, Andreas; Schlüter, Thomas; Kinzel, Olaf; Abel, Ulrich; Kremoser, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is expressed predominantly in tissues exposed to high levels of bile acids and controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis. FXR(-/-) mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and show an increased prevalence for intestinal malignancies, suggesting a role of FXR as a tumor suppressor in enterohepatic tissues. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene, which is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and many other malignancies.We show reduced NDRG2 mRNA in livers of FXR(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice and both, FXR and NDRG2 mRNAs, are reduced in human HCC compared to normal liver. Gene reporter assays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation data support that FXR directly controls NDRG2 transcription via IR1-type element(s) identified in the first introns of the human, mouse and rat NDRG2 genes. NDRG2 mRNA was induced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in livers of mice and the magnitude of induction of NDRG2 mRNA in three different human hepatoma cell lines was increased when ectopically expressing human FXR. Growth and metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells was strongly reduced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in an orthotopic liver xenograft tumor model. Ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep1 cells reduced tumor growth and metastasis potential of corresponding cells and increased the anti-tumor efficacy of FXR agonists, which may be partly mediated via increased NDRG2 expression. FXR agonists may show a potential in the prevention and/or treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma, a devastating malignancy with increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options.

  2. Development of a Fully Human Anti-PDGFRβ Antibody That Suppresses Growth of Human Tumor Xenografts and Enhances Antitumor Activity of an Anti-VEGFR2 Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Juqun; Vil, Marie Danielle; Prewett, Marie; Damoci, Chris; Zhang, Haifan; Li, Huiling; Jimenez, Xenia; Deevi, Dhanvanthri S; Iacolina, Michelle; Kayas, Anthony; Bassi, Rajiv; Persaud, Kris; Rohoza-Asandi, Anna; Balderes, Paul; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L; Tonra, James; Witte, Larry; Zhu, Zhenping

    2009-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is upregulated in most of solid tumors. It is expressed by pericytes/smooth muscle cells, fibroblast, macrophage, and certain tumor cells. Several PDGF receptor-related antagonists are being developed as potential antitumor agents and have demonstrated promising antitumor activity in both preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we produced a fully human neutralizing antibody, IMC-2C5, directed against PDGFRβ from an antibody phage display library. IMC-2C5 binds to both human and mouse PDGFRβ and blocks PDGF-B from binding to the receptor. IMC-2C5 also blocks ligand-stimulated activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules in tumor cells. In animal studies, IMC-2C5 significantly delayed the growth of OVCAR-8 and NCI-H460 human tumor xenografts in nude mice but failed to show antitumor activities in OVCAR-5 and Caki-1 xenografts. Our results indicate that the antitumor efficacy of IMC-2C5 is primarily due to its effects on tumor stroma, rather than on tumor cells directly. Combination of IMC-2C5 and DC101, an anti-mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody, resulted in significantly enhanced antitumor activity in BxPC-3, NCI-H460, and HCT-116 xenografts, compared with DC101 alone, and the trend of additive effects to DC101 treatment in several other tumor models. ELISA analysis of NCI-H460 tumor homogenates showed that IMC-2C5 attenuated protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor elevated by DC101 treatment. Finally, IMC-2C5 showed a trend of additive effects when combined with DC101/chemotherapy in MIA-PaCa-2 and NCI-H460 models. Taken together, these results lend great support to the use of PDGFRβ antagonists in combination with other antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of a broad range of human cancers. PMID:19484148

  3. Magnetic resonance image-guided photodynamic therapy of xenograft pancreas tumors with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer generally has very poor prognosis, with less than 4% survival at 5 years after diagnosis. This dismal survival rate is in part due to the aggressive nature of the adenocarcinoma, leading to a late-stage at diagnosis and exhibits resistance to most therapies. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a model cellular and vascular therapy agent, which uses light activation of the delivered drug to photosensitize the local cellular millieu. We suggest that interstitial verteporfin (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A) PDT has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy to the commonly used Gemcitabine chemotherapy. In the current study, an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (Panc-1) has undergone interstitial verteporfin PDT (40 J/cm with verteporfin and 40 J/cm without verteporfin). Prior to PDT, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to determine the location and size of the tumor within the pancreas, allowing accurate placement of the diffusing fiber. The success of therapy was monitored in vivo by assessing the total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes 24 hours pre- and 48 hours post-PDT. Total tumor and vascular perfusion volumes were determined using T2 weighted (T2W) and Gd-DTPA difference T1 weighted (T1W) turbo spin echo (TSE) MR imaging sequences, respectively. The validity of the in vivo imaging for therapeutic response was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and histological staining of frozen tissue sections. The ex vivo DiOC7(3) fluorescence analysis correlates well with the information provided from the MR images, indicating that MR imaging will be a successful surrogate marker for interstitial PDT.

  4. Correlation of tissue-plasma partition coefficients between normal tissues and subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines in mouse as a prediction tool of drug penetration in tumors.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Salphati, Laurent; Liederer, Bianca M

    2013-04-01

    Understanding drug distribution and accumulation in tumors would be informative in the assessment of efficacy in targeted therapy; however, existing methods for predicting tissue drug distribution focus on normal tissues and do not incorporate tumors. The main objective of this study was to describe the relationships between tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) of normal tissues and those of subcutaneous xenograft tumors under nonsteady-state conditions, and establish regression equations that could potentially be used for the prediction of drug levels in several human tumor xenografts in mouse, based solely on a Kp value determined in a normal tissue (e.g., muscle). A dataset of 17 compounds was collected from the literature and from Genentech. Tissue and plasma concentration data in mouse were obtained following oral gavage or intraperitoneal administration. Linear regression analyses were performed between Kp values in several normal tissues (muscle, lung, liver, or brain) and those in human tumor xenografts (CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, PC3, U-87, MCF-7-neo-Her2, or BT474M1.1). The tissue-plasma ratios in normal tissues reasonably correlated with the tumor-plasma ratios in CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, U-87, BT474M1.1, and MCF-7-neo-Her2 xenografts (r(2) in the range 0.62-1) but not with the PC3 xenograft. In general, muscle and lung exhibited the strongest correlation with tumor xenografts, followed by liver. Regression coefficients from brain were low, except between brain and the glioblastoma U-87 xenograft (r(2) in the range 0.62-0.94). Furthermore, reasonably strong correlations were observed between muscle and lung and between muscle and liver (r(2) in the range 0.67-0.96). The slopes of the regressions differed depending on the class of drug (strong vs. weak base) and type of tissue (brain vs. other tissues and tumors). Overall, this study will contribute to our understanding of tissue-plasma partition coefficients for tumors and facilitate the use of physiologically

  5. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention.

  6. Noninvasively Imaging Subcutaneous Tumor Xenograft by a Handheld Raman Detector, with the Assistance of an Optical Clearing Agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Haoran; Tang, Jiali; Li, Zhuoyun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Ren; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying; Li, Cong

    2017-05-31

    A handheld Raman detector with operational convenience, high portability, and rapid acquisition rate has been applied in clinics for diagnostic purposes. However, the inherent weakness of Raman scattering and strong scattering of the turbid tissue restricts its utilization to superficial locations. To extend the applications of a handheld Raman detector to deep tissues, a gold nanostar-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoprobe with robust colloidal stability, a fingerprint-like spectrum, and extremely high sensitivity (5.0 fM) was developed. With the assistance of FPT, a multicomponent optical clearing agent (OCA) efficiently suppressing light scattering from the turbid dermal tissues, the handheld Raman detector noninvasively visualized the subcutaneous tumor xenograft with a high target-to-background ratio after intravenous injection of the gold nanostar-based SERS nanoprobe. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first example to introduce the optical clearing technique in assisting SERS imaging in vivo. The combination of optical clearing technology and SERS is a promising strategy for the extension of the clinical applications of the handheld Raman detector from superficial tissues to subcutaneous or even deeper lesions that are usually "concealed" by the turbid dermal tissue.

  7. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention. PMID:27217750

  8. Antitumor activity of erlotinib (OSI-774, Tarceva) alone or in combination in human non-small cell lung cancer tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Brian; Kolinsky, Kenneth; Smith, Melissa; Beck, Gordon; Rashed, Mohammad; Adames, Violeta; Linn, Michael; Wheeldon, Eric; Gand, Laurent; Birnboeck, Herbert; Hoffmann, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    Our objective was the preclinical assessment of the pharmacokinetics, monotherapy and combined antitumor activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1/EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in athymic nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft models. Immunohistochemistry determined the HER1/EGFR status of the NSCLC tumor models. Pharmacokinetic studies assessed plasma drug concentrations of erlotinib in tumor- and non-tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. These were followed by maximum tolerated dose (MTD) studies for erlotinib and each chemotherapy. Erlotinib was then assessed alone and in combination with these chemotherapies in the NSCLC xenograft models. Complete necropsies were performed on most of the animals in each study to further assess antitumor or toxic effects. Erlotinib monotherapy dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth in the H460a tumor model, correlating with circulating levels of drug. There was antitumor activity at the MTD with each agent tested in both the H460a and A549 tumor models (erlotinib 100 mg/kg: 71 and 93% tumor growth inhibition; gemcitabine 120 mg/kg: 93 and 75% tumor growth inhibition; cisplatin 6 mg/kg: 81 and 88% tumor growth inhibition). When each compound was given at a fraction of the MTD, tumor growth inhibition was suboptimal. Combinations of gemcitabine or cisplatin with erlotinib were assessed at 25% of the MTD to determine efficacy. In both NSCLC models, doses of gemcitabine (30 mg/kg) or cisplatin (1.5 mg/kg) with erlotinib (25 mg/kg) at 25% of the MTD were well tolerated. For the slow growing A549 tumor, there was significant tumor growth inhibition in the gemcitabine/erlotinib and cisplatin/erlotinib combinations (above 100 and 98%, respectively), with partial regressions. For the faster growing H460a tumor, there was significant but less remarkable tumor growth inhibition in these same combinations (86 and 53% respectively). These results show that in NSCLC xenograft tumors with similar

  9. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract modulates CHOP/GADD153 to promote androgen receptor degradation and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Petiwala, Sakina M; Berhe, Saba; Li, Gongbo; Puthenveetil, Angela G; Rahman, Ozair; Nonn, Larisa; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells procured from two different patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with standardized rosemary extract and evaluated by flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU, Western blot and fluorescent microscopy. A significant modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins was observed in cancer cells while normal prostate epithelial cells did not undergo endoplasmic reticulum stress. This biphasic response suggests that standardized rosemary extract may preferentially target cancer cells as opposed to "normal" cells. Furthermore, we observed standardized rosemary extract to decrease androgen receptor expression that appears to be regulated by the expression of CHOP/GADD153. Using a xenograft tumor model we observed standardized rosemary extract when given orally to significantly suppress tumor growth by 46% compared to mice not receiving standardized rosemary extract. In the last several years regulatory governing bodies (e.g. European Union) have approved standardized rosemary extracts as food preservatives. These results are especially significant as it is becoming more likely that individuals will be receiving standardized rosemary extracts that are a part of a natural preservative system in various food preparations. Taken a step further, it is possible that the potential benefits that are often associated with a "Mediterranean Diet" in the future may begin to extend beyond the Mediterranean diet as more of the population is consuming standardized rosemary extracts.

  10. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  11. Fluorescence-guided surgery for cancer patients: a proof of concept study on human xenografts in mice and spontaneous tumors in pets

    PubMed Central

    Mery, Eliane; Golzio, Muriel; Guillermet, Stephanie; Lanore, Didier; Naour, Augustin Le; Thibault, Benoît; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne Françoise; Bellard, Elizabeth; Delord, Jean Pierre; Querleu, Denis; Ferron, Gwenael; Couderc, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Surgery is often the first treatment option for patients with cancer. Patient survival essentially depends on the completeness of tumor resection. This is a major challenge, particularly in cases of peritoneal carcinomatosis, where tumors are widely disseminated in the large peritoneal cavity. Any development to help surgeons visualize these residual cells would improve the completeness of the surgery. For non-disseminated tumors, imaging could be used to ensure that the tumor margins and the draining lymph nodes are free of tumor deposits. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging has been shown to be one of the most convenient imaging modalities. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a near-infrared fluorescent probe targeting the αvβ3 integrins (Angiostamp™) for intraoperative detection of tumors using the Fluobeam® device. We determined whether different human tumor nodules from various origins could be detected in xenograft mouse models using both cancer cell lines and patient-derived tumor cells. We found that xenografts could be imaged by fluorescent staining irrespective of their integrin expression levels. This suggests imaging of the associated angiogenesis of the tumor and a broader potential utilization of Angiostamp™. We therefore performed a veterinary clinical trial in cats and dogs with local tumors or with spontaneous disseminated peritoneal carcinomatosis. Our results demonstrate that the probe can specifically visualize both breast and ovarian nodules, and suggest that Angiostamp™ is a powerful fluorescent contrast agent that could be used in both human and veterinary clinical trials for intraoperative detection of tumors. PMID:29312629

  12. Multicolor fluorescent intravital live microscopy (FILM) for surgical tumor resection in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Figueiredo, Jose L; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-11-30

    Complete surgical resection of neoplasia remains one of the most efficient tumor therapies. However, malignant cell clusters are often left behind during surgery due to the inability to visualize and differentiate them against host tissue. Here we establish the feasibility of multicolor fluorescent intravital live microscopy (FILM) where multiple cellular and/or unique tissue compartments are stained simultaneously and imaged in real time. Theoretical simulations of imaging probe localization were carried out for three agents with specificity for cancer cells, stromal host response, or vascular perfusion. This transport analysis gave insight into the probe pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution, facilitating the experimental design and allowing predictions to be made about the localization of the probes in other animal models and in the clinic. The imaging probes were administered systemically at optimal time points based on the simulations, and the multicolor FILM images obtained in vivo were then compared to conventional pathological sections. Our data show the feasibility of real time in vivo pathology at cellular resolution and molecular specificity with excellent agreement between intravital and traditional in vitro immunohistochemistry. Multicolor FILM is an accurate method for identifying malignant tissue and cells in vivo. The imaging probes distributed in a manner similar to predictions based on transport principles, and these models can be used to design future probes and experiments. FILM can provide critical real time feedback and should be a useful tool for more effective and complete cancer resection.

  13. The distribution of the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and trastuzumab within solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol M; Tannock, Ian F

    2010-06-03

    Poor distribution of some anticancer drugs in solid tumors may limit their anti-tumor activity. Here we used immunohistochemistry to quantify the distribution of the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and trastuzumab in relation to blood vessels and to regions of hypoxia in human tumor xenografts. The antibodies were injected into mice implanted with human epidermoid carcinoma A431 or human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 transfected with ERBB2 (231-H2N) that express high levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 respectively, or wild-type MDA-MB-231, which expresses intermediate levels of ErbB1 and low levels of ErbB2. The distribution of cetuximab in A431 xenografts and trastuzumab in 231-H2N xenografts was time and dose dependent. At early intervals after injection of 1 mg cetuximab into A431 xenografts, the concentration of cetuximab decreased with increasing distance from blood vessels, but became more uniformly distributed at later times; there remained however limited distribution and binding in hypoxic regions of tumors. Injection of lower doses of cetuximab led to heterogeneous distributions. Similar results were observed with trastuzumab in 231-H2N xenografts. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, which express lower levels of ErbB1, homogeneity of distribution of cetuximab was achieved more rapidly. Cetuximab and trastuzumab distribute slowly, but at higher doses achieve a relatively uniform distribution after about 24 hours, most likely due to their long half-lives in the circulation. There remains poor distribution within hypoxic regions of tumors.

  14. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-06-22

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs.

  15. Schedule-dependent inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha protein accumulation, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by topotecan in U251-HRE glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Annamaria; Zalek, Jessica; Hollingshead, Melinda; Braunschweig, Till; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Bonomi, Carrie A; Borgel, Suzanne D; Carter, John P; Hewitt, Stephen M; Shoemaker, Robert H; Melillo, Giovanni

    2004-10-01

    We have previously shown that topotecan, a topoisomerase I poison, inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha protein accumulation by a DNA damage-independent mechanism. Here, we report that daily administration of topotecan inhibits HIF-1alpha protein expression in U251-HRE glioblastoma xenografts. Concomitant with HIF-1alpha inhibition, topotecan caused a significant tumor growth inhibition associated with a marked decrease of angiogenesis and expression of HIF-1 target genes in tumor tissue. These results provide a compelling rationale for testing topotecan in clinical trials to target HIF-1 in cancer patients.

  16. Interleukin 35 Expression Correlates With Microvessel Density in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma, Recruits Monocytes, and Promotes Growth and Angiogenesis of Xenograft Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chongbiao; Li, Zengxun; Li, Na; Li, Yang; Chang, Antao; Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Hongwei; Gao, Song; Yang, Shengyu; Hao, Jihui; Ren, He

    2018-02-01

    Cells of the monocyte lineage contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Interleukin 35 (IL35) is a member of the IL12 family produced by regulatory, but not effector, T cells. IL35 is a dimer comprising the IL12 alpha and IL27 beta chains, encoded by IL12A and EBI3, respectively. Expression of IL35 is increased in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) compared with normal pancreatic tissues, and promotes metastasis. We investigated the role of IL35 in monocyte-induced angiogenesis of PDAC in mice. We measured levels of IL35 protein, microvessel density, and numbers of monocytes in 123 sequential PDAC tissues from patients who underwent surgery in China in 2010. We performed studies with the human PDAC cell lines CFPAC-1, BxPC-3, Panc-1, MIA-PaCa-2, and mouse PDAC cell line Pan02. Monocyte subsets were isolated by flow cytometry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Fused human or mouse IL12A and EBI3 genes were overexpressed in PDAC cells or knocked down using small hairpin RNAs. Cells were grown as xenograft tumors in SCID mice; some mice were given injections of an IL35-neutralizing antibody and tumor growth was monitored. We performed chemotaxis assays to measure the ability of IL35 to recruit monocytes. We analyzed mRNA sequences of 179 PDACs in the Cancer Genome Atlas to identify correlations between expression of IL12A and EBI3 and monocyte markers. Monocytes incubated with IL35 or PDAC cell supernatants were analyzed in tube formation and endothelial migration assays. In PDAC samples from patients, levels of IL35 mRNA and protein correlated with microvessel density and infiltration of monocyte lineage cells. In cells and mice with xenograft tumors, IL35 increased recruitment of monocytes into PDAC tumors, which required CCL5. Upon exposure to IL35, monocytes increased expression of genes whose products promote angiogenesis (CXCL1 and CXCL8). IL35 activated transcription of CCL5, CXCL1, and CXCL8 by inducing GP130 signaling, via IL12RB2 and

  17. Tumor Xenograft Response to Redox-Active Therapies Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Thiol-Bearing DOTA Complex of Gadolinium1

    PubMed Central

    Guntle, Gerald P; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Dorr, Robert T; Raghunand, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Gd-LC6-SH is a thiol-bearing DOTA complex of gadolinium designed to bind plasma albumin at the conserved Cys34 site. The binding of Gd-LC6-SH shows sensitivity to the presence of competing thiols. We hypothesized that Gd-LC6-SH could provide magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement that is sensitive to tumor redox state and that the prolonged retention of albumin-bound Gd-LC6-SH in vivo can be exploited to identify a saturating dose above which the shortening of MRI longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of tissue is insensitive to the injected gadolinium dose. In the Mia-PaCa-2 pancreatic tumor xenograft model in SCID mice, both the small-molecule Gd-DTPA-BMA and the macromolecule Galbumin MRI contrast agents produced dose-dependent decreases in tumor T1. By contrast, the decreases in tumor T1 provided by Gd-LC6-SH at 0.05 and 0.1 mmol/kg were not significantly different at longer times after injection. SCID mice bearing Mia-PaCa-2 or NCI-N87 tumor xenografts were treated with either the glutathione synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine or the thiol-oxidizing anticancer drug Imexon, respectively. In both models, there was a significantly greater increase in tumor R1 (=1/T1) 60 minutes after injection of Gd-LC6-SH in drug-treated animals relative to saline-treated controls. In addition, Mercury Orange staining for nonprotein sulfhydryls was significantly decreased by drug treatment relative to controls in both tumor models. In summary, these studies show that thiol-bearing complexes of gadolinium such as Gd-LC6-SH can serve as redox-sensitive MRI contrast agents for detecting differences in tumor redox status and can be used to evaluate the effects of redox-active drugs. PMID:22741038

  18. C086, a novel analog of curcumin, induces growth inhibition and down-regulation of NFκB in colon cancer cells and xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yuanzhong; Xu, Jianhua

    2011-11-01

    New analogues of curcumin with improved properties are needed to meet therapeutic requirements. In this study, the effects of C086 on growth inhibition and NFκB pathway regulation were investigated in colon cancer cells and xenograft tumors. C086 exhibited potent antiproliferative activity in all 6 colon cancer cell lines. In a xenograft model of SW480 cells in nude mice, the oral administration of C086 showed significant growth suppression of SW480 tumors, and both Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses showed decreased NFκB (p65) expression in tumor tissues. Using TNF-α to induce NFκB activation in SW480 cells, it was revealed that C086 inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and its subsequent degradation, and suppressed the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NFκB. C-Myc, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2, NFκB-regulated gene products involving in cellular proliferation and antiapoptosis, were decreased in the C086 treated groups. This effect was accompanied by pro-apoptosis of C086 in colon cancer cells and lower expression of PCNA in C086 treated colon cancer xenografts. Immunostaining for CD31 showed that there were fewer microvessels in C086 treated SW480 tumors, and NFκB-targeted gene products involved in angiogenesis (i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9) were also downregulated. C086 also inhibited bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) proliferation and tube formation in Matrigel. Overall, our results suggest that C086 is a potent antitumor agent and has promising future in colon cancer. C086 suppressed NFκB activation through inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Downregulation of NFκB-regulated gene products contributed to the antiproliferation, pro-apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis effect of C086.

  19. Anti-Tumor Effect of Adipose Tissue Derived-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Interferon-β and Treatment with Cisplatin in a Xenograft Mouse Model for Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors. PMID:24040358

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound evaluation of pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice after irradiation with sub-threshold focused ultrasound for tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Guo, Qian; Chen, Yi Ni; Hu, Bing; Jiang, Li Xin

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for assessing tumors after irradiation with sub-threshold focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation in pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice. Thirty tumor-bearing nude mice were divided into three groups: Group A received sham irradiation, Group B received a moderate-acoustic energy dose (sub-threshold), and Group C received a high-acoustic energy dose. In Group B, B-mode ultrasound (US), color Doppler US, and dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) studies were conducted before and after irradiation. After irradiation, tumor growth was inhibited in Group B, and the tumors shrank in Group C. In Group A, the tumor sizes were unchanged. In Group B, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) images showed a rapid rush of contrast agent into and out of tumors before irradiation. After irradiation, CEUS revealed contrast agent perfusion only at the tumor periphery and irregular, un-perfused volumes of contrast agent within the tumors. DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (PI) and area under the curve (AUC), had decreased 24 hours after irradiation. PI and AUC were increased 48 hours and 2weeks after irradiation. Time to peak (TP) and sharpness were increased 24 hours after irradiation. TP decreased at 48 hours and 2 weeks after irradiation. CEUS is thus an effective method for early evaluation after irradiation with sub-threshold FUS. PMID:28402267

  1. A potencial theranostic agent for EGF-R expression tumors: (177)Lu-DOTA-nimotuzumab.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; Zhang, Xiuli; Fernandez, Marcelo; Diaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Deutscher, Susan L; Balter, Henia; Quinn, Thomas P; Cabral, Pablo

    2012-10-01

    In this work Nimotuzumab (monoclonal antibody, recognizes the EGF-R) was radiolabeled with (177)Lu as a potential cancer therapy radiopharmaceutical. In-vitro cell binding studies and in-vivo biodistribution and imaging studies were performed to determine the radiochemical stability, targeting specificity and pharmacokinetics of the (177)Lu-labeled antibody. Nimotuzumab was derivatized with DOTA-NHS at room temperature for 2 hours. DOTA-Nimotuzumab was radiolabeled with (177)LuCl3 (15 MBq/mg) at 37°C for 1 h. The radiochemical purity was assessed by ITLC, silica gel and by RP-HPLC. Binding specificity studies were performed with EGF-R positive A431 human epithelial carcinoma and EGF-R negative MDA-MB-435 breast carcinoma cells. Biodistribution studies were performed in healthy female CD-1 mice at 1 h, 4 h, 24 h, and A431 xenografted nude mice at 10 min, 1 h, 4 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h. SPECT-CT imaging studies were performed in A431 xenografted mice at 24 h post injection. DOTA-Nimotuzumab was efficiently labeled with (177) LuCl(3) at 37°C. The in vitro stability of labeled product was optimal over 24 h in buffered saline and mouse serum. Specific recognition of EGF-R by (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab was observed in A431 cell binding studies. Biodistribution studies demonstrated increasing tumor uptake of (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab over time, with tumor to muscle ratios of 6.26, 10.68, and 18.82 at 4 h, 24 h, and 96 h post injection. Imaging of A431 xenografted mice showed high uptake in the tumor. (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab has the potential to be a promising therapy agent, which may be useful in the treatment of patients with EGF-R positive cancer.

  2. Development of a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model: bioluminescence image-guided focal irradiation and tumor monitoring of orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; Deweese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response.

  3. Development of a Novel Preclinical Pancreatic Cancer Research Model: Bioluminescence Image-Guided Focal Irradiation and Tumor Monitoring of Orthotopic Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. RESULTS: Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response. PMID:22496923

  4. Evaluation of 6-([18F] fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoic-anilide (18F-FAHA) as imaging probe in tumor xenograft mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fiona; Cho, Sung Ju; Yu, Lihai; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Pin, Christopher L.; Kovacs, Michael S.; Koropatnick, James; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-03-01

    Alteration in genetic expression is as important as gene mutation in cancer development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Histone deacetylase (HDAC), an enzyme facilitating histone remodelling, can lead to silencing of tumor suppressor genes making HDAC inhibitors viable anticancer drugs against tumors with increased activity of the enzyme. In this study we evaluated 18F-fluroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide (18F-FAHA), an artificial HDAC substrate, as imaging probe of HDAC activity of human tumor xenografts in immunocompromised host mice. Human breast and melanoma cell lines, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-435 respectively, known to overexpress HDAC activity were xenografted into immunocompromised mice and HDAC activity was imaged using 18F-FAHA. The melanoma group was treated with saline, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an approved anticancer HDAC inhibitor) in DMSO, or DMSO as positive control. Tracer kinetic modelling and SUV were used to estimate HDAC activity from dynamic PET data. Both breast tumor and melanoma group showed great variability in binding rate constant (BRC) of 18F-FAHA suggesting highly variable inter- and intra-tumoral HDAC activity. For the SAHA treated melanoma group, HDAC activity, as monitored by BRC of 18F-FAHA, decreased more than the two (positive and negative) control groups but not tumor growth. Our preliminary study showed that noninvasive PET imaging with 18F-FAHA has the potential to identify patients for whom treatment with HDAC inhibitors are appropriate, to assess the effectiveness of that treatment as an early marker of target reduction, and also eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsy to individualize treatment.

  5. A Versatile Technique for the In Vivo Imaging of Human Tumor Xenografts Using Near-Infrared Fluorochrome-Conjugated Macromolecule Probes

    PubMed Central

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Kawai, Kenji; Higuchi, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Haruo; Ogura, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Toshio; Sasaki, Erika; Nakamura, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a versatile method for detecting human tumor xenografts in vivo, based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, using near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome-conjugated macromolecule probes. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two immunoglobulins—an anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) monoclonal antibody and isotype control IgG2a—were labeled with XenoLight CF770 fluorochrome and used as NIR-conjugated macromolecule probes to study whole-body imaging in a variety of xenotransplantation mouse models. NIR fluorescent signals were observed in subcutaneously transplanted BxPC-3 (human pancreatic cancer) cells and HCT 116 (colorectal cancer) cells within 24 h of NIR-macromolecule probe injection, but the signal from the fluorochrome itself or from the NIR-conjugated small molecule (glycine) injection was not observed. The accuracy of tumor targeting was confirmed by the localization of the NIR-conjugated immunoglobulin within the T-HCT 116 xenograft (in which the orange-red fluorescent protein tdTomato was stably expressed by HCT 116 cells) in the subcutaneous transplantation model. However, there was no significant difference in the NIR signal intensity of the region of interest between the anti-HLA antibody group and the isotype control group in the subcutaneous transplantation model. Therefore, the antibody accumulation within the tumor in vivo is based on the EPR effect. The liver metastasis generated by an intrasplenic injection of T-HCT 116 cells was clearly visualized by the NIR-conjugated anti-HLA probe but not by the orange-red fluorescent signal derived from the tdTomato reporter. This result demonstrated the superiority of the NIR probes over the tdTomato reporter protein at enhancing tissue penetration. In another xenograft model, patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of LC11-JCK (human non-small cell lung cancer) were successfully visualized using the NIR-conjugated macromolecule probe without any genetic modification. These results

  6. Connective tissue of cervical carcinoma xenografts: associations with tumor hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure and its assessment by DCE-MRI and DW-MRI.

    PubMed

    Hompland, Tord; Ellingsen, Christine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background. A high fraction of stroma in malignant tissues is associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis. Possible correlations between the stromal and physiologic microenvironments of tumors and the potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in quantification of the stromal microenvironment were investigated in this study. Material and methods. CK-160 cervical carcinoma xenografts were used as preclinical tumor model. A total of 43 tumors were included in the study, and of these tumors, 17 were used to search for correlations between the stromal and physiologic microenvironments, 11 were subjected to DCE-MRI, and 15 were subjected to DW-MRI. DCE-MRI and DW-MRI were carried out at 1.5 T with a clinical MR scanner and a slotted tube resonator transceiver coil constructed for mice. Fraction of connective tissue (CTFCol) and fraction of hypoxic tissue (HFPim) were determined by immunohistochemistry. A Millar SPC 320 catheter was used to measure tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Results. CTFCol showed a positive correlation to IFP and an inverse correlation to HFPim. The apparent diffusion coefficient assessed by DW-MRI was inversely correlated to CTFCol, whereas no correlation was found between DCE-MRI-derived parameters and CTFCol. Conclusion. DW-MRI is a potentially useful method for characterizing the stromal microenvironment of tumors.

  7. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E; Bigner, Darell D; Johnson, Laura A; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  8. Evaluation of efficacy of a new MEK inhibitor, RO4987655, in human tumor xenografts by [(18)F] FDG-PET imaging combined with proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tegnebratt, Tetyana; Ruge, Elisabeth; Bader, Sabine; Ishii, Nobuya; Aida, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Yasushi; Ooi, Chia-Huey; Lu, Li; Mitsios, Nicholas; Meresse, Valerie; Mulder, Jan; Pawlak, Michael; Venturi, Miro; Tessier, Jean; Stone-Elander, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK, also known as MAPK2, MAPKK), a key molecule of the Ras/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, has shown promising effects on B-raf-mutated and some RAS (rat sarcoma)-activated tumors in clinical trials. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy of a novel allosteric MEK inhibitor RO4987655 in K-ras-mutated human tumor xenograft models using [(18)F] FDG-PET imaging and proteomics technology. [(18)F] FDG uptake was studied in human lung carcinoma xenografts from day 0 to day 9 of RO4987655 therapy using microPET Focus 120 (CTI Concorde Microsystems, Knoxville, TN, USA). The expression levels of GLUT1 and hexokinase 1 were examined using semi-quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemistry (fIHC). The in vivo effects of RO4987655 on MAPK/PI3K pathway components were assessed by reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). We have observed modest metabolic decreases in tumor [(18)F] FDG uptake after MEK inhibition by RO4987655 as early as 2 h post-treatment. The greatest [(18)F] FDG decreases were found on day 1, followed by a rebound in [(18)F] FDG uptake on day 3 in parallel with decreasing tumor volumes. Molecular analysis of the tumors by fIHC did not reveal statistically significant correlations of GLUT1 and hexokinase 1 expressions with the [(18)F] FDG changes. RPPA signaling response profiling revealed not only down-regulation of pERK1/2, pMKK4, and pmTOR on day 1 after RO4987655 treatment but also significant up-regulation of pMEK1/2, pMEK2, pC-RAF, and pAKT on day 3. The up-regulation of these markers is interpreted to be indicative of a reactivation of the MAPK and activation of the compensatory PI3K pathway, which can also explain the rebound in [(18)F] FDG uptake following MEK inhibition with RO4987655 in the K-ras-mutated human tumor xenografts. We have performed the first preclinical evaluation of a new MEK inhibitor, RO4987655, using a combination of [(18)F] FDG-PET imaging and molecular

  9. Thymoquinone Inhibits Tumor Growth and Induces Apoptosis in a Breast Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model: The Role of p38 MAPK and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Chern Chiuh; Hsu, Annie; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam; Tan, Kwong Huat Benny

    2013-01-01

    Due to narrow therapeutic window of cancer therapeutic agents and the development of resistance against these agents, there is a need to discover novel agents to treat breast cancer. The antitumor activities of thymoquinone (TQ), a compound isolated from Nigella sativa oil, were investigated in breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Cell responses after TQ treatment were assessed by using different assays including MTT assay, annexin V-propidium iodide staining, Mitosox staining and Western blot. The antitumor effect was studied by breast tumor xenograft mouse model, and the tumor tissues were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. The level of anti-oxidant enzymes/molecules in mouse liver tissues was measured by commercial kits. Here, we show that TQ induced p38 phosphorylation and ROS production in breast cancer cells. These inductions were found to be responsible for TQ’s anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Moreover, TQ-induced ROS production regulated p38 phosphorylation but not vice versa. TQ treatment was found to suppress the tumor growth and this effect was further enhanced by combination with doxorubicin. TQ also inhibited the protein expression of anti-apoptotic genes, such as XIAP, survivin, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, in breast cancer cells and breast tumor xenograft. Reduced Ki67 and increased TUNEL staining were observed in TQ-treated tumors. TQ was also found to increase the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione in mouse liver tissues. Overall, our results demonstrated that the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of TQ in breast cancer are mediated through p38 phosphorylation via ROS generation. PMID:24098377

  10. A novel method to visually determine the intracellular pH of xenografted tumor in vivo by utilizing fluorescent protein as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-04

    The alkalization of intracellular pH (pHin) advances together with enhancement of aerobic glycolysis within tumor cells (the Warburg effect), and that is responsible for the progression of tumor malignancy together with hypoxia and angiogenesis. But how they correlate each other during tumor growth is poorly understood, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging methods. In present study, we propose a novel method to visually determine the pHin of tumor xenograft model from fluorescent image ratios. We utilized tandemly-linked two fluorescent proteins as a pH indicator; yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, pH sensitive) as an indicator, and red fluorescent protein (RFP, pH insensitive) as a reference. This method can eliminate the influence of optical factors from tissue as well as of the diverse expression level of pH indicator in the grafted cells. In addition, that can be operated by filter-based fluorescent imagers that are generally used in small animal study. The efficacy of the pH indicator, RFP-YFP, was confirmed by studies using recombinant protein in vitro and HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP in vivo. Furthermore, we prepared nude mice subcutaneously xenografted HeLa cells expressing RFP-YFP cells as tumor model. The image ratios (YFP/RFP) of the tumor at the day 5 after surgery clearly showed the heterogeneous distribution of diverse pHin cells in the tumor tissue. Concomitantly acquired angiography using near-infrared fluorescence (680 nm for emission) also indicated that the relative alkaline pHin cells located in the region far from tumor vessels in which tumor aerobic glycolysis would be facilitated by progression of hypoxia and nutrient starvation. Applying the present method for a multi-wavelength imaging concerning pO2 and/or nutrient starvation states in addition to pHin and angiogenesis would provide valuable information about complicated alteration of tumoral cell states during tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Volume of Three-Dimensional Cultures of Cancer Cells InVitro Influences Transcriptional Profile Differences and Similarities with Monolayer Cultures and Xenografted Tumors.

    PubMed

    Boghaert, Erwin R; Lu, Xin; Hessler, Paul E; McGonigal, Thomas P; Oleksijew, Anatol; Mitten, Michael J; Foster-Duke, Kelly; Hickson, Jonathan A; Santo, Vitor E; Brito, Catarina; Uziel, Tamar; Vaidya, Kedar S

    2017-09-01

    Improving the congruity of preclinical models with cancer as it is manifested in humans is a potential way to mitigate the high attrition rate of new cancer therapies in the clinic. In this regard, three-dimensional (3D) tumor cultures in vitro have recently regained interest as they have been acclaimed to have higher similarity to tumors in vivo than to cells grown in monolayers (2D). To identify cancer functions that are active in 3D rather than in 2D cultures, we compared the transcriptional profiles (TPs) of two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines, NCI-H1650 and EBC-1 grown in both conditions to the TP of xenografted tumors. Because confluence, diameter or volume can hypothetically alter TPs, we made intra- and inter-culture comparisons using samples with defined dimensions. As projected by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), a limited number of signal transduction pathways operational in vivo were better represented by 3D than by 2D cultures in vitro. Growth of 2D and 3D cultures as well as xenografts induced major changes in the TPs of these 3 modes of culturing. Alterations of transcriptional network activation that were predicted to evolve similarly during progression of 3D cultures and xenografts involved the following functions: hypoxia, proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and interleukin activation. Direct comparison of TPs of 3D cultures and xenografts to monolayer cultures yielded up-regulation of networks involved in hypoxia, TGF and Wnt signaling as well as regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition. Differences in TP of 2D and 3D cancer cell cultures are subject to progression of the cultures. The emulation of the predicted cell functions in vivo is therefore not only determined by the type of culture in vitro but also by the confluence or diameter of the 2D or 3D cultures, respectively. Consequently, the successful implementation of 3D models will require phenotypic characterization to verify the relevance of

  12. Dual mTORC1/2 blockade inhibits glioblastoma brain tumor initiating cells in vitro and in vivo and synergizes with temozolomide to increase orthotopic xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Luchman, H Artee; Stechishin, Owen D M; Nguyen, Stephanie A; Lun, Xueqing Q; Cairncross, J Gregory; Weiss, Samuel

    2014-11-15

    The EGFR and PI3K/mTORC1/2 pathways are frequently altered in glioblastoma (GBM), but pharmacologic targeting of EGFR and PI3K signaling has failed to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. Lack of relevant models has rendered it difficult to assess whether targeting these pathways might be effective in molecularly defined subgroups of GBMs. Here, human brain tumor-initiating cell (BTIC) lines with different combinations of endogenous EGFR wild-type, EGFRvIII, and PTEN mutations were used to investigate response to the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib, mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, and dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor AZD8055 alone and in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In vitro growth inhibition and cell death induced by gefitinib, rapamycin, AZD8055, and TMZ or combinations in human BTICs were assessed by alamarBlue, neurosphere, and Western blotting assays. The in vivo efficacy of AZD8055 was assessed in subcutaneous and intracranial BTIC xenografts. Kaplan-Meier survival studies were performed with AZD8055 and in combination with TMZ. We confirm that gefitinib and rapamycin have modest effects in most BTIC lines, but AZD8055 was highly effective at inhibiting Akt/mTORC2 activity and dramatically reduced the viability of BTICs regardless of their EGFR and PTEN mutational status. Systemic administration of AZD8055 effectively inhibited tumor growth in subcutaneous BTIC xenografts and mTORC1/2 signaling in orthotopic BTIC xenografts. AZD8055 was synergistic with the alkylating agent TMZ and significantly prolonged animal survival. These data suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may be of benefit in GBM, including the subset of TMZ-resistant GBMs. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Characterization of patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) as models for estrogen receptor positive (ER+HER2- and ER+HER2+) breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Noriko; Somlo, George; Wu, Jun; Frankel, Paul; Kai, Masaya; Liu, Xueli; Wu, Shang Victoria; Nguyen, Duc; Chan, Nymph; Hsieh, Meng-Yin; Kirschenbaum, Michele; Kruper, Laura; Vito, Courtney; Badie, Behnam; Yim, John H; Yuan, Yuan; Hurria, Arti; Peiguo, Chu; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2017-06-01

    The research was to appraise the utility of the patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) as models of estrogen receptor positive (ER+HER2- and ER+HER2+) breast cancers. We compared protein expression profiles by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) in tumors that resulted in PDXs compared to those that did not. Our overall PDX intake rate for ER+ breast cancer was 9% (9/97). The intake rate for ER+HER2+ tumors (3/16, 19%) was higher than for ER+HER2- tumors (6/81, 7%). Heat map analyses of RPPA data showed that ER+HER2- tumors were divided into 2 groups by luminal A/B signature [protein expression of ER, AR, Bcl-2, Bim (BCL2L11), GATA3 and INPP4b], and this expression signature was also associated with the rate of PDX intake. Cell survival pathways such as the PI3K/AKT signaling and RAS/ERK pathways were more activated in the specimens that could be established as PDX in both classes. Expression of the ER protein itself may have a bearing on the potential success of an ER+ PDX model. In addition, HER2 and its downstream protein expressions were up-regulated in the ER+HER2+ patient tumors that were successfully established as PDX models. Moreover, the comparison of RPPA data between original and PDX tumors suggested that the selection/adaptation process required to grow the tumors in mice is unavoidable for generation of ER+ PDX models, and we identified differences between patient tumor samples and paired PDX tumors. A better understanding of the biological characteristics of ER+PDX would be the key to using PDX models in assessing treatment strategies in a preclinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  15. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacymore » and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.« less

  16. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: tomsyu@163.com; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Thesemore » findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer.« less

  17. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting; Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Chune

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of the highly selective focal adhesion kinase inhibitor BI 853520 in adenocarcinoma xenograft models is linked to a mesenchymal tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Ulrich A; Waizenegger, Irene C; Schweifer, Norbert; Haslinger, Christian; Gerlach, Daniel; Braunger, Jürgen; Weyer-Czernilofsky, Ulrike; Stadtmüller, Heinz; Sapountzis, Ioannis; Bader, Gerd; Zoephel, Andreas; Bister, Bojan; Baum, Anke; Quant, Jens; Kraut, Norbert; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Adolf, Günther R

    2018-02-23

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, has attracted interest as a target for pharmacological intervention in malignant diseases. Here, we describe BI 853520, a novel ATP-competitive inhibitor distinguished by high potency and selectivity. In vitro, the compound inhibits FAK autophosphorylation in PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells with an IC 50 of 1 nmol/L and blocks anchorage-independent proliferation of PC-3 cells with an EC 50 of 3 nmol/L, whereas cells grown in conventional surface culture are 1000-fold less sensitive. In mice, the compound shows long half-life, high volume of distribution and high oral bioavailability; oral dosing of immunodeficient mice bearing subcutaneous PC-3 prostate adenocarcinoma xenografts resulted in rapid, long-lasting repression of FAK autophosphorylation in tumor tissue. Daily oral administration of BI 853520 to nude mice at doses of 50 mg/kg was well tolerated for prolonged periods of time. In a diverse panel of 16 subcutaneous adenocarcinoma xenograft models in nude mice, drug treatment resulted in a broad spectrum of outcomes, ranging from group median tumor growth inhibition values >100% and tumor regression in subsets of animals to complete lack of sensitivity. Biomarker analysis indicated that high sensitivity is linked to a mesenchymal tumor phenotype, initially defined by loss of E-cadherin expression and subsequently substantiated by gene set enrichment analysis. Further, we obtained microRNA expression profiles for 13 models and observed that hsa-miR-200c-3p expression is strongly correlated with efficacy (R 2  = 0.889). BI 853520 is undergoing evaluation in early clinical trials.

  19. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martey, Orleans; Nimick, Mhairi; Taurin, Sebastien; Sundararajan, Vignesh; Greish, Khaled; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2017-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71), that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA) micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks) also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg) for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles.

  20. TMOD-05. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ORTHOTOPIC PATIENT-DERIVED XENOGRAFT MODELS OF PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMORS AND THEIR USE IN PRECLINICAL EXPERIMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Brabetz, Sebastian; Schmidt, Christin; Groebner, Susanne N.; Mack, Norman; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Jones, David T.W.; Chavez, Lukas; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Leary, Sarah E.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Olson, James M.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Kool, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Genomic studies have shown that multiple molecular subtypes of pediatric brain tumors exist that are biologically and clinically highly distinct. These findings ask for novel subtype specific treatments. To develop these we need more and better preclinical models that correctly reflect the proper tumor (sub)type. Orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models generated by intracranial injection of primary patient material into the brain of NSG mice offer the unique possibility to test novel substances in primary patient tissue in an in vivo environment. Prior to drug selection and testing, extensive molecular characterizations of PDX and matching primary tumor/blood (DNA methylation, DNA sequencing, and gene expression) are needed to see how the PDX represents the original disease and to learn about targetable oncogenic drivers in each model. In collaboration with several groups around the world we have generated and fully characterized thus far 75 PDX models reflecting 15 distinct subtypes of pediatric brain cancer. PDX models always retain their molecular subtype and in the vast majority of cases also mutations and copy number alterations compared to matching primary tumors. Most aggressive tumors, harboring MYC(N) amplifications, are overrepresented in the cohort, but also subtypes which have not been available for preclinical testing before due to lack of genetically engineered mouse models or suitable cell lines, such as Group 4 medulloblastoma, are included. All models and corresponding molecular data will become available for the community for preclinical research. Examples of such preclinical experiments will be presented. PDX models of pediatric brain tumors are still quite rare. Our repertoire of PDX models and corresponding molecular characterizations allow researchers all over the world to find the right models for their specific scientific questions. It will provide an unprecedented resource to study tumor biology and pave the way for

  1. Influence of anchoring ligands and particle size on the colloidal stability and in vivo biodistribution of polyethylene glycol-coated gold nanoparticles in tumor-xenografted mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Yang, Zhi; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Qian; Tian, Mei; Li, Li; Liang, Dong; Li, Chun

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated (pegylated) gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed as drug carriers and diagnostic contrast agents. However, the impact of particle characteristics on the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of pegylated AuNPs is not clear. We investigated the effects of PEG molecular weight, type of anchoring ligand, and particle size on the assembly properties and colloidal stability of PEG-coated AuNPs. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the most stable PEG-coated AuNPs in nude mice bearing subcutaneous A431 squamous tumors were further studied using 111In-labeled AuNPs. AuNPs coated with thioctic acid (TA)-anchored PEG exhibited higher colloidal stability in phosphate-buffered saline in the presence of dithiothreitol than did AuNPs coated with monothiol-anchored PEG. AuNPs coated with high-molecular-weight (5000 Da) PEG were more stable than AuNPs coated with low-molecular-weight (2000 Da) PEG. Of the 20-nm, 40-nm, and 80-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000, the 20-nm AuNPs exhibited the lowest uptake by reticuloendothelial cells and the slowest clearance from the body. Moreover, the 20-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000 showed significantly higher tumor uptake and extravasation from the tumor blood vessels than did the 40- and 80-nm AuNPs. Thus, 20-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000 are promising potential drug delivery vehicles and diagnostic imaging agents. PMID:19131103

  2. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors.

  3. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  4. Antitumor effects with apoptotic death in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and suppression of leukemia xenograft tumor growth by irinotecan HCl.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Liang; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan HCl (CPT-11) is an anticancer prodrug, but there is no available information addressing CPT-11-inhibited leukemia cells in in vitro and in vivo studies. Therefore, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 in promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and in vivo and tumor growth in a leukemia xenograft model. Effects of CPT-11 on HL-60 cells were determined using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, comet assay, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. CPT-11 demonstrated a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, and cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in HL-60 cells. CPT-11 promoted the release of AIF from mitochondria and its translocation to the nucleus. Bid, Bax, Apaf-1, caspase-9, AIF, Endo G, caspase-12, ATF-6b, Grp78, CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D were all significantly upregulated and Bcl-2 was down-regulated by CPT-11 in HL-60 cells. Induction of cell-cycle arrest by CPT-11 was associated with changes in expression of key cell-cycle regulators such as CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D in HL-60 cells. To test whether CPT-11 could augment antitumor activity in vivo, athymic BALB/c(nu/nu) nude mice were inoculated with HL-60 cells, followed by treatment with either CPT-11. The treatments significantly inhibited tumor growth and reduced tumor weight and volume in the HL-60 xenograft mice. The present study demonstrates the schedule-dependent antileukemia effect of CPT-11 using both in vitro and in vivo models. CPT-11 could potentially be a promising agent for the treatment of promyelocytic leukemia and requires further investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Marine microalgae are a source of biologically active compounds and are widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. It has been reported that Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have various beneficial pharmacological compounds that modulate immune responses; however, no studies have investigated the anti-cancer effects of Chlorella sorokiniana (CS) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of CS in two human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells), and its effects on tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. We also investigated the possible molecular mechanisms governing the pharmacological function of CS. Our results showed that exposure of the two cell lines to CS resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that CS might induce apoptosis in human NSCLC cells. Western blot analysis revealed that exposure to CS resulted in increased protein expression of the cleaved/activated forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, except caspase-8. ZDEVD (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-LEHD (caspase-9 inhibitor) were sufficient at preventing apoptosis in both A549 and CL1-5 cells, proving that CS induced cell death via the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Exposure of A549 and CL1-5 cells to CS for 24 h resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2 protein and increased expression of Bax protein as well as decreased expression of two IAP family proteins, survivin and XIAP. We demonstrated that CS induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells via downregulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and survivin. In addition, we also found that the tumors growth of subcutaneous xenograft in vivo was markedly inhibited after oral intake of CS.

  6. Orally available stilbene derivatives as potent HDAC inhibitors with antiproliferative activities and antitumor effects in human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kachhadia, Virendra; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Ponpandian, Thanasekaran; Vignesh, Radhakrishnan; Anandhan, Karnambaram; Prabhu, Daivasigamani; Rajendran, Praveen; Nidhyanandan, Saranya; Roy, Anshu Mittal; Ahamed, Fakrudeen Ali; Surendran, Narayanan; Rajagopal, Sriram; Narayanan, Shridhar; Gopalan, Balasubramanian

    2016-01-27

    Herein we report the synthesis and activity of a novel class of HDAC inhibitors based on 2, 3-diphenyl acrylic acid derivatives. The compounds in this series have shown to be potent HDAC inhibitors possessing significant antiproliferative activity. Further compounds in this series were subjected to metabolic stability in human liver microsomes (HLM), mouse liver microsomes (MLM), and exhibits promising stability in both. These efforts culminated with the identification of a developmental candidate (5a), which displayed desirable PK/PD relationships, significant efficacy in the xenograft models and attractive ADME profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel, selective inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptors that shows a potent broad spectrum of antitumor activity in several tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Genshi; Li, Wei-Ying; Chen, Daohong; Henry, James R; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Zhaogen; Zia-Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Bloem, Laura; Zhai, Yan; Huss, Karen; Peng, Sheng-Bin; McCann, Denis J

    2011-11-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are tyrosine kinases that are present in many types of endothelial and tumor cells and play an important role in tumor cell growth, survival, and migration as well as in maintaining tumor angiogenesis. Overexpression of FGFRs or aberrant regulation of their activities has been implicated in many forms of human malignancies. Therefore, targeting FGFRs represents an attractive strategy for development of cancer treatment options by simultaneously inhibiting tumor cell growth, survival, and migration as well as tumor angiogenesis. Here, we describe a potent, selective, small-molecule FGFR inhibitor, (R)-(E)-2-(4-(2-(5-(1-(3,5-Dichloropyridin-4-yl)ethoxy)-1H-indazol-3yl)vinyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethanol, designated as LY2874455. This molecule is active against all 4 FGFRs, with a similar potency in biochemical assays. It exhibits a potent activity against FGF/FGFR-mediated signaling in several cancer cell lines and shows an excellent broad spectrum of antitumor activity in several tumor xenograft models representing the major FGF/FGFR relevant tumor histologies including lung, gastric, and bladder cancers and multiple myeloma, and with a well-defined pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship. LY2874455 also exhibits a 6- to 9-fold in vitro and in vivo selectivity on inhibition of FGF- over VEGF-mediated target signaling in mice. Furthermore, LY2874455 did not show VEGF receptor 2-mediated toxicities such as hypertension at efficacious doses. Currently, this molecule is being evaluated for its potential use in the clinic.

  8. Fluence plays a critical role on the subsequent distribution of chemotherapy and tumor growth delay in murine mesothelioma xenografts pre-treated by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yabo; Wang, Xingyu; Le Bitoux, Marie-Aude; Wagnieres, Georges; Vandenbergh, Hubert; Gonzalez, Michel; Ris, Hans-Beat; Perentes, Jean Y; Krueger, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    The pre-conditioning of tumor vessels by low-dose photodynamic therapy (L-PDT) was shown to enhance the distribution of chemotherapy in different tumor types. However, how light dose affects drug distribution and tumor response is unknown. Here we determined the effect of L-PDT fluence on vascular transport in human mesothelioma xenografts. The best L-PDT conditions regarding drug transport were then combined with Lipoplatin(®) to determine tumor response. Nude mice bearing dorsal skinfold chambers were implanted with H-Meso1 cells. Tumors were treated by Visudyne(®) -mediated photodynamic therapy with 100 mW/cm(2) fluence rate and a variable fluence (5, 10, 30, and 50 J/cm(2) ). FITC-Dextran (FITC-D) distribution was assessed in real time in tumor and normal tissues. Tumor response was then determined with best L-PDT conditions combined to Lipoplatin(®) and compared to controls in luciferase expressing H-Meso1 tumors by size and whole body bioluminescence assessment (n = 7/group). Tumor uptake of FITC-D following L-PDT was significantly enhanced by 10-fold in the 10 J/cm(2) but not in the 5, 30, and 50 J/cm(2) groups compared to controls. Normal surrounding tissue uptake of FITC-D following L-PDT was significantly enhanced in the 30 J/cm(2) and 50 J/cm(2) groups compared to controls. Altogether, the FITC-D tumor to normal tissue ratio was significantly higher in the 10 J/cm(2) group compared others. Tumor growth was significantly delayed in animals treated by 10 J/cm2-L-PDT combined to Lipoplatin(®) compared to controls. Fluence of L-PDT is critical for the optimal distribution and effect of subsequently administered chemotherapy. These findings have an importance for the clinical translation of the vascular L-PDT concept in the clinics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel

    Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conductedmore » by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K{sub i}) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V{sub d}) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.« less

  10. Sequential Systemic Administrations of Combretastatin A4 Phosphate and Radioiodinated Hypericin Exert Synergistic Targeted Theranostic Effects with Prolonged Survival on SCID Mice Carrying Bifocal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Chen, Feng; Feng, Yuanbo; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Guozhi; Nuyts, Johan; de Witte, Peter; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Jie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Based on the soil-to-seeds principle, we explored the small-molecular sequential dual-targeting theranostic strategy (SMSDTTS) for prolonged survival and imaging detectability in a xenograft tumor model. Materials and Methods: Thirty severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing bilateral radiation-induced fibrosarcoma-1 (RIF-1) subcutaneously were divided into group A of SMSDTTS with sequential intravenous injections of combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) and 131I-iodohypericin (131I-Hyp) at a 24 h interval; group B of single targeting control with CA4P and vehicle of 131I-Hyp; and group C of vehicle control (10 mice per group). Tumoricidal events were monitored by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and planar gamma scintiscan, and validated by ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology. Besides, 9 mice received sequential intravenous injections of CA4P and 131I-Hyp were subjected to biodistribution analysis at 24, 72 and 120 h. Results: Gamma counting revealed fast clearance of 131I-Hyp from normal organs but intense accumulation in necrotic tumor over 120 h. After only one treatment, significantly prolonged survival (p<0.001) was found in group A compared to group B and C with median survival of 33, 22, and 21 days respectively. Tumor volume on day 15 was 2.0 ± 0.89, 5.66 ± 1.66, and 5.02 ± 1.0 cm3 with tumor doubling time 7.8 ± 2.8, 4.4 ± 0.67, and 4.5 ± 0.5 days respectively. SMSDTTS treated tumors were visualized as hot spots on gamma scintiscans, and necrosis over tumor ratio remained consistently high on MRI, autoradiography and histology. Conclusion: The synergistic antitumor effects, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theranostic property, and good tolerance of the SMSDTTS were evident in this experiment, which warrants further development for preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:23423247

  11. Anti-tumor activity of high-dose EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and sequential docetaxel in wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer cell nude mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Zhang, Qianqian; Fang, Shu; Han, Xiao; Wang, Zhehai

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is still a challenge. This study explored antitumor activity of high-dose icotinib (an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus sequential docetaxel against wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells-generated nude mouse xenografts. Nude mice were subcutaneously injected with wild-type EGFR NSCLC A549 cells and divided into different groups for 3-week treatment. Tumor xenograft volumes were monitored and recorded, and at the end of experiments, tumor xenografts were removed for Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Compared to control groups (negative control, regular-dose icotinib [IcoR], high-dose icotinib [IcoH], and docetaxel [DTX]) and regular icotinib dose (60 mg/kg) with docetaxel, treatment of mice with a high-dose (1200 mg/kg) of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel for 3 weeks (IcoH-DTX) had an additive effect on suppression of tumor xenograft size and volume (P < 0.05). Icotinib-containing treatments markedly reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase B (Akt), but only the high-dose icotinib-containing treatments showed an additive effect on CD34 inhibition (P < 0.05), an indication of reduced microvessel density in tumor xenografts. Moreover, high-dose icotinib plus docetaxel had a similar effect on mouse weight loss (a common way to measure adverse reactions in mice), compared to the other treatment combinations. The study indicate that the high dose of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel (IcoH-DTX) have an additive effect on suppressing the growth of wild-type EGFR NSCLC cell nude mouse xenografts, possibly through microvessel density reduction. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:27852073

  12. α-Mangostin: a dietary antioxidant derived from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. inhibits pancreatic tumor growth in xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-08-10

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC.

  13. In vivo molecular imaging of gastric cancer in human-murine xenograft models with confocal laser endomicroscopy using a tumor vascular homing peptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Yin, Jipeng; Liu, Changhao; Guan, Guofeng; Shi, Doufei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Bing; Tian, Zuhong; Zhao, Jing; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Wu, Kaichun; Ding, Jie

    2015-01-28

    The early detection of premalignant lesions and cancers are very important for improving the survival of patients with gastric malignancies. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel imaging tool for achieving real-time microscopy during the ongoing endoscopy at subcellular resolution. In the present study, to evaluate the feasibility of real-time molecular imaging of GEBP11 by CLE in gastric cancer, CLE was performed on two types of tumor-bearing mice models, as well as surgical specimens of patients with gastric cancer, after the application of GEBP11. A whole-body fluorescent imaging device was first used to screen for the strongest specific fluorescent signal in xenograft models. Next, the tumor sites, as well as human tissues, were scanned with CLE. After this, targeted specimens were obtained for fluorescence microscopy and histology. We confirmed that GEBP11 could specifically bind to co-HUVECs by means of CLE in cell experiments. Thereafter, a specific signal was observed in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft models in vivo after the injection of FITC-GEBP11 via tail vein, whereas the group injected with FITC-URP showed no fluorescent signals. In human tissues, a specific signal of GEBP11 was observed in 26/28 neoplastic specimens and in 8/28 samples of non-neoplastic specimens from the patients (p < 0.01). The findings from ex vivo immunofluorescence microscopy of cryostat sections correlated well with that obtained by CLE. These findings indicate that the peptide, GEBP11, might be a potential candidate for the molecular imaging of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of primary cell culture and an intracranial xenograft model of pediatric ependymoma: a prospect for therapy development and understanding of tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Caminada de Toledo, Silvia Regina; Mara de Oliveira, Daniela; Cabral, Francisco Romero; Gabriel de Souza, Jean; Boufleur, Pamela; Marti, Luciana C; Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Ferreira da Cruz, Edgar; Paiva, Fernando F; Malheiros, Suzana M F; de Paiva Neto, Manoel A; Tannús, Alberto; Mascarenhas de Oliveira, Sérgio; Silva, Nasjla Saba; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Petrilli, Antonio Sérgio; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2018-04-24

    Ependymoma (EPN), the third most common pediatric brain tumor, is a central nervous system (CNS) malignancy originating from the walls of the ventricular system. Surgical resection followed by radiation therapy has been the primary treatment for most pediatric intracranial EPNs. Despite numerous studies into the prognostic value of histological classification, the extent of surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy, there have been relatively few studies into the molecular and cellular biology of EPNs. We elucidated the ultrastructure of the cultured EPN cells and characterized their profile of immunophenotypic pluripotency markers (CD133, CD90, SSEA-3, CXCR4). We established an experimental EPN model by the intracerebroventricular infusion of EPN cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles (MION), thereby generating a tumor and providing a clinically relevant animal model. MRI analysis was shown to be a valuable tool when combined with effective MION labeling techniques to accompany EPN growth. We demonstrated that GFAP/CD133+CD90+/CD44+ EPN cells maintained key histopathological and growth characteristics of the original patient tumor. The characterization of EPN cells and the experimental model could facilitate biological studies and preclinical drug screening for pediatric EPNs. In this work, we established notoriously challenging primary cell culture of anaplastic EPNs (WHO grade III) localized in the posterior fossa (PF), using EPNs obtained from 1 to 10-year-old patients ( n = 07), and then characterized their immunophenotype and ultrastructure to finally develop a xenograft model.

  15. A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Nardella, Caterina; Chen, Zhenbang; Clohessy, John G.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Cheng, Ke; Varmeh, Shohreh; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rosivatz, Erika; Woscholski, Rudiger; Cognetti, Francesco; Scher, Howard I.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible cell growth arrest, a process termed cellular senescence, is emerging as an intrinsic tumor suppressive mechanism. Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to be invariably preceded by hyperproliferation, aberrant replication, and activation of a DNA damage checkpoint response (DDR), rendering therapeutic enhancement of this process unsuitable for cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated in a mouse model of prostate cancer that inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) elicits a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Pten-loss–induced cellular senescence (PICS) represents a senescence response that is distinct from oncogene-induced senescence and can be targeted for cancer therapy. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we determined that PICS occurs rapidly after Pten inactivation, in the absence of cellular proliferation and DDR. Further, we found that PICS is associated with enhanced p53 translation. Consistent with these data, we showed that in mice p53-stabilizing drugs potentiated PICS and its tumor suppressive potential. Importantly, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN drives senescence and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo in a human xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, our data identify a type of cellular senescence that can be triggered in nonproliferating cells in the absence of DNA damage, which we believe will be useful for developing a “pro-senescence” approach for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:20197621

  16. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R regresses an osteosarcoma in a patient-derived xenograft model resistant to a molecular-targeting drug.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara; Federman, Noah; Singh, Arun; Elliott, Irmina; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-01-31

    Osteosarcoma occurs mostly in children and young adults, who are treated with multiple agents in combination with limb-salvage surgery. However, the overall 5-year survival rate for patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma is 20-30% which has not improved significantly over 30 years. Refractory patients would benefit from precise individualized therapy. We report here that a patient-derived osteosarcoma growing in a subcutaneous nude-mouse model was regressed by tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R, p<0.001 compared to untreated control). The osteosarcoma was only partially sensitive to the molecular-targeting drug sorafenib, which did not arrest its growth. S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more effective than sorafenib (P <0.001). S. typhimurium grew in the treated tumors and caused extensive necrosis of the tumor tissue. These data show that S. typhimurium A1-R is powerful therapy for an osteosarcoma patient-derived xenograft model.

  17. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R regresses an osteosarcoma in a patient-derived xenograft model resistant to a molecular-targeting drug

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Nelson, Scott D.; Dry, Sarah M.; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara; Federman, Noah; Singh, Arun; Elliott, Irmina; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma occurs mostly in children and young adults, who are treated with multiple agents in combination with limb-salvage surgery. However, the overall 5-year survival rate for patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma is 20-30% which has not improved significantly over 30 years. Refractory patients would benefit from precise individualized therapy. We report here that a patient-derived osteosarcoma growing in a subcutaneous nude-mouse model was regressed by tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R, p<0.001 compared to untreated control). The osteosarcoma was only partially sensitive to the molecular-targeting drug sorafenib, which did not arrest its growth. S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more effective than sorafenib (P <0.001). S. typhimurium grew in the treated tumors and caused extensive necrosis of the tumor tissue. These data show that S. typhimurium A1-R is powerful therapy for an osteosarcoma patient-derived xenograft model. PMID:28030831

  18. Establishment of primary cell culture and an intracranial xenograft model of pediatric ependymoma: a prospect for therapy development and understanding of tumor biology

    PubMed Central

    Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Caminada de Toledo, Silvia Regina; Mara de Oliveira, Daniela; Cabral, Francisco Romero; Gabriel de Souza, Jean; Boufleur, Pamela; Marti, Luciana C.; Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Ferreira da Cruz, Edgar; Paiva, Fernando F.; Malheiros, Suzana M.F.; de Paiva Neto, Manoel A.; Tannús, Alberto; Mascarenhas de Oliveira, Sérgio; Silva, Nasjla Saba; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Petrilli, Antonio Sérgio; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2018-01-01

    Background Ependymoma (EPN), the third most common pediatric brain tumor, is a central nervous system (CNS) malignancy originating from the walls of the ventricular system. Surgical resection followed by radiation therapy has been the primary treatment for most pediatric intracranial EPNs. Despite numerous studies into the prognostic value of histological classification, the extent of surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy, there have been relatively few studies into the molecular and cellular biology of EPNs. Results We elucidated the ultrastructure of the cultured EPN cells and characterized their profile of immunophenotypic pluripotency markers (CD133, CD90, SSEA-3, CXCR4). We established an experimental EPN model by the intracerebroventricular infusion of EPN cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles (MION), thereby generating a tumor and providing a clinically relevant animal model. MRI analysis was shown to be a valuable tool when combined with effective MION labeling techniques to accompany EPN growth. Conclusions We demonstrated that GFAP/CD133+CD90+/CD44+ EPN cells maintained key histopathological and growth characteristics of the original patient tumor. The characterization of EPN cells and the experimental model could facilitate biological studies and preclinical drug screening for pediatric EPNs. Methods In this work, we established notoriously challenging primary cell culture of anaplastic EPNs (WHO grade III) localized in the posterior fossa (PF), using EPNs obtained from 1 to 10-year-old patients (n = 07), and then characterized their immunophenotype and ultrastructure to finally develop a xenograft model. PMID:29774098

  19. Cryo-image Analysis of Tumor Cell Migration, Invasion, and Dispersal in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Qutaish, Mohammed Q.; Sullivant, Kristin E.; Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Lu, Hong; Roy, Debashish; Wang, Jing; Basilion, James P.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Wilson, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goals of this study were to create cryo-imaging methods to quantify characteristics (size, dispersal, and blood vessel density) of mouse orthotopic models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to enable studies of tumor biology, targeted imaging agents, and theranostic nanoparticles. Procedures Green fluorescent protein-labeled, human glioma LN-229 cells were implanted into mouse brain. At 20–38 days, cryo-imaging gave whole brain, 4-GB, 3D microscopic images of bright field anatomy, including vasculature, and fluorescent tumor. Image analysis/visualization methods were developed. Results Vessel visualization and segmentation methods successfully enabled analyses. The main tumor mass volume, the number of dispersed clusters, the number of cells/cluster, and the percent dispersed volume all increase with age of the tumor. Histograms of dispersal distance give a mean and median of 63 and 56 μm, respectively, averaged over all brains. Dispersal distance tends to increase with age of the tumors. Dispersal tends to occur along blood vessels. Blood vessel density did not appear to increase in and around the tumor with this cell line. Conclusion Cryo-imaging and software allow, for the first time, 3D, whole brain, microscopic characterization of a tumor from a particular cell line. LN-229 exhibits considerable dispersal along blood vessels, a characteristic of human tumors that limits treatment success. PMID:22125093

  20. Dynamics of different-sized solid-state nanocrystals as tracers for a drug-delivery system in the interstitium of a human tumor xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Masaaki; Higuchi, Hideo; Takeda, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent anticancer drugs have been made larger to pass selectively through tumor vessels and stay in the interstitium. Understanding drug movement in association with its size at the single-molecule level and estimating the time needed to reach the targeted organ is indispensable for optimizing drug delivery because single cell-targeted therapy is the ongoing paradigm. This report describes the tracking of single solid nanoparticles in tumor xenografts and the estimation of arrival time. Methods Different-sized nanoparticles measuring 20, 40, and 100 nm were injected into the tail vein of the female Balb/c nu/nu mice bearing human breast cancer on their backs. The movements of the nanoparticles were visualized through the dorsal skin-fold chamber with the high-speed confocal microscopy that we manufactured. Results An analysis of the particle trajectories revealed diffusion to be inversely related to the particle size and position in the tumor, whereas the velocity of the directed movement was related to the position. The difference in the velocity was the greatest for 40-nm particles in the perivascular to the intercellular region: difference = 5.8 nm/s. The arrival time of individual nanoparticles at tumor cells was simulated. The estimated times for the 20-, 40-, and 100-nm particles to reach the tumor cells were 158.0, 218.5, and 389.4 minutes, respectively, after extravasation. Conclusions This result suggests that the particle size can be individually designed for each goal. These data and methods are also important for understanding drug pharmacokinetics. Although this method may be subject to interference by surface molecules attached on the particles, it has the potential to elucidate the pharmacokinetics involved in constructing novel drug-delivery systems involving cell-targeted therapy. PMID:19575785

  1. Low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide combined with vascular disrupting therapy induces potent antitumor activity in preclinical human tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Daenen, Laura G; Shaked, Yuval; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Voest, Emile E; Hoffman, Robert M; Chaplin, David J; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents preferentially target the established but abnormal tumor vasculature, resulting in extensive intratumoral hypoxia and cell death. However, a rim of viable tumor tissue remains from which angiogenesis-dependent regrowth can occur, in part through the mobilization and tumor colonization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP). Cotreatment with an agent that blocks CEPs, such as a vascular endothelial growth factor pathway-targeting biological antiangiogenic drug, results in enhanced antitumor efficacy. We asked whether an alternative therapeutic modality, low-dose metronomic chemotherapy, could achieve the same result given its CEP-targeting effects. We studied the combination of the vascular disrupting agent OXi4503 with daily administration of CEP-inhibiting, low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide to treat primary orthotopic tumors with the use of the 231/LM2-4 breast cancer cell line and MeWo melanoma cell line. In addition, CEP mobilization and various tumor characteristics were assessed. We found that daily p.o. low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide was capable of preventing the CEP spike and tumor colonization induced by OXi4503. This was associated with a decrease in the tumor rim and marked suppression of primary 231/LM2-4 growth in nude as well as severe combined immunodeficient mice. Similar results were found in MeWo-bearing nude mice. The delay in tumor growth was accompanied by significant decreases in microvessel density, perfusion, and proliferation, and a significant increase in tumor cell apoptosis. No overt toxicity was observed. The combination of OXi4503 and metronomic chemotherapy results in prolonged tumor control, thereby expanding the list of therapeutic agents that can be successfully integrated with metronomic low-dose chemotherapy.

  2. β-HPV Infection Correlates with Early Stages of Carcinogenesis in Skin Tumors and Patient-Derived Xenografts from a Kidney Transplant Recipient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Borgogna, Cinzia; Olivero, Carlotta; Lanfredini, Simone; Calati, Federica; De Andrea, Marco; Zavattaro, Elisa; Savoia, Paola; Trisolini, Elena; Boldorini, Renzo; Patel, Girish K; Gariglio, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Many malignancies that occur in high excess in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are due to viruses that thrive in the setting of immunosuppression. Keratinocyte carcinoma (KC), the most frequently occurring cancer type in KTR, has been associated with skin infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) from the beta genus. In this report, we extend our previous investigation aimed at identifying the presence of active β-HPV infection in skin tumors from KTRs through detection of viral protein expression. Using a combination of antibodies raised against the E4 and L1 proteins of the β-genotypes, we were able to visualize infection in five tumors [one keratoacanthoma (KA), three actinic keratoses (AKs), and one seborrheic keratoses (SKs)] that were all removed from two patients who had been both transplanted twice, had developed multiple KCs, and presented with a long history of immunosuppression (>30 years). These infected tissues displayed intraepidermal hyperplasia and increased expression of the ΔNp63 protein, which extended into the upper epithelial layers. In addition, using a xenograft model system in nude mice displaying a humanized stromal bed in the site of grafting, we successfully engrafted three AKs, two of which were derived from the aforementioned KTRs and displayed β-HPV infection in the original tumor. Of note, one AK-derived xenograft, along with its ensuing lymph node metastasis, was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the latter, both β-HPV infection and ΔNp63 expression were no longer detectable. Although the overall success rate of engrafting was very low, the results of this study show for the first time that β-HPV + and ΔNp63 + intraepidermal hyperplasia can indeed progress to an aggressive SCC able to metastasize. Consistent with a series of reports attributing a causative role of β-HPV at early stages of skin carcinogenesis through ΔNp63 induction and increased keratinocytes stemness, here we provide in vivo evidence that

  3. β-HPV Infection Correlates with Early Stages of Carcinogenesis in Skin Tumors and Patient-Derived Xenografts from a Kidney Transplant Recipient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Borgogna, Cinzia; Olivero, Carlotta; Lanfredini, Simone; Calati, Federica; De Andrea, Marco; Zavattaro, Elisa; Savoia, Paola; Trisolini, Elena; Boldorini, Renzo; Patel, Girish K.; Gariglio, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Many malignancies that occur in high excess in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are due to viruses that thrive in the setting of immunosuppression. Keratinocyte carcinoma (KC), the most frequently occurring cancer type in KTR, has been associated with skin infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) from the beta genus. In this report, we extend our previous investigation aimed at identifying the presence of active β-HPV infection in skin tumors from KTRs through detection of viral protein expression. Using a combination of antibodies raised against the E4 and L1 proteins of the β-genotypes, we were able to visualize infection in five tumors [one keratoacanthoma (KA), three actinic keratoses (AKs), and one seborrheic keratoses (SKs)] that were all removed from two patients who had been both transplanted twice, had developed multiple KCs, and presented with a long history of immunosuppression (>30 years). These infected tissues displayed intraepidermal hyperplasia and increased expression of the ΔNp63 protein, which extended into the upper epithelial layers. In addition, using a xenograft model system in nude mice displaying a humanized stromal bed in the site of grafting, we successfully engrafted three AKs, two of which were derived from the aforementioned KTRs and displayed β-HPV infection in the original tumor. Of note, one AK-derived xenograft, along with its ensuing lymph node metastasis, was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the latter, both β-HPV infection and ΔNp63 expression were no longer detectable. Although the overall success rate of engrafting was very low, the results of this study show for the first time that β-HPV+ and ΔNp63+ intraepidermal hyperplasia can indeed progress to an aggressive SCC able to metastasize. Consistent with a series of reports attributing a causative role of β-HPV at early stages of skin carcinogenesis through ΔNp63 induction and increased keratinocytes stemness, here we provide in vivo evidence that

  4. Reduced 64Cu uptake and tumor growth inhibition by knockdown of human copper transporter 1 in xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J; Peng, Fangyu

    2014-04-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased (64)Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using (64)CuCl2 as a radiotracer ((64)CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor (64)Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of (64)Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic (64)CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular (64)Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of (64)Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of (64)Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer (64)CuCl2, the (64)Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the (64)Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P < 0.001) by PET quantification. Moreover, the volumes of prostate cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm(3) for Lenti-hCtr1-sh

  5. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  6. Light at night activates IGF-1R/PDK1 signaling and accelerates tumor growth in human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinghai; Dauchy, Robert T; Tirrell, Paul C; Wu, Steven S; Lynch, Darin T; Jitawatanarat, Potjana; Burrington, Christine M; Dauchy, Erin M; Blask, David E; Greene, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Regulation of diurnal and circadian rhythms and cell proliferation are coupled in all mammals, including humans. However, the molecular mechanisms by which diurnal and circadian rhythms regulate cell proliferation are relatively poorly understood. In this study, we report that tumor growth in nude rats bearing human steroid receptor-negative MCF-7 breast tumors can be significantly accelerated by exposing the rats to light at night (LAN). Under normal conditions of an alternating light/dark cycle, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) levels in tumors were maximal in the early light phase but remained at very low levels throughout the daily 24-hour cycle period monitored. Surprisingly, PCNA was expressed in tumors continually at a high level throughout the entire 24-hour period in LAN-exposed nude rats. Daily fluctuations of Akt and mitogen activated protein kinase activation in tumors were also disrupted by LAN. These fluctuations did not track with PCNA changes, but we found that activation of the Akt stimulatory kinase phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) directly correlated with PCNA levels. Expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), an upstream signaling molecule for PDK1, also correlated with fluctuations of PDK1/PCNA in the LAN group. In addition, circulating IGF-1 concentrations were elevated in LAN-exposed tumor-bearing nude rats. Finally, RNAi-mediated knockdown of PDK1 led to a reduction in PCNA expression and cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, indicating that PDK1 regulates breast cancer growth in a manner correlated with PCNA expression. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that LAN exposure can accelerate tumor growth in vivo, in part through continuous activation of IGF-1R/PDK1 signaling.

  7. Sulforaphane suppresses the growth of glioblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cell-like spheroids, and tumor xenografts through multiple cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Reza Saadatzadeh, M; Wang, Haiyan; Nguyen, Angie; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; Cai, Wenjing; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Halum, Stacey L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Pollok, Karen E; Safa, Ahmad R

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Defects in the apoptotic machinery and augmented survival signals contribute to drug resistance in glioblastoma (GBM). Moreover, another complexity related to GBM treatment is the concept that GBM development and recurrence may arise from the expression of GBM stem cells (GSCs). Therefore, the use of a multifaceted approach or multitargeted agents that affect specific tumor cell characteristics will likely be necessary to successfully eradicate GBM. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of sulforaphane (SFN)-a constituent of cruciferous vegetables with a multitargeted effect-as a therapeutic agent for GBM. METHODS The inhibitory effects of SFN on established cell lines, early primary cultures, CD133-positive GSCs, GSC-derived spheroids, and GBM xenografts were evaluated using various methods, including GSC isolation and the sphere-forming assay, analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, cell growth inhibition assay, comet assays for assessing SFN-triggered DNA damage, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, and the determination of in vivo efficacy as assessed in human GBM xenograft models. RESULTS SFN triggered the significant inhibition of cell survival and induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with caspase 3 and caspase 7 activation. Moreover, SFN triggered the formation of mitochondrial ROS, and SFN-triggered cell death was ROS dependent. Comet assays revealed that SFN increased single- and double-strand DNA breaks in GBM. Compared with the vehicle control cells, a significantly higher amount of γ-H2AX foci correlated with an increase in DNA double-strand breaks in the SFN-treated samples. Furthermore, SFN robustly inhibited the growth of GBM cell-induced cell death in established cell cultures and early-passage primary cultures and, most importantly, was effective in eliminating GSCs, which play a major role in drug resistance and disease recurrence. In vivo studies revealed that SFN

  8. Anticancer Effect of Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish Venom on HepG2 Cells and a Tumor Xenograft Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seong Kyeong; Kim, Munki; Pyo, Min Jung; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Sujeoung; Yoon, Won Duk; Han, Chang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Various kinds of animal venoms and their components have been widely studied for potential therapeutic applications. This study evaluated whether Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV) has anticancer activity. NnV strongly induced cytotoxicity of HepG2 cells through apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by alterations of chromatic morphology, activation of procaspase-3, and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, NnV inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, PDK1, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and 4EBP1, whereas it enhanced the expression of p-PTEN. Interestingly, NnV also inactivated the negative feedback loops associated with Akt activation, as demonstrated by downregulation of Akt at Ser473 and mTOR at Ser2481. The anticancer effect of NnV was significant in a HepG2 xenograft mouse model, with no obvious toxicity. HepG2 cell death by NnV was inhibited by tetracycline, metalloprotease inhibitor, suggesting that metalloprotease component in NnV is closely related to the anticancer effects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that NnV exerts highly selective cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells via dual inhibition of the Akt and mTOR signaling pathways, but not in normal cells. PMID:28785288

  9. Brain- and brain tumor-penetrating disulfiram nanoparticles: Sequence of cytotoxic events and efficacy in human glioma cell lines and intracranial xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Madala, Hanumantha Rao; Punganuru, Surendra R.; Ali-Osman, Francis; Zhang, Ruiwen; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2018-01-01

    There is great interest in repurposing disulfiram (DSF), a rapidly metabolizing nontoxic drug, for brain cancers and other cancers. To overcome the instability and low therapeutic efficacy, we engineered passively-targeted DSF-nanoparticles (DSFNPs) using biodegradable monomethoxy (polyethylene glycol) d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid (mPEG-PLGA) matrix. The physicochemical properties, cellular uptake and the blood brain-barrier permeability of DSFNPs were investigated. The DSFNPs were highly stable with a size of ∼70 nm with a >90% entrapment. Injection of the nanoparticles labeled with HITC, a near-infrared dye into normal mice and tumor-bearing nude mice followed by in vivo imaging showed a selective accumulation of the formulation within the brain and subcutaneous tumors for >24 h, indicating an increased plasma half-life and entry of DSF into desired sites. The DSFNPs induced a potent and preferential killing of many brain tumor cell lines in cytotoxicity assays. Confocal microscopy showed a quick internalization of the nanoparticles in tumor cells followed by initial accumulation in lysosomes and subsequently in mitochondria. DSFNPs induced high levels of ROS and led to a marked loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Activation of the MAP-kinase pathway leading to a nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and altered expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins were also observed. DSFNPs induced a powerful and significant regression of intracranial medulloblastoma xenografts compared to the marginal efficacy of unencapsulated DSF. Together, we show that passively targeted DSFNPs can affect multiple targets, trigger potent anticancer effects, and can offer a sustained drug supply for brain cancer treatment through an enhanced permeability retention (EPR). PMID:29423059

  10. Reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for active targeting and intelligent delivery of doxorubicin to drug resistant CD44+ human breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yinan; Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Xie, Fang; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-05-10

    The existence of drug resistance poses a major obstacle for the treatment of various malignant human cancers. Here, we report on reduction-sensitive reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles based on HA-Lys-LA conjugates (Lys: l-lysine methyl ester, LA: lipoic acid) for active targeting delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to CD44+ breast cancers in vitro and in vivo, effectively overcoming drug resistance (ADR). HA-Lys-LA with degrees of substitution of 5, 10 and 28% formed robust nano-sized nanoparticles (152-219nm) following auto-crosslinking. DOX-loaded crosslinked nanoparticles revealed inhibited DOX release under physiological conditions while fast drug release in the presence of 10mM glutathione (GSH). Notably, MTT assays showed that DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles possessed an apparent targetability and a superior antitumor activity toward CD44 receptor overexpressing DOX-resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in MCF-7/ADR tumor xenografts in nude mice showed that DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles had a prolonged circulation time and a remarkably high accumulation in the tumor (12.71%ID/g). Notably, DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles exhibited effective inhibition of tumor growth while continuous tumor growth was observed for mice treated with free drug. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that in contrast to control groups, all mice treated with DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles survived over an experimental period of 44days. Importantly, DOX-loaded crosslinked HA nanoparticles caused low side effects. The reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanoparticles with excellent biocompatibility, CD44-targetability, and effective reversal of drug resistance have a great potential in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxygen Plasma-Fragmented KMnF3 Nanoparticle Benefits Contrast Enhancement for MR Imaging of a Patient-derived Tumor Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Yu, Lulu; Li, Yanshu; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jinsheng; Shu, Ting; Jing, Cai; Tang, Qun

    2018-06-11

    Magnetic nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for next-generation of imaging contrast agents and its performance was largely dependent on physico-chemistry properties. In this paper, A new type of "top down" fabrication technique was developed to synthesize ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticle as contrast enhancer. In detailed, home-made oxygen plasma generator fragments larger KMnF3 nanoparticle (22 nm) into smaller (<5 nm) particle with enhanced hydrophilicity, as massive activated oxygen species produced during plasma could severally etch the nanoparticle, and VUV light irradiated it heavily as well, leaving it weak crystallinity, even splitting into ultrafine particle, also its surface transformed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by oxidizing the passivated ligand, evidenced from the spectroscopy and microscopy. The fragmented nanoparticle is characteristic of unprecedented high longitudinal relaxivity (r1=35.52 mM-1.s-1) and appropriate biocompatibility. In healthy mouse, the ultrafine nanoparticle did not exert observable toxicity, evaluated by histology of the main organ and hemogram analysis, including kidney and liver function analysis. More interesting, the ultrasmall NP has very long circulation time, as its blood half time is around 20 hours. When applied as a contrast enhancer for MR imaging of patient-derived tumor xenograft model, the accumulation of KMnF3 nanoparticle within the tumor can be as high as averaged 12.13%ID per gram, which greatly shortens relaxation time of the tumor, therefore control-to-noise ratio got significant enhancement, relative to the same dosage of Gd-DTPA (Magvenist) (P<0.001). Our primary results demonstrate that fragmentation of nanoparticle via our home-made O2 plasma technique might be an effective route to fabricate ultrasmall NPs, and benefit their contrast effect as applied as MRI enhancer for clinical diagnosis of tumor. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetic evaluation of choline-bound gold nanoparticles in a human prostate tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Rene; Zhou, Joe; Yang, XiaoHong; Pervez, Nadim; Bédard, Eric Lr; Moore, Ronald B; Shaw, Andrew; Amanie, John; Roa, Wilson H

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have attracted significant attention in the treatment of cancer due to their potential as novel radiation enhancers, particularly when functionalized with various targeting ligands. The aim of this study was to assess the biodistribution and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a novel choline-bound GNP (choline-GNP) stabilized with polyethelenimine (PEI). Choline bound to 27 nm diameter GNPs was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Toxicity of choline-GNPs was examined on DU-145 prostate cancer cells using an MTT assay. Using balb/c mice bearing flank DU-145 prostate tumors, choline-GNPs bio-distribution was measured using inductively coupled mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Blood, heart, lung, liver, spleen, brain, kidney and tumor gold content were examined at multiple time points over a 24-hour period after tail vein injection. An MTT assay using DU-145 prostate cancer cells yielded a 95% cell viability 72 hours after choline-GNP administration. The tumor GNP area under the concentration-time curve during the first 4 hours (AUC0-4) was 2.2 µg/ml h, representing 13% of the circulating blood GNP concentration over the same time period. The maximum intra-tumor GNP concentration observed was 1.4% of the injected dose per gram of tumor tissue (%ID/g) one hour post injection. GNPs functionalized with choline demonstrates a viable future nanoparticle platform with increased intra-tumor uptake as compared to unconjugated GNPs. Decreased intra-hepatic accumulation appears to be the reason for the improved systemic bioavailability. The next logical translational investigation will incorporate external beam radiation with the observed maximum intra-tumor uptake.

  13. Improved synthesis and biological evaluation of Tc-99m radiolabeled AMO for miRNA imaging in tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Fan, Zhongyi; Sun, Hongwei; Feng, Yingying; Ma, Chao; Yan, Ping; Zhang, Chunli; Ma, Huan; Hao, Pan; Chen, Xueqi; Zheng, Zhibing; Xu, Xiaojie; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been considered as important biomarkers for malignant tumors. In this study, we introduced an improved (99m)Tc labeling method for noninvasive visualization of overexpressed miRNAs in tumor-bearing mice. Anti-miRNA-21 oligonucleotide (AMO) with partial 2'-O-methyl and phosphorothioate modification was designed and chemically synthesized. After conjugated with NHS-MAG3, AMO was labeled with (99m)Tc. Optimization was made to shorten reaction time and to improve labeling efficiency. Labeling efficiency was 97%, and specific activity was 2.78 MBq/ng. During 12 h, (99m)Tc-AMO showed no significant degradation by gel electrophoresis. Its radiochemical purity was stable, between 95.8% and 99.1%. Further, (99m)Tc-AMO decreased the level of miR-21 and increased the expression of PTEN protein at cellular level, shown by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Fluorescent protein labeled AMO displayed specific distribution and good stability in tumor cells. After the administration in tumor-bearing mice, (99m)Tc-AMO showed more radioactive uptake in the miR-21 over-expressed tumors than scramble control. Biodistribution results further proved the significant difference of tumor uptake between (99m)Tc-AMO and (99m)Tc-control. Therefore, this study presents an improved method with shorten time to prepare a (99m)Tc radiolabeled AMO. In addition, it supports the role of (99m)Tc-AMO for noninvasive visualization of miR-21 in malignant tumors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. In vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of the VO-chrysin complex on a new three-dimensional osteosarcoma spheroids model and a xenograft tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    León, Ignacio E; Cadavid-Vargas, Juan F; Resasco, Agustina; Maschi, Fabricio; Ayala, Miguel A; Carbone, Cecilia; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary tumor of bone, occurring predominantly in the second decade of life. High-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgical resection have improved prognosis, with long-term survival for patients with localized disease. Vanadium is an ultra-trace element that after being absorbed accumulates in bone. Besides, vanadium compounds have been studied during recent years to be considered as representative of a new class of non-platinum antitumor agents. Moreover, flavonoids are a wide family of polyphenolic compounds that display many interesting biological effects. Since coordination of ligands to metals can improve the pharmacological properties, we report herein, for the first time, the in vitro and in vivo effects of an oxidovanadium(IV) complex with the flavonoid chrysin on the new 3D human osteosarcoma and xenograft osteosarcoma mice models. The pharmacological results show that VOchrys inhibited the cell viability affecting the shape and volume of the spheroids and VOchrys suppressed MG-63 tumor growth in the nude mice without inducing toxicity and side effects. As a whole, the results presented herein demonstrate that the antitumor action of the complex was very promissory on human osteosarcoma models, whereby suggesting that VOchrys is a potentially good candidate for future use in alternative antitumor treatments.

  15. In Vivo magnetic resonance imaging of xenografted tumors using FTH1 reporter gene expression controlled by a tet-on switch.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoya; Cai, Jinhua; Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Qin, Yong; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Longlun; Liao, Yifan

    2016-11-29

    As a promising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reporter, ferritin has been used to track cells in vivo; however, its continuous overexpression can be cytotoxic, which restricts its application. In this study, we aimed to develop a switch to turn this genetic reporter "on" or "off" while monitoring cell grafts via MRI. To accomplish this, we genetically modified the ferritin heavy chain (FTH1) with a Tet-On switch and assessed the expression of FTH1 in transduced neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) in vitro and in xenografted tumors in vivo. We found that FTH1 expression induced by doxycycline (Dox) in SK-N-SH-FTH1 cells depended on treatment dose and duration. We successfully detected T2-weighted MRI contrast in cell grafts after switching "on" the reporter gene using Dox, and this contrast disappeared when we switched it "off". The genetic reporter FTH1 can thus be switched "on" or "off" throughout longitudinal monitoring of cell grafts, limiting expression to when MRI contrast is needed. The controllable imaging system we have developed minimizes risks from constitutive reporter gene overexpression and facilitates tumor cell monitoring in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Improved decision making for prioritizing tumor targeting antibodies in human xenografts: Utility of fluorescence imaging to verify tumor target expression, antibody binding and optimization of dosage and application schedule.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Michael; Haupt, Ute; Scheuer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical efficacy studies of antibodies targeting a tumor-associated antigen are only justified when the expression of the relevant antigen has been demonstrated. Conventionally, antigen expression level is examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue section. This method represents the diagnostic "gold standard" for tumor target evaluation, but is affected by a number of factors, such as epitope masking and insufficient antigen retrieval. As a consequence, variances and discrepancies in histological staining results can occur, which may influence decision-making and therapeutic outcome. To overcome these problems, we have used different fluorescence-labeled therapeutic antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family members and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in combination with fluorescence imaging modalities to determine tumor antigen expression, drug-target interaction, and biodistribution and tumor saturation kinetics in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. For this, whole-body fluorescence intensities of labeled antibodies, applied as a single compound or antibody mixture, were measured in Calu-1 and Calu-3 tumor-bearing mice, then ex vivo multispectral tumor tissue analysis at microscopic resolution was performed. With the aid of this simple and fast imaging method, we were able to analyze the tumor cell receptor status of HER1-3 and IGF1R, monitor the antibody-target interaction and evaluate the receptor binding sites of anti-HER2-targeting antibodies. Based on this, the most suitable tumor model, best therapeutic antibody, and optimal treatment dosage and application schedule was selected. Predictions drawn from obtained imaging data were in excellent concordance with outcome of conducted preclinical efficacy studies. Our results clearly demonstrate the great potential of combined in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging for the preclinical development and characterization of

  17. DICER governs characteristics of glioma stem cells and the resulting tumors in xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Singh, Sanjay; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Burrell, Kelly; Li, Mira; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Koch, Elizabeth; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Chang, Jeffery T; Wouters, Bradly; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-08-30

    The RNAse III endonuclease DICER is a key regulator of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and is frequently decreased in a variety of malignancies. We characterized the role of DICER in glioblastoma (GB), specifically demonstrating its effects on the ability of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) to form tumors in a mouse model of GB. DICER silencing in GSCs reduced their stem cell characteristics, while tumors arising from these cells were more aggressive, larger in volume, and displayed a higher proliferation index and lineage differentiation. The resulting tumors, however, were more sensitive to radiation treatment. Our results demonstrate that DICER silencing enhances the tumorigenic potential of GSCs, providing a platform for analysis of specific relevant miRNAs and development of potentially novel therapies against GB.

  18. Evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced and photoacoustic CT to assess intra-tumor heterogeneity in xenograft mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Dzemidzic, Mario; Liang, Yun; Kruger, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate photoacoustic CT spectroscopy (PCT-S) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) ability to measure parameters - oxygen saturation and vascular physiology - associated with the intra-tumor oxygenation status. Material and Methods: Breast (VEGF165 enhance MCF-7) and ovarian (SKOV3x) cancer cells were implanted into the fat pads and flanks of immune deficient mice and allowed to grow to a diameter of 8-15 mm. CT was used to determine physiological parameters by acquiring a sequence of scans over a 10 minute period after an i.v. injection of a radio-opaque contrast agent (Isovue). These time-dependent contrast-enhanced curves were fit to a two-compartmental model determining tumor perfusion, fractional plasma volume, permeability-surface area produce, and fractional interstitial volume on a voxel-by-voxel basis. After which, the tumors were imaged using photoacoustic CT (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202). The near infrared spectra (700-910 nm) within the vasculature was fit to linear combination of measured oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin blood samples to obtain oxygen saturation levels (SaO II). Results: The PCT-S scanner was first calibrated using different samples of oxygenated blood, from which a statistical error ranging from 2.5-6.5% was measured and a plot of the hemoglobin dissociation curve was consistent with empirical formula. In vivo determination of tumor vasculature SaO II levels were measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Tumor depend variations in SaO II - 0.32 (ovarian) and 0.60 (breast) - and in vascular physiology - perfusion, 1.03 and 0.063 mL/min/mL, and fractional plasma volume, 0.20 and 0.07 - were observed. Conclusion: Combined, PCT-S and CED-CT has the potential to measure intra-tumor levels of tumor oxygen saturation and vascular physiology, key parameters associated with hypoxia.

  19. [Abnormal expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor].

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Yan, X D; Cai, Y; Gu, J J; Yang, X L; Pan, L H; Wang, L; Yao, D F

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in liver cancer and the inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor. Methods: A total of 40 patients with primary liver cancer were enrolled, and 40 samples of cancer lesions, peri-cancerous tissues (with a distance of 2 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), or distal liver tissues (with a distance of 5 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), with a weight of 200 mg, were collected after surgery. Some of these samples were used for pathological examination, and the rest were stored at -85°C. A total of 18 BALB/c nude mice aged 4-6 weeks with a body weight of 18-20 g (9 male and 9 female mice) were randomly divided into control group, negative control group, and co-intervention group, with 6 mice in each group, and fed under specific pathogen-free conditions. The cell line was cultured in the dimethyl sulfoxide complete medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum in a CO 2 incubator at 37°C. When the cell confluence reached 90% after cell inoculation, shRNA was divided into co-intervention group, negative control group, and untreated control group and were transfected to hepatoma cells using PolyJetTM transfection reagent. Stable cell clones obtained by G418 screening and used for the in vivo study. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze the expression of IGF-IR in the human hepatoma tissue and cell line. The IGF-IR shRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids were established and screened for the most effective sequence; they were transfected to PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, and the CCK-8 assay was used to analyze the changes in cell proliferation. The stable cell line screened out by G418 was inoculated to establish the subcutaneous xenograft tumor in nude mice. The tumor growth curve was plotted and histological examination was performed. Graphpad Prism 5.0 and SPSS 18.0 were used for plotting and data

  20. Harnessing Autopsied DIPG Tumor Tissues for Orthotopic Xenograft Model Development in the Brain Stems of SCID Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    patched-1-deficient mouse medulloblastoma . Cancer Res. 2009;69:4682-4690. 14. Mao XG, Zhang X, Xue XY, et al. Brain Tumor Stem-Like Cells Identified by...propagating cells in a mouse model of medulloblastoma . Cancer Cell. 2009;15:135-147. 16. Yagi H, Yanagisawa M, Suzuki Y, et al. HNK-1 epitope-carrying

  1. Anti-tumor effects of a novel chimeric peptide on S180 and H22 xenografts bearing nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongdong; Gao, Yanfeng; Chen, Lixiang; Qi, Yuanming; Kang, Qiaozhen; Wang, Haili; Zhu, Linyu; Ye, Yong; Zhai, Mingxia

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, many endogenous peptides have been identified by screening combinatory phage display peptide library, which play important roles in the process of angiogenesis. A heptapeptide, ATWLPPR, binds specifically to NRP-1 and selectively inhibits VEGF165 binding to VEGFR-2. Another heptapeptide, NLLMAAS, blocks both Ang-1 and Ang-2 binding to Tie-2 in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study, we aimed to connect ATWLPPR (V1) with NLLMAAS (V2) via a flexible linker, Ala-Ala, to reconstruct a novel peptide ATWLPPRAANLLMAAS (V3). We firstly investigated the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects of peptide V3 on sarcoma S180 and hepatoma H22 bearing BALB/c nude mice. Mice were continuously subcutaneously administrated with normal saline, V1 (320microg/kg/d), V2 (320microg/kg/d), V1+V2 (320microg/kg/d), and V3 (160, 320 and 480microg/kg/d), for 7 days. Treatment with peptide V3 could significantly reduce the tumor weight and volume. Pathological examination showed that the tumors treated with peptide V3 had a larger region of necrosis than that of peptide V1, V2, and V1+V2 at the same dose. A significant decrease of microvessel density (MVD) in a dose-dependent manner was observed in each group of peptide V3. The results of pathological examination on normal tissue, lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidney and white blood cells showed that peptide V3 might have no significant toxicity. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that peptide V3 could be more effective on inhibiting tumor growth and angiogenesis than that of V1, V2, and V1+V2. Peptide V3 could be considered as a novel chimeric peptide with potent anti-tumor activity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  3. A predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of tumor growth kinetics in xenograft mice after administration of anticancer agents given in combination.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Nadia; Germani, Massimiliano; Del Bene, Francesca; Magni, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    In clinical oncology, combination treatments are widely used and increasingly preferred over single drug administrations. A better characterization of the interaction between drug effects and the selection of synergistic combinations represent an open challenge in drug development process. To this aim, preclinical studies are routinely performed, even if they are only qualitatively analyzed due to the lack of generally applicable mathematical models. This paper presents a new pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that, starting from the well-known single agent Simeoni TGI model, is able to describe tumor growth in xenograft mice after the co-administration of two anticancer agents. Due to the drug action, tumor cells are divided in two groups: damaged and not damaged ones. The damaging rate has two terms proportional to drug concentrations (as in the single drug administration model) and one interaction term proportional to their product. Six of the eight pharmacodynamic parameters assume the same value as in the corresponding single drug models. Only one parameter summarizes the interaction, and it can be used to compute two important indexes that are a clear way to score the synergistic/antagonistic interaction among drug effects. The model was successfully applied to four new compounds co-administered with four drugs already available on the market for the treatment of three different tumor cell lines. It also provided reliable predictions of different combination regimens in which the same drugs were administered at different doses/schedules. A good and quantitative measurement of the intensity and nature of interaction between drug effects, as well as the capability to correctly predict new combination arms, suggest the use of this generally applicable model for supporting the experiment optimal design and the prioritization of different therapies.

  4. α-Mangostin: A Dietary Antioxidant Derived from the Pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. Inhibits Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W.; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. Results: The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. Innovation: We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 682–699. PMID:24295217

  5. Multiphoton imaging reveals that nanosecond pulsed electric fields collapse tumor and normal vascular perfusion in human glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Sylvia M; Carr, Lynn; Soueid, Malak; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2016-10-04

    Despite the biomedical advances of the last century, many cancers including glioblastoma are still resistant to existing therapies leaving patients with poor prognoses. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are a promising technology for the treatment of cancer that have thus far been evaluated in vitro and in superficial malignancies. In this paper, we develop a tumor organoid model of glioblastoma and apply intravital multiphoton microscopy to assess their response to nsPEFs. We demonstrate for the first time that a single 10 ns, high voltage electric pulse (35-45 kV/cm), collapses the perfusion of neovasculature, and also alters the diameter of capillaries and larger vessels in normal tissue. These results contribute to the fundamental understanding of nsPEF effects in complex tissue environments, and confirm the potential of nsPEFs to disrupt the microenvironment of solid tumors such as glioblastoma.

  6. [Inhibitory effect of imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin on tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, D C; Wang, L C; Wang, L J; Chen, G; Zhao, Y X; Zhao, Z F; Li, Y H

    2016-05-23

    To evaluate the inhibitory effect of imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin on tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and to explore its possible mechanisms. Human lung cancer A549 cells were injected into Bal B/c nude mice subcutaneously. Twenty-eight healthy male nude mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, imrecoxib group, lobaplatin group and imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin group. Each group was treated with appropriate drugs and the tumor size was measured every five days. The expression of ezrin and E-cadherin protein was detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Ezrin and E-cadherin mRNA were detected by real-time PCR. The tumor inhibition rates of imrecoxib group, lobaplatin group and combination group were 36.7%, 54.6% and 69.2%, respectively. The tumor volumes of imrecoxib group [(905.33±113.31) mm(3)] and combination group [(507.74±77.50) mm(3)] were significantly lower than that of the control group (1355.33±189.04) mm(3) (P<0.05), and the tumor weights were significantly reduced [(1.13±0.14) g, (0.63±0.10) g respectively] vs. (1.69±0.24) g (P<0.05). The expressions of ezrin protein and mRNA in the imrecoxib group and combined treatment group were significantly lower than that of the control group (136.53±35.52, 74.72±19.48 vs. 175.62±21.16 for protein expression level; 0.54±0.03, 0.36±0.03 vs. 1.02±0.02 for mRNA expression level, respectively, P<0.05 for both), while the expression of E-cadherin protein and mRNA in the imrecoxib group and combined treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group (253.78±38.87, 308.94±24.67 vs. 213.66±30.31 for protein expression level; 2.19±0.02, 3.02±0.02 vs. 1.05±0.03 for mRNA expression level, respectively, P<0.05 for both). There was a significant negative correlation between ezrin protein and E-cadherin protein (r=-0.737, P<0.01), as well as between ezrin mRNA and E-cadherin mRNA (r=-0

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluates the early response of human head and neck tumor xenografts following anti-EMMPRIN therapy with cisplatin or irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Hartman, Yolanda E; Zhai, Guihua; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Beasley, Timothy M; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2015-10-01

    To assess the early therapeutic effects of anti-EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer) antibody with/without cisplatin or X-ray radiation in head and neck cancer mouse models using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Mice bearing SCC1 (or OSC19) tumor xenografts were treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody, radiation, cisplatin, or anti-EMMPRIN antibody plus cisplatin (or radiation) for a week (n = 4-5 per group). DCE-MRI was carried out on a 9.4T small animal MR scanner on days 0, 3, and 7, and K(trans) values were averaged in a 0.5-mm-thick peripheral tumor region. Ki67 and CD31 staining were implemented for all tumors after imaging. The K(trans) changes of SCC1 and OSC19 tumors treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody for 3 days were -18 ± 8% and 4 ± 7%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of control groups (39 ± 5% and 45 ± 7%; P = 0.0025 and 0.0220, respectively). When cisplatin was added, those were -42 ± 9% and -44 ± 9%, respectively, and with radiation, -45 ± 9% and -27 ± 10%, respectively, which were also significantly lower than those of control groups (P < 0.0001 for all four comparisons). In the eight groups untreated (served as control) or treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody with/without cisplatin or radiation, the mean K(trans) change for 3 days was significantly correlated with the mean tumor volume change for 7 days (r = 0.74, P = 0.0346), Ki67-expressing cell density (r = 0.96, P = 0.0001), and CD31 density (r = 0.84, P = 0.0084). DCE-MRI might be utilized to assess the early therapeutic effects of anti-EMMPRIN antibody with/without chemotherapy or radiotherapy in head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Targeting tissue factor as a novel therapeutic oncotarget for eradication of cancer stem cells isolated from tumor cell lines, tumor xenografts and patients of breast, lung and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiwei; Xu, Jie; Cheng, Jijun; McMichael, Elizabeth; Yu, Lianbo; Carson, William E

    2017-01-03

    Targeting cancer stem cell (CSC) represents a promising therapeutic approach as it can potentially fight cancer at its root. The challenge is to identify a surface therapeutic oncotarget on CSC. Tissue factor (TF) is known as a common yet specific surface target for cancer cells and tumor neovasculature in several solid cancers. However, it is unknown if TF is expressed by CSCs. Here we demonstrate that TF is constitutively expressed on CD133 positive (CD133+) or CD24-CD44+ CSCs isolated from human cancer cell lines, tumor xenografts from mice and breast tumor tissues from patients. TF-targeted agents, i.e., a factor VII (fVII)-conjugated photosensitizer (fVII-PS for targeted photodynamic therapy) and fVII-IgG1Fc (Immunoconjugate or ICON for immunotherapy), can eradicate CSC via the induction of apoptosis and necrosis and via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that TF is a novel surface therapeutic oncotarget for CSC, in addition to cancer cell TF and tumor angiogenic vascular endothelial TF. Moreover, this research highlights that TF-targeting therapeutics can effectively eradicate CSCs, without drug resistance, isolated from breast, lung and ovarian cancer with potential to translate into other most commonly diagnosed solid cancer, in which TF is also highly expressed.

  9. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  10. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-02-17

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn't showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins.

  11. Pulsatilla saponin A, an active molecule from Pulsatilla chinensis, induces cancer cell death and inhibits tumor growth in mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Weichang; Jiao, Yang; Hou, Jianquan; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yanli; Qi, Xiaofei

    2014-05-15

    Many natural compounds possess antitumor growth activities. Pulsatilla chinensis is an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious diseases. More recently, extracts from P chinensis have been shown to contain antitumor activities. In this study, we isolated Pulsatilla saponin A as an active compound from P chinensis extracts and tested its anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, Pulsatilla saponin A significantly inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMCC-7721 cells and pancreatic BXPC3 and SW1990 cancer cells. Similar inhibitory activities were observed when the compound was tested in mouse xenograft tumor models using human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402 and pancreatic cancer SW1990 cells. In Comet assay and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle distribution and annexin V expression, DNA damage, G2 arrest, and apoptosis were identified in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells. Based on the results of Western blotting, p53 and cyclin B protein levels were higher, whereas Bcl-2 protein levels were lower in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells than in vehicle-treated cells. Pulsatilla saponin A may exert its antitumor effect by inducing DNA damage and causing G2 arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Pulsatilla saponin A and its derivatives may be developed as a new class of anticancer agents. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ONYX-411, a conditionally replicative oncolytic adenovirus, induces cell death in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines and suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, HV; Madde, P; Reichert-Eberhardt, AJ; Galanis, EC; Copland, JA; McIver, B; Grebe, SKG; Eberhardt, NL

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive thyroid cancer variant, accounting for 1–2% of all cases, but 33% of deaths, and exhibiting an average life expectancy of 5 months. ATC is largely unresponsive to radioactive iodine, chemotherapy, external beam radiation or surgery, underscoring the need for new and effective therapies. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of an oncolytic adenovirus, ONYX-411, that replicates selectively in and kills cells with dysfunction of the retinoblastoma (RB) pathway. In the present study, we report that ONYX-411 is able to induce cell death in eight human anaplastic carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The cytopathic effect of the virus is specific to cells with RB dysfunction, which appears to be frequent in ATC. We confirmed the expression of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor, CAR, in all ATC cell lines, demonstrating the potentially universal application of this oncolytic viral therapy to ATC. In addition, the growth of xenograft tumors induced in athymic mice with the ARO and DRO cell lines was significantly reduced by ONYX-411 treatment. These results indicate that ONYX-411 can be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ATC, rendering this class of conditionally replicating adenoviruses an attractive candidate for clinical trials. PMID:18583996

  13. Acyclic Cucurbit[n]uril-Type Molecular Container Enables Systemic Delivery of Effective Doses of Albendazole for Treatment of SK-OV-3 Xenograft Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Gaya; Samanta, Soumen K; Falcinelli, Shane; Zhang, Ben; Moncelet, Damien; Isaacs, Lyle; Briken, Volker

    2016-03-07

    Approximately, 40-70% of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) are severely limited by their extremely poor aqueous solubility, and consequently, there is a high demand for excipients that can be used to formulate clinically relevant doses of these drug candidates. Here, proof-of-concept studies demonstrate the potential of our recently discovered acyclic cucurbit[n]uril-type molecular container Motor1 (M1) as a solubilizing agent for insoluble drugs. M1 did not induce significant rates of mutations in various Salmonella typhimurium test strains during the Ames test, suggesting low genotoxicity. M1 also has low risk of causing cardiac toxicity in humans since it did not inhibit the human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene channel as tested on transfected CHO cell lines via patch clamp analysis. Albendazole (ABZ) is a widely used antihelminthic agent but that has also shown promising efficacy against cancerous cells in vitro. However, due to its low aqueous solubility (2.7 μM) and poor pharmacokinetics, ABZ is clinically limited as an anticancer agent. Here we investigated the potential of M1 as a solubilizing excipient for ABZ formulation. A pharmacokinetic study indicated that ABZ escapes the peritoneal cavity resulting in 78% absolute bioavailability, while its active intermediate metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, achieved 43% absolute bioavailability. The daily dosing of 681 mg/kg M1 complexed with 3.2 mg/kg of ABZ for 14 days did not result in significant weight loss or pathology in Swiss Webster mice. In vivo efficacy studies using this M1·ABZ inclusion complex showed significant decreases in tumor growth rates and increases in survival of mice bearing SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors. In conclusion, we provide substantial new evidence demonstrating that M1 is a safe and efficient excipient that enables in vivo parenteral delivery of poorly water-soluble APIs.

  14. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  15. Marine guanidine alkaloids crambescidins inhibit tumor growth and activate intrinsic apoptotic signaling inducing tumor regression in a colorectal carcinoma zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Roel, María; Rubiolo, Juan A; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Silva, Siguara B L; Thomas, Olivier P; Cabezas-Sainz, Pablo; Sánchez, Laura; López, Rafael; Botana, Luis M

    2016-12-13

    The marine environment constitutes an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new therapeutic agents. In the present manuscript we studied the effect of 3 different sponge derived guanidine alkaloids, crambescidine-816, -830, and -800. We show that these compounds strongly inhibit tumor cell proliferation by down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinases 2/6 and cyclins D/A expression while up-regulating the cell cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors -2A, -2D and -1A. We also show that these guanidine compounds disrupt tumor cell adhesion and cytoskeletal integrity promoting the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic signaling, resulting in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and concomitant caspase-3 cleavage and activation. The crambescidin 816 anti-tumor effect was fnally assayed in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model confirming its potent antitumor activity against colorectal carcinoma in vivo.Considering these results crambescidins could represent promising natural anticancer agents and therapeutic tools.

  16. Marine guanidine alkaloids crambescidins inhibit tumor growth and activate intrinsic apoptotic signaling inducing tumor regression in a colorectal carcinoma zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Roel, María; Rubiolo, Juan A.; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Silva, Siguara B. L.; Thomas, Olivier P.; Cabezas-Sainz, Pablo; Sánchez, Laura; López, Rafael; Botana, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment constitutes an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new therapeutic agents. In the present manuscript we studied the effect of 3 different sponge derived guanidine alkaloids, crambescidine-816, -830, and -800. We show that these compounds strongly inhibit tumor cell proliferation by down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinases 2/6 and cyclins D/A expression while up-regulating the cell cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors -2A, -2D and -1A. We also show that these guanidine compounds disrupt tumor cell adhesion and cytoskeletal integrity promoting the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic signaling, resulting in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and concomitant caspase-3 cleavage and activation. The crambescidin 816 anti-tumor effect was fnally assayed in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model confirming its potent antitumor activity against colorectal carcinoma in vivo. Considering these results crambescidins could represent promising natural anticancer agents and therapeutic tools. PMID:27825113

  17. Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Tumors: Calibration and Treatment with Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Fox, Traci B; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in rats with breast cancer xenografts was non-invasively estimated using subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) versus an invasive pressure monitor. Moreover, monitoring of IFP changes after chemotherapy was assessed. Eighty-nine rats (calibration n = 25, treatment n = 64) were injected with 5 × 10 6 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Radiofrequency signals were acquired (39 rats successfully imaged) with a Sonix RP scanner (BK Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a linear array (L9-4, transmit/receive: 8/4 MHz) after administration of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA, USA; 180 μL/kg) and compared with readings from an invasive pressure monitor (Stryker, Berkshire, UK). An inverse linear relationship was established between tumor IFP and SHAPE (y = -1.06x + 28.27, r = -0.69, p = 0.01) in the calibration group. Use of this relationship in the treatment group resulted in r = 0.74 (p < 0.05) between measured (pressure monitor) and SHAPE-estimated IFP (average error: 6.24 mmHg). No significant before/after differences were observed with respect to paclitaxel treatment (5 mg/kg, Mayne Pharma, Paramus, NJ, USA) with either method (p ≥ 0.15). Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lidocaine Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Chen, Dong-Tai; Pan, Jia-Hao; Chen, Yong-Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Qiang; Xue, Rui-Feng; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Wei-An

    2017-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the potential beneficial effects of regional anesthetics, and the differences in cancer prognosis may be the result of anesthetics on cancer biologic behavior. However, the function and underlying mechanisms of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo have been poorly studied. Human HepG2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were assessed. The effects of lidocaine on apoptosis-related and mitogen-activated protein kinase protein expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The antitumor activity of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma with or without cisplatin was investigated with in vitro experiments and also with animal experiments. Lidocaine inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The authors also found that lidocaine arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (63.7 ± 1.7% vs. 72.4 ± 3.2%; P = 0.0143) and induced apoptosis (1.7 ± 0.3% vs. 5.0 ± 0.7%; P = 0.0009). Lidocaine may exert these functions by causing an increase in Bax protein and activated caspase-3 and a corresponding decrease in Bcl-2 protein through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. More importantly, for the first time, xenograft experiments (n = 8 per group) indicated that lidocaine suppressed tumor development (P < 0.0001; lidocaine vs. control) and enhanced the sensitivity of cisplatin (P = 0.0008; lidocaine plus cisplatin vs. cisplatin). The authors' findings suggest that lidocaine may exert potent antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, combining lidocaine with cisplatin may be a novel treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Orthotopic Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongye; Kader, Michael; Sen, Rajeev; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) provide in vivo glioblastoma (GBM) models that recapitulate actual tumors. Orthotopic tumor xenografts within the mouse brain are obtained by injection of GBM stem-like cells derived from fresh surgical specimens. These xenografts reproduce GBM's histologic complexity and hallmark biological behaviors, such as brain invasion, angiogenesis, and resistance to therapy. This method has become essential for analyzing mechanisms of tumorigenesis and testing the therapeutic effect of candidate agents in the preclinical setting. Here, we describe a protocol for establishing orthotopic tumor xenografts in the mouse brain with human GBM cells.

  20. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in a human HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not derived from cancer cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition, phenotypically activated but karyotypically normal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  1. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in a Human HEp-2 Established Laryngeal Xenografted Tumor Are Not Derived from Cancer Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Phenotypically Activated but Karyotypically Normal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  2. The B-Raf Status of Tumor Cells May Be a Significant Determinant of Both Antitumor and Anti-Angiogenic Effects of Pazopanib in Xenograft Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-05

    B-Raf status was identified as a significant determinant of both tumor growth and angiogenesis. Citation: Gril B, Palmieri D , Qian Y, Anwar T, Ileva L...231-B R EJ MCF7-HER2 D MCF7 100mg/kg * 30m g/kg 100mg/kg * * • WM3899 ElWM3918 DSKMEL28 DSKMEL2 30mg/kg * * * * 30mg/kg 100mg/kg c...without any pazopanib treatment (average of the three experiments). D - Cell viability by MTT assay at T96 with the indicated Pazopanib treatments. (PDF

  3. A ketogenic diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides enhances the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic efficacy of chemotherapy on neuroblastoma xenografts in a CD1-nu mouse model.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, René Günther; Vidali, Silvia; Locker, Felix; Rutherford, Tricia; O'Donnel, Maura; Stöger-Kleiber, Andrea; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2017-09-12

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric malignancy characterized by a marked reduction in aerobic energy metabolism. Recent preclinical data indicate that targeting this metabolic phenotype by a ketogenic diet (KD), especially in combination with calorie restriction, slows tumor growth and enhances metronomic cyclophosphamide (CP) therapy of NB xenografts. Because calorie restriction would be contraindicated in most cancer patients, the aim of the present study was to optimize the KD such that the tumors are sensitized to CP without the need of calorie restriction. In a NB xenograft model, metronomic CP was combined with KDs of different triglyceride compositions and fed to CD1-nu mice ad libitum . Metronomic CP in combination with a KD containing 8-carbon medium-chain triglycerides exerted a robust anti-tumor effect, suppressing growth and causing a significant reduction of tumor blood-vessel density and intratumoral hemorrhage, accompanied by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in NB cells. Furthermore, the KDs caused a significant reduction in the serum levels of essential amino acids, but increased those of serine, glutamine and glycine. Our data suggest that targeting energy metabolism by a modified KD may be considered as part of a multimodal treatment regimen to improve the efficacy of classic anti-NB therapy.

  4. Discovery of LY2457546: a multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitor with a novel spectrum of activity and exquisite potency in the acute myelogenous leukemia-Flt-3-internal tandem duplication mutant human tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Timothy P; Clayton, Joshua R; Rempala, Mark E; Henry, James R; Knobeloch, John M; Mendel, David; McLean, Johnathan A; Hao, Yan; Barda, David A; Considine, Eileen L; Uhlik, Mark T; Chen, Yuefeng; Ma, Liandong; Bloem, Laura J; Akunda, Jacqueline K; McCann, Denis J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel; Clawson, David K; Lahn, Michael M; Starling, James J

    2012-06-01

    LY2457546 is a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenic and tumorigenic signalling. In biochemical and cellular assays, LY2457546 demonstrates potent activity against targets that include VEGFR2 (KDR), PDGFRβ, FLT-3, Tie-2 and members of the Eph family of receptors. With activities against both Tie2 and Eph receptors, LY2457546 possesses an activity profile that distinguishes it from multikinase inhibitors. When compared head to head with sunitinib, LY2457546 was more potent for inhibition of endothelial tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis co-culture model with an intermittent treatment design. In vivo, LY2457546 inhibited VEGF-driven autophosphorylation of lung KDR in the mouse and rat in a dose and concentration dependent manner. LY2457546 was well tolerated and exhibited efficacy in a 13762 syngeneic rat mammary tumor model in both once and twice daily continuous dosing schedules and in mouse human tumor xenograft models of lung, colon, and prostate origin. Additionally, LY2457546 caused complete regression of well-established tumors in an acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) FLT3-ITD mutant xenograft tumor model. The observed efficacy that was displayed by LY2457546 in the AML FLT3-ITD mutant tumor model was superior to sunitinib when both were evaluated using equivalent doses normalized to in vivo inhibition of pKDR in mouse lung. LY2457546 was well tolerated in non-clinical toxicology studies conducted in rats and dogs. The majority of the toxicities observed were similar to those observed with other multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitors (MAKs) and included bone marrow hypocellularity, hair and skin depigmentation, cartilage dysplasia and lymphoid organ degeneration and necrosis. Thus, the unique spectrum of target activity, potent in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in a variety of rodent and human solid tumor models, exquisite potency against a clinically relevant model of AML, and non

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Novel 64Cu- and 67Ga-Labeled Neurokinin 1 Receptor Antagonist for in Vivo Targeting of NK1R-Positive Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwen; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Desai, Pooja; Ahad, Afruja; Carlin, Sean; Tandon, Nidhi; Weber, Wolfgang A; Low, Philip S

    2018-04-18

    Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) is expressed in gliomas and neuroendocrine malignancies and represents a promising target for molecular imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy. The goal of this study was to synthesize and evaluate a novel NK1R ligand (NK1R-NOTA) for targeting NK1R-expressing tumors. Using a carboxymethyl moiety linked to L-733060 as a starting reagent, NK1R-NOTA was synthesized in a three-step reaction and then labeled with 64 Cu (or 67 Ga for in vitro studies) in the presence of CH 3 COONH 4 buffer. The radioligand affinity and cellular uptake were evaluated with NK1R-transduced HEK293 cells (HEK293-NK1R) and NK1R nontransduced HEK293 cells (HEK293-WT) and their xenografts. Radiolabeled NK1R-NOTA was obtained with a radiochemical purity of >95% and specific activities of >7.0 GBq/μmol for 64 Cu and >5.0 GBq/μmol for 67 Ga. Both 64 Cu- and 67 Ga-labeled NK1R-NOTA demonstrated high levels of uptake in HEK293-NK1R cells, whereas co-incubation with an excess of NK1R ligand L-733060 reduced the level of uptake by 90%. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging showed that [ 64 Cu]NK1R-NOTA had a accumulated rapidly in HEK293-NK1R xenografts and a 10-fold lower level of uptake in HEK293-WT xenografts. Radioactivity was cleared by gastrointestinal tract and urinary systems. Biodistribution studies confirmed that the tumor-to-organ ratios were ≥5 for all studied organs at 1 h p.i., except kidneys, liver, and intestine, and that the tumor-to-intestine and tumor-to-kidney ratios were also improved 4 and 20 h post-injection. [ 64 Cu]NK1R-NOTA is a promising ligand for PET imaging of NK1R-expressing tumor xenografts. Delayed imaging with [ 64 Cu]NK1R-NOTA improves image contrast because of the continuous clearance of radioactivity from normal organs.

  6. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation withmore » large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.« less

  7. Involvement of CTGF, a hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific gene product, in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shimo, T; Nakanishi, T; Nishida, T; Asano, M; Sasaki, A; Kanyama, M; Kuboki, T; Matsumura, T; Takigawa, M

    2001-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a potent secreted signaling factor which functions in multiple stages of angiogenesis. In the present study, we examined the role of CTGF in tumor angiogenesis and made the following observations: (1) Histological analysis of human breast cancer (MDA231) cell and human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cell xenografts in BALB/c nude mice showed a high level of neovascularization. Human squamous cell carcinoma (A431) xenografts induced only a low level of neovascularization. (2) CTGF mRNA was strongly expressed in MDA231 and in HT1080 cells in vivo and in vitro, but not in A431 cells. (3) CTGF protein was markedly produced in MDA231 cells and HT1080 cells and secreted into culture medium, and its production was greater during phases of growth rather than confluency. (4) Production of CTGF in bovine aorta endothelial cells was induced by CTGF, VEGF, bFGF and TGF-beta. (5) Neovascularization induced by HT1080 cells or MDA231 cells on chicken chorioallantoic membrane was suppressed in the presence of neutralizing CTGF-specific polyclonal antibody. These results suggest that CTGF regulates progression in tumor angiogenesis and the release or secretion of CTGF from tumor cells is essential for the angiogenesis. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. A comparison of 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging subcutaneous HER2-positive tumor xenografts in athymic mice using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to compare 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging small or large s.c. tumor xenografts in athymic mice that display a wide range of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT. Methods Trastuzumab Fab were labeled with 111In or 64Cu by conjugation to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The purity of 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was measured by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. HER2 binding affinity was determined in saturation radioligand binding assays using SKBR-3 cells (1.3 × 106 HER2/cell). MicroSPECT/CT and microPET/CT were performed in athymic mice bearing s.c. BT-20 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts with low (0.5 to 1.6 × 105 receptors/cell), MDA-MB-361 tumors with intermediate (5.1 × 105 receptors/cell) or SKOV-3 xenografts with high HER2 expression (1.2 × 106 receptors/cell) at 24 h p.i. of 70 MBq (10 μg) of 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or 22 MBq (10 μg) of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or irrelevant 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were quantified in biodistribution studies. Results 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab were > 98% radiochemically pure and bound HER2 with high affinity (Kd = 20.4 ± 2.5 nM and 40.8 ± 3.5 nM, respectively). MDA-MB-361 and SKOV-3 tumors were most clearly imaged using 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab. Significantly higher tumor/blood (T/B) ratios were found for 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab than 111In-DOTA-rituximab Fab for BT-20, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 xenografts, and there was a direct association between T/B ratios and HER2 expression. In contrast, tumor uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was significantly higher than 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab in MDA-MB-361 tumors but no direct association with HER2 expression was found. Both 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab imaged small (5 to 10 mm) or larger (10 to 15 mm) MDA-MB-361 tumors. Higher blood, liver, and spleen

  9. A comparison of 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging subcutaneous HER2-positive tumor xenografts in athymic mice using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Conrad; Scollard, Deborah A; McLarty, Kristin; Smith, Serena; Reilly, Raymond M

    2011-08-17

    Our objective was to compare 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging small or large s.c. tumor xenografts in athymic mice that display a wide range of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT. Trastuzumab Fab were labeled with 111In or 64Cu by conjugation to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The purity of 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was measured by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. HER2 binding affinity was determined in saturation radioligand binding assays using SKBR-3 cells (1.3 × 106 HER2/cell). MicroSPECT/CT and microPET/CT were performed in athymic mice bearing s.c. BT-20 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts with low (0.5 to 1.6 × 105 receptors/cell), MDA-MB-361 tumors with intermediate (5.1 × 105 receptors/cell) or SKOV-3 xenografts with high HER2 expression (1.2 × 106 receptors/cell) at 24 h p.i. of 70 MBq (10 μg) of 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or 22 MBq (10 μg) of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or irrelevant 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were quantified in biodistribution studies. 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab were > 98% radiochemically pure and bound HER2 with high affinity (Kd = 20.4 ± 2.5 nM and 40.8 ± 3.5 nM, respectively). MDA-MB-361 and SKOV-3 tumors were most clearly imaged using 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab. Significantly higher tumor/blood (T/B) ratios were found for 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab than 111In-DOTA-rituximab Fab for BT-20, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 xenografts, and there was a direct association between T/B ratios and HER2 expression. In contrast, tumor uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was significantly higher than 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab in MDA-MB-361 tumors but no direct association with HER2 expression was found. Both 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab imaged small (5 to 10 mm) or larger (10 to 15 mm) MDA-MB-361 tumors. Higher blood, liver, and spleen radioactivity were observed for 64Cu

  10. Cell cycle perturbation induced by gemcitabine in human tumor cells in cell culture, xenografts and bladder cancer patients: implications for clinical trial designs combining gemcitabine with a Chk1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Montano, Ryan; Khan, Nadeem; Hou, Huagang; Seigne, John; Ernstoff, Marc S; Lewis, Lionel D; Eastman, Alan

    2017-09-15

    Gemcitabine irreversibly inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and induces S phase arrest but whether this occurs in tumors in mice or patients has not been established. Tumor cells in culture were incubated with gemcitabine for 6 h to approximate the administration schedule in a patient. Concentrations that induced persistent S phase arrest thereafter correlated with cell killing. Administration of gemcitabine to mice also demonstrated a persistent S phase arrest in their tumor. The minimum dose that induced almost complete S phase arrest after 24 h (40 mg/kg) was well below the maximum tolerated dose in mice. S phase arrest was also observed in tumors of bladder cancer patients receiving gemcitabine. The Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776 sensitized cells to gemcitabine with the greatest cell killing when added 18 h after gemcitabine. In mice, the administration of MK-8776 18 h after gemcitabine elicited positivity for the DNA damage marker γH2AX; this also occurred at relatively low dose (40 mg/kg) gemcitabine. Hence, in both cell culture and xenografts, MK-8776 can markedly enhance cell killing of cells reversibly arrested in S phase by gemcitabine. Some cell lines are hypersensitive to MK-8776 as monotherapy, but this was not observed in xenograft models. Effective monotherapy requires a higher dose of Chk1 inhibitor, and target inhibition over a longer time period as compared to its use in combination. These results have important implications for combining Chk1 inhibitors with gemcitabine and suggest that Chk1 inhibitors with increased bioavailability may have improved efficacy both in combination and as monotherapy.

  11. Down-regulation of MDR1 by Ad-DKK3 via Akt/NFκB pathways augments the anti-tumor effect of temozolomide in glioblastoma cells and a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Toshitaka; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nakajima, Kohei; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Kitazato, Keiko T; Otsuka, Ryotaro; Hara, Keijiro; Mure, Hideo; Okazaki, Toshiyuki; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Nagahiro, Shinji; Takagi, Yasushi

    2018-05-19

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant of brain tumors. Acquired drug resistance is a major obstacle for successful treatment. Earlier studies reported that expression of the multiple drug resistance gene (MDR1) is regulated by YB-1 or NFκB via the JNK/c-Jun or Akt pathway. Over-expression of the Dickkopf (DKK) family member DKK3 by an adenovirus vector carrying DKK3 (Ad-DKK3) exerted anti-tumor effects and led to the activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. We investigated whether Ad-DKK3 augments the anti-tumor effect of temozolomide (TMZ) via the regulation of MDR1. GBM cells (U87MG and U251MG), primary TGB105 cells, and mice xenografted with U87MG cells were treated with Ad-DKK3 or TMZ alone or in combination. Ad-DKK3 augmentation of the anti-tumor effects of TMZ was associated with reduced MDR1 expression in both in vivo and in vitro studies. The survival of Ad-DKK3-treated U87MG cells was inhibited and the expression of MDR1 was reduced. This was associated with the inhibition of Akt/NFκB but not of YB-1 via the JNK/c-Jun- or Akt pathway. Our results suggest that Ad-DKK3 regulates the expression of MDR1 via Akt/NFκB pathways and that it augments the anti-tumor effects of TMZ in GBM cells.

  12. Inhibition on the growth of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro and tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model by Se-containing polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chengfu; Wang, Changdong; Wang, Junjie; Kumar, Vikas; Anwar, Firoz; Xiao, Fangxiang; Mushtaq, Gohar; Liu, Yufei; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Yuan, Ding

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death among Women. Current therapies for breast cancer have adverse side-effects. Selenium (Se)-containing polysaccharides have multiple health benefits to humans. Pyracantha fortuneana (P. fortuneana) contains rich Se polysaccharides. We hypothesized that Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana possess anticancer activity on breast cancer via inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis. This study aimed to assess the anticancer effect of Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana and the underlying mechanisms. Se-containing polysaccharides were purified. Their properties and monosaccharide compositions were analyzed. Their effects on cell growth, expression of cycle proteins, apoptosis and apoptosis-related protein, and tumor growth in mouse xenograft model were examined. This extract contained 93.7% (w/w) of carbohydrate, 2.1% (w/w) of uronic acid and 3.7μg/g of Se, and was considered as Se-conjugated polysaccharides (Se-PFPs). In vitro studies showed that treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) MDA-MB-231 cells with Se-PFPs (1) inhibited cell growth dose-dependently by arresting cells at G2 phase via inhibiting CDC25C-CyclinB1/CDC2 pathway; (2) caused apoptosis associated with increased p53, Bax, Puma and Noxa, decreased Bcl2, increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio and increased activities of caspases 3/9, suggesting its effect on p53-mediated cytochrome c-caspase pathway. Treatment of nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231-derived xenograft tumors with Se-PFPs significantly reduced tumor growth without altering body weight, confirming its antitumor activity without toxic side effects. Se-PFPs enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxic effects. It is concluded that Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana potently inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of TNBC cells and can be potential anticancer agent for TNBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 124I-HuCC49deltaCH2 for TAG-72 antigen-directed positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of LS174T colon adenocarcinoma tumor implants in xenograft mice: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) is widely used in diagnostic cancer imaging. However, the use of 18F-FDG in PET-based imaging is limited by its specificity and sensitivity. In contrast, anti-TAG (tumor associated glycoprotein)-72 monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for binding to a variety of adenocarcinomas, including colorectal cancer. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate a complimentary determining region (CDR)-grafted humanized CH2-domain-deleted anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody (HuCC49deltaCH2), radiolabeled with iodine-124 (124I), as an antigen-directed and cancer-specific targeting agent for PET-based imaging. Methods HuCC49deltaCH2 was radiolabeled with 124I. Subcutaneous tumor implants of LS174T colon adenocarcinoma cells, which express TAG-72 antigen, were grown on athymic Nu/Nu nude mice as the xenograft model. Intravascular (i.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 124I-HuCC49deltaCH2 was then evaluated in this xenograft mouse model at various time points from approximately 1 hour to 24 hours after injection using microPET imaging. This was compared to i.v. injection of 18F-FDG in the same xenograft mouse model using microPET imaging at 50 minutes after injection. Results At approximately 1 hour after i.v. injection, 124I-HuCC49deltaCH2 was distributed within the systemic circulation, while at approximately 1 hour after i.p. injection, 124I-HuCC49deltaCH2 was distributed within the peritoneal cavity. At time points from 18 hours to 24 hours after i.v. and i.p. injection, 124I-HuCC49deltaCH2 demonstrated a significantly increased level of specific localization to LS174T tumor implants (p = 0.001) when compared to the 1 hour images. In contrast, approximately 50 minutes after i.v. injection, 18F-FDG failed to demonstrate any increased level of specific localization to a LS174T tumor implant, but showed the propensity toward more nonspecific uptake within the heart, Harderian glands

  14. Combination of rapamycin and garlic-derived S-allylmercaptocysteine induces colon cancer cell apoptosis and suppresses tumor growth in xenograft nude mice through autophagy/p62/Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Siying; Yang, Guang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Cheng, Lin; Sun, Yueyue; Zhao, Zhongxi

    2017-09-01

    The natural plant-derived product S-allylmercapto-cysteine (SAMC) has been studied in cancer therapy as a single and combination chemotherapeutic agent. The present study was employed to verify the combination use of SAMC and rapamycin that is the mTOR inhibitor with anticancer ability but has limited efficacy due to drug resistance, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. We combined rapamycin and SAMC for colorectal cancer treatment in the HCT‑116 cancer cells and a xenograft murine model. The in vivo study was established by xenografting HCT‑116 cells in BALB/c nude mice. It was found that the combination therapy had enhanced tumor-suppressing ability with the upregulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as a consequence of activated apoptosis, inhibition of autophagic activity and prevention of Akt phosphorylation. The rapamycin and SAMC combination activated antioxidant transcription expressions of Nrf2 and downstream gene NQO1. Concomitantly, autophagosome cargo p62 was downregulated, indicating that the p62 played a negative-regulatory role between Nrf2 and autophagy. Our results show that the combination of SAMC and rapamycin enhanced the anticancer ability, which could be used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. The underling mechanism of autophagy/p62/Nrf2 pathway discovered may provide a new direction for drug development, especially for traditional Chinese medicines.

  15. 64Cu-ATSM internal radiotherapy to treat tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia in human colon carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Furukawa, Takako; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Inubushi, Masayuki; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Higashi, Tatsuya; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-10-24

    Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, is an antiangiogenic agent clinically used for various cancers. However, repeated use of this agent leads to tumor-decreased vascularity and hypoxia with activation of an HIF-1 signaling pathway, which results in drug delivery deficiency and induction of malignant behaviors in tumors. Here, we developed a novel strategy to treat tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia using 64 Cu-diacetyl-bis ( N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( 64 Cu-ATSM), a potential theranostic agent, which possesses high tissue permeability and can target over-reduced conditions under hypoxia in tumors, with a human colon carcinoma HT-29 tumor-bearing mouse model. The long-term treatment with bevacizumab caused decreased blood vessel density and activation of an HIF-1 signaling pathway; increased uptake of 64 Cu-ATSM was also observed despite limited blood vessel density in HT-29 tumors. In vivo high-resolution SPECT/PET/CT imaging confirmed reduced vascularity and increased proportion of 64 Cu-ATSM uptake areas within the bevacizumab-treated tumors. 64 Cu-ATSM therapy was effective to inhibit tumor growth and prolong survival of the bevacizumab-treated tumor-bearing mice without major adverse effects. In conclusion, 64 Cu-ATSM therapy effectively enhanced anti-tumor effects in tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia. 64 Cu-ATSM therapy could represent a novel approach as an add-on to antiangiogenic therapy.

  16. 64Cu-ATSM internal radiotherapy to treat tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia in human colon carcinoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Yukie; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Furukawa, Takako; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Inubushi, Masayuki; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Higashi, Tatsuya; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-01-01

    Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, is an antiangiogenic agent clinically used for various cancers. However, repeated use of this agent leads to tumor-decreased vascularity and hypoxia with activation of an HIF-1 signaling pathway, which results in drug delivery deficiency and induction of malignant behaviors in tumors. Here, we developed a novel strategy to treat tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia using 64Cu-diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM), a potential theranostic agent, which possesses high tissue permeability and can target over-reduced conditions under hypoxia in tumors, with a human colon carcinoma HT-29 tumor-bearing mouse model. The long-term treatment with bevacizumab caused decreased blood vessel density and activation of an HIF-1 signaling pathway; increased uptake of 64Cu-ATSM was also observed despite limited blood vessel density in HT-29 tumors. In vivo high-resolution SPECT/PET/CT imaging confirmed reduced vascularity and increased proportion of 64Cu-ATSM uptake areas within the bevacizumab-treated tumors. 64Cu-ATSM therapy was effective to inhibit tumor growth and prolong survival of the bevacizumab-treated tumor-bearing mice without major adverse effects. In conclusion, 64Cu-ATSM therapy effectively enhanced anti-tumor effects in tumors with bevacizumab-induced vascular decrease and hypoxia. 64Cu-ATSM therapy could represent a novel approach as an add-on to antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:29179478

  17. Sonoporation enhances liposome accumulation and penetration in tumors with low EPR.

    PubMed

    Theek, Benjamin; Baues, Maike; Ojha, Tarun; Möckel, Diana; Veettil, Seena Koyadan; Steitz, Julia; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2016-06-10

    The Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect is a highly variable phenomenon. To enhance EPR-mediated passive drug targeting to tumors, several different pharmacological and physical strategies have been evaluated over the years, including e.g. TNFα-treatment, vascular normalization, hyperthermia and radiotherapy. Here, we systematically investigated the impact of sonoporation, i.e. the combination of ultrasound (US) and microbubbles (MB), on the tumor accumulation and penetration of liposomes. Two different MB formulations were employed, and their ability to enhance liposome accumulation and penetration was evaluated in two different tumor models, which are both characterized by relatively low levels of EPR (i.e. highly cellular A431 epidermoid xenografts and highly stromal BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts). The liposomes were labeled with two different fluorophores, enabling in vivo computed tomography/fluorescence molecular tomography (CT-FMT) and ex vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). In both models, in spite of relatively high inter- and intra-individual variability, a trend towards improved liposome accumulation and penetration was observed. In treated tumors, liposome concentrations were up to twice as high as in untreated tumors, and sonoporation enhanced the ability of liposomes to extravasate out of the blood vessels into the tumor interstitium. These findings indicate that sonoporation may be a useful strategy for improving drug targeting to tumors with low EPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA)*

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect

  19. MicroSPECT imaging of triple negative breast cancer cell tumor xenografted in athymic mice with radioiodinated anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    You, Linyi; Wang, Xiangyu; Guo, Zhide; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Pu; Li, Jindian; Su, Xinhui; Pan, Weimin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2018-04-04

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) is a potential molecular target and biomarker for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) therapy and diagnosis. In this study, aICAM-1 was radioiodinated with 125 I/ 131 I in high radiochemical yield and the probes for TNBC tumor targeting and radioimmunotherapy were evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. High and specific accumulation of 125 I-aICAM1 in TNBC MDA-MB-231 tumor was observed in SPECT imaging and the tumor grew was inhibited obviously by 131 I-aICAM1. Thus, the radioiodinated aICAM1 could serve as potential agents for TNBC theranostics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early Therapy Evaluation of Combined Anti-DR5 Antibody and Gemcitabine in Orthotopic Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts by Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Morgan, Desiree E.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Zeng, Huadong; Grizzle, William E.; Warram, Jason M.; Stockard, Cecil R.; McNally, Lacey R.; Long, Joshua W.; Sellers, Jeffrey C.; Forero, Andres; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2008-01-01

    Early therapeutic efficacy of anti-DR5 antibody (TRA-8) combined with gemcitabine was measured using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model. Groups 1–4 of SCID mice (n=5–7/group) bearing orthotopically implanted, luciferase-positive human pancreatic tumors (MIA PaCa-2) were subsequently (4–5 weeks thereafter) injected with saline (control), gemcitabine (120mg/kg), TRA-8 (200μg), or TRA-8 combined with gemcitabine, respectively, on day 0. DWI, anatomical MRI, and bioluminescence imaging were performed on days 0, 1, 2, and 3 after treatment. Three tumors from each group were collected randomly on day 3 after imaging, and TUNEL staining was performed to quantify apoptotic cellularity. At just 1 day after starting therapy, the changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in tumor regions for groups 3 (TRA-8) and 4 (TRA-8/Gem) were 21±9% (mean±SE) and 27±3%, respectively, significantly higher (p <0.05) than those of groups 1 (−1±5%) and 2 (−2±4%). There was no statistical difference in tumor volumes for the groups at this time. The mean ADC values of groups 2–4 gradually increased over 3 days, which were concurrent with tumor-volume regressions and bioluminescence-signal decreases. Apoptotic-cell densities of tumors in groups 1–4 were 0.7±0.4%, 0.6±0.2%, 3.1±0.9%, and 4.7±1.0%, respectively, linearly proportional to the ADC changes on day 1. Further, the ADC changes were highly correlated with the previously reported mean survival times of animals treated with the same agents and doses. This study supports the clinical use of DWI for pancreatic tumor patients for early assessment of drug efficacy. PMID:18922909

  1. Inhibitory effect of vitamin C in combination with vitamin K3 on tumor growth and metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma xenografted in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Feng; Yang, Chih-Min; Su, Cheng-Ming; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin C in combination with vitamin K3 (vit CK3) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo, but the mechanism of action is poorly understood. Herein, C57BL/6 mice were implanted (s.c.) with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) for 9 days before injection (i.p.) with low-dose (100 mg vit C/kg + 1 mg vit K3/kg), high-dose (1,000 mg vit C/kg + 10 mg vit K3/kg) vit CK3 twice a week for an additional 28 days. As expected, vit CK3 or cisplatin (6 mg/kg, as a positive control) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in LLC-bearing mice. Vit CK3 restored the body weight of tumor-bearing mice to the level of tumor-free mice. Vit CK3 significantly decreased activities of plasma metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In lung tissues, vit CK3 1) increased protein expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), TIMP-2, nonmetastatic protein 23 homolog 1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; 2) reduced protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9; and 3) inhibited the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). These results demonstrate that vit CK3 inhibits primary tumor growth and exhibits antimetastastic potential in vivo through attenuated tumor invasion and proliferation.

  2. Inhibition of DNA damage repair by the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib delays irradiated intracranial atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and glioblastoma xenograft regrowth.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Zhang, Ali; Mueller, Sabine; Prados, Michael D; Lulla, Rishi R; Goldman, Stewart; Saratsis, Amanda M; Mazar, Andrew P; Stegh, Alexander H; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Horbinski, Craig; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Waldman, Todd; James, C David

    2016-11-01

    Radiation therapy is the most commonly used postsurgical treatment for primary malignant brain tumors. Consequently, investigating the efficacy of chemotherapeutics combined with radiation for treating malignant brain tumors is of high clinical relevance. In this study, we examined the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib, when used in combination with radiation for treating human atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) as well as glioblastoma (GBM). Evaluation of treatment antitumor activity in vitro was based upon results from cell proliferation assays, clonogenicity assays, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry for DNA double-strand break repair. Interpretation of treatment antitumor activity in vivo was based upon bioluminescence imaging, animal subject survival analysis, and staining of tumor sections for markers of proliferation and apoptosis. For each of the retinoblastoma protein (RB)-proficient tumor models examined (2 ATRTs and 2 GBMs), one or more of the combination therapy regimens significantly (P < .05) outperformed both monotherapies with respect to animal subject survival benefit. Among the combination therapy regimens, concurrent palbociclib and radiation treatment and palbociclib treatment following radiation consistently outperformed the sequence in which radiation followed palbociclib treatment. In vitro investigation revealed that the concurrent use of palbociclib with radiation, as well as palbociclib following radiation, inhibited DNA double-strand break repair and promoted increased tumor cell apoptosis. Our results support further investigation and possible clinical translation of palbociclib as an adjuvant to radiation therapy for patients with malignant brain tumors that retain RB expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Comparative therapeutic efficacy of rhenium-188 radiolabeled-liposome and 5-fluorouracil in LS-174T human colon carcinoma solid tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Wei; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Lan, Keng-Li; Ting, Gann; Lee, Te-Wei

    2012-10-01

    Nanoliposomes are important carriers capable of packaging drugs for various delivery applications. Rhenium-188-radiolabeled liposome ((188)Re-liposome) has potential for radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging. To evaluate the targeting of (188)Re-liposome, biodistribution, microSPECT/CT, whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), and pharmacokinetics were performed in LS-174T human tumor-bearing mice. The comparative therapeutic efficacy of (188)Re-liposome and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed according to inhibition of tumor growth and the survival ratio. The highest uptake of (188)Re-liposome in LS-174T tumor was found at 24 hours by biodistribution and microSPECT/CT imaging, showing a positive correlation for tumor targeting of (188)Re-liposome using the Pearson's correlation analysis (r=0.997). Pharmacokinetics of (188)Re-liposome showed the properties of high circulation time and high bioavailability (mean residence time [MRT]=18.8 hours, area under the curve [AUC]=1371%ID/g·h). For therapeutic efficacy, the tumor-bearing mice treated with (188)Re-liposome (80% maximum tolerated dose [MTD], 23.7 MBq) showed better tumor growth inhibition and longer survival time than those treated with 5-FU (80% MTD, 144 mg/kg). The median survival time for mice treated with (188)Re-liposome (58.5 days; p<0.05) was significantly better than those of 5-FU (48.25 days; p>0.05) and normal saline-treated mice (43.63 days). Dosimetry study revealed that the (188)Re-liposome did not lead to high absorbed doses in normal tissue, but did in small tumors. These results of imaging and biodistribution indicated the highly specific accumulation of tumor after intravenous (i.v.) injection of (188)Re-liposome. The therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapeutics of (188)Re-liposome have been confirmed in a LS-174T solid tumor animal model, which points to the potential benefit and promise of passive nanoliposome delivered radiotherapeutics for cancer treatment.

  4. Convection-enhanced delivery of a topoisomerase I inhibitor (nanoliposomal topotecan) and a topoisomerase II inhibitor (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin) in intracranial brain tumor xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T.; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2007-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment options, the response and survival rates for patients with malignant gliomas remain dismal. Clinical trials with convection-enhanced delivery (CED) have recently opened a new window in neuro-oncology to the direct delivery of chemotherapeutics to the CNS, circumventing the blood-brain barrier and reducing systemic side effects. Our previous CED studies with liposomal chemotherapeutics have shown promising antitumor activity in rodent brain tumor models. In this study, we evaluated a combination of nanoliposomal topotecan (nLs-TPT) and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) to enhance efficacy in our brain tumor models, and to establish a CED treatment capable of improving survival from malignant brain tumors. Both liposomal drugs decreased key enzymes involved in tumor cell replication in vitro. Synergistic effects of nLs-TPT and PLD on U87MG cell death were found. The combination displayed excellent efficacy in a CED-based survival study 10 days after tumor cell implantation. Animals in the control group and those in single-agent groups had a median survival of less than 30 days, whereas the combination group experienced a median survival of more than 90 days. We conclude that CED of two liposomal chemotherapeutics (nLs-TPT and PLD) may be an effective treatment option for malignant gliomas. PMID:17018695

  5. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in "Pocket" liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC(8,9)PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them "Pocket" liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0-5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5-8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  6. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  7. Curcumin synergizes with 5-fluorouracil by impairing AMPK/ULK1-dependent autophagy, AKT activity and enhancing apoptosis in colon cancer cells with tumor growth inhibition in xenograft mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan; Lai, Ze-Lin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Zhang, Min; Wang, An; Jia, Tao; Sun, Wen-Qin; Zhu, Xi-Min; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jun

    2017-12-22

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle that limits the benefits of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu)-based chemotherapy for colon cancer patients. Autophagy is an important cellular mechanism underlying chemoresistance. Recent research advances have given new insights into the use of natural bioactive compounds to overcome chemoresistance in colon cancer chemotherapy. As one of the multitargeted and safer phytomedicines, curcumin has been reported to work as cancer-specific chemosensitizer, presumably via induction of autophagic signaling pathways. The precise therapeutic effect of curcumin on autophagy in determining tumorous cells' fate, however, remains unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the differential modulations of the treatments either with 5-Fu alone or 5-Fu combined with curcumin on cellular autophagic responses and viabilities in the human colon cancer cells HCT116 and HT29, and explore molecular signaling transductions underlying the curcumin-mediated autophagic changes and potentiation of 5-Fu's cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Cell proliferation assay and morphology observation were used to identify the cytotoxicity of different combinations of curcumin and 5-Fu in HCT116 and HT29 cells. Cell immunofluorescence assay, Flow cytometry and Western blot were employed to detect changes of autophagy and the autophagy-related signaling pathways in the colon cancer cells and/or xenograft mice. Curcumin could significantly augment the cytotoxicity of 5-Fu to the tumorous cells, and the pre-treatment with curcumin followed by 5-Fu (pre-Cur) proved to be the most effective one compared to other two combinations. The chemosensitizing role of curcumin might attribute to the autophagy turnover from being activated in 5-Fu mono-treatment to being inhibited in the pre-Cur treatment as indicated by the changes in expression of beclin-1, p62 and LC3II/LC3I and the intensity of Cyto-ID Green staining. The autophagic alterations appeared to be contributed by down

  8. Infrared-Transparent Gold Nanoparticles Converted by Tumors to Infrared Absorbers Cure Tumors in Mice by Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F.; O'Connor, Michael J.; Lin, Ping; Qian, Luping; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) absorb light and can be used to heat and ablate tumors. The “tissue window” at ∼800 nm (near infrared, NIR) is optimal for best tissue penetration of light. Previously, large, 50–150 nm, gold nanoshells and nanorods that absorb well in the NIR have been used. Small AuNPs that may penetrate tumors better unfortunately barely absorb at 800 nm. We show that small AuNPs conjugated to anti-tumor antibodies are taken up by tumor cells that catalytically aggregate them (by enzyme degradation of antibodies and pH effects), shifting their absorption into the NIR region, thus amplifying their photonic absorption. The AuNPs are NIR transparent until they accumulate in tumor cells, thus reducing background heating in blood and non-targeted cells, increasing specificity, in contrast to constructs that are always NIR-absorptive. Treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma A431 which overexpresses epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in subcutaneous murine xenografts with anti-EGFr antibodies conjugated to 15 nm AuNPs and NIR resulted in complete tumor ablation in most cases with virtually no normal tissue damage. The use of targeted small AuNPs therefore provides a potent new method of selective NIR tumor therapy. PMID:24520385

  9. Development of a Novel SPECT Tracer to Image c-Met Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in a Human Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaoguo; Xiao, Yadi; Wang, Kai; Yan, Ji; Xiao, Zunyu; Fang, Fang; Jin, Zhongnan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2018-05-18

    Rationale: Elevated expression of the c-Met receptor plays a crucial role in cancers. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aberrant activation of c-Met signaling pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and cancer progression, and may mediate acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy. c-Met is therefore emerging as a promising therapeutic target for treating NSCLC, and the methods for noninvasive in vivo assessment of c-Met expression will improve NSCLC treatment and diagnosis. Methods: A new peptide-based (cMBP) radiotracer targeting c-Met, 99m Tc-hydrazine nicotinamide (HYNIC)-cMBP, was developed for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Cell uptake assays were performed on two NSCLC cell lines with different c-Met expression: H1993 (high expression) and H1299 (no expression). In vivo tumor specificity was assessed by SPECT imaging in tumor-bearing mice at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h after injection of the probe. Blocking assays, biodistribution and autoradiography were also conducted to determine probe specificity. Results: 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP was prepared with high efficiency and showed higher uptake in H1993 cells than H1299 cells. Biodistribution and autoradiography also showed significantly higher accumulation of 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP in H1993 tumors than H1299 (H1993: 4.74±1.43 %ID/g and H1299: 1.00±0.37 %ID/g at 0.5h, p<0.05). H1993 tumors were clearly visualized at 0.5h in SPECT images, whereas H1299 tumors were not observed at any time. Specificity of 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP to c-Met was demonstrated by competitive block with excess un-radiolabeled peptide. Conclusion: We developed a novel SPECT tracer, 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP, for c-Met-targeted imaging in NSCLC that specifically bound to c-Met with favorable pharmacokinetics in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. Delayed xenograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hancock, W W

    1997-01-01

    The triumph of genetic engineering in overcoming hyperacute rejection (HAR) of a discordant organ xenograft is clear, but the promise of clinical application of xenotransplantation remains unfulfilled as further immunologic barriers are defined that lead to rejection of a vascularized xenograft within days of transplantation. This report describes the features of this second set of immunologic responses, collectively termed delayed xenograft rejection (DXR). DXR is a syndrome seen in xenograft recipients in which HAR has been avoided or suppressed by antibody depletion or blockade of complement activation. DXR may result, at least in part, from the persisting activation of those pathways first encountered during the HAR phase. Serial studies over several days after transplant show that, histologically, xenografts undergoing DXR demonstrate varying combinations of (1) progressive infiltration by activated macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells, (2) platelet aggregation and fibrin deposition throughout the microvasculature, and (3) endothelial activation. In various experimental models, DXR is T cell-independent and can occur in the absence of demonstrable xenoreactive antibodies. Hence DXR is probably best regarded as arising from the activation of innate host defense mechanisms coupled with failure of normal regulatory mechanisms due to manifold molecular incompatibilities. Although DXR-like features can be seen in concordant models, T cell involvement in the latter is probably requisite. Similarly, in a much muted form, aspects of a DXR-like process may contribute to numerous inflammatory processes, including allograft rejection. The importance of DXR in xenotransplantation is that its development appears resistant to all but the most dense and toxic forms of immunosuppression, which prolong xenograft survival at the expense of inducing host leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathies. It is likely that until the basis of DXR is more clearly understood

  11. The JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor pacritinib effectively inhibits patient-derived GBM brain tumor initiating cells in vitro and when used in combination with temozolomide increases survival in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Katharine Victoria; Cseh, Orsolya; Aman, Ahmed; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, Hema Artee

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains dismal, with current treatment prolonging survival only modestly. As such, there remains a strong need for novel therapeutic strategies. The janus kinase (JAK)2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 pathway regulates many cellular processes in GBM, including survival, proliferation, invasion, anti-apoptosis, and immune evasion. Here, we evaluated the preclinical efficacy of pacritinib, a novel compound targeting JAK2, using a collection of diverse patient-derived brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). The effects of pacritinib on BTIC viability and sphere forming capacity were evaluated in vitro using the alamarBlue and neurosphere assays, respectively. On-target inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling was investigated using western blotting. The efficacy of pacritinib was tested in vivo in pharmacokinetic analyses, liver microsome analyses, and Kaplan-Meier survival studies. In vitro, pacritinib decreased BTIC viability and sphere forming potential at low micromolar doses and demonstrated on-target inhibition of STAT3 signaling. Additionally, pacritinib was found to improve the response to temozolomide (TMZ) in TMZ-resistant BTICs. In vivo, systemic treatment with pacritinib demonstrated blood-brain barrier penetration and led to improved overall median survival in combination with TMZ, in mice orthotopically xenografted with an aggressive recurrent GBM BTIC culture. This preclinical study demonstrates the efficacy of pacritinib and supports the feasibility of testing pacritinib for the treatment of GBM, in combination with the standard of care TMZ.

  12. Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models for cancer of unknown primary precisely distinguish chemotherapy, and tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R is superior to first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kentaro; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Masuyo; Kawaguchi, Kei; Yoon, Sang Nam; Zhang, Zhiying; Igarashi, Kentaro; Razmjooei, Sahar; Wangsiricharoen, Sintawat; Murakami, Takashi; Li, Yunfeng; Nelson, Scott D; Russell, Tara A; Singh, Arun S; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Momiyama, Masashi; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Singh, Shree Ram; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a recalcitrant disease with poor prognosis because it lacks standard first-line therapy. CUP consists of diverse malignancy groups, making personalized precision therapy essential. The present study aimed to identify an effective therapy for a CUP patient using a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. This paper reports the usefulness of the PDOX model to precisely identify effective and ineffective chemotherapy and to compare the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R with first-line chemotherapy using the CUP PDOX model. The present study is the first to use a CUP PDOX model, which was able to precisely distinguish the chemotherapeutic course. We found that a carboplatinum (CAR)-based regimen was effective for this CUP patient. We also demonstrated that S. typhimurium A1-R was more effective against the CUP tumor than first-line chemotherapy. Our results indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R has clinical potential for CUP, a resistant disease that requires effective therapy.

  13. A novel pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine is a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent protein kinases 1, 2, and 9, which demonstrates antitumor effects in human tumor xenografts following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Dean A; Patel, Hetal; Kroll, Sebastian H B; Hazel, Pascale; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Alikian, Mary; Kanneganti, Seshu K; Jogalekar, Ashutosh S; Scheiper, Bodo; Barbazanges, Marion; Blum, Andreas; Brackow, Jan; Siwicka, Alekasandra; Pace, Robert D M; Fuchter, Matthew J; Snyder, James P; Liotta, Dennis C; Freemont, Paul S; Aboagye, Eric O; Coombes, R Charles; Barrett, Anthony G M; Ali, Simak

    2010-12-23

    Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) are central to the appropriate regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression. Abnormalities in CDK activity and regulation are common features of cancer, making CDK family members attractive targets for the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we report the identification of a pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derived compound, 4k (BS-194), as a selective and potent CDK inhibitor, which inhibits CDK2, CDK1, CDK5, CDK7, and CDK9 (IC₅₀= 3, 30, 30, 250, and 90 nmol/L, respectively). Cell-based studies showed inhibition of the phosphorylation of CDK substrates, Rb and the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain, down-regulation of cyclins A, E, and D1, and cell cycle block in the S and G₂/M phases. Consistent with these findings, 4k demonstrated potent antiproliferative activity in 60 cancer cell lines tested (mean GI₅₀= 280 nmol/L). Pharmacokinetic studies showed that 4k is orally bioavailable, with an elimination half-life of 178 min following oral dosing in mice. When administered at a concentration of 25 mg/kg orally, 4k inhibited human tumor xenografts and suppressed CDK substrate phosphorylation. These findings identify 4k as a novel, potent CDK selective inhibitor with potential for oral delivery in cancer patients.

  14. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Anti-Tumor Effect of Sunitinib Combined with Dopamine in the Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fangran; Wang, Siyuan; Zhu, Xiao; Xue, Junsheng; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Lijie; Li, Jian; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tianyan

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the anti-tumor effect of sunitinib in combination with dopamine in the treatment of nu/nu nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells and to develop the combination PK/PD model. Further, simulations were conducted to optimize the administration regimens. A PK/PD model was developed based on our preclinical experiment to explore the relationship between plasma concentration and drug effect quantitatively. Further, the model was evaluated and validated. By fixing the parameters obtained from the PK/PD model, simulations were built to predict the tumor suppression under various regimens. The synergistic effect was observed between sunitinib and dopamine in the study, which was confirmed by the effect constant (GAMA, estimated as 2.49). The enhanced potency of dopamine on sunitinib was exerted by on/off effect in the PK/PD model. The optimal dose regimen was selected as sunitinib (120 mg/kg, q3d) in combination with dopamine (2 mg/kg, q3d) based on the simulation study. The synergistic effect of sunitinib and dopamine was demonstrated by the preclinical experiment and confirmed by the developed PK/PD model. In addition, the regimens were optimized by means of modeling as well as simulation, which may be conducive to clinical study.

  15. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) as a causative factor of cancer-associated wasting: possible involvement of PTHrP in the repression of locomotor activity in rats bearing human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Etsuro; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Saito, Hidemi; Sato, Koh; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Ogata, Etsuro

    2005-09-01

    Nude rats bearing the LC-6-JCK human lung cancer xenograft displayed cancer-associated wasting syndrome in addition to humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. In these rats, not only PTHrP but also several other human proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, leukemia-inducing factor, IL-8, IL-5 and IL-11, were secreted to the bloodstream. Proinflammatory cytokines induce acute-phase reactions, as evidenced by a decrease of serum albumin and an increase in alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Tumor resection abolished the production of proinflammatory cytokines and improved acute-phase reactions, whereas anti-PTHrP antibody affected neither proinflammatory cytokine production nor acute-phase reactions. Nevertheless, tumor resection and administration of anti-PTHrP antibody similarly and markedly attenuated not only hypercalcemia but also loss of fat, muscle and body weight. Body weight gain by anti-PTHrP antibody was associated with increased food consumption; increased body weight from anti-PTHrP antibody was observed when animals were freely fed but not when they were given the same feeding as those that received only vehicle. Furthermore, nude rats bearing LC-6-JCK showed reduced locomotor activity, less eating and drinking and low blood phosphorus; and anti-PTHrP antibody restored them. Although alendronate, a bisphosphonate drug, decreased blood calcium, it affected neither locomotor activity nor serum phosphorus level. These results indicate that PTHrP represses physical activity and energy metabolism independently of hypercalcemia and proinflammatory cytokine actions and that deregulation of such physiologic activities and functions by PTHrP is at least in part involved in PTHrP-induced wasting syndrome.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Tumor Cell Growth Inhibitory Potential of New Putative HSP90 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, Ana; Sousa, Diana; Lima, Raquel T; Musso, Loana; Cincinelli, Raffaella; Zuco, Vantina; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2018-02-13

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a well-known target for cancer therapy. In a previous work, some of us have reported a series of 3-aryl-naphtho[2,3- d ]isoxazole-4,9-diones as inhibitors of HSP90. In the present work, various compounds with new chromenopyridinone and thiochromenopyridinone scaffolds were synthesized as potential HSP90 inhibitors. Their binding affinity to HSP90 was studied in vitro. Selected compounds ( 5 and 8 ) were further studied in various tumor cell lines regarding their potential to cause cell growth inhibition, alter the cell cycle profile, inhibit proliferation, and induce apoptosis. Their effect on HSP90 client protein levels was also confirmed in two cell lines. Finally, the antitumor activity of compound 8 was studied in A431 squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Our results indicated that treatment with compounds 5 and 8 decreased the proliferation of tumor cell lines and compound 8 induced apoptosis. In addition, these two compounds were able to downregulate selected proteins known as "clients" of HSP90. Finally, treatment of xenografted mice with compound 5 resulted in a considerable dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth. Our results show that two new compounds with a chromenopyridinone and thiochromenopyridinone scaffold are promising putative HSP90 inhibitors causing tumor cell growth inhibition.

  17. Diosmin reduces cell viability of A431 skin cancer cells through apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Buddhan, Rajamanickam; Manoharan, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic potential of the diosmin in A431 skin cancer cells. The cytotoxic (anti-cell proliferative) potential of diosmin in A431 cells was assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay (cell viability), dual staining (apoptotic induction), dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate assay (reactive oxygen species [ROS] generation), DNA fragmentation study, Western blotting analysis (apoptotic markers expression) and flow cytometry (cell cycle arrest). Diosmin reduced the cell viability of A431 cells in a dose-dependent fashion and the inhibitory concentration 50% value was attained at 45 μg/ml using MTT assay. Diosmin at a concentration of 45 μg/ml generated excessive ROS in A431 cells, as compared to untreated cells. Diosmin treated A431 cells also revealed multiple DNA fragments than the untreated cells. Diosmin upregulated the expression of p53, caspases 3 and 9 and downregulated the expression of Bcl-2, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9 in A431 cells. The cytotoxic or anti-cell proliferative potential of diosmin is due to its ROS-mediated apoptotic induction potential, as well as due to its role in the inhibition of invasion in the A431 cells.

  18. Constitutive secretion of soluble interleukin-2 receptor by human T cell lymphoma xenografted into SCID mice. Correlation of tumor volume with concentration of tumor-derived soluble interleukin-2 receptor in body fluids of the host mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, M. A.; Sioutos, N.; Tuttle, M.; Butmarc, J. R.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kadin, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Increased serum concentration of soluble alpha-chain receptor for interleukin-2 (sIL-2R) has been noted in patients with a variety of inflammatory conditions and lymphoid malignancies including T cell leukemia and lymphoma. Elevated sIL-2R serum levels seen in lymphoid malignancies appear to correlate with the clinical stage of disease. However, because sIL-2R is produced by normal activated lymphocytes, it has been uncertain whether serum sIL-2R in such conditions is derived from tumor cells or normal immune cells responding to the tumor. To address this question, we used a model of human (CD30+) anaplastic, large T cell lymphoma transplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tumor RNA showed that the tumor, designated mJB6, contains mRNA for alpha-chain of human IL-2R. Furthermore, 15 to 25% of tumor cells stained with anti-human IL-2R alpha-chain mAb. Solid phase ELISA analysis of serum samples from mice bearing mJB6 lymphoma showed high concentrations of human sIL-2R. None of the control mice without lymphoma or with human nonlymphoid tumors (prostatic carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and glioblastoma multiforme) showed detectable human sIL-2R. The sIL-2R serum titers of mJB6-bearing mice correlated strongly with tumor volume (P < 0.0001). Tumors as small as 0.4 to 0.8 mm3 could be detected by this method. The sensitivity of sIL-2R ELISA exceeded at least 150 times the sensitivity of conventional radioisotopic tumor detection. Total resection of mJB6 tumors resulted in complete clearance of sIL-2R from the murine serum within 48 hours with a half-life of 6 hours. Accordingly, partial resection led to a significant decrease in sIL-2R followed by gradual increase with tumor regrowth. sIL-2R was also detected in the urine of mJB6-transplanted mice. As in serum, urine concentrations of sIL-2R were proportional to tumor mass (P < 0.02). Based on these findings we postulate that malignant cells are a major source of serum

  19. Nanofitin as a New Molecular-Imaging Agent for the Diagnosis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Over-Expressing Tumors.

    PubMed

    Goux, Marine; Becker, Guillaume; Gorré, Harmony; Dammicco, Sylvestre; Desselle, Ariane; Egrise, Dominique; Leroi, Natacha; Lallemand, François; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Doumont, Gilles; Plenevaux, Alain; Cinier, Mathieu; Luxen, André

    2017-09-20

    Epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in cell growth and proliferation and is over-expressed in malignant tissues. Although anti-EGFR-based immunotherapy became a standard of care for patients with EGFR-positive tumors, this strategy of addressing cancer tumors by targeting EGFR with monoclonal antibodies is less-developed for patient diagnostic and monitoring. Indeed, antibodies exhibit a slow blood clearance, which is detrimental for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. New molecular probes are proposed to overcome such limitations for patient monitoring, making use of low-molecular-weight protein scaffolds as alternatives to antibodies, such as Nanofitins with better pharmacokinetic profiles. Anti-EGFR Nanofitin B10 was reformatted by genetic engineering to exhibit a unique cysteine moiety at its C-terminus, which allows the development of a fast and site-specific radiolabeling procedure with 18 F-4-fluorobenzamido-N-ethylamino-maleimide ( 18 F-FBEM). The in vivo tumor targeting and imaging profile of the anti-EGFR Cys-B10 Nanofitin was investigated in a double-tumor xenograft model by static small-animal PET at 2 h after tail-vein injection of the radiolabeled Nanofitin 18 F-FBEM-Cys-B10. The image showed that the EGFR-positive tumor (A431) is clearly delineated in comparison to the EGFR-negative tumor (H520) with a significant tumor-to-background contrast. 18 F-FBEM-Cys-B10 demonstrated a significantly higher retention in A431 tumors than in H520 tumors at 2.5 h post-injection with a A431-to-H520 uptake ratio of 2.53 ± 0.18 and a tumor-to-blood ratio of 4.55 ± 0.63. This study provides the first report of Nanofitin scaffold used as a targeted PET radiotracer for in vivo imaging of EGFR-positive tumor, with the anti-EGFR B10 Nanofitin used as proof-of-concept. The fast generation of specific Nanofitins via a fully in vitro selection process, together with the excellent imaging features of the Nanofitin scaffold, could facilitate the

  20. Integrin αvβ3-targeted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a gadolinium-loaded polyethylene gycol-dendrimer-cyclic RGD conjugate to evaluate tumor angiogenesis and to assess early antiangiogenic treatment response in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Shih, Tiffany Ting Fang; Chen, Ran-Chou; Tu, Shin-Yang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuen; Yang, Pang-Chyr

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate an integrin αvβ3-targeted magnetic resonance contrast agent, PEG-G3-(Gd-DTPA)6-(cRGD-DTPA)2, for its ability to detect tumor angiogenesis and assess early response to antiangiogenic therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Integrin αvβ3-positive U87 cells and control groups were incubated with fluorescein-labeled cRGD-conjugated dendrimer, and the cellular attachment of the dendrimer was observed. DCE MRI was performed on mice bearing KB xenograft tumors using either PEG-G3-(Gd-DTPA)6-(cRGD-DTPA)2 or PEG-G3-(Gd-DTPA)6-(cRAD-DTPA)2. DCE MRI was also performed 2 hours after anti-integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody treatment and after bevacizumab treatment on days 3 and 6t. Using DCE MRI, the 30-minute contrast washout percentage was significantly lower in the cRGD-conjugate injection groups. The enhancement patterns were different between the two contrast injection groups. In the antiangiogenic therapy groups, a rapid increase in 30-minute contrast washout percentage was observed in both the LM609 and bevacizumab treatment groups, and this occurred before there was an observable decrease in tumor size. The integrin αvβ3 targeting ability of PEG-G3-(Gd-DTPA)6-(cRGD-DTPA)2 in vitro and in vivo was demonstrated. The 30-minute contrast washout percentage is a useful parameter for examining tumor angiogenesis and for the early assessment of antiangiogenic treatment response.

  1. Expression of miR-17-92 enhances anti-tumor activity of T-cells transduced with the anti-EGFRvIII chimeric antigen receptor in mice bearing human GBM xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masasuke; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Tanahashi, Kuniaki; June, Carl H; Natsume, Atsushi; Okada, Hideho

    2013-01-01

    Expression of miR-17-92 enhances T-cell survival and interferon (IFN)-γ production. We previously reported that miR-17-92 is down-regulated in T-cells derived from glioblastoma (GBM) patients. We hypothesized that transgene-derived co-expression of miR17-92 and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in T-cells would improve the efficacy of adoptive transfer therapy against GBM. We constructed novel lentiviral vectors for miR-17-92 (FG12-EF1a-miR-17/92) and a CAR consisting of an epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, single-chain variable fragment (scFv) coupled to the T-cell receptor CD3ζ chain signaling module and co-stimulatory motifs of CD137 (4-1BB) and CD28 in tandem (pELNS-3C10-CAR). Human T-cells were transduced with these lentiviral vectors, and their anti-tumor effects were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-transduced T-cells (CAR-T-cells) exhibited potent, antigen-specific, cytotoxic activity against U87 GBM cells that stably express EGFRvIII (U87-EGFRvIII) and, when co-transduced with miR-17-92, exhibited improved survival in the presence of temozolomide (TMZ) compared with CAR-T-cells without miR-17-92 co-transduction. In mice bearing intracranial U87-EGFRvIII xenografts, CAR-T-cells with or without transgene-derived miR-17-92 expression demonstrated similar levels of therapeutic effect without demonstrating any uncontrolled growth of CAR-T-cells. However, when these mice were re-challenged with U87-EGFRvIII cells in their brains, mice receiving co-transduced CAR-T-cells exhibited improved protection compared with mice treated with CAR-T-cells without miR-17-92 co-transduction. These results warrant the development of novel CAR-T-cell strategies that incorporate miR-17-92 to improve therapeutic potency, especially in patients with GBM.

  2. Expression of miR-17-92 enhances anti-tumor activity of T-cells transduced with the anti-EGFRvIII chimeric antigen receptor in mice bearing human GBM xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression of miR-17-92 enhances T-cell survival and interferon (IFN)-γ production. We previously reported that miR-17-92 is down-regulated in T-cells derived from glioblastoma (GBM) patients. We hypothesized that transgene-derived co-expression of miR17-92 and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in T-cells would improve the efficacy of adoptive transfer therapy against GBM. Methods We constructed novel lentiviral vectors for miR-17-92 (FG12-EF1a-miR-17/92) and a CAR consisting of an epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, single-chain variable fragment (scFv) coupled to the T-cell receptor CD3ζ chain signaling module and co-stimulatory motifs of CD137 (4-1BB) and CD28 in tandem (pELNS-3C10-CAR). Human T-cells were transduced with these lentiviral vectors, and their anti-tumor effects were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Results CAR-transduced T-cells (CAR-T-cells) exhibited potent, antigen-specific, cytotoxic activity against U87 GBM cells that stably express EGFRvIII (U87-EGFRvIII) and, when co-transduced with miR-17-92, exhibited improved survival in the presence of temozolomide (TMZ) compared with CAR-T-cells without miR-17-92 co-transduction. In mice bearing intracranial U87-EGFRvIII xenografts, CAR-T-cells with or without transgene-derived miR-17-92 expression demonstrated similar levels of therapeutic effect without demonstrating any uncontrolled growth of CAR-T-cells. However, when these mice were re-challenged with U87-EGFRvIII cells in their brains, mice receiving co-transduced CAR-T-cells exhibited improved protection compared with mice treated with CAR-T-cells without miR-17-92 co-transduction. Conclusion These results warrant the development of novel CAR-T-cell strategies that incorporate miR-17-92 to improve therapeutic potency, especially in patients with GBM. PMID:24829757

  3. Identification of Sonic Hedgehog-Induced Stromal Factors That Stimulate Prostate Tumor Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    LN -Shh xenograft tumors is unabated after castration of the host mouse. However, castration of mice bearing LNCaP + Gli3-/- UGSM bi-clonal...canonical xenograft undergoes involution and growth arrest, growth of LN -Shh xenograft tumors is unabated after castration. As we have shown...signalingindependent of Shh ligand in tumor stroma accelerates tumor growth. We have identified potential stromal Shh target genes in xenograft tumors and have begun

  4. Melanoma patient derived xenografts acquire distinct Vemurafenib resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Monsma, David J; Cherba, David M; Eugster, Emily E; Dylewski, Dawna L; Davidson, Paula T; Peterson, Chelsea A; Borgman, Andrew S; Winn, Mary E; Dykema, Karl J; Webb, Craig P; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Duesbery, Nicholas S; Nickoloff, Brian J; Monks, Noel R

    2015-01-01

    Variable clinical responses, tumor heterogeneity, and drug resistance reduce long-term survival outcomes for metastatic melanoma patients. To guide and accelerate drug development, we characterized tumor responses for five melanoma patient derived xenograft models treated with Vemurafenib. Three BRAFV600E models showed acquired drug resistance, one BRAFV600E model had a complete and durable response, and a BRAFV600V model was expectedly unresponsive. In progressing tumors, a variety of resistance mechanisms to BRAF inhibition were uncovered, including mutant BRAF alternative splicing, NRAS mutation, COT (MAP3K8) overexpression, and increased mutant BRAF gene amplification and copy number. The resistance mechanisms among the patient derived xenograft models were similar to the resistance pathways identified in clinical specimens from patients progressing on BRAF inhibitor therapy. In addition, there was both inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in resistance mechanisms, accompanied by heterogeneous pERK expression immunostaining profiles. MEK monotherapy of Vemurafenib-resistant tumors caused toxicity and acquired drug resistance. However, tumors were eradicated when Vemurafenib was combined the MEK inhibitor. The diversity of drug responses among the xenograft models; the distinct mechanisms of resistance; and the ability to overcome resistance by the addition of a MEK inhibitor provide a scheduling rationale for clinical trials of next-generation drug combinations. PMID:26101714

  5. Nicotine Promotes Cholangiocarcinoma Growth in Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Allyson K; Jensen, Kendal; Hall, Chad; O'Brien, April; Ehrlich, Laurent; White, Tori; Meng, Fanyin; Zhou, Tianhao; Greene, John; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Invernizzi, Pietro; Dostal, David E; Lairmore, Terry; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2017-05-01

    Nicotine, the main addictive substance in tobacco, is known to play a role in the development and/or progression of a number of malignant tumors. However, nicotine's involvement in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma is controversial. Therefore, we studied the effects of nicotine on the growth of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro and the progression of cholangiocarcinoma in a mouse xenograft model. The predominant subunit responsible for nicotine-mediated proliferation in normal and cancer cells, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), was more highly expressed in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines compared with normal human cholangiocytes. Nicotine also stimulated the proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and promoted α7-nAChR-dependent activation of proliferation and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase in Mz-ChA-1 cells. In addition, nicotine and PNU282987 (α7-nAChR agonist) accelerated the growth of the cholangiocarcinoma tumors in our xenograft mouse model and increased fibrosis, proliferation of the tumor cells, and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase activation. Finally, α7-nAChR was expressed at significantly higher levels in human cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal human control liver samples. Taken together, results of this study suggest that nicotine acts through α7-nAChR and plays a novel role in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, nicotine may act as a mitogen in cholestatic liver disease processes, thereby facilitating malignant transformation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  7. Next generation patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Wu, Rebecca; Watahiki, Akira; Dong, Xin; Cheng, Hongwei; Wyatt, Alexander W; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for more effective therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer. Research in this area, however, has been seriously hampered by a lack of clinically relevant, experimental in vivo models of the disease. This review particularly focuses on the development of prostate cancer xenograft models based on subrenal capsule grafting of patients’ tumor tissue into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This technique allows successful development of transplantable, patient-derived cancer tissue xenograft lines not only from aggressive metastatic, but also from localized prostate cancer tissues. The xenografts have been found to retain key biological properties of the original malignancies, including histopathological and molecular characteristics, tumor heterogeneity, response to androgen ablation and metastatic ability. As such, they are highly clinically relevant and provide valuable tools for studies of prostate cancer progression at cellular and molecular levels, drug screening for personalized cancer therapy and preclinical drug efficacy testing; especially when a panel of models is used to cover a broader spectrum of the disease. These xenograft models could therefore be viewed as next-generation models of prostate cancer. PMID:24589467

  8. Temporal morphologic changes in human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting.

    PubMed

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1983-03-01

    The temporal morphologic changes of human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting into immunosuppressed mice were investigated by the use of light and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that colorectal carcinomas undergo a series of morphologic changes during the initial 30-day period following transplantation. During the initial 1-5-day period the majority of tumor cells die, and during the following 5-10-day period the necrotic debris created during the 1-5-day period is removed by host-supplied inflammatory cells. Only small groups of peripherally placed tumor cells survived at the end of the first 10 days. During the 10-20-day period the tumor cell populations of xenografts were reestablished by a morphologically heterogeneous population of tumor cells, and during the 20-30 day period consolidation of this process continued and some xenografts showed macroscopic evidence of growth. The authors hypothesize that human colorectal carcinomas, like the antecedent epithelium, contain subpopulations of undifferentiated cells that give rise to populations of more-differentiated cells.

  9. Temporal morphologic changes in human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting.

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, D. H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The temporal morphologic changes of human colorectal carcinomas following xenografting into immunosuppressed mice were investigated by the use of light and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that colorectal carcinomas undergo a series of morphologic changes during the initial 30-day period following transplantation. During the initial 1-5-day period the majority of tumor cells die, and during the following 5-10-day period the necrotic debris created during the 1-5-day period is removed by host-supplied inflammatory cells. Only small groups of peripherally placed tumor cells survived at the end of the first 10 days. During the 10-20-day period the tumor cell populations of xenografts were reestablished by a morphologically heterogeneous population of tumor cells, and during the 20-30 day period consolidation of this process continued and some xenografts showed macroscopic evidence of growth. The authors hypothesize that human colorectal carcinomas, like the antecedent epithelium, contain subpopulations of undifferentiated cells that give rise to populations of more-differentiated cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6829710

  10. Synthetic progestins induce growth and metastasis of BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yayun; Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Hyder, Ryyan S; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hyder, Salman M

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential exposure to estrogen and progesterone or medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) stimulates vascularization and promotes the progression of BT-474 and T47-D human breast cancer cell xenografts in nude mice (Liang et al, Cancer Res 2007, 67:9929). In this follow-up study, the effects of progesterone, MPA, norgestrel (N-EL), and norethindrone (N-ONE) on BT-474 xenograft tumors were compared in the context of several different hormonal environments. N-EL and N-ONE were included in the study because synthetic progestins vary considerably in their biological effects and the effects of these two progestins on the growth of human tumor xenografts are not known. Estradiol-supplemented intact and ovariectomized immunodeficient mice were implanted with BT-474 cells. Progestin pellets were implanted simultaneously with estradiol pellets either 2 days before tumor cell injection (ie, combined) or 5 days after tumor cell injections (ie, sequentially). Progestins stimulated the growth of BT-474 xenograft tumors independent of exposure timing and protocol, MPA stimulated the growth of BT-474 xenograft tumors in ovariectomized mice, and progestins stimulated vascular endothelial growth factor elaboration and increased tumor vascularity. Progestins also increased lymph node metastasis of BT-474 cells. Therefore, progestins, including N-EL and N-ONE, induce the progression of breast cancer xenografts in nude mice and promote tumor metastasis. These observations suggest that women who ingest progestins for hormone therapy or oral contraception could be more at risk for developing breast cancer because of proliferation of existing latent tumor cells. Such risks should be considered in the clinical setting.

  11. Synthetic progestins induce growth and metastasis of BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Hyder, Ryyan S; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Hyder, Salman M

    2010-01-01

    Objective Previous studies showed that sequential exposure to estrogen and progesterone or medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) stimulates vascularization and promotes the progression of BT-474 and T47-D human breast cancer cell xenografts in nude mice (Liang et al, Cancer Res 2007, 67:9929). In this follow-up study, the effects of progesterone, MPA, norgestrel (N-EL) and norethindrone (N-ONE) on BT-474 xenograft tumors were compared in the context of several different hormonal environments. N-EL and N-ONE were included in the study since synthetic progestins vary considerably in their biological effects and the effects of these two progestins on the growth of human tumor xenografts are not known. Methods Estradiol-supplemented intact and ovariectomized Immunodeficient mice were implanted with BT-474 cells. Progestin pellets were implanted either simultaneously with estradiol pellets 2-days prior to tumor cell injection (i.e. combined), or 5-days following tumor cell injections (i.e. sequentially). Results Progestins stimulated the growth of BT-474 xenograft tumors independent of exposure timing and protocol, MPA stimulated the growth of BT-474 xenograft tumors in ovariectomized mice and progestins stimulated VEGF elaboration and increased tumor vascularity. Progestins also increased lymph node metastasis of BT-474 cells. Therefore, progestins, including N-EL and N-ONE, induce the progression of breast cancer xenografts in nude mice and promote tumor metastasis. Conclusions These observations suggests that women who ingest progestins for HT or oral contraception could be more at risk for developing breast cancer as a result of proliferation of existing latent tumor cells. Such risks should be considered in the clinical setting. PMID:20461021

  12. Establishment, maintenance and in vitro and in vivo applications of primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) xenograft models for translational biology studies and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Brett L; Pokorny, Jenny L; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2011-03-01

    Development of clinically relevant tumor model systems for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is important for advancement of basic and translational biology. One model that has gained wide acceptance in the neuro-oncology community is the primary xenograft model. This model entails the engraftment of patient tumor specimens into the flank of nude mice and subsequent serial passage of these tumors in the flank of mice. These tumors are then used to establish short-term explant cultures or intracranial xenografts. This unit describes detailed procedures for establishment, maintenance, and utilization of a primary GBM xenograft panel for the purpose of using them as tumor models for basic or translational studies.

  13. Antitumor effect of bevacizumab in a xenograft model of canine hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Masaki; Uto, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Ryota; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Ogihara, Kikumi; Naya, Yuko; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Azakami, Daigo; Kishikawa, Seigo; Arai, Toshiro; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2013-01-01

    Canine hemangiopericytoma (CHP) is characterized by frequent local recurrence and increased invasiveness. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of angiogenesis in tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a single dose of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of CHP. VEGF protein was secreted from cultured CHP cells and interacted with bevacizumab. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, whereas no significant differences were observed in the proliferation index and apoptosis rates of treated and untreated mice. Thus, bevacizumab had antitumor effects in a xenograft model of CHP.

  14. Nanoparticulate Tetrac Inhibits Growth and Vascularity of Glioblastoma Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Sell, Stewart; Darwish, Noureldien H E; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormone as L-thyroxine (T 4 ) stimulates proliferation of glioma cells in vitro and medical induction of hypothyroidism slows clinical growth of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The proliferative action of T 4 on glioma cells is initiated nongenomically at a cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) is a thyroid hormone derivative that blocks T 4 action at αvβ3 and has anticancer and anti-angiogenic activity. Tetrac has been covalently bonded via a linker to a nanoparticle (Nanotetrac, Nano-diamino-tetrac, NDAT) that increases the potency of tetrac and broadens the anticancer properties of the drug. In the present studies of human GBM xenografts in immunodeficient mice, NDAT administered daily for 10 days subcutaneously as 1 mg tetrac equivalent/kg reduced tumor xenograft weight at animal sacrifice by 50%, compared to untreated control lesions (p < 0.01). Histopathological analysis of tumors revealed a 95% loss of the vascularity of treated tumors compared to controls at 10 days (p < 0.001), without intratumoral hemorrhage. Up to 80% of tumor cells were necrotic in various microscopic fields (p < 0.001 vs. control tumors), an effect attributable to devascularization. There was substantial evidence of apoptosis in other fields (p < 0.001 vs. control tumors). Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is a well-described quality of NDAT. In summary, systemic NDAT has been shown to be effective by multiple mechanisms in treatment of GBM xenografts.

  15. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER +) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER + adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistentmore » with “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44 High  subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44 Low  cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER +  cancers. In conclusion, this model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development.« less

  16. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma

    DOE PAGES

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; ...

    2015-12-12

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER +) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER + adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistentmore » with “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44 High  subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44 Low  cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER +  cancers. In conclusion, this model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development.« less

  17. A Real-Time Non-invasive Auto-bioluminescent Urinary Bladder Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    John, Bincy Anu; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2017-02-01

    The study was to develop an auto-bioluminescent urinary bladder cancer (UBC) xenograft animal model for pre-clinical research. The study used a humanized, bacteria-originated lux reporter system consisting of six (luxCDABEfrp) genes to express components required for producing bioluminescent signals in human UBC J82, J82-Ras, and SW780 cells without exogenous substrates. Immune-deficient nude mice were inoculated with Lux-expressing UBC cells to develop auto-bioluminescent xenograft tumors that were monitored by imaging and physical examination. Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Lux, J82-Ras-Lux, and SW780-Lux cell lines were established. Xenograft tumors derived from tumorigenic Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Ras-Lux cells allowed a serial, non-invasive, real-time monitoring by imaging of tumor development prior to the presence of palpable tumors in animals. Using Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent tumorigenic cells enabled us to monitor the entire course of xenograft tumor development through tumor cell implantation, adaptation, and growth to visible/palpable tumors in animals.

  18. Patient-derived xenografts as preclinical neuroblastoma models.

    PubMed

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Bexell, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The prognosis for children with high-risk neuroblastoma is often poor and survivors can suffer from severe side effects. Predictive preclinical models and novel therapeutic strategies for high-risk disease are therefore a clinical imperative. However, conventional cancer cell line-derived xenografts can deviate substantially from patient tumors in terms of their molecular and phenotypic features. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) recapitulate many biologically and clinically relevant features of human cancers. Importantly, PDXs can closely parallel clinical features and outcome and serve as excellent models for biomarker and preclinical drug development. Here, we review progress in and applications of neuroblastoma PDX models. Neuroblastoma orthotopic PDXs share the molecular characteristics, neuroblastoma markers, invasive properties and tumor stroma of aggressive patient tumors and retain spontaneous metastatic capacity to distant organs including bone marrow. The recent identification of genomic changes in relapsed neuroblastomas opens up opportunities to target treatment-resistant tumors in well-characterized neuroblastoma PDXs. We highlight and discuss the features and various sources of neuroblastoma PDXs, methodological considerations when establishing neuroblastoma PDXs, in vitro 3D models, current limitations of PDX models and their application to preclinical drug testing.

  19. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar, E-mail: snimmag1@jhmi.edu; Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287; Pullambhatla, Mrudula

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeledmore » anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in

  20. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  1. In vivo preservation of steroid specificity in CWR22 xenografts having a mutated androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tsang C; Li, Huiling; Eid, Wael; Ittmann, Michael; Unni, Emmanual; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2003-09-15

    In vitro studies of CWR22 tumor cells lack steroid specificity. We sought to determine if CWR22 xenografts also lack steroid specificity. We injected castrated nude mice with CWR22 tumor cells (6 x 10(6) cells) and implanted Alzet osmotic pumps that delivered approximately 1 mg steroid/kg body weight/day. Serum PSA levels were detectable in intact mice and castrated mice treated with testosterone (T), but not in those treated with estradiol (E(2)), progesterone (P), or flutamide (F). T maintained mean tumor weight similar to that in intact mice (P = NS). We observed no tumors in castrated mice or mice treated with E(2), P, or F, and tumor histology was consistent with weights. The mutation of the androgen receptor (H874Y) that occurs in the CWR22 xenograft model of human prostate cancer does not significantly affect in vivo steroid specificity for E(2), P, or F. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Establishment of A431 cell membrane chromatography-RPLC method for screening target components from Radix Caulophylli.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaofang; Wang, Sicen; Hou, Jingjing; He, Langchong

    2011-03-01

    We describe here an analytical method of A431 cell membrane chromatography (A431/CMC) (CMC, cell membrane chromatography) combined with RPLC for recognition, separation, and identification of target components from traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) Radix Caulophylli. The A431 cells with high expressed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were used to prepare the stationary phase in the CMC model. Retention fractions on the A431-CMC model were collected using an automated fraction collection and injection module (FC/I). Each fraction was analyzed by RPLC under the optimized conditions. Gefitinib and erlotinib were used as standard compounds to investigate the suitability and reliability of the A431 cell membrane chromatography-RPLC method prior to screening target component from Radix Caulophylli total alkaloids. The results indicated that caulophine and taspine were the target component acting on the epidermal growth factor receptor. This method could be an efficient way in drug discovery using natural medicinal herbs as a source of novel compounds. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    No 6 C8161 s.c. xenografts No 5 K14-HPV16 skin cancer No 4 MDA-MB-435 orthotopic xenografts No 4 AGR TRAMP PIN lesions TRAMP PIN lesions Yes 18 TRAMP...CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18 . NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c...Summary We developed three tumor models under this project: 4T1 mouse breast cancer and MDA-MB-435 human cancer xenograft tumors treated with anti

  4. The growth of human fibroblasts and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells on gamma-irradiated human amnion collagen substrata.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Harrell, R; Lamb, D J; Dresden, M H; Spira, M

    1989-10-15

    Human fibroblasts and A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were cultured on gamma-irradiated human amnion collagen as well as on plastic dishes and non-irradiated collagen coated dishes. The morphology, attachment, growth and short-term cytotoxicity of these culture conditions have been determined. Both irradiated and non-irradiated amnion collagen enhanced the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts as compared to the plastic dishes. No differences in these properties were observed for A431 cells cultured on irradiated collagen when compared with culture on non-irradiated collagen substrates. Cytotoxicity assays showed that irradiated and non-irradiated collagens were not cytotoxic for either fibroblasts or A431 cells. The results demonstrated that amnion collagen irradiated at doses of 0.25-2.0 Mrads is optimal for cell growth.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  6. Clonal selection in xenografted human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia recapitulates gain of malignancy at relapse.

    PubMed

    Clappier, Emmanuelle; Gerby, Bastien; Sigaux, François; Delord, Marc; Touzri, Farah; Hernandez, Lucie; Ballerini, Paola; Baruchel, André; Pflumio, Françoise; Soulier, Jean

    2011-04-11

    Genomic studies in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have revealed clonal heterogeneity at diagnosis and clonal evolution at relapse. In this study, we used genome-wide profiling to compare human T cell ALL samples at the time of diagnosis and after engraftment (xenograft) into immunodeficient recipient mice. Compared with paired diagnosis samples, the xenograft leukemia often contained additional genomic lesions in established human oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes. Mimicking such genomic lesions by short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown in diagnosis samples conferred a selective advantage in competitive engraftment experiments, demonstrating that additional lesions can be drivers of increased leukemia-initiating activity. In addition, the xenograft leukemias appeared to arise from minor subclones existing in the patient at diagnosis. Comparison of paired diagnosis and relapse samples showed that, with regard to genetic lesions, xenograft leukemias more frequently more closely resembled relapse samples than bulk diagnosis samples. Moreover, a cell cycle- and mitosis-associated gene expression signature was present in xenograft and relapse samples, and xenograft leukemia exhibited diminished sensitivity to drugs. Thus, the establishment of human leukemia in immunodeficient mice selects and expands a more aggressive malignancy, recapitulating the process of relapse in patients. These findings may contribute to the design of novel strategies to prevent or treat relapse.

  7. Radiosensitizing Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts by an Implantable Micro-Oxygen Generator.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ning; Song, Seung Hyun; Maleki, Teimour; Shaffer, Michael; Stantz, Keith M; Cao, Minsong; Kao, Chinghai; Mendonca, Marc S; Ziaie, Babak; Ko, Song-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, little progress has been made to improve the extremely low survival rates in pancreatic cancer patients. Extreme hypoxia observed in pancreatic tumors contributes to the aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and can reduce the effectiveness of conventional radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In an attempt to reduce hypoxia-induced obstacles to effective radiation treatment, we used a novel device, the implantable micro-oxygen generator (IMOG), for in situ tumor oxygenation. After subcutaneous implantation of human pancreatic xenograft tumors in athymic rats, the IMOG was wirelessly powered by ultrasonic waves, producing 30 μA of direct current (at 2.5 V), which was then utilized to electrolyze water and produce oxygen within the tumor. Significant oxygen production by the IMOG was observed and corroborated using the NeoFox oxygen sensor dynamically. To test the radiosensitization effect of the newly generated oxygen, the human pancreatic xenograft tumors were subcutaneously implanted in nude mice with either a functional or inactivated IMOG device. The tumors in the mice were then exposed to ultrasonic power for 10 min, followed by a single fraction of 5 Gy radiation, and tumor growth was monitored thereafter. The 5 Gy irradiated tumors containing the functional IMOG exhibited tumor growth inhibition equivalent to that of 7 Gy irradiated tumors that did not contain an IMOG. Our study confirmed that an activated IMOG is able to produce sufficient oxygen to radiosensitize pancreatic tumors, enhancing response to single-dose radiation therapy.

  8. Therapeutic effects of autologous lymphocytes activated with trastuzumab for xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shinichiro; Matsuoka, Yusuke; Ichihara, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hitoji; Yoshida, Kenshi; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab (TTZ) is molecular targeted drug used for metastatic breast cancer patients overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Therapeutic effects of lymphocytes activated with TTZ (TTZ-LAK) using xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-453) cells were examined in vivo. Remarkable reduction of tumor volume in a xenograft mouse models intravenously treated with TTZ-LAK cells after the subcutaneously inoculated of MDA-MB-453 cells was verified in vivo. The migration of TTZ-LAK cells in tumor of mouse models subcutaneously inoculated MDA-MB-453 cells was observed on the basis of histological analysis using immunostaining with CD-3. Induction of apoptosis in tumor of xenograft mice treated with TTZ-LAK cells was observed in micrographs using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method. It was noteworthy that the therapeutic effects of TTZ-LAK cells along with apoptosis were obtained for xenograft mouse models of human breast tumor in vivo.

  9. Impact of ER520, a candidate of selective estrogen receptor modulators, on in vitro cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and in vivo tumor xenograft of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Ying; Du, Huaqing; Jiang, Yao; Tang, Zhichao; Liu, Hongyi; Xiang, Hua; Xiao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    ER520, a derivative of indenoisoquinoline, is a patented compound. This study was designed to screen its biological properties and to evaluate its antineoplastic and antiangiogenic effect. Western blot was employed to monitor the ERα and ERβ protein expression in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and endometrial carcinoma Ishikawa cells. MTT assay was employed to determine cell proliferation. Cell adhesion, scratch and Transwell assay were utilized to estimate the ability of cellular adhesion, migration and invasion. ELISA kit was applied to detect the VEGF products in culture medium. In addition, the inhibitory effect of ER520 on the vessel-like construction of HUVEC cells and the angiogenesis of chicken embryos was investigated. The efficiency of ER520 on tumor growth in nude mice was also assessed. ER520 inhibited the expression of ERα in MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells, while it increased ERβ protein level. ER520 also suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells. Due to its remarkably negative role in cell adhesion, migration and invasion, ER520 showed a potential ability of inhibiting tumor metastasis. Meanwhile, ER520 reduced the VEGF secretion of MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells, prevented the formation of VEGF-stimulated tubular structure and the cell migration of HUVEC cells, and inhibited the angiogenesis of chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Animal experiment also demonstrated that ER520 could frustrate the in vivo tumor growth and the inhibitory ratio was 48.5 % compared with control group. Our findings indicate that ER520 possesses the competence to be a candidate against breast cancer and angiogenesis.

  10. A Primary Xenograft Model of Small Cell Lung Cancer Reveals Irreversible Changes in Gene Expression Imposed by Culture In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Vincent C.; Marchionni, Luigi; Hierman, Jared S.; Rhodes, Jonathan T.; Devereux, Wendy L.; Rudin, Charles M.; Yung, Rex; Parmigani, Giovanni; Dorsch, Marion; Peacock, Craig D.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2009-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the preclinical investigation of cancer therapies rely on the use of established cell lines maintained in serum-based growth media. This is particularly true of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), where surgically resected tissue is rarely available. Recent attention has focused on the need for better models that preserve the integrity of cancer stem cell populations, as well as three-dimensional tumor-stromal interactions. Here we describe a primary xenograft model of SCLC in which endobronchial tumor specimens obtained from chemo-naive patients are serially propagated in vivo in immunodeficient mice. In parallel, cell lines grown in conventional tissue culture conditions were derived from each xenograft line, passaged for 6 months, and then re-implanted to generate secondary xenografts. Using the Affymetrix platform, we analyzed gene expression in primary xenograft, xenograft-derived cell line, and secondary xenograft, and compared these data to similar analyses of unrelated primary SCLC samples and laboratory models. When compared to normal lung, primary tumors, xenografts and cell lines displayed a gene expression signature specific for SCLC. Comparison of gene expression within the xenograft model identified a group of tumor-specific genes expressed in primary SCLC and xenografts that was lost during the transition to tissue culture, and that was not regained when the tumors were re-established as secondary xenografts. Such changes in gene expression may be a common feature of many cancer cell culture systems, with functional implications for the use of such models for preclinical drug development. PMID:19351829

  11. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  12. pO{sub 2} Fluctuation Pattern and Cycling Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma and Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Galappathi, Kanthi

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Blood perfusion in tumors is spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in local fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) and tissue regions showing cycling hypoxia. In this study, we investigated whether the pO{sub 2} fluctuation pattern and the extent of cycling hypoxia differ between tumor types showing high (e.g., cervical carcinoma xenograft) and low (e.g., melanoma xenograft) fractions of connective tissue-associated blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Two cervical carcinoma lines (CK-160 and TS-415) and two melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) transplanted into BALB/c nu/nu mice were included in the study. Tissue pO{sub 2} was measured simultaneously in two positionsmore » in each tumor by using a two-channel OxyLite fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device. The extent of acute and chronic hypoxia was assessed by combining a radiobiological and a pimonidazole-based immunohistochemical assay of tumor hypoxia. Results: The proportion of tumor regions showing pO{sub 2} fluctuations, the pO{sub 2} fluctuation frequency in these regions, and the relative amplitude of the pO{sub 2} fluctuations were significantly higher in the melanoma xenografts than in the cervical carcinoma xenografts. Cervical carcinoma and melanoma xenografts did not differ significantly in the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells or the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells. However, the ratio between fraction of acutely hypoxic cells and fraction of chronically hypoxic cells was significantly higher in melanoma than in cervical carcinoma xenografts. Conclusions: Temporal heterogeneity in blood flow and tissue pO{sub 2} in tumors may depend on tumor histology. Connective tissue surrounding microvessels may stabilize blood flow and pO{sub 2} and, thus, protect tumor tissue from cycling hypoxia.« less

  13. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and -negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  14. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and ‑negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  15. Inhibition of gamma-secretase activity impedes uterine serous carcinoma growth in a human xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Groeneweg, Jolijn W; Hall, Tracilyn R; Zhang, Ling; Kim, Minji; Byron, Virginia F; Tambouret, Rosemary; Sathayanrayanan, Sriram; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R; Growdon, Whitfield B

    2014-06-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) represents an aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. We sought to understand Notch pathway activity in USC and determine if pathway inhibition has anti-tumor activity. Patient USC tissue blocks were obtained and used to correlate clinical outcomes with Notch1 expression. Three established USC cell lines were treated with gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) in vitro. Mice harboring cell line derived or patient derived USC xenografts (PDXs) were treated with vehicle, GSI, paclitaxel and carboplatin (P/C), or combination GSI and P/C. Levels of cleaved Notch1 protein and Hes1 mRNA were determined in GSI treated samples. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon rank sum and Kaplan-Meier methods. High nuclear Notch1 protein expression was observed in 58% of USC samples with no correlation with overall survival. GSI induced dose-dependent reductions in cell number and decreased levels of cleaved Notch1 protein and Hes1 mRNA in vitro. Treatment of mice with GSI led to decreased Hes1 mRNA expression in USC xenografts. In addition, GSI impeded tumor growth of cell line xenografts as well as UT1 USC PDXs. When GSI and P/C were combined, synergistic anti-tumor activity was observed in UT1 xenografts. Notch1 is expressed in a large subset of USC. GSI-mediated Notch pathway inhibition led to both reduced cell numbers in vitro and decreased tumor growth of USC some xenograft models. When combined with conventional chemotherapy, GSI augmented anti-tumor activity in one USC PDX line suggesting that targeting of the Notch signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for future investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reproducibility of Differential Proteomic Technologies in CPTAC Fractionated Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Tabb, David L.; Wang, Xia; Carr, Steven A.

    2016-03-04

    The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) employed a pair of reference xenograft proteomes for initial platform validation and ongoing quality control of its data collection for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors. These two xenografts, representing basal and luminal-B human breast cancer, were fractionated and analyzed on six mass spectrometers in a total of 46 replicates divided between iTRAQ and label-free technologies, spanning a total of 1095 LC-MS/MS experiments. These data represent a unique opportunity to evaluate the stability of proteomic differentiation by mass spectrometry over many months of time for individual instruments or across instruments running dissimilarmore » workflows. We evaluated iTRAQ reporter ions, label-free spectral counts, and label-free extracted ion chromatograms as strategies for data interpretation. From these assessments we found that differential genes from a single replicate were confirmed by other replicates on the same instrument from 61-93% of the time. When comparing across different instruments and quantitative technologies, differential genes were reproduced by other data sets from 67-99% of the time. Projecting gene differences to biological pathways and networks increased the similarities. These overlaps send an encouraging message about the maturity of technologies for proteomic differentiation.« less

  17. A novel patient-derived xenograft model for claudin-low triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matossian, Margarite D; Burks, Hope E; Bowles, Annie C; Elliott, Steven; Hoang, Van T; Sabol, Rachel A; Pashos, Nicholas C; O'Donnell, Benjamen; Miller, Kristin S; Wahba, Bahia M; Bunnell, Bruce A; Moroz, Krzysztof; Zea, Arnold H; Jones, Steven D; Ochoa, Augusto C; Al-Khami, Amir A; Hossain, Fokhrul; Riker, Adam I; Rhodes, Lyndsay V; Martin, Elizabeth C; Miele, Lucio; Burow, Matthew E; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M

    2018-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes are clinically aggressive and cannot be treated with targeted therapeutics commonly used in other breast cancer subtypes. The claudin-low (CL) molecular subtype of TNBC has high rates of metastases, chemoresistance and recurrence. There exists an urgent need to identify novel therapeutic targets in TNBC; however, existing models utilized in target discovery research are limited. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have emerged as superior models for target discovery experiments because they recapitulate features of patient tumors that are limited by cell-line derived xenograft methods. We utilize immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western Blot to visualize tumor architecture, cellular composition, genomic and protein expressions of a new CL-TNBC PDX model (TU-BcX-2O0). We utilize tissue decellularization techniques to examine extracellular matrix composition of TU-BcX-2O0. Our laboratory successfully established a TNBC PDX tumor, TU-BCX-2O0, which represents a CL-TNBC subtype and maintains this phenotype throughout subsequent passaging. We dissected TU-BCx-2O0 to examine aspects of this complex tumor that can be targeted by developing therapeutics, including the whole and intact breast tumor, specific cell populations within the tumor, and the extracellular matrix. Here, we characterize a claudin-low TNBC patient-derived xenograft model that can be utilized for therapeutic research studies.

  18. Toxicity of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid toward human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Ibata, Kenji; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2007-08-01

    Chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated drinking water induces skin lesions and urinary bladder cancer in humans. It is now recognized that thioarsenicals such as dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA (V)) are commonly excreted in the urine of humans and animals and that the production of DMMTA (V) may be a risk factor for the development of the diseases caused by arsenic. The toxicity of DMMTA (V) was compared with that of related nonthiolated arsenicals with respect to cell viability, uptake ability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell cycle progression of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, arsenate (iAs (V)), arsenite (iAs (III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA (V)), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)) being used as reference nonthiolated arsenicals. DMMTA (V) (LC 50 = 10.7 microM) was shown to be much more cytotoxic than iAs (V) (LC 50 = 571 microM) and DMA (V) (LC 50 = 843 microM), and its potency was shown to be close to that of trivalent arsenicals iAs (III) (LC 50 = 5.49 microM) and DMA (III) (LC 50 = 2.16 microM). The greater cytotoxicity of DMMTA (V) was associated with greater cellular uptake and distribution, and the level of intracellular ROS remarkably increased in A431 cells upon exposure to DMMTA (V) compared to that after exposure to other trivalent arsenicals at the respective LC 50. Exposure of DMMTA (V) to cells for 24 h induced cell cycle perturbation. Namely, the percentage of cells residing in S and G2/M phases increased from 10.2 and 15.6% to 46.5 and 20.8%, respectively. These results suggest that although DMMTA (V) is a pentavalent arsenical, it is taken up efficiently by cells and causes various levels of toxicity, in a manner different from that of nonthiolated pentavalent arsenicals, demonstrating that DMMTA (V) is one of the most toxic arsenic metabolites. The high cytotoxicity of DMMTA (V) was explained and/or proposed by (1) efficient uptake by cells followed by (2) its transformation to DMA (V), (3) producing ROS

  19. Comparison of Two Site-Specifically 18F-Labeled Affibodies for PET Imaging of EGFR Positive Tumors

    DOE PAGES

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; ...

    2014-06-27

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules 64Cu-DOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-FBEM-Z EGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with 64Cu, 18F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of 18F-FBEM-Z EGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of 18F labeled affibody probes (Al 18F-NOTA-Zmore » EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating Z EGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al 18F to produce Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group 18F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ( 18F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-Z EGFR:1907 to produce 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 or 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 demonstrated high in vitro and in

  20. Comparison of Two Site-Specifically 18F-Labeled Affibodies for PET Imaging of EGFR Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules 64Cu-DOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-FBEM-Z EGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with 64Cu, 18F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of 18F-FBEM-Z EGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of 18F labeled affibody probes (Al 18F-NOTA-Zmore » EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating Z EGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al 18F to produce Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group 18F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ( 18F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-Z EGFR:1907 to produce 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 or 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 and 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although 18F-CBT-Z EGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al 18F-NOTA-Z EGFR:1907 demonstrated high in vitro and in

  1. Lysosomal Signaling Enhances Mitochondria-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy in A431 Cancer Cells: Role of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Shalini; Hung, Hsin-I; Quiogue, Geraldine; Lemasters, John J.; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), light activates a photosensitizer added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. The photosensitizer phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes in cancer cells, resulting in mitochondria-mediated cell death. The aim of this study was to determine how lysosomes contribute to PDT-induced cell killing by mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers such as Pc 4. We monitored cell killing of A431 cells after Pc 4-PDT in the presence and absence of bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump of lysosomes and endosomes. Bafilomycin was not toxic by itself, but greatly enhanced Pc 4-PDT-induced cell killing. To investigate whether iron loading of lysosomes affects bafilomycin-induced killing, cells were incubated with ammonium ferric citrate (30 μm) for 30 h prior to PDT. Ammonium ferric citrate enhanced Pc 4 plus bafilomycin-induced cell killing without having toxicity by itself. Iron chelators (desferrioxamine and starch-desferrioxamine) and the inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium (and ferrous iron) uniporter, Ru360, protected against Pc 4 plus bafilomycin toxicity. These results support the conclusion that chelatable iron stored in the lysosomes enhances the efficacy of bafilomycin-mediated PDT and that lysosomal disruption augments PDT with Pc 4. PMID:22220628

  2. Establishment of a neuroblastoma mouse model by subcutaneous xenograft transplantation and its use to study metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Chen, C F; Dong, Q; Hou, L; Chen, X; Zhi, Y L; Li, X; Lu, H T; Zhang, H Y

    2015-12-08

    The aim of this study was to establish a metastatic human neuroblastoma (NB) mouse model by xenograft in order to study the metastatic mechanisms of NB. A human NB cell line was obtained from a 5-year-old patient and cultured in vitro. A suspension of these cells was subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice at the right flank next to the forelimb. The biological characteristics of the developed subcutaneous and metastatic tumors were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of the tumor marker neuron-specific enolase was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the invasive ability of metastatic tumors was examined by a Matrigel invasion assay. DNA microarray analyses were performed to examine the metastasis-related gene expression. Our results showed that tumors grew in 75% of the mice injected with NB cells and the rate of metastasis was 21%. The xenograft tumors retained the morphological and biological characteristics of the NB specimen from the pediatric patient. Neuron-specific enolase was highly expressed in both subcutaneous and metastatic tumors. The metastatic tumor cells possessed a higher invasive capability than the primary NB cells. The expression of 25 metastasis-related genes was found to be significantly altered in metastatic tumors compared to primary tumors, including RECK, MMP2, VEGF, MMP3, and CXCL12. In conclusion, we successfully established a human NB xenograft model with high tumor-bearing and metastatic rates in nude mice, providing an ideal animal model for the in vivo study of NB.

  3. [Effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Huang, Yi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Chen, Bu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice in vivo and explore its mechanism. Xenograft tumor model of HL-60 cells in nude mice was established, which was divided randomly into 6 groups: negative control group (injection of 5% NaHCO(3)), 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg baicalin groups, combination group (50 mg/kg baicalin + 2 mg/kg VP16) and positive control group (VP16 4 mg/kg). The nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were treated with drugs via intraperitoneal injection daily. After treatment for 14 days average weigh and inhibitory rate of transplanted tumor stripped from 5 nude mice in each group were calculated, and the ultrastructure change of xenografts cells were tested by transmission electron microscopy. Histopathologic examination was used to observed the change of main organs in nude mice. The expression of signaling molecular PI3K/Akt proteins extracted from xenografts was detected by Western blot. The effects of baicalin on overall survival time in nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were evaluated. The results showed that baicalin could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in dose-dependent manner. There were more necrotic and apoptotic cells in mice of baicalin-treated groups and combination group than that in mice of negative control group. Baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells in vivo by down-regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, where the expressions of p-Akt, mTOR and p-mTOR proteins decreased compared with negative control group, and no significant difference of Akt expression was found between different groups. Compared with negative control group, the median survival time of mice in combination group was more prolongated (P < 0.05). It is concluded that baicalin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice, and prolong median survival time of nude mice. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of Akt activity and down

  4. Vitrification and xenografting of human ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Christiani Andrade; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; David, Anu; Jaeger, Jonathan; Vanacker, Julie; Camboni, Alessandra; Donnez, Jacques; Van Langendonckt, Anne

    2012-11-01

    To assess the efficiency of two vitrification protocols to cryopreserve human preantral follicles with the use of a xenografting model. Pilot study. Gynecology research unit in a university hospital. Ovarian biopsies were obtained from seven women aged 30-41 years. Ovarian tissue fragments were subjected to one of three cryopreservation protocols (slow freezing, vitrification protocol 1, and vitrification protocol 2) and xenografted for 1 week to nude mice. The number of morphologically normal follicles after cryopreservation and grafting and fibrotic surface area were determined by histologic analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by the TUNEL method. Morphometric analysis of TUNEL-positive surface area also was performed. Follicle proliferation was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. After xenografting, a difference was observed between the cryopreservation procedures applied. According to TUNEL analysis, both vitrification protocols showed better preservation of preantral follicles than the conventional freezing method. Moreover, histologic evaluation showed a significantly higher proportion of primordial follicles in vitrified (protocol 2)-warmed ovarian tissue than in frozen-thawed tissue. The proportion of growing follicles and fibrotic surface area was similar in all groups. Vitrification procedures appeared to preserve not only the morphology and survival of preantral follicles after 1 week of xenografting, but also their ability to resume folliculogenesis. In addition, vitrification protocol 2 had a positive impact on the quiescent state of primordial follicles after xenografting. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chitosan nanoparticles inhibit the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts through an antiangiogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinglei; Wen, Zhengshun; Xu, Zirong

    2009-12-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) have demonstrated anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo by a few recent researches. However, the mechanisms involved in their potential anticancer activity remain to be elucidated. In this study, the effects of CNP on tumor growth were investigated using a model of nude mice xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (BEL-7402) cells. The results demonstrated that the treatment of these nude mice with CNP significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor necrosis. Furthermore, microvessel density (MVD) determination by counting immunohistologically stained tumor microvessels suggested that CNP dose-dependent tumor suppression was correlated with the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase reaction assays provided evidence that CNP-mediated inhibition of tumor angiogenesis was linked to impaired levels of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Due to their low or non-toxicity, CNP and their derivatives may represent a novel class of anti-cancer drug.

  6. Halofuginone suppresses growth of human uterine leiomyoma cells in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Koohestani, Faezeh; Qiang, Wenan; MacNeill, Amy L; Druschitz, Stacy A; Serna, Vanida A; Adur, Malavika; Kurita, Takeshi; Nowak, Romana A

    2016-07-01

    Does halofuginone (HF) inhibit the growth of human uterine leiomyoma cells in a mouse xenograft model? HF suppresses the growth of human uterine leiomyoma cells in a mouse xenograft model through inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors of the female reproductive tract. HF can suppress the growth of human uterine leiomyoma cells in vitro. The mouse xenograft model reflects the characteristics of human leiomyomas. Primary leiomyoma smooth muscle cells from eight patients were xenografted under the renal capsule of adult, ovariectomized NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice (NSG). Mice were treated with two different doses of HF or vehicle for 4 weeks with six to eight mice per group. Mouse body weight measurements and immunohistochemical analysis of body organs were carried out to assess the safety of HF treatment. Xenografted tumors were measured and analyzed for cellular and molecular changes induced by HF. Ovarian steroid hormone receptors were evaluated for possible modulation by HF. Treatment of mice carrying human UL xenografts with HF at 0.25 or 0.50 mg/kg body weight for 4 weeks resulted in a 35-40% (P < 0.05) reduction in tumor volume. The HF-induced volume reduction was accompanied by increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation. In contrast, there was no significant change in the collagen content either at the transcript or protein level between UL xenografts in control and HF groups. HF treatment did not change the expression level of ovarian steroid hormone receptors. No adverse pathological effects were observed in other tissues from mice undergoing treatment at these doses. While this study did test the effects of HF on human leiomyoma cells in an in vivo model, HF was administered to mice whose tolerance and metabolism of the drug may differ from that in humans. Also, the longer term effects of HF treatment are yet unclear. The results of this study showing the effectiveness of HF in

  7. Monitoring the development of xenograft triple-negative breast cancer models using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Renu M; Pagel, Mark D; Brown, Kathy; Baker, Amanda F; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Evaluations of tumor growth rates and molecular biomarkers are traditionally used to assess new mouse models of human breast cancers. This study investigated the utility of diffusion weighted (DW)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating cellular proliferation of new tumor models of triple-negative breast cancer, which may augment traditional analysis methods. Eleven human breast cancer cell lines were used to develop xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient mice, with two of these cell lines exhibiting sufficient growth to be serially passaged. DW-MRI was performed to measure the distributions of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in these two tumor xenograft models, which showed a correlation with tumor growth rates and doubling times during each passage. The distributions of the ADC values were also correlated with expression of Ki67, a biomarker of cell proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2), which are essential proteins involved in regulating aerobic glycolysis and angiogenesis that support tumor cell proliferation. Although phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) levels were different between the two xenograft models, AKT levels did not differ nor did they correlate with tumor growth. This last result demonstrates the complexity of signaling protein pathways and the difficulty in interpreting the effects of protein expression on tumor cell proliferation. In contrast, DW-MRI may be a more direct assessment of tumor growth and cancer cell proliferation.

  8. Purification of high-molecular-weight subfraction from porcine skin inhibiting proliferation of A431 human carcinoma epidermoid cells.

    PubMed

    Belova, O V; Sergienko, V I; Arion, V Ya; Lukanidina, T A; Moskvina, S N; Zimina, I V; Borisenko, G G; Lutsenko, G V; Grechikhina, M V; Kovaleva, E V; Klyuchnikova, Zh I

    2014-07-01

    Subfraction with a molecular weight >250 kDa isolated from porcine skin and inhibiting the proliferation of A431 human carcinoma epidermoid cells was purified by DEAE 32 anion exchange chromatography with NaCl concentration step-gradient. The effects of the initial subfraction and fractions obtained by separation in DEAE 32 on the proliferation of A431 human carcinoma epidermoid cells were studied in vitro in two tests (MTT and fluorescent test). The more sensitive fluorescent test showed the highest inhibitory activity of fraction No. 2 released from the column at 0.15 M NaCl. One major protein component and a series of minor protein components were detected in this fraction by vertical PAAG-SDS electrophoresis.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Ya; Han, Guo-Qing; Liang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Li-Li; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Kun

    2015-09-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). BALB/c nude mice were randomized into four groups 24 h before subcutaneous injection of hepatocarcinoma BEL7402 cells suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the right flank. The control group (n = 10) was fed a standard diet while treatment groups (n = 10 each) were fed a standard daily diet supplemented with different concentrations of UDCA (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg per day) for 21 d. Tumor growth was measured once each week, and tumor volume (V) was calculated with the following equation: V = (L × W(2)) × 0.52, where L is the length and W is the width of the xenograft. After 21 d, mice were killed under ether anesthesia, and tumors were excised and weighed. Apoptosis was evaluated through detection of DNA fragmentation with gel electrophoresis and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the expression of apoptosis-related proteins BAX, BCL2, APAF1, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3. UDCA suppressed tumor growth relative to controls. The mean tumor volumes were the following: control, 1090 ± 89 mm(3); 30 mg/kg per day, 612 ± 46 mm(3); 50 mg/kg per day, 563 ± 38 mm(3); and 70 mg/kg per day, 221 ± 26 mm(3). Decreased tumor volumes reached statistical significance relative to control xenografts (30 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 50 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 70 mg/kg per day, P < 0.01). Increasing concentrations of UDCA led to increased DNA fragmentation observed on gel electrophoresis and in the TUNEL assay (control, 1.6% ± 0.3%; 30 mg/kg per day, 2.9% ± 0.5%; 50 mg/kg per day, 3.15% ± 0.7%, and 70 mg/kg per day, 4.86% ± 0.9%). Western blot analysis revealed increased expression of BAX, APAF1, cleaved-caspase-9 and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins, which induce apoptosis, but decreased expression of BCL2 protein, which

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Ya; Han, Guo-Qing; Liang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Li-Li; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: BALB/c nude mice were randomized into four groups 24 h before subcutaneous injection of hepatocarcinoma BEL7402 cells suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the right flank. The control group (n = 10) was fed a standard diet while treatment groups (n = 10 each) were fed a standard daily diet supplemented with different concentrations of UDCA (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg per day) for 21 d. Tumor growth was measured once each week, and tumor volume (V) was calculated with the following equation: V = (L × W2) × 0.52, where L is the length and W is the width of the xenograft. After 21 d, mice were killed under ether anesthesia, and tumors were excised and weighed. Apoptosis was evaluated through detection of DNA fragmentation with gel electrophoresis and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the expression of apoptosis-related proteins BAX, BCL2, APAF1, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3. RESULTS: UDCA suppressed tumor growth relative to controls. The mean tumor volumes were the following: control, 1090 ± 89 mm3; 30 mg/kg per day, 612 ± 46 mm3; 50 mg/kg per day, 563 ± 38 mm3; and 70 mg/kg per day, 221 ± 26 mm3. Decreased tumor volumes reached statistical significance relative to control xenografts (30 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 50 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 70 mg/kg per day, P < 0.01). Increasing concentrations of UDCA led to increased DNA fragmentation observed on gel electrophoresis and in the TUNEL assay (control, 1.6% ± 0.3%; 30 mg/kg per day, 2.9% ± 0.5%; 50 mg/kg per day, 3.15% ± 0.7%, and 70 mg/kg per day, 4.86% ± 0.9%). Western blot analysis revealed increased expression of BAX, APAF1, cleaved-caspase-9 and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins, which induce apoptosis, but decreased expression of BCL2

  11. Proteolytic cleavage and activation of PAK2 during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis in A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, T K; Chang, W C; Chan, W H; Yang, S D; Ni, M H; Yu, J S

    1998-09-15

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ultraviolet (UV) light elicits a cellular response and can also lead to apoptotic cell death. In this report, we show that a 36-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase detected by an in-gel kinase assay can be dramatically activated during the early stages of UV irradiation-triggered apoptosis of A431 cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed that this 36-kDa MBP kinase could be recognized by an antibody against the C-terminal regions of a family of p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinases (PAKs). By using this antibody and a PAK2-specific antibody against the N-terminal region of PAK2 as studying tools, we further demonstrated that UV irradiation caused cleavage of PAK2 to generate a 36-kDa C-terminal catalytic fragment and a 30-kDa N-terminal fragment in A431 cells. The appearance of the 36-kDa C-terminal catalytic fragment of PAK2 matched exactly with the activation of the 36-kDa MBP kinase in A431 cells upon UV irradiation. In addition, UV irradiation also led to activation of CPP32/caspase-3, but not ICH-1L/caspase-2 and ICE/caspase-1, in A431 cells and the kinetics of activation of CPP32/caspase-3 appeared to correlate well with that of DNA fragmentation and of cleavage/activation of PAK2, respectively. Moreover, blockage of activation of CPP32/caspase-3 by pretreating the cells with two specific tetrapeptidic inhibitors for caspases (Ac-DEVD-cho and Ac-YVAD-cmk) could significantly attenuate the extent of cleavage/activation of PAK2 induced by UV irradiation. Collectively, the results demonstrate that cleavage and activation of PAK2 can be induced during the early stages of UV irradiation-triggered apoptosis and indicate the involvement of CPP32/caspase-3 in this process.

  12. Flurbiprofen benzyl nitrate (NBS-242) inhibits the growth of A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells and targets β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Nath, Niharika; Liu, Xiaoping; Jacobs, Lloydine; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) signaling pathway is important in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Nitric-oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) are chemopreventive agents consisting of a traditional NSAID attached to an NO-releasing moiety through a chemical spacer. Previously we showed that an aromatic spacer enhanced the potency of a particular NO-NSAID compared to an aliphatic spacer. We synthesized an NO-releasing NSAID with an aromatic spacer (flurbiprofen benzyl nitrate, NBS-242), and using the human skin cancer cell line A-431, we evaluated its effects on cell kinetics, Wnt/β-catenin, cyclin D1, and caspase-3. NBS-242 inhibited the growth of A-431 cancer cells, being ~15-fold more potent than flurbiprofen and up to 5-fold more potent than NO-flurbiprofen with an aliphatic spacer, the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for growth inhibition being 60 ± 4 μM, 320 ± 20 μM, and 880 ± 65 μM for NBS-242, NO-flurbiprofen, and flurbiprofen, respectively. This effect was associated with inhibition of proliferation, accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and an increase in apoptotic cell population. NBS-242 cleaved β-catenin both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of A-431 cells. NBS-242 activated caspase-3 whose activation was reflected in the cleavage of procaspase-3. To test the functional consequence of β-catenin cleavage, we determined the expression of cyclin D1, a Wnt-response gene. NBS-242 reduced cyclin D1 levels in a concentration dependent manner. These findings establish a strong inhibitory effect of NBS-242 in A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. NBS-242 modulates parameters that are important in determining cellular mass.

  13. Patient-specific orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft models recapitulate the histopathology and biology of human glioblastomas in situ.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyeung Min; Kim, Jinkuk; Jin, Juyoun; Kim, Misuk; Seol, Ho Jun; Muradov, Johongir; Yang, Heekyoung; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Woong-Yang; Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Woo, Hyun Goo; Lee, Jeongwu; Kim, Sunghoon; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2013-01-31

    Frequent discrepancies between preclinical and clinical results of anticancer agents demand a reliable translational platform that can precisely recapitulate the biology of human cancers. Another critical unmet need is the ability to predict therapeutic responses for individual patients. Toward this goal, we have established a library of orthotopic glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft models using surgical samples of GBM patients. These patient-specific GBM xenograft tumors recapitulate histopathological properties and maintain genomic characteristics of parental GBMs in situ. Furthermore, in vivo irradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy of these xenograft tumors mimic the treatment response of parental GBMs. We also found that establishment of orthotopic xenograft models portends poor prognosis of GBM patients and identified the gene signatures and pathways signatures associated with the clinical aggressiveness of GBMs. Together, the patient-specific orthotopic GBM xenograft library represent the preclinically and clinically valuable "patient tumor's phenocopy" that represents molecular and functional heterogeneity of GBMs. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A.

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na+ adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na+/K+ ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na+ and K+ adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results.

  15. Synthetic curcumin analog EF31 inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shijun; Moore, Terry W.; Lin, Xiaoqian; Morii, Nao; Mancini, Alessandra; Howard, Randy B.; Culver, Deborah; Arrendale, Richard F.; Reddy, Prabhakar; Evers, Taylor J.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Sica, Gabriel; Chen, Zhuo G.; Sun, Aiming; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Shin, Dong M.; Snyder, James P.; Shoji, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Objectives are to examine the efficacy of new synthetic curcumin analogs EF31 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in vitro and in vivo, and study their pharmacokinetic and toxicologic effects in vivo. The synthesis of EF31 was described for the first time. Solubility of EF24, EF31 was compared using nephelometric analysis. Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Tu212 xenograft tumors were established in athymic nude mice and treated with EF31 i.p. once daily five days a week for about 5 – 6 weeks. The long term effect of EF31 on the NF-κB signaling system in the tumors was examined by Western blot analysis. EF31 at 25 mg/kg, i.p. inhibited tumor growth almost completely. Solubility of EF24 and EF31 are <10, 13 μg/mL or <32, 47 μM, respectively. The serum chemistry profiles of treated mice were within the limits of normal, it revealed a linear increase of Cmax. EF31 decreased the level of phosphorylation of NF-κB p65. In conclusion, the novel synthetic curcumin analogs EF31 is efficacious in inhibiting the growth of Tu212 xenograft tumors and may be useful for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The long term EF31 treatment inhibited NF-kB p65 phosphorylation in xenografts, implicating downregulation of cancer promoting transcription factors such as angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:22532032

  16. Synthetic curcumin analog EF31 inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Moore, Terry W; Lin, Xiaoqian; Morii, Nao; Mancini, Alessandra; Howard, Randy B; Culver, Deborah; Arrendale, Richard F; Reddy, Prabhakar; Evers, Taylor J; Zhang, Hongzheng; Sica, Gabriel; Chen, Zhuo G; Sun, Aiming; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R; Shin, Dong M; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2012-06-01

    Objectives are to examine the efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology of a synthetic curcumin analog EF31 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The synthesis of EF31 was described for the first time. Solubility of EF24 and EF31 was compared using nephelometric analysis. Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Tu212 xenograft tumors were established in athymic nude mice and treated with EF31 i.p. once daily five days a week for about 5-6 weeks. The long term effect of EF31 on the NF-κB signaling system in the tumors was examined by Western blot analysis. EF31 at 25 mg kg(-1), i.p. inhibited tumor growth almost completely. Solubilities of EF24 and EF31 are <10 and 13 μg mL(-1) or <32 and 47 μM, respectively. The serum chemistry profiles of treated mice were within the limits of normal, they revealed a linear increase of C(max). EF31 decreased the level of phosphorylation of NF-κB p65. In conclusion, the novel synthetic curcumin analog EF31 is efficacious in inhibiting the growth of Tu212 xenograft tumors and may be useful for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The long term EF31 treatment inhibited NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in xenografts, implicating downregulation of cancer promoting transcription factors such as angiogenesis and metastasis.

  17. Statistical inference for tumor growth inhibition T/C ratio.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2010-09-01

    The tumor growth inhibition T/C ratio is commonly used to quantify treatment effects in drug screening tumor xenograft experiments. The T/C ratio is converted to an antitumor activity rating using an arbitrary cutoff point and often without any formal statistical inference. Here, we applied a nonparametric bootstrap method and a small sample likelihood ratio statistic to make a statistical inference of the T/C ratio, including both hypothesis testing and a confidence interval estimate. Furthermore, sample size and power are also discussed for statistical design of tumor xenograft experiments. Tumor xenograft data from an actual experiment were analyzed to illustrate the application.

  18. Antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor hairpin ribozyme in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell cultures and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Hua; Guo, Zi-Jian; Yan, Ling-Ling; Yang, Ji-Cheng; Xie, Yu-Feng; Sheng, Wei-Hua; Huang, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Xue-Hao

    2007-12-21

    To study the effectiveness and mechanisms of anti- human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF) hairpin ribozyme on angiogenesis, oncogenicity and tumor growth in a hepatocarcinoma cell line and a xenografted model. The artificial anti-hVEGF hairpin ribozyme was transfected into hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7,721 and, subsequently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed to confirm the ribozyme gene integration and transcription. To determine the effects of ribozyme ,VEGF expression was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and enzyme liked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MTT assay was carried out to measure the cell proliferation. Furthermore,the transfected and control cells were inoculated into nude mice respectively, the growth of cells in nude mice and angiogenesis were observed. VEGF expression was down-regulated sharply by ribozyme in transfected SMMC-7,721 cells and xenografted tumor. Compared to the control group, the transfected cells grew slower in cell cultures and xenografts, and the xenograft formation was delayed as well. In addition, the microvessel density of the xenografted tumor was obviously declined in the transfected group. As demonstrated by microscopy,reduction of VEGF production induced by ribozyme resulted in a significantly higher cell differentiation and less proliferation vigor in xenografted tumor. Anti-hVEGF hairpin ribozyme can effectively inhibit VEGF expression and growth of hepatocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. VEGF is functionally related to cell proliferation, differentiation and tumori-genesis in hepatocarcinoma.

  19. Prioritizing therapeutic targets using patient-derived xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, K.A; Hadley, A; Haluska, P; Scott, C.L

    2015-01-01

    Effective systemic treatment of cancer relies on the delivery of agents with optimal therapeutic potential. The molecular age of medicine has provided genomic tools that can identify a large number of potential therapeutic targets in individual patients, heralding the promise of personalized treatment. However, determining which potential targets actually drive tumor growth and should be prioritized for therapy is challenging. Indeed, reliable molecular matches of target and therapeutic agent have been stringently validated in the clinic for only a small number of targets. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) are tumor models developed in immunocompromised mice using tumor procured directly from the patient. As patient surrogates, PDX models represent a powerful tool for addressing individualized therapy. Challenges include humanizing the immune system of PDX models and ensuring high quality molecular annotation, in order to maximise insights for the clinic. Importantly, PDX can be sampled repeatedly and in parallel, to reveal clonal evolution, which may predict mechanisms of drug resistance and inform therapeutic strategy design. PMID:25783201

  20. Pim Kinases Promote Migration and Metastatic Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Santio, Niina M.; Eerola, Sini K.; Paatero, Ilkka; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Anizon, Fabrice; Moreau, Pascale; Tuomela, Johanna; Härkönen, Pirkko; Koskinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and methods Pim family proteins are oncogenic kinases implicated in several types of cancer and involved in regulation of cell proliferation, survival as well as motility. Here we have investigated the ability of Pim kinases to promote metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells in two xenograft models for human prostate cancer. We have also evaluated the efficacy of Pim-selective inhibitors to antagonize these effects. Results We show here that tumorigenic growth of both subcutaneously and orthotopically inoculated prostate cancer xenografts is enhanced by stable overexpression of either Pim-1 or Pim-3. Moreover, Pim-overexpressing orthotopic prostate tumors are highly invasive and able to migrate not only to the nearby prostate-draining lymph nodes, but also into the lungs to form metastases. When the xenografted mice are daily treated with the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, both the volumes as well as the metastatic capacity of the tumors are drastically decreased. Interestingly, the Pim-promoted metastatic growth of the orthotopic xenografts is associated with enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, forced Pim expression also increases phosphorylation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which may enable the tumor cells to migrate towards tissues such as the lungs that express the CXCL12 chemokine ligand. Conclusions Our results indicate that Pim overexpression enhances the invasive properties of prostate cancer cells in vivo. These effects can be reduced by the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, which can reach tumor tissues without serious side effects. Thus, Pim-targeting therapies with DHPCC-9-like compounds may help to prevent progression of local prostate carcinomas to fatally metastatic malignancies. PMID:26075720

  1. Effect pf Estrogen on Progression of Human Proliferation Breast Cancer Disease in a Xenograft Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumor. Virchows Arch. Pathol. Anal., 418: 111-117,1991. 61. Fukeda, M ., Maekawa, J., Hosokawa, Y., Urata , Y., Sugihara, H...s) adhered to policies of applicable Federal Law 45 CFR 46. ^y m conducting research utilizing recombinant DNA. technology, the investigator(s...receptor (ER) gene in MCFlOAneoT cells, a potential factor in neoplastic progression of MCFlOAneoT xenografts. P. V.M. Shekhar, M .- L. Chen, J. Werdell

  2. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vines, Douglass C.; Scollard, Deborah A.; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Besanger, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15) compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2)). Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal), tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro, NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET), a molecular target for 131I-MIBG therapy, low 123I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy. PMID:29097943

  3. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Vines, Douglass C; Scollard, Deborah A; McKee, Trevor; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Vali, Reza; Shammas, Amer; Besanger, Travis; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15) compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2)). Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal), tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro , NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET), a molecular target for 131 I-MIBG therapy, low 123 I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123 I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy.

  4. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R combined with recombinant methioninase and cisplatinum eradicates an osteosarcoma cisplatinum-resistant lung metastasis in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model: decoy, trap and kill chemotherapy moves toward the clinic.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Miyake, Masuyo; Li, Shukuan; Han, Qinghong; Tan, Yuying; Zhao, Ming; Li, Yunfeng; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Singh, Arun S; Elliott, Irmina A; Russell, Tara A; Eckardt, Mark A; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model of recurrent cisplatinum (CDDP)-resistant metastatic osteosarcoma was treated with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R), which decoys chemoresistant quiescent cancer cells to cycle, and recombinant methioninase (rMETase), which selectively traps cancer cells in late S/G 2 , and chemotherapy. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups 14 days after implantation: G1, control without treatment; G2, CDDP (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks). G4, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks); G5, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks); G6, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks) and CDDP (6 mg/kg, i.p. injection, weekly, for 2 weeks). On day 14 after initiation, all treatments except CDDP alone, significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to untreated control: (CDDP: p = 0.586; rMETase: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R combined with rMETase: p = 0.0004; rMETase combined with both S. typhimurium A1-R and CDDP: p = 0.0001). The decoy, trap and kill combination of S. typhimurium A1-R, rMETase and CDDP was the most effective of all therapies and was able to eradicate the metastatic osteosarcoma PDOX.

  5. Initiation and Characterization of Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts from Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspirates

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Wade C.; Boyd, Michael B.; Aguilar, Jorge; Pickell, Brett; Laysang, Amy; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Bheddah, Sheila; Ramoth, Johanna; Slingerland, Brian C.; Dylla, Scott J.; Rubio, Edmundo R.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Due to its early metastatic nature and rapid growth, surgical resection is rare. Standard of care treatment regimens remain largely unchanged since the 1980’s, and five-year survival lingers near 5%. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have been established for other tumor types, amplifying material for research and serving as models for preclinical experimentation; however, limited availability of primary tissue has curtailed development of these models for SCLC. The objective of this study was to establish PDX models from commonly collected fine needle aspirate biopsies of primary SCLC tumors, and to assess their utility as research models of primary SCLC tumors. These transbronchial needle aspirates efficiently engrafted as xenografts, and tumor histomorphology was similar to primary tumors. Resulting tumors were further characterized by H&E and immunohistochemistry, cryopreserved, and used to propagate tumor-bearing mice for the evaluation of standard of care chemotherapy regimens, to assess their utility as models for tumors in SCLC patients. When treated with Cisplatin and Etoposide, tumor-bearing mice responded similarly to patients from whom the tumors originated. Here, we demonstrate that PDX tumor models can be efficiently established from primary SCLC transbronchial needle aspirates, even after overnight shipping, and that resulting xenograft tumors are similar to matched primary tumors in cancer patients by both histology and chemo-sensitivity. This method enables physicians at non-research institutions to collaboratively contribute to the rapid establishment of extensive PDX collections of SCLC, enabling experimentation with clinically relevant tissues and development of improved therapies for SCLC patients. PMID:25955027

  6. A Murine Xenograft Model for Human CD30+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Walther; Levi, Edi; Petrogiannis-Haliotis, Tina; Lehmann, Leslie; Wang, Zhenxi; Kadin, Marshall E.

    1999-01-01

    To develop a model for the biology and treatment of CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), we transplanted leukemic tumor cells from a 22-month-old girl with multiple relapsed ALCL. Tumor cells were inoculated intraperitoneally into a 4-week-old SCID/bg mouse and produced a disseminated tumor within 8 weeks; this tumor was serially transplanted by subcutaneous injections to other mice. Morphology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular genetics which demonstrated the NPM-ALK fusion protein, resulting from the t(2;5)(p23;q35), confirmed the identity of the xenograft with the original tumor. The tumor produced transcripts for interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ which could explain the patient’s B-symptoms. Treatment of mice with monoclonal antibody (HeFi-1) which activates CD30 antigen administered on day 1 after tumor transplantation prevented tumor growth. Treatment with HeFi-1 after tumors had reached a 0.2 cm3 volume caused tumor growth arrest and prevention of tumor dissemination. We conclude that transplantation of CD30+ ALCL to SCID/bg mice may provide a valuable model for the study of the biology and design of treatment modalities for CD30+ ALCL. PMID:10514417

  7. Analysis of MUC4 expression in human pancreatic cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Daniel; Bauden, Monika P; Sasor, Agata; Gundewar, Chinmay; Andersson, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Mucin 4 (MUC4) is a cell surface glycoprotein that is overexpressed in most pancreatic tumors. The aim of the present study was to characterize MUC4 expression in experimental pancreatic cancer in order to clarify the correlation between MUC4 and pancreatic cancer histology in vivo. Pancreatic xenograft tumors were generated in immunodeficient mice (n=15) by subcutaneous injection of MUC4(+) human pancreatic cancer cell lines Capan-1, HPAF-II or CD18/HPAF. MUC4 immunoreactivity was compared between the cancer models. Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was used to identify cancer-associated fibroblasts and the amount of collagen fibers was quantified with sirius red. Tumor incidence was 100%. Tumor size showed no difference across groups (p=0.796). The median MUC4 count was highest in Capan-1 tumors (p=0.002). α-SMA and collagen extent were also highest in Capan-1 tumors (p=0.018). The Capan-1 xenograft model could serve as a valuable resource to test new therapeutic strategies targeting MUC4 in pancreatic cancer. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Biodistribution and predictive value of 18F-fluorocyclophosphamide in mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Amanda L; Hsueh, Wei-Ann; Htet, Nwe Linn; Pio, Betty S; Czernin, Johannes; Pegram, Mark D; Phelps, Michael E; Silverman, Daniel H S

    2007-12-01

    In mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts, we examined the biodistribution of (18)F-fluorocyclophosphamide ((18)F-F-CP) to evaluate its potential as a noninvasive prognostic tool for predicting the resistance of tumors to cyclophosphamide therapy. (18)F-F-CP was synthesized as we recently described, and PET data were acquired after administration of (18)F-F-CP in mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts (MCF-7 cells). Tracer biodistribution in reconstructed images was quantified by region-of-interest analysis. Distribution was also assessed by harvesting dissected organs, tumors, and blood, determining (18)F content in each tissue with a gamma-well counter. The mice were subsequently treated with cyclophosphamide, and tumor size was monitored for at least 3 wk after chemotherapy administration. The distribution of harvested activity correlated strongly with distribution observed in PET images. Target organs were related to routes of metabolism and excretion. (18)F-F-CP uptake was highest in kidneys, lowest in brain, and intermediate in tumors, as determined by both image-based and tissue-based measurements. (18)F-F-CP uptake was not inhibited by coadministration of an approximately x700 concentration of unlabeled cyclophosphamide. PET measures of (18)F-F-CP uptake in tumor predicted the magnitude of the response to subsequent administration of cyclophosphamide. Noninvasive assessment of (18)F-F-CP uptake using PET may potentially be helpful for predicting the response of breast tumors to cyclophosphamide before therapy begins.

  9. Evaluation of Cytarabine Against Ewing Sarcoma Xenografts by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Peter J.; Morton, Christopher L.; Kang, Min; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Billups, Catherine A.; Favours, Edward; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Tucker, Chandra; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with the nucleoside analog cytarabine has been shown to mimic changes in gene expression associated with down-regulation of the EWS-FLI1 oncogene in Ewing sarcoma cell lines, selectively inhibit their growth in vitro, and cause tumor regression in athymic nude mice. For this report cytarabine was studied in vitro against a panel of 23 pediatric cancer cell lines and in vivo against 6 Ewing sarcoma xenografts. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines were the most sensitive to cytarabine in vitro (median IC50 9 nM), while Ewing sarcoma cell lines showed intermediate sensitivity (median IC50 232 nM). Cytarabine at a dose of 150 mg/kg administered daily 5× failed to significantly inhibit growth of five xenograft models, but reduced growth rate of the A673 xenograft by 50%. Cytarabine shows no differential in vitro activity against Ewing sarcoma cell lines and is ineffective in vivo against Ewing sarcoma xenografts at the dose and schedule studied. PMID:20979180

  10. [Osteostimulating effect of bone xenograft on bone tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Balin, V N; Balin, D V; Iordanishvili, A K; Musikin, M I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of experimental case-control study performed in 28 dogs divided in 2 groups was to assess local tissue reactions on bone xenograft transplantation; dynamics of bone remodeling and formation at the site of bone defect wall contacting with bone xenograft; dynamics and mechanisms of xenograft remodeling. Transplantation of xenograft in conventional bone defects did not cause inflammatory of destructive reactions because of high biocompatibility of the material. At transplantation site active fibrous bone trabeculae formation filling the spaces between xenograft participles was observed. On the 90th day newly formed bone showed lammelar structure. Simultaneously from the 42d day the invasion of cell elements from recipient bed into the material was seen leading to xenograft resorption. The observed dynamics may be assessed as gradual substitution of xenograft with newly formed host bone structures.

  11. [Inhibitory effect of Biejiajian pills on HepG2 cell xenograft growth and expression of β-catenin and Tbx3 in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Sun, Hai-Tao; He, Song-Qi; LA, Lei; An, Hai-Yan; Pang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism by which Biejiajian pills inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma in a nude mouse model bearing HepG2 cell xenograft. The inhibitory effect of Biejiajian pills on the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice was observed. Immunohistochemical method was used to examine proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in HepG2 cell xenograft, and TUNEL method was employed to detect the cell apoptosis; the expression levels of β-catenin and Tbx3 were measured by Western blotting. Biejiajian pills significantly suppressed the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice treated with a high and a moderate dose of Biejiajian pills showed significantly increased apoptosis rate of the tumor cells [(22.9±1.220)% and (14.7±0.50)%, respectively] compared with the control group [(5.5±0.90)%, P<0.05]. Treatment with Biejiajian pills significantly decreased the expressions of PNCA, β-catenin, and Tbx3 in the cell xenograft (P<0.05). Biejiajian pills can inhibit the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice and promote tumor cell apoptosis possibly by inhibiting PNCA expression and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  12. Novel dedifferentiated liposarcoma xenograft models reveal PTEN down-regulation as a malignant signature and response to PI3K pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathleen B; Tran, Linh M; Tam, Brenna M; Shurell, Elizabeth M; Li, Yunfeng; Braas, Daniel; Tap, William D; Christofk, Heather R; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C; Wu, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Liposarcoma is a type of soft tissue sarcoma that exhibits poor survival and a high recurrence rate. Treatment is generally limited to surgery and radiation, which emphasizes the need for better understanding of this disease. Because very few in vivo and in vitro models can reproducibly recapitulate the human disease, we generated several xenograft models from surgically resected human dedifferentiated liposarcoma. All xenografts recapitulated morphological and gene expression characteristics of the patient tumors after continuous in vivo passages. Importantly, xenograftability was directly correlated with disease-specific survival of liposarcoma patients. Thus, the ability for the tumor of a patient to engraft may help identify those patients who will benefit from more aggressive treatment regimens. Gene expression analyses highlighted the association between xenograftability and a unique gene expression signature, including down-regulated PTEN tumor-suppressor gene expression and a progenitor-like phenotype. When treated with the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor rapamycin alone or in combination with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, all xenografts responded with increased lipid content and a more differentiated gene expression profile. These human xenograft models may facilitate liposarcoma research and accelerate the generation of readily translatable preclinical data that could ultimately influence patient care. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma Xenograft Models Reveal PTEN Down-Regulation as a Malignant Signature and Response to PI3K Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathleen B.; Tran, Linh M.; Tam, Brenna M.; Shurell, Elizabeth M.; Li, Yunfeng; Braas, Daniel; Tap, William D.; Christofk, Heather R.; Dry, Sarah M.; Eilber, Fritz C.; Wu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Liposarcoma is a type of soft tissue sarcoma that exhibits poor survival and a high recurrence rate. Treatment is generally limited to surgery and radiation, which emphasizes the need for better understanding of this disease. Because very few in vivo and in vitro models can reproducibly recapitulate the human disease, we generated several xenograft models from surgically resected human dedifferentiated liposarcoma. All xenografts recapitulated morphological and gene expression characteristics of the patient tumors after continuous in vivo passages. Importantly, xenograftability was directly correlated with disease-specific survival of liposarcoma patients. Thus, the ability for the tumor of a patient to engraft may help identify those patients who will benefit from more aggressive treatment regimens. Gene expression analyses highlighted the association between xenograftability and a unique gene expression signature, including down-regulated PTEN tumor-suppressor gene expression and a progenitor-like phenotype. When treated with the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor rapamycin alone or in combination with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, all xenografts responded with increased lipid content and a more differentiated gene expression profile. These human xenograft models may facilitate liposarcoma research and accelerate the generation of readily translatable preclinical data that could ultimately influence patient care. PMID:23416162

  14. Enhanced antitumor effect of YM872 and AG1296 combination treatment on human glioblastoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Aihara, Masanori; Ishiuchi, Shogo

    2013-04-01

    Blockade of Ca(++)-permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) inhibits the proliferation of human glioblastoma by inhibiting Akt phosphorylation, which is independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-mediated phosphorylation causes growth inhibition in glioblastoma cells. The authors of this study investigated the effects of YM872 and AG1296, singly and in combination and targeting different pathways upstream of Akt, on Akt-mediated tumor growth in glioblastoma cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of AMPAR, PDGFR, and c-kit in glioblastoma cells was analyzed via immunofluorescence. Glioblastoma cells, both in culture and in xenografts grown in mice, were treated with YM872 and AG1296, singly or in combination. Inhibition of tumor growth was observed after treatment in the xenograft model. Cell proliferation assays were performed using anti-Ki 67 antibody in vivo and in vitro. The CD34-positive tumor vessel counts within the vascular hot spots of tumor specimens were evaluated. Phosphorylation of Akt was studied using Western blot analysis. Combined administration of YM872 and AG1296 had a significant enhanced effect on the inhibition of cell proliferation and reduction of tumor vascularity in the xenograft model. These agents singly and in combination demonstrated a significant reduction of Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and inhibition of tumor proliferation in vitro, although combined administration had no enhanced antitumor effects. The strongly enhanced antitumor effect of this combination therapy in vivo rather than in vitro may be attributable to disruption of the aberrant vascular niche. This combination therapy might provide substantial benefits to patients with glioblastoma.

  15. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  16. Dual HER2 targeting impedes growth of HER2 gene-amplified uterine serous carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Groeneweg, Jolijn W; Hernandez, Silvia F; Byron, Virginia F; DiGloria, Celeste M; Lopez, Hector; Scialabba, Vanessa; Kim, Minji; Zhang, Ling; Borger, Darrell R; Tambouret, Rosemary; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R; Growdon, Whitfield B

    2014-12-15

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is an aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer that commonly harbors HER2 gene amplification. We investigated the effectiveness of HER2 inhibition using lapatinib and trastuzumab in vitro and in xenografts derived from USC cell lines and USC patient-derived xenografts. Immunohistochemistry and FISH were performed to assess HER2 expression in 42 primary USC specimens. ARK1, ARK2, and SPEC2 cell lines were treated with trastuzumab or lapatinib. Cohorts of mice harboring xenografts derived from ARK2 and SPEC2 cell lines and EnCa1 and EnCa2 primary human USC samples were treated with either vehicle, trastuzumab, lapatinib, or the combination of trastuzumab and lapatinib. Acute and chronic posttreatment tumor samples were assessed for downstream signaling alterations and examined for apoptosis and proliferation. HER2 gene amplification (24%) correlated significantly with HER2 protein overexpression (55%). All models were impervious to single-agent trastuzumab treatment. Lapatinib decreased in vitro proliferation of all cell lines and in vivo growth of HER2-amplified xenografts (ARK2, EnCa1). In addition, dual therapy with trastuzumab and lapatinib resulted in significant antitumor activity only in ARK2 and EnCa1 tumors. Dual HER2 therapy induced on target alteration of downstream MAPK and PI3K pathway mediators only in HER2-amplified models, and was associated with increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Although trastuzumab alone did not impact USC growth, dual anti-HER2 therapy with lapatinib led to improved inhibition of tumor growth in HER2-amplified USC and may be a promising avenue for future investigation. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: Role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Harish C.; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) one of the most common neoplasms causes serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fistein (5-80 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1), (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad), (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential, (iv) release of cytchrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria, (v) activation of caspases, and (vi) cleavage of PARP protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. PMID:23800058

  18. Reversal of multidrug resistance by magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle copolymerizating daunorubicin and 5-bromotetrandrine in xenograft nude-mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baoan; Cheng, Jian; Wu, Yanan; Gao, Feng; Xu, Wenlin; Shen, Huilin; Ding, Jiahua; Gao, Chong; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinchen; Cheng, Hongyan; Li, Guohong; Chen, Wenji; Chen, Ningna; Liu, Lijie; Li, Xiaomao; Wang, Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we establish the xenograft leukemia model with stable multidrug resistance in nude mice and to investigate the reversal effect of 5-bromotetrandrine (5-BrTet) and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe3O4 (MNP-Fe3O4) combined with daunorubicin (DNR) in vivo. Two subclones of K562 and K562/A02 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into the back of athymic nude mice (1 × 107 cells/each) respectively to establish leukemia xenograft models. Drug-resistant and sensitive tumor-bearing nude mice were assigned randomly into five groups which were treated with normal saline; DNR; NP-Fe3O4 combined with DNR; 5-BrTet combined with DNR; 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe3O4 combined with DNR, respectively. The incidence of formation, growth characteristics, weight, and volume of tumors were observed. The histopathologic examination of tumors and organs were detected. For resistant tumors, the protein levels of Bcl-2, and BAX were detected by Western blot. Bcl-2, BAX, and caspase-3 genes were also detected. For K562/A02 cells xenograft tumors, 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe3O4 combined with DNR significantly suppressed growth of tumor. A histopathologic examination of tumors clearly showed necrosis of the tumors. Application of 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe3O4 inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 protein and upregulated the expression of BAX and caspase-3 proteins in K562/A02 cells xenograft tumor. It is concluded that 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe3O4 combined with DNR had a significant tumor-suppressing effect on a MDR leukemia cells xenograft model. PMID:19421372

  19. Reversal of multidrug resistance in xenograft nude-mice by magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles combined with daunorubicin and 5-bromotetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Nan; Chen, Bao-An; Cheng, Jian; Gao, Feng; Xu, Wen-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hua; Gao, Chong; Sun, Xin-Chen; Li, Guo-Hong; Chen, Wen-Ji; Liu, Li-Jie; Li, Xiao-Mao; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2009-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the reversal effect of 5-bromotetrandrine (5-BrTet) and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) (Fe(3)O(4)-MNPs) combined with DNR in vivo. The xenograft leukemia model with stable multiple drug resistance in nude mice was established. The two sub-clones of K562 and K562/A02 cells were respectively inoculated subcutaneously into back of athymic nude mice (1 x 10(7) cells/each) to establish the leukemia xenograft models. Drug resistant and the sensitive tumor-bearing nude mice were both assigned randomly into 5 groups: group A was treated with NS; group B was treated with DNR; group C was treated with nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR; group D was treated with 5-BrTet combined with DNR; group E was treated with 5-bromotetrandrine and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR. The incidence of tumor formation, growth characteristics, weight and volume of tumor were observed. The histopathologic examination of tumors and organs were carried out. The protein levels of BCL-2, BAX, and Caspase-3 in resistant tumors were detected by Western blot. The results indicated that 5-BrTet and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR significantly suppressed growth of K562/A02 cell xenograft tumor, histopathologic examination of tumors showed the tumors necrosis obviously. Application of 5-BrTet and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) inhibited the expression of BCL-2 protein and up-regulated the expression of BAX, and Caspase-3 protein in K562/A02 cell xenograft tumor. It is concluded that 5-bromotetrandrine and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR have significant tumor-suppressing effect on MDR leukemia cell xenograft model.

  20. Reversal of multidrug resistance by magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle copolymerizating daunorubicin and 5-bromotetrandrine in xenograft nude-mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baoan; Cheng, Jian; Wu, Yanan; Gao, Feng; Xu, Wenlin; Shen, Huilin; Ding, Jiahua; Gao, Chong; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinchen; Cheng, Hongyan; Li, Guohong; Chen, Wenji; Chen, Ningna; Liu, Lijie; Li, Xiaomao; Wang, Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we establish the xenograft leukemia model with stable multidrug resistance in nude mice and to investigate the reversal effect of 5-bromotetrandrine (5-BrTet) and magnetic nanoparticle of Fe(3)O(4) (MNP-Fe(3)O(4)) combined with daunorubicin (DNR) in vivo. Two subclones of K562 and K562/A02 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into the back of athymic nude mice (1 x 10(7) cells/each) respectively to establish leukemia xenograft models. Drug-resistant and sensitive tumor-bearing nude mice were assigned randomly into five groups which were treated with normal saline; DNR; NP-Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR; 5-BrTet combined with DNR; 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR, respectively. The incidence of formation, growth characteristics, weight, and volume of tumors were observed. The histopathologic examination of tumors and organs were detected. For resistant tumors, the protein levels of Bcl-2, and BAX were detected by Western blot. Bcl-2, BAX, and caspase-3 genes were also detected. For K562/A02 cells xenograft tumors, 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR significantly suppressed growth of tumor. A histopathologic examination of tumors clearly showed necrosis of the tumors. Application of 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe(3)O(4) inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 protein and upregulated the expression of BAX and caspase-3 proteins in K562/A02 cells xenograft tumor. It is concluded that 5-BrTet and MNP-Fe(3)O(4) combined with DNR had a significant tumor-suppressing effect on a MDR leukemia cells xenograft model.

  1. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-16

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  2. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  3. Regulation of apoptosis by resveratrol through JAK/STAT and mitochondria mediated pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Madan, Esha; Prasad, Sahdeo; Roy, Preeti

    2008-12-26

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin present mainly in grapes, red wine and berries, is known to possess strong chemopreventive and anticancer properties. Here, we demonstrated the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities of resveratrol in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Resveratrol has cytotoxic effects through inhibiting cellular proliferation of A431 cells, which leads to the induction of apoptosis, as evident by an increase in the fraction of cells in the sub-G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle and Annexin-V binding of externalized phosphatidylserine. Results revealed that inhibition of proliferation is associated with regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway, where resveratrol prevents phosphorylation ofmore » JAK, thereby inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment actively stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Consequently, an imbalance in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio triggered the caspase cascade and subsequent cleavage of PARP, thereby shifting the balance in favor of apoptosis. These observations indicate that resveratrol treatment inhibits JAK/STAT-mediated gene transcription and induce the mitochondrial cell death pathway.« less

  4. Establishment and characterization of a human papillomavirus type 16-positive tonsillar carcinoma xenograft in BALB/c nude mice.

    PubMed

    Letsolo, Boitelo T; Faust, Helena; Ekblad, Lars; Wennerberg, Johan; Forslund, Ola

    2016-03-01

    Among head and neck cancers, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with tonsillar carcinomas. Despite this, no HPV16-positive tonsillar cancer cell line has been established in nude mice. Fresh tonsillar carcinoma biopsies were obtained from 23 patients and implanted subcutaneously into nude mice (BALB/c, nu/nu). After 7 months, one xenograft was established. The primary tumor harbored 2.7 copies (95% confidence interval = 2.4-2.9) of HPV16/cell and displayed 99.9% (7904/7906) nucleotide identity to HPV16 (EU118173.1). The xenograft showed increased methylation in two E2-binding sites of the HPV16 genome. Both episomal and integrated HPV16 were detected in the original tumor and in 14 xenografts from the second passage. From this passage, a viral load of 6.4 copies/cell (range = 4.6-9.6) and 3.7 (range = 1.0-5.5) E7-mRNA transcripts/HPV16-genome were detected. This xenograft represents the first established HPV16-positive tonsillar tumor in nude mice and could provide an experimental system of HPV16-positive tonsillar cancers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The effects of a picosecond pulsed electric field on angiogenesis in the cervical cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limei; Yao, Chenguo; Xiong, Zhengai; Zhang, Ruizhe; Wang, Zhiliang; Wu, Yutong; Qin, Qin; Hua, Yuanyuan

    2016-04-01

    The application of picosecond pulsed electric field (psPEF) is a new biomedical engineering technique used in cancer therapy. However, its effects on cervical cancer angiogenesis are not clear. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of psPEF on angiogenesis in cervical cancer xenograft models. Xenograft tumors were created by subcutaneously inoculating nude mice (athymic BALB/c nu/nu mice) with HeLa cells, then were placed closely between tweezer-type plate electrodes and subjected to psPEF with a gradually increased electric field intensity (0kV/cm, 50kV/cm, 60kV/cm, 70kV/cm). The direct effect on tumor tissue was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The changes of blood vessels and oxygen saturation (sO2) of tumors were monitored in vivo by photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) were detected by immunohistochemical technique (IHC). Their protein expressions and gene transcription levels were evaluated using western blot (WB) and quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PsPEF induced obvious necrosis of cervical cancer tissue; with the increasing of electric field intensity, the MVD, vascular PA signal and sO2 values declined significantly. The protein expression and gene transcription levels of VEGF, HIF1α and HIF2α were significantly decreased at the same time. PsPEF exhibited dramatic anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis effects in cervical cancer xenograft models by exerting direct effect on cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells and indirect effect on tumor angiogenesis-related factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Resveratrol Enhances Antitumor Activity of TRAIL in Prostate Cancer Xenografts through Activation of FOXO Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Chen, Qinghe; Singh, Karan P.; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resveratrol (3, 4′, 5 tri-hydroxystilbene), a naturally occurring polyphenol, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, cardioprotective and antitumor activities. We have recently shown that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in prostate cancer cells through multiple mechanisms in vitro. Therefore, the present study was designed to validate whether resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in a xenograft model of prostate cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited growth of PC-3 xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67 staining) and inducing apoptosis (TUNEL staining). The combination of resveratrol and TRAIL was more effective in inhibiting tumor growth than single agent alone. In xenografted tumors, resveratrol upregulated the expressions of TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5, Bax and p27/K IP1, and inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1. Treatment of mice with resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited angiogenesis (as demonstrated by reduced number of blood vessels, and VEGF and VEGFR2 positive cells) and markers of metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9). The combination of resveratrol with TRAIL further inhibited number of blood vessels in tumors, and circulating endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive endothelial cells than single agent alone. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the cytoplasmic phosphorylation of FKHRL1 resulting in its enhanced activation as demonstrated by increased DNA binding activity. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL by activating FKHRL1 and its target genes. The ability of resveratrol to inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis, and enhance the therapeutic potential of TRAIL suggests that resveratrol alone or in combination with TRAIL can be used for the management of prostate cancer. PMID:21209944

  7. Relaxin receptor antagonist AT-001 synergizes with docetaxel in androgen-independent prostate xenografts.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H; Branch, Donald R; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Trachtenberg, John; Silvertown, Joshua D

    2014-06-01

    Androgen hormones and the androgen receptor (AR) pathway are the main targets of anti-hormonal therapies for prostate cancer. However, resistance inevitably develops to treatments aimed at the AR pathway resulting in androgen-independent or hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Therefore, there is a significant unmet need for new, non-androgen anti-hormonal strategies for the management of prostate cancer. We demonstrate that a relaxin hormone receptor antagonist, AT-001, an analog of human H2 relaxin, represents a first-in-class anti-hormonal candidate treatment designed to significantly curtail the growth of androgen-independent human prostate tumor xenografts. Chemically synthesized AT-001, administered subcutaneously, suppressed PC3 xenograft growth by up to 60%. AT-001 also synergized with docetaxel, standard first-line chemotherapy for HRPC, to suppress tumor growth by more than 98% in PC3 xenografts via a mechanism involving the downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and the hypoxia-induced response. Our data support developing AT-001 for clinical use as an anti-relaxin hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer.

  8. In Vivo Activity and Pharmacokinetics of Nemorosone on Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Robert J.; Hilger, Ralf A.; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Werner, Jens; Holtrup, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading cancer-related causes of death in the western world with an urgent need for new treatment strategies. Recently, hyperforin and nemorosone have been described as promising anti-cancer lead compounds. While hyperforin has been thoroughly investigated in vitro and in vivo, in vivo data for nemorosone are still missing. Thus, we investigated the growth-inhibitory potential of nemorosone on pancreatic cancer xenografts in NMRI nu/nu mice and determined basic pharmacokinetic parameters. Xenograft tumors were treated with nemorosone and gemcitabine, the current standard of care. Tumor sections were subjected to H&E as well as caspase 3 and Ki-67 staining. Nemorosone plasma kinetics were determined by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Induction of CYP3A4 and other metabolizing enzymes by nemorosone and hyperforin was tested on primary hepatocytes using qRT-PCR. At a dose of 50 mg/kg nemorosone per day, a significant growth-inhibitory effect was observed in pancreatic cancer xenografts. The compound was well tolerated and rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream with a half-life of approximately 30 min. Different metabolites were detected, possibly resembling CYP3A4-independent oxidation products. It is concluded that nemorosone is a potential anti-cancer lead compound with good bioavailability, little side-effects and promising growth-inhibitory effects, thus representing a valuable compound for a combination therapy approach. PMID:24040280

  9. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  10. Growth characteristics and metastatic properties of human breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Visonneau, S.; Cesano, A.; Torosian, M. H.; Miller, E. J.; Santoli, D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the growth and metastatic potential of two human breast cancer cell lines and 16 patient-derived biopsy specimens, representing the most common histological types of breast carcinomas, upon subcutaneous implantation into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The method of engraftment we used, based on implantation of intact tissue specimens and complete immunosuppression of the host, provided an easier system to grow human breast carcinoma specimens in mouse models and resulted in a 50% success rate of tumor take. No correlation was found between growth in SCID mice and pathological diagnosis, grading, or estrogen/progesterone receptor expression by the tumor biopsy specimen. Serial passage of the tumor fragments in SCID mice resulted in increased metastasis rates and more rapid emergence of a palpable tumor mass. A tumor from a patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which grew aggressively and metastasized in 100% of the female SCID mice, was also successfully engrafted in 100% of nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID female mice, but systemic spread was minimal. Fragments of the same tumor grew in only 33% of male SCID mice with very limited metastases. A strong correlation (r = 0.997) was observed between tumor burden and the presence of soluble (serum) interleukin-2 receptor, a marker associated with a subset of human breast tumors. All together, these data indicate the usefulness of SCID/human breast tumor xenografts for measuring tumor progression and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9588898

  11. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo , and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression.

  12. [Inhibitory effect of migration-inducing gene-7-shRNA recombinant retrovirus combined with endostatin on growth and metastasis of hepatoma xenograft].

    PubMed

    Qu, B; Chen, G N; Sheng, G N; Yu, F; Lyu, Q; Gu, Y J; Guo, L; Lyu, Y

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effect of migration-inducing gene-7(Mig-7)interfered with retrovirus-mediated RNA(shRNA)combined with recombinant human endostatin(ES)on the growth and metastasis of subcutaneous xenograft of human hepatoma cells in nude mice. Methods: Two Mig-7-mRNA oligonucleotide sequences(Mig-7-shRNA-1 and Mig-7-shRNA-2)and one sequence as a negative control(Mig-7-shRNA-N)were designed. The specific Mig-7-shRNA recombinant retrovirus expression vector plasmid was constructed and used for the transfection of human hepatoma MHCC-97H cells with high expression of Mig-7. The subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)in nude mice was established, and according to the condition of transfection and administration, the nude mice were divided into pSIREN-M1 group, pSIREN-MN group, ES group, and pSIREN-M1+ES group. The xenograft tumor volume, mass, and metastasis were compared between groups. Immunohistochemistry was used to observe the formation of vasculogenic mimicry(VM)in xenograft tumor and the difference in tumor microvascular density(MVD), and Western blot was used to measure the expression of Mig-7 and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)in each group. A one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between groups, and the Fisher's exact test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups. Results: Compared with the pSIREN-MN group, the pSIREN-M1 group had significantly lower xenograft tumor volume, mass, and metastasis rate, Mig-7 expression, and formation of VM( P < 0.05), as well as significantly higher VEGF expression and MVD( P < 0.05). Compared with the pSIREN-MN group, the ES group had significantly lower xenograft tumor volume, mass, and metastasis rate, VEGF expression, and MVD( P < 0.05), as well as significantly higher Mig-7 expression and formation of VM( P < 0.05). Compared with the pSIREN-M1 group and the ES group, the pSIREN-M1+ES group had significantly lower xenograft

  13. [Inhibitory effect of VEGF antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides on the growth of human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-guang; Wang, Xu-xia; Li, Teng-yu; Wang, Yan-xiu; Gao, Jing; Ni, Chun-xiao

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of VEGF antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleoiides on the growth of human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) xenografts in nude mice. The VEGF-ASODN was synthesised artificially. After the model of human SACC xenografts in nude mice was established, they were random1y divided into three groups: antisense group, scrambled group and normal saline group. A control group without cancer was also established. Antisense(66 μg), scrambled sequence(66 μg) and normal saline(once every 3 days and 7 times in all) were injected in three experimental groups, respectively. Two days after therapy, the mice were sacrificed. Serums were used for detection of VEGF protein. All tumors were measured and weighted. The quantity of VEGF mRNA and protein and PLI, MVD was detected by hybridization in situ and immunohistochemistry. SPSS13.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The VEGF-ASODN could suppress the expression of VEGF in human SACC xenografts in nude mice and reduce VEGF protein in serum of nude mice significantly. It cou1d also reduce the volume and weight of xenografts and could reduce the expression of VEGF mRNA and its protein, PCNA and CD34. By inhibiting the expression of VEGF, VEGF-ASODN can inhabit proliferation of human SACC xenografts in nude mice.

  14. Growth inhibition of squamous cell carcinoma xenografts with the polyamine analogue BE 4444.

    PubMed

    Auchter, R M; Pickart, M A; Nash, G A; Qu, R P; Harari, P M

    1996-09-01

    The capacity of radiation to cure advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is compromised by the proliferation of surviving tumor cells during the course of therapy (overall duration, often 7-9 weeks). Antiproliferative agents that inhibit tumor proliferation, even in the absence of direct cytotoxicity, may be useful adjuncts for concurrent use with radiation. Modulation of endogenous polyamine (PA) metabolism has the potential to inhibit cell growth. The PA analogue 1,19-bis(ethylamino)-5,10,15-triazanonadecane (BE 4444) is a synthetic compound that demonstrates antiproliferative effects in human tumor cells. To evaluate the PA analogue BE 4444 for its inhibitory effect on the growth of human squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Xenografts of human squamous cell carcinomas were grown in nude mice; then, BE 4444 was injected intraperitoneally (5 mg/kg) on a twice-daily schedule for 8 days. Tumor growth measurements were performed twice weekly for 8 weeks and compared with those of control mice that were injected with sterile saline solution on the same schedule. The PA levels in the tumor and normal tissue samples were assayed at the completion of treatment. Tumor volume in the BE 4444-treated mice was reduced by 62% compared with tumor volumes in control mice, and the tumor growth rate was reduced by 64%. This growth inhibition was maintained through completion of the experiment. Levels of endogenous PAs were not significantly different from control levels, suggesting that the mechanism of action for BE 4444 is not simply PA biosynthesis inhibition. The PA analogue BE 4444 is an inhibitor of human squamous cell cancer growth. Further studies are in progress to characterize the potential value of PA analogues as adjuncts to radiation therapy for rapidly proliferating squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  15. A green approach toward quinoxalines and bis-quinoxalines and their biological evaluation against A431, human skin cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Cruz, Jessica; Morales, Liza D; Arman, Hadi D; Cuate, Erica; Lee, Young S; Banik, Bimal K; Kim, Dae J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a practical green procedure to synthesize quinoxalines and bis-quinoxalines and evaluate their inhibitory effects on the viability of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. A series of quinoxaline and bis-quinoxaline derivatives have been designed and synthesized following a microwave-assisted and bismuth nitrate-catalyzed eco-friendly route. A detailed comparison has been made between microwave-induced protocol with the reactions occurred at room temperature. The structure of the compounds have been elucidated by various spectroscopic methods and finally confirmed by x-ray crystallographic analyses. Two quinoxaline derivatives, compounds 6 and 12 have demonstrated inhibitory effects on the viability of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells when compared with HaCaT nontumorigenic human keratinocyte cells. Notably, compound 6 inhibits Stat3 phosphorylation/activation in A431 skin cancer cells.

  16. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-11-15

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer.

  17. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition ofmore » A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.« less

  18. Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjay K; Xiao, Dong; Lew, Karen L; Hershberger, Pamela; Kokkinakis, Demetrius M; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Singh, Shivendra V

    2003-10-01

    We have shown previously that allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, significantly inhibits survival of PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in culture, whereas proliferation of a normal prostate epithelial cell line is minimally affected by AITC even at concentrations that are highly cytotoxic to the prostate cancer cells. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that AITC administration may retard growth of human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Bolus i.p. injection of 10 micromol AITC, three times per week (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) beginning the day of tumor cell implantation, significantly inhibited the growth of PC-3 xenograft (P < 0.05 by two-way ANOVA). For example, 26 days after tumor cell implantation, the average tumor volume in control mice (1025 +/- 205 mm3) was approximately 1.7-fold higher compared with AITC-treated mice. Histological analysis of tumors excised at the termination of the experiment revealed a statistically significant increase in number of apoptotic bodies with a concomitant decrease in cells undergoing mitosis in the tumors of AITC-treated mice compared with that of control mice. Western blot analysis indicated an approximately 70% reduction in the levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the tumor lysate of AITC-treated mice compared with that of control mice. Moreover, the tumors from AITC-treated mice, but not control mice, exhibited cleavage of BID, which is known to promote apoptosis. Statistically significant reduction in the expression of several proteins that regulate G2/M progression, including cyclin B1, cell division cycle (Cdc)25B and Cdc25C (44, 45 and 90% reduction, respectively, compared with control), was also observed in the tumors of AITC-treated mice relative to control tumors. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that AITC administration inhibits growth of PC-3 xenografts in vivo by inducing apoptosis and reducing mitotic activity.

  19. Origin and quantification of circulating DNA in mice with human colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Alain R.; Mouliere, Florent; Gongora, Celine; Ollier, Jeremy; Robert, Bruno; Ychou, Marc; Del Rio, Maguy; Molina, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Although circulating DNA (ctDNA) could be an attractive tool for early cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring or prediction of response to therapies, knowledge on its origin, form and rate of release is poor and often contradictory. Here, we describe an experimental system to systematically examine these aspects. Nude mice were xenografted with human HT29 or SW620 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells and ctDNA was analyzed by Q–PCR with highly specific and sensitive primer sets at different times post-graft. We could discriminate ctDNA from normal (murine) cells and from mutated and non-mutated tumor (human) cells by using species-specific KRAS or PSAT1 primers and by assessing the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation. The concentration of human (mutated and non-mutated) ctDNA increased significantly with tumor growth. Conversely, and differently from previous studies, low, constant level of mouse ctDNA was observed, thus facilitating the study of mutated and non-mutated tumor derived ctDNA. Finally, analysis of ctDNA fragmentation confirmed the predominance of low-size fragments among tumor ctDNA from mice with bigger tumors. Higher ctDNA fragmentation was also observed in plasma samples from three metastatic CRC patients in comparison to healthy individuals. Our data confirm the predominance of mononucleosome-derived fragments in plasma from xenografted animals and, as a consequence, of apoptosis as a source of ctDNA, in particular for tumor-derived ctDNA. Altogether, our results suggest that ctDNA features vary during CRC tumor development and our experimental system might be a useful tool to follow such variations. PMID:20494973

  20. The use of longitudinal 18F-FET MicroPET imaging to evaluate response to irinotecan in orthotopic human glioblastoma multiforme xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Kristoffersen, Karina; Michaelsen, Signe R; Madsen, Jacob; Poulsen, Hans S; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Lassen, Ulrik; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor imaging is challenging. Although 18F-FET PET is widely used in the clinic, the value of 18F-FET MicroPET to evaluate brain tumors in xenograft has not been assessed to date. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance of in vivo 18F-FET MicroPET in detecting a treatment response in xenografts. In addition, the correlations between the 18F-FET tumor accumulation and the gene expression of Ki67 and the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 were investigated. Furthermore, Ki67, LAT1 and LAT2 gene expression in xenograft and archival patient tumors was compared. Human GBM cells were injected orthotopically in nude mice and 18F-FET uptake was followed by weekly MicroPET/CT. When tumor take was observed, mice were treated with CPT-11 or saline weekly. After two weeks of treatment the brain tumors were isolated and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed on the xenograft tumors and in parallel on archival patient tumor specimens. The relative tumor-to-brain (T/B) ratio of SUV max was significantly lower after one week (123 ± 6%, n = 7 vs. 147 ± 6%, n = 7; p = 0.018) and after two weeks (142 ± 8%, n = 5 vs. 204 ± 27%, n = 4; p = 0.047) in the CPT-11 group compared with the control group. Strong negative correlations between SUV max T/B ratio and LAT1 (r = -0.62, p = 0.04) and LAT2 (r = -0.67, p = 0.02) were observed. In addition, a strong positive correlation between LAT1 and Ki67 was detected in xenografts. Furthermore, a 1.6 fold higher expression of LAT1 and a 23 fold higher expression of LAT2 were observed in patient specimens compared to xenografts. 18F-FET MicroPET can be used to detect a treatment response to CPT-11 in GBM xenografts. The strong negative correlation between SUV max T/B ratio and LAT1/LAT2 indicates an export transport function. We suggest that 18F-FET PET may be used for detection of early treatment response in patients.

  1. The growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effect of deferoxamine combined with arsenic trioxide on HL-60 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Runhong; Wang, Dao; Ren, Xiuhua; Zeng, Li; Liu, Yufeng

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effect of deferoxamine (DFO) combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO) on the human HL-60 xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism. The highly tumorigenic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice to establish a human leukemia xenograft model. The HL-60 xenograft nude mice models were randomly divided into four groups: control (Normal saline, NS), 50mg/kg DFO, 3mg/kg ATO, the combined treatment (50mg/kg DFO+1.5mg/kg ATO) once HL-60 cells were inoculated. Tumor sizes, growth curves, inhibitory rates, cell apoptosis, and the expression of apoptosis related markers were measured to evaluate the tumor growth. Xenografted tumors were observed in all nude mice since the 5th day of inoculation. The inhibitory rates of tumor weight were 2.67%, 10.69%, and 25.57% in DFO, ATO and combination therapy groups, respectively. The combination of DFO with ATO induces significantly more tumor cell apoptosis than either agent alone (p<0.05). The expression of NF-κBp65 and survivin proteins decreased significantly while the expression of Caspase-3 and Bax increased in the combination therapy group (p<0.05). Double immunofluorescence for Caspase-3 and NFκBp65 demonstrated an inverse relationship between Caspase-3-positive areas and NFκBp65-positive areas, as well as the co-localization of Bax and survivin in xenografted tumor cells. Combination of DFO and ATO has synergistic effects on tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis-inducing in vivo with no significant side effects. The DFO and ATO can up-regulate the expression of Caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulate the expression of NF-κBp65 and survivin, especially for their combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoxia-Targeting Drug Evofosfamide (TH-302) Enhances Sunitinib Activity in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Sun, Jessica D; Zhang, Libo; Mokhtari, Reza Bayat; Wu, Bing; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Qian; Bhupathi, Deepthi; Wang, Yan; Yeger, Herman; Hart, Charles; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2018-05-23

    Antiangiogenic therapy has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical trials. However, tumor cells acquire resistance to this therapy by gaining ability to survive and proliferate under hypoxia induced by antiangiogenic therapy. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with hypoxia-activated prodrugs can overcome this limitation. Here, we have tested the combination of antiangiogenic drug sunitinib in combination with hypoxia-activated prodrug evofosfamide in neuroblastoma. In vitro, neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE(2) was 40-folds sensitive to evofosfamide under hypoxia compared to normoxia. In IV metastatic model, evofosfamide significantly increased mice survival compared to the vehicle (P=.02). In SK-N-BE(2) subcutaneous xenograft model, we tested two different treatment regimens using 30 mg/kg sunitinib and 50 mg/kg evofosfamide. Here, sunitinib therapy when started along with evofosfamide treatment showed higher efficacy compared to single agents in subcutaneous SK-N-BE(2) xenograft model, whereas sunitinib when started 7 days after evofosfamide treatment did not have any advantage compared to treatment with either single agent. Immunofluorescence of tumor sections revealed higher number of apoptotic cells and hypoxic areas compared to either single agent when both treatments were started together. Treatment with 80 mg/kg sunitinib with 50 mg/kg evofosfamide was significantly superior to single agents in both xenograft and metastatic models. This study confirms the preclinical efficacy of sunitinib and evofosfamide in murine models of aggressive neuroblastoma. Sunitinib enhances the efficacy of evofosfamide by increasing hypoxic areas, and evofosfamide targets hypoxic tumor cells. Consequently, each drug enhances the activity of the other. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Passive and active targeting of quantum dots for whole-body fluorescence imaging of breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Balalaeva, Irina V; Zdobnova, Tatiana A; Krutova, Irina V; Brilkina, Anna A; Lebedenko, Ekaterina N; Deyev, Sergey M

    2012-11-01

    Far-red and near-infrared fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) have become advancing contrast agents for efficient whole-body tumor imaging. In this study, we investigated the possibility of the vital fluorescence imaging of tumor using two contrast agents on the basis of QDs: bioinert QDs coated with polyethyleneglycol and QDs bound with anti-HER2/neu scFv antibodies. HER2/neu-positive breast cancer tumor xenografts in nude mice were used as a model. It was shown that both bioinert and tumor-targeted QD probes can be successfully applied for visualization of the tumor using in vivo imaging method, but fluorescent signal of QD-4D5scFv in tumors was considerably stronger than that of QD-PEG. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Evaluation of (188)Re-labeled NGR-VEGI protein for radioimaging and radiotherapy in mice bearing human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenhui; Shao, Yahui; Yang, Weidong; Li, Guiyu; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Mingru; Zuo, Changjing; Chen, Kai; Wang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI) is an anti-angiogenic protein, which includes three isoforms: VEGI-174, VEGI-192, and VEGI-251. The NGR (asparagine-glycine-arginine)-containing peptides can specifically bind to CD13 (Aminopeptidase N) receptor which is overexpressed in angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells. In this study, a novel NGR-VEGI fusion protein was prepared and labeled with (188)Re for radioimaging and radiotherapy in mice bearing human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 xenografts. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging results revealed that (188)Re-NGR-VEGI exhibits good tumor-to-background contrast in CD13-positive HT-1080 tumor xenografts. The CD13 specificity of (188)Re-NGR-VEGI was further verified by significant reduction of tumor uptake in HT-1080 tumor xenografts with co-injection of the non-radiolabeled NGR-VEGI protein. The biodistribution results demonstrated good tumor-to-muscle ratio (4.98 ± 0.25) of (188)Re-NGR-VEGI at 24 h, which is consistent with the results from SPECT imaging. For radiotherapy, 18.5 MBq of (188)Re-NGR-VEGI showed excellent tumor inhibition effect in HT-1080 tumor xenografts with no observable toxicity, which was confirmed by the tumor size change and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of major mouse organs. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that (188)Re-NGR-VEGI has the potential as a theranostic agent for CD13-targeted tumor imaging and therapy.

  5. Interference of silibinin with IGF-1R signalling pathways protects human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells from UVB-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weiwei; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Li, Lingzhi

    Highlights: ► Silibinin protects A431 cells from UVB irradiation-induced apoptosis. ► Up-regulation of the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways by UVB induces cell apoptosis. ► Silibinin inhibits IGF-1R pathways to repress caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet B (UVB) from sunlight is a major cause of cutaneous lesion. Silibinin, a traditional hepatic protectant, elicits protective effects against UVB-induced cellular damage. In A431 cells, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was markedly up-regulated by UVB irradiation. The activation of the IGF-1R signalling pathways contributed to apoptosis of the cells rather than rescuing the cells from death. Up-regulated IGF-1R stimulated downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), suchmore » as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). The subsequent activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 led to apoptosis. The activation of IGF-1R signalling pathways is the cause of A431 cell death. The pharmacological inhibitors and the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IGF-1R suppressed the downstream activation of JNK/ERK-caspases to help the survival of the UVB-irradiated A431 cells. Indeed, silibinin treatment suppressed the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways and thus protected the cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.« less

  6. Proteomics of xenografted human breast cancer indicates novel targets related to tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Besada, Vladimir; Diaz, Maylin; Becker, Michael; Ramos, Yassel; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Fichtner, Iduna

    2006-02-01

    Tamoxifen is the most frequently used drug for hormone therapy of breast cancer patients, even though a high percentage of women are (or become) refractory to this treatment. The proteins involved in tamoxifen resistance of breast tumor cells as well as the mechanisms by which they interact, are still unknown. Some years ago, we established the xenograft breast tumor 3366, sensitive to tamoxifen and the 3366/TAM, resistant to tamoxifen, derived after two years of in vivo passages of the parental 3366 under tamoxifen treatment. Here, we compare the protein expression levels of both xenografts. 2-DE of proteins from total cell extracts showed very high reproducibility among tumors from each group (tamoxifen sensitive and tamoxifen resistant). The heuristic clustering analysis of these gels pooled them correctly in both groups. Twelve proteins were found up-regulated in the tamoxifen-resistant line, while nine were down-regulated. The proteins differentially expressed were identified by MS and sequence database analysis. Biological functions of these proteins are related to cell-cell adhesion and interaction, signal transduction, DNA and protein synthesis machinery, mitochondrial respiratory chain, oxidative stress processes and apoptosis. Three of the identified proteins (ALG-2 interacting protein and two GDP-dissociation inhibitors) could be directly involved in the resistance phenomenon.

  7. Inhibition of Tumorigenesis by the Thyroid Hormone Receptor β in Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Gu; Zhao, Li; Kim, Dong Wook; Willingham, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies showed a close association between several types of human cancers and somatic mutations of thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) and reduced expression of TRβ due to epigenetic inactivation and/or deletion of the THRB gene. These observations suggest that TRβ could act as a tumor suppressor in carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms by which TRβ could function to inhibit tumorigenesis are less well understood. Methods: We used the human follicular thyroid cancer cell lines (FTC-133 and FTC-236 cells) to elucidate how functional expression of the THRB gene could affect tumorigenesis. We stably expressed the THRB gene in FTC cells and evaluated the effects of the expressed TRβ on cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor growth in cell-based studies and xenograft models. Results: Expression of TRβ in FTC-133 cells, as compared with control FTC cells without TRβ, reduced cancer cell proliferation and impeded migration of tumor cells through inhibition of the AKT-mTOR-p70 S6K pathway. TRβ expression in FTC-133 and FTC-236 led to less tumor growth in xenograft models. Importantly, new vessel formation was significantly suppressed in tumors induced by FTC cells expressing TRβ compared with control FTC cells without TRβ. The decrease in vessel formation was mediated by the downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in FTC cells expressing TRβ. Conclusions: These findings indicate that TRβ acts as a tumor suppressor through downregulation of the AKT-mTOR-p70 S6K pathway and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor expression in FTC cells. The present results raise the possibility that TRβ could be considered as a potential therapeutic target for thyroid cancer. PMID:23731250

  8. Antitumor effect of novel anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-12 against malignant pleural mesothelioma in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tsuchihashi, Yuki; Izumi, Toshihiro; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Okada, Naoto; Sato, Chiemi; Tobiume, Makoto; Otsuka, Kenji; Miyamoto, Licht; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Podoplanin (aggrus) is highly expressed in several types of cancers, including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Previously, we developed a rat anti-human podoplanin mAb, NZ-1, and a rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody, NZ-8, derived from NZ-1, which induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against podoplanin-positive MPM cell lines. In this study, we showed the antitumor effect of NZ-1, NZ-8, and NZ-12, a novel rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody derived from NZ-1, in an MPM orthotopic xenograft SCID mouse model. Treatment with NZ-1 and rat NK (CD161a(+) ) cells inhibited the growth of tumors and the production of pleural effusion in NCI-H290/PDPN or NCI-H226 orthotopic xenograft mouse models. NZ-8 and human natural killer (NK) (CD56(+) ) cells also inhibited tumor growth and pleural effusion in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. Furthermore, NZ-12 induced potent ADCC mediated by human MNC, compared with either NZ-1 or NZ-8. Antitumor effects were observed following treatment with NZ-12 and human NK (CD56(+) ) cells in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. In addition, combined immunotherapy using the ADCC activity of NZ-12 mediated by human NK (CD56(+) ) cells with pemetrexed, led to enhanced antitumor effects in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. These results strongly suggest that combination therapy with podoplanin-targeting immunotherapy using both NZ-12 and pemetrexed might provide an efficacious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MPM. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Fluorescent humanized anti-CEA antibody specifically labels metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwin, Thinzar M.; Miyake, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi; DeLong, Jonathan C.; Yazaki, Paul J.; Shivley, John E.; Clary, Bryan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Specific tumor targeting can result in selective labeling of cancer in vivo for surgical navigation. In the present study, we show that the use of an anti-CEA antibody conjugated to the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, IRDye800CW, can selectively target and label pancreatic cancer and its metastases in a clinically relevant patient derived xenograft mouse model.

  10. [Inhibitory effects of luteolin on human gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue-ying; Li, Yan-hong; Xiao, Xiang-wen; Li, Xiao-bo

    2013-01-08

    To explore the in vivo anticancer effects of luteolin with BGC-823 gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and elucidate its mechanism. After modeling of gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, 40 BALB/c (nu/nu) nude mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8 each). And an intraperitoneal injection of luteolin was administered at 10 mg/kg (low-dose), 20 mg/kg (middle-dose) and 40 mg/kg (high-dose) groups. And 5-fluorouracil (30 mg/kg) and control groups were also established. The growth curves of xenografts in nude mice were drawn and weight inhibition rates measured. The morphological features were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. And the protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were measured by immunohistochemistry. In vivo tumor formation test showed that tumor volume in nude mice treated with luteolin was smaller than that of control group. Tumor weights of high-dose luteolin group were lighter than those of the control ((0.29 ± 0.01) vs (0.38 ± 0.03) g). And the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The rate of tumor inhibition in high-dose luteolin group was up to 24.87%. Lymphocytic invasion of tumor tissue was observed under light microscope in the treatment groups. Results of immunohistochemistry showed the positive cell integral of VEGF in middle and high-dose luteolin groups were 1.25 ± 0.17 and 1.00 ± 0.07 respectively. Both were significantly lower than that of control group (1.50 ± 0.15, both P < 0.05). The positive cell integral of MMP-9 in high-dose luteolin group was markedly lower than that of control group (3.75 ± 1.43 vs 9.00 ± 1.08, P < 0.01). Luteolin can effectively inhibit the in vivo growth of gastric tumor. The mechanism may be correlated with the stimulation of immune response and the down-regulated expressions of VEGF-A and MMP-9.

  11. Nab-Paclitaxel Plus S-1 Shows Increased Antitumor Activity in Patient-Derived Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ang; Xu, Xue-Feng; Han, Xu; Fang, Yuan; Shi, Chen-Ye; Jin, Da-Yong; Lou, Wen-Hui

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the antitumor activity of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) plus S-1 in patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse models and to explore biomarkers that could predict drug efficacy. Ten patient-derived xenograft models were established. The third-generation tumor-bearing mice were randomized into 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) S-1; (3) nab-paclitaxel; (4) S-1 plus nab-paclitaxel. Resected tumors were tested by immunohistochemistry for the expression of thymidylate synthase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), secreted protein that is acidic and rich in cysteine, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), collagen-1, and CD31. Tumor growth inhibition of the S-1 group, nab-paclitaxel group, and combination group was 69.52%, 86.63%, 103.56%, respectively (P < 0.05). The efficacy of S-1 is better in thymidylate synthase-negative, OPRT-positive, and DPD-negative tumors. The efficacy of nab-paclitaxel is better in HER2-positive tumors. Collagen-1 was decreased and CD31 was increased in tumors treated with nab-paclitaxel and S-1 plus nab-paclitaxel compared with control or S-1. This preclinical study showed that S-1 plus nab-paclitaxel exerted significantly better antitumor activity than S-1 or nab-paclitaxel alone. Thymidylate synthase, OPRT, and DPD were possibly biomarkers of S-1 and HER2 of nab-paclitaxel.

  12. Testosterone inhibits the growth of prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Weitao; Soni, Vikram; Soni, Samit; Khera, Mohit

    2017-09-07

    Traditional beliefs of androgen's stimulating effects on the growth of prostate cancer (PCa) have been challenged in recent years. Our previous in vitro study indicated that physiological normal levels of androgens inhibited the proliferation of PCa cells. In this in vivo study, the ability of testosterone (T) to inhibit PCa growth was assessed by testing the tumor incidence rate and tumor growth rate of PCa xenografts on nude mice. Different serum testosterone levels were manipulated in male nude/nude athymic mice by orchiectomy or inserting different dosages of T pellets subcutaneously. PCa cells were injected subcutaneously to nude mice and tumor incidence rate and tumor growth rate of PCa xenografts were tested. The data demonstrated that low levels of serum T resulted in the highest PCa incidence rate (50%). This PCa incidence rate in mice with low T levels was significantly higher than that in mice treated with higher doses of T (24%, P < 0.01) and mice that underwent orchiectomy (8%, P < 0.001). Mice that had low serum T levels had the shortest tumor volume doubling time (112 h). This doubling time was significantly shorter than that in the high dose 5 mg T arm (158 h, P < 0.001) and in the orchiectomy arm (468 h, P < 0.001). These results indicated that low T levels are optimal for PCa cell growth. Castrate T levels, as seen after orchiectomy, are not sufficient to support PCa cell growth. Higher levels of serum T inhibited PCa cell growth.

  13. Evaluation of 89Zr-pertuzumab in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    DOE PAGES

    Marquez, Bernadette V.; Ikotun, Oluwatayo F.; Zheleznyak, Alexander; ...

    2014-07-24

    Here, pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to HER2 and is used in combination with another HER2–specific monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, for the treatment of HER2+ metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab binds to an HER2 binding site distinct from that of trastuzumab, and its affinity is enhanced when trastuzumab is present. We aim to exploit this enhanced affinity of pertuzumab for its HER2 binding epitope and adapt this antibody as a PET imaging agent by radiolabeling with 89Zr to increase the sensitivity of HER2 detection in vivo. Here, we investigate the biodistribution of 89Zr-pertuzumab in HER2–expressing BT-474 and HER2–nonexpressing MDA-MB-231 xenograftsmore » to quantitatively assess HER2 expression in vivo. In vitro cell binding studies were performed resulting in retained immunoreactivity and specificity for HER2–expressing cells. In vivo evaluation of 89Zr-pertuzumab was conducted in severely combined immunodeficient mice, subcutaneously inoculated with BT-474 and MDA-MB-231 cells. 89Zr-pertuzumab was systemically administered and imaged at 7 days postinjection (p.i.) followed by terminal biodistribution studies. Higher tumor uptake was observed in BT-474 compared to MDA-MB-231 xenografts with 47.5 ± 32.9 and 9.5 ± 1.7% ID/g, respectively at 7 days p.i (P = 0.0009) and blocking studies with excess unlabeled pertuzumab showed a 5-fold decrease in BT-474 tumor uptake (P = 0.0006), confirming the in vivo specificity of this radiotracer. Importantly, we observed that the tumor accumulation of 89Zr-pertuzumab was increased in the presence of unlabeled trastuzumab, at 173 ± 74.5% ID/g (P = 0.01). Biodistribution studies correlate with PET imaging quantification using max SUV (r = 0.98, P = 0.01). Collectively, these results illustrate that 89Zr-pertuzumab as a PET imaging agent may be beneficial for the quantitative and noninvasive assessment of HER2 expression in vivo especially for patients undergoing trastuzumab therapy.« less

  14. CWR22: the first human prostate cancer xenograft with strongly androgen-dependent and relapsed strains both in vivo and in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Nagabhushan, M; Miller, C M; Pretlow, T P; Giaconia, J M; Edgehouse, N L; Schwartz, S; Kung, H J; de Vere White, R W; Gumerlock, P H; Resnick, M I; Amini, S B; Pretlow, T G

    1996-07-01

    Most patients' prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation but relapse after periods of several months to years. Only two prostate cancer xenografts, LNCaP and PC-346, have been reported to be responsive to androgen deprivation and to relapse subsequently. Both of these tumors shrink slightly, if at all, and relapse less than 5 weeks after androgen withdrawal. After androgen withdrawal, the human primary prostate cancer xenograft CWR22 regresses markedly, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) falls up to 3000-fold in the blood of mice. PSA usually returns to normal. In some animals, the tumor relapses and is then designated CWR22R. In these animals, PSA starts to rise approximately 2-7 months, and tumor begins to grow 3-10 months after castration. Animals with CWR22 need to be euthanized because of large tumors 6-12 weeks after the transplantation of CWR22. Androgen withdrawal prolongs life approximately 3-4-fold.

  15. Biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles from three diverse family of plant extracts and their anticancer activity against epidermoid A431 carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Debasis; Pradhan, Sonali; Ashe, Sarbani; Rauta, Pradipta Ranjan; Nayak, Bismita

    2015-11-01

    Biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles is a cost effective natural process where the phytochemicals specifically phenols, flavonoids and terpenoids present in the plant extracts act as capping and reducing agent. Due to their nano size regime the silver nanoparticles may directly bind to the DNA of the pathogenic bacterial strains leading to higher antimicrobial activity. In the current study silver nanoparticles were synthesised using plant extracts from different origin Cucurbita maxima (petals), Moringa oleifera (leaves) and Acorus calamus (rhizome). The synthesised nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (Fe-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Highly crystalline, roughly spherical and cuboidal silver nanoparticles of 30-70 nm in size were synthesised. The nanoparticles provided strong antimicrobial activity against pathogenic strains. The effect of the synthesised nanoparticles against A431 skin cancer cell line was tested for their toxicity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye. The IC50 values of 82.39±3.1, 83.57±3.9 and 78.58±2.7 μg/ml were calculated for silver nanoparticles synthesised by C. maxima, M. oleifera and A. calamus respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Metastatic Potential of Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Ellingsen, Christine; Galappathi, Kanthi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been suggested as a useful noninvasive method for characterizing the physiologic microenvironment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether Gd-DTPA-based DCE-MRI has the potential to provide biomarkers for hypoxia-associated metastatic dissemination. Methods and Materials: C-10 and D-12 melanoma xenografts were used as experimental tumor models. Pimonidazole was used as a hypoxia marker. A total of 60 tumors were imaged, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of themore » DCE-MRI series. The host mice were killed immediately after DCE-MRI, and the primary tumor and the lungs were resected and prepared for histologic assessment of the fraction of pimonidazole-positive hypoxic tissue and the presence of lung metastases, respectively. Results: Metastases were found in 11 of 26 mice with C-10 tumors and 14 of 34 mice with D-12 tumors. The primary tumors of the metastatic-positive mice had a greater fraction of hypoxic tissue (p = 0.00031, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), a lower median K{sup trans} (p = 0.0011, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), and a lower median v{sub e} (p = 0.014, C-10; p = 0.016, D-12) than the primary tumors of the metastatic-negative mice. Conclusions: These findings support the clinical attempts to establish DCE-MRI as a method for providing biomarkers for tumor aggressiveness and suggests that primary tumors characterized by low K{sup trans} and low v{sub e} values could have a high probability of hypoxia-associated metastatic spread.« less

  18. [Influence of rosiglitazone and all-trans-retinoic acid on angiogenesis and growth of myeloma xenograft in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-wen; Chen, Ping; Li, Bing-zong; Fu, Jin-xiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Rui; Fan, Yin-yin; Zhang, Hong; Chow, Howard C H; Leung, Anska Y H; Liang, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    To observe the effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) on the growth of myeloma xenograft in nude mice and to explore the influence of RGZ and ATRA on VEGF expression and angiogenesis in the tumor. VEGF gene expression in myeloma cell line U266 cells was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR after incubation with RGZ, ATRA, or RGZ + ATRA for 24 h. Myeloma xenograft was established by subcutaneous injection of 10(7) U266 cells in the scapula area of 4-week old nude mice. 7 days later, the nude mice were administered with RGZ, ATRA or RGZ + ATRA, respectively, by intraperitoneal injection once every day for 21 days. The control mice were given equal volume of normal saline instead of the drug. On the 21(st) day of treatment, the mice were sacrificed and the tumors were taken off, and the tumor volume and weight were measured. The tumors were examined by histopathology with HE staining, and microvessel density (MVD), CD34 and VEGF expression in the tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. VEGF mRNA was highly expressed in U266 cells and was decreased in a dose-dependent manner after incubation with RGZ. The VEGF mRNA level was further more decreased after RGZ + ATRA treatment. Xenografts of U266 cells were developed in all nude mice. The volume and weight of xenografts in the RGZ group were (785 ± 262) mm(3) and (1748 ± 365) mg, respectively, significantly lower than those of the control group (both P < 0.01). More significant inhibition was in the RGZ + ATRA group, (154 ± 89) mm(3) and (626 ± 102) mg, respectively, both were P < 0.05 vs. the RGZ group. RGZ inhibited the angiogenesis in U266 xenografts and immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor MVD and VEGF expression were significantly decreased by RGZ treatment, and further more inhibited in the RGZ + ATRA group. VEGF protein was expressed in all xenografts in the nude mice. Its immunohistochemical staining intensity was 2.20 ± 0.40 in the control group

  19. Detection of Baicalin Metabolites Baicalein and Oroxylin-A in Mouse Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Lifeng; Moro, Aune; Chen, Monica C.; Harris, Diane M.; Eibl, Guido; Go, Vay-Liang W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Scutellaria baicalensis has been a subject of research interests due to its potential multiple therapeutic benefits. This study was to examine the distribution of baicalein, wogonin, oroxylin A and their glucuronide/sulfate conjugated metabolites in plasma, colon, small intestine, lung, liver, pancreas, kidney, and prostate tissues and in pancreatic tumor in a xenograft animal model. In addition, we examined metabolic stability of baicalin in these tissues. Methods A mouse xenograft model was prepared by injection of 3×106 human pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells subcutaneously into nude mice. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet (AIN76A) and 1% SB diet (n=8 per group) for 13 weeks. Levels of baicalein, wogonin, oroxylin A, and their conjugates in mouce tissues were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Results A substantial amount of baicalin (34–63%) was methylated to oroxylin A and its conjugates in various organs during absorption. While plasma contained predominantly conjugates of baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A, both aglycones and conjugates were found in all other tissues investigated and in tumor. Conclusions Substantial accumulation of bioactive metabolites are found in target tissues, suggesting strong potential for SB use as a preventive or adjuvant supplement for pancreatic cancer. PMID:22158070

  20. A single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platform for the authentication of patient derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    El-Hoss, Jad; Jing, Duohui; Evans, Kathryn; Toscan, Cara; Xie, Jinhan; Lee, Hyunjoo; Taylor, Renea A; Lawrence, Mitchell G; Risbridger, Gail P; MacKenzie, Karen L; Sutton, Rosemary; Lock, Richard B

    2016-09-13

    Patient derived xenografts (PDXs) have become a vital, frequently used, component of anti-cancer drug development. PDXs can be serially passaged in vivo for years, and shared across laboratories. As a consequence, the potential for mis-identification and cross-contamination is possible, yet authentication of PDXs appears limited. We present a PDX Authentication System (PAS), by combining a commercially available OpenArray assay of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with in-house R studio programs, to validate PDXs established in individual mice from acute lymphoblastic leukemia biopsies. The PAS is sufficiently robust to identify contamination at levels as low as 3%, similar to the gold standard of short tandem repeat (STR) profiling. We have surveyed a panel of PDXs established from 73 individual leukemia patients, and found that the PAS provided sufficient discriminatory power to identify each xenograft. The identified SNP-discrepant PDXs demonstrated distinct gene expression profiles, indicating a risk of contamination for PDXs at high passage number. The PAS also allows for the authentication of tumor cells with complex karyotypes from solid tumors including prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. This study highlights the demands of authenticating PDXs for cancer research, and evaluates a reliable authentication platform that utilizes a commercially available and cost-effective system.

  1. PTEN Loss Does Not Predict for Response to RAD001 (Everolimus) in a Glioblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Test Panel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Clarke, Michelle J.; Carlson, Brett L.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Decker, Paul; Wu, Wenting; Kitange, Gaspar J.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Goble, Jennie M.; Uhm, Joon; Galanis, Evanthia; Giannini, Caterina; Lane, Heidi A.; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling through disruption of PTEN function is common in glioblastoma multiforme, and these genetic changes are predicted to enhance sensitivity to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors such as RAD001 (everolimus). Experimental Design To test whether PTEN loss could be used as a predictive marker for mTOR inhibitor sensitivity, the response of 17 serially transplantable glioblastoma multiforme xenografts was evaluated in an orthotopic therapy evaluation model. Of these 17 xenograft lines, 7 have either genomic deletion or mutation of PTEN. Results Consistent with activation of Akt signaling, there was a good correlation between loss of PTEN function and elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation. However, of the 7 lines with disrupted PTEN function, only 1 tumor line (GBM10) was significantly sensitive to RAD001 therapy (25% prolongation in median survival), whereas1 of 10 xenograft lines with wild-type PTEN was significantly sensitive to RAD001 (GS22; 34% prolongation in survival). Relative to placebo, 5 days of RAD001 treatment was associated with a marked 66% reduction in the MIB1 proliferation index in the sensitive GBM10 line (deleted PTEN) compared with a 25% and 7% reduction in MIB1 labeling index in the insensitive GBM14 (mutant PTEN) and GBM15 (wild-type PTEN) lines, respectively. Consistent with a cytostatic antitumor effect, bioluminescent imaging of luciferase-transduced intracranial GBM10 xenografts showed slowed tumor growth without significant tumor regression during RAD001 therapy. Conclusion These data suggest that loss of PTEN function is insufficient to adequately predict responsiveness to mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:18559622

  2. Heterogeneous Binding and Central Nervous System Distribution of the Multitargeted Kinase Inhibitor Ponatinib Restrict Orthotopic Efficacy in a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Laramy, Janice K; Kim, Minjee; Gupta, Shiv K; Parrish, Karen E; Zhang, Shuangling; Bakken, Katrina K; Carlson, Brett L; Mladek, Ann C; Ma, Daniel J; Sarkaria, Jann N; Elmquist, William F

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated how differences in drug distribution and free fraction at different tumor and tissue sites influence the efficacy of the multikinase inhibitor ponatinib in a patient-derived xenograft model of glioblastoma (GBM). Efficacy studies in GBM6 flank (heterotopic) and intracranial (orthotopic) models showed that ponatinib is effective in the flank but not in the intracranial model, despite a relatively high brain-to-plasma ratio. In vitro binding studies indicated that flank tumor had a higher free (unbound) drug fraction than normal brain. The total and free drug concentrations, along with the tissue-to-plasma ratio (Kp) and its unbound derivative (Kp,uu), were consistently higher in the flank tumor than the normal brain at 1 and 6 hours after a single dose in GBM6 flank xenografts. In the orthotopic xenografts, the intracranial tumor core displayed higher Kp and Kp,uu values compared with the brain-around-tumor (BAT). The free fractions and the total drug concentrations, hence free drug concentrations, were consistently higher in the core than in the BAT at 1 and 6 hours postdose. The delivery disadvantages in the brain and BAT were further evidenced by the low total drug concentrations in these areas that did not consistently exceed the in vitro cytotoxic concentration (IC 50 ). Taken together, the regional differences in free drug exposure across the intracranial tumor may be responsible for compromising efficacy of ponatinib in orthotopic GBM6. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Orthotopic glioblastoma stem-like cell xenograft model in mice to evaluate intra-arterial delivery of bevacizumab: from bedside to bench.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Santillan, Alejandro; Shin, Benjamin J; Foley, Conor P; Ballon, Douglas J; Pierre Gobin, Y; Boockvar, John A

    2012-11-01

    Bevacizumab (BV), a humanized monocolonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is a standard intravenous (IV) treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), that has been introduced recently as an intra-arterial (IA) treatment modality in humans. Since preclinical models have not been reported, we sought to develop a tumor stem cell (TSC) xenograft model to investigate IA BV delivery in vivo. Firefly luciferase transduced patient TSC were injected into the cortex of 35 nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored weekly using bioluminescence imaging. Mice were treated with either intraperitoneal (IP) or IA BV, with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), or with IP saline injection (controls). Tumor tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and western blot techniques. Tumor formation occurred in 31 of 35 (89%) mice with a significant signal increase over time (p=0.018). Post mortem histology revealed an infiltrative growth of TSC xenografts in a similar pattern compared to the primary human GBM. Tumor tissue analyzed at 24 hours after treatment revealed that IA BV treatment with BBBD led to a significantly higher intratumoral BV concentration compared to IA BV alone, IP BV or controls (p<0.05). Thus, we have developed a TSC-based xenograft mouse model that allows us to study IA chemotherapy. However, further studies are needed to analyze the treatment effects after IA BV to assess tumor progression and overall animal survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Application of Heptamethine Cyanine Dye DZ-1 and Indocyanine Green for Imaging and Targeting in Xenograft Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiqin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, He; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Ningning; Tan, Dengxu; Zhang, Hai; Shi, Changhong

    2017-06-21

    Near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has strong potential for widespread use in noninvasive tumor imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) -approved NIRF dye for clinical diagnosis; however, it is unstable and poorly targets tumors. DZ-1 is a novel heptamethine cyanine NIRF dye, suitable for imaging and tumor targeting. Here, we compared the fluorescence intensity and metabolism of DZ-1 and ICG. Additionally, we assayed their specificities and abilities to target tumor cells, using cultured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, a nude mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of liver cancer, and a rabbit orthotopic transplantation model. We found that DZ-1 accumulates in tumor tissue and specifically recognizes HCC in subcutaneous and orthotopic models. The NIRF intensity of DZ-1 was one order of magnitude stronger than that of ICG, and DZ-1 showed excellent intraoperative tumor targeting in the rabbit model. Importantly, ICG accumulated at tumor sites, as well as in the liver and kidney. Furthermore, DZ-1 analog-gemcitabine conjugate (NIRG) exhibited similar tumor-specific targeting and imaging properties, including inhibition of tumor growth, in HCC patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice. DZ-1 and NIRG demonstrated superior tumor-targeting specificity, compared to ICG. We show that DZ-1 is an effective molecular probe for specific imaging, targeting, and therapy in HCC.

  5. The Application of Heptamethine Cyanine Dye DZ-1 and Indocyanine Green for Imaging and Targeting in Xenograft Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiqin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, He; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Ningning; Tan, Dengxu; Zhang, Hai; Shi, Changhong

    2017-01-01

    Near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has strong potential for widespread use in noninvasive tumor imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) -approved NIRF dye for clinical diagnosis; however, it is unstable and poorly targets tumors. DZ-1 is a novel heptamethine cyanine NIRF dye, suitable for imaging and tumor targeting. Here, we compared the fluorescence intensity and metabolism of DZ-1 and ICG. Additionally, we assayed their specificities and abilities to target tumor cells, using cultured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, a nude mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of liver cancer, and a rabbit orthotopic transplantation model. We found that DZ-1 accumulates in tumor tissue and specifically recognizes HCC in subcutaneous and orthotopic models. The NIRF intensity of DZ-1 was one order of magnitude stronger than that of ICG, and DZ-1 showed excellent intraoperative tumor targeting in the rabbit model. Importantly, ICG accumulated at tumor sites, as well as in the liver and kidney. Furthermore, DZ-1 analog-gemcitabine conjugate (NIRG) exhibited similar tumor-specific targeting and imaging properties, including inhibition of tumor growth, in HCC patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice. DZ-1 and NIRG demonstrated superior tumor-targeting specificity, compared to ICG. We show that DZ-1 is an effective molecular probe for specific imaging, targeting, and therapy in HCC. PMID:28635650

  6. DHEA increases epithelial markers and decreases mesenchymal proteins in breast cancer cells and reduces xenograft growth.

    PubMed

    Colín-Val, Zaira; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Gómez, Erika Olivia; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2017-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most common neoplasias and the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its high mortality rate is linked to a great metastatic capacity associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During this process, a decrease in epithelial proteins expression and an increase of mesenchymal proteins are observed. On the other hand, it has been shown that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant steroid in human plasma, inhibits migration of breast cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, the in vitro effect of DHEA on the expression pattern of some EMT-related proteins, such as E-cadherin (epithelial), N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail (mesenchymal) was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with invasive, metastatic and mesenchymal phenotype. Also, the in vivo effect of DHEA on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice (nu - /nu - ) and on expression of the same epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in generated tumors was evaluated. We found that DHEA increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail expression both in MD-MB-231 cells and in the formed tumors, possibly by DHEA-induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotype. These results were correlated with a tumor size reduction in mouse xenografts following DHEA administration either a week earlier or concurrent with breast cancer cells inoculation. In conclusion, DHEA could be useful in the treatment of breast cancer with mesenchymal phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of bevacizumab on angiogenesis and growth of canine osteosarcoma cells xenografted in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Valery F; Farese, James P; Coomer, Alastair R; Milner, Rowan J; Taylor, David P; Salute, Marc E; Chang, Myron N; Neal, Dan; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2013-05-01

    Objective-To investigate the effects of bevacizumab, a human monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, on the angiogenesis and growth of canine osteosarcoma cells xenografted in mice. Animals-27 athymic nude mice. Procedures-To each mouse, highly metastasizing parent osteosarcoma cells of canine origin were injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle. Each mouse was then randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatment groups: high-dose bevacizumab (4 mg/kg, IP), low-dose bevacizumab (2 mg/kg, IP), or control (no treatment). Tumor growth (the number of days required for the tumor to grow from 8 to 13 mm), vasculature, histomorphology, necrosis, and pulmonary metastasis were evaluated. Results-Mice in the high-dose bevacizumab group had significantly delayed tumor growth (mean ± SD, 13.4 ± 3.8 days; range, 9 to 21 days), compared with that for mice in the low-dose bevacizumab group (mean ± SD, 9.4 ± 1.5 days; range, 7 to 11 days) or control group (mean ± SD, 7. 2 ± 1.5 days; range, 4 to 9 days). Mice in the low-dose bevacizumab group also had significantly delayed tumor growth, compared with that for mice in the control group. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that bevacizumab inhibited growth of canine osteosarcoma cells xenografted in mice, which suggested that vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors may be clinically useful for the treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs. Impact for Human Medicine-Canine osteosarcoma is used as a research model for human osteosarcoma; therefore, bevacizumab may be clinically beneficial for the treatment of osteosarcoma in humans.

  8. External beam radiotherapy synergizes 188Re-liposome against human esophageal cancer xenograft and modulates 188Re-liposome pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsien; Liu, Shin-Yi; Chi, Chih-Wen; Yu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Tsui-Jung; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Lee, Te-Wei; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) treats gross tumors and local microscopic diseases. Radionuclide therapy by radioisotopes can eradicate tumors systemically. Rhenium 188 (188Re)-liposome, a nanoparticle undergoing clinical trials, emits gamma rays for imaging validation and beta rays for therapy, with biodistribution profiles preferential to tumors. We designed a combinatory treatment and examined its effects on human esophageal cancer xenografts, a malignancy with potential treatment resistance and poor prognosis. Human esophageal cancer cell lines BE-3 (adenocarcinoma) and CE81T/VGH (squamous cell carcinoma) were implanted and compared. The radiochemical purity of 188Re-liposome exceeded 95%. Molecular imaging by NanoSPECT/CT showed that BE-3, but not CE81T/VGH, xenografts could uptake the 188Re-liposome. The combination of EBRT and 188Re-liposome inhibited tumor regrowth greater than each treatment alone, as the tumor growth inhibition rate was 30% with EBRT, 25% with 188Re-liposome, and 53% with the combination treatment at 21 days postinjection. Combinatory treatment had no additive adverse effects and significant biological toxicities on white blood cell counts, body weight, or liver and renal functions. EBRT significantly enhanced the excretion of 188Re-liposome into feces and urine. In conclusion, the combination of EBRT with 188Re-liposome might be a potential treatment modality for esophageal cancer. PMID:26056445

  9. Dynamic PET evaluation of elevated FLT level after sorafenib treatment in mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Ukon, Naoyuki; Zhao, Songji; Yu, Wenwen; Shimizu, Yoichi; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Naoki; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Nagara; Higashikawa, Kei; Yasui, Hironobu; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, has anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities and is therapeutically effective against renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recently, we have evaluated the tumor responses to sorafenib treatment in a RCC xenograft using [Methyl- 3 H(N)]-3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythythymidine ([ 3 H]FLT). Contrary to our expectation, the FLT level in the tumor significantly increased after the treatment. In this study, to clarify the reason for the elevated FLT level, dynamic 3'-[ 18 F]fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic studies were performed in mice bearing a RCC xenograft (A498). The A498 xenograft was established in nude mice, and the mice were assigned to the control (n = 5) and treatment (n = 5) groups. The mice in the treatment group were orally given sorafenib (20 mg/kg/day p.o.) once daily for 3 days. Twenty-four hours after the treatment, dynamic [ 18 F]FLT PET was performed by small-animal PET. Three-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs) were manually defined for the tumors. A three-compartment model fitting was carried out to estimate four rate constants using the time activity curve (TAC) in the tumor and the blood clearance rate of [ 18 F]FLT. The dynamic pattern of [ 18 F]FLT levels in the tumor significantly changed after the treatment. The rate constant of [ 18 F]FLT phosphorylation (k 3 ) was significantly higher in the treatment group (0.111 ± 0.027 [1/min]) than in the control group (0.082 ± 0.009 [1/min]). No significant changes were observed in the distribution volume, the ratio of [ 18 F]FLT forward transport (K 1 ) to reverse transport (k 2 ), between the two groups (0.556 ± 0.073 and 0.641 ± 0.052 [mL/g] in the control group). Our dynamic PET studies indicated that the increase in FLT level may be caused by the phosphorylation of FLT in the tumor after the sorafenib treatment in the mice bearing a RCC xenograft. Dynamic PET studies with kinetic

  10. Binding of fluoresceinated epidermal growth factor to A431 cell sub-populations studied using a model-independent analysis of flow cytometric fluorescence data.

    PubMed Central

    Chatelier, R C; Ashcroft, R G; Lloyd, C J; Nice, E C; Whitehead, R H; Sawyer, W H; Burgess, A W

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed for determining ligand-cell association parameters from a model-free analysis of data obtained with a flow cytometer. The method requires measurement of the average fluorescence per cell as a function of ligand and cell concentration. The analysis is applied to data obtained for the binding of fluoresceinated epidermal growth factor to a human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, A431. The results indicate that the growth factor binds to two classes of sites on A431 cells: 4 X 10(4) sites with a dissociation constant (KD) of less than or equal to 20 pM, and 1.5 X 10(6) sites with a KD of 3.7 nM. A derived plot of the average fluorescence per cell versus the average number of bound ligands per cell is used to construct binding isotherms for four sub-populations of A431 cells fractionated on the basis of low-angle light scatter. The four sub-populations bind the ligand with equal affinity but differ substantially in terms of the number of binding sites per cell. We also use this new analysis to critically evaluate the use of 'Fluorotrol' as a calibration standard in flow cytometry. PMID:3015587

  11. Icotinib, a potent and specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, inhibits growth of squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431 through negatively regulating AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Cai, Peifen; Fang, Xianying; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Gu, Yanhong

    2013-06-01

    Icotinib is a potent and specific epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In this study, we reported that icotinib had the antitumor activity on human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431 in vitro. Meanwhile, adhesion to fibronectin and expression of integrin α3 and β1 were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner after the treatment of icotinib. Moreover, icotinib induced cell cycle arrested and affected expression of various cell cycle related proteins in squamous cancer cell line A431, whereas it did not cause apoptosis. Furthermore, icotinib remarkably down-regulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) though blocking the interaction between 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and AKT in A431 cells. Taken together, it is shown that the small molecular compound, icotinib, has an anti-squamous cell carcinoma activity in vitro and its antitumor mechanism is associated with the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. These results provide a novel strategy for anti-squamous cell carcinoma therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Intratumoral delivery of docetaxel enhances antitumor activity of Ad-p53 in murine head and neck cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yoo, George H; Subramanian, Geetha; Ezzat, Waleed H; Tulunay, Ozlem E; Tran, Vivian R; Lonardo, Fulvio; Ensley, John F; Kim, Harold; Won, Joshua; Stevens, Timothy; Zumstein, Louis A; Lin, Ho-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ability of intratumorally delivered docetaxel to enhance the antitumor activity of adenovirus-mediated delivery of p53 (Ad-p53) in murine head and neck cancer xenograft model. A xenograft head and neck squamous cell carcinoma mouse model was used. Mice were randomized into 4 groups of 6 mice receiving 6 weeks of biweekly intratumoral injection of (a) diluent, (b) Ad-p53 (1 x 10(10) viral particles per injection), (c) docetaxel (1 mg/kg per injection), and (d) combination of Ad-p53 (1 x 10(10) viral particles per injection) and docetaxel (1 mg/kg per injection). Tumor size, weight, toxicity, and overall and disease-free survival rates were determined. Intratumoral treatments with either docetaxel alone or Ad-p53 alone resulted in statistically significant antitumor activity and improved survival compared with control group. Furthermore, combined delivery of Ad-p53 and docetaxel resulted in a statistically significant reduction in tumor weight when compared to treatment with either Ad-p53 or docetaxel alone. Intratumoral delivery of docetaxel enhanced the antitumor effect of Ad-p53 in murine head and neck cancer xenograft model. The result of this preclinical in vivo study is promising and supports further clinical testing to evaluate efficacy of combined intratumoral docetaxel and Ad-p53 in treatment of head and neck cancer. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antitumor effect of Deoxypodophyllotoxin on human breast cancer xenograft transplanted in BALB/c nude mice model.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Meyada; Belaaloui, Ghania; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, biologically active compounds isolated from plants used in herbal medicine have been the center of interest. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), structurally closely related to the lignan podophyllotoxin, was found to be a potent antitumor and antiproliferative agent, in several tumor cells, in vitro. However, DPT has not been used clinically yet because of the lack of in vivo studies. This study is the first report demonstrating the antitumor effect of DPT on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. DPT, significantly, inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft in BALB/c nude mice. The T/C value (the value of the relative tumor volume of treatment group compared to the control group) of groups treated with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of intravenous DPT-HP-β-CD was 42.87%, 34.04% and 9.63%, respectively, suggesting the positive antitumor activity of DPT. In addition, the antitumor effect of DPT-HP-β-CD (20 mg/kg) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft was more effective than etoposide (VP-16) (20 mg/kg) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg). These findings suggest that this drug is a promising chemotherapy candidate against human breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.