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Sample records for a431 tumor xenografts

  1. Blue light activates phase 2 response proteins and slows growth of a431 epidermoid carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh D; Rotenberg, Shaun; Messer, Regina L W; Wataha, John C; Ogbureke, Kalu U E; McCloud, Veronica V; Lockwood, Petra; Hsu, Stephen; Lewis, Jill B

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that light in the UVA range (320-400 nm) activates signaling pathways that are anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and play a critical role in protection against cancer. These effects have been attributed to NF-E2-related factor (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation of 'phase 2' genes that neutralize oxidative stress and metabolize electrophiles. We had previously shown that small doses of blue light (400-500 nm) had selective toxicity for cultured oral tumor cells and increased levels of peroxiredoxin phase 2 proteins, which led to our hypothesis that blue light activates NRF2 signaling. A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells were treated in culture and as nude mouse xenografts with doses of blue light. Cell lysates and tumor samples were tested for NRF2 activation, and for markers of proliferation and oxidative stress. Blue light activated the phase 2 response in cultured A431 cells and reduced their viability dose dependently. Light treatment of tumors reduced tumor growth, and levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and oxidized proteins. Cellular responses to these light energies are worth further study and may provide therapeutic interventions for inflammation and cancer. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Antitumor activity of erlotinib in combination with capecitabine in human tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kaori F; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Tanaka, Yutaka

    2006-05-01

    To examine the antitumor activity and tolerability of a combination comprising erlotinib and capecitabine in human colorectal, breast and epidermal cancer xenograft models. Further aims of the study were to examine the effects of single-agent erlotinib therapy on tumor growth, and on thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) levels, (enzymes which activate and deactivate capecitabine, respectively) in tumor tissue. BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing LoVo and HT-29 (colon cancer), A-431 (vulval cancer), and KPL-4 and MAXF401 (breast cancer) human tumors were treated with erlotinib 100 mg/kg/day and/or capecitabine 359 or 90 mg/kg/day, by oral administration once daily for 14 days. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib, formulated in carboxymethylcelluose/Tween 80, was identified as 125 mg/kg/day. Erlotinib at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day achieved significant tumor-growth inhibition in the, LoVo, KPL-4, and A-431 models. Some inhibition of MAXF401 tumor growth was observed, but was not significant. In the HT-29 model, erlotinib showed less marked but statistically significant antitumor activity. On day 15, mean tumor-growth inhibition in HT-29, LoVo, KPL-4, MAXF401, and A-431 models was 46, 74, 71, 20, and 85%, respectively. Evaluation of erlotinib/capecitabine combination therapy, at sub-optimal doses, in the three erlotinib-sensitive tumor models LoVo, KPL-4 and A-431, demonstrated at least additive activity with the combination compared with the single agents. In the A-431 and LoVo models, the combination of agents had greater antitumor activity than the single agent capecitabine alone at the MTD. Erlotinib in combination with capecitabine was not associated with significantly increased toxicity compared with single-agent therapy. Erlotinib 100 mg/kg/day induced significant upregulation of TP and DPD in the LoVo model, a significant upregulation of TP in the HT-29, MAXF401 and A-431 models, but had no obvious effect on TP and DPD levels in

  3. [11C]Erlotinib PET cannot detect acquired erlotinib resistance in NSCLC tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Traxl, Alexander; Beikbaghban, Taraneh; Wanek, Thomas; Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Filip, Thomas; Sauberer, Michael; Kuntner, Claudia; Berger, Walter; Langer, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    [ 11 C]Erlotinib PET has shown promise to distinguish non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors harboring the activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation delE746-A750 from tumors with wild-type EGFR. To assess the suitability of [ 11 C]erlotinib PET to detect the emergence of acquired erlotinib resistance in initially erlotinib-responsive tumors, we performed in vitro binding and PET experiments in mice bearing tumor xenografts using a range of different cancer cells, which were erlotinib-sensitive or exhibited clinically relevant resistance mechanisms to erlotinib. The following cell lines were used for in vitro binding and PET experiments: the epidermoid carcinoma cell line A-431 (erlotinib-sensitive, wild-type EGFR) and the three NSCLC cell lines HCC827 (erlotinib-sensitive, delE746-A750), HCC827 EPR (erlotinib-resistant, delE746-A750 and T790M) and HCC827 ERLO (erlotinib-resistant, delE746-A750 and MET amplification). BALB/c nude mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts underwent two consecutive [ 11 C]erlotinib PET scans, a baseline scan and a second scan in which unlabeled erlotinib (10mg/kg) was co-injected. Logan graphical analysis was used to estimate total distribution volume (V T ) of [ 11 C]erlotinib in tumors. In vitro experiments revealed significantly higher uptake of [ 11 C]erlotinib (5.2-fold) in the three NSCLC cell lines as compared to A-431 cells. In all four cell lines co-incubation with unlabeled erlotinib (1μM) led to significant reductions in [ 11 C]erlotinib uptake (-19% to -66%). In both PET scans and for all four studied cell lines there were no significant differences in tumoral [ 11 C]erlotinib V T values. For all three NSCLC cell lines, but not for the A-431 cell line, tumoral V T was significantly reduced following co-injection of unlabeled erlotinib (-20% to -35%). We found no significant differences in the in vitro and in vivo binding of [ 11 C]erlotinib between erlotinib-sensitive and erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells

  4. ALA-PpIX variability quantitatively imaged in A431 epidermoid tumors using in vivo ultrasound fluorescence tomography and ex vivo assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Treatment monitoring of Aminolevunilic-acid (ALA) - Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) calls for superficial and subsurface imaging techniques. While superficial imagers exist for this purpose, their ability to assess PpIX levels in thick lesions is poor; additionally few treatment centers have the capability to measure ALA-induced PpIX production. An area of active research is to improve treatments to deeper and nodular BCCs, because treatment is least effective in these. The goal of this work was to understand the logistics and technical capabilities to quantify PpIX at depths over 1mm, using a novel hybrid ultrasound-guided, fiber-based fluorescence molecular spectroscopictomography system. This system utilizes a 633nm excitation laser and detection using filtered spectrometers. Source and detection fibers are collinear so that their imaging plane matches that of ultrasound transducer. Validation with phantoms and tumor-simulating fluorescent inclusions in mice showed sensitivity to fluorophore concentrations as low as 0.025μg/ml at 4mm depth from surface, as presented in previous years. Image-guided quantification of ALA-induced PpIX production was completed in subcutaneous xenograft epidermoid cancer tumor model A431 in nude mice. A total of 32 animals were imaged in-vivo, using several time points, including pre-ALA, 4-hours post-ALA, and 24-hours post-ALA administration. On average, PpIX production in tumors increased by over 10-fold, 4-hours post-ALA. Statistical analysis of PpIX fluorescence showed significant difference among all groups; p<0.05. Results were validated by exvivo imaging of resected tumors. Details of imaging, analysis and results will be presented to illustrate variability and the potential for imaging these values at depth.

  5. Orthotopic Patient-Derived Xenografts of Pediatric Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Federico, Sara M.; Chen, Xiang; Shelat, Anang A.; Bradley, Cori; Gordon, Brittney; Karlstrom, Asa; Twarog, Nathaniel R.; Clay, Michael R.; Bahrami, Armita; Freeman, Burgess B.; Xu, Beisi; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Jianrong; Honnell, Victoria; Ocarz, Monica; Blankenship, Kaley; Dapper, Jason; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James; Zhang, Jinghui; Easton, John; Pappo, Alberto; Dyer, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors arise from endodermal, ectodermal, or mesodermal lineages1. Although the overall survival of children with solid tumors is 75%, that of children with recurrent disease is below 30%2. To capture the complexity and diversity of pediatric solid tumors and establish new models of recurrent disease, we developed a protocol to produce orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (O-PDXs) at diagnosis, recurrence, and autopsy. Tumor specimens were received from 168 patients, and 67 O-PDXs were established for 12 types of cancer. The origins of the O-PDX tumors were reflected in their gene-expression profiles and epigenomes. Genomic profiling of the tumors, including detailed clonal analysis, was performed to determine whether the clonal population in the xenograft recapitulated the patient’s tumor. We identified several drug vulnerabilities and showed that the combination of a WEE1 inhibitor (AZD1775), irinotecan, and vincristine can lead to complete response in multiple rhabdomyosarcoma O-PDX tumors in vivo. PMID:28854174

  6. Establishment and characterization of patient tumor-derived head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Mukund; Merzianu, Mihai; Tang, Haikuo; Rigual, Nestor R; Sullivan, Maureen; Loree, Thom R; Popat, Saurin R; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Hylander, Bonnie L

    2009-12-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to establish human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenografts in mice by transplantation of surgical tumor tissue and to characterize the growth, histologic and vascular properties of these xenografts. Primary surgical specimens of HNSCC were xenografted into eight-to-twelve week old severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Histologic features of primary HNSCC specimens, initial and established xenografts were compared for tumors established from three different head and neck subsites, namely, oral cavity, larynx and base of tongue (one tumor per site). Growth rates of xenografts were compared along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of tumor vascularity and correlative CD31-immunostaining. Initial and established xenografts from all three sites demonstrated a squamous phenotype similar to the original patient tumor histology. Established xenografts of oral cavity and larynx exhibited increased keratinization (H&E) compared to initial xenografts and the primary tumor. No differences in tumor growth rates were observed between established xenografts from the different subsites. Xenografts established from SCC of the larynx exhibited increased microvessel density and lumen area (CD31 staining) along with enhanced permeability to the MR contrast agent compared to oral cavity and base of tongue tumors. Our results show that the combination of non-invasive imaging along with histologic evaluation of patient tumor xenografts offers a valuable platform for preclinical investigations in head and neck cancer. However, it is important to recognize the influence of tumor-host interactions on the histologic phenotype of transplanted tumors.

  7. Anticancer effects of cantharidin in A431 human skin cancer (Epidermoid carcinoma) cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Chuan; Yu, Fu-Shun; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chen, Ya-Yin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Wen-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-03-01

    Cantharidin (CTD), a potential anticancer agent of Traditional Chinese Medicine has cytotxic effects in different human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effects of CTD on A431 human skin cancer (epidermoid carcinoma) cells in vitro and in A431 cell xenograft mouse model were examined. In vitro, A431 human skin cell were treated with CTD for 24 and 48 h. Cell phase distribution, ROS production, Ca 2+ release, Caspase activity and the level of apoptosis associated proteins were measured. In vivo, A431 cell xenograft mouse model were examined. CTD-induced cell morphological changes and decreased percentage of viable A431 cells via G0/G1 phase arrest and induced apoptosis. CTD-induced G0/G1 phase arrest through the reduction of protein levels of cyclin E, CDK6, and cyclin D in A431 cells. CTD-induced cell apoptosis of A431 cells also was confirm by DNA gel electrophoresis showed CTD-induced DNA fragmentation. CTD reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated release of cytochrome c, AIF and Endo G in A431 cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that CTD increased activity of caspase-8, -9 and -3. However, when cells were pretreated with specific caspase inhibitors activity was reduced and cell viability increased. CTD increased protein levels of death receptors such as DR4, DR5, TRAIL and levels of the active form of caspase-8, -9 and -3 in A431 cells. AIF and Endo G proteins levels were also enhanced by CTD. In vivo studies showed that CTD significantly inhibited A431 cell xenograft tumors in mice. Taken together, these in vitro and in vivo results provide insight into the mechanisms of CTD on cell growth and tumor production. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 723-738, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Antibody treatment of human tumor xenografts elicits active anti-tumor immunity in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Meredith A.; Roche, Marly I.; Williams, Brent R.; Kim, Jae; Pageau, Steven C.; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts of the human anti-colorectal cancer cell line SW480 were used as a preclinical model to explore anti-tumor immunotherapies. Intratumor or systemic treatment of the mice with murine anti-SW480 serum, recombinant anti-SW480 polyclonal antibodies, or the anti-colorectal cancer monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, caused retardation or regression of SW480 tumor xenografts. Interestingly, when mice that had regressed their tumors were re-challenged with SW480 cells, these mice regressed the new tumors without further antibody treatment. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from mice that had regressed their tumors conferred anti-tumor immunity to naïve nude mice. Pilot experiments suggest that the transferred anti-tumor immunity is mediated by T cells of both γδ and αβ lineages. These results demonstrate that passive anti-tumor immunotherapy can elicit active immunity and support a role for extra-thymic γδ and αβ T cells in tumor rejection. Implications for potential immunotherapies include injection of tumor nodules in cancer patients with anti-tumor antibodies to induce anti-tumor T cell immunity. PMID:17920694

  9. Genetically Engineered Cancer Models, But Not Xenografts, Faithfully Predict Anticancer Drug Exposure in Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Combest, Austin J.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Sandison, Katie; Hanna, Suzan K.; Ross, Charlene; Habibi, Sohrab; Zamboni, Beth; Müller, Markus; Brunner, Martin; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rodent studies are a vital step in the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and are used in pharmacokinetic (PK), toxicology, and efficacy studies. Traditionally, anticancer drug development has relied on xenograft implantation of human cancer cell lines in immunocompromised mice for efficacy screening of a candidate compound. The usefulness of xenograft models for efficacy testing, however, has been questioned, whereas genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and orthotopic syngeneic transplants (OSTs) may offer some advantages for efficacy assessment. A critical factor influencing the predictability of rodent tumor models is drug PKs, but a comprehensive comparison of plasma and tumor PK parameters among xenograft models, OSTs, GEMMs, and human patients has not been performed. Methods. In this work, we evaluated the plasma and tumor dispositions of an antimelanoma agent, carboplatin, in patients with cutaneous melanoma compared with four different murine melanoma models (one GEMM, one human cell line xenograft, and two OSTs). Results. Using microdialysis to sample carboplatin tumor disposition, we found that OSTs and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors, whereas the GEMM model exhibited PK parameters similar to those seen in human tumors. Conclusions. The tumor PKs of carboplatin in a GEMM of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models. GEMMs show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral PKs and response in patients with solid tumors. PMID:22993143

  10. Active thermodynamic contrast imaging for label-free tumor detection in a murine xenograft tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyungseok; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Chung, Euiheon

    2017-01-01

    Passive thermal imaging provides a limited differentiation between a tumor and neighboring tissue based on the temperature difference. We propose active thermodynamic contrast imaging (ATCI) with convection thermal modulators to provide more physiologically relevant parameters with high contrast such as the rate of temperature change, and thermal recovery time for tumor detection with a murine xenograft tumor model. With early stage tumors, we found the average rate of temperature change was higher in the tumor (0.22 ± 0.06 °C/sec) than that of neighboring tissue (0.13 ± 0.01 °C/sec) with heating modulation. With established tumors (volume > 100 mm3), this tendency was greater. On the other hand, the thermal recovery time was shorter in tumor tissue (τ = 7.30 ± 0.59 sec) than that of neighboring tissue (τ = 11.91 ± 2.22 sec). We also found distinct thermal contrast with cooling modulation. These data suggest ATCI is a potential tumor detection modality for clinical application with its inherently label-free and physiology-based approach. Furthermore, this strategy may find applications in endoscopic tumor detection in the future. PMID:29188098

  11. Volume of preclinical xenograft tumors is more accurately assessed by ultrasound imaging than manual caliper measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Gregory D.; McKinley, Eliot T.; Zhao, Ping; Fritz, Jordan M.; Metry, Rebecca E.; Deal, Brenton C.; Adlerz, Katrina M.; Coffey, Robert J.; Manning, H. Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Volume of subcutaneous xenograft tumors is an important metric of disease progression and response to therapy in preclinical drug development. Non-invasive imaging technologies suitable for measuring xenograft volume are increasingly available, yet manual calipers, which are susceptible to inaccuracy and bias, are routinely employed. The goal of this study was to quantify and compare the accuracy, precision, and inter-rater variability of xenograft tumor volume assessment by caliper measurements and ultrasound imaging. Methods Subcutaneous xenograft tumors derived from human colorectal cancer cell lines (DLD1, SW620) were generated in athymic nude mice. Experienced independent reviewers segmented three-dimensional ultrasound data sets and collected manual caliper measurements resulting in tumor volumes. Imaging- and caliper-derived volumes were compared to tumor mass, the gold standard, determined following resection. Bias, precision and inter-rater differences were estimated for each mouse among reviewers. Bootstrapping was used to estimate mean and confidence intervals of variance components, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC’s) and confidence intervals for each source of variation. Results Average deviation from true volume and inter-rater differences were significantly lower for ultrasound volumes compared to caliper volumes. Reviewer ICC’s for ultrasound and caliper measurements were similarly low (1%), yet caliper volume variance was 1.3-fold higher than ultrasound. Conclusions Ultrasound imaging more accurately, precisely, and reproducibly reflects xenograft tumor volume than caliper measurements. These data suggest that preclinical studies utilizing xenograft burden as a surrogate endpoint measured by ultrasound imaging require up to 30% fewer animals to reach statistical significance compared to analogous studies utilizing caliper measurements. PMID:20498463

  12. Volume of preclinical xenograft tumors is more accurately assessed by ultrasound imaging than manual caliper measurements.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Gregory D; McKinley, Eliot T; Zhao, Ping; Fritz, Jordan M; Metry, Rebecca E; Deal, Brenton C; Adlerz, Katrina M; Coffey, Robert J; Manning, H Charles

    2010-06-01

    The volume of subcutaneous xenograft tumors is an important metric of disease progression and response to therapy in preclinical drug development. Noninvasive imaging technologies suitable for measuring xenograft volume are increasingly available, yet manual calipers, which are susceptible to inaccuracy and bias, are routinely used. The goal of this study was to quantify and compare the accuracy, precision, and inter-rater variability of xenograft tumor volume assessment by caliper measurements and ultrasound imaging. Subcutaneous xenograft tumors derived from human colorectal cancer cell lines (DLD1 and SW620) were generated in athymic nude mice. Experienced independent reviewers segmented 3-dimensional ultrasound data sets and collected manual caliper measurements resulting in tumor volumes. Imaging- and caliper-derived volumes were compared with the tumor mass, the reference standard, determined after resection. Bias, precision, and inter-rater differences were estimated for each mouse among reviewers. Bootstrapping was used to estimate mean and confidence intervals of variance components, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and confidence intervals for each source of variation. The average deviation from the true volume and inter-rater differences were significantly lower for ultrasound volumes compared with caliper volumes (P = .0005 and .001, respectively). Reviewer ICCs for ultrasound and caliper measurements were similarly low (1%), yet caliper volume variance was 1.3-fold higher than for ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging more accurately, precisely, and reproducibly reflects xenograft tumor volume than caliper measurements. These data suggest that preclinical studies using the xenograft burden as a surrogate end point measured by ultrasound imaging require up to 30% fewer animals to reach statistical significance compared with analogous studies using caliper measurements.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET.

    PubMed

    Honndorf, Valerie S; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J

    2016-05-10

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1 mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting.

  14. Use of a murine xenograft model for canine transmissible venereal tumor.

    PubMed

    Harmelin, A; Pinthus, J H; Katzir, N; Kapon, A; Volcani, Y; Amariglio, E N; Rehavi, G

    2001-06-01

    To develop a murine model for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT). Thirty-three 6-week-old NOD/LtSz-scid (NOD/SCID) mice and seven 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice. Samples of CTVT were excised from a 3-year-old dog and inoculated SC into ten 6-week-old NOD/SCID mice to induce growth of xenograft transmissible venereal tumor (XTVT). To establish mouse-to-mouse transmission, samples of XTVT were removed and inoculated SC into 4 groups of 6-week-old NOD/SCID mice and into a control group. Samples of CTVT were also inoculated into immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice for a mouse antibody production (MAP) test. The canine and xenografted tumors were evaluated cytologically and histologically, and polymerase chain reaction was performed for detection of the rearranged LINE/c-MYC junction. 8 of 10 NOD/SCID mice that were inoculated with CTVT developed tumors 3 to 10 weeks after inoculation. In the second-generation xenograft, all mice developed tumors by postinoculation day 47; 1 X 10(6) of XTVT cells were enough to create a xenograft. Metastases developed in 4 of 20 mice. Xenografted and metastatic tumors retained cytologic, histologic, and molecular characteristics of CTVT. Results of the MAP test were negative for all pathogens. We established an NOD/SCID murine model for XTVT and metastasis of CTVT. This model should facilitate study of tumor transplantation, progression, and metastasis and should decrease or eliminate the need for maintaining allogenic transfer in dogs.

  15. Inhibition of human tumor xenograft growth in nude mice by a conjugate of monoclonal antibody LA22 to epidermal growth factor receptor with anti-tumor antibiotics mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Wei; Zhao Shan; Liu Zhaofei

    2006-10-20

    Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies LA22 and Erbitux bind to different epitopes of EGFR. The chemimmunoconjugates of MMC with LA22 or Erbitux were prepared, and in vitro cytotoxicity assays with A549 cells showed that LA22-MMC was much more potent than Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC. Viabilities of A549 cells treated with LA22-MMC, Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC were 35%, 94%, and 81%, respectively. Immunoscintigraphy of xenografts of human A431 and A549 cells in nude mice both showed that {sup 125}I-labeled-LA22-MMC enriched in tumor sites prominently. Most importantly, in vivo assays showed LA22-MMC was significantly more effective than free drug MMC in the treatment of subcutaneous xenograftsmore » of human A431 cells in nude mice (83% inhibition for LA22-MMC and 30% for MMC). We concluded that LA22-MMC could be a very potent drug for treatment of solid tumors.« less

  16. Establishment and characterization of a panel of human uveal melanoma xenografts derived from primary and/or metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Némati, Fariba; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Laurent, Cécile; Couturier, Jérôme; Mariani, Pascale; Desjardins, Laurence; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Lantz, Olivier; Asselain, Bernard; Plancher, Corine; Robert, Delphine; Péguillet, Isabelle; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Dahmani, Ahmed; Bessard, Marie-Andrée; Gentien, David; Reyes, Cécile; Saule, Simon; Barillot, Emmanuel; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Decaudin, Didier

    2010-04-15

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignant tumor in adults and is defined by a poor natural outcome, as 50% of patients die from metastases. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a panel of human uveal melanoma xenografts transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Ninety tumor specimens were grafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice, and 25 transplantable xenografts were then established (28%). Relationship between tumor graft and clinical, biological, and therapeutic features of the patients included were investigated. Characterization of 16 xenografts included histology, molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry, genetic alteration analysis (single-nucleotide polymorphism), and specific tumor antigen expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Pharmacologic characterization (chemosensitivity) was also done in four models using two drugs, temozolomide and fotemustine, currently used in the clinical management of uveal melanoma. Take rate of human uveal melanoma was 28% (25 of 90). Tumor take was independent of size, histologic parameters, or chromosome 3 monosomy but was significantly higher in metastatic tumors. Interestingly, in vivo tumor growth was prognostic for a lower metastasis-free survival in patients with primary tumors. A high concordance between the patients' tumors and their corresponding xenografts was found for all parameters tested (histology, genetic profile, and tumor antigen expression). Finally, the four xenografts studied displayed different response profiles to chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these results, this panel of 16 uveal melanoma xenografts represents a useful preclinical tool for both pharmacologic and biological assessments.

  17. Deficiency of caspase 3 in tumor xenograft impairs therapeutic effect of measles virus Edmoston strain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Yan, Xu; Guo, Qingguo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Haiyan; Xie, JiSheng; Meng, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic measles virus Edmonston (MV-Edm) strain shows considerable oncolytic activity against a variety of human tumors. In this study, we report MV-Edm is able to trigger apoptosis pathways in infected tumor cells and elucidate the roles of cellular apoptosis in the whole oncolytic process. We also show that activated caspase 3, a key executioner of apoptosis, plays key roles in the oncolytic virotherapy. Activated caspase 3 can accelerate viral replication in cervical cancer cells and enhance the killing effects of the virus. Deficiency of caspase 3 either in tumor cells or in tumor xenograft significantly desensitized tumor to oncolysis with MV-Edm. In the infected cells, caspase 3 regulates interferon α release, which can inhibit viral replication in neighboring tumor cells. We propose that caspase-3 activation enhances the oncolytic effects of MV-Edm, thus inhibiting tumor growth in mice. PMID:25909216

  18. Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Vascularity of Intradermal and Intramuscular Human Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliksrud, Kristine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K., E-mail: einar.k.rofstad@rr-research.n

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: High interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumors has been shown to be associated with poor prognosis. Mechanisms underlying the intertumor heterogeneity in IFP were investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: A-07 melanoma xenografts were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly in BALB/c nu/nu mice. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors with a Millar catheter. Tumor blood perfusion and extracellular volume fraction were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The necrotic fraction, vascular density, and vessel diameters of the tumors were determined by image analysis of histological preparations. Results: Significant intertumor heterogeneity in IFP, blood perfusion,more » and microvascular morphology was observed whether the tumors were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly. High IFP was mainly a consequence of high resistance to blood flow caused by low vessel diameters in either transplantation site. IFP decreased with increasing blood perfusion in intradermal tumors and increased with increasing blood perfusion in intramuscular tumors, mainly because the morphology of the tumor microvasculature differed systematically between the two tumor models. Conclusion: The potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the IFP of tumors may be limited because any relationship between IFP and blood perfusion may differ with the tumor growth site.« less

  19. Transcriptomic alterations in human prostate cancer cell LNCaP tumor xenograft modulated by dietary phenethyl isothiocyanate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temporal growth of tumor xenografts in mice on a control diet was compared to mice supplemented daily with 3 µmol/g of the cancer preventive compound phenethyl isothiocyanate. Phenethyl isothiocyanate decreased the rate of tumor growth. The effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate on tumor growth were ex...

  20. Advances in prostate cancer research models: From transgenic mice to tumor xenografting models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuejiao; Cheng, Chun; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yonghui; Chen, Miaomiao; Strand, Douglas W; Jiang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The identification of the origin and molecular characteristics of prostate cancer (PCa) has crucial implications for personalized treatment. The development of effective treatments for PCa has been limited; however, the recent establishment of several transgenic mouse lines and/or xenografting models is better reflecting the disease in vivo . With appropriate models, valuable tools for elucidating the functions of specific genes have gone deep into prostate development and carcinogenesis. In the present review, we summarize a number of important PCa research models established in our laboratories (PSA- Cre -ER T2 /PTEN transgenic mouse models, AP-OX model, tissue recombination-xenografting models and PDX models), which represent advances of translational models from transgenic mouse lines to human tumor xenografting. Better understanding of the developments of these models will offer new insights into tumor progression and may help explain the functional significance of genetic variations in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new modes for curing PCa based on their particular biological phenotypes.

  1. p53 dependent cell-cycle arrest triggered by chemotherapy in xenografted breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Varna, Mariana; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Turpin, Elisabeth; Marangoni, Elizabetha; El-Bouchtaoui, Morad; Jeanne, Marion; Grigoriu, Carmen; Ratajczak, Philippe; Leboeuf, Christophe; Plassa, Louis-François; Ferreira, Irmine; Poupon, Marie-France; Janin, Anne; de Thé, Hugues; Bertheau, Philippe

    2009-02-15

    The major long-term prognostic factor for breast cancer patients treated by first-line chemotherapy is response to treatment. We have previously shown that complete responses to high doses epirubicin-cyclophosphamide were observed only in human tumors bearing a TP53 mutation. Three xenografted human breast tumors, 2 of them with a TP53 mutation and one of them without, were studied for their immediate response to this drug association. Cell cycle, cellular senescence and cell death were characterized and quantified on tissue section before and after treatment. The TP53 wild-type tumor showed a strong early induction of senescence-like phenotype with overexpression of SA-beta-gal and p21(CIP1). In contrast both TP53 mutated tumors showed no sign of cell cycle arrest or senescence. Conversely, abnormal mitoses strongly increased, only in TP53 mutated tumors. Thus, in these in vivo models, epirubicin-cyclophosphamide treatment induces senescence-like features in TP53 wild-type tumor, likely accounting for cell cycle arrest and subsequent resistance to treatment. Conversely in TP53 mutated tumors, chemotherapy induces mitotic catastrophe and tumor death, accounting for complete response to this association exclusively in patients with TP53 mutated tumors.

  2. Procedure for Horizontal Transfer of Patient-Derived Xenograft Tumors to Eliminate Corynebacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Bagby, Stacey M; Reisinger, Julie A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Pitts, Todd M; Keysar, Stephen B; Arcaroli, John J; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2017-01-01

    Human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors, propagated in immunodeficient mice, are rapidly growing in use as a model for cancer research. Horizontal transfer between mice, without in vitro cell culture, allows these tumors to retain many of their unique characteristics from their individual patient of origin. However, the immunodeficient mouse strains used to grow these tumors are susceptible to numerous opportunistic pathogens, including Corynebacterium bovis. At our institution, 2 in vivo tumor banks of PDX tumors had been maintained within nude mouse colonies enzootically infected with C. bovis. Elimination of C. bovis from these colonies required the aseptic harvest and horizontal transfer of tumor tissue between infected and naïve recipient mice without cross-contamination. Out of necessity, we developed a standard operating procedure using enhancements to traditional aseptic surgical technique with concurrent application of both procedural and physical barriers to prevent C. bovis transmission. By using these methods, all 61 unique PDX tumor models were successfully harvested from C. bovis-infected mice and transferred into recipient mice without transmission of infection. Our data demonstrate that, in situations where C. bovis-free colonies can be established and maintained, this procedure can successfully be used to eliminate C. bovis from an in vivo tumor bank of valuable PDX tumors. PMID:28315646

  3. Low-Level Endogenous PSMA Expression in Nonprostatic Tumor Xenografts Is Sufficient for In Vivo Tumor Targeting and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Chen, Ying; Parsana, Princy; Lisok, Ala; Chatterjee, Samit; Mease, Ronnie; Rowe, Steven P; Lupold, Shawn; Pienta, Kenneth J; Pomper, Martin G

    2018-03-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed in prostate cancer and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors. The nonprostatic expression of PSMA has been reported exclusively within the neovasculature endothelial cells of nonprostatic cancers; however, there are few reports on PSMA expression in epithelial cells. Herein, we describe PSMA expression in nonprostatic epithelial cells and characterize the potential of PSMA-binding agents to noninvasively detect that expression. Methods: PSMA expression data were extracted from publicly available genomic databases. Genomic data were experimentally validated for PSMA expression-by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and Western blotting-in several nonprostatic cell lines and xenografts of melanoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) origin. The feasibility of PSMA detection in those tumor models was further established using PSMA-based nuclear and optical imaging agents and by biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo molecular characterization studies. Results: We discovered that a small percentage of nonprostatic cancer cell lines and tumors express PSMA. Importantly, PSMA expression was sufficiently high to image established melanoma and SCLC xenografts using PSMA-based nuclear and optical imaging agents. Conclusion: These results indicate that PSMA expression in nonprostatic tumors may not be limited to the endothelium but may also include solid tumor tissue of nonprostatic cancers including melanoma and SCLC. Our observations indicate broader applicability of PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutics. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  4. Small-sample inference for incomplete longitudinal data with truncation and censoring in tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    In cancer drug development, demonstrating activity in xenograft models, where mice are grafted with human cancer cells, is an important step in bringing a promising compound to humans. A key outcome variable is the tumor volume measured in a given period of time for groups of mice given different doses of a single or combination anticancer regimen. However, a mouse may die before the end of a study or may be sacrificed when its tumor volume quadruples, and its tumor may be suppressed for some time and then grow back. Thus, incomplete repeated measurements arise. The incompleteness or missingness is also caused by drastic tumor shrinkage (<0.01 cm3) or random truncation. Because of the small sample sizes in these models, asymptotic inferences are usually not appropriate. We propose two parametric test procedures based on the EM algorithm and the Bayesian method to compare treatment effects among different groups while accounting for informative censoring. A real xenograft study on a new antitumor agent, temozolomide, combined with irinotecan is analyzed using the proposed methods.

  5. ProstaCaid inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft model of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Loganathan, Jagadish; Eliaz, Isaac; Terry, Colin; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the dietary supplement ProstaCaid (PC) inhibits growth and invasive behavior of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we evaluated toxicity and whether PC suppresses growth of prostate cancer in a xenograft model of human prostate cancer cells implanted in mice. Here, we show that an oral administration of PC (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) did not affect body weight or activity of liver enzymes (ALT, AST) and did not show any sign of toxicity in liver, spleen, kidney, lung and heart tissues in mice. In addition, PC treatment resulted in the inhibition of tumor volumes (1024.6 ± 378.6 vs. 749.3 ± 234.3, P<0.001) in a xenograft model of prostate cancer with human hormone refractory (independent) PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Moreover, qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant upregulation of expression of CDKN1A (p21) and inhibition of expression of IGF2, NR2F2 and PLAU (uPA) genes by an oral administration of PC in prostate cancer xenografts. Our study demonstrates that the concentrations of the dietary supplement ProstaCaid tested did not show signs of toxicity, and its oral application has significant anticancer activity in vivo and can be considered as an alternative treatment for prostate cancer patients.

  6. Contextual niche signals towards colorectal tumor progression by mesenchymal stem cell in the mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Suguru; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Nagaishi, Kanna; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Nasuno, Masanao; Watanabe, Shuhei; Idogawa, Masashi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Fujimiya, Mineko; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-09-01

    The role of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) in tumorigenesis remains controversial. This study aimed to determine whether heterotypic interactions between MSCs and colon cancer cells can supply contextual signals towards tumor progression. Xenografts consisting of co-implanted human colorectal cancer cells with rat MSCs in immunodeficient mice were evaluated by tumor progression, angiogenic profiles, and MSC fate. Furthermore, we investigated how MSCs function as a cancer cell niche by co-culture experiments in vitro. Tumor growth progressed in two ways, either independent of or dependent on MSCs. Such cell line-specific dependency could not be explained by host immune competency. COLO 320 xenograft angiogenesis was MSC-dependent, but less dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), whereas HT-29 angiogenesis was not MSC-dependent, but was VEGF-dependent. MSCs and COLO 320 cells established a functional positive feedback loop that triggered formation of a cancer cell niche, leading to AKT activation. Subsequently, MSCs differentiated into pericytes that enhanced angiogenesis as a perivascular niche. In contrast, the MSC niche conferred an anti-proliferative property to HT-29 cells, through mesenchymal-epithelial transition resulting in p38 activation. In conclusion, MSCs demonstrate pleiotropic capabilities as a cancer cell or perivascular niche to modulate colorectal cancer cell fate in a cell line-dependent manner in a xenogeneic context.

  7. Molecular targeting of carbonic anhydrase IX in mice with hypoxic HT29 colorectal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Sean; Khan, Nahida; Ku, Thomas; Longo, Valerie A; Larson, Steve M; Smith-Jones, Peter M

    2010-05-27

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a membrane spanning protein involved in the enzymatic regulation of tumor acid-base balance. CAIX has been shown to be elevated in a number of hypoxic tumor types. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of intact and IgG fragments of cG250 to target CAIX in vivo in a hypoxic tumor model. Conventional biodistribution studies were performed with (111)In-DO3A-cG250, (111)In-DO3A-F(ab')(2)-cG250 and (111)In-DO3A-Fab-cG250. Additional ex vivo analysis of the tumor was performed with markers for tumor hypoxia, blood perfusion and endogenous CAIX expression. All four data sets were digitally correlated to determine the optimal agent for determining hypoxia in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft. The HT29 human colorectal tumor xenografts show strong CAIX expression in hypoxic areas of poor blood perfusion. The intact IgG had an initial high focal uptake at the periphery of these hypoxic regions and penetration into the areas of highest CAIX expression over the 7-day study period. The lower molecular weight antibody fragments had a faster uptake into areas of high CAIX expression, but had a much lower absolute uptake at the optimal imaging times. For the clinical detection of hypoxia induced CAIX using cG250 antibody based agents, imaging with the intact IgG at 7 days post injection would allow for the most sensitive and accurate detection of CAIX.

  8. Optimal design for informative protocols in xenograft tumor growth inhibition experiments in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth; ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e. control vs treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e. “short” and “long” studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 grams of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped three days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  9. Can 111In-RGD2 monitor response to therapy in head and neck tumor xenografts?

    PubMed

    Terry, Samantha Y A; Abiraj, Keelara; Lok, Jasper; Gerrits, Danny; Franssen, Gerben M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-11-01

    RGD (arginylglycylaspartic acid)-based imaging tracers allow specific imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression, proteins overexpressed during angiogenesis; however, few studies have investigated the potential of these tracers to monitor responses of antiangiogenic or radiation therapy. In the studies presented here, (111)In-RGD2 was assessed for its potential as an imaging tool to monitor such responses to therapies. DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 was radiolabeled with (111)In ((111)In-RGD2), and biodistribution studies were performed in mice with subcutaneous FaDu or SK-RC-52 xenografts after treatment with either antiangiogenic therapy (bevacizumab or sorafenib) or tumor irradiation (10 Gy). Micro-SPECT imaging studies and subsequent quantitative analysis were also performed. The effect of bevacizumab, sorafenib, or radiation therapy on tumor growth was determined. The uptake of (111)In-RGD2 in tumors, as determined from biodistribution studies, correlated well with that quantified from micro-SPECT images, and both showed that 15 d after irradiation (111)In-RGD2 uptake was enhanced. Specific or nonspecific uptake of (111)In-RGD2 in FaDu or SK-RC-52 xenografts was not affected after antiangiogenic therapy, except in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma 19 d after the start of sorafenib therapy (P < 0.05). The uptake of (111)In-RGD2 followed tumor volume in studies featuring antiangiogenic therapy. However, the uptake of (111)In-RGD2 in FaDu xenografts was decreased as early as 4 h after tumor irradiation, despite nonspecific uptake remaining unaltered. Tumor growth was inhibited after antiangiogenic or radiation therapy. Here, it is suggested that (111)In-RGD2 could allow in vivo monitoring of angiogenic responses after radiotherapy and may therefore prove a good clinical tool to monitor angiogenic responses early after the start of radiotherapy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite clear antitumor efficacy, antiangiogenic therapy did not alter tumor

  10. Combination of angiogenesis inhibitors increases the anti-tumor efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a human bladder tumor xenograft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Gan, Yik Yuen; Thong, Patricia S. P.; Chin, William Wei L.; Soo, Khee Chee; Olivo, Malini

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a standard treatment for various malignant and non-malignant conditions. Though therapeutic responses are encouraging, recurrences have been noted, as one of the limitations of PDT is treatment-induced hypoxia that triggers angiogenesis. The present study evaluates the use of angiogenic inhibitors Avastin, that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Erbitux that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with PDT in an in vivo bladder carcinoma xenograft. Tumor bearing mice were assigned to 6 different categories: control, PDT only, Avastin + Erbitux, PDT + Avastin, PDT + Erbitux and PDT + Avastin and Erbitux. Treated and control tumors were monitored for recurrence for up to 90 days. VEGF and EGFR expression was detected in the tumor tissue. Migratory assay was performed to establish the inhibitory effect of the angiogenesis agents. Using confocal laser endomicroscopy, the tumor microvasculature was assessed. Tumors treated with the combination therapy of PDT + inhibitors showed significantly greater response compared to control and PDT only treated group. Combination therapy treated tumors also showed the most post-treatment damage with reduced tumor vasculature. These results demonstrate that the combination of PDT with inhibitors that target different angiogenesis pathways can improve tumor control.

  11. Inhibition of PI4K IIIα radiosensitizes in human tumor xenograft and immune-competent syngeneic murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Park, Younghee; Park, Ji Min; Kim, Dan Hyo; Kwon, Jeanny; Kim, In Ah

    2017-12-15

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinase (PI4K) has emerged as a potential target for anti-cancer treatment. We recently reported that simeprevir, an anti-hepatitis C viral (HCV) agent, radiosensitized diverse human cancer cells by inhibiting PI4K IIIα in vitro . In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of simeprevir in an in vivo tumor xenograft model and the mechanism of its interaction. The immune modulatory effect of PI4K IIIα was evaluated in an immune-competent syngeneic murine tumor model. In in vivo xenograft models using BT474 breast cancer and U251 brain tumor cells, inhibition of PI4K IIIα induced by simeprevir combined with radiation significantly delayed tumor growth compared to either treatment alone. PI4K IIIα inhibition led to eversion of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition as suggested by decreased invasion/migration and vascular tube formation. Simeprevir down-regulated PI3Kδ expression and PI3Kδ inhibition using RNA interference radiosensitized breast cancer cells. PI4K IIIα inhibition enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and decreased the expression of PI3Kδ, phosphorylated-Akt, and PD-L1 in breast cancer cells co-cultured with human T-lymphocytes. The immune modulatory effect in vivo was evaluated in immune-competent syngeneic 4T1 murine tumor models. Simeprevir showed significant radiosensitizing effect and immune modulatory function by affecting the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. These findings suggest that targeting PI4K IIIα with an anti-HCV agent is a viable drug repositioning approach for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiation therapy. The immune regulatory function of PI4K IIIα via modulation of PI3Kδ suggests a strategy for enhancing the radiosensitizing effect of immune checkpoint blockades.

  12. Astragalus saponins induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Tin, Mandy M Y; Cho, Chi-Hin; Chan, Kelvin; James, Anthony E; Ko, Joshua K S

    2007-06-01

    Astragalus memebranaceus is used as immunomodulating agent in treating immunodeficiency diseases and to alleviate the adverse effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. In recent years, it has been proposed that Astragalus may possess anti-tumorigenic potential in certain cancer cell types. In this study, the anti-carcinogenic effects of Astragalus saponin extract were investigated in HT-29 human colon cancer cells and tumor xenograft. Our findings have shown that Astragalus saponins (AST) inhibit cell proliferation through accumulation in S phase and G2/M arrest, with concomitant suppression of p21 expression and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity. Besides, AST promotes apoptosis in HT-29 cells through caspase 3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, which is indicated by DNA fragmentation and nuclear chromatin condensation. Nevertheless, we also demonstrate the anti-tumorigenic effects of AST in vivo, of which the reduction of tumor volume as well as pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in HT-29 nude mice xenograft are comparable with that produced by the conventional chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In addition, the side effects (body weight drop and mortality) associated with the drug combo 5-FU and oxaliplatin are not induced by AST. These results indicate that AST could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent in colon cancer treatment, which might also be used as an adjuvant in combination with other orthodox chemotherapeutic drugs to reduce the side effects of the latter compounds.

  13. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  14. Serotonergic system antagonists target breast tumor initiating cells and synergize with chemotherapy to shrink human breast tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gwynne, William D; Hallett, Robin M; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Bojovic, Bojana; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Aarts, Craig; Dias, Kay; Bane, Anita; Hassell, John A

    2017-01-01

    Breast tumors comprise an infrequent tumor cell population, termed breast tumor initiating cells (BTIC), which sustain tumor growth, seed metastases and resist cytotoxic therapies. Hence therapies are needed to target BTIC to provide more durable breast cancer remissions than are currently achieved. We previously reported that serotonergic system antagonists abrogated the activity of mouse BTIC resident in the mammary tumors of a HER2-overexpressing model of breast cancer. Here we report that antagonists of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) biosynthesis and activity, including US Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved antidepressants, targeted BTIC resident in numerous breast tumor cell lines regardless of their clinical or molecular subtype. Notably, inhibitors of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), required for 5-HT biosynthesis in select non-neuronal cells, the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and several 5-HT receptors compromised BTIC activity as assessed by functional sphere-forming assays. Consistent with these findings, human breast tumor cells express TPH1, 5-HT and SERT independent of their molecular or clinical subtype. Exposure of breast tumor cells ex vivo to sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), reduced BTIC frequency as determined by transplanting drug-treated tumor cells into immune-compromised mice. Moreover, another SSRI (vilazodone; Viibryd) synergized with chemotherapy to shrink breast tumor xenografts in immune-compromised mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and inducing their apoptosis. Collectively our data suggest that antidepressants in combination with cytotoxic anticancer therapies may be an appropriate treatment regimen for testing in clinical trials. PMID:28404880

  15. Combined modality therapy of A431 human epidermoid cancer using anti-EGFr antibody C225 and radiation.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M N; Raisch, K P; Stackhouse, M A; Grizzle, W E; Bonner, J A; Mayo, M S; Kim, H G; Meredith, R F; Wheeler, R H; Buchsbaum, D J

    1999-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) inhibit tumor cell proliferation and enhance cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of the anti-EGFr antibody C225 combined with radiotherapy (RT) on EGFr expressing A431 human epidermoid cancer cells. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, EGFr expression and phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival were assayed in vitro. A431 tumor growth inhibition and immunohistochemistry analysis of EGFr expression and apoptosis were assessed in vivo. C225 plus RT produced greater inhibition of A431 cell proliferation than C225 or RT alone which was corroborated by enhanced apoptosis. Similar clonogenic survival occurred following the addition of C225 to RT, although colonies were smaller in the presence of C225. C225 produced inhibition of EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFr without concurrent down-regulation of surface receptor, which was not altered by RT. Combined treatment of mice bearing tumors demonstrated enhancement of complete regressions, reduction in time to tumor size doubling, and prolongation of survival. Significant apoptosis occurred in xenograft tumors treated with C225 with or without RT. These data demonstrate an interaction between C225 and RT. C225-mediated apoptosis and inhibition of EGFr phosphorylation may be critical in the interaction. Studies to define the precise influence of combined modality treatment on the EGFr signal transduction cascade need to be pursued. The combination of growth factor receptor antibodies and RT has potential application in clinical oncology.

  16. Lapatinib in Combination With Radiation Diminishes Tumor Regrowth in HER2+ and Basal-Like/EGFR+ Breast Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Sambade, Maria J.; Kimple, Randall J.; Camp, J. Terese

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lapatinib, a dual epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/HER2 kinase inhibitor, can radiosensitize EGFR+ or HER2+ breast cancer xenografts. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing xenografts of basal-like/EGFR+ SUM149 and HER2+ SUM225 breast cancer cells were treated with lapatinib and fractionated radiotherapy and tumor growth inhibition correlated with alterations in ERK1 and AKT activation by immunohistochemistry. Results: Basal-like/EGFR+ SUM149 breast cancer tumors were completely resistant to treatment with lapatinib alone but highly growth impaired with lapatinib plus radiotherapy, exhibiting an enhancement ratio average of 2.75 and a fractional tumor product ratio average of 2.20 during the study period.more » In contrast, HER2+ SUM225 breast cancer tumors were highly responsive to treatment with lapatinib alone and yielded a relatively lower enhancement ratio average of 1.25 during the study period with lapatinib plus radiotherapy. Durable tumor control in the HER2+ SUM225 model was more effective with the combination treatment than either lapatinib or radiotherapy alone. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that radiosensitization by lapatinib correlated with ERK1/2 inhibition in the EGFR+ SUM149 model and with AKT inhibition in the HER2+ SUM225 model. Conclusion: Our data suggest that lapatinib combined with fractionated radiotherapy may be useful against EGFR+ and HER2+ breast cancers and that inhibition of downstream signaling to ERK1/2 and AKT correlates with sensitization in EGFR+ and HER2+ cells, respectively.« less

  17. A polysaccharide from Trametes robiniophila inhibits human osteosarcoma xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingkai; Ma, Shuo; Liu, Ning; Liu, Jiakun; Wang, Wenbo

    2015-06-25

    In the present study, we isolated and purified one polysaccharide (TRP) from Trametes robiniophila, which had a backbone of 1,3,6- and 1,4-linked glucpyranosyl moieties, with 1-linked arabinofuranosyl and galactopyranosyl terminal at the O-3 position of 1,3,6-linked glucpyranosyl residues. TRP was further evaluated for its antitumor activity against xenografted U-2 OS osteosarcoma in BALB/c nude mice together with the possible mechanism of action. We found that oral administration of TRP significantly suppressed U-2 OS tumor growth in mice via the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased number of TUNEL-positive cells in tumor tissues. Moreover, TRP administration increased the levels of the proapoptotic Bax protein and decreased the level of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, thus resulting in a rise of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, the protein expression of caspase-9, caspase-3 and cleaved PARP became evident in tumor tissues from mice following TRP treatment, but caspase-8 keep unchanged. Besides, overexpression of metadherin (MTDH) was attenuated in tumor tissues of TRP-fed mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the TRP-induced apoptosis of tumor tissues is through a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-line specific pO(2) fluctuations in human melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Brurberg, Kjetil G; Graff, Bjørn A; Olsen, Dag R; Rofstad, Einar K

    2004-02-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that tumors are heterogeneous in oxygen tension (pO(2)) and may develop regions with chronically or acutely hypoxic cells during growth. In the present study, it was investigated whether experimental tumors of different lines may show characteristic pO(2) fluctuation patterns and hence may differ with respect to the kinetics of acute hypoxia. A total of 70 xenografted tumors of two human melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) were included in the study. Tissue pO(2) was measured simultaneously in two positions in each tumor for periods of at least 60 min using a two-channel fiberoptic oxygen-sensing device (OxyLite 2000, Oxford Optronix, Oxford, UK). The mean pO(2) was calculated for each pO(2) trace, and this parameter was significantly greater in A-07 than in R-18 tumors (p <0.000001). Fluctuations in pO(2) around 3, 5, or 10 mm Hg were seen in a large fraction of the tumors of both lines. The pO(2) fluctuation frequency differed among individual traces from 0 to 20/h (A-07) and from 0 to 12/h (R-18) and was significantly greater in A-07 than in R-18 tumors (p = 0.0026). The absolute amplitude of the pO(2) fluctuations ranged from 1 to 16 mm Hg (A-07) and 1 to 33 mm Hg (R-18) and did not differ between the tumor lines. The relative amplitude was significantly higher in R-18 than in A-07 tumors (p <0.000001). The pO(2) values recorded simultaneously in the same tumor were in general not temporally coordinated. Experimental tumors of different lines may show individual and characteristic pO(2) fluctuation patterns. The pO(2) fluctuations may result in regions with acutely hypoxic cells. The kinetics of the acute hypoxia may differ among tumors of different lines, individual tumors of the same line, and different regions within the same tumor.

  19. Patient-derived mouse xenografts from pediatric liver cancer predict tumor recurrence and advise clinical management.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Delphine; Fabre, Monique; Simon-Coma, Marina; Gorse, Aurore; Kappler, Roland; Nonell, Lara; Mallo, Mar; Haidar, Hazar; Déas, Olivier; Mussini, Charlotte; Guettier, Catherine; Redon, Marie-José; Brugières, Laurence; Ghigna, Maria Rosa; Fadel, Elie; Galmiche-Rolland, Louise; Chardot, Christophe; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Armengol, Carolina; Branchereau, Sophie; Cairo, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Identification of new treatments for relapsing pediatric cancer is an unmet clinical need and a societal challenge. Liver cancer occurrence in infancy, 1.5 for million children per year, falls far below the threshold of interest for dedicated drug development programs, and this disease is so rare that it is very difficult to gather enough children into a phase II clinical trial. Here, we present the establishment of an unprecedented preclinical platform of 24 pediatric liver cancer patient-derived xenografts (PLC-PDXs) from 20 hepatoblastomas (HBs), 1 transitional liver cell tumor (TCLT), 1 hepatocellular carcinoma, and 2 malignant rhabdoid tumors. Cytogenetic array and mutational analysis of the parental tumors and the corresponding PLC-PDXs show high conservation of the molecular features of the parental tumors. The histology of PLC-PDXs is strikingly similar to that observed in primary tumors and recapitulates the heterogeneity of recurrent disease observed in the clinic. Tumor growth in the mouse is strongly associated with elevated circulating alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), low rate of necrosis/fibrosis after treatment, and gain of chromosome 20, all indicators of resistance to chemotherapy and poor outcome. Accordingly, the ability of a tumor to generate PLC-PDX is predictive of poor prognosis. Exposure of PLC-PDXs to standards of care or therapeutic options already in use for other pediatric malignancies revealed unique response profiles in these models. Among these, the irinotecan/temozolomide combination induced strong tumor regression in the TCLT and in a model derived from an AFP-negative relapsing HB. These results provide evidence that PLC-PDX preclinical platform can strongly contribute to accelerate the identification and diversification of anticancer treatment for aggressive subtypes of pediatric liver cancer. (Hepatology 2016;64:1121-1135). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. Migrating glioma cells express stem cell markers and give rise to new tumors upon xenografting.

    PubMed

    Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A; Lathia, Justin D; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor with an overall survival of only 14.6 months. Although these tumors are treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, recurrence is inevitable. A critical population of tumor cells in terms of therapy, the so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), has been identified in gliomas and many other cancers. These tumor cells have a stem cell-like phenotype and are suggested to be responsible for tumor growth, chemo- and radio-resistance as well as recurrence. However, functional evidence for migrating glioma cells having a stem cell-like phenotype is currently lacking. In the present study, the aim was to characterize the phenotype of migrating tumor cells using a novel migration assay based on serum-free stem cell medium and patient-derived spheroid cultures. The results showed pronounced migration of five different GBM spheroid cultures, but not of the commercial cell line U87MG. An in vitro limiting dilution assay showed preserved but reduced spheroid formation capacity of migrating cells. Orthotopic xenografting in mice showed preserved but reduced tumorigenic capacity. Profiling of mRNAs revealed no significant deregulation of 16 predefined CSC-related genes and the HOX-gene list in migrating cells compared to spheroids. Determination of GBM molecular subtypes revealed that subtypes of spheroids and migrating cells were identical. In conclusion, migrating tumor cells preserve expression of stem cell markers and functional CSC characteristics. Since CSCs are reported to be highly resistant to therapy, these results emphasize that the CSC phenotype should be taken into consideration in future treatment of GBMs.

  1. Astaxanthin Inhibits PC-3 Xenograft Prostate Tumor Growth in Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaofeng; Yu, Haining; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shen, Shengrong

    2017-03-08

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most common malignancy in men, is a major cause of cancer deaths. A better understanding of the mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression may identify actionable targets to improve treatment of this patient group. As a dietary carotenoid, astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects against inflammation, cardiovascular disease, oxidative damage, or different cancer sites. This study used intragastric administration of astaxanthin to detect its role on tumor proliferation, apoptosis, microRNA (miRNA) overexpression, and microbacteria composition change by establishing androgen-independent PCa cell PC-3 xenograft nude mice. Nude mice were inoculated with androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells subcutaneously. The intervention was started when tumors reached 0.5-0.6 cm in diameter. Mice were intragastrically administered 100 mg/kg astaxanthin (HA), 25 mg/kg astaxanthin (LA), or olive oil (TC). The results showed that 100 mg/kg astaxanthin significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the TC group, with an inhibitory rate of 41.7%. A decrease of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as well as an increase of cleaved caspase-3 were observed in HA-treated tumors, along with increasing apoptotic cells, obtained by TUNEL assay. The HA significantly elevated the levels of tumor suppressors miR-375 and miR-487b in tumor tissues and the amount of Lactobacillus sp. and Lachnospiraceae in mice stools, while there was no significant difference between LA and TC groups. These results provide a promising regimen to enhance the therapeutic effect in a dietary supplement manner.

  2. Tumor circulating DNA profiling in xenografted mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Rene; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) a hallmark characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is proposed as a major determinant of processes involving tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. To examine whether circulating DNA (cirDNA) in blood plasma reflects changes in tumor cells under IH conditions, we used a xenografted murine model. Mice engrafted with TC1 epithelial lung cancer cells and controls were exposed to IH or room air (RA) conditions. Plasma cirDNA amounts were significantly increased in mice exposed to IH (p<0.05). Significant associations between plasma cirDNA concentrations and tumor size, weight and invasiveness also emerged (p<0.05). Using a methylation microarray-based approach, we identified 2,094 regions showing significant differential cirDNA modifications. Systems biology analyses revealed an association with molecular pathways deregulated in cancer progression and with distal and TSS-associated transcription factor binding sites. We detected clusters of highly variable regions in chromosomes 7, 13, 14 and X, which may highlight hotspots for DNA deletions. Single locus displayed high intragroup variation, suggesting cellular heterogeneity within the tissue may be associated to cirDNA release. Thus, exposures to IH increase the shedding of cirDNA into circulation, which carries epigenetic modifications that may characterize cell populations within the tumor that preferentially release their DNA upon IH exposure.

  3. Tumor circulating DNA profiling in xenografted mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Rene; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) a hallmark characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is proposed as a major determinant of processes involving tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. To examine whether circulating DNA (cirDNA) in blood plasma reflects changes in tumor cells under IH conditions, we used a xenografted murine model. Mice engrafted with TC1 epithelial lung cancer cells and controls were exposed to IH or room air (RA) conditions. Plasma cirDNA amounts were significantly increased in mice exposed to IH (p<0.05). Significant associations between plasma cirDNA concentrations and tumor size, weight and invasiveness also emerged (p<0.05). Using a methylation microarray-based approach, we identified 2,094 regions showing significant differential cirDNA modifications. Systems biology analyses revealed an association with molecular pathways deregulated in cancer progression and with distal and TSS-associated transcription factor binding sites. We detected clusters of highly variable regions in chromosomes 7, 13, 14 and X, which may highlight hotspots for DNA deletions. Single locus displayed high intragroup variation, suggesting cellular heterogeneity within the tissue may be associated to cirDNA release. Thus, exposures to IH increase the shedding of cirDNA into circulation, which carries epigenetic modifications that may characterize cell populations within the tumor that preferentially release their DNA upon IH exposure. PMID:25415227

  4. Incorporation of OSI-7836 into DNA of Calu-6 and H460 xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Frank; Black, Chris; Richardson, Katherine; Franks, April; Wells, Edward; Karimi, Susan; Sennello, Gina; Hart, Karen; Meyer, Denny; Emerson, David; Brown, Eric; LeRay, Jeremy; Nilsson, Christy; Tomkinson, Blake; Bendele, Raymond

    2005-03-01

    OSI-7836 (4'-thio-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) is a novel nucleoside analog in phase I clinical development for the treatment of cancer. As with other nucleoside analogs, the proposed mechanism of action involves phosphorylation to the triphosphate form followed by incorporation into cellular DNA, leading to cell death. This hypothesis has been examined by measuring and comparing the incorporation of ara-C, OSI-7836, and gemcitabine (dFdC) into DNA of cultured cells and by investigating the role of deoxycytidine kinase in OSI-7836 toxicity. We report here additional studies in which the role of cell cycling on OSI-7836 toxicity was investigated and incorporation of OSI-7836 into DNA of xenograft tumors measured. The role of the cell cycle was examined by comparing the toxicity of OSI-7836 in A549 NSCLC cells that were either in log phase growth or had reached confluence. A novel validated LC-MS/MS assay was developed to quantify the concentrations of OSI-7836 in DNA from Calu-6 and H460 human tumor xenografts in mice. Results showed that apoptosis induced by OSI-7836 was markedly greater in cycling cells than in confluent non-cycling cells despite only a modest increase in intracellular OSI-7836 triphosphate concentration. The LC-MS/MS assay developed to measure OSI-7836 incorporation into DNA had an on-column detection limit of 0.25 fmol, a quantification limit of 0.5 fmol, and a sensitivity of approximately 0.1 pmol OSI-7836/micromol dThy. Concentrations of OSI-7836 in splenic DNA (0.4 pmol OSI-7836/micromol dThy) averaged fivefold less than the average concentration in Calu-6 and H460 xenograft DNA (3.0 pmol OSI-7836/micromol dThy) following a 400 mg/kg dose of OSI-7836. Concentrations of OSI-7836 in Calu-6 tumor DNA isolated 24 h following a dose of 400, 1000, or 1600 mg OSI-7836/kg were approximately 1.3, 1 and 1.3 pmol OSI-7836/micromol dThy, respectively. Concentrations of OSI-7836 in DNA from H460 and Calu-6 xenografts did not appear to increase during

  5. Therapeutic effect against human xenograft tumors in nude mice by the third generation microtubule stabilizing epothilones

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Zhong, Zi-Yang; Li, Yong; Feng, Li; Eng, Sara; Myles, David R.; Johnson, Robert; Wu, Nian; Yin, Ye Ingrid; Wilson, Rebecca M.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2008-01-01

    The epothilones represent a promising class of natural product-based antitumor drug candidates. Although these compounds operate through a microtubule stabilization mechanism similar to that of taxol, the epothilones offer a major potential therapeutic advantage in that they retain their activity against multidrug-resistant cell lines. We have been systematically synthesizing and evaluating synthetic epothilone congeners that are not accessible through modification of the natural product itself. We report herein the results of biological investigations directed at two epothilone congeners: iso-fludelone and iso-dehydelone. Iso-fludelone, in particular, exhibits a number of properties that render it an excellent candidate for preclinical development, including biological stability, excellent solubility in water, and remarkable potency relative to other epothilones. In nude mouse xenograft settings, iso-fludelone was able to achieve therapeutic cures against a number of human cancer cell lines, including mammarian-MX-1, ovarian-SK-OV-3, and the fast-growing, refractory, subcutaneous neuroblastoma-SK-NAS. Strong therapeutic effect was observed against drug-resistant lung-A549/taxol and mammary-MCF-7/Adr xenografts. In addition, iso-fludelone was shown to exhibit a significant therapeutic effect against an intracranially implanted SK-NAS tumor. PMID:18755900

  6. Evaluation of 9-dimethylaminomethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin against xenografts derived from adult and childhood solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Houghton, P J; Cheshire, P J; Myers, L; Stewart, C F; Synold, T W; Houghton, J A

    1992-01-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor 9-dimethylaminomethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (topotecan) was evaluated against a panel of xenografts comprising four lines of adult colon adenocarcinoma, three colon tumors derived from adolescents, six childhood rhabdomyosarcomas from previously untreated patients as well as sublines selected in vivo for resistance to vincristine and melphalan, and three lines of childhood osteogenic sarcoma. Efficacy was determined at maximal tolerated dose levels using intermittent i.p. administration [every 4 days for 4 doses (q4dx4)] or daily p.o. or i.p. administration 5 days per week for up to 20 courses. On a q4dx4 schedule, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was 12.5 mg/kg per administration, which caused marked weight loss and lethality in approximately 5% of the tumor-bearing mice. This schedule caused significant growth inhibition (but no tumor regression) in advanced adult colon adenocarcinomas. The minimal treated/control (T/C) ratios were 0.49, 0.54, and 0.3 for three of the tumor lines and were achieved at 18-21 days after the initiation of treatment. In contrast, rhabdomyosarcomas were considerably more sensitive, with T/C ratios being < 0.1 for three lines, whereas topotecan was less active against two other rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts (minimal T/C ratios, 0.17 and 0.14). As inhibitors of topoisomerase I have been demonstrated to have activity in the replication phase of the cell cycle (S-phase-specific), prolonged administration schedules were examined. Mice received topotecan 5 days per week for 3 weeks either by i.p. injection or by oral gavage (p.o.). In selected experiments, p.o. administration was continued for up to 20 weeks. Oral administration for 3 weeks (2 mg/kg per dose) resulted in complete regression of all six lines of rhabdomyosarcoma, with two lines demonstrating no regrowth during the period of observation (> or = 84 days). Similar results were obtained after i.p. administration, suggesting significant schedule

  7. Direct in vivo Measurement of Targeted Binding in a Human Tumor Xenograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, David A.; Yuan, Fan; Leunig, Michael; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1997-03-01

    Binding is crucial to the function of most biologically active molecules, but difficult to quantify directly in living tissue. To this end, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to detect the immobilization of fluorescently labeled ligand caused by binding to receptors in vivo. Measurements of mAb affinity to target antigen within human tumor xenografts revealed a saturable binding isotherm, from which an in vivo carcinoembryonic antigen density of 0.56 nmol/g (5.0 × 105/cell) and an association constant of Ka<= 4 × 107 M-1 were estimated. The present method can be adapted for in vivo studies of cell signaling, targeted drugs, gene therapy, and other processes involving receptor-ligand binding.

  8. Establishment and Characterization of 7 Novel Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines from Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xie, Fubo; Ouyang, Kedong; Tang, Xuzhen; Wang, Minjun; Wen, Danyi; Zhu, Yizhun; Qin, Xiaoran

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis worldwide and the molecular mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to establish a collection of human HCC cell lines from patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. From the 20 surgical HCC sample collections, 7 tumors were successfully developed in immunodeficient mice and further established 7 novel HCC cell lines (LIXC002, LIXC003, LIXC004, LIXC006, LIXC011, LIXC012 and CPL0903) by primary culture. The characterization of cell lines was defined by morphology, growth kinetics, cell cycle, chromosome analysis, short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, molecular profile, and tumorigenicity. Additionally, response to clinical chemotherapeutics was validated both in vitro and in vivo. STR analysis indicated that all cell lines were unique cells different from known cell lines and free of contamination by bacteria or mycoplasma. The other findings were quite heterogeneous between individual lines. Chromosome aberration could be found in all cell lines. Alpha-fetoprotein was overexpressed only in 3 out of 7 cell lines. 4 cell lines expressed high level of vimentin. Ki67 was strongly stained in all cell lines. mRNA level of retinoic acid induced protein 3 (RAI3) was decreased in all cell lines. The 7 novel cell lines showed variable sensitivity to 8 tested compounds. LIXC011 and CPL0903 possessed multiple drug resistance property. Sorafenib inhibited xenograft tumor growth of LIXC006, but not of LIXC012. Our results indicated that the 7 novel cell lines with low passage maintaining their clinical and pathological characters could be good tools for further exploring the molecular mechanism of HCC and anti-cancer drug screening. PMID:24416385

  9. Hypoxia-induced human endonuclease G expression suppresses tumor growth in a xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, PT; Botlagunta, M; Kluth, JB; Mukadam, S; Krishnamachary, B; Vesuna, F; Raman, V

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hypoxia-inducible gene therapy approach for the expression of the mature form of human endonuclease G to facilitate cell death in hypoxic regions of the tumor. The chimeric therapeutic gene is placed under the control of a hypoxia response element based promoter and contains a translocation motif linked in frame to an oxygen-dependent degradation domain and the endonuclease G gene. Transient expression of the chimeric therapeutic gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines resulted in efficient cell death under hypoxia-mimetic conditions. Stable MDA-MB-435 cells expressing the chimeric therapeutic gene under 1% O2 showed an increase in stable HIF-1α protein levels and synthesis of the endonuclease G protein in a time-dependent manner. In normoxic conditions, these stable transgenic cells exhibited no change in growth rate, invasion and motility when compared to parental cells. Moreover, xenografts generated using the transgenic cells exhibited highly significant suppression of tumor growth in a preclinical cancer model compared to the parental cell line. Thus, the hypoxia-modulated endonuclease G expression has the potential to be used as a gene-based-therapy system to kill malignant cells within hypoxic regions of tumors. PMID:18551145

  10. Imaging Tiny Hepatic Tumor Xenografts via Endoglin Targeted Paramagnetic/Optical Nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihui; Gao, Xihui; Zhang, Yunfei; Chang, Wenju; Li, Jianhui; Li, Xinwei; Du, Qin; Li, Cong

    2018-04-30

    Surgery is a mainstay for treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it is a great challenge for surgeons to identify HCC in its early developmental stage. The diagnostic sensitivity for tiny HCC with a diameter less than 1.0 cm is usually as low as 10-33% for computed tomography (CT) and 29-43% for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although MRI is the preferred imaging modality for detecting HCC, with its unparalleled spatial resolution for soft tissue, the commercially available contrast agents, such as Gd 3+ -DTPA, cannot accurately define HCC due to its short circulation lifetime and lack of tumor targeting specificity. Endoglin (CD105), a type I membrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed both in HCC cells and in the endothelial cells of neovasculature, which are abundant at the tumor periphery. In this work, a novel single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide based aptamer was screened by systematic evolution of ligands in an exponential enrichment (SELEX) assay and showed high binding affinity (K D = 98 pmol/L) to endoglin. Conjugating the aptamers and imaging reporters on a G5 dendrimer created an HCC targeting nanoprobe that allowed the successful visualization of orthotopic HCC xenografts with diameters as small as 1-4 mm. Significantly, the invasive tumor margin was clearly delineated, with a tumor to normal ratio of 2.7 by near-infrared fluorescence imaging and 2.1 by T1-weighted MRI. This multimodal nanoprobe holds promise not only for non-invasively defining tiny HCC by preoperative MRI but also for guiding tumor excision via intra-operative NIR fluorescence imaging.

  11. Glucosamine-Linked Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes for Imaging of Solid Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Korotcov, Alexandru V.; Ye, Yunpeng; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Fayun; Huang, Sophia; Lin, Stephen; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive technique for studying diseases at the molecular level in vivo. Glucose transporters are often used as targets for in vivo imaging of tumors. The efficiency of a tumor-seeking fluorescent probe can be enhanced by attaching one or more glucosamine (GlcN) moieties. This study was designed to evaluate the use of previously developed GlcN-linked NIRF probes for in vitro and in vivo optical imaging of cancer. Procedures Cellular uptake of the probes (1 μM) was investigated in monolayer cultures of luciferase-expressing PC3 (PC3-luc) cells. The prostate tumors were established as subcutaneous xenografts using PC3-luc cells in nude mice. The biodistributions and tumor-targeting specificities of cypate (cyp), cypate-d-(+)-glucosamine (cyp-GlcN), and d-(+)-gluosamine-cypate-d-(+)-gluosamine (cyp-2GlcN) were studied. The tumor, muscle, and major organs were collected for ex vivo optical imaging. Results The tumor cell uptake of the probe containing two glucosamine residues, cyp-2GlcN, was significantly higher than the uptake of both the probe with one glucosamine residue, cyp-GlcN, and the probe without glucosamine, cyp only. Similarly, in in vivo experiments, cyp-2GlcN demonstrated higher maximum fluorescence intensity and longer residence lifetime in tumors than cyp-GlcN or cyp. The ex vivo biodistribution analysis revealed that tumor uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN was four- and twofold higher than that of cyp at 24 h post-injection, respectively. Conclusion Both cyp-GlcN and cyp-2GlcN NIRF probes exhibited good tumor-targeting properties in prostate cancer cell cultures and live mice. The cyp-2GlcN probe showed the highest uptake with good retention characteristics in vivo. The uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN is likely mediated by glucosamine-recognizing transporters. The uptake mechanism is being explored further for developing cypate-glucosamine-based probes for in vivo imaging. PMID:21971932

  12. Lack of MHC expression and retention of ultrastructural characteristics by xenograft transmissible venereal tumor cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Harmelin, A; Pinthus, J H; Friedmann-Morvinski, D; Kaufman, K; Brenner, O

    2002-07-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is primarily a tumor of adult dogs with a high incidence of spontaneous regression. We recently reported a xenograft model of CTVT (XTVT) in NOD/SCID mice. XTVT cells retain cytological and histological features of CTVT as well as characteristic rearranged LINE/c-MYC junction [Am. J. Vet. Res. 62 (2001) 907]. In this paper, we demonstrate that XTVT cells maintain ultrastructural characteristics of CTVT and do not express MHC classes I and II molecules.

  13. Hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles restore sensitivity to letrozole-resistant xenograft tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Hareesh B; Huffman, Steven; Veerapaneni, Poornachand; Kirma, Nameer B; Binkley, Peter; Perla, Rao P; Evans, Dean B; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R

    2011-05-01

    Letrozole is a potent aromatase inhibitor and superior to other defined selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen in treating hormone-responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Patients who receive this drug may become insensitive to the effects of estrogen deprivation induced by letrozole. Letrozole has known side effects on bone metabolism due to systemic ablation of estrogen production. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles (HA-Letr-NPs) in restoring sensitivity to letrozole-resistant (LTLT-Ca) cells. To target letrozole to LTLT-Ca cells, hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation using biodegradable PLGA-PEG co-polymer. Binding specificity of HA to CD44 on the cell surface was analyzed in vitro using FITC-CD44 Ab and CD44 siRNA by flow cytometry. Effects on in vitro cytotoxicity and aromatase enzymatic activity of HA-Letr-NPs were performed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells over-expressing aromatase (MCF-7/Aro), and LTLT-Ca cells resistant to letrozole. Preclinical efficacy of HA-Letr-NPs was examined in mice using LTLT-Ca xenograft tumors. HA-Letr-NPs were restricted to a maximum size of 100 nm. The in vitro drug release assay showed that the highest released concentration of letrozole occurred after 23 hours at 37 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline. HA-Letr-NPs on MCF-7/Aro and LTLT-Ca cells showed an IC50 of 2 microM and 5 microM, respectively. HA-Letr-NPs were more efficacious in inhibiting tumor growth, reducing in vitro cellular and in vivo tumor aromatase enzyme activity more than the corresponding Letr-NPs or letrozole. HA-Letr-NPs restored and maintained a prolonged sensitivity and targeted delivery of letrozole in letrozole-resistant tumors in vivo.

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Anja; Schumacher, Udo

    2017-01-01

    Background Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities. Methods The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model “Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool” (CaTSiT) to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model. Results According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels’ geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor’s therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior. Conclusion Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry

  15. A New Apparatus and Surgical Technique for the Dual Perfusion of Human Tumor Xenografts in Situ in Nude Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Dauchy, Erin M; Mao, Lulu; Belancio, Victoria P; Hill, Steven M; Blask, David E

    2012-01-01

    We present a new perfusion system and surgical technique for simultaneous perfusion of 2 tissue-isolated human cancer xenografts in nude rats by using donor blood that preserves a continuous flow. Adult, athymic nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu) were implanted with HeLa human cervical or HT29 colon adenocarcinomas and grown as tissue-isolated xenografts. When tumors reached an estimated weight of 5 to 6 g, rats were prepared for perfusion with donor blood and arteriovenous measurements. The surgical procedure required approximately 20 min to complete for each tumor, and tumors were perfused for a period of 150 min. Results showed that tumor venous blood flow, glucose uptake, lactic acid release, O2 uptake and CO2 production, uptake of total fatty acid and linoleic acid and conversion to the mitogen 13-HODE, cAMP levels, and activation of several marker kinases were all well within the normal physiologic, metabolic, and signaling parameters characteristic of individually perfused xenografts. This new perfusion system and technique reduced procedure time by more than 50%. These findings demonstrate that 2 human tumors can be perfused simultaneously in situ or ex vivo by using either rodent or human blood and suggest that the system may also be adapted for use in the dual perfusion of other organs. Advantages of this dual perfusion technique include decreased anesthesia time, decreased surgical manipulation, and increased efficiency, thereby potentially reducing the numbers of laboratory animals required for scientific investigations. PMID:22546915

  16. Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled Bevacizumab-N-HYNIC Conjugate in Human Ovarian Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Qaiser; Mahmood, Samia

    2018-03-20

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine the suitability of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB as a specific vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeting agent. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF. N-hydroxysuccinimide-2-hydrazinonicotinic acid (N-HYNIC) was conjugated to BZMB, followed by labeling with 99m Tc using N-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl] glycine (tricine), ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA), and nicotinic acid as coligands. 99m Tc-labeled BZMB was characterized in terms of 99m TcO 4 , radiocolloids, and labeled N-HYNIC-BZMB using thin-layer chromatography and HPLC. Poor metastatic SKOV-3 and high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cell lines were used for in vitro binding uptake of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB. Biodistribution and scintigraphy accuracy were examined in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats and rabbits. 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB prepared by using a mixture of tricine and EDDA demonstrated relatively high radiochemical purity (more than 98%). In L-cysteine and serum, it exhibited a stable behavior up to 16 hours. In vitro binding uptake indicated that it targets high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 tumors. Biodistribution in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats confirmed a significant uptake in SKOV-3.ip1 tumors (5.69% ± 1.86%, 4 hours). Scintigraphic accuracy in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rabbits validated its suitability as a high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 radiotracer. High radiochemical purity, stability in saline and serum, biodistribution, and scintigraphy of 99m Tc-N-HYNIC-BZMB in human ovarian tumor xenografts in rats and rabbits confirmed its suitability as a potential radiotracer for imaging high metastatic SKOV-3.ip1 sites.

  17. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG inhibits progression of LuCaP35 xenograft prostate tumors to castration resistance.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Katherine J; Langmann, Gabrielle; Ai, Junkui; Ramos-Garcia, Raquel; Vessella, Robert L; Wang, Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is currently treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT initially results in tumor regression; however, all patients eventually relapse with castration-resistant prostate cancer. New approaches to delay the progression of prostate cancer to castration resistance are in desperate need. This study addresses whether targeting Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) regulation of androgen receptor (AR) can inhibit prostate cancer progression to castration resistance. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG was injected intraperitoneally into nude mice bearing LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to determine the effect of HSP90 inhibition on prostate cancer progression to castration resistance and host survival. Administration of 17-AAG maintained androgen-sensitivity, delayed the progression of LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to castration resistance, and prolonged the survival of host. In addition, 17-AAG prevented nuclear localization of endogenous AR in LuCaP35 xenograft tumors in castrated nude mice. Targeting Hsp90 or the mechanism by which HSP90 regulates androgen-independent AR nuclear localization and activation may lead to new approaches to prevent and/or treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.ed

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5more » Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.« less

  19. The Effects of Vandetanib on Paclitaxel Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Activity in a Xenograft Model of Human Ovarian Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Marta; Frapolli, Roberta; Berndt, Alexander; Scarlato, Valentina; Richter, Petra; Kosmehl, Hartwig; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Ryan, Anderson J; Giavazzi, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of vandetanib, a small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor, on paclitaxel (PTX) tumor distribution and antitumor activity in xenograft models of human ovarian carcinoma. Nude mice bearing A2780-1A9 xenografts received daily (5, 10, or 15 days) doses of vandetanib (50 mg/kg per os), combined with PTX (20 mg/kg intravenously). Morphologic and functional modifications associated with the tumor vasculature (CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin staining and Hoechst 33342 perfusion) and PTX concentrations in plasma and tumor tissues were analyzed. Activity was evaluated as inhibition of tumor growth subcutaneously and spreading into the peritoneal cavity. Vandetanib treatment produced no significant change in tumor vessel density, although a reduced number of large vessels, an increased percentage of mature vessels, and diminished tumor perfusion were evident. Pretreatment with vandetanib led to decreased tumor PTX levels within 1 hour of PTX injection, although 24 hours later, tumor PTX levels were comparable with controls. In efficacy studies, the combination of vandetanib plus PTX improved antitumor activity compared with vandetanib or PTX alone, with greater effects being obtained when PTX was administered before vandetanib. The combination of PTX plus vandetanib reduced tumor burden in the peritoneal cavity of mice and significantly increased their survival. Analysis of vascular changes and PTX tumor uptake in vandetanib-treated tumors may help to guide the scheduling of vandetanib plus PTX combinations and may have implications for the design of clinical trials with these drugs. PMID:19881951

  20. Characterization of a large panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts representing the clinical heterogeneity of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Julien, Sylvia; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Lacroix, Ludovic; Pocard, Marc; Goéré, Diane; Mariani, Pascale; Landron, Sophie; Bigot, Ludovic; Nemati, Fariba; Dartigues, Peggy; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Lantuas, Denis; Morgand, Loïc; Pham, Emmanuel; Gonin, Patrick; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Job, Bastien; Dessen, Philippe; Bruno, Alain; Pierré, Alain; De Thé, Hugues; Soliman, Hany; Nunes, Manoel; Lardier, Guillaume; Calvet, Loreley; Demers, Brigitte; Prévost, Grégoire; Vrignaud, Patricia; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Duchamp, Olivier; Berthet, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Patient-derived xenograft models are considered to represent the heterogeneity of human cancers and advanced preclinical models. Our consortium joins efforts to extensively develop and characterize a new collection of patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) models. From the 85 unsupervised surgical colorectal samples collection, 54 tumors were successfully xenografted in immunodeficient mice and rats, representing 35 primary tumors, 5 peritoneal carcinoses and 14 metastases. Histologic and molecular characterization of patient tumors, first and late passages on mice includes the sequence of key genes involved in CRC (i.e., APC, KRAS, TP53), aCGH, and transcriptomic analysis. This comprehensive characterization shows that our collection recapitulates the clinical situation about the histopathology and molecular diversity of CRC. Moreover, patient tumors and corresponding models are clustering together allowing comparison studies between clinical and preclinical data. Hence, we conducted pharmacologic monotherapy studies with standard of care for CRC (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab). Through this extensive in vivo analysis, we have shown the loss of human stroma cells after engraftment, observed a metastatic phenotype in some models, and finally compared the molecular profile with the drug sensitivity of each tumor model. Through an experimental cetuximab phase II trial, we confirmed the key role of KRAS mutation in cetuximab resistance. This new collection could bring benefit to evaluate novel targeted therapeutic strategies and to better understand the basis for sensitivity or resistance of tumors from individual patients.

  1. High resolution digital autoradiographic and dosimetric analysis of heterogeneous radioactivity distribution in xenografted prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Timmermand, Oskar V; Nilsson, Jenny; Strand, Sven-Erik; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2016-12-01

    The first main aim of this study was to illustrate the absorbed dose rate distribution from 177 Lu in sections of xenografted prostate cancer (PCa) tumors using high resolution digital autoradiography (DAR) and compare it with hypothetical identical radioactivity distributions of 90 Y or 7 MeV alpha-particles. Three dosimetry models based on either dose point kernels or Monte Carlo simulations were used and evaluated. The second and overlapping aim, was to perform DAR imaging and dosimetric analysis of the distribution of radioactivity, and hence the absorbed dose rate, in tumor sections at an early time point after injection during radioimmunotherapy using 177 Lu-h11B6, directed against the human kallikrein 2 antigen. Male immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice, aged 6-8 w, were inoculated by subcutaneous injection of ∼10 7 LNCaP cells in a 200 μl suspension of a 1:1 mixture of medium and Matrigel. The antibody h11B6 was conjugated with the chelator CHX-A″-DTPA after which conjugated h11B6 was mixed with 177 LuCl 3 . The incubation was performed at room temperature for 2 h, after which the labeling was terminated and the solution was purified on a NAP-5 column. About 20 MBq 177 Lu-h11B6 was injected intravenously in the tail vein. At approximately 10 h postinjection (hpi), the mice were sacrificed and one tumor was collected from each of the five animals and cryosectioned into 10 μm thick slices. The tumor slices were measured and imaged using the DAR MicroImager system and the M3Vision software. Then the absorbed dose rate was calculated using a dose point kernel generated with the Monte Carlo code gate v7.0. The DAR system produced high resolution images of the radioactivity distribution, close to the resolution of single PCa cells. The DAR images revealed a pronounced heterogeneous radioactivity distribution, i.e., count rate per area, in the tumors, indicated by the normalized intensity variations along cross sections as mean ± SD: 0.15 ± 0.15, 0.20 ± 0

  2. YM155, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, induces regression of established human hormone-refractory prostate tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takahito; Kita, Aya; Yamanaka, Kentaro; Mori, Masamichi; Amino, Nobuaki; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Tominaga, Fumiko; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Kinoyama, Isao; Matsuhisa, Akira; Kudoh, Masafumi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-09-01

    Various accumulating evidence suggests that survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, plays an important role in drug resistance and cancer cell survival in many types of cancer, including hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Here, we characterized YM155, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, using a survivin gene promoter activity assay. YM155 suppressed expression of survivin and induced apoptosis in PC-3 and PPC-1 human HRPC cell lines at 10 nmol/L. In contrast, YM155 up to 100 nmol/L showed little effect on expression levels of other IAP- or Bcl-2-related proteins. In a s.c. xenografted PC-3 tumor model in mice, 3-day continuous infusions of YM155 at 3 to 10 mg/kg induced massive tumor regression accompanied by suppression of intratumoral survivin. YM155 also completely inhibited the growth of orthotopically xenografted PC-3 tumors. No significant decreases in body weight were observed in mice treated with YM155 during the experimental period. Pharmacokinetic analyses indicated that YM155 is highly distributed to tumors and at concentrations approximately 20-fold higher than those in plasma. Our findings represent the first attempt to show tumor regression and suppression of survivin in p53-deficient human HRPC cells by a single small molecular compound treatment. Further extensive investigation of YM155 in many types of cancer, including HRPC, seems to be worthwhile to develop this novel therapeutic approach.

  3. The Somatostatin Analog Rhenium Re-188-P2045 Inhibits the Growth of AR42J Pancreatic Tumor-xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carol A.; Azure, Michael T.; Adams, Christopher T.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    P2045 is a peptide analog of somatostatin with picomolar affinity for the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) upregulated in some pancreatic tumors. Studies were conducted in rat AR42J pancreatic tumor-xenograft mice to determine if Re-188-P2045 could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer in an animal model. Methods Re-188-P2045 was intravenously administered every 3 days for 16 days to nude mice with AR42J tumor-xenografts that were ≈ 20 mm3 at study initiation. Tumor volumes were recorded throughout the dosing period. At necropsy all tissues were assessed for levels of radioactivity and evaluated for histological abnormalities. Clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were determined from terminal blood samples. The affinity of non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 for somatostatin receptors was compared in human NCI-H69 and rat AR42J tumor-cell membranes expressing predominantly SSTR2. Results In the 1.85 and 5.55 mBq groups tumor growth was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion. In the 11.1 mBq group tumor growth was completely inhibited throughout the dosing period and for 12 days after the last administered dose. The radioactivity level in tumors 4 hours post-injection was 10%ID/g, which was 2-fold higher than in the kidneys. Re-188-P2045 was well tolerated in all dose-groups with no adverse clinical, histological, or hematological findings. The non-radioactive Re-185/187-P2045 bound more avidly (0.2 nM) to SSTR2 in human than rat tumor membranes suggesting that these studies are relevant to human studies. Conclusion Re-188-P2045 is a promising therapeutic candidate for patients with somatostatin-receptor-positive cancer. PMID:25359879

  4. The somatostatin analog 188Re-P2045 inhibits the growth of AR42J pancreatic tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carol A; Azure, Michael T; Adams, Christopher T; Zinn, Kurt R

    2014-12-01

    P2045 is a peptide analog of somatostatin with picomolar affinity for the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) upregulated in some pancreatic tumors. Studies were conducted in rat AR42J pancreatic tumor xenograft mice to determine whether (188)Re-P2045 could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer in an animal model. (188)Re-P2045 was intravenously administered every 3 d for 16 d to nude mice with AR42J tumor xenografts that were approximately 20 mm(3) at study initiation. Tumor volumes were recorded throughout the dosing period. At necropsy, all tissues were assessed for levels of radioactivity and evaluated for histologic abnormalities. Clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were determined from terminal blood samples. The affinity of nonradioactive (185/187)Re-P2045 for somatostatin receptors was compared in human NCI-H69 and rat AR42J tumor cell membranes expressing predominantly SSTR2. In the 1.85- and 5.55-MBq groups, tumor growth was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion. In the 11.1-MBq group, tumor growth was completely inhibited throughout the dosing period and for 12 d after the last administered dose. The radioactivity level in tumors 4 h after injection was 10 percentage injected dose per gram, which was 2-fold higher than in the kidneys. (188)Re-P2045 was well tolerated in all dose groups, with no adverse clinical, histologic, or hematologic findings. The nonradioactive (185/187)Re-P2045 bound more avidly (0.2 nM) to SSTR2 in human than rat tumor membranes, suggesting that these studies are relevant to human studies. (188)Re-P2045 is a promising therapeutic candidate for patients with somatostatin receptor-positive cancer. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors,more » genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.« less

  6. Diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts: associations with tumor differentiation and collagen content.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Catherine S; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Simonsen, Trude G; Rofstad, Einar K

    2016-06-07

    The aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is highly dependent on the level of differentiation and the composition of the stroma. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) as noninvasive methods for providing information on the differentiation and the stroma of PDACs. Xenografted tumors initiated from four PDAC cell lines (BxPC-3, Capan-2, MIAPaCa-2, and Panc-1) were included in the study. DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were carried out on a 7.05-T MR scanner, and tumor images of ADC (the apparent diffusion coefficient), K (trans) (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DOTA), and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DOTA) were produced. The level of differentiation and the amount and structure of collagen I and collagen IV were determined by examining histological preparations. Differentiated tumors showed lower levels of collagen I and collagen IV than non-differentiated tumors. Significant correlations were found between ADC and v e, and both parameters differentiated clearly between collagen-rich non-differentiated tumors and differentiated tumors containing less collagen. Differentiated PDAC xenografts show higher ADC values and higher v e values than their non-differentiated counterparts. This observation supports the application of parametric MR images as tumor biomarkers in PDAC. Patients showing low values of ADC and v e most likely have non-differentiated tumors with extensive stroma and, hence, poor prognosis.

  7. Suppressing the growth of rectal cancer xenografts derived from patient tumors by an adenovector expressing small hairpin RNA targeting Bcl-XL.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Jingzi; Huang, Zhongting; Lao, Weifeng; Huang, Xuefeng; He, Chao

    2012-12-01

    Bcl-XL, a mitochondria membrane protein, is overexpressed in colorectal cancers and promotes cell survival. We have previously shown that the adenovector expressing small hairpin (sh)RNA targeting Bcl-XL could induce significantly apoptosis in colon cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to further detect the anti-cancer effect of adenovector expressing the shRNA targeting Bcl-XL (Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA) on rectal cancer xenografts that were derived from patient tumors. We first established three rectal cancer xenografts. These xenografts were subsequently treated with Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA alone or in combination with 5-fluouracil (5-Fu). Finally, the inhibition of tumor growth, survival time and induction of apoptosis were analyzed. The results obtained demonstrated that Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA could effectively suppress the tumor growth of all three rectal cancer xenografts and prolong their survival time. After being combined with 5-Fu, the suppressing effect of Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA was enhanced further. In addition, the data also showed that Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA combined with 5-Fu could significantly increase the apoptotic ratio in the rectal cancer xenograft. These data indicate that Ad/Bcl-XL shRNA with or without 5-Fu has effective anti-tumor effects on the patient tumor-derived rectal cancer xenografts, suggesting that it could be a potential strategy for rectal cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Orthotopic xenografting of human luciferase-tagged malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells for in vivo testing of candidate therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Zinn, Kurt R; Carroll, Steven L

    2011-03-07

    Although in vitro screens are essential for the initial identification of candidate therapeutic agents, a rigorous assessment of the drug's ability to inhibit tumor growth must be performed in a suitable animal model. The type of animal model that is best for this purpose is a topic of intense discussion. Some evidence indicates that preclinical trials examining drug effects on tumors arising in transgenic mice are more predictive of clinical outcome(1)and so candidate therapeutic agents are often tested in these models. Unfortunately, transgenic models are not available for many tumor types. Further, transgenic models often have other limitations such as concerns as to how well the mouse tumor models its human counterpart, incomplete penetrance of the tumor phenotype and an inability to predict when tumors will develop. Consequently, many investigators use xenograft models (human tumor cells grafted into immunodeficient mice) for preclinical trials if appropriate transgenic tumor models are not available. Even if transgenic models are available, they are often partnered with xenograft models as the latter facilitate rapid determination of therapeutic ranges. Further, this partnership allows a comparison of the effectiveness of the agent in transgenic tumors and genuine human tumor cells. Historically, xenografting has often been performed by injecting tumor cells subcutaneously (ectopic xenografts). This technique is rapid and reproducible, relatively inexpensive and allows continuous quantitation of tumor growth during the therapeutic period(2). However, the subcutaneous space is not the normal microenvironment for most neoplasms and so results obtained with ectopic xenografting can be misleading due to factors such as an absence of organ-specific expression of host tissue and tumor genes. It has thus been strongly recommended that ectopic grafting studies be replaced or complemented by studies in which human tumor cells are grafted into their tissue of origin

  9. Genetic and metabolic comparison of orthotopic and heterotopic patient-derived pancreatic-cancer xenografts to the original patient tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Eunsung; Hong, Seung-Mo; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Moon-Bo; Won, Ji Sun; An, Soyeon; Shim, In Kyong; Chang, Suhwan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Kim, Song Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Tumors from 25 patients with pancreatic cancer were used to establish two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models: orthotopic PDX (PDOX) and heterotopic (subcutaneous) PDX (PDHX). We compared gene expression by immunohistochemistry, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), DNA methylation, and metabolite levels. The 4 cases, of the total of 13 in which simultaneous PDHX & PDOX models were established, were randomly selected. The molecular-genetic characteristics of the patient's tumor were well maintained in the two PDX models. SNP analysis demonstrated that both groups were more than 90% identical to the original patient's tumor, and there was little difference between the two models. DNA methylation of most genes was similar among the two models and the original patients tumor, but some gene sets were hypermethylated the in PDOX model and hypomethylated in the PDHX model. Most of the metabolites had a similar pattern to those of the original patient tumor in both PDX tumor models, but some metabolites were more prominent in the PDOX and PDHX models. This is the first simultaneous molecular-genetic and metabolite comparison of patient tumors and their tumors established in PDOX and PDHX models. The results indicate high fidelity of these critical properties of the patient tumors in the two models. PMID:29487698

  10. Patient-derived xenografts of triple-negative breast cancer reproduce molecular features of patient tumors and respond to mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is aggressive and lacks targeted therapies. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways are frequently activated in TNBC patient tumors at the genome, gene expression and protein levels, and mTOR inhibitors have been shown to inhibit growth in TNBC cell lines. We describe a panel of patient-derived xenografts representing multiple TNBC subtypes and use them to test preclinical drug efficacy of two mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus (rapamycin) and temsirolimus (CCI-779). Methods We generated a panel of seven patient-derived orthotopic xenografts from six primary TNBC tumors and one metastasis. Patient tumors and corresponding xenografts were compared by histology, immunohistochemistry, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) sequencing; TNBC subtypes were determined. Using a previously published logistic regression approach, we generated a rapamycin response signature from Connectivity Map gene expression data and used it to predict rapamycin sensitivity in 1,401 human breast cancers of different intrinsic subtypes, prompting in vivo testing of mTOR inhibitors and doxorubicin in our TNBC xenografts. Results Patient-derived xenografts recapitulated histology, biomarker expression and global genomic features of patient tumors. Two primary tumors had PIK3CA coding mutations, and five of six primary tumors showed flanking intron single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with conservation of sequence variations between primary tumors and xenografts, even on subsequent xenograft passages. Gene expression profiling showed that our models represent at least four of six TNBC subtypes. The rapamycin response signature predicted sensitivity for 94% of basal-like breast cancers in a large dataset. Drug testing of mTOR inhibitors in our xenografts showed 77 to 99% growth inhibition, significantly more than

  11. Activity of MM-398, nanoliposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI), in Ewing's family tumor xenografts is associated with high exposure of tumor to drug and high SLFN11 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min H; Wang, Jing; Makena, Monish R; Lee, Joo-Sang; Paz, Nancy; Hall, Connor P; Song, Michael M; Calderon, Ruben I; Cruz, Riza E; Hindle, Ashly; Ko, Winford; Fitzgerald, Jonathan B; Drummond, Daryl C; Triche, Timothy J; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2015-03-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics and the antitumor activity in pediatric cancer models of MM-398, a nanoliposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI). Mouse plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of nal-IRI and the current clinical formulation of irinotecan were characterized. In vivo activity of irinotecan and nal-IRI was compared in xenograft models (3 each in nu/nu mice) of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (EFT), neuroblastoma (NB), and rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). SLFN11 expression was assessed by Affymetrix HuEx arrays, Taqman RT-PCR, and immunoblotting. Plasma and tumor concentrations of irinotecan and SN-38 (active metabolite) were approximately 10-fold higher for nal-IRI than for irinotecan. Two doses of NAL-IRI (10 mg/kg/dose) achieved complete responses maintained for >100 days in 24 of 27 EFT-xenografted mice. Event-free survival for mice with RMS and NB was significantly shorter than for EFT. High SLFN11 expression has been reported to correlate with sensitivity to DNA damaging agents; median SLFN11 mRNA expression was >100-fold greater in both EFT cell lines and primary tumors compared with NB or RMS cell lines or primary tumors. Cytotoxicity of SN-38 inversely correlated with SLFN11 mRNA expression in 20 EFT cell lines. In pediatric solid tumor xenografts, nal-IRI demonstrated higher systemic and tumor exposures to SN-38 and improved antitumor activity compared with the current clinical formulation of irinotecan. Clinical studies of nal-IRI in pediatric solid tumors (especially EFT) and correlative studies to determine if SLFN11 expression can serve as a biomarker to predict nal-IRI clinical activity are warranted. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Antibody Drug Conjugates Differentiate Uptake and DNA Alkylation of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines in Tumors from Organs of Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Erickson, Hans K; Polson, Andrew; Pillow, Thomas H; Yu, Shang-Fan; Wang, Hong; Dragovich, Peter S; Zhang, Donglu

    2016-12-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-dimer is a DNA minor groove alkylator, and its CD22 THIOMAB antibody drug conjugate (ADC) demonstrated, through a disulfide linker, an efficacy in tumor reduction for more than 7 weeks with minimal body weight loss in xenograft mice after a single 0.5-1 mg/kg i.v. dose. The DNA alkylation was investigated here in tumors and healthy organs of mice to understand the sustained efficacy and tolerability. The experimental procedures included the collection of tumors and organ tissues of xenograft mice treated with the ADC followed by DNA isolation/hydrolysis/quantitation and payload recovery from reversible DNA alkylation. PBD-dimer formed a considerable amount of adducts with tissue DNA, representing approximately 98% (at 24 hours), and 99% (at 96 hours) of the total PBD-dimer in tumors, and 78-89% in liver and lung tissues, suggesting highly efficient covalent binding of the released PBD-dimer to tissue DNA. The amount of PBD-DNA adducts in tumor tissues was approximately 24-fold (at 24 hours) and 70-fold (at 96 hours) greater than the corresponding amount of adducts in liver and lung tissues. In addition, the DNA alkylation levels increased 3-fold to 4-fold from 24 to 96 hours in tumors [41/10 6 base pairs (bp) at 96 hours] but remained at the same level (1/10 6 bp) in livers and lungs. These results support the typical target-mediated cumulative uptake of ADC into tumors and payload release that offers an explanation for its sustained antitumor efficacy. In addition, the low level of DNA alkylation in normal tissues is consistent with the tolerability observed in mice. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [ 18 F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R 2 >0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95xenograft tumor radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacodynamics of DT-IgG, a dual-targeting antibody against VEGF-EGFR, in tumor xenografted mice.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Selwyn J; Zhang, Hongzheng; Yun, Sujin; Batuwangala, Thil D; Steward, Michael; Holmes, Steve D; Rycroft, Daniel; Pan, Lin; Tighiouart, Mourad; Shin, Hyung Ju C; Koenig, Lydia; Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2012-03-01

    DT-IgG is a fully humanized dual-target therapeutic antibody being developed to simultaneously target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), important signaling molecules for tumor growth. The antitumor pharmacodynamics (PD) of DT-IgG was studied in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts with different EGFR and VEGF expressions and K-ras oncogene status and compared with bevacizumab, cetuximab and bevacizumab + cetuximab. Mice bearing human oral squamous cell carcinoma (Tu212), lung adenocarcinoma (A549), or colon cancer (GEO) subcutaneous xenografts were administered with the antibodies intraperitoneally (i.p.), and tumor volumes were measured versus time. Nonlinear mixed effects modeling (NONMEM) was used to study drug potencies (IC(50)) and variations in tumor growth. The PD models adequately described tumor responses for the antibody dose regimens. In vivo IC(50) values varied with EGFR and K-ras status. DT-IgG had a similar serum t (1/2) as cetuximab (~1.7 vs. 1.5 day), was more rapid than bevacizumab (~6 day), and had the largest apparent distribution volume (DT-IgG > cetuximab > bevacizumab). The efficacy of DT-IgG was comparable to bevacizumab despite lower serum concentrations, but was less than bevacizumab + cetuximab. A lower IC(50) of DT-IgG partially compensated for lower serum concentrations than bevacizumab and cetuximab, but may require higher doses for comparable efficacy as the combination. The model adequately predicted variations of tumor response at the DT-IgG doses tested and could be used for targeting specific tumor efficacies for future testing.

  15. The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib is effective in direct-patient tumor xenografts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan T.; Keysar, Stephen B.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Astling, David P.; Morton, J. Jason; Le, Phuong; Umpierrez, Adrian; Eagles-Soukup, Justin; Gan, Gregory N.; Vogler, Brian W.; Sehrt, Daniel; Takimoto, Sarah M.; Aisner, Dara L.; Wilhelm, Francois; Frederick, Barbara A.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Tan, Aik-Choon; Jimeno, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib inhibits phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation as well as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) activity across a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines. The importance of PIK3CA alterations in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has raised interest in exploring agents targeting PI3K, the product of PIK3CA. The genetic and molecular basis of rigosertib treatment response was investigated in a panel of 16 HNSCC cell lines, and direct patient tumor xenografts from 8 HNSCC patients (4 HPV16-positive). HNSCC cell lines and xenografts were characterized by pathway enrichment gene expression analysis, exon sequencing, gene copy number, western blotting, and IHC. Rigosertib had potent antiproliferative effects on 11 of the 16 HPV− HNSCC cell lines. Treatment sensitivity was confirmed in two cell lines using an orthotopic in vivo xenograft model. Growth reduction after rigosertib treatment was observed in 3/8 HNSCC direct patient tumor lines. The responsive tumor lines carried a combination of a PI3KCA activating event (amplification or mutation) and a p53 inactivating event (either HPV16-mediated or mutation-mediated TP53 inactivation). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of rigosertib in both HPV+ and HPV− HNSCCs focusing on inhibition of the PI3K pathway. Although consistent inhibition of the PI3K pathway was not evident in HNSCC, we identified a combination of PI3K/TP53 events necessary, but not sufficient for rigosertib-sensitivity. PMID:23873848

  16. Micelle-encapsulated thiostrepton as an effective nanomedicine for inhibiting tumor growth and for suppressing FOXM1 in human xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Gartel, Andrei L.

    2011-01-01

    The thiazole antiobiotic, thiostrepton, has been found to induce cell death in cancer cells through proteasome inhibition. As a proteasome inhibitor, thiostrepton has also been shown to suppress the expression of FOXM1, the oncogenic forkhead transcription factor overexpressed in cancer cells. In this study, we explored the potential in vivo anticancer properties of thiostrepton, delivered through nanoparticle encapsulation to xenograft models of breast and liver cancer. We encapsulated thiostrepton into micelles assembled from amphiphilic lipid-PEG (polyethylene glycol) molecules, where thiostrepton is solubilized within the inner lipid compartment of the micelle. Upon assembly, hydrophobic thiostrepton molecules are solubilized into the lipid component of the micelle shell, formed through the self assembly of amphipilic lipid-PEG molecules. Maximum accumulation of micelle-thiostrepton nanoparticles (100nm in diameter, −16mV in zetapotential) into tumors was found at 4 hours post-administration and was retained for at least 24 hours. Upon continuous treatment, we found that nanoparticle-encapsulated thiostrepton reduced tumor growth rates of MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show for the first time the in vivo suppression of the oncogenic FOXM1 after treatment with proteasome inhibitors. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining also showed increased apoptosis in the treated tumors, as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 expression. Our data suggest that the thiazole antibiotic/proteasome inhibitor thiostrepton, when formulated into nanoparticles, may be highly suited as a nanomedicine for treating human cancer. PMID:21903609

  17. The Novel HSP90 inhibitor, IPI-493, is highly effective in human gastrostrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts carrying heterogeneous KIT mutations.

    PubMed

    Floris, Giuseppe; Sciot, Raf; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Faa, Gavino; Normant, Emmanuel; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    KIT activity is crucial for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Imatinib (IMA) and sunitinib (SUN) are very effective KIT-inhibitors in patients with advanced GIST but have no curative potential. We evaluated the efficacy of the novel HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 alone, or in combination with IMA or SUN in GIST xenografts with KIT mutations. Nude mice (n = 98) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying KIT exon 11 (GIST-PSW), KIT exon 9 (GIST-BOE), or double, KIT imatinib-sensitive exon 11 and imatinib-resistant exon 17 mutations (GIST-48). Mice were divided into six treatment groups and dosed orally for 15 days as follows: (i) control group, sterile water; (ii) IMA alone; (iii) SUN alone; (iv) IPI-493 alone; (v) IPI-493+IMA; and (vi) IPI-493+SUN. Treatment with IPI-493 resulted in tumor growth stabilization, variable proliferation arrest, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, and downregulation of KIT and its signaling cascade, especially in the GIST-BOE model. Significant reduction of vessel density was observed with IPI-493 treatment, and was equal to SUN treatment in GIST-PSW and GIST-BOE xenografts. IPI-493 treatment effects were enhanced in combination with TKIs, especially with IPI-493+SUN. In our hands, IPI-493 showed dose-dependent liver damages. When administered as a single agent in a xenograft model, the HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 has consistent antitumor activity and induces KIT downregulation in GISTs with heterogeneous KIT mutations. IPI-493 synergizes with TKIs that are commonly used for the treatment of advanced or IMA-resistant GIST. The antitumor response of IPI-493 is particularly enhanced in combination with SUN. ©2011 AACR.

  18. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis ofmore » tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.« less

  19. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro. PMID:28422711

  20. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-05-16

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro.

  1. Anti-GPC3-CAR T Cells Suppress the Growth of Tumor Cells in Patient-Derived Xenografts of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Suimin; Lai, Yunxin; Wei, Xinru; Li, Baiheng; Lin, Simiao; Wang, Suna; Wu, Qiting; Liang, Qiubin; Liu, Qifa; Peng, Muyun; Yu, Fenglei; Weng, Jianyu; Du, Xin; Pei, Duanqing; Liu, Pentao; Yao, Yao; Xue, Ping; Li, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a general clinic-relevant model for human cancer is a major impediment to the acceleration of novel therapeutic approaches for clinical use. We propose to establish and characterize primary human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenografts that can be used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of adoptive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and accelerate the clinical translation of CAR T cells used in HCC. Primary HCCs were used to establish the xenografts. The morphology, immunological markers, and gene expression characteristics of xenografts were detected and compared to those of the corresponding primary tumors. CAR T cells were adoptively transplanted into patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of HCC. The cytotoxicity of CAR T cells in vivo was evaluated. PDX1, PDX2, and PDX3 were established using primary tumors from three individual HCC patients. All three PDXs maintained original tumor characteristics in their morphology, immunological markers, and gene expression. Tumors in PDX1 grew relatively slower than that in PDX2 and PDX3. Glypican 3 (GPC3)-CAR T cells efficiently suppressed tumor growth in PDX3 and impressively eradicated tumor cells from PDX1 and PDX2, in which GPC3 proteins were highly expressed. GPC3-CAR T cells were capable of effectively eliminating tumors in PDX model of HCC. Therefore, GPC3-CAR T cell therapy is a promising candidate for HCC treatment.

  2. Suppression of colorectal cancer subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis using nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Guan, Ying-Yun; Lu, Qin; Yu, De-Hong; Bai, Fan; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Fang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is a validated approach for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. However, diverse adverse effects inevitably appear due to the off-target effect of the approved antiangiogenic inhibitors on the physiological functions and homeostasis. This study was to investigate a new tumor vessel targeting nanoparticulate drug delivery system, F56 peptide conjugated nanoparticles loading vincristine (F56-VCR-NP), for the effective treatment of CRC subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis model. The controlled release behavior and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of F56-VCR-NP were characterized. The tumor vessel targeting and antiangiogenic activity of F56-VCR-NP was evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, a classical cell model mimicking tumor vascular EC), subcutaneous human HCT-15 xenograft in immunodeficient nude mice, and experimental CT-26 lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic efficacy (animal survival and toxicity) was further investigated in the model of CT-26 lung metastasis in mice. F56-VCR-NP could achieve 30-day controlled drug release in PBS (pH 7.4) and exhibited favorable long-circulating feature in vivo. F56-VCR-NP could accurately target the CRC neovasculature and elicit nanoparticle internalization in the tumor vascular EC, where the antiangiogenic VCR-induced dramatic EC apoptosis and necrosis of CRC tissue. F56-VCR-NP significantly prolonged the mouse survival with no obvious toxicity (weight loss and anepithymia) in the CT-26 lung metastasis mice model, and this pronounced antitumor effect was closely related with the decreased microvessel density in the metastases. The present nanoparticle-based targeted antiangiogenic therapy may provide a new promising approach for the therapy of CRC and lung metastasis, which deserves further translational research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dieckol, isolated from the edible brown algae Ecklonia cava, induces apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells and inhibits tumor xenograft growth.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Hye; Yang, Yeong-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-02-01

    Ecklonia cava is an abundant brown alga and has been reported to possess various bioactive compounds having anti-inflammatory effect. However, the anticancer effects of dieckol, a major active compound in E. cava, are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity of dieckol and its molecular mechanism in ovarian cancer cells and in a xenograft mouse model . MTT assay, PI staining, and PI and Annexin double staining were performed to study cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis. We also investigated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and protein expression using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, respectively. Anti-tumor effects of dieckol were evaluated in SKOV3 tumor xenograft model. We found that the E. cava extract and its phlorotannins have cytotoxic effects on A2780 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Dieckol induced the apoptosis of SKOV3 cells and suppressed tumor growth without any significant adverse effect in the SKOV3-bearing mouse model. Dieckol triggered the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and pretreatment with caspase inhibitors neutralized the pro-apoptotic activity of dieckol. Furthermore, treatment with dieckol caused mitochondrial dysfunction and suppressed the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins. We further demonstrated that dieckol induced an increase in intracellular ROS, and the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly reversed the caspase activation, cytochrome c release, Bcl-2 downregulation, and apoptosis that were caused by dieckol. Moreover, dieckol inhibited the activity of AKT and p38, and overexpression of AKT and p38, at least in part, reversed dieckol-induced apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. These data suggest that dieckol suppresses ovarian cancer cell growth by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis via ROS production and the regulation of AKT and p38 signaling.

  4. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  5. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05) and increase animal survival (p<0.05) in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001), increase survival (p<0.001), and increase diffusion (p<0.01) and perfusion rates (p<0.05). OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9)-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05)], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05) and microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05) and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) (p<0.05) immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05) in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  6. Influence of cellular radiation sensitivity on local tumor control of human melanoma xenografts given fractionated radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.

    1991-09-01

    The radiocurability of human melanoma xenografts was studied by treating tumors with multiple fractions of 2.0 Gy and using local tumor control at 180 days as end point. Three melanoma lines (E. F., G. E., M. F.) that are only weakly immunogenic in athymic nude mice (BALB/c-nu/nu/BOM) were selected for the study. The tumor radiocurability was found to differ considerably among the lines; the radiation doses required to achieve local control of 50% of the tumors irradiated (TCD50s; mean {plus minus} SE) were 85.0 {plus minus} 4.7 Gy (E.F.), 60.3 {plus minus} 5.4 Gy (G.E.), and 99.3 {plus minus} 5.7more » Gy (M. F.). The radiation sensitivity in vitro of cells isolated directly from tumors also differed significantly among the lines. The TCD50 showed positive correlations with the surviving fraction after 2.0 Gy in vitro, the surviving fraction after two doses of 2.0 Gy (4-h interval) in vitro, and the surviving fraction after 4.0 Gy at a low dose rate (1.25 cGy/min) in vitro. Thus, the differences in tumor radiocurability among the lines were mainly a consequence of cellular differences in the capacity to repair radiation damage. Comparisons of measured TCD50s with theoretical TCD50s, calculated from cell-surviving fractions measured in vitro after radiation treatment in vitro or in vivo, suggested that other tumor parameters, e.g., rate of population between radiation fractions, also had a significant impact on the TCD50. However, this study strongly supports the assumptions that the surviving fraction at 2.0 Gy in vitro is a useful parameter for prediction of clinical tumor radiocurability.« less

  7. Functional Characterization of VEGF- and FGF-induced Tumor Blood Vessel Models in Human Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yusaku; Ito, Ken; Hamamichi, Shusei; Ozawa, Yoichi; Matsui, Junji; Umeda, Izumi O; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2017-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and/or fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays an important role in tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. However, the characteristics of tumor vessels derived from these angiogenic factors have not been fully explored. To functionally examine tumor vessels, we developed in vivo VEGF- and FGF-induced tumor blood vessel models. We performed immunohistochemistry and Hoechst perfusion assay to elucidate histopathological differences between the derived tumor vessels. To kinetically understand tumor perfusion, we employed radiolabeled PEGylated liposomes. While tumor vessel density was substantially increased by enhanced expression levels of VEGF and FGF, permeability of VEGF-driven tumor vessels was significantly higher than that of FGF-driven ones, the latter demonstrating an increased number of pericyte-covered vessels. Accordingly, we observed an increased tumor retention of the PEGylated liposomes in the VEGF-driven tumor. Our in vivo models of tumor vessel demonstrate the frequency of pericyte coverage and tumor perfusion levels as major functional differences between VEGF- and FGF-driven tumor vessels. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Complete elimination of colorectal tumor xenograft by combined manganese superoxide dismutase with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand gene virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Gu, Jinfa; Zhao, Lili; He, Lingfeng; Qian, Wenbin; Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Yigang; Qian, Qijun; Qian, Cheng; Wu, Jian; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2006-04-15

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a latent tumor suppressor gene. To investigate the therapeutic effect of MnSOD and its mechanisms, a replication-competent recombinant adenovirus with E1B 55-kDa gene deletion (ZD55) was constructed, and human MnSOD and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) genes were inserted to form ZD55-MnSOD and ZD55-TRAIL. ZD55-MnSOD exhibited an inhibition in tumor cell growth approximately 1,000-fold greater than Ad-MnSOD. ZD55-TRAIL was shown to induce the MnSOD expression in SW620 cells. Accordingly, by the combined use of ZD55-MnSOD with ZD55-TRAIL (i.e., "dual gene virotherapy"), all established colorectal tumor xenografts were completely eliminated in nude mice. The evidence exists that the MnSOD overexpression led to a slower tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo as a result of apoptosis caused by MnSOD and TRAIL overexpression after adenoviral transduction. Our results showed that the production of hydrogen peroxide derived from MnSOD dismutation activated caspase-8, which might down-regulate Bcl-2 expression and induce Bax translocation to mitochondria. Subsequently, Bax translocation enhanced the release of apoptosis-initiating factor and cytochrome c. Cytochrome c finally triggered apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3 in apoptotic cascade. Bax-mediated apoptosis seems to be dependent on caspase-8 activation because the inhibition of caspase-8 prevented Bid processing and Bax translocation. In conclusion, our dual gene virotherapy completely eliminated colorectal tumor xenografts via enhanced apoptosis, and this novel strategy points toward a new direction of cancer treatment.

  10. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. METHODS: A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group [10 mg/(kg·d)], fluoxetine group [10 mg/(kg·d)] and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). RESULTS: Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 ± 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 ± 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F(2,12) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F(2,18) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 ± 2.1 vs 7.1 ± 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  11. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-07-21

    To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group (10 mg/kg per day), fluoxetine group (10 mg/kg per day) and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 +/- 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 +/- 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F( (2,12) ) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F( (2,18) ) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 +/- 2.1 vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  12. The Impact of the Low Molecular Weight Heparin Tinzaparin on the Sensitization of Cisplatin-Resistant Ovarian Cancers-Preclinical In Vivo Evaluation in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Thomas; Pfankuchen, Daniel Bastian; Wantoch von Rekowski, Kathleen; Schlesinger, Martin; Reipsch, Franziska; Bendas, Gerd

    2017-05-03

    Resistance formation of tumors against chemotherapeutics is the major obstacle in clinical cancer therapy. Although low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an important component in oncology referring to guideline-based antithrombotic prophylaxis of tumor patients, a potential interference of LMWH with chemoresistance is unknown. We have recently shown that LMWH reverses the cisplatin resistance of A2780cis human ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Here we address the question whether this LMWH effect is also valid under in vivo conditions. Therefore, we established tumor xenografts of A2780 and cisplatin resistant A2780cis cells in nude mice and investigated the impact of daily tinzaparin applications (10 mg/kg BW) on anti-tumor activity of cisplatin (6 mg/kg BW, weekly) considering the tumor growth kinetics. Intratumoral platinum accumulation was detected by GF-AAS. Xenografts of A2780 and A2780cis cells strongly differed in cisplatin sensitivity. As an overall consideration, tinzaparin co-treatment affected the response to cisplatin of A2780cis, but not A2780 tumors in the later experimental time range. A subgroup analysis confirmed that initially smaller A2780cis tumors benefit from tinzaparin, but also small A2780 xenografts. Tinzaparin did not affect cisplatin accumulation in A2780cis xenografts, but strongly increased the platinum content in A2780, obviously related to morphological differences in both xenografts. Although we cannot directly confirm a return of A2780cis cisplatin resistance by tinzaparin, as shown in vitro, the present findings give reason to discuss heparin effects on cytostatic drug efficiency for small tumors and warrants further investigation.

  13. Capsaicin enhances the antitumor activity of sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma cells and mouse xenograft tumors through increased ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su-Shan; Ni, Yu-Hao; Zhao, Chen-Ru; Qiao, Zhen; Yu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Lu-Yao; Sun, Jin-Yan; Du, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Hao; Dong, Li-Ying; Wang, KeWei; Gao, Jian-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Sorafenib, a small inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, is currently the standard chemotherapy drug for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although sorafenib improves the survival of HCC patients, its efficacy is not optimal and requires further improvement. Capsaicin, the major active component of chili peppers from the genus Capsicum, is not only the agonist of TRPV1 channel, but also displays antitumor activity and enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of combined sorafenib and capsaicin on HCC cells in vitro and xenograft tumors. Treatment with capsaicin alone dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of the HCC cell lines PLC/PRF/7, HuH7 and HepG2 with IC 50 values of 137, 108 and 140.7 μmol/L, respectively. No obvious expression of TRPV1 channel was detected in the 3 HCC cell lines and TRPV1 channel blockers did not alleviate the cytotoxicity of capsaicin. By contrast, combining capsaicin and sorafenib significantly enhanced the suppression on cell proliferation, achieving a high-level synergistic effect (inhibition rates over 50%) and promoting HCC cell apoptosis. In nude mice with PLC/PRF/5 xenografts, combined administration of capsaicin and sorafenib significantly enhanced the suppression on tumor growth without apparent gross toxicity compared to either agent alone. Mechanistically, capsaicin (10-200 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the levels of phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) in PLC/PRF/5 cells, thus leading to enhanced sorafenib sensitivity and a synergistic suppression on the tumor cells. Taken together, our results suggest that capsaicin-increased phosphorylation of ERK contributes to the enhanced antitumor activity of sorafenib, and capsaicin may be useful in improving the efficacy of sorafenib for the treatment of HCC.

  14. Cisplatin and photodynamic therapy exert synergistic inhibitory effects on small-cell lung cancer cell viability and xenograft tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, You-Shuang; Peng, Yin-Bo; Yao, Min; Teng, Ji-Ping; Ni, Da; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Zhuang, Bu-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Yin

    2017-06-03

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer that shows an overall 5-year survival rate below 10%. Although chemotherapy using cisplatin has been proven effective in SCLC treatment, conventional dose of cisplatin causes adverse side effects. Photodynamic therapy, a form of non-ionizing radiation therapy, is increasingly used alone or in combination with other therapeutics in cancer treatment. Herein, we aimed to address whether low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can effectively induce SCLC cell death by using in vitro cultured human SCLC NCI-H446 cells and in vivo tumor xenograft model. We found that both cisplatin and PDT showed dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in NCI-H446 cells. Importantly, co-treatment with low dose cisplatin (1 μM) and PDT (1.25 J/cm 2 ) synergistically inhibited cell viability and cell migration. We further showed that the combined therapy induced a higher level of intracellular ROS in cultured NCI-H446 cells. Moreover, the synergistic effect by cisplatin and PDT was recapitulated in tumor xenograft as revealed by a more robust increase in the staining of TUNEL (a marker of cell death) and decrease in tumor volume. Taken together, our findings suggest that low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can be an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of SCLC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined magnetic resonance and optical imaging of head and neck tumor xenografts using Gadolinium-labelled phosphorescent polymeric nanomicelles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The overall objective of this study was to develop a nanoparticle formulation for dual modality imaging of head and neck cancer. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of polymeric phospholipid-based nanomicelles encapsulating near-infrared (NIR) phosphorescent molecules of Pt(II)-tetraphenyltetranaphthoporphyrin [Pt(TPNP)] and surface functionalized with gadolinium [Pt(TPNP)-Gd] for combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and NIR optical imaging applications. Methods Dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy and MR relaxometric measurements were performed to characterize the optical and magnetic properties of nanoparticles in vitro. Subsequently, in vivo imaging experiments were carried out using nude mice bearing primary patient tumor-derived human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts. Results The nanomicelles were ~100 nm in size and stable in aqueous suspension. T1-weighted MRI and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) measurements carried out at 4.7 T revealed enhancement in the tumor immediately post injection with nanomicelles, particularly in the tumor periphery which persisted up to 24 hours post administration. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs) generated from 3D T1-weighted images also demonstrated visible enhancement in contrast within the tumor, liver and blood vessels. NIR optical imaging performed (in vivo and ex vivo) following completion of MRI at the 24 h time point confirmed tumor localization of the nanoparticles. The large spectral separation between the Pt(TPNP) absorption (~700 nm) and phosphorescence emission (~900 nm) provided a dramatic decrease in the level of background, resulting in high contrast optical (NIR phosphorescence) imaging. Conclusions In conclusion, Pt(TPNP)-Gd nanomicelles exhibit a high degree of tumor-avidity and favorable imaging properties that allow for combined MR and optical imaging of head and neck tumors. Further investigation into the potential of Pt

  16. Mapping water exchange rates in rat tumor xenografts using the late-stage uptake following bolus injections of contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Colleen; Moosvi, Firas; Stanisz, Greg J

    2014-05-01

    To map the intra-to-extracellular water exchange rate constant in rat xenografts using a two-compartment model of relaxation with water exchange and a range of contrast agent concentrations and compare with histology. MDA-MB-231 cells were xenografted into six nude rats. Three bolus injections of gadodiamide were administered. When uptake in the tumor demonstrated a steady-state, T1 data were acquired by spoiled gradient recalled acquisitions at four flip angles. A global fit of data to a two-compartment model incorporating exchange was performed, assuming a distribution volume of 20% of the rat. Voxels that did not reach steady-state and were excluded from parametric maps tended to be in large necrotic areas. TUNEL-negative (nonapoptotic) regions tended to have well-defined error bounds, with an average intra-to-extracellular exchange rate constant of 0.6 s(-1) . Apoptotic regions had higher exchange, but poorly determined upper bounds, with goodness of fit similar to that for a model assuming infinitely fast exchange. A lower bound of >3 s(-1) was used to establish voxels where the exchange rate constant was fast despite a large upper bound. Water exchange rates were higher in apoptotic regions, but examination of statistical errors was an important step in the mapping process. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Targeted tumor theranostics using folate-conjugated and camptothecin-loaded acoustic nanodroplets in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Lin, Jian-Liang; Wang, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Ran-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to validate the feasibility of receptor-targeted tumor theranostics with folate-conjugated (FA) and camptothecin-loaded (CPT) acoustic nanodroplets (NDs) (collectively termed FA-CPT-NDs). The ND formulation was based on lipid-stabilized low-boiling perfluorocarbon that can undergo acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under ultrasound (US) exposure. Conjugation of folate enhanced the selective delivery to tumors expressing high levels of folate receptor (FR) under mediation by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed using FR-positive KB and FR-negative HT-1080 cell lines and mouse xenograft tumor models. Simultaneous therapy and imaging were conducted with a clinical US imaging system at mechanical indices of up to 1.4 at a center frequency of 10 MHz. The results demonstrated that FA-CPT-NDs selectively attached to KB cells, but not HT-1080 cells. The targeted ADV caused instant and delayed damage via mechanical disruption and chemical toxicity to decrease the viability of KB cells by up to 45%, a much higher decrease than that achieved by the NDs without folate conjugation. The in vivo experiments showed that FR-mediated targeting successfully enhanced the EPR of FA-CPT-NDs in KB tumors mainly on the tumor periphery as indicated by immunofluorescence microscopy and US B-mode imaging. Treatments with FA-CPT-NDs at a CPT dose of 50 μg/kg inhibited the growth of KB tumors for up to six weeks, whereas treatment with NDs lacking folate produced a 4.6-fold increase in tumor volume. For HT-1080 tumors, neither the treatments with FA-CPT-NDs nor those with the NDs lacking folate presented tumor growth inhibition. In summary, FR-targeted tumor theranostics has been successfully implemented with FA-CPT-NDs and a clinical US unit. The ligand-directed and EPR-mediated accumulation provides active and passive targeting capabilities, permitting the antitumor effects of FA-CPT-NDs to be exerted

  18. Genotyping of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in a panel of human tumor xenografts: relationship between genotype status, NQO1 activity and the response of xenografts to Mitomycin C chemotherapy in vivo(1).

    PubMed

    Phillips, R M; Burger, A M; Fiebig, H H; Double, J A

    2001-11-15

    Pharmacogenetic analysis of polymorphisms in drug metabolizing enzymes is currently generating considerable interest as a means of individualizing patient therapy. Recent studies have suggested that patients that are homozygous for a polymorphic variant (a C to T transition at position 609 of the cDNA sequence) of the enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) may be resistant to Mitomycin C (MMC). Genotyping of a panel of 54 human tumor xenografts by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), classified tumors as wild type (40/54), heterozygotes (11/54), and homozygous mutants (3/54). Previously, 37 of these tumors had been characterized in terms of their response to MMC in vivo, and in this study, a further nine tumor xenografts have been characterized in terms of their response to MMC. No correlation could be found between the NQO1 polymorphic status of xenografts and their response to MMC in vivo. In terms of genotype/phenotype relationships, NQO1 activity in tumors genotyped as wild type, heterozygotes, and homozygous mutants were 311.1 +/- 421.9 (N = 40), 76.9 +/- 109.5 (N = 11), and 0.2 +/- 0.17 (N = 3) nmol/min/mg, respectively. Genotyping of patients may provide a useful initial step in identifying patients who are unlikely to benefit from quinone-based chemotherapy. In the case of MMC, however, the work presented here demonstrates that genotyping of individuals with respect to NQO1 is unlikely to be beneficial in terms of predicting tumor responses to MMC.

  19. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K.; Siddik, Zahid H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT) relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC). When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin), proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1) and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF), all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3) in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity. PMID:29311914

  20. Continuous inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation by erlotinib enhances antitumor activity of chemotherapy in erlotinib-resistant tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    IWAI, TOSHIKI; MORIYA, YOICHIRO; SHIRANE, MASATOSHI; FUJIMOTO-OUCHI, KAORI; MORI, KAZUSHIGE

    2012-01-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to have benefits for non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer patients; however, almost all patients develop progressive disease during the therapy. On the other hand, it has been reported that a tumor continues to express epidermal growth factor receptor even after developing progressive disease. To demonstrate the clinical relevance of erlotinib treatment after progressive disease, we investigated whether continuous administration of erlotinib in combination with chemotherapy has a useful effect on progressive disease development during erlotinib treatment. For this purpose, we examined the antitumor effect of a combination therapy of a chemotherapeutic agent with erlotinib using two types of erlotinib-resistant tumor xenograft models: a non-small cell lung cancer model, in which EBC-1, H1975 and HCC827TR3 tumors were implanted, and an HPAC pancreatic cancer cell xenograft which generates erlotinib-resistant tumors in vivo. As a result, the combination therapy showed a significantly higher antitumor activity compared with chemomonotherapy in all xenograft models except the H1975 xenografts. Furthermore, erlotinib alone suppressed the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor in HPAC tumors and the two non-small cell lung cancer cell lines other than H1975. Therefore, combination therapy which uses erlotinib can be considered effective if epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation is inhibited by erlotinib, even in erlotinib-resistant tumor xenograft models. Our results suggest that the continuous inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation by erlotinib after progressive disease enhances the antitumor activity of chemotherapy. PMID:22209766

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of human cervical carcinoma xenografts: pharmacokinetic analysis and correlation to tumor histomorphology.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A M; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers that can predict the outcome of treatment accurately are needed for treatment individualization in advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was investigated in the present preclinical study. CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts were subjected to DCE-MRI at 1.5T using a spatial resolution of 0.23×0.47×2.0mm(3). Parametric images of K(trans) (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v(e) (the extravascular extracellular volume fraction) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data and compared with the histomorphology of the imaged tissue. Analysis of small homogeneous tumor regions showed that K(trans), but not v(e), differed significantly between parenchymal tissue, connective tissue, and necrotic tissue, consistent with the vascularity of these compartments. However, strong correlations between K(trans) and the fractional volume of the compartments could not be detected for larger tumor regions, primarily because the majority of the voxels represented a chaotic mixture of parenchymal, connective, and necrotic tissue. The potential of DCE-MRI in providing detailed information on the histomorphology of cervical carcinoma is limited, mainly because the tumor tissue shows significant morphological heterogeneity at the subvoxel level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogel-based 3D model of patient-derived prostate xenograft tumors suitable for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Fong, Eliza L S; Martinez, Mariane; Yang, Jun; Mikos, Antonios G; Navone, Nora M; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2014-07-07

    The lack of effective therapies for bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) underscores the need for accurate models of the disease to enable the discovery of new therapeutic targets and to test drug sensitivities of individual tumors. To this end, the patient-derived xenograft (PDX) PCa model using immunocompromised mice was established to model the disease with greater fidelity than is possible with currently employed cell lines grown on tissue culture plastic. However, poorly adherent PDX tumor cells exhibit low viability in standard culture, making it difficult to manipulate these cells for subsequent controlled mechanistic studies. To overcome this challenge, we encapsulated PDX tumor cells within a three-dimensional hyaluronan-based hydrogel and demonstrated that the hydrogel maintains PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression. Furthermore, a differential sensitivity to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug, was observed as compared to a traditional PCa cell line. These findings underscore the potential impact of this novel 3D PDX PCa model as a diagnostic platform for rapid drug evaluation and ultimately push personalized medicine toward clinical reality.

  3. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies of a porphyrin dimer photosensitizer (Oxdime) by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy in mice bearing xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mamta; Ulrich, Sébastien; Kim, Anthony; Moriyama, Yumi; Netchev, George; Akens, Margarete K; Anderson, Harry L; Wilson, Brian C

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we present a study of the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a butadiyne-linked conjugated porphyrin dimer (Oxdime) designed to have high near-infrared (NIR) 2-photon absorption cross-section for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Changes in biodistribution over time were monitored in mice carrying B16-F10 melanoma xenografts, following intravenous injection. Using fluorescence imaging of live animals and analyzing isolated organs ex vivo at different time points between 30 min and 24 h after injection, accumulation of Oxdime was measured in several organs (heart, kidney and liver) and in tumor. The concentration in the plasma was about 5-10 times higher than in other tissues. The fluorescence signal peaked at 3-12 h after injection in most tissues, including the tumor and the plasma. The change in the fluorescence emission spectrum of the sensitizer over time was also monitored and a shift in the maximum from 800 to 740 nm was observed over 24 h, showing that the Oxdime is metabolized. Significant quantities accumulated in the tumor, indicating that this PDT sensitizer may be promising for cancer treatment. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    PubMed

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  5. Biodistribution and safety assessment of bladder cancer specific recombinant oncolytic adenovirus in subcutaneous xenografts tumor model in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Zhiping; Tian, Hongwei; Qi, Meijiao; Zhai, Zhenxing; Li, Shuwen; Li, Renju; Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Wenyun; Fu, Shenjun; Lu, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Ronald; Guo, Yinglu; Zhou, Liqun

    2012-04-01

    The previous works about safety evaluation for constructed bladder tissue specific adenovirus are poorly documented. Thus, we investigated the biodistribution and body toxicity of bladder specific oncolytic adenovirus Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A (APU-E1A) and Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A-AR (APU-E1A-AR), providing meaningful information prior to embarking on human clinical trials. Conditionally replicate recombinant adenovirus (CRADs) APU-E1A, APU-EIA-AR were constructed with bladder tissue specific UroplakinII(UPII) promoter to induce the expression of Ad5E1A gene and E1A-AR fusing gene, and PSCAE was inserted at upstream of promoter to enhance the function of promoter. Based on the cytopathic and anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer, these CRADs were intratumorally injected into subcutaneous xenografts tumor in nude mice. We then determined the toxicity through general health and behavioral assessment, hepatic and hematological toxicity evaluation, macroscopic and microscopic postmortem analyses. The spread of the transgene E1A of adenovirus was detected with RT-PCR and Western blot. Virus replication and distribution were examined with APU-LUC administration and Luciferase Assay. General assessment and body weight of the animals did not reveal any alteration in general behavior. The hematological alterations of groups which were injected with 5x10(8) pfu or higher dose (5x10(9) pfu) of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR showed no difference in comparison with PBS group, and only slight increased transaminases in contrast to PBS group at 5x10(9) pfu of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR were observed. E1A transgene did not disseminate to organs outside of xenograft tumor. Virus replication was not detected in other organs beside tumor according to Luciferase Assay. Our study showed that recombinant adenovirus APU-E1A-AR and APU-E1A appear safe with 5x10(7) pfu and 5x10(8) pfu intratumorally injection in mice, without any discernable effects on general health and behavior.

  6. Oxygen-dependent regulation of tumor growth and metastasis in human breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yttersian Sletta, Kristine; Lu, Ning; Engelsen, Agnete S. T.; Reed, Rolf K.; Garmann-Johnsen, Annette; Stuhr, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is relevant for tumor growth, metabolism, resistance to chemotherapy and metastasis. We have previously shown that hyperoxia, using hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), attenuates tumor growth and shifts the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET) in the DMBA-induced mammary tumor model. This study describes the effect of HBOT on tumor growth, angiogenesis, chemotherapy efficacy and metastasis in a triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer model, and evaluates tumor growth using a triple positive BT-474 breast cancer model. Materials and methods 5 x 105 cancer cells were injected s.c. in the groin area of NOD/SCID female mice. The BT-474 group was supplied with Progesterone and Estradiol pellets 2-days prior to tumor cell injection. Mice were divided into controls (1 bar, pO2 = 0.2 bar) or HBOT (2.5 bar, pO2 = 2.5 bar, 90 min, every third day until termination of the experiments). Treatment effects were determined by assessment of tumor growth, proliferation (Ki67-staining), angiogenesis (CD31-staining), metastasis (immunostaining), EMT markers (western blot), stromal components collagen type I, Itgb1 and FSP1 (immunostaining) and chemotherapeutic efficacy (5FU). Results HBOT significantly suppressed tumor growth in both the triple positive and negative tumors, and both MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 showed a decrease in proliferation after HBOT. No differences were found in angiogenesis or 5FU efficacy between HBOT and controls. Nevertheless, HBOT significantly reduced both numbers and total area of the metastastatic lesions, as well as reduced expression of N-cadherin, Axl and collagen type I measured in the MDA-MB-231 model. No change in stromal Itgb1 and FSP1 was found in either tumor model. Conclusion Despite the fact that behavior and prognosis of the triple positive and negative subtypes of cancer are different, the HBOT had a similar suppressive effect on tumor growth, indicating that they share a common oxygen dependent anti-tumor

  7. Predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of tumor growth after administration of an anti-angiogenic agent, bevacizumab, as single-agent and combination therapy in tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Maurizio; Germani, Massimiliano; Del Bene, Francesca; Poggesi, Italo; Magni, Paolo; Pesenti, Enrico; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models able to predict the action of anticancer compounds in tumor xenografts have an important impact on drug development. In case of anti-angiogenic compounds, many of the available models show difficulties in their applications, as they are based on a cell kill hypothesis, while these drugs act on the tumor vascularization, without a direct tumor cell kill effect. For this reason, a PK-PD model able to describe the tumor growth modulation following treatment with a cytostatic therapy, as opposed to a cytotoxic treatment, is proposed here. Untreated tumor growth was described using an exponential growth phase followed by a linear one. The effect of anti-angiogenic compounds was implemented using an inhibitory effect on the growth function. The model was tested on a number of experiments in tumor-bearing mice given the anti-angiogenic drug bevacizumab either alone or in combination with another investigational compound. Nonlinear regression techniques were used for estimating the model parameters. The model successfully captured the tumor growth data following different bevacizumab dosing regimens, allowing to estimate experiment-independent parameters. A combination model was also developed under a 'no-interaction' assumption to assess the effect of the combination of bevacizumab with a target-oriented agent. The observation of a significant difference between model-predicted and observed tumor growth curves was suggestive of the presence of a pharmacological interaction that was further accommodated into the model. This approach can be used for optimizing the design of preclinical experiments. With all the inherent limitations, the estimated experiment-independent model parameters can be used to provide useful indications for the single-agent and combination regimens to be explored in the subsequent development phases.

  8. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showedmore » that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.« less

  9. Folate-linked lipid-based nanoparticles for synthetic siRNA delivery in KB tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Takashi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hakoshima, Motoki; Koga, Kimiko; Maitani, Yoshie

    2008-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism triggered by synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA), and is utilized in a wide range of fields including cancer gene therapy by down-regulating a specific target protein. In this study, for tumor-targeted siRNA delivery, we developed a folate-linked nanoparticle (NP-F), and evaluated the potential of NP-F-mediated tumor gene therapy in human nasopharyngeal KB cells, which overexpressed folate receptor (FR). NP-F was composed of cholesteryl-3beta-carboxyamidoethylene-N-hydroxyethylamine (OH-Chol), Tween 80 and folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (f-PEG(2000)-DSPE), and NP-P was substituted f-PEG(2000)-DSPE in NP-F PEG(2000)-DSPE for a non-targeting nanoparticle. The NP-F and siRNA complex (nanoplex) formed at a charge ratio (+/-) of 2/1 in the presence of 5mM NaCl was injectable size and increased transfection efficiency in the cells. NP-F showed a significantly higher intracellular amount of siRNA and stronger localization of siRNA in the cytoplasm than NP-P. When Her-2 siRNA was transfected into cells by NP-F and NP-P, NP-F significantly inhibited tumor growth, and selectively suppressed Her-2 protein expression more than NP-P. In in vivo gene therapy, a NP-F nanoplex of Her-2 siRNA by intratumoral injection significantly inhibited tumor growth of KB xenografts compared with control siRNA, but a NP-P nanoplex did not. These results of the experiments have provided optimal conditions to form folate-linked nanoparticle complexes with siRNA for folate-targeted gene therapy.

  10. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Hernán Pérez de la Ossa, Dolores; Lorente, Mar; Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Torres, Sofía; García-Taboada, Elena; Aberturas, María Del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús; Velasco, Guillermo; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w) of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  11. Local Delivery of Cannabinoid-Loaded Microparticles Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Torres, Sofía; García-Taboada, Elena; Aberturas, María del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) – the two major ingredients of marijuana – have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1∶1 w:w) of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies. PMID:23349970

  12. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American

  13. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor IPI-504 induces KIT degradation, tumor shrinkage, and cell proliferation arrest in xenograft models of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Floris, Giuseppe; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Stefan, Cristiana; Normant, Emmanuel; Faa, Gavino; Machiels, Kathleen; Vanleeuw, Ulla; Sciot, Raf; Schöffski, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    The activity of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is crucial for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) growth and survival. Imatinib and sunitinib are very effective in advanced GIST, but have no curative potential. The observation that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibition results in KIT degradation prompted us to assess the efficacy of the HSP90 inhibitor retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504) alone or in combination with imatinib or sunitinib in two GIST xenografts with distinctive KIT mutations. Nude mice were grafted with human GIST carrying KIT exon 13 (GIST-882; n = 59) or exon 11 (GIST-PSW; n = 44) mutations and dosed with imatinib (50 mg/kg twice daily), sunitinib (40 mg/kg once daily), IPI-504 (100 mg/kg 3 times per week), IPI-504 + imatinib, or IPI-504 + sunitinib. We evaluated tumor volume, proliferation and apoptosis, KIT expression and activation, as well as adverse events during treatment. Treatment with IPI-504 alone resulted in tumor regression, proliferation arrest, and induction of tumor necrosis. We documented downregulation of KIT and its signaling cascade in IPI-504-treated animals. Treatment effects were enhanced by combining IPI-504 with imatinib or sunitinib. On histologic examination, liver damage was frequently observed in animals exposed to combination treatments. In conclusion, IPI-504 shows consistent antitumor activity and induces KIT downregulation in GIST, as a single agent, and is more potent in combination with imatinib or sunitinib. The sequence of drug administration in the combination arms warrants further studies.

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides

  15. Intermittent Metronomic Drug Schedule Is Essential for Activating Antitumor Innate Immunity and Tumor Xenograft Regression12

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Sheng; Doloff, Joshua C; Waxman, David J

    2014-01-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CPA) is widely associated with antiangiogenesis; however, recent studies implicate other immune-based mechanisms, including antitumor innate immunity, which can induce major tumor regression in implanted brain tumor models. This study demonstrates the critical importance of drug schedule: CPA induced a potent antitumor innate immune response and tumor regression when administered intermittently on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule but not with the same total exposure to activated CPA administered on an every 3-day schedule or using a daily oral regimen that serves as the basis for many clinical trials of metronomic chemotherapy. Notably, the more frequent metronomic CPA schedules abrogated the antitumor innate immune and therapeutic responses. Further, the innate immune response and antitumor activity both displayed an unusually steep dose-response curve and were not accompanied by antiangiogenesis. The strong recruitment of innate immune cells by the 6-day repeating CPA schedule was not sustained, and tumor regression was abolished, by a moderate (25%) reduction in CPA dose. Moreover, an ∼20% increase in CPA dose eliminated the partial tumor regression and weak innate immune cell recruitment seen in a subset of the every 6-day treated tumors. Thus, metronomic drug treatment must be at a sufficiently high dose but also sufficiently well spaced in time to induce strong sustained antitumor immune cell recruitment. Many current clinical metronomic chemotherapeutic protocols employ oral daily low-dose schedules that do not meet these requirements, suggesting that they may benefit from optimization designed to maximize antitumor immune responses. PMID:24563621

  16. FASN Inhibition and Taxane Treatment Combine to Enhance Anti-tumor Efficacy in Diverse Xenograft Tumor Models through Disruption of Tubulin Palmitoylation and Microtubule Organization and FASN Inhibition-Mediated Effects on Oncogenic Signaling and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Timothy S; Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George

    2017-02-01

    Palmitate, the enzymatic product of FASN, and palmitate-derived lipids support cell metabolism, membrane architecture, protein localization, and intracellular signaling. Tubulins are among many proteins that are modified post-translationally by acylation with palmitate. We show that FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 or TVB-3664 significantly reduces tubulin palmitoylation and mRNA expression. Disrupted microtubule organization in tumor cells is an additional consequence of FASN inhibition. FASN inhibition combined with taxane treatment enhances inhibition of in vitro tumor cell growth compared to treatment with either agent alone. In lung, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic tumor xenograft studies, FASN inhibition and paclitaxel or docetaxel combine to inhibit xenograft tumor growth with significantly enhanced anti-tumor activity. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 6 tumor xenograft models. FASN inhibition does not affect cellular taxane concentration in vitro. Our data suggest a mechanism of enhanced anti-tumor activity of the FASN and taxane drug combination that includes inhibition of tubulin palmitoylation and disruption of microtubule organization in tumor cells, as well as a sensitization of tumor cells to FASN inhibition-mediated effects that include gene expression changes and inhibition of β-catenin. Together, the results strongly support investigation of combined FASN inhibition and taxane treatment as a therapy for a variety of human cancers. Copyright © 2016 3-V Biosciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gynura divaricata attenuates tumor growth and tumor relapse after cisplatin therapy in HCC xenograft model through suppression of cancer stem cell growth and Wnt/β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chia-Hung; Lai, Chi-Chung; Shia, Tsu-Hsiang; Chen, Marcelo; Yu, Hsin-Che; Liu, Yu-Peng; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2018-03-01

    Gynura divaricata subsp. formosana is a widely used traditional herbal medicine for treating liver disorders such as hepatitis and liver cancer in Taiwan. This study was aimed to evaluate the anti-cancer and cancer stabilization effect of water extract of the aerial part of G. divaricata (GD extract) both in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative effects of GD extract alone and in combination with cisplatin were determined by alamarBlue and clonogenic assay. Cancer stem cell (CSC) inhibition and the expression of CSC markers were revealed by sphere formation assay and real-time PCR (qPCR). The in vivo anti-cancer effect of GD extract was evaluated in Huh7 xenograft mice model and Ki-67 expression were also measured. The activity of Wnt signalling and the expression level of Wnt target genes and β-catenin were determined by luciferase reporter assay, qPCR, immunoblotting and IHC. Moderate cytotoxicity of GD extract in liver cancer cells was observed. GD extract sensitized Huh7 cells to cisplatin treatment. Interestingly, GD extract inhibited cancer sphere formation and reduced the expression of CSC markers. Importantly, GD extract suppressed Huh7 tumor growth, Ki-67 expression and prolonged the anti-liver cancer effect of cisplatin in vivo. Treatment of GD extract resulted in reductions of Wnt reporter activity and the expression of Wnt target genes. Moreover, suppression of β-catenin were observed in both GD extract treated Huh7 spheres and xenograft tumors. Accordingly, our findings suggest that G. divaricata may target liver CSC by suppressing the Wnt pathway and the combination of G. divaricata and cisplatin could be a candidate regimen for treating HCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. [Establishment of a human bladder cancer cell line stably co-expressing hSPRY2 and luciferase genes and its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Jin, Yipeng; Yin, Zhaoyang; Qi, Siyong; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Yu, Jiyun; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-01

    Objective To establish a human bladder cancer cell line stably co-expressing human sprouty2 (hSPRY2) and luciferase (Luc) genes simultaneously, and develop its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice. Methods The hSPRY2 and Luc gene segments were amplified by PCR, and were cloned into lentiviral vector pCDH and pLVX respectively to produce corresponding lentivirus particles. The J82 human bladder cancer cells were infected with these two kinds of lentivirus particles, and then further screened by puromycin and G418. The expressions of hSPRY2 and Luc genes were detected by bioluminescence, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. The screened J82-hSPRY2/Luc cells were injected subcutaneously into BALB/c nude mice, and the growth of tumor was monitored dynamically using in vivo fluorescence imaging system. Results J82-hSPRY2/Luc cell line stably expressing hSPRY2 and Luc genes was established successfully. Bioluminescence, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis validated the expressions of hSPRY2 and Luc genes. The in vivo fluorescence imaging system showed obvious fluorescence in subcutaneous tumor xenograft in nude mice. Conclusion The J82-hSPRY2/Luc bladder cancer cell line and its subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice have been established successfully.

  19. FXR Controls the Tumor Suppressor NDRG2 and FXR Agonists Reduce Liver Tumor Growth and Metastasis in an Orthotopic Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Schüler, Julia; Schulz, Andreas; Schlüter, Thomas; Kinzel, Olaf; Abel, Ulrich; Kremoser, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is expressed predominantly in tissues exposed to high levels of bile acids and controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis. FXR−/− mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and show an increased prevalence for intestinal malignancies, suggesting a role of FXR as a tumor suppressor in enterohepatic tissues. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene, which is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and many other malignancies. We show reduced NDRG2 mRNA in livers of FXR−/− mice compared to wild type mice and both, FXR and NDRG2 mRNAs, are reduced in human HCC compared to normal liver. Gene reporter assays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation data support that FXR directly controls NDRG2 transcription via IR1-type element(s) identified in the first introns of the human, mouse and rat NDRG2 genes. NDRG2 mRNA was induced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in livers of mice and the magnitude of induction of NDRG2 mRNA in three different human hepatoma cell lines was increased when ectopically expressing human FXR. Growth and metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells was strongly reduced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in an orthotopic liver xenograft tumor model. Ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep1 cells reduced tumor growth and metastasis potential of corresponding cells and increased the anti-tumor efficacy of FXR agonists, which may be partly mediated via increased NDRG2 expression. FXR agonists may show a potential in the prevention and/or treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma, a devastating malignancy with increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options. PMID:23056173

  20. Antitumor activity of erlotinib (OSI-774, Tarceva) alone or in combination in human non-small cell lung cancer tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Brian; Kolinsky, Kenneth; Smith, Melissa; Beck, Gordon; Rashed, Mohammad; Adames, Violeta; Linn, Michael; Wheeldon, Eric; Gand, Laurent; Birnboeck, Herbert; Hoffmann, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    Our objective was the preclinical assessment of the pharmacokinetics, monotherapy and combined antitumor activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1/EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in athymic nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft models. Immunohistochemistry determined the HER1/EGFR status of the NSCLC tumor models. Pharmacokinetic studies assessed plasma drug concentrations of erlotinib in tumor- and non-tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. These were followed by maximum tolerated dose (MTD) studies for erlotinib and each chemotherapy. Erlotinib was then assessed alone and in combination with these chemotherapies in the NSCLC xenograft models. Complete necropsies were performed on most of the animals in each study to further assess antitumor or toxic effects. Erlotinib monotherapy dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth in the H460a tumor model, correlating with circulating levels of drug. There was antitumor activity at the MTD with each agent tested in both the H460a and A549 tumor models (erlotinib 100 mg/kg: 71 and 93% tumor growth inhibition; gemcitabine 120 mg/kg: 93 and 75% tumor growth inhibition; cisplatin 6 mg/kg: 81 and 88% tumor growth inhibition). When each compound was given at a fraction of the MTD, tumor growth inhibition was suboptimal. Combinations of gemcitabine or cisplatin with erlotinib were assessed at 25% of the MTD to determine efficacy. In both NSCLC models, doses of gemcitabine (30 mg/kg) or cisplatin (1.5 mg/kg) with erlotinib (25 mg/kg) at 25% of the MTD were well tolerated. For the slow growing A549 tumor, there was significant tumor growth inhibition in the gemcitabine/erlotinib and cisplatin/erlotinib combinations (above 100 and 98%, respectively), with partial regressions. For the faster growing H460a tumor, there was significant but less remarkable tumor growth inhibition in these same combinations (86 and 53% respectively). These results show that in NSCLC xenograft tumors with similar

  1. Dealcoholized Korean Rice Wine (Makgeolli) Exerts Potent Anti-Tumor Effect in AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells and Tumor Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Ju; Kim, Sung Hee; Kim, Jae Ho; Ha, Jaeho; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2015-09-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional wine in Korea and has been traditionally believed to exhibit health benefits. However, the inhibitory effect of dealcoholized makgeolli (MK) on cancer has never been investigated scientifically. In this study, MK exhibited an anti-angiogenic effect by inhibiting tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, without cytotoxicity. Treatment with MK reduced the proliferation of AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and increased the sub-G1 population. Next, we evaluated whether MK could induce apoptosis in AGS cells by using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay or Annexin V method. Treatment with MK at 500 and 1,000 μg/ml increased the number of TUNEL-positive AGS cells. Under the same conditions, MK-treated (500 and 1,000 μg/ml) cells showed significant induction of early or late apoptosis, compared with untreated cells (no induction). In addition, MK also induced phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression in AGS cells. However, p53 expression in AGS cells was not changed by MK treatment. Furthermore, MK at 500 mg/kg·d reduced the tumor size and volume in AGS tumor xenografts. Taken together, MK may be useful for the prevention of cancer cell growth.

  2. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  3. Efficacy of Tumor-Targeting Salmonella A1-R on a Melanoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mako; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Shurell, Elizabeth; Eilber, Fritz C.; Bouvet, Michael; Noda, Makoto; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-targeting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium A1-R (Salmonella A1-R) had strong efficacy on a melanoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model. GFP-expressing Salmonella A1-R highly and selectively colonized the PDOX melanoma and significantly suppressed tumor growth (p = 0.021). The combination of Salmonella A1-R and cisplatinum (CDDP), both at low-dose, also significantly suppressed the growth of the melanoma PDOX (P = 0.001). Salmonella A1-R has future clinical potential for combination chemotherapy with CDDP of melanoma, a highly-recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27500926

  4. Comparative antitumor efficacy of docetaxel and paclitaxel in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts that overexpress the multidrug resistance protein (MRP)

    PubMed

    Vanhoefer, U; Cao, S; Harstrick, A; Seeber, S; Rustum, Y M

    1997-12-01

    Multidrug resistance has been associated with expression of the multidrug resistance protein (MRP). Recently, MRP-expression has been detected in human tumor samples of patients with breast cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer. Since taxoids are the most active drugs in the treatment of both tumor entities, the antitumor efficacies of paclitaxel and docetaxel were compared in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts that express MRP. Athymic nude mice (nu/nu) bearing tumor xenografts of parental human sarcoma HT1080 or MRP-expressing HT1080/DR4 cells (as confirmed by Northern blot analysis) were treated with the maximum tolerated doses (MTD) of doxorubicin ([Dx] 10 mg/kg i.v. push), paclitaxel ([PC] 50 mg/kg three-hour i.v. infusion), or docetaxel ([DC] 40 mg/kg three-hour i.v. infusion). In vitro, the activity of doxorubicin, paclitaxel and docetaxel was evaluated by the sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assay using the pyridine analogue PAK-104P (5 microM), a potent inhibitor of MRP-function. At their MTDs both taxoids showed significant activity against MRP-negative HT1080 xenografts with response rates of 80% (40% CR) for PC and 100% (60% CR) for DC. In contrast, DC was significantly more active than PC in nude mice bearing doxorubicin resistant MRP-expressing HT1080/DR4 tumor xenografts (overall response rates: 100% (60% CR) for DC; 10% (0% CR) for PC; 0% for Dx). Since treatment of mice with the MTD of PC or DC yielded similar overall toxicity (maximum weight loss for HT1080: PC 8.6 +/- 2.2%; DC 7.5 +/- 2.2% and for HT1080/DR4: PC 11.6 +/- 3.0%; DC 7.6 +/- 1.8%, respectively), these results demonstrate the increase in the therapeutic index for docetaxel against MRP-expressing tumors. In vitro, HT1080/DR4 cells were 270-fold, 6.4-fold and 2.8-fold more resistant than parental cells to doxorubicin, PC and DC, respectively. Pyridine analogue PAK-104P completely restored drug sensitivity to PC and DC, while no effect of PAK-104P on parental HT1080 cells was observed. Both

  5. Local tumor control following single dose irradiation of human melanoma xenografts: Relationship to cellular radiosensitivity and influence of an immune response by the athymic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.

    1989-06-15

    The potential usefulness of untreated congenitally athymic adult mice as hosts for human tumors in radiocurability studies was investigated using five human melanoma xenograft lines (E.E., E.F., G.E., M.F., V.N.). The tumor radiocurability was found to differ considerably among the lines; the radiation doses required to achieve local control of 50% of the tumors irradiated (TCD50 values) ranged from 29.6 +/- 2.1 (SE) to 67.9 +/- 3.5 Gy. Since the clinical relevance of experimentally determined TCD50 values depends on to what extent they are modified by a host immune response, a possible immune reactivity against the melanomas was investigated bymore » comparing the radiocurability data with cell survival data measured in vitro after irradiation in vivo and by performing quantitative tumor transplantability studies. The radiocurability and the cell survival data were found to agree well for the E.F., G.E., and M.F. melanomas. Moreover, the number of tumor cells required to achieve tumors in 50% of the inoculation sites (TD50 values) in untreated and in whole-body irradiated mice were similar, suggesting that the TCD50 values measured for these lines were not significantly influenced by a host immune response. On the other hand, the E.E. and V.N. melanomas showed significantly lower TCD50 values in vivo than predicted theoretically from the in vitro cell survival data and a significantly lower number of tumor cells required to achieve tumors in 50% of the inoculation sites in whole-body irradiated than in untreated mice, suggesting that the radiocurability of these two lines was enhanced due to an immune response by the host. Athymic mice may thus express a significant immune reactivity against some human tumor xenograft lines but not against others.« less

  6. Xenograft and Transgenic Mouse Models of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Non Invasive Imaging Modalities to Monitor Ovarian Tumor Growth In situ -Applications in Evaluating Novel Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Denise C.; Hensley, Harvey H.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most commonly fatal gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stage when disease has spread beyond the ovary. While many patients initially respond to surgery and chemotherapy, the long term prognosis is generally unfavorable, with recurrence and development of drug resistant disease. There is a critical need to identify new therapeutic agents that prolong disease-free intervals and effectively manage recurrent disease. Murine models of ovarian carcinoma are excellent models to study tumor biology in the search for new treatments for EOC. Described in this unit are methods for establishing xenograft or allograft models of EOC using ovarian carcinoma cell lines, in vivo imaging strategies for detection and quantification of EOC in transgenic and in xenograft/allograft models, and procedures for necropsy and pathological evaluation of experimental animals. PMID:20634901

  7. Bryostatin 1 induces differentiation and potentiates the antitumor effect of Auristatin PE in a human pancreatic tumor (PANC-1) xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, R M; Adsay, N V; Philip, P A; Pettit, G R; Vaitkevicius, V K; Sarkar, F H

    2001-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all cancers with a dismal 5-year survival rate. Hence, there is a tremendous need for development of new and effective therapy for this tumor. In an earlier study we reported a potent antitumor activity of Auristatin PE (AuriPE) against pancreatic tumor. In addition, we have also reported that bryostatin 1 (bryo1) induces differentiation of leukemia cells, but the effect of bryo1 has not been investigated in pancreatic tumors. This is the first report where we demonstrate that bryo1 induces differentiation and potentiates the antitumor effect of AuriPE in a human pancreatic tumor (PANC-1) xenograft model. A xenograft model was established by injecting the PANC-1 cells s.c. in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. After development of the s.c. tumors, tumors were dissected and small fragments were transplanted in vivo to new SCID mice, with a success rate of 100% and a doubling time of 4.8 days. The SCID mouse xenograft model was used to test the in vivo differentiation effect of bryo1 and its efficacy when given alone or in combination with AuriPE. Sections from paraffin-embedded tumors excised from untreated (control) SCID mice revealed typical poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Interestingly, sections of s.c. tumors taken from bryo1-treated mice revealed carcinomas that were much lower grade and less aggressive, and displayed prominent squamous and glandular differentiation. In this study, the tumor growth inhibition (T/C), activity score and cure rate for bryo1, AuriPE and bryo1+AuriPE were 80%, (+) and 0/4; 0.0%, (++++) and 3/5; and 0.0%, (++++) and 3/4, respectively. Mice treated with either AuriPE or bryo1+AuriPE were free of tumors for more than 150 days and were considered cured. The use of bryo1 as a novel differentiating agent and its combination with AuriPE should be further explored for the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  8. Tenfibgen ligand nanoencapsulation delivers bi-functional anti-CK2 RNAi oligomer to key sites for prostate cancer targeting using human xenograft tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Trembley, Janeen H; Unger, Gretchen M; Korman, Vicci L; Abedin, Md Joynal; Nacusi, Lucas P; Vogel, Rachel I; Slaton, Joel W; Kren, Betsy T; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Protected and specific delivery of nucleic acids to malignant cells remains a highly desirable approach for cancer therapy. Here we present data on the physical and chemical characteristics, mechanism of action, and pilot therapeutic efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG)-shell nanocapsule technology for tumor-directed delivery of single stranded DNA/RNA chimeric oligomers targeting CK2αα' to xenograft tumors in mice. The sub-50 nm size TBG nanocapsule (s50-TBG) is a slightly negatively charged, uniform particle of 15 - 20 nm size which confers protection to the nucleic acid cargo. The DNA/RNA chimeric oligomer (RNAi-CK2) functions to decrease CK2αα' expression levels via both siRNA and antisense mechanisms. Systemic delivery of s50-TBG-RNAi-CK2 specifically targets malignant cells, including tumor cells in bone, and at low doses reduces size and CK2-related signals in orthotopic primary and metastatic xenograft prostate cancer tumors. In conclusion, the s50-TBG nanoencapsulation technology together with the chimeric oligomer targeting CK2αα' offer significant promise for systemic treatment of prostate malignancy.

  9. Tenfibgen Ligand Nanoencapsulation Delivers Bi-Functional Anti-CK2 RNAi Oligomer to Key Sites for Prostate Cancer Targeting Using Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trembley, Janeen H.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Korman, Vicci L.; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Nacusi, Lucas P.; Vogel, Rachel I.; Slaton, Joel W.; Kren, Betsy T.; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Protected and specific delivery of nucleic acids to malignant cells remains a highly desirable approach for cancer therapy. Here we present data on the physical and chemical characteristics, mechanism of action, and pilot therapeutic efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG)-shell nanocapsule technology for tumor-directed delivery of single stranded DNA/RNA chimeric oligomers targeting CK2αα' to xenograft tumors in mice. The sub-50 nm size TBG nanocapsule (s50-TBG) is a slightly negatively charged, uniform particle of 15 - 20 nm size which confers protection to the nucleic acid cargo. The DNA/RNA chimeric oligomer (RNAi-CK2) functions to decrease CK2αα' expression levels via both siRNA and antisense mechanisms. Systemic delivery of s50-TBG-RNAi-CK2 specifically targets malignant cells, including tumor cells in bone, and at low doses reduces size and CK2-related signals in orthotopic primary and metastatic xenograft prostate cancer tumors. In conclusion, the s50-TBG nanoencapsulation technology together with the chimeric oligomer targeting CK2αα' offer significant promise for systemic treatment of prostate malignancy. PMID:25333839

  10. Lenvatinib, an angiogenesis inhibitor targeting VEGFR/FGFR, shows broad antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models associated with microvessel density and pericyte coverage.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Matsui, Junji; Matsushima, Tomohiro; Obaishi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Nakamura, Katsuji; Tohyama, Osamu; Semba, Taro; Yamaguchi, Atsumi; Hoshi, Sachi Suzuki; Mimura, Fusayo; Haneda, Toru; Fukuda, Yoshio; Kamata, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Keiko; Matsukura, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Toshiaki; Asada, Makoto; Nomoto, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Dezso, Zoltan; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Tsuruoka, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Lenvatinib is an oral inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1-4), platelet growth factor receptor α (PDGFR α), RET and KIT. Antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib in VEGF- and FGF-driven angiogenesis models in both in vitro and in vivo was determined. Roles of tumor vasculature (microvessel density (MVD) and pericyte coverage) as biomarkers for lenvatinib were also examined in this study. We evaluated antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib against VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. Effects of lenvatinib on in vivo angiogenesis, which was enhanced by overexpressed VEGF or FGF in human pancreatic cancer KP-1 cells, were examined in the mouse dorsal air sac assay. We determined antitumor activity of lenvatinib in a broad panel of human tumor xenograft models to test if vascular score, which consisted of high MVD and low pericyte coverage, was associated with sensitivity to lenvatinib treatment. Vascular score was also analyzed using human tumor specimens with 18 different types of human primary tumors. Lenvatinib inhibited VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In vivo angiogenesis induced by overexpressed VEGF (KP-1/VEGF transfectants) or FGF (KP-1/FGF transfectants) was significantly suppressed with oral treatments of lenvatinib. Lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in KP-1/VEGF and five 5 of 7 different types of human tumor xenograft models at between 1 to 100 mg/kg. We divided 19 human tumor xenograft models into lenvatinib-sensitive (tumor-shrinkage) and relatively resistant (slow-growth) subgroups based on sensitivity to lenvatinib treatments at 100 mg/kg. IHC analysis showed that vascular score was significantly higher in sensitive subgroup than relatively resistant subgroup (p < 0.0004). Among 18 types of human primary tumors, kidney cancer had

  11. Lenvatinib, an angiogenesis inhibitor targeting VEGFR/FGFR, shows broad antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models associated with microvessel density and pericyte coverage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lenvatinib is an oral inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1-4), platelet growth factor receptor α (PDGFR α), RET and KIT. Antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib in VEGF- and FGF-driven angiogenesis models in both in vitro and in vivo was determined. Roles of tumor vasculature (microvessel density (MVD) and pericyte coverage) as biomarkers for lenvatinib were also examined in this study. Method We evaluated antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib against VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. Effects of lenvatinib on in vivo angiogenesis, which was enhanced by overexpressed VEGF or FGF in human pancreatic cancer KP-1 cells, were examined in the mouse dorsal air sac assay. We determined antitumor activity of lenvatinib in a broad panel of human tumor xenograft models to test if vascular score, which consisted of high MVD and low pericyte coverage, was associated with sensitivity to lenvatinib treatment. Vascular score was also analyzed using human tumor specimens with 18 different types of human primary tumors. Result Lenvatinib inhibited VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In vivo angiogenesis induced by overexpressed VEGF (KP-1/VEGF transfectants) or FGF (KP-1/FGF transfectants) was significantly suppressed with oral treatments of lenvatinib. Lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in KP-1/VEGF and five 5 of 7 different types of human tumor xenograft models at between 1 to 100 mg/kg. We divided 19 human tumor xenograft models into lenvatinib-sensitive (tumor-shrinkage) and relatively resistant (slow-growth) subgroups based on sensitivity to lenvatinib treatments at 100 mg/kg. IHC analysis showed that vascular score was significantly higher in sensitive subgroup than relatively resistant subgroup (p < 0.0004). Among 18 types of human primary

  12. Imaging the distribution of an antibody-drug conjugate constituent targeting mesothelin with ⁸⁹Zr and IRDye 800CW in mice bearing human pancreatic tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    ter Weele, Eva J; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G T; Kosterink, Jos G W; Pot, Linda; Vedelaar, Silke R; Lamberts, Laetitia E; Williams, Simon P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2015-12-08

    Mesothelin is a tumor differentiation antigen expressed by epithelial tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Currently, mesothelin is being targeted with an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) consisting of a mesothelin-specific antibody coupled to a highly potent chemotherapeutic drug. Considering the toxicity of the ADC and reduced accessibility of pancreatic tumors, non-invasive imaging could provide necessary information. We therefore developed a zirconium-89 (89Zr) labeled anti-mesothelin antibody (89Zr-AMA) to study its biodistribution in human pancreatic tumor bearing mice. Biodistribution and dose-finding of 89Zr-AMA were studied 144 h after tracer injection in mice with subcutaneously xenografted HPAC. MicroPET imaging was performed 24, 72 and 144 h after tracer injection in mice bearing HPAC or Capan-2. Tumor uptake and organ distribution of 89Zr-AMA were compared with nonspecific 111In-IgG. Biodistribution analyses revealed a dose-dependent 89Zr-AMA tumor uptake. Tumor uptake of 89Zr-AMA was higher than 111In-IgG using the lowest tracer dose. MicroPET showed increased tumor uptake over 6 days, whereas activity in blood pool and other tissues decreased. Immunohistochemistry showed that mesothelin was expressed by the HPAC and CAPAN-2 tumors and fluorescence microscopy revealed that AMA-800CW was present in tumor cell cytoplasm. 89Zr-AMA tumor uptake is antigen-specific in mesothelin-expressing tumors. 89Zr-AMA PET provides non-invasive, real-time information about AMA distribution and tumor targeting.

  13. Digoxin Inhibits Blood Vessel Density and HIF‐1a Expression in Castration‐Resistant C4‐2 Xenograft Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gayed, Bishoy A.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Pilch, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  Purpose: Recent studies suggest a potential application for digoxin in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. However, the effect of digoxin on androgen receptor (AR)‐positive prostate tumor in vivo is not clear. This study is designed to determine if digoxin can inhibit AR‐positive xenograft prostate tumors. Materials and Methods: Athymic male nude mice were utilized to establish subcutaneous C4‐2 castration‐resistant prostate tumors. The animals were castrated and then treated with daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of digoxin at 2mg/kg along with vehicle controls for 7 consecutive days. Tumor growth was determined by measuring tumor volume changes, blood vessel density by immunostaining of CD31, and cell proliferation by BrdU labeling. The expression of HIF‐1a in C4‐2 tumors was measured by Western blot and real‐time RT‐PCR. Results: Digoxin inhibited blood vessel density about fourfold and down‐regulated HIF‐1a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. However, digoxin did not inhibit C4‐2 tumor growth. Conclusions: Digoxin is a potent inhibitor of HIF‐1a signaling pathway and blood vessel formation in C4‐2 castration‐resistant prostate tumors. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume #: 1–4 PMID:22376255

  14. Anti-tumor effect of adipose tissue derived-mesenchymal stem cells expressing interferon-β and treatment with cisplatin in a xenograft mouse model for canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors.

  15. Anti-Tumor Effect of Adipose Tissue Derived-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Interferon-β and Treatment with Cisplatin in a Xenograft Mouse Model for Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors. PMID:24040358

  16. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  17. Combination of Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol Enhances Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP and PC-3 Cells Xenograft Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feiya; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) are promising anti-cancer substances. Our previous in vitro study showed that quercetin synergized with 2-Methoxyestradiol exhibiting increased antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines. In the present study, we determined whether their combination could inhibit LNCaP and PC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo and explored the underlying mechanism. Human prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in male BALB/c nude mice. When xenograft tumors reached about 100 mm3, mice were randomly allocated to vehicle control, quercetin or 2-Methoxyestradiol singly treated and combination treatment groups. After therapeutic intervention for 4 weeks, combination treatment of quercetin and 2-ME i) significantly inhibited prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% for LNCaP and 51.3% for PC-3 as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than quercetin (28.4% for LNCaP, 24.8% for PC3) or 2-ME (32.1% for LNCaP, 28.9% for PC3) alone; ii) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; iii) led to higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and apoptosis rate; and iv) resulted in lower phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) protein level, vascular endothelial growth factor protein and mRNA expression, microvascular density and proliferation rate than single drug treatment. These effects were more remarkable compared to vehicle group. Therefore, combination of quercetin and 2-ME can serve as a novel clinical treatment regimen owning the potential of enhancing antitumor effect on prostate cancer in vivo and lessening the dose and side effects of either quercetin or 2-ME alone. These in vivo results will lay a further solid basis for subsequent researches on this novel therapeutic regimen in human prostate cancer.

  18. Apigenin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction in U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells and inhibits osteosarcoma xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Chung; Chuang, Ya-Ju; Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lin, Jing-Pin; Tang, Nou-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-11-14

    The cytostatic drug from natural products has acted as a chemotherapeutic agent used in treatment of a wide variety of cancers. Apigenin, a type of flavonoid, exhibits anticancer actions, but there is no report to show that apigenin induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells and clarify that the apigenin-induced apoptosis-associated signals. The cytotoxic effects of apigenin were examined by culturing U-2 OS cells with or without apigenin. The percentage of viable cells via PI staining, apoptotic cells, productions of ROS and Ca²⁺, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were assayed by flow cytometry. The levels of apoptosis-related proteins were measured by immunoblotting. Results indicated that apigenin significantly decreased cell viability. Apigenin effectively induced apoptosis through the activations of caspase-3, -8, -9, and BAX and promoted the release of AIF in U-2 OS cells. In nude mice bearing U-2 OS xenograft tumors, apigenin inhibited tumor growth. In conclusion, apigenin has anticancer properties for induction of cell apoptosis in U-2 OS cells and suppresses the xenograft tumor growth. These findings offer novel information that apigenin possibly possesses anticancer activity in human osteosarcoma.

  19. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  20. Evaluation of 6-([18F] fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoic-anilide (18F-FAHA) as imaging probe in tumor xenograft mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fiona; Cho, Sung Ju; Yu, Lihai; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Pin, Christopher L.; Kovacs, Michael S.; Koropatnick, James; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-03-01

    Alteration in genetic expression is as important as gene mutation in cancer development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Histone deacetylase (HDAC), an enzyme facilitating histone remodelling, can lead to silencing of tumor suppressor genes making HDAC inhibitors viable anticancer drugs against tumors with increased activity of the enzyme. In this study we evaluated 18F-fluroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide (18F-FAHA), an artificial HDAC substrate, as imaging probe of HDAC activity of human tumor xenografts in immunocompromised host mice. Human breast and melanoma cell lines, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-435 respectively, known to overexpress HDAC activity were xenografted into immunocompromised mice and HDAC activity was imaged using 18F-FAHA. The melanoma group was treated with saline, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an approved anticancer HDAC inhibitor) in DMSO, or DMSO as positive control. Tracer kinetic modelling and SUV were used to estimate HDAC activity from dynamic PET data. Both breast tumor and melanoma group showed great variability in binding rate constant (BRC) of 18F-FAHA suggesting highly variable inter- and intra-tumoral HDAC activity. For the SAHA treated melanoma group, HDAC activity, as monitored by BRC of 18F-FAHA, decreased more than the two (positive and negative) control groups but not tumor growth. Our preliminary study showed that noninvasive PET imaging with 18F-FAHA has the potential to identify patients for whom treatment with HDAC inhibitors are appropriate, to assess the effectiveness of that treatment as an early marker of target reduction, and also eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsy to individualize treatment.

  1. A Versatile Technique for the In Vivo Imaging of Human Tumor Xenografts Using Near-Infrared Fluorochrome-Conjugated Macromolecule Probes

    PubMed Central

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Kawai, Kenji; Higuchi, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Haruo; Ogura, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Toshio; Sasaki, Erika; Nakamura, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a versatile method for detecting human tumor xenografts in vivo, based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, using near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome-conjugated macromolecule probes. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two immunoglobulins—an anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) monoclonal antibody and isotype control IgG2a—were labeled with XenoLight CF770 fluorochrome and used as NIR-conjugated macromolecule probes to study whole-body imaging in a variety of xenotransplantation mouse models. NIR fluorescent signals were observed in subcutaneously transplanted BxPC-3 (human pancreatic cancer) cells and HCT 116 (colorectal cancer) cells within 24 h of NIR-macromolecule probe injection, but the signal from the fluorochrome itself or from the NIR-conjugated small molecule (glycine) injection was not observed. The accuracy of tumor targeting was confirmed by the localization of the NIR-conjugated immunoglobulin within the T-HCT 116 xenograft (in which the orange-red fluorescent protein tdTomato was stably expressed by HCT 116 cells) in the subcutaneous transplantation model. However, there was no significant difference in the NIR signal intensity of the region of interest between the anti-HLA antibody group and the isotype control group in the subcutaneous transplantation model. Therefore, the antibody accumulation within the tumor in vivo is based on the EPR effect. The liver metastasis generated by an intrasplenic injection of T-HCT 116 cells was clearly visualized by the NIR-conjugated anti-HLA probe but not by the orange-red fluorescent signal derived from the tdTomato reporter. This result demonstrated the superiority of the NIR probes over the tdTomato reporter protein at enhancing tissue penetration. In another xenograft model, patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of LC11-JCK (human non-small cell lung cancer) were successfully visualized using the NIR-conjugated macromolecule probe without any genetic modification. These results

  2. A potencial theranostic agent for EGF-R expression tumors: (177)Lu-DOTA-nimotuzumab.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; Zhang, Xiuli; Fernandez, Marcelo; Diaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Deutscher, Susan L; Balter, Henia; Quinn, Thomas P; Cabral, Pablo

    2012-10-01

    In this work Nimotuzumab (monoclonal antibody, recognizes the EGF-R) was radiolabeled with (177)Lu as a potential cancer therapy radiopharmaceutical. In-vitro cell binding studies and in-vivo biodistribution and imaging studies were performed to determine the radiochemical stability, targeting specificity and pharmacokinetics of the (177)Lu-labeled antibody. Nimotuzumab was derivatized with DOTA-NHS at room temperature for 2 hours. DOTA-Nimotuzumab was radiolabeled with (177)LuCl3 (15 MBq/mg) at 37°C for 1 h. The radiochemical purity was assessed by ITLC, silica gel and by RP-HPLC. Binding specificity studies were performed with EGF-R positive A431 human epithelial carcinoma and EGF-R negative MDA-MB-435 breast carcinoma cells. Biodistribution studies were performed in healthy female CD-1 mice at 1 h, 4 h, 24 h, and A431 xenografted nude mice at 10 min, 1 h, 4 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h. SPECT-CT imaging studies were performed in A431 xenografted mice at 24 h post injection. DOTA-Nimotuzumab was efficiently labeled with (177) LuCl(3) at 37°C. The in vitro stability of labeled product was optimal over 24 h in buffered saline and mouse serum. Specific recognition of EGF-R by (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab was observed in A431 cell binding studies. Biodistribution studies demonstrated increasing tumor uptake of (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab over time, with tumor to muscle ratios of 6.26, 10.68, and 18.82 at 4 h, 24 h, and 96 h post injection. Imaging of A431 xenografted mice showed high uptake in the tumor. (177)Lu-DOTA-Nimotuzumab has the potential to be a promising therapy agent, which may be useful in the treatment of patients with EGF-R positive cancer.

  3. EGFRvIII-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Migrate to and Kill Tumor Deposits Infiltrating the Brain Parenchyma in an Invasive Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D.; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J.; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E.; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E.; Bigner, Darell D.; Johnson, Laura A.; Sampson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression. PMID:24722266

  4. A peptidomimetic inhibitor of ras functionality markedly suppresses growth of human prostate tumor xenografts in mice. Prospects for long-term clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Sirotnak, F M; Sepp-Lorenzino, L; Kohl, N E; Rosen, N; Scher, H I

    2000-01-01

    These studies sought to evaluate the antitumor properties of an inhibitor of ras functionality, L-744,832, which acts at the level of its associated protein farnesyltransferase. Studies were carried out to measure the effects of L-744,832 alone and in combination with paclitaxel (PTXL) against TSU-PR1, DU-145 and PC-3 human prostate tumors xenografted to NCR-nul (AT) mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated on a schedule of daily for 5 days x2 or 3 with the MTD of L-744,832 and every 3-4 days x4 with the MTD of PTXL starting 3-5 days after tumor implantation. Tumor volume in millimeters (4/3pir3) was measured 3 5 days after cessation of treatment and the increase in tumor volume in treated and control groups compared. Statistical analysis was carried out by the Chi-squared test. L-744,832 at its MTD markedly inhibited the growth of all three tumors (TIC for increase in tumor mass varied from 11% to 15% and inhibition of growth had a rapid onset (within 1-2 days) and was independent of ras gene status. Estimated tumor doubling times were 8-12-fold greater in treated animals than in control animals. Treatment with L-744,832 for as long as 3 weeks had no untoward effects on the mice as determined by gross examination or necropsy. Administration of L-744,832 with this same dose and schedule potentiated the growth-inhibitory effect of PTXL at its MTD and induced some regression of TSU-PR1 with no obvious deleterious effects on the mice. L-744,832 could be safely administered over a protracted period of time to mice at doses which were markedly inhibitory to the growth of three human prostate tumor xenografts and in combination with PTXL was also well tolerated and brought about some regression of the TSU-PR1 tumor. Overall, these results suggest that L-744,832 could be clinically useful for long-term treatment of early-stage prostate cancer in patients and as an adjunct to cytotoxic therapy for late stages of this disease.

  5. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Binderup, Tina; Kjær, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. Methods Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10) were determined independently by two observers to assess inter-observer variation. Results Tumor volume measured by microCT, PET and caliper all correlated with reference volume. No significant bias of microCT measurements compared with the reference was found, whereas both PET and caliper had systematic bias compared to reference volume. Coefficients of variation for intra-observer variation were 7% and 14% for microCT and caliper measurements, respectively. Regression coefficients between observers were 0.97 for microCT and 0.91 for caliper measurements. Conclusion MicroCT was more accurate than both caliper and 18F-FDG-PET for in vivo volumetric measurements of subcutaneous tumors in mice.18F-FDG-PET was considered unsuitable for determination of tumor size. External caliper were inaccurate and encumbered with a significant and size dependent bias. MicroCT was also the most reproducible of the methods. PMID:18925932

  6. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina; Kjaer, Andreas

    2008-10-16

    In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10) were determined independently by two observers to assess inter-observer variation. Tumor volume measured by microCT, PET and caliper all correlated with reference volume. No significant bias of microCT measurements compared with the reference was found, whereas both PET and caliper had systematic bias compared to reference volume. Coefficients of variation for intra-observer variation were 7% and 14% for microCT and caliper measurements, respectively. Regression coefficients between observers were 0.97 for microCT and 0.91 for caliper measurements. MicroCT was more accurate than both caliper and 18F-FDG-PET for in vivo volumetric measurements of subcutaneous tumors in mice.18F-FDG-PET was considered unsuitable for determination of tumor size. External caliper were inaccurate and encumbered with a significant and size dependent bias. MicroCT was also the most reproducible of the methods.

  7. Administration of the optimized β-Lapachone-poloxamer-cyclodextrin ternary system induces apoptosis, DNA damage and reduces tumor growth in a human breast adenocarcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Samuel; Díaz-Rodríguez, Patricia; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Gallego, Rosalia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Landin, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    β-Lapachone (β-Lap) is a 1,2-orthonaphthoquinone that selectively induces cell death in human cancer cells through NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1). NQO1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, as compared to normal adjacent tissue. However, the low solubility and non-specific distribution of β-Lap limit its suitability for clinical assays. We formulated β-Lap in an optimal random methylated-β-cyclodextrin/poloxamer 407 mixture (i.e., β-Lap ternary system) and, using human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and immunodeficient mice, performed in vitro and in vivo evaluation of its anti-tumor effects on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, and tumor growth. This ternary system is fluid at room temperature, gels over 29 °C, and provides a significant amount of drug, thus facilitating intratumoral delivery, in situ gelation, and the formation of a depot for time-release. Administration of β-Lap ternary system to MCF-7 cells induces an increase in apoptosis and DNA damage, while producing no changes in cell cycle. Moreover, in a mouse xenograft tumor model, intratumoral injection of the system significantly reduces tumor volume, while increasing apoptosis and DNA damage without visible toxicity to liver or kidney. These anti-tumoral effects and lack of visible toxicity make this system a promising new therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies in patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma and related metastases.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Cao, Feilin; Han, Na; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; He, Kuifeng; Teng, Lisong

    2012-08-01

    Heterogeneity in primary tumors and related metastases may result in failure of antitumor therapies, particularly in targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to evaluate the response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies. Our results showed that primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases have a different response rate to anti-EGFR (cetuximab) and anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) therapies. However, the underlying mechanism of these types of phenomenon is still unclear. To investigate whether such phenomena may result from the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and related metastases, we compared the expression levels of cell signaling pathway proteins using immunohistochemical staining and western blotting, and the gene status of KRAS using pyrosequencing in the same primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastatic tissues which were used for establishing the PDTT xenograft models. Our results showed that the expression levels of EGFR, VEGF, Akt/pAkt, ERK/pERK, MAPK/pMAPK, and mTOR/pmTOR were different in primary colon carcinoma and matched lymphatic and hepatic metastases although the KRAS gene status in all cases was wild-type. Our results indicate that the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in differences in the response to dual-inhibition of EGFR and VEGF.

  9. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacymore » and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.« less

  10. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: tomsyu@163.com; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Thesemore » findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer.« less

  11. Radioimmunotherapy of head and neck cancer xenografts using 131I-labeled antibody L19-SIP for selective targeting of tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Tijink, Bernard M; Neri, Dario; Leemans, C René; Budde, Marianne; Dinkelborg, Ludger M; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Zardi, Luciano; van Dongen, Guus A M S

    2006-07-01

    The extra domain B of fibronectin (ED-B) is a marker of tumor angiogenesis. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) L19-SIP (approximately 80 kDa; SIP is "small immunoprotein") has been selected for targeting of ED-B. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with L19-SIP, either alone or in combination with cetuximab, for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Combination with cetuximab was considered because this anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) mAb has proven value for the treatment of HNSCC. HNSCC xenograft lines FaDu and HNX-OE were evaluated for ED-B and EGFR expression. L19-SIP was radiolabeled with 2 candidate radionuclides for RIT, 177Lu and 131I (or 125I as substitute). The biodistribution of coinjected 177Lu-L19-SIP and 125I-L19-SIP was assessed in FaDu-bearing nude mice, whereas 131I-L19-SIP was evaluated in both xenograft lines. After labeling with high-dose 131I (623-789 MBq/mg), the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was assessed. The efficacy of RIT with injected 131I-L19-SIP, either alone or in combination with unlabeled cetuximab (1 mg 2 times a week intraperitoneally for 4 wk), was evaluated in both xenograft lines. Xenograft lines expressed both antigens, with similar EGFR expression and the highest ED-B expression in FaDu. Radioiodinated L19-SIP performed better than 177Lu-L19-SIP and was further exploited. The biodistribution of 131I-L19-SIP was most favorable in FaDu-bearing mice, with tumor uptake values at 24, 48, and 72 h after injection of 8.6 +/- 1.6, 5.8 +/- 0.4, and 3.4 +/- 0.2 %ID/g (%ID/g is percentage injected dose per gram of tissue), respectively, and ratios of tumor to normal tissues that gradually increased in time, such as for blood from 4.4 +/- 1.8 at 24 h to 21.4 +/- 1.7 at 72 h, after injection. RIT at the MTD level of 74 MBq caused significant tumor growth delay and improved survival in both lines. Although FaDu was most sensitive for RIT, with size reduction of

  12. Combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade inhibits tumor growth in xenograft models of EGFR inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Naumov, George N; Nilsson, Monique B; Cascone, Tina; Briggs, Alexandra; Straume, Oddbjorn; Akslen, Lars A; Lifshits, Eugene; Byers, Lauren Averett; Xu, Li; Wu, Hua-Kang; Jänne, Pasi; Kobayashi, Susumu; Halmos, Balazs; Tenen, Daniel; Tang, Xi M; Engelman, Jeffrey; Yeap, Beow; Folkman, Judah; Johnson, Bruce E; Heymach, John V

    2009-05-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) gefitinib and erlotinib benefit some non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but most do not respond (primary resistance) and those who initially respond eventually progress (acquired resistance). EGFR TKI resistance is not completely understood and has been associated with certain EGFR and K-RAS mutations and MET amplification. We hypothesized that dual inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and EGFR pathways may overcome primary and acquired resistance. We investigated the VEGF receptor/EGFR TKI vandetanib, and the combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib in vivo using xenograft models of EGFR TKI sensitivity, primary resistance, and three models of acquired resistance, including models with mutated K-RAS and secondary EGFR T790M mutation. Vandetanib, gefitinib, and erlotinib had similar profiles of in vitro activity and caused sustained tumor regressions in vivo in the sensitive HCC827 model. In all four resistant models, vandetanib and bevacizumab/erlotinib were significantly more effective than erlotinib or gefitinib alone. Erlotinib resistance was associated with a rise in both host and tumor-derived VEGF but not EGFR secondary mutations in the KRAS mutant-bearing A549 xenografts. Dual inhibition reduced tumor endothelial proliferation compared with VEGF or EGFR blockade alone, suggesting that the enhanced activity of dual inhibition is due at least in part to antiendothelial effects. These studies suggest that erlotinib resistance may be associated with a rise in both tumor cell and host stromal VEGF and that combined blockade of the VEGFR and EGFR pathways can abrogate primary or acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. This approach merits further evaluation in NSCLC patients.

  13. Combined Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Blockade Inhibits Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models of EGFR Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Naumov, George N.; Nilsson, Monique B.; Cascone, Tina; Briggs, Alexandra; Straume, Oddbjorn; Akslen, Lars A.; Lifshits, Eugene; Byers, Lauren Averett; Xu, Li; Wu, Hua-kang; Jänne, Pasi; Kobayashi, Susumu; Halmos, Balazs; Tenen, Daniel; Tang, Xi M.; Engelman, Jeffrey; Yeap, Beow; Folkman, Judah; Johnson, Bruce E.; Heymach, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) gefitinib and erlotinib benefit some non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but most do not respond (primary resistance) and those who initially respond eventually progress (acquired resistance). EGFR TKI resistance is not completely understood and has been associated with certain EGFR and K-RAS mutations and MET amplification. Experimental Design We hypothesized that dual inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and EGFR pathways may overcome primary and acquired resistance. We investigated the VEGF receptor/EGFR TKI vandetanib, and the combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib in vivo using xenograft models of EGFR TKI sensitivity, primary resistance, and three models of acquired resistance, including models with mutated K-RAS and secondary EGFR T790M mutation. Results Vandetanib, gefitinib, and erlotinib had similar profiles of in vitro activity and caused sustained tumor regressions in vivo in the sensitive HCC827 model. In all four resistant models, vandetanib and bevacizumab/erlotinib were significantly more effective than erlotinib or gefitinib alone. Erlotinib resistance was associated with a rise in both host and tumor-derived VEGF but not EGFR secondary mutations in the KRAS mutant-bearing A549 xenografts. Dual inhibition reduced tumor endothelial proliferation compared with VEGF or EGFR blockade alone, suggesting that the enhanced activity of dual inhibition is due at least in part to antiendothelial effects. Conclusion These studies suggest that erlotinib resistance may be associated with a rise in both tumor cell and host stromal VEGF and that combined blockade of the VEGFR and EGFR pathways can abrogate primary or acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. This approach merits further evaluation in NSCLC patients. PMID:19447865

  14. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  15. Imaging of human tumor xenografts in nude mice with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Limitations of specificity due to nonspecific uptake of antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, B.D.; Cohen, M.B.; Saxton, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    To determine if in vivo binding specificities of monoclonal antibodies to tumor nodules would reflect in vitro antibody specificities as determined by radioimmunoassay, two monoclonal antibodies were selected for imaging of human tumor xenografts in nude mice. By in vitro radioimmunoassay, antibody 436 binds to the M20 melanoma cell line, but not to the P3 carcinoma cell line; antibody 44 binds to P3 but not to M20. Both antibodies are IgG1 isotypes. Nude mice bearing an M20 melanoma in one flank and a P3 carcinoma in the other were injected intravenously with 5 to 25 micrograms of each antibody labeledmore » with either I-125 or I-131; in separate animals the labels were reversed. Animals were imaged daily with a scintillation camera equipped with a pinhole collimator. On day 6 the animals were sacrificed, and binding of the antibodies to the tumors and normal tissue were compared. Antibody 436 had up to a two-fold binding advantage in vivo for the melanoma, whereas antibody 44 had up to a two-fold binding advantage for the carcinoma, thus confirming the in vitro specificities of each. However, imaging on day 4 and computer analysis of percent radioactivity in the tumors showed that tumor images were related directly to tumor size and relatively uninfluenced by antibody specificity. Thus, even though antibody specificity can be demonstrated by differential tissue counting, imaging of tumor deposits appears to involve a nonspecific phenomenon that is largely dependent upon tumor weight.« less

  16. Analysis of the prolonged infusion of DFP-10917, a deoxycytidine analog, as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human tumor xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Kenzo; Zhang, Chun; Eshima, Kokoro; Jin, Cheng; Eshima, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2018-03-01

    2'-C-cyano-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabino-pentofranocyl-cytosine (DFP-10917, CNDAC) is a 2'-deoxycytidine analog with antitumor activity against various tumor cells. However, a clinically available therapeutic regimen for this compound needs to be established and its functional mechanisms in relation to the dosing schedule need to be clarified. In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity and toxicity of DFP-10917 by varying the dose and administration schedule in human solid tumor and leukemia xenografts in vivo. Compared to a 1-day infusion with a high-dose of DFP-10917 (30 mg/kg/day), a prolonged 14-day infusion with a low-dose (4.5 mg/kg/day) exerted superior tumor growth inhibitory effects without decreasing the body weights of mice in our human tumor xenograft model. In addition, we found that a 14-day infusion of low-dose DFP-10917 markedly prolonged the lifespan of nude mice bearing both acute leukemia and ovarian cancer cell-derived tumors. On the other hand, gemcitabine (GEM) and cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), which are similar deoxycytidine analogs and are widely used clinically as standard regimens, exerted less potent antitumor effects than DFP-10917 on these tumors. To elucidate the possible functional mechanisms of the prolonged infusion of DFP-10197 compared with that of GEM or Ara-C, the rate of DNA damage in CCRF-CEM and HeLa cells treated with DFP-10917, Ara-C and GEM was detected using a comet assay. DFP-10917, at a range of 0.05 to 1 µM, induced a clear tailed-DNA pattern in both the CCRF-CEM and HeLa cells; Ara-C and GEM did not have any effect. It was thus suggested that a low concentration and long-term exposure to DFP-10917 aggressively introduced the fragmentation of DNA molecules, namely the so-called double-strand breaks in tumor cells, leading to potent cytotoxicity. Moreover, treatment with DFP-10917 at a low-dose with a long-term exposure specifically increased the population of cells in the G2/M phase, while GEM reduced this cell

  17. Influence of anchoring ligands and particle size on the colloidal stability and in vivo biodistribution of polyethylene glycol-coated gold nanoparticles in tumor-xenografted mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Yang, Zhi; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Qian; Tian, Mei; Li, Li; Liang, Dong; Li, Chun

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated (pegylated) gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed as drug carriers and diagnostic contrast agents. However, the impact of particle characteristics on the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of pegylated AuNPs is not clear. We investigated the effects of PEG molecular weight, type of anchoring ligand, and particle size on the assembly properties and colloidal stability of PEG-coated AuNPs. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the most stable PEG-coated AuNPs in nude mice bearing subcutaneous A431 squamous tumors were further studied using 111In-labeled AuNPs. AuNPs coated with thioctic acid (TA)-anchored PEG exhibited higher colloidal stability in phosphate-buffered saline in the presence of dithiothreitol than did AuNPs coated with monothiol-anchored PEG. AuNPs coated with high-molecular-weight (5000 Da) PEG were more stable than AuNPs coated with low-molecular-weight (2000 Da) PEG. Of the 20-nm, 40-nm, and 80-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000, the 20-nm AuNPs exhibited the lowest uptake by reticuloendothelial cells and the slowest clearance from the body. Moreover, the 20-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000 showed significantly higher tumor uptake and extravasation from the tumor blood vessels than did the 40- and 80-nm AuNPs. Thus, 20-nm AuNPs coated with TA-terminated PEG5000 are promising potential drug delivery vehicles and diagnostic imaging agents. PMID:19131103

  18. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Marine microalgae are a source of biologically active compounds and are widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. It has been reported that Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have various beneficial pharmacological compounds that modulate immune responses; however, no studies have investigated the anti-cancer effects of Chlorella sorokiniana (CS) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of CS in two human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells), and its effects on tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. We also investigated the possible molecular mechanisms governing the pharmacological function of CS. Our results showed that exposure of the two cell lines to CS resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that CS might induce apoptosis in human NSCLC cells. Western blot analysis revealed that exposure to CS resulted in increased protein expression of the cleaved/activated forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, except caspase-8. ZDEVD (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-LEHD (caspase-9 inhibitor) were sufficient at preventing apoptosis in both A549 and CL1-5 cells, proving that CS induced cell death via the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Exposure of A549 and CL1-5 cells to CS for 24 h resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2 protein and increased expression of Bax protein as well as decreased expression of two IAP family proteins, survivin and XIAP. We demonstrated that CS induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells via downregulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and survivin. In addition, we also found that the tumors growth of subcutaneous xenograft in vivo was markedly inhibited after oral intake of CS.

  19. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Bendale; Vineeta, Bendale; Rammesh, Natu; Saili, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt)-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID) were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27386144

  20. Antitumor effects with apoptotic death in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and suppression of leukemia xenograft tumor growth by irinotecan HCl.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Liang; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan HCl (CPT-11) is an anticancer prodrug, but there is no available information addressing CPT-11-inhibited leukemia cells in in vitro and in vivo studies. Therefore, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 in promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells and in vivo and tumor growth in a leukemia xenograft model. Effects of CPT-11 on HL-60 cells were determined using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, comet assay, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. CPT-11 demonstrated a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, and cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in HL-60 cells. CPT-11 promoted the release of AIF from mitochondria and its translocation to the nucleus. Bid, Bax, Apaf-1, caspase-9, AIF, Endo G, caspase-12, ATF-6b, Grp78, CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D were all significantly upregulated and Bcl-2 was down-regulated by CPT-11 in HL-60 cells. Induction of cell-cycle arrest by CPT-11 was associated with changes in expression of key cell-cycle regulators such as CDK2, Chk2, and cyclin D in HL-60 cells. To test whether CPT-11 could augment antitumor activity in vivo, athymic BALB/c(nu/nu) nude mice were inoculated with HL-60 cells, followed by treatment with either CPT-11. The treatments significantly inhibited tumor growth and reduced tumor weight and volume in the HL-60 xenograft mice. The present study demonstrates the schedule-dependent antileukemia effect of CPT-11 using both in vitro and in vivo models. CPT-11 could potentially be a promising agent for the treatment of promyelocytic leukemia and requires further investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R is a highly effective general therapeutic for undifferentiated soft tissue sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Miyake, Masuyo; Singh, Arun S; Eckardt, Mark A; Nelson, Scott D; Russell, Tara A; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Singh, Shree Ram; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-03-18

    Undifferentiated soft tissue sarcoma (USTS) is a recalcitrant and heterogeneous subgroup of soft tissue sarcoma with high risk of metastasis and recurrence. Due to heterogeneity of USTS, there is no reliably effective first-line therapy. We have generated tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R), which previously showed strong efficacy on single patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) models of Ewing's sarcoma and follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. In the present study, tumor resected from 4 patients with a biopsy-proven USTS (2 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma [UPS], 1 undifferentiated sarcoma not otherwise specified [NOS] and 1 undifferentiated spindle cell sarcoma [USS]) were grown orthotopically in the biceps femoris muscle of mice to establish PDOX models. One USS model and one UPS model were doxorubicin (DOX) resistant. One UPS and the NOS model were partially sensitive to DOX. DOX is first-line therapy for these diseases. S. typhimurium A1-R arrested tumor growth all 4 models. In addition to arresting tumor growth in each case, S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more efficacious than DOX in each case, thereby surpassing first-line therapy. These results suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R can be a general therapeutic for USTS and possibly sarcoma in general. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. CK2 targeted RNAi therapeutic delivered via malignant cell-directed tenfibgen nanocapsule: dose and molecular mechanisms of response in xenograft prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil; Kren, Betsy T; Abedin, Md Joynal; Vogel, Rachel I; Shaughnessy, Daniel P; Nacusi, Lucas; Korman, Vicci L; Li, Yingming; Dehm, Scott M; Zimmerman, Cheryl L; Niehans, Gloria A; Unger, Gretchen M; Trembley, Janeen H

    2016-09-20

    CK2, a protein serine/threonine kinase, promotes cell proliferation and suppresses cell death. This essential-for-survival signal demonstrates elevated expression and activity in all cancers examined, and is considered an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we present data on the efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG) coated nanocapsule which delivers its cargo of siRNA (siCK2) or single stranded RNA/DNA oligomers (RNAi-CK2) simultaneously targeting CK2α and α' catalytic subunits. Intravenous administration of TBG-siCK2 or TBG-RNAi-CK2 resulted in significant xenograft tumor reduction at low doses in PC3-LN4 and 22Rv1 models of prostate cancer. Malignant cell uptake and specificity in vivo was verified by FACS analysis and immunofluorescent detection of nanocapsules and PCR detection of released oligomers. Dose response was concordant with CK2αα' RNA transcript levels and the tumors demonstrated changes in CK2 protein and in markers of proliferation and cell death. Therapeutic response corresponded to expression levels for argonaute and GW proteins, which function in oligomer processing and translational repression. No toxicity was detected in non-tumor tissues or by serum chemistry. Tumor specific delivery of anti-CK2 RNAi via the TBG nanoencapsulation technology warrants further consideration of translational potential.

  4. CK2 targeted RNAi therapeutic delivered via malignant cell-directed tenfibgen nanocapsule: dose and molecular mechanisms of response in xenograft prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Rachel I.; Shaughnessy, Daniel P.; Nacusi, Lucas; Korman, Vicci L.; Li, Yingming; Dehm, Scott M.; Zimmerman, Cheryl L.; Niehans, Gloria A.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Trembley, Janeen H.

    2016-01-01

    CK2, a protein serine/threonine kinase, promotes cell proliferation and suppresses cell death. This essential-for-survival signal demonstrates elevated expression and activity in all cancers examined, and is considered an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we present data on the efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG) coated nanocapsule which delivers its cargo of siRNA (siCK2) or single stranded RNA/DNA oligomers (RNAi-CK2) simultaneously targeting CK2α and α′ catalytic subunits. Intravenous administration of TBG-siCK2 or TBG-RNAi-CK2 resulted in significant xenograft tumor reduction at low doses in PC3-LN4 and 22Rv1 models of prostate cancer. Malignant cell uptake and specificity in vivo was verified by FACS analysis and immunofluorescent detection of nanocapsules and PCR detection of released oligomers. Dose response was concordant with CK2αα′ RNA transcript levels and the tumors demonstrated changes in CK2 protein and in markers of proliferation and cell death. Therapeutic response corresponded to expression levels for argonaute and GW proteins, which function in oligomer processing and translational repression. No toxicity was detected in non-tumor tissues or by serum chemistry. Tumor specific delivery of anti-CK2 RNAi via the TBG nanoencapsulation technology warrants further consideration of translational potential. PMID:27557516

  5. HDAC inhibitor valproic acid enhances tumor cell kill in adenovirus-HSVtk mediated suicide gene therapy in HNSCC xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vishal; Joshi, Ganesh; Nama, Srikanth; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Mulherkar, Rita

    2010-02-01

    Safety, efficacy and enhanced transgene expression are the primary concerns while using any vector for gene therapy. One of the widely used vectors in clinical trials is adenovirus which provides a safe way to deliver the therapeutic gene. However, adenovirus has poor transduction efficiency in vivo since most tumor cells express low coxsackie and adenovirus receptors. Similarly transgene expression remains low, possibly because of the chromatization of adenoviral genome upon infection in eukaryotic cells, an effect mediated by histone deacetylases (HDACs). Using a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HSVtk) carrying the herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSVtk) and GFP genes we demonstrate that HDAC inhibitor valproic acid can bring about an increase in CAR expression on host cells and thereby enhanced Ad-HSVtk infectivity. It also resulted in an increase in transgene (HSVtk and GFP) expression. This, in turn, resulted in increased cell kill of HNSCC cells, following ganciclovir treatment in vitro as well as in vivo in a xenograft nude mouse model.

  6. Sequential Systemic Administrations of Combretastatin A4 Phosphate and Radioiodinated Hypericin Exert Synergistic Targeted Theranostic Effects with Prolonged Survival on SCID Mice Carrying Bifocal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Chen, Feng; Feng, Yuanbo; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Guozhi; Nuyts, Johan; de Witte, Peter; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Jie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Based on the soil-to-seeds principle, we explored the small-molecular sequential dual-targeting theranostic strategy (SMSDTTS) for prolonged survival and imaging detectability in a xenograft tumor model. Materials and Methods: Thirty severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing bilateral radiation-induced fibrosarcoma-1 (RIF-1) subcutaneously were divided into group A of SMSDTTS with sequential intravenous injections of combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) and 131I-iodohypericin (131I-Hyp) at a 24 h interval; group B of single targeting control with CA4P and vehicle of 131I-Hyp; and group C of vehicle control (10 mice per group). Tumoricidal events were monitored by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and planar gamma scintiscan, and validated by ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology. Besides, 9 mice received sequential intravenous injections of CA4P and 131I-Hyp were subjected to biodistribution analysis at 24, 72 and 120 h. Results: Gamma counting revealed fast clearance of 131I-Hyp from normal organs but intense accumulation in necrotic tumor over 120 h. After only one treatment, significantly prolonged survival (p<0.001) was found in group A compared to group B and C with median survival of 33, 22, and 21 days respectively. Tumor volume on day 15 was 2.0 ± 0.89, 5.66 ± 1.66, and 5.02 ± 1.0 cm3 with tumor doubling time 7.8 ± 2.8, 4.4 ± 0.67, and 4.5 ± 0.5 days respectively. SMSDTTS treated tumors were visualized as hot spots on gamma scintiscans, and necrosis over tumor ratio remained consistently high on MRI, autoradiography and histology. Conclusion: The synergistic antitumor effects, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theranostic property, and good tolerance of the SMSDTTS were evident in this experiment, which warrants further development for preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:23423247

  7. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conductedmore » by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K{sub i}) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V{sub d}) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.« less

  8. Plasma DCLK1 is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Targeting DCLK1 prevents HCC tumor xenograft growth via a microRNA-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sureban, Sripathi M; Madhoun, Mohammad F; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Ali, Naushad; Fazili, Javid; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ding, Kai; Lightfoot, Stanley A; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-11-10

    Tumor stem cell marker Doublecortin-like kinase1 (DCLK1) is upregulated in several solid tumors. The role of DCLK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. We immunostained tissues from human livers with HCC, cirrhosis controls (CC), and non-cirrhosis controls (NCC) for DCLK1. Western blot and ELISA analyses for DCLK1 were performed with stored plasma samples. We observed increased immunoreactive DCLK1 in epithelia and stroma in HCC and CCs compared with NCCs, and observed a marked increase in plasma DCLK1 from patients with HCC compared with CC and NCC. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas' HCC dataset revealed that DCLK1 is overexpressed in HCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues. High DCLK1-expressing cells had more epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Various tumor suppressor miRNAs were also downregulated in HCC tumors. We evaluated the effects of DCLK1 knockdown on Huh7.5-derived tumor xenograft growth. This was associated with growth arrest and a marked downregulation of cMYC, and EMT transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL, and SLUG via let-7a and miR-200 miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-143/145, a corresponding decrease in pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG, KLF4, and LIN28, and a reduction of let-7a, miR-143/145, and miR-200-specific luciferase activity was observed. These findings suggest that the detection of elevated plasma DCLK1 may provide a cost-effective, less invasive tool for confirmation of clinical signs of cirrhosis, and a potential companion diagnostic marker for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Our results support evaluating DCLK1 as a biomarker for detection and as a therapeutic target for eradicating HCC.

  9. Sequential systemic administrations of combretastatin A4 Phosphate and radioiodinated hypericin exert synergistic targeted theranostic effects with prolonged survival on SCID mice carrying bifocal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Chen, Feng; Feng, Yuanbo; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Guozhi; Nuyts, Johan; de Witte, Peter; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Jie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Based on the soil-to-seeds principle, we explored the small-molecular sequential dual-targeting theranostic strategy (SMSDTTS) for prolonged survival and imaging detectability in a xenograft tumor model. Thirty severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing bilateral radiation-induced fibrosarcoma-1 (RIF-1) subcutaneously were divided into group A of SMSDTTS with sequential intravenous injections of combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) and (131)I-iodohypericin ((131)I-Hyp) at a 24 h interval; group B of single targeting control with CA4P and vehicle of (131)I-Hyp; and group C of vehicle control (10 mice per group). Tumoricidal events were monitored by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and planar gamma scintiscan, and validated by ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology. Besides, 9 mice received sequential intravenous injections of CA4P and (131)I-Hyp were subjected to biodistribution analysis at 24, 72 and 120 h. Gamma counting revealed fast clearance of (131)I-Hyp from normal organs but intense accumulation in necrotic tumor over 120 h. After only one treatment, significantly prolonged survival (p<0.001) was found in group A compared to group B and C with median survival of 33, 22, and 21 days respectively. Tumor volume on day 15 was 2.0 ± 0.89, 5.66 ± 1.66, and 5.02 ± 1.0 cm(3) with tumor doubling time 7.8 ± 2.8, 4.4 ± 0.67, and 4.5 ± 0.5 days respectively. SMSDTTS treated tumors were visualized as hot spots on gamma scintiscans, and necrosis over tumor ratio remained consistently high on MRI, autoradiography and histology. The synergistic antitumor effects, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theranostic property, and good tolerance of the SMSDTTS were evident in this experiment, which warrants further development for preclinical and clinical applications.

  10. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  11. α-Mangostin: a dietary antioxidant derived from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. inhibits pancreatic tumor growth in xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-08-10

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC.

  12. Pancreatic tumor mass in a xenograft mouse model is decreased by treatment with therapeutic stem cells following introduction of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Jin; Yi, Bo-Rim; Lee, Hye-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related mortality. In the present study, we employed 2 types of therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase (CD) with or without human interferon-β (IFN‑β), HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells, respectively, to selectively treat pancreatic cancer. The CD gene converts the non-toxic prodrug, 5-flurorocytosine (5-FC), into the toxic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In addition, human IFN-β is a potent cytokine that has antitumor effects. To generate a xenograft mouse model, PANC-1 cells (2x10(6)/mouse) cultured in DMEM containing 10% FBS were mixed with Matrigel and were subcutaneously injected into Balb/c nu/nu mice. In the migration assay, the stem cells expressing the CD or IFN-β gene effectively migrated toward the pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting the presence of chemoattractant factors secreted by the pancreatic tumors. In the co-culture and MTT assay, antitumor activity of the therapeutic stem cells was observed in the presence of 5-FC was shown that the growth of PANC-1 cells was inhibited. Furthermore, these effects were confirmed in the xenograft mouse model bearing tumors originating from PANC-1 cells. Analyses by histological and fluorescence microscopy showed that treatment with the stem cells resulted in the inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in the presence of 5-FC. Taken together, these results indicate that stem cells expressing the CD and/or IFN-β gene can be used to effectively treat pancreatic cancer and reduce the side-effects associated with conventional therapies.

  13. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R regresses an osteosarcoma in a patient-derived xenograft model resistant to a molecular-targeting drug

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Nelson, Scott D.; Dry, Sarah M.; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara; Federman, Noah; Singh, Arun; Elliott, Irmina; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma occurs mostly in children and young adults, who are treated with multiple agents in combination with limb-salvage surgery. However, the overall 5-year survival rate for patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma is 20-30% which has not improved significantly over 30 years. Refractory patients would benefit from precise individualized therapy. We report here that a patient-derived osteosarcoma growing in a subcutaneous nude-mouse model was regressed by tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R, p<0.001 compared to untreated control). The osteosarcoma was only partially sensitive to the molecular-targeting drug sorafenib, which did not arrest its growth. S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more effective than sorafenib (P <0.001). S. typhimurium grew in the treated tumors and caused extensive necrosis of the tumor tissue. These data show that S. typhimurium A1-R is powerful therapy for an osteosarcoma patient-derived xenograft model. PMID:28030831

  14. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R regresses an osteosarcoma in a patient-derived xenograft model resistant to a molecular-targeting drug.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara; Federman, Noah; Singh, Arun; Elliott, Irmina; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-01-31

    Osteosarcoma occurs mostly in children and young adults, who are treated with multiple agents in combination with limb-salvage surgery. However, the overall 5-year survival rate for patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma is 20-30% which has not improved significantly over 30 years. Refractory patients would benefit from precise individualized therapy. We report here that a patient-derived osteosarcoma growing in a subcutaneous nude-mouse model was regressed by tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R, p<0.001 compared to untreated control). The osteosarcoma was only partially sensitive to the molecular-targeting drug sorafenib, which did not arrest its growth. S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more effective than sorafenib (P <0.001). S. typhimurium grew in the treated tumors and caused extensive necrosis of the tumor tissue. These data show that S. typhimurium A1-R is powerful therapy for an osteosarcoma patient-derived xenograft model.

  15. Dynamics of different-sized solid-state nanocrystals as tracers for a drug-delivery system in the interstitium of a human tumor xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Masaaki; Higuchi, Hideo; Takeda, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent anticancer drugs have been made larger to pass selectively through tumor vessels and stay in the interstitium. Understanding drug movement in association with its size at the single-molecule level and estimating the time needed to reach the targeted organ is indispensable for optimizing drug delivery because single cell-targeted therapy is the ongoing paradigm. This report describes the tracking of single solid nanoparticles in tumor xenografts and the estimation of arrival time. Methods Different-sized nanoparticles measuring 20, 40, and 100 nm were injected into the tail vein of the female Balb/c nu/nu mice bearing human breast cancer on their backs. The movements of the nanoparticles were visualized through the dorsal skin-fold chamber with the high-speed confocal microscopy that we manufactured. Results An analysis of the particle trajectories revealed diffusion to be inversely related to the particle size and position in the tumor, whereas the velocity of the directed movement was related to the position. The difference in the velocity was the greatest for 40-nm particles in the perivascular to the intercellular region: difference = 5.8 nm/s. The arrival time of individual nanoparticles at tumor cells was simulated. The estimated times for the 20-, 40-, and 100-nm particles to reach the tumor cells were 158.0, 218.5, and 389.4 minutes, respectively, after extravasation. Conclusions This result suggests that the particle size can be individually designed for each goal. These data and methods are also important for understanding drug pharmacokinetics. Although this method may be subject to interference by surface molecules attached on the particles, it has the potential to elucidate the pharmacokinetics involved in constructing novel drug-delivery systems involving cell-targeted therapy. PMID:19575785

  16. Dynamics of different-sized solid-state nanocrystals as tracers for a drug-delivery system in the interstitium of a human tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Masaaki; Higuchi, Hideo; Takeda, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2009-01-01

    Recent anticancer drugs have been made larger to pass selectively through tumor vessels and stay in the interstitium. Understanding drug movement in association with its size at the single-molecule level and estimating the time needed to reach the targeted organ is indispensable for optimizing drug delivery because single cell-targeted therapy is the ongoing paradigm. This report describes the tracking of single solid nanoparticles in tumor xenografts and the estimation of arrival time. Different-sized nanoparticles measuring 20, 40, and 100 nm were injected into the tail vein of the female Balb/c nu/nu mice bearing human breast cancer on their backs. The movements of the nanoparticles were visualized through the dorsal skin-fold chamber with the high-speed confocal microscopy that we manufactured. An analysis of the particle trajectories revealed diffusion to be inversely related to the particle size and position in the tumor, whereas the velocity of the directed movement was related to the position. The difference in the velocity was the greatest for 40-nm particles in the perivascular to the intercellular region: difference = 5.8 nm/s. The arrival time of individual nanoparticles at tumor cells was simulated. The estimated times for the 20-, 40-, and 100-nm particles to reach the tumor cells were 158.0, 218.5, and 389.4 minutes, respectively, after extravasation. This result suggests that the particle size can be individually designed for each goal. These data and methods are also important for understanding drug pharmacokinetics. Although this method may be subject to interference by surface molecules attached on the particles, it has the potential to elucidate the pharmacokinetics involved in constructing novel drug-delivery systems involving cell-targeted therapy.

  17. β-HPV Infection Correlates with Early Stages of Carcinogenesis in Skin Tumors and Patient-Derived Xenografts from a Kidney Transplant Recipient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Borgogna, Cinzia; Olivero, Carlotta; Lanfredini, Simone; Calati, Federica; De Andrea, Marco; Zavattaro, Elisa; Savoia, Paola; Trisolini, Elena; Boldorini, Renzo; Patel, Girish K; Gariglio, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Many malignancies that occur in high excess in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are due to viruses that thrive in the setting of immunosuppression. Keratinocyte carcinoma (KC), the most frequently occurring cancer type in KTR, has been associated with skin infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) from the beta genus. In this report, we extend our previous investigation aimed at identifying the presence of active β-HPV infection in skin tumors from KTRs through detection of viral protein expression. Using a combination of antibodies raised against the E4 and L1 proteins of the β-genotypes, we were able to visualize infection in five tumors [one keratoacanthoma (KA), three actinic keratoses (AKs), and one seborrheic keratoses (SKs)] that were all removed from two patients who had been both transplanted twice, had developed multiple KCs, and presented with a long history of immunosuppression (>30 years). These infected tissues displayed intraepidermal hyperplasia and increased expression of the ΔNp63 protein, which extended into the upper epithelial layers. In addition, using a xenograft model system in nude mice displaying a humanized stromal bed in the site of grafting, we successfully engrafted three AKs, two of which were derived from the aforementioned KTRs and displayed β-HPV infection in the original tumor. Of note, one AK-derived xenograft, along with its ensuing lymph node metastasis, was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the latter, both β-HPV infection and ΔNp63 expression were no longer detectable. Although the overall success rate of engrafting was very low, the results of this study show for the first time that β-HPV + and ΔNp63 + intraepidermal hyperplasia can indeed progress to an aggressive SCC able to metastasize. Consistent with a series of reports attributing a causative role of β-HPV at early stages of skin carcinogenesis through ΔNp63 induction and increased keratinocytes stemness, here we provide in vivo evidence that

  18. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  19. Correlation of 360-degree Surface Mapping In Vivo Bioluminescence with Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography in Human Xenograft Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Brannen, Andrew; Eggert, Matthew; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Arnold, Robert; Panizzi, Peter

    2018-02-20

    Pre-clinical monitoring of tumor growth and identification of distal metastasis requires a balance between accuracy and expediency. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is often used to track tumor growth but is primarily limited to planar 2-dimensional (2D) imaging. Consistent subject placement within a standard top-mounted, single-detector small animal imager is vital to reducing variability in repeated same-animal measures over time. Here, we describe a method for tracking tumor development using a multi-angle BLI and photo-acoustic workflow. We correlate serial caliper measurements and 2D BLI to 360° BLI and photo-acoustic datasets for the same animals. Full 360° BLI showed improved correlations with both volumes obtained from caliper measurements and photo-acoustic segmentation, as compared to planar BLI. We also determined segmented tumor volumes from photo-acoustic datasets more accurately reflects true excised tumors' volumes compared to caliper measurements. Our results demonstrate the distinct advantages of both 360° surface mapping by BLI and photo-acoustic methodologies for non-invasive tracking of tumor growth in pre-clinical academic settings. Furthermore, our design is fully implementable in all top-mounted, single-detector imagers, thereby providing the opportunity to shift the paradigm away from planar BLI into rapid BLI tomography applications.

  20. Anticancer Effect of Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish Venom on HepG2 Cells and a Tumor Xenograft Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seong Kyeong; Kim, Munki; Pyo, Min Jung; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Sujeoung; Yoon, Won Duk; Han, Chang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Various kinds of animal venoms and their components have been widely studied for potential therapeutic applications. This study evaluated whether Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV) has anticancer activity. NnV strongly induced cytotoxicity of HepG2 cells through apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by alterations of chromatic morphology, activation of procaspase-3, and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, NnV inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, PDK1, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and 4EBP1, whereas it enhanced the expression of p-PTEN. Interestingly, NnV also inactivated the negative feedback loops associated with Akt activation, as demonstrated by downregulation of Akt at Ser473 and mTOR at Ser2481. The anticancer effect of NnV was significant in a HepG2 xenograft mouse model, with no obvious toxicity. HepG2 cell death by NnV was inhibited by tetracycline, metalloprotease inhibitor, suggesting that metalloprotease component in NnV is closely related to the anticancer effects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that NnV exerts highly selective cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells via dual inhibition of the Akt and mTOR signaling pathways, but not in normal cells. PMID:28785288

  1. Sulforaphane suppresses the growth of glioblastoma cells, glioblastoma stem cell-like spheroids, and tumor xenografts through multiple cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Reza Saadatzadeh, M; Wang, Haiyan; Nguyen, Angie; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; Cai, Wenjing; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Halum, Stacey L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Pollok, Karen E; Safa, Ahmad R

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Defects in the apoptotic machinery and augmented survival signals contribute to drug resistance in glioblastoma (GBM). Moreover, another complexity related to GBM treatment is the concept that GBM development and recurrence may arise from the expression of GBM stem cells (GSCs). Therefore, the use of a multifaceted approach or multitargeted agents that affect specific tumor cell characteristics will likely be necessary to successfully eradicate GBM. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of sulforaphane (SFN)-a constituent of cruciferous vegetables with a multitargeted effect-as a therapeutic agent for GBM. METHODS The inhibitory effects of SFN on established cell lines, early primary cultures, CD133-positive GSCs, GSC-derived spheroids, and GBM xenografts were evaluated using various methods, including GSC isolation and the sphere-forming assay, analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, cell growth inhibition assay, comet assays for assessing SFN-triggered DNA damage, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, and the determination of in vivo efficacy as assessed in human GBM xenograft models. RESULTS SFN triggered the significant inhibition of cell survival and induced apoptotic cell death, which was associated with caspase 3 and caspase 7 activation. Moreover, SFN triggered the formation of mitochondrial ROS, and SFN-triggered cell death was ROS dependent. Comet assays revealed that SFN increased single- and double-strand DNA breaks in GBM. Compared with the vehicle control cells, a significantly higher amount of γ-H2AX foci correlated with an increase in DNA double-strand breaks in the SFN-treated samples. Furthermore, SFN robustly inhibited the growth of GBM cell-induced cell death in established cell cultures and early-passage primary cultures and, most importantly, was effective in eliminating GSCs, which play a major role in drug resistance and disease recurrence. In vivo studies revealed that SFN

  2. Assessment of Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetics Using 1-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tryptophan and α-11C-Methyl-l-Tryptophan PET Imaging in Mice Implanted with Patient-Derived Brain Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Muzik, Otto; Guastella, Anthony R; Klinger, Neil V; Polin, Lisa A; Cai, Hancheng; Xin, Yangchun; Mangner, Thomas J; Zhang, Shaohui; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of a variety of human diseases including cancers. α- 11 C-methyl-l-tryptophan ( 11 C-AMT) PET imaging demonstrated increased tryptophan uptake and trapping in epileptic foci and brain tumors, but the short half-life of 11 C limits its widespread clinical application. Recent in vitro studies suggested that the novel radiotracer 1-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-l-tryptophan ( 18 F-FETrp) may be useful to assess tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In this study, we tested in vivo organ and tumor uptake and kinetics of 18 F-FETrp in patient-derived xenograft mouse models and compared them with 11 C-AMT uptake. Xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma and metastatic brain tumors (from lung and breast cancer) were developed by subcutaneous implantation of patient tumor fragments. Dynamic PET scans with 18 F-FETrp and 11 C-AMT were obtained for mice bearing human brain tumors 1-7 d apart. The biodistribution and tumoral SUVs for both tracers were compared. 18 F-FETrp showed prominent uptake in the pancreas and no bone uptake, whereas 11 C-AMT showed higher uptake in the kidneys. Both tracers showed uptake in the xenograft tumors, with a plateau of approximately 30 min after injection; however, 18 F-FETrp showed higher tumoral SUV than 11 C-AMT in all 3 tumor types tested. The radiation dosimetry for 18 F-FETrp determined from the mouse data compared favorably with the clinical 18 F-FDG PET tracer. 18 F-FETrp tumoral uptake, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry data provide strong preclinical evidence that this new radiotracer warrants further studies that may lead to a broadly applicable molecular imaging tool to examine abnormal tryptophan metabolism in human tumors. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. Assessment of Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetics Using 1-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tryptophan and α-11C-Methyl-l-Tryptophan PET Imaging in Mice Implanted with Patient-Derived Brain Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Muzik, Otto; Guastella, Anthony R.; Klinger, Neil V.; Polin, Lisa A.; Cai, Hancheng; Xin, Yangchun; Mangner, Thomas J.; Zhang, Shaohui; Juhász, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of a variety of human diseases including cancers. α-11C-methyl-l-tryptophan (11C-AMT) PET imaging demonstrated increased tryptophan uptake and trapping in epileptic foci and brain tumors, but the short half-life of 11C limits its widespread clinical application. Recent in vitro studies suggested that the novel radiotracer 1-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-l-tryptophan (18F-FETrp) may be useful to assess tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In this study, we tested in vivo organ and tumor uptake and kinetics of 18F-FETrp in patient-derived xenograft mouse models and compared them with 11C-AMT uptake. Methods: Xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma and metastatic brain tumors (from lung and breast cancer) were developed by subcutaneous implantation of patient tumor fragments. Dynamic PET scans with 18F-FETrp and 11C-AMT were obtained for mice bearing human brain tumors 1–7 d apart. The biodistribution and tumoral SUVs for both tracers were compared. Results: 18F-FETrp showed prominent uptake in the pancreas and no bone uptake, whereas 11C-AMT showed higher uptake in the kidneys. Both tracers showed uptake in the xenograft tumors, with a plateau of approximately 30 min after injection; however, 18F-FETrp showed higher tumoral SUV than 11C-AMT in all 3 tumor types tested. The radiation dosimetry for 18F-FETrp determined from the mouse data compared favorably with the clinical 18F-FDG PET tracer. Conclusion: 18F-FETrp tumoral uptake, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry data provide strong preclinical evidence that this new radiotracer warrants further studies that may lead to a broadly applicable molecular imaging tool to examine abnormal tryptophan metabolism in human tumors. PMID:27765857

  4. Salivary gland cancer patient-derived xenografts enable characterization of cancer stem cells and new gene fusions associated with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Keysar, Stephen; Eagles, Justin; Miller, Bettina; Jackson, Brian C; Chowdhury, Farshad N; Reisinger, Julie; Chimed, Tugs-Saikhan; Le, Phuong N; Morton, J Jason; Somerset, Hilary; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Tan, Aik-Choon; Song, John I; Bowles, Daniel W; Reyland, Mary E; Jimeno, Antonio

    2018-03-19

    Salivary gland cancers (SGC) frequently present with distant metastases many years after diagnosis, suggesting a cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation that initiates late recurrences; however current models are limited both in their availability and suitability to characterize these rare cells. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) were generated by engrafting patient tissue onto nude mice from one acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC), four adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), and three mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) cases, which were derived from successive relapses from the same MEC patient. Patient and PDX samples were analyzed by RNA-seq and Exome-seq. Sphere formation potential and in vivo tumorigenicity was assessed by sorting for Aldefluor (ALDH) activity and CD44 expressing subpopulations. For successive MEC relapses we found a time-dependent increase in CSCs (ALDH+CD44high), increasing from 0.2% to 4.5% (P=0.033), but more importantly we observed an increase in individual CSC sphere formation and tumorigenic potential. A 50% increase in mutational burden was documented in subsequent MEC tumors, and this was associated with increased expression of tumor promoting genes (MT1E, LGR5, LEF1), decreased expression of tumor suppressor genes (CDKN2B, SIK1, TP53), and higher expression of CSC-related proteins such as SOX2, MYC, and ALDH1A1. Finally, genomic analyses identified a novel NFIB-MTFR2 fusion in an ACC tumor and confirmed previously reported fusions (NTRK3-ETV6 and MYB-NFIB). Sequential MEC PDX models preserved key patient features and enabled the identification of genetic events putatively contributing to increases in both CSC proportion and intrinsic tumorigenicity, which mirrored the patient's clinical course. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Anti-metastasis activity of black rice anthocyanins against breast cancer: analyses using an ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell line and tumoral xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Ping; Han, Bin; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Peng, Xiao-Li; Zou, Qiang; Li, Sui-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence from animal, epidemiological and clinical investigations suggest that dietary anthocyanins have potential to prevent chronic diseases, including cancers. It is also noteworthy that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2) protein overexpression or ErbB2 gene amplification has been included as an indicator for metastasis and higher risk of recurrence for breast cancer. The present experiments investigated the anti-metastasis effects of black rice anthocyanins (BRACs) on ErbB2 positive breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of BRACs (150 mg/kg/day) reduced transplanted tumor growth, inhibited pulmonary metastasis, and decreased lung tumor nodules in BALB/c nude mice bearing ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 xenografts. The capacity for migration, adhesion, motility and invasion was also inhibited by BRACs in MDA-MB-453 cells in a concentration dependent manner, accompanied by decreased activity of a transfer promoting factor, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Together, our results indicated that BRACs possess anti-metastasis potential against ErbB2 positive human breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro through inhibition of metastasis promoting molecules.

  6. In vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of the VO-chrysin complex on a new three-dimensional osteosarcoma spheroids model and a xenograft tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    León, Ignacio E; Cadavid-Vargas, Juan F; Resasco, Agustina; Maschi, Fabricio; Ayala, Miguel A; Carbone, Cecilia; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary tumor of bone, occurring predominantly in the second decade of life. High-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgical resection have improved prognosis, with long-term survival for patients with localized disease. Vanadium is an ultra-trace element that after being absorbed accumulates in bone. Besides, vanadium compounds have been studied during recent years to be considered as representative of a new class of non-platinum antitumor agents. Moreover, flavonoids are a wide family of polyphenolic compounds that display many interesting biological effects. Since coordination of ligands to metals can improve the pharmacological properties, we report herein, for the first time, the in vitro and in vivo effects of an oxidovanadium(IV) complex with the flavonoid chrysin on the new 3D human osteosarcoma and xenograft osteosarcoma mice models. The pharmacological results show that VOchrys inhibited the cell viability affecting the shape and volume of the spheroids and VOchrys suppressed MG-63 tumor growth in the nude mice without inducing toxicity and side effects. As a whole, the results presented herein demonstrate that the antitumor action of the complex was very promissory on human osteosarcoma models, whereby suggesting that VOchrys is a potentially good candidate for future use in alternative antitumor treatments.

  7. Quantitative optical spectroscopy can identify long-term local tumor control in irradiated murine head and neck xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Klein, Daniel; Chang, Kevin; Schroeder, Thies; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2009-09-01

    Noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of tumor oxygenation status using quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is used to test whether a final treatment outcome could be estimated from early optical signatures in a murine model of head and neck cancer when treated with radiation. Implanted tumors in the flank of 23 nude mice are exposed to 39 Gy of radiation, while 11 animals exposed to sham irradiation serve as controls. Diffuse optical reflectance is measured from the tumors at baseline (prior to irradiation) and then serially until 17 days posttreatment. The fastest and greatest increase in baseline-corrected blood oxygen saturation levels are observed from the animals that show complete tumor regression with no recurrence 90 days postirradiation, relative to both untreated and treated animals with local recurrences. These increases in saturation are observed starting 5 days posttreatment and last up to 17 days posttreatment. This preclinical study demonstrates that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could provide a practical method far more effective than the growth delay assay to prognosticate treatment outcome in solid tumors and may hold significant translational promise.

  8. [Abnormal expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor].

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Yan, X D; Cai, Y; Gu, J J; Yang, X L; Pan, L H; Wang, L; Yao, D F

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in liver cancer and the inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor. Methods: A total of 40 patients with primary liver cancer were enrolled, and 40 samples of cancer lesions, peri-cancerous tissues (with a distance of 2 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), or distal liver tissues (with a distance of 5 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), with a weight of 200 mg, were collected after surgery. Some of these samples were used for pathological examination, and the rest were stored at -85°C. A total of 18 BALB/c nude mice aged 4-6 weeks with a body weight of 18-20 g (9 male and 9 female mice) were randomly divided into control group, negative control group, and co-intervention group, with 6 mice in each group, and fed under specific pathogen-free conditions. The cell line was cultured in the dimethyl sulfoxide complete medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum in a CO 2 incubator at 37°C. When the cell confluence reached 90% after cell inoculation, shRNA was divided into co-intervention group, negative control group, and untreated control group and were transfected to hepatoma cells using PolyJetTM transfection reagent. Stable cell clones obtained by G418 screening and used for the in vivo study. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze the expression of IGF-IR in the human hepatoma tissue and cell line. The IGF-IR shRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids were established and screened for the most effective sequence; they were transfected to PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, and the CCK-8 assay was used to analyze the changes in cell proliferation. The stable cell line screened out by G418 was inoculated to establish the subcutaneous xenograft tumor in nude mice. The tumor growth curve was plotted and histological examination was performed. Graphpad Prism 5.0 and SPSS 18.0 were used for plotting and data

  9. Scopoletin, an active principle of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) inhibits human tumor vascularization in xenograft models and modulates ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2 in computer model.

    PubMed

    Tabana, Yasser M; Hassan, Loiy Elsir A; Ahamed, Mohamed B Khadeer; Dahham, Saad S; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Saeed, Mohammed A A; Khan, Md Shamsuddin S; Sandai, Doblin; Majid, Aman S Abdul; Oon, Chern Ein; Majid, Amin Malik S A

    2016-09-01

    We recently reported the antineovascularization effect of scopoletin on rat aorta and identified its potential anti-angiogenic activity. Scopoletin could be useful as a systemic chemotherapeutic agent against angiogenesis-dependent malignancies if its antitumorigenic activity is investigated and scientifically proven using a suitable human tumor xenograft model. In the present study, bioassay-guided (anti-angiogenesis) phytochemical investigation was conducted on Nicotiana glauca extract which led to the isolation of scopoletin. Further, anti-angiogenic activity of scopoletin was characterized using ex vivo, in vivo and in silico angiogenesis models. Finally, the antitumorigenic efficacy of scopoletin was studied in human colorectal tumor xenograft model using athymic nude mice. For the first time, an in vivo anticancer activity of scopoletin was reported and characterized using xenograft models. Scopoletin caused significant suppression of sprouting of microvessels in rat aortic explants with IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) 0.06μM. Scopoletin (100 and 200mg/kg) strongly inhibited (59.72 and 89.4%, respectively) vascularization in matrigel plugs implanted in nude mice. In the tumor xenograft model, scopoletin showed remarkable inhibition on tumor growth (34.2 and 94.7% at 100 and 200mg/kg, respectively). Tumor histology revealed drastic reduction of the extent of vascularization. Further, immunostaining of CD31 and NG2 receptors in the histological sections confirmed the antivascular effect of scopoletin in tumor vasculature. In computer modeling, scopoletin showed strong ligand affinity and binding energies toward the following angiogenic factors: protein kinase (ERK1), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These results suggest that the antitumor activity of scopoletin may be due to its strong anti-angiogenic effect, which may be mediated by its effective inhibition of ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2. Copyright

  10. In vivo labeling of B16 melanoma tumor xenograft with a thiol-reactive gadolinium based MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Menchise, Valeria; Digilio, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Cittadino, Evelina; Catanzaro, Valeria; Carrera, Carla; Aime, Silvio

    2011-10-03

    Murine melanoma B16 cells display on the extracellular side of the plasma membrane a large number of reactive protein thiols (exofacial protein thiols, EPTs). These EPTs can be chemically labeled with Gd-DO3A-PDP, a Gd(III)-based MRI contrast agent bearing a 2-pyridinedithio chemical function for the recognition of EPTs. Uptake of gadolinium up to 10(9) Gd atoms per cell can be achieved. The treatment of B16 cells ex vivo with a reducing agent such as tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) results in an increase by 850% of available EPTs and an increase by 45% of Gd uptake. Blocking EPTs with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) caused a decrease by 84% of available EPTs and a decrease by 55% of Gd uptake. The amount of Gd taken up by B16 cells is therefore dependent upon the availability of EPTs, whose actual level in turn changes according to the extracellular redox microenvironment. Then Gd-DO3A-PDP has been assessed for the labeling of tumor cells in vivo on B16.F10 melanoma tumor-bearing mice. Gd-DO3A-PDP (or Gd-DO3A as the control) has been injected directly into the tumor region at a dose level of 0.1 μmol and the signal enhancement in MR images followed over time. The washout kinetics of Gd-DO3A-PDP from tumor is very slow if compared to that of control Gd-DO3A, and 48 h post injection, the gadolinium-enhancement is still clearly visible. Therefore, B16 cells can be labeled ex vivo as well as in vivo according to a common EPTs-dependent route, provided that high levels of the thiol reactive probe can be delivered to the tumor.

  11. NOTCH Pathway Blockade Depletes CD133-Positive Glioblastoma Cells and Inhibits Growth of Tumor Neurospheres and Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Khaki, Leila; Zhu, Thant S.; Soules, Mary E.; Talsma, Caroline E.; Gul, Naheed; Koh, Cheryl; Zhang, Jiangyang; Li, Yue-Ming; Maciaczyk, Jarek; Nikkhah, Guido; DiMeco, Francesco; Piccirillo, Sara; Vescovi, Angelo L.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be critical for the engraftment and long-term growth of many tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). The cells are at least partially spared by traditional chemotherapies and radiation therapies, and finding new treatments that can target CSCs may be critical for improving patient survival. It has been shown that the NOTCH signaling pathway regulates normal stem cells in the brain, and that GBMs contain stem-like cells with higher NOTCH activity. We therefore used low-passage and established GBM-derived neurosphere cultures to examine the overall requirement for NOTCH activity, and also examined the effects on tumor cells expressing stem cell markers. NOTCH blockade by γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) reduced neurosphere growth and clonogenicity in vitro, whereas expression of an active form of NOTCH2 increased tumor growth. The putative CSC markers CD133, NESTIN, BMI1, and OLIG2 were reduced following NOTCH blockade. When equal numbers of viable cells pretreated with either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) or GSI were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, the former always formed tumors, whereas the latter did not. In vivo delivery of GSI by implantation of drug-impregnated polymer beads also effectively blocked tumor growth, and significantly prolonged survival, albeit in a relatively small cohort of animals. We found that NOTCH pathway inhibition appears to deplete stem-like cancer cells through reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis associated with decreased AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation. In summary, we demonstrate that NOTCH pathway blockade depletes stem-like cells in GBMs, suggesting that GSIs may be useful as chemotherapeutic reagents to target CSCs in malignant gliomas. PMID:19904829

  12. Catabolism of (64)Cu and Cy5.5-labeled human serum albumin in a tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Choong Mo; Kim, Hyunjung; Koo, Hyun-Jung; Park, Jin Won; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae; Choe, Yearn Seong

    2016-07-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma, has been used as a drug carrier for the last few decades. Residualizingly radiolabeled serum albumin has been reported to be avidly taken up by tumors of sarcoma-bearing mice and to most likely undergo lysosomal degradation. In this study, we prepared (64)Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and Cy5.5-conjugated HSA (dual probe), and evaluated its tumor uptake and catabolism. Two dual probes were prepared using different DOTA conjugation sites of HSA (one via Lys residues and the other via the Cys residue). (64)Cu-DOTA-Lys-HSA-Cy5.5 (dual probe-Lys) exhibited higher uptake by RR1022 sarcoma cells in vitro than (64)Cu-DOTA-Cys-HSA-Cy5.5 (dual probe-Cys). In RR1022 tumor-bearing mice, the two dual probes showed a similar level of tumor uptake, but uptake of dual probe-Lys was reduced in the liver and spleen compared to dual probe-Cys, probably because of the presence of a higher number of DOTA molecules in the former. At 24 and 48 h after injection, dual probe-Lys was intact or partially degraded in blood, liver, kidney, and tumor samples, but (64)Cu-DOTA-Lys was observed in the urine using radioactivity detection. Similarly, Cy5.5-Lys was observed in the urine using fluorescence detection. These results indicate that dual probe-Lys may be useful for predicting the catabolic fate of drug-HSA conjugates.

  13. Correlation of ultrasound contrast agent derived blood flow parameters with immunohistochemical angiogenesis markers in murine xenograft tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Wilson, Christian C.; Ro, Raymond J.; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study we used temporal analysis of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) wash-in to estimate blood flow dynamics and demonstrate their improved correlation to angiogenesis markers relative to previously reported, non-temporal fractional vascularity estimates. Materials and Methods Breast tumor (NMU) or glioma (C6) cells were implanted in either the abdomen or thigh of 144 rats. After 6, 8 or 10 days, rats received a bolus UCA injection of Optison (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ; 0.4ml/kg) during power Doppler imaging (PDI), harmonic imaging (HI), and microflow imaging (MFI) using an Aplio ultrasound scanner with 7.5 MHz linear array (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Time-intensity curves of contrast wash-in were constructed on a pixel-by-pixel basis and averaged to calculate maximum intensity, time to peak, perfusion, and time integrated intensity (TII). Tumors were then stained for 4 immunohistochemical markers (bFGF, CD31, COX-2, and VEGF). Correlations between temporal parameters and the angiogenesis markers were investigated for each imaging mode. Effects of tumor model and implant location on these correlations were also investigated. Results Significant correlation over the entire dataset was only observed between TII and VEGF for all three imaging modes (R=−0.35,−0.54,−0.32 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0001). Tumor type and location affected these correlations, with the strongest correlation of TII to VEGF found to be with implanted C6 cells (R=−0.43,−0.54,−0.52 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0002). Conclusions While UCA-derived temporal blood flow parameters were found to correlate strongly with VEGF expression, these correlations were also found to be influenced by both tumor type and implant location. PMID:23659876

  14. A bispecific antibody targeting IGF-IR and EGFR has tumor and metastasis suppressive activity in an orthotopic xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gvozdenovic, Ana; Boro, Aleksandar; Born, Walter; Muff, Roman; Fuchs, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a highly aggressive bone cancer and the second most frequent cause of cancer-associated death in childhood and adolescence. Pulmonary metastases account for the high mortality rate in osteosarcoma patients. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches, efficiently restraining the metastatic disease, are mandatory for a significant improvement of the currently poor patients’ survival. Although initial studies with antibodies targeting insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) showed promising potential for the treatment of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, phase II clinical trials revealed variable results, which implied activation of alternative signaling pathways leading to therapy resistance. Since a cross-talk between IGF-IR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been demonstrated in several cancer types, co-targeting of these two receptors was considered in the present study as a valuable therapeutic strategy to overcome single-agent treatment resistance in osteosarcoma. The effects of IGF-IR and/or EGFR targeting by intraperitoneal administration of the monospecific IGF-IR antibody R1507 or the EGFR antibody Cetuximab or the bispecific IGF-IR/EGFR antibody XGFR* on primary tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis were investigated in an intratibial human xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model. In vitro functional assays demonstrated that targeting IGF-IR and EGFR didn’t affect osteosarcoma cell viability, but inhibited ligand-activated intracellular signaling and cell migratory capacity. The blocking potential of ligand-induced signaling in vitro was similar for all antibodies, but, in vivo, only XGFR* treatment significantly inhibited intratibial primary tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. The therapeutic response to XGFR* was associated with an infiltration of innate immune system effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Taken together, our study highlights the bispecific anti-IGF-IR/EGFR antibody XGFR* as an

  15. A bispecific antibody targeting IGF-IR and EGFR has tumor and metastasis suppressive activity in an orthotopic xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gvozdenovic, Ana; Boro, Aleksandar; Born, Walter; Muff, Roman; Fuchs, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a highly aggressive bone cancer and the second most frequent cause of cancer-associated death in childhood and adolescence. Pulmonary metastases account for the high mortality rate in osteosarcoma patients. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches, efficiently restraining the metastatic disease, are mandatory for a significant improvement of the currently poor patients' survival. Although initial studies with antibodies targeting insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) showed promising potential for the treatment of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, phase II clinical trials revealed variable results, which implied activation of alternative signaling pathways leading to therapy resistance. Since a cross-talk between IGF-IR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been demonstrated in several cancer types, co-targeting of these two receptors was considered in the present study as a valuable therapeutic strategy to overcome single-agent treatment resistance in osteosarcoma. The effects of IGF-IR and/or EGFR targeting by intraperitoneal administration of the monospecific IGF-IR antibody R1507 or the EGFR antibody Cetuximab or the bispecific IGF-IR/EGFR antibody XGFR* on primary tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis were investigated in an intratibial human xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model. In vitro functional assays demonstrated that targeting IGF-IR and EGFR didn't affect osteosarcoma cell viability, but inhibited ligand-activated intracellular signaling and cell migratory capacity. The blocking potential of ligand-induced signaling in vitro was similar for all antibodies, but, in vivo , only XGFR* treatment significantly inhibited intratibial primary tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. The therapeutic response to XGFR* was associated with an infiltration of innate immune system effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Taken together, our study highlights the bispecific anti-IGF-IR/EGFR antibody XGFR* as an

  16. The iron chelator, deferasirox, as a novel strategy for cancer treatment: oral activity against human lung tumor xenografts and molecular mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Lui, Goldie Y L; Obeidy, Peyman; Ford, Samuel J; Tselepis, Chris; Sharp, Danae M; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2013-01-01

    Deferasirox is an orally effective iron (Fe) chelator currently used for the treatment of iron-overload disease and has been implemented as an alternative to the gold standard chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO). Earlier studies demonstrated that DFO exhibits anticancer activity due to its ability to deplete cancer cells of iron. In this investigation, we examined the in vitro and in vivo activity of deferasirox against cells from human solid tumors. To date, there have been no studies to investigate the effect of deferasirox on these types of tumors in vivo. Deferasirox demonstrated similar activity at inhibiting proliferation of DMS-53 lung carcinoma and SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma cell lines compared with DFO. Furthermore, deferasirox was generally similar or slightly more effective than DFO at mobilizing cellular (59)Fe and inhibiting iron uptake from human transferrin depending on the cell type. However, deferasirox potently inhibited DMS-53 xenograft growth in nude mice when given by oral gavage, with no marked alterations in normal tissue histology. To understand the antitumor activity of deferasirox, we investigated its effect on the expression of molecules that play key roles in metastasis, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. We demonstrated that deferasirox increased expression of the metastasis suppressor protein N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 and upregulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) while decreasing cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, this agent increased the expression of apoptosis markers, including cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1. Collectively, we demonstrate that deferasirox is an orally effective antitumor agent against solid tumors.

  17. Comparison of Ga-68-Labeled Fusarinine C-Based Multivalent RGD Conjugates and [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD-In Vivo Imaging Studies in Human Xenograft Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chuangyan; Franssen, Gerben M; Petrik, Milos; Laverman, Peter; Summer, Dominik; Rangger, Christine; Haubner, Roland; Haas, Hubertus; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-10-01

    Multimeric arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides have advantages for imaging integrin αvβ3 expression. Here, we compared the in vitro and in vivo behavior of three different Ga-68-labeled multimeric Fusarinine C-RGD (FSC-RGD) conjugates, whereby RGD was coupled directly, via a succinic acid or PEG linker (FSC(RGDfE)3, FSC(succ-RGD)3, FSC(Mal-RGD)3). The positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging properties were further compared using [(68)Ga]FSC(succ-RGD)3 with the monomeric [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD in a murine tumor model. FSC-RGD conjugates were labeled with Ga-68, and stability properties were studied. For in vitro characterization, the partition coefficient, integrin αvβ3 binding affinity, and cell uptake were determined. To characterize the in vivo properties, biodistribution studies and microPET/CT were carried out using mice bearing either human M21/M21-L melanoma or human U87MG glioblastoma tumor xenografts. All FSC-RGD conjugates were quantitatively labeled with Ga-68 within 10 min at RT. The [(68)Ga]FSC-RGD conjugates exhibited high stability and hydrophilic character, with only minor differences between the different conjugates. In vitro and in vivo studies showed enhanced integrin αvβ3 binding affinity, receptor-selective tumor uptake, and rapid renal excretion resulting in good imaging properties. The type of linker between FSC and RGD had no pronounced effect on targeting properties of [(68)Ga]FSC-RGD trimers. In particular, [(68)Ga]FSC(succ-RGD)3 exhibited improved properties compared to [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD, making it an alternative for imaging integrin αvβ3 expression.

  18. α-Mangostin: A Dietary Antioxidant Derived from the Pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. Inhibits Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W.; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. Results: The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. Innovation: We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 682–699. PMID:24295217

  19. [Inhibitory effect of imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin on tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, D C; Wang, L C; Wang, L J; Chen, G; Zhao, Y X; Zhao, Z F; Li, Y H

    2016-05-23

    To evaluate the inhibitory effect of imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin on tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and to explore its possible mechanisms. Human lung cancer A549 cells were injected into Bal B/c nude mice subcutaneously. Twenty-eight healthy male nude mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, imrecoxib group, lobaplatin group and imrecoxib combined with lobaplatin group. Each group was treated with appropriate drugs and the tumor size was measured every five days. The expression of ezrin and E-cadherin protein was detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Ezrin and E-cadherin mRNA were detected by real-time PCR. The tumor inhibition rates of imrecoxib group, lobaplatin group and combination group were 36.7%, 54.6% and 69.2%, respectively. The tumor volumes of imrecoxib group [(905.33±113.31) mm(3)] and combination group [(507.74±77.50) mm(3)] were significantly lower than that of the control group (1355.33±189.04) mm(3) (P<0.05), and the tumor weights were significantly reduced [(1.13±0.14) g, (0.63±0.10) g respectively] vs. (1.69±0.24) g (P<0.05). The expressions of ezrin protein and mRNA in the imrecoxib group and combined treatment group were significantly lower than that of the control group (136.53±35.52, 74.72±19.48 vs. 175.62±21.16 for protein expression level; 0.54±0.03, 0.36±0.03 vs. 1.02±0.02 for mRNA expression level, respectively, P<0.05 for both), while the expression of E-cadherin protein and mRNA in the imrecoxib group and combined treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group (253.78±38.87, 308.94±24.67 vs. 213.66±30.31 for protein expression level; 2.19±0.02, 3.02±0.02 vs. 1.05±0.03 for mRNA expression level, respectively, P<0.05 for both). There was a significant negative correlation between ezrin protein and E-cadherin protein (r=-0.737, P<0.01), as well as between ezrin mRNA and E-cadherin mRNA (r=-0

  20. Targeting tissue factor as a novel therapeutic oncotarget for eradication of cancer stem cells isolated from tumor cell lines, tumor xenografts and patients of breast, lung and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiwei; Xu, Jie; Cheng, Jijun; McMichael, Elizabeth; Yu, Lianbo; Carson, William E

    2017-01-03

    Targeting cancer stem cell (CSC) represents a promising therapeutic approach as it can potentially fight cancer at its root. The challenge is to identify a surface therapeutic oncotarget on CSC. Tissue factor (TF) is known as a common yet specific surface target for cancer cells and tumor neovasculature in several solid cancers. However, it is unknown if TF is expressed by CSCs. Here we demonstrate that TF is constitutively expressed on CD133 positive (CD133+) or CD24-CD44+ CSCs isolated from human cancer cell lines, tumor xenografts from mice and breast tumor tissues from patients. TF-targeted agents, i.e., a factor VII (fVII)-conjugated photosensitizer (fVII-PS for targeted photodynamic therapy) and fVII-IgG1Fc (Immunoconjugate or ICON for immunotherapy), can eradicate CSC via the induction of apoptosis and necrosis and via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that TF is a novel surface therapeutic oncotarget for CSC, in addition to cancer cell TF and tumor angiogenic vascular endothelial TF. Moreover, this research highlights that TF-targeting therapeutics can effectively eradicate CSCs, without drug resistance, isolated from breast, lung and ovarian cancer with potential to translate into other most commonly diagnosed solid cancer, in which TF is also highly expressed.

  1. Tumor growth inhibition by simultaneously blocking epidermal growth factor receptor and cyclooxygenase-2 in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Choe, Mi Sun; Lin, Yan; Sun, Shi-Yong; Wieand, H Samuel; Shin, Hyung Ju C; Chen, Amy; Khuri, Fadlo R; Shin, Dong M

    2005-09-01

    Our previous study revealed that simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) additively or synergistically inhibited growth of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in vitro. However, an in vivo efficacy of this combined treatment in SCCHN has not been studied. Nude mice were pretreated with control (1% Tween 80), ZD1839 (50 mg/kg) alone, celecoxib (50 mg/kg) alone, or a combination of ZD1839 and celecoxib at the same dosages for 7 days before injection of a human SCCHN cell line Tu212. The animals were continuously treated with the agents 5 days a week for about 11 weeks. Tumor growth in the combined treatment was significantly inhibited compared with the control (P < 0.001), ZD1839 (P = 0.005), or celecoxib (P < 0.001). At the same time, a dramatic delay of tumor progression was observed in the combined treatment compared with all other three groups. Molecular analysis showed that the combined treatment significantly decreased prostaglandin E metabolite production. The cooperative effect of these two agents in combination was also associated with down-regulation of phosphorylated EGFR, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 levels and reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and Ki-67 expression. Specifically, gene silencing of both EGFR and COX-2 by small interfering RNA further confirmed the cooperative antitumor effect. The current results strongly suggest that a cooperative effect of the combined treatment on tumor progression is mediated through blocking both EGFR- and COX-2-related pathways. This combination regimen may provide a promising strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention in SCCHN.

  2. α-Mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, promotes cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy J; Petiwala, Sakina M; Syed, Deeba N; Rasmussen, John T; Adhami, Vaqar M; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Kohl, Amanda M; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    There is a need to characterize promising dietary agents for chemoprevention and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). We examined the anticancer effect of α-mangostin, derived from the mangosteen fruit, in human PCa cells and its role in targeting cell cycle-related proteins involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, we found that α-mangostin significantly decreases PCa cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis using flow cytometry identified cell cycle arrest along with apoptosis. To establish a more precise mechanism of action, we performed a cell free biochemical kinase assay against multiple cyclins/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) involved in cell cycle progression; the most significant inhibition in the cell free-based assays was CDK4, a critical component of the G1 phase. Through molecular modeling, we evaluated α-mangostin against the adenosine triphosphate-binding pocket of CDK4 and propose three possible orientations that may result in CDK4 inhibition. We then performed an in vivo animal study to evaluate the ability of α-mangostin to suppress tumor growth. Athymic nude mice were implanted with 22Rv1 cells and treated with vehicle or α-mangostin (100 mg/kg) by oral gavage. At the conclusion of the study, mice in the control cohort had a tumor volume of 1190 mm(3), while the treatment group had a tumor volume of 410 mm(3) (P < 0.01). The ability of α-mangostin to inhibit PCa in vitro and in vivo suggests α-mangostin may be a novel agent for the management of PCa.

  3. α-Mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, promotes cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer and decreases xenograft tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Petiwala, Sakina M.; Syed, Deeba N.; Rasmussen, John T.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Kohl, Amanda M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to characterize promising dietary agents for chemoprevention and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). We examined the anticancer effect of α-mangostin, derived from the mangosteen fruit, in human PCa cells and its role in targeting cell cycle-related proteins involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, we found that α-mangostin significantly decreases PCa cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis using flow cytometry identified cell cycle arrest along with apoptosis. To establish a more precise mechanism of action, we performed a cell free biochemical kinase assay against multiple cyclins/cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) involved in cell cycle progression; the most significant inhibition in the cell free-based assays was CDK4, a critical component of the G1 phase. Through molecular modeling, we evaluated α-mangostin against the adenosine triphosphate-binding pocket of CDK4 and propose three possible orientations that may result in CDK4 inhibition. We then performed an in vivo animal study to evaluate the ability of α-mangostin to suppress tumor growth. Athymic nude mice were implanted with 22Rv1 cells and treated with vehicle or α-mangostin (100 mg/kg) by oral gavage. At the conclusion of the study, mice in the control cohort had a tumor volume of 1190 mm3, while the treatment group had a tumor volume of 410 mm3 (P < 0.01). The ability of α-mangostin to inhibit PCa in vitro and in vivo suggests α-mangostin may be a novel agent for the management of PCa. PMID:22159229

  4. 5-azacytidine reduces methylation, promotes differentiation and induces tumor regression in a patient-derived IDH1 mutant glioma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Salmasi, Vafi; Turcan, Sevin; Fabius, Armida W. M.; Baia, Gilson S.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Weingart, Jon D.; Gallia, Gary L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Chan, Timothy A.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequent in low grade and progressive gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from α-ketoglutarate by the mutant enzyme. 2-HG is an “oncometabolite” that competitively inhibits α-KG dependent dioxygenases resulting in various widespread cellular changes including abnormal hypermethylation of genomic DNA and suppression of cellular differentiation. Despite the growing understanding of IDH mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proved challenging in part due to the scarcity of endogenous mutant in vivo models. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma model which rapidly grows in vivo, produces 2-HG and exhibits DNA hypermethylation. Using this model, we have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy and mechanism of action of the FDA approved demethylating drug 5-azacytidine in vivo. Long term administration of 5-azacytidine resulted in reduction of DNA methylation of promoter loci, induction of glial differentiation, reduction of cell proliferation and a significant reduction in tumor growth. Tumor regression was observed at 14 weeks and subsequently showed no signs of re-growth at 7 weeks despite discontinuation of therapy. These results have implications for clinical trials of demethylating agents for patients with IDH mutated gliomas. PMID:24077805

  5. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  6. Acyclic Cucurbit[n]uril-Type Molecular Container Enables Systemic Delivery of Effective Doses of Albendazole for Treatment of SK-OV-3 Xenograft Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Gaya; Samanta, Soumen K; Falcinelli, Shane; Zhang, Ben; Moncelet, Damien; Isaacs, Lyle; Briken, Volker

    2016-03-07

    Approximately, 40-70% of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) are severely limited by their extremely poor aqueous solubility, and consequently, there is a high demand for excipients that can be used to formulate clinically relevant doses of these drug candidates. Here, proof-of-concept studies demonstrate the potential of our recently discovered acyclic cucurbit[n]uril-type molecular container Motor1 (M1) as a solubilizing agent for insoluble drugs. M1 did not induce significant rates of mutations in various Salmonella typhimurium test strains during the Ames test, suggesting low genotoxicity. M1 also has low risk of causing cardiac toxicity in humans since it did not inhibit the human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene channel as tested on transfected CHO cell lines via patch clamp analysis. Albendazole (ABZ) is a widely used antihelminthic agent but that has also shown promising efficacy against cancerous cells in vitro. However, due to its low aqueous solubility (2.7 μM) and poor pharmacokinetics, ABZ is clinically limited as an anticancer agent. Here we investigated the potential of M1 as a solubilizing excipient for ABZ formulation. A pharmacokinetic study indicated that ABZ escapes the peritoneal cavity resulting in 78% absolute bioavailability, while its active intermediate metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, achieved 43% absolute bioavailability. The daily dosing of 681 mg/kg M1 complexed with 3.2 mg/kg of ABZ for 14 days did not result in significant weight loss or pathology in Swiss Webster mice. In vivo efficacy studies using this M1·ABZ inclusion complex showed significant decreases in tumor growth rates and increases in survival of mice bearing SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors. In conclusion, we provide substantial new evidence demonstrating that M1 is a safe and efficient excipient that enables in vivo parenteral delivery of poorly water-soluble APIs.

  7. Novel combinations of PI3K-mTOR inhibitors with dacomitinib or chemotherapy in PTEN-deficient patient-derived tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Brana, Irene; Pham, Nhu-An; Kim, Lucia; Sakashita, Shingo; Li, Ming; Ng, Christine; Wang, Yuhui; Loparco, Peter; Sierra, Rafael; Wang, Lisa; Clarke, Blaise A.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Siu, Lillian L.; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2017-01-01

    PTEN inactivation occurs commonly in human cancers and putatively activates the PI3K/AKT/ mTOR pathway. Activation of this pathway has been involved in resistance to chemotherapy or anti-EGFR/HER2 therapies. We evaluated the combination of PI3K-mTOR inhibitors with chemotherapy or the pan-HER inhibitor dacomitinib in PTEN-deficient patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX). Three PDXs were selected for their lack of PTEN expression by immunohistochemistry: a triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a KRAS G12R low-grade serous ovarian cancer (LGSOC), and KRAS G12C and TP53 R181P lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). Two dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitors were evaluated—PF-04691502 and PF-05212384—in combination with cisplatin, paclitaxel, or dacomitinib. The addition of PI3K-mTOR inhibitors to cisplatin or paclitaxel increased the activity of chemotherapy in the TNBC and LGSOC models; whereas no added activity was observed in the LADC model. Pharmacodynamic modulation of pS6 and pAKT was observed in the group treated with PI3K-mTOR inhibitor. Our research suggests that the addition of a PI3K-mTOR inhibitor may enhance tumor growth inhibition when compared to chemotherapy alone in certain PTEN-deficient PDXs. However, this benefit was absent in the KRAS and TP53 mutant LADC model. The role of PTEN deficiency in the antitumor activity of these combinations should be further investigated in the clinic. PMID:29156674

  8. High efficacy of CpG-ODN, cetuximab and cisplatin combination for very advanced ovarian xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Sommariva, Michele; de Cesare, Michelandrea; Meini, Alessandra; Cataldo, Alessandra; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea

    2013-01-29

    To mimic clinical treatment situations in advanced human ovarian disease, we tested the efficacy of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), synthetic DNA sequences recognized by Toll-like receptor 9 and able to induce innate/adaptive immune responses, in combination with other possible therapeutic reagents in ovarian carcinoma ascites-bearing athymic mice. Mice injected i.p. with IGROV-1 ovarian cancer cells were treated at different stages of ascites progression for 4 weeks with CpG-ODN, alone or in combination with Bevacizumab, Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic acid (Poly(I):Poly(C)), Gefitinib, Cetuximab and Cisplatin. Median survival time (MST) was calculated for each group. IGROV-1 cells treated or not with Cetuximab were assayed for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by 51Cr-release assay, and for macrophage antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis by flow cytometry. In mice treated when ascitic fluid began to accumulate, CpG-ODN combined with Bevacizumab, Poly(I):Poly(C) or Gefitinib did not significantly increase MST as compared with that using CpG-ODN alone, whereas MST in mice treated with CpG-ODN plus Cetuximab was significantly increased (>103 days for combination vs 62 days for CpG alone; P = 0.0008), with 4/8 mice alive at the end of the experiment. In experiments in mice showing increased abdominal volume and body weight (27.9 ± 0.8 g after vs 23 ± 1.1 g before tumor cell injection), treatment with Cisplatin in addition to CpG-ODN/Cetuximab led to significantly increased MST (105.5 days; P = 0.001), with all mice still alive at 85 days, over that using CpG-ODN/Cetuximab (66 days), Cetuximab/Cisplatin (18.5 days), Cisplatin (23 days) or saline (16 days). At a very advanced stage of disease (body weight: 31.4 ± 0.9 g), when more than half of control mice had to be sacrificed 6 days after starting treatments, the triple-combination therapy still increased MST (45 days; P = 0.0089) vs controls. CpG-ODN combination therapies

  9. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  10. Isoliquiritigenin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Xenograft Tumor Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting Both Wild Type and L858R/T790M Mutant EGFR*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Jong Eun; Singh, Puja; Lee, Sung-Young; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Chen, Hanyong; Chi, Young-In; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Lee, Charles C.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with diverse genetic alterations including mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Isoliquiritigenin (ILQ), a chalcone derivative, possesses anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ILQ on the growth of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. Treatment with ILQ inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells. ILQ-induced apoptosis was associated with the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, increased expression of Bim, and reduced expression of Bcl-2. In vitro kinase assay results revealed that ILQ inhibited the catalytic activity of both wild type and double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR. Treatment with ILQ inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells stably transfected with either wild type or double-mutant EGFR with or without EGF stimulation. ILQ also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells, and attenuated the kinase activity of Akt1 and ERK2 in vitro. ILQ directly interacted with both wild type and double-mutant EGFR in an ATP-competitive manner. A docking model study showed that ILQ formed two hydrogen bonds (Glu-762 and Met-793) with wild type EGFR and three hydrogen bonds (Lys-745, Met-793, and Asp-855) with mutant EGFR. ILQ attenuated the xenograft tumor growth of H1975 cells, which was associated with decreased expression of Ki-67 and diminished phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Taken together, ILQ suppresses NSCLC cell growth by directly targeting wild type or mutant EGFR. PMID:25368326

  11. Isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth of human lung cancer cells by targeting both wild type and L858R/T790M mutant EGFR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Jong Eun; Singh, Puja; Lee, Sung-Young; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Chen, Hanyong; Chi, Young-In; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Lee, Charles C; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-12-26

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with diverse genetic alterations including mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Isoliquiritigenin (ILQ), a chalcone derivative, possesses anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ILQ on the growth of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. Treatment with ILQ inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells. ILQ-induced apoptosis was associated with the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, increased expression of Bim, and reduced expression of Bcl-2. In vitro kinase assay results revealed that ILQ inhibited the catalytic activity of both wild type and double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR. Treatment with ILQ inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells stably transfected with either wild type or double-mutant EGFR with or without EGF stimulation. ILQ also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells, and attenuated the kinase activity of Akt1 and ERK2 in vitro. ILQ directly interacted with both wild type and double-mutant EGFR in an ATP-competitive manner. A docking model study showed that ILQ formed two hydrogen bonds (Glu-762 and Met-793) with wild type EGFR and three hydrogen bonds (Lys-745, Met-793, and Asp-855) with mutant EGFR. ILQ attenuated the xenograft tumor growth of H1975 cells, which was associated with decreased expression of Ki-67 and diminished phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Taken together, ILQ suppresses NSCLC cell growth by directly targeting wild type or mutant EGFR. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Lidocaine Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Chen, Dong-Tai; Pan, Jia-Hao; Chen, Yong-Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Qiang; Xue, Rui-Feng; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Wei-An

    2017-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the potential beneficial effects of regional anesthetics, and the differences in cancer prognosis may be the result of anesthetics on cancer biologic behavior. However, the function and underlying mechanisms of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo have been poorly studied. Human HepG2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were assessed. The effects of lidocaine on apoptosis-related and mitogen-activated protein kinase protein expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The antitumor activity of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma with or without cisplatin was investigated with in vitro experiments and also with animal experiments. Lidocaine inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The authors also found that lidocaine arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (63.7 ± 1.7% vs. 72.4 ± 3.2%; P = 0.0143) and induced apoptosis (1.7 ± 0.3% vs. 5.0 ± 0.7%; P = 0.0009). Lidocaine may exert these functions by causing an increase in Bax protein and activated caspase-3 and a corresponding decrease in Bcl-2 protein through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. More importantly, for the first time, xenograft experiments (n = 8 per group) indicated that lidocaine suppressed tumor development (P < 0.0001; lidocaine vs. control) and enhanced the sensitivity of cisplatin (P = 0.0008; lidocaine plus cisplatin vs. cisplatin). The authors' findings suggest that lidocaine may exert potent antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, combining lidocaine with cisplatin may be a novel treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. The B-Raf Status of Tumor Cells May Be a Significant Determinant of Both Antitumor and Anti-Angiogenic Effects of Pazopanib in Xenograft Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-05

    therapeutic index for tumors expressing oncogenic BRAF by the kinase inhibitor SB-590885. Cancer Res 66: 11100–11105. 27. Hutson TE, Davis ID, Machiels JP, De ...Patricia S. Steeg1 1 Women’s Cancers Section, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda...Maryland, United States of America, 2 Laboratory Animal Science Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, National Cancer

  14. Dose scheduling of the dual VEGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib (ZD6474, Zactima) in combination with radiotherapy in EGFR-positive and EGFR-null human head and neck tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Daniel L; Frederick, Barbara; Merz, Andrea L; Raben, David

    2008-02-01

    Vandetanib (ZD6474, Zactima) is a novel, orally available inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase activity with additional activity against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. Vandetanib has demonstrated enhanced efficacy in combination with radiation therapy (RT) in human tumor models. This study aimed to evaluate the schedule-dependent interaction of clinically relevant dosing of vandetanib with RT in human head and neck cancer models that had been characterized as EGFR positive (EGFR+) or negative (EGFR-) in order to begin differentiating vandetanib and RT interactions at the level of antitumor (EGFR) or antivascular (VEGFR2) activities. The human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines UMSCC2 (EGFR+) and UMSCC10 (EGFR(-)) are sensitive and resistant to EGFR inhibitors, respectively, while having similar sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Nude mice with UMSCC2 or UMSCC10 tumor xenografts were treated with vandetanib or RT alone, or with combinations of concomitant and sequential therapy. Vandetanib was dosed at 30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) based on pharmacokinetic studies in nude mice showing that this dose results in drug exposure similar to that seen in humans at clinical doses. RT was dosed at 3 Gy twice a week for two consecutive weeks for a total dose of 12 Gy. Vandetanib alone caused regression in EGFR+ but not EGFR- tumors and RT therapy alone was similar in both tumor types. Combinations of vandetanib and RT showed concomitant use of vandetanib and RT was superior to RT followed by vandetanib or visa versa in EGFR- tumors. Therapeutic response of EGFR+ tumors was similar regardless of treatment sequencing. The combination of vandetanib and RT is active in both EGFR+ and EGFR- HNSCC tumor xenografts, however, vandetanib alone is only active in EGFR+ xenografts. EGFR+ tumor response to vandetanib and RT was independent of treatment sequencing, but concomitant treatment was superior

  15. A new A431/cell membrane chromatography and online high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for screening epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists from Radix sophorae flavescentis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sicen; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Yanmin; Du, Hui; He, Langchong

    2010-08-06

    The intracellular kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in some tumor cells such as human epidermal squamous cells (A(431) cells) are an important target for drug discovery. We have developed a new A(431)/cell membrane chromatography (A(431)/CMC)-online-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) method for screening EGFR antagonists from medicinal herbs such as traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). In this study, A(431) cells with high EGFR expression levels were used to prepare cell membrane stationary phase (CMSP) in an A(431)/CMC model. The retention fractions eluted from the CMSP column were enriched onto an ODS pre-column and then switched into an HPLC/MS system by combining a 10 port columns switching valve. The screening results found that oxymatrine and matrine from Radix sophorae flavescentis (RSF) were the targeted components which could act on EGFR in similar manner of gefitinib as a control drug. There was a good relationship of their inhibiting effects on EGFR secretion and A(431) cell growth in vitro. This new A(431)/CMC-online-HPLC/MS method can be applied for screening EGFR antagonists from TCMs such as RSF. It will be a useful method for drug discovery with natural medicinal herbs as a leading compound resource. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vorinostat, an HDAC Inhibitor Attenuates Epidermoid Squamous Cell Carcinoma Growth by Dampening mTOR Signaling Pathway in a Human Xenograft Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTRs). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. PMID:23147569

  17. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model.

    PubMed

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Ballestas, Mary E; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Combined 177Lu-DOTA-8-AOC-BBN(7-14)NH2 GRP Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in PC-3 Human Prostate Tumor Cell Xenografted SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher V.; Shelton, Tiffani; Smith, Charles J.; Ma, Lixin; Perry, Michael C.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of combined gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptor targeted-radiotherapy (TRT) with chemotherapy using the PC-3 xenograft SCID mouse model. 177Lu-DOTA-8-AOC-BBN(7-14)NH2 is a radiotherapeutic peptide which specifically targets the gastrin releasing peptide receptor over-expressed on primary and metastatic prostate cancer. The chemotherapeutic agents docetaxel and estramustine, were administered as single agents or in combination with the receptor targeted radiotherapeutic agent. Combination receptor TRT/chemotherapy studies were begun 21 days post xenografting and were conducted as multiple dose trials. The GRP receptor TRT agent was administered every 14 days and single and combination chemotherapy dose regimens were given weekly. Tumor size, body weight, and body condition score were evaluated twice weekly and a hematology profile once weekly. Therapy study tumor volumes were evaluated by way of a repeated measures analysis of variance. Tumor volume measurements at 12 days post dose administration demonstrated a statistically significant (two-tailed p value < 0.05) tumor growth suppression in all experimental groups receiving GRP receptor targeted radiotherapy, when compared to the control group. The two combined GRP receptor TRT/chemotherapy treatment groups demonstrated the greatest tumor growth suppression of all treatment groups. In comparing the two combined GRP receptor TRT/chemotherapy groups to the GRP receptor TRT alone group, a statistically significant difference was demonstrated for the combined groups by day 30, post dose administration. These data demonstrate that GRP receptor targeted radiation therapy using 177Lu-DOTA-8-AOC-BBN(7-14)NH2, employed either alone, or in combination with conventional chemotherapy can suppress the growth of androgen independent prostate cancer. PMID:16706636

  19. A comparison of 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging subcutaneous HER2-positive tumor xenografts in athymic mice using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Conrad; Scollard, Deborah A; McLarty, Kristin; Smith, Serena; Reilly, Raymond M

    2011-08-17

    Our objective was to compare 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging small or large s.c. tumor xenografts in athymic mice that display a wide range of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT. Trastuzumab Fab were labeled with 111In or 64Cu by conjugation to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The purity of 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was measured by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. HER2 binding affinity was determined in saturation radioligand binding assays using SKBR-3 cells (1.3 × 106 HER2/cell). MicroSPECT/CT and microPET/CT were performed in athymic mice bearing s.c. BT-20 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts with low (0.5 to 1.6 × 105 receptors/cell), MDA-MB-361 tumors with intermediate (5.1 × 105 receptors/cell) or SKOV-3 xenografts with high HER2 expression (1.2 × 106 receptors/cell) at 24 h p.i. of 70 MBq (10 μg) of 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or 22 MBq (10 μg) of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or irrelevant 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were quantified in biodistribution studies. 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab were > 98% radiochemically pure and bound HER2 with high affinity (Kd = 20.4 ± 2.5 nM and 40.8 ± 3.5 nM, respectively). MDA-MB-361 and SKOV-3 tumors were most clearly imaged using 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab. Significantly higher tumor/blood (T/B) ratios were found for 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab than 111In-DOTA-rituximab Fab for BT-20, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 xenografts, and there was a direct association between T/B ratios and HER2 expression. In contrast, tumor uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was significantly higher than 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab in MDA-MB-361 tumors but no direct association with HER2 expression was found. Both 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab imaged small (5 to 10 mm) or larger (10 to 15 mm) MDA-MB-361 tumors. Higher blood, liver, and spleen radioactivity were observed for 64Cu

  20. A comparison of 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging subcutaneous HER2-positive tumor xenografts in athymic mice using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to compare 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab fragments for imaging small or large s.c. tumor xenografts in athymic mice that display a wide range of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression using microSPECT/CT or microPET/CT. Methods Trastuzumab Fab were labeled with 111In or 64Cu by conjugation to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The purity of 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was measured by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. HER2 binding affinity was determined in saturation radioligand binding assays using SKBR-3 cells (1.3 × 106 HER2/cell). MicroSPECT/CT and microPET/CT were performed in athymic mice bearing s.c. BT-20 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts with low (0.5 to 1.6 × 105 receptors/cell), MDA-MB-361 tumors with intermediate (5.1 × 105 receptors/cell) or SKOV-3 xenografts with high HER2 expression (1.2 × 106 receptors/cell) at 24 h p.i. of 70 MBq (10 μg) of 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or 22 MBq (10 μg) of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab or irrelevant 111In- or 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were quantified in biodistribution studies. Results 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab were > 98% radiochemically pure and bound HER2 with high affinity (Kd = 20.4 ± 2.5 nM and 40.8 ± 3.5 nM, respectively). MDA-MB-361 and SKOV-3 tumors were most clearly imaged using 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab. Significantly higher tumor/blood (T/B) ratios were found for 111In-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab than 111In-DOTA-rituximab Fab for BT-20, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 xenografts, and there was a direct association between T/B ratios and HER2 expression. In contrast, tumor uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab was significantly higher than 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab Fab in MDA-MB-361 tumors but no direct association with HER2 expression was found. Both 111In- and 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab Fab imaged small (5 to 10 mm) or larger (10 to 15 mm) MDA-MB-361 tumors. Higher blood, liver, and spleen

  1. Construction of orthotopic xenograft mouse models for human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Lu, Caide; Yu, X I; Dai, Long-Jun; Zhou, Jeff X

    2015-09-01

    Animal models are indispensable for the study of tumorigenesis and the development of anti-cancer drugs for human pancreatic cancer. In the present study, two orthotopic xenograft mouse models were developed. AsPC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells were stably labeled with red fluorescent protein (RFP) and injected subcutaneously into nude mice. For the orthotopic tumor mass model, the formed subcutaneous tumors were cut into blocks and implanted into the pancreas of nude mice via laparotomy. For the Matrigel™ tumor block model, solidified Matrigel containing RFP-labeled AsPC-1 cells was cut into blocks and implanted into the pancreas of nude mice. A subcutaneous tumor xenograft model was used as a control. Tumor growth and metastasis were assessed using an in vivo fluorescence imaging system. Thirty-six days after implantation, all mice from the two orthotopic xenograft models (n=20 per group) and 55% of the subcutaneous xenograft mice (n=20) developed tumors. The tumor growth rate was significantly higher in the orthotopic models than that in the subcutaneous model (P<0.01). Metastasis to organs such as the liver was observed in the orthotopic tumor models. Histological examination showed that the tumors were poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, two orthotopic xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer were established; these exhibited greater tumor growth and metastasis than the subcutaneous xenograft mouse model.

  2. A novel ligand-independent peptide inhibitor of TREM-1 suppresses tumor growth in human lung cancer xenografts and prolongs survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the inflammatory response and plays a role in cancer and sepsis. Inhibition of TREM-1 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in macrophages suppresses cancer cell invasion in vitro. In the clinical setting, high levels of TREM-1 expression on tumor-associated macrophages are associated with cancer recurrence and poor survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TREM-1 upregulation on peritoneal neutrophils has been found in human sepsis patients and in mice with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock. However, the precise function of TREM-1 and the nature of its ligand are not yet known. In this study, we used the signaling chain homooligomerization (SCHOOL) model of immune signaling to design a novel, ligand-independent peptide-based TREM-1 inhibitor and demonstrated that this peptide specifically silences TREM-1 signaling in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing two human lung tumor xenograft nude mouse models (H292 and A549) and mice with LPS-induced sepsis, we show for the first time that blockade of TREM-1 function using non-toxic and non-immunogenic SCHOOL peptide inhibitors: 1) delays tumor growth in xenograft models of human NSCLC, 2) prolongs survival of mice with LPS-induced septic shock, and 3) substantially decreases cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. In addition, targeted delivery of SCHOOL peptides to macrophages utilizing lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles significantly increased peptide half-life and dosage efficacy. Together, the results suggest that ligand-independent modulation of TREM-1 function using small synthetic peptides might be a suitable treatment for sepsis and NSCLC and possibly other types of inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24836682

  3. Assessment of Acute Antivascular Effects of Vandetanib with High-Resolution Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging in a Human Colon Tumor Xenograft Model in the Nude Rat1

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Joo Ho; Tessier, Jean; Ryan, Anderson J; Hoffman, Lisa; Chen, Xiaogang; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2010-01-01

    Tumor size is not a reliable marker for the assessment of early antivascular effects of antiangiogenics. In the present study, we used 200-µm in-plane high-resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) to noninvasively assess the immediate antivascular effects of vandetanib in a subcutaneous human colon cancer (LoVo) xenograft model in nude rats and to investigate correlation between changes in CT perfusion parameters and tumor volume or immunohistochemical end points. At 3 to 4 weeks after LoVo cell implantation, the animal was gavaged with either vandetanib (50 mg/kg) or vehicle twice (22 hours apart) and scanned with a preclinical DCE-CT scanner before (0 hour) and after treatment (24 hours). Quantitative maps of blood flow (BF) and volume (BV) of the tumor were calculated from the acquired DCE-CT images. The rats were divided into nonhypovascular, hypovascular, and combined (regardless of vascularity) groups. In the nonhypovascular group, significant decreases in both tumor BF and BV were observed in the vandetanib-treated rats compared with increases in the vehicle-treated rats. A significant decrease in BV was detected in the vandetanib-treated rats in the combined group as well. No differences in tumor growth, vascular endothelial growth factor expression, microvessel density, or apoptosis were observed between vandetanib- and vehicle-treated rats in all three groups. These results demonstrate that BF and BV imaging biomarkers from DCE-CT imaging can be used for rapid monitoring of immediate (24 hours after) antimicrovascular effects of vandetanib on tumors, even in the absence of significant changes of tumor volume or clinically relevant immunohistochemical end points. PMID:20824046

  4. Tumor growth-inhibitory effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril) in a lung cancer xenograft model analyzed using 18F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Koji; Otsuka, Hideki; Kondo, Kazuya; Otani, Tamaki; Nagata, Motoi

    2016-02-01

    We administered an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril) to mice implanted with a human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549 cells) and investigated the tumor growth-inhibitory effect of captopril from the viewpoint of glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG)-PET/CT. Subcutaneous implantation of A549 cells (1.9×10(6) cells) was carried out in the lower right flank of mice. Fifteen days after the transplantation of A549 cells, mice (six in each group) were treated with captopril (3.0 mg/mouse) or saline (1000 μl/mouse) for 5 days. We performed (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging of the mice before and after the treatment and evaluated the degree of (18)F-FDG accumulation in tumors. In both groups (the captopril-administrated and control groups), values for the metabolic tumor volume (MTV), maximum standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and tumor volume after treatment had a tendency to increase. However, tumor growth was suppressed in the captopril-administrated group compared with the control group. In terms of the growth rate, the MTV and tumor volume were significantly different (P<0.05). It was found that captopril exerted a potential tumor growth-inhibitory effect; this was because the captopril-administrated group showed low values of MTV, maximum standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and tumor volume in comparison with the control group.

  5. PET imaging of HER1-expressing xenografts in mice with 86Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Regino, Celeste A S; Wong, Karen J; Milenic, Diane E; Garmestani, Kayhan; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Szajek, Lawrence P; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2010-07-01

    Cetuximab is a recombinant, human/mouse chimeric IgG(1) monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1). Cetuximab is approved for the treatment of patients with HER1-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer. Limitations in currently reported radiolabeled cetuximab for PET applications prompted the development of (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab as an alternative for imaging HER1-expressing cancer. (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab can also serve as a surrogate marker for (90)Y therapy. Bifunctional chelate, CHX-A''-DTPA was conjugated to cetuximab and radiolabeled with (86)Y. In vitro immunoreactivity was assessed in HER1-expressing A431 cells. In vivo biodistribution, PET imaging and noncompartmental pharmacokinetics were performed in mice bearing HER1-expressing human colorectal (LS-174T and HT29), prostate (PC-3 and DU145), ovarian (SKOV3) and pancreatic (SHAW) tumor xenografts. Receptor blockage was demonstrated by coinjection of either 0.1 or 0.2 mg cetuximab. (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab was routinely prepared with a specific activity of 1.5-2 GBq/mg and in vitro cell-binding in the range 65-75%. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies demonstrated high HER1-specific tumor uptake of the radiotracer and clearance from nonspecific organs. In LS-174T tumor-bearing mice injected with (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab alone, (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab plus 0.1 mg cetuximab or 0.2 mg cetuximab, the tumor uptake values at 3 days were 29.3 +/- 4.2, 10.4 +/- 0.5 and 6.4 +/- 0.3%ID/g, respectively, demonstrating dose-dependent blockage of the target. Tumors were clearly visualized 1 day after injecting 3.8-4.0 MBq (86)Y-CHX-A''-DTPA-cetuximab. Quantitative PET revealed the highest tumor uptake in LS-174T (29.55 +/- 2.67%ID/cm(3)) and the lowest tumor uptake in PC-3 (15.92 +/- 1.55%ID/cm(3)) xenografts at 3 days after injection. Tumor uptake values quantified by PET were closely correlated (r (2) = 0.9, n = 18) with values determined by

  6. Modulation of EGFR and ROS induced cytochrome c release by combination of photodynamic therapy and carboplatin in human cultured head and neck cancer cells and tumor xenograft in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Heejun; Biswas, Raktim; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2013-11-05

    Photodynamic therapy in combination with different treatment modalities has been evaluated to study the mechanism of cellular cytotoxicity and apoptosis in various forms of cancer. In the present study, human head and neck cancer cells were treated with radachlorin mediated photodynamic therapy and the chemotherapy drug, carboplatin singly or in combination. Several parameters were studied to check the enhanced cytotoxicity of combination therapy at different time interval. From the cell viability study by MTT assay, a 22% decrease in cell viability was observed in combination treatment. This enhanced activity of combination treatment was confirmed by cell migration assay and Hoechst PI staining. Generation of reactive oxygen species was observed and found to be higher than that of individual treatments. Cytochrome c was found to be released from mitochondria that also induced the enhance efficacy in combination treatment. The expression of other proteins like EGFR and PARP was also modulated with the time of incubation after treatment. In the tumor xenograft study in nude mouse model, the carboplatin treated group did not show any noticeable changes in tumor volume whereas tumor volume was reduced in PDT and the combination group. Though the difference in the reduction of the tumor size was not significant between PDT and combination group, there was a difference in the expression of EGFR between these two groups. Histologic study of the inhibition in tumor growth was also performed. Therefore, this study may provide an avenue of combating head and neck cancer by a combination of conventional chemotherapy and PDT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Suicide HSVtk gene delivery by neurotensin-polyplex nanoparticles via the bloodstream and GCV Treatment specifically inhibit the growth of human MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer tumors xenografted in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa A; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; Escobedo, Lourdes; Hernandez-Baltazar, Daniel; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia; Martínez-Fong, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 has the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) phenotype, which is an aggressive subtype with no specific treatment. MDA-MB-231 cells express neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1), which makes these cells an attractive target of therapeutic genes that are delivered by the neurotensin (NTS)-polyplex nanocarrier via the bloodstream. We addressed the relevance of this strategy for TNBC treatment using NTS-polyplex nanoparticles harboring the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene and its complementary prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). The reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a control. NTS-polyplex successfully transfected both genes in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. The transfection was demonstrated pharmacologically to be dependent on activation of NTSR1. The expression of HSVtk gene decreased cell viability by 49% (P<0.0001) and induced apoptosis in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells after complementary GCV treatment. In the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model, NTS-polyplex nanoparticles carrying either the HSVtk gene or GFP gene were injected into the tumors or via the bloodstream. Both routes of administration allowed the NTS-polyplex nanoparticles to reach and transfect tumorous cells. HSVtk expression and GCV led to apoptosis, as shown by the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and Apostain immunoreactivity, and significantly inhibited the tumor growth (55-60%) (P<0.001). At the end of the experiment, the weight of tumors transfected with the HSVtk gene was 55% less than that of control tumors (P<0.05). The intravenous transfection did not induce apoptosis in peripheral organs. Our results offer a promising gene therapy for TNBC using the NTS-polyplex nanocarrier.

  8. Inhibition of Tumor Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Jiazhong

    2017-01-01

    A tumor growth model of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells in nude mice was employed to investigate the antitumor activity of the total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE) in vivo. Several biochemical assays including hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were performed to elucidate the mechanism of action of total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE). The results showed that TFAE effectively inhibited the tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice and had no significant effect on body weight, blood system, and functions of liver and kidney. Expression levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 remarkably increased while the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF were suppressed by TFAE. These results suggested that the antitumor potential of TFEA was implied by the apoptosis of tumor cells and the inhibition of angiogenesis in tumor tissue. PMID:29348766

  9. In vivo characterization of four 68Ga-labeled multimeric RGD peptides to image αvβ3 integrin expression in two human tumor xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lobeek, Daphne; Franssen, Gerben M; Ma, Michelle T; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Decristoforo, Clemens; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Terry, Samantha Y A; Rijpkema, Mark

    2018-04-06

    Rationale: α v β 3 integrins play an important role in angiogenesis and cell migration of cancers. They are highly expressed on activated endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels. Here, we compare the targeting characteristics of four 68 Ga-labeled multimeric cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate RGD-based tracers in an α v β 3 integrin-expressing tumor model and in a tumor model where α v β 3 integrin is expressed solely on the neovasculature. Methods: Female BALB/c nude mice were subcutaneously injected with SK-RC-52 (α v β 3 integrin-positive) or FaDu (α v β 3 integrin-negative) tumor cells. 68 Ga-labeled DOTA-(RGD) 2 , TRAP-(RGD) 3 , FSC-(RGD) 3 , or THP-(RGD) 3 were intravenously administered to the mice (0.5 nmol per mouse, 10-20 MBq), followed by microPET/CT imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies one hour post injection. Nonspecific uptake of the tracers in both models was determined by co-injecting an excess of unlabeled DOTA-(RGD) 2 (50 nmol) along with the radiolabeled tracers. Results: Imaging and biodistribution data showed specific uptake in the tumors for each tracer in both tumor models. Tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Ga-FSC-(RGD) 3 was significantly higher than that of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-(RGD) 2 , [ 68 Ga]Ga-TRAP-(RGD) 3 , and [ 68 Ga]Ga-THP-(RGD) 3 , in the SK-RC-52 model, but not in the FaDu model, where [ 68 Ga]Ga-FSC-(RGD) 3 showed significantly higher tumor uptake than [ 68 Ga]Ga-TRAP-(RGD) 3 Most importantly, differences were also observed in normal tissues and in tumor-to-blood ratios. Conclusion: All tracers showed sufficient targeting of α v β 3 integrin expression to allow for tumor detection. Although the highest tumor uptake was found for [ 68 Ga]Ga-FSC-(RGD) 3 and [ 68 Ga]Ga-THP-(RGD) 3 in the SK-RC-52 and FaDu model, respectively, selection of the most optimal tracer for specific diagnostic or therapeutic applications also depends on tumor-to-blood ratio and uptake in normal tissues, and should therefore also be considered

  10. Re-engineered p53 Activates Apoptosis In Vivo and Causes Primary Tumor Regression in A Dominant Negative Breast Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Okal, Abood; Matissek, Karina J.; Matissek, Stephan J.; Price, Robert; Salama, Mohamed E.; Janát-Amsbury, Margit Maria; Lim, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 pathway is reported in more than half of all human tumors and can be correlated to malignant development. Missense mutation in the DNA binding region (DBD) of p53 is the most common mechanism of p53 inactivation in cancer cells. The resulting tumor-derived p53 variants, similar to wild-type (wt) p53, retain their ability to oligomerize via the tetramerization domain (TD). Upon hetero-oligomerization, mutant p53 enforces a dominant negative effect over active wt-p53 in cancer cells. To overcome this barrier, we have previously designed a chimeric superactive p53 (p53-CC) with an alternative oligomerization domain capable of escaping transdominant inhibition by mutant p53 in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the superior tumor suppressor activity of p53-CC and its ability to cause tumor regression of the MDA-MB-468 aggressive p53-dominant negative breast cancer tumor model in vivo. In addition, we illustrate the profound effects of the dominant negative effect of endogenous mutant p53 over wt-p53 in cancer cells. Finally, we investigate the underlying differential mechanisms of activity for p53-CC and wt-p53 delivered using viral-mediated gene therapy approach in the MDA-MB-468 tumor model. PMID:25077773

  11. Inhibitory effect of vitamin C in combination with vitamin K3 on tumor growth and metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma xenografted in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Feng; Yang, Chih-Min; Su, Cheng-Ming; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin C in combination with vitamin K3 (vit CK3) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo, but the mechanism of action is poorly understood. Herein, C57BL/6 mice were implanted (s.c.) with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) for 9 days before injection (i.p.) with low-dose (100 mg vit C/kg + 1 mg vit K3/kg), high-dose (1,000 mg vit C/kg + 10 mg vit K3/kg) vit CK3 twice a week for an additional 28 days. As expected, vit CK3 or cisplatin (6 mg/kg, as a positive control) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in LLC-bearing mice. Vit CK3 restored the body weight of tumor-bearing mice to the level of tumor-free mice. Vit CK3 significantly decreased activities of plasma metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In lung tissues, vit CK3 1) increased protein expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), TIMP-2, nonmetastatic protein 23 homolog 1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; 2) reduced protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9; and 3) inhibited the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). These results demonstrate that vit CK3 inhibits primary tumor growth and exhibits antimetastastic potential in vivo through attenuated tumor invasion and proliferation.

  12. Mangosenone F, A Furanoxanthone from Garciana mangostana, Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Decreases Xenograft Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyung Hye; Ryu, Hyung Won; Park, Mi Jin; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Jin Hyo; Lee, Mi-Ja; Kang, Hyeon Jung; Kim, Sun Lim; Lee, Jin Hwan; Seo, Woo Duck

    2015-11-01

    Mangosenone F (MSF), a natural xanthone, was isolated form Carcinia mangotana, and a few studies have reported its glycosidase inhibitor effect. In this study we investigated the anti lung cancer effect of MSF both in vitro and in vivo. MSF inhibited cancer cell cytotoxicity and induced and induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in NCI-H460. MSF treatment also showed in pronounced release of apoptogenic cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and upregulation of Bax, suggesting that caspase-mediated pathways were involved in MSF-induced apoptosis. ROS activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway was shown to play a predominant role in the apoptosis mechanism of MSF. Compared with cisplatin treatment, MSF treatment showed significantly increased inhibition of the growth of NCI-H460 cells xenografted in nude mice. Together, these results indicate the potential of MSF as a candidate natural anticancer drug by promoting ROS production. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Plasma membrane targeting by short chain sphingolipids inserted in liposomes improves anti-tumor activity of mitoxantrone in an orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Tellingen, Olaf; Soullié, Thomas; Seynhaeve, Ann L; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Verheij, Marcel; Koning, Gerben A

    2015-08-01

    Mitoxantrone (MTO) is clinically used for treatment of various types of cancers providing an alternative for similarly active, but more toxic chemotherapeutic drugs such as anthracyclines. To further decrease its toxicity MTO was encapsulated into liposomes. Although liposomal drugs can accumulate in target tumor tissue, they still face the plasma membrane barrier for effective intracellular delivery. Aiming to improve MTO tumor cell availability, we used short chain lipids to target and modulate the tumor cell membrane, promoting MTO plasma membrane traversal. MTO was encapsulated in liposomes containing the short chain sphingolipid (SCS), C8-Glucosylceramide (C8-GluCer) or C8-Galactosylceramide (C8-GalCer) in their bilayer. These new SCS-liposomes containing MTO (SCS-MTOL) were tested in vivo for tolerability, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, tumor drug delivery by intravital microscopy and efficacy, and compared to standard MTO liposomes (MTOL) and free MTO. Liposomal encapsulation decreased MTO toxicity and allowed administration of higher drug doses. SCS-MTOL displayed increased clearance and lower skin accumulation compared to standard MTOL. Intratumoral liposomal drug delivery was heterogeneous and rather limited in hypoxic tumor areas, yet SCS-MTOL improved intracellular drug uptake in comparison with MTOL. The increased MTO availability correlated well with the improved antitumor activity of SCS-MTOL in a MDAMB-231 breast carcinoma model. Multiple dosing of liposomal MTO strongly delayed tumor growth compared to free MTO and prolonged mouse survival, whereas among the liposomal MTO treatments, C8-GluCer-MTOL was most effective. Targeting plasma membranes with SCS improved MTO tumor availability and thereby therapeutic activity and represents a promising approach to improve MTO-based chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Endothelial expression of autocrine VEGF upon the uptake of tumor-derived microvesicles containing oncogenic EGFR.

    PubMed

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Meehan, Brian; Kerbel, Robert S; Allison, Anthony C; Rak, Janusz

    2009-03-10

    Activated EGF receptor (EGFR) plays an oncogenic role in several human malignancies. Although the intracellular effects of EGFR are well studied, its ability to induce and modulate tumor angiogenesis is less understood. We found previously that oncogenic EGFR can be shed from cancer cells as cargo of membrane microvesicles (MVs), which can interact with surfaces of other cells. Here we report that MVs produced by human cancer cells harboring activated EGFR (A431, A549, DLD-1) can be taken up by cultured endothelial cells, in which they elicit EGFR-dependent responses, including activation of MAPK and Akt pathways. These responses can be blocked by annexin V and its homodimer, Diannexin, both of which cloak phosphatidylserine residues on the surfaces of MVs. Interestingly, the intercellular EGFR transfer is also accompanied by the onset of VEGF expression in endothelial cells and by autocrine activation of its key signaling receptor (VEGF receptor-2). In A431 human tumor xenografts in mice, angiogenic endothelial cells stain positively for human EGFR and phospho-EGFR, while treatment with Diannexin leads to a reduction of tumor growth rate and microvascular density. Thus, we propose that oncogene-containing tumor cell-derived MVs could act as a unique form of angiogenesis-modulating stimuli and are capable of switching endothelial cells to act in an autocrine mode.

  15. Flaxseed and soy protein isolate, alone and in combination, differ in their effect on bone mass, biomechanical strength, and uterus in ovariectomized nude mice with MCF-7 human breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Power, Krista A; Ward, Wendy E; Chen, Jian Min; Saarinen, Niina M; Thompson, Lilian U

    2007-11-01

    In our previous study, flaxseed (FS) reduced while soy protein isolate (SPI) stimulated MCF-7 breast tumor growth in ovariectomized mice. In addition, combining SPI and FS resulted in a negation of SPI-induced tumor growth. In this study, the effects of SPI, FS, and their combination were further examined on mouse bone and uterus to further ensure overall safety of the breast cancer treatments. Ovariectomized mice with established MCF-7 xenografts were fed either a basal diet (control), or a basal diet supplemented with 10% FS, 20% SPI, or SPI + FS for 25 wk. Mouse bones were analyzed for mineral and biomechanical strength properties, and uterus weight was measured. The SPI group had a higher femur bone mineral density and biomechanical strength parameters (yield load, stiffness, and peak load) compared to control, while the FS group significantly increased femur stiffness and peak load. The SPI + FS group did not affect femur mineral, but significantly reduced whole femur area and length and increased femur yield load, stiffness, and peak load. Uterus weight was significantly increased by the SPI + FS group, while SPI alone induced an intermediate effect. In conclusion, all dietary treatments induced beneficial effects on bone in a preclinical mouse model of postmenopausal breast cancer. Although the SPI + FS and SPI groups exerted stimulatory effects on uterus weight, other histological parameters need to be measured to determine the overall safety of these breast cancer treatments on the uterus.

  16. Comparative therapeutic efficacy of rhenium-188 radiolabeled-liposome and 5-fluorouracil in LS-174T human colon carcinoma solid tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Wei; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Lan, Keng-Li; Ting, Gann; Lee, Te-Wei

    2012-10-01

    Nanoliposomes are important carriers capable of packaging drugs for various delivery applications. Rhenium-188-radiolabeled liposome ((188)Re-liposome) has potential for radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging. To evaluate the targeting of (188)Re-liposome, biodistribution, microSPECT/CT, whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), and pharmacokinetics were performed in LS-174T human tumor-bearing mice. The comparative therapeutic efficacy of (188)Re-liposome and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed according to inhibition of tumor growth and the survival ratio. The highest uptake of (188)Re-liposome in LS-174T tumor was found at 24 hours by biodistribution and microSPECT/CT imaging, showing a positive correlation for tumor targeting of (188)Re-liposome using the Pearson's correlation analysis (r=0.997). Pharmacokinetics of (188)Re-liposome showed the properties of high circulation time and high bioavailability (mean residence time [MRT]=18.8 hours, area under the curve [AUC]=1371%ID/g·h). For therapeutic efficacy, the tumor-bearing mice treated with (188)Re-liposome (80% maximum tolerated dose [MTD], 23.7 MBq) showed better tumor growth inhibition and longer survival time than those treated with 5-FU (80% MTD, 144 mg/kg). The median survival time for mice treated with (188)Re-liposome (58.5 days; p<0.05) was significantly better than those of 5-FU (48.25 days; p>0.05) and normal saline-treated mice (43.63 days). Dosimetry study revealed that the (188)Re-liposome did not lead to high absorbed doses in normal tissue, but did in small tumors. These results of imaging and biodistribution indicated the highly specific accumulation of tumor after intravenous (i.v.) injection of (188)Re-liposome. The therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapeutics of (188)Re-liposome have been confirmed in a LS-174T solid tumor animal model, which points to the potential benefit and promise of passive nanoliposome delivered radiotherapeutics for cancer treatment.

  17. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  18. HER1-Targeted 86Y-Panitumumab Possesses Superior Targeting Characteristics than 86Y-Cetuximab for PET Imaging of Human Malignant Mesothelioma Tumors Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Garmestani, Kayhan; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM), a rare form of cancer is often associated with previous exposure to fibrous minerals, such as asbestos. Asbestos exposure increases HER1-activity and expression in pre-clinical models. Additionally, HER1 over-expression is observed in the majority of MM cases. In this study, the utility of HER1-targeted chimeric IgG1, cetuximab, and a human IgG2, panitumumab, radiolabeled with 86Y, were evaluated for PET imaging to detect MM non-invasively in vivo, and to select an antibody candidate for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Methods Radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) of cetuximab and panitumumab were prepared by conjugation with CHX-A’’-DTPA followed by radiolabeling with 86Y. The HER1 expression of NCI-H226, NCI-H2052, NCI-H2452 and MSTO-211H human mesothelioma cells was characterized by flow cytometry. In vivo biodistribution, pharmacokinetic analysis, and PET imaging were performed in tumor bearing athymic mice. Results In vivo studies demonstrated high HER1 tumor uptake of both RICs. Significant reduction in tumor uptake was observed in mice co-injected with excess mAb (0.1 mg), demonstrating that uptake in the tumor was receptor specific. Significant differences were observed in the in vivo characteristics of the RICs. The blood clearance T½α of 86Y-cetuximab (0.9–1.1 h) was faster than 86Y-panitumumab (2.6–3.1 h). Also, the tumor area under the curve (AUC) to liver AUC ratios of 86Y-panitumumab were 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than 86Y-cetuximab as observed by the differences in PET tumor to background ratios, which could be critical when imaging orthotopic tumors and concerns regarding radiation doses to normal organs such as the liver. Conclusion This study demonstrates the more favorable HER1-targeting characteristics of 86Y-panitumumab than 86Y-cetuximab for non-invasive assessment of the HER1 status of MM by PET imaging. Due to lower liver uptake, panitumumab based immunoconjugates may fare better in therapy than corresponding cetuximab

  19. Melittin inhibits tumor angiogenesis modulated by endothelial progenitor cells associated with the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling pathway in a UMR-106 osteosarcoma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    QIN, GANG; CHEN, YONGQIANG; LI, HAIDONG; XU, SUYANG; LI, YUMEI; SUN, JIAN; RAO, WU; CHEN, CHAOWEI; DU, MINDONG; HE, KAIYI; YE, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important in tumor angiogenesis. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) are key in stem cell homing. Melittin, a component of bee venom, exerts antitumor activity, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to assess the effects of melittin on EPCs and angiogenesis in a mouse model of osteosarcoma. UMR-106 cells and EPCs were treated with various concentrations of melittin and cell viability was determined using the MTT assay. EPC adherence, migration and tube forming ability were assessed. Furthermore, SDF-1α, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression levels were detected by western blotting. Nude mice were inoculated with UMR-106 cells to establish an osteosarcoma mouse model. The tumors were injected with melittin, and its effects were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Melittin decreased the viability of UMR-106 cells and EPCs. In addition, it decreased EPC adhesion, migration and tube formation when compared with control and SDF-1α-treated cells. Melittin decreased the expression of phosphorylated (p)-AKT, p-ERK1/2, SDF-1α and CXCR4 in UMR-106 cells and EPCs when compared with the control. The proportions of cluster of differentiation (CD)34/CD133 double-positive cells were 16.4±10.4% in the control, and 7.0±4.4, 2.9±1.2 and 1.3±0.3% in tumors treated with 160, 320 and 640 µg/kg melittin per day, respectively (P<0.05). At 11 days, melittin reduced the tumor size when compared with that of the control (control, 4.8±1.3 cm3; melittin, 3.2±0.6, 2.6±0.5, and 2.0±0.2 cm3 for 160, 320 and 640 µg/kg, respectively; all P<0.05). Melittin decreased the microvessel density, and SDF-1α and CXCR4 protein expression levels in the tumors. Melittin may decrease the effect of osteosarcoma on EPC-mediated angiogenesis, possibly via inhibition of the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling pathway

  20. Infrared-Transparent Gold Nanoparticles Converted by Tumors to Infrared Absorbers Cure Tumors in Mice by Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F.; O'Connor, Michael J.; Lin, Ping; Qian, Luping; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) absorb light and can be used to heat and ablate tumors. The “tissue window” at ∼800 nm (near infrared, NIR) is optimal for best tissue penetration of light. Previously, large, 50–150 nm, gold nanoshells and nanorods that absorb well in the NIR have been used. Small AuNPs that may penetrate tumors better unfortunately barely absorb at 800 nm. We show that small AuNPs conjugated to anti-tumor antibodies are taken up by tumor cells that catalytically aggregate them (by enzyme degradation of antibodies and pH effects), shifting their absorption into the NIR region, thus amplifying their photonic absorption. The AuNPs are NIR transparent until they accumulate in tumor cells, thus reducing background heating in blood and non-targeted cells, increasing specificity, in contrast to constructs that are always NIR-absorptive. Treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma A431 which overexpresses epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in subcutaneous murine xenografts with anti-EGFr antibodies conjugated to 15 nm AuNPs and NIR resulted in complete tumor ablation in most cases with virtually no normal tissue damage. The use of targeted small AuNPs therefore provides a potent new method of selective NIR tumor therapy. PMID:24520385

  1. The JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor pacritinib effectively inhibits patient-derived GBM brain tumor initiating cells in vitro and when used in combination with temozolomide increases survival in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Katharine Victoria; Cseh, Orsolya; Aman, Ahmed; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, Hema Artee

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains dismal, with current treatment prolonging survival only modestly. As such, there remains a strong need for novel therapeutic strategies. The janus kinase (JAK)2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 pathway regulates many cellular processes in GBM, including survival, proliferation, invasion, anti-apoptosis, and immune evasion. Here, we evaluated the preclinical efficacy of pacritinib, a novel compound targeting JAK2, using a collection of diverse patient-derived brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). The effects of pacritinib on BTIC viability and sphere forming capacity were evaluated in vitro using the alamarBlue and neurosphere assays, respectively. On-target inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling was investigated using western blotting. The efficacy of pacritinib was tested in vivo in pharmacokinetic analyses, liver microsome analyses, and Kaplan-Meier survival studies. In vitro, pacritinib decreased BTIC viability and sphere forming potential at low micromolar doses and demonstrated on-target inhibition of STAT3 signaling. Additionally, pacritinib was found to improve the response to temozolomide (TMZ) in TMZ-resistant BTICs. In vivo, systemic treatment with pacritinib demonstrated blood-brain barrier penetration and led to improved overall median survival in combination with TMZ, in mice orthotopically xenografted with an aggressive recurrent GBM BTIC culture. This preclinical study demonstrates the efficacy of pacritinib and supports the feasibility of testing pacritinib for the treatment of GBM, in combination with the standard of care TMZ.

  2. A small molecule disruptor of Rb/Raf-1 interaction inhibits cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and growth of human tumor xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kinkade, Rebecca; Dasgupta, Piyali; Carie, Adam; Pernazza, Daniele; Carless, Melanie; Pillai, Smitha; Lawrence, Nicholas; Sebti, Said M; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2008-05-15

    Although it is well established that cyclin-dependent kinases phosphorylate and inactivate Rb, the Raf-1 kinase physically interacts with Rb and initiates the phosphorylation cascade early in the cell cycle. We have identified an orally active small molecule, Rb/Raf-1 disruptor 251 (RRD-251), that potently and selectively disrupts the Rb/Raf-1 but not Rb/E2F, Rb/prohibitin, Rb/cyclin E, and Rb/HDAC binding. The selective inhibition of Rb/Raf-1 binding suppressed the ability of Rb to recruit Raf-1 to proliferative promoters and inhibited E2F1-dependent transcriptional activity. RRD-251 inhibited anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of human cancer cells and knockdown of Rb with short hairpin RNA or forced expression of E2F1 rescued cells from RRD-251-mediated growth arrest. P.o. treatment of mice resulted in significant tumor growth suppression only in tumors with functional Rb, and this was accompanied by inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of proliferation, decreased phosphorylated Rb levels, and inhibition of Rb/Raf-1 but not Rb/E2F1 binding in vivo. Thus, selective targeting of Rb/Raf-1 interaction seems to be a promising approach for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. A small molecule disruptor of Rb-Raf-1 interaction inhibits cell proliferation, angiogenesis and growth of human tumor xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinkade, Rebecca; Dasgupta, Piyali; Carie, Adam; Pernazza, Daniele; Carless, Melanie; Pillai, Smitha; Lawrence, Nicholas; Sebti, Said M.; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2011-01-01

    Though it is well established that cyclin-dependent kinases phosphorylate and inactivate Rb, the Raf-1 kinase physically interacts with Rb and initiates the phosphorylation cascade early in the cell cycle. We have identified an orally-active small molecule, RRD-251 (Rb – Raf-1 Disruptor 251), that potently and selectively disrupts the Rb/Raf-1 but not Rb/E2F, Rb/Prohibitin, Rb/Cyclin E and Rb/HDAC binding. The selective inhibition of Rb/Raf-1 binding suppressed the ability of Rb to recruit Raf-1 to proliferative promoters and inhibited E2F1-dependent transcriptional activity. RRD-251 inhibited anchorage-dependent and –independent growth of human cancer cells; and knockdown of Rb with shRNA or forced expression of E2F1 rescued from RRD251-mediated growth arrest. Oral treatment of mice resulted in significant tumor growth suppression only in tumors with functional Rb; and this was accompanied by inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of proliferation, decreased phospho-Rb levels, and inhibition of Rb/Raf-1 but not Rb/E2F1 binding in vivo. Thus, selective targeting of Rb-Raf-1 interaction appears to be a promising approach for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18483265

  4. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Anti-Tumor Effect of Sunitinib Combined with Dopamine in the Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fangran; Wang, Siyuan; Zhu, Xiao; Xue, Junsheng; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Lijie; Li, Jian; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tianyan

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the anti-tumor effect of sunitinib in combination with dopamine in the treatment of nu/nu nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells and to develop the combination PK/PD model. Further, simulations were conducted to optimize the administration regimens. A PK/PD model was developed based on our preclinical experiment to explore the relationship between plasma concentration and drug effect quantitatively. Further, the model was evaluated and validated. By fixing the parameters obtained from the PK/PD model, simulations were built to predict the tumor suppression under various regimens. The synergistic effect was observed between sunitinib and dopamine in the study, which was confirmed by the effect constant (GAMA, estimated as 2.49). The enhanced potency of dopamine on sunitinib was exerted by on/off effect in the PK/PD model. The optimal dose regimen was selected as sunitinib (120 mg/kg, q3d) in combination with dopamine (2 mg/kg, q3d) based on the simulation study. The synergistic effect of sunitinib and dopamine was demonstrated by the preclinical experiment and confirmed by the developed PK/PD model. In addition, the regimens were optimized by means of modeling as well as simulation, which may be conducive to clinical study.

  5. Matrigel alters the pathophysiology of orthotopic human breast adenocarcinoma xenografts with implications for nanomedicine evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shuhendler, Adam J; Prasad, Preethy; Cai, Ping; Hui, Kelvin K W; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Rauth, Andrew M; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2013-08-01

    Matrigel, a mouse sarcoma-derived basement membrane protein mixture, is frequently used to facilitate human tumor xenograft growth in rodents. Despite its known effects on tumor growth and metastasis, its impact on tumor pathophysiology and preclinical evaluation of nanomedicines in tumor xenografts has not been reported previously. Herein bilateral MDA435 tumors were established orthotopically with (Mat+) or without (Mat-) co-injection of Matrigel. Tumor perfusion, morphology and nanoparticle retention were evaluated. As compared to Mat- tumors, Mat+tumors exhibited enhanced vascular perfusion and lymphatic flow, greater blood vessel and lymphatic growth within the tumor core, and more deformation and collapse of lymphatics in tumor-associated lymph nodes. These changes were accompanied by reduced nanoparticle retention in Mat+tumors. The results suggest that Matrigel is not a passive medium for tumor growth, but rather significantly alters long-term tumor architecture. These findings have significant implications for the evaluation of therapeutic nanomedicine in xenograft mouse models. Matrigel is utilized in facilitating human tumor xenograft growth in rodents. The authors demonstrate that Matrigel is not a passive medium for tumor growth; instead it significantly alters long-term tumor architecture, with major implications in the evaluation of therapeutic nanomedicine in xenograft mouse models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. α-Mangostin extracted from the pericarp of the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn) reduces tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in an immunocompetent xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer carrying a p53 mutation.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masa-Aki; Iinuma, Munekazu; Morimoto, Junji; Kurose, Hitomi; Akamatsu, Kanako; Okuno, Yasushi; Akao, Yukihiro; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2011-06-03

    The mangosteen fruit has a long history of medicinal use in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Recently, the compound α-mangostin, which is isolated from the pericarp of the fruit, was shown to induce cell death in various types of cancer cells in in vitro studies. This led us to investigate the antitumor growth and antimetastatic activities of α-mangostin in an immunocompetent xenograft model of mouse metastatic mammary cancer having a p53 mutation that induces a metastatic spectrum similar to that seen in human breast cancers. Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of BALB/c mice syngeneic with metastatic BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with α-mangostin at 0, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps and histopathologically examined. To investigate the mechanisms of antitumor ability by α-mangostin, in vitro studies were also conducted. Not only were in vivo survival rates significantly higher in the 20 mg/kg/day α-mangostin group versus controls, but both tumor volume and the multiplicity of lymph node metastases were significantly suppressed. Apoptotic levels were significantly increased in the mammary tumors of mice receiving 20 mg/kg/day and were associated with increased expression of active caspase-3 and -9. Other significant effects noted at this dose level were decreased microvessel density and lower numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells in mammary carcinoma tissues. In vitro, α-mangostin induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and S-phase suppression in the cell cycle. Since activation by Akt phosphorylation plays a central role in a variety of oncogenic processes, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptotic cell death, angiogenesis and metastasis, we also investigated alterations in Akt phosphorylation induced by α-mangostin treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that α-mangostin significantly decreased the levels of phospho

  7. α-Mangostin extracted from the pericarp of the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn) reduces tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in an immunocompetent xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer carrying a p53 mutation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The mangosteen fruit has a long history of medicinal use in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Recently, the compound α-mangostin, which is isolated from the pericarp of the fruit, was shown to induce cell death in various types of cancer cells in in vitro studies. This led us to investigate the antitumor growth and antimetastatic activities of α-mangostin in an immunocompetent xenograft model of mouse metastatic mammary cancer having a p53 mutation that induces a metastatic spectrum similar to that seen in human breast cancers. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of BALB/c mice syngeneic with metastatic BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with α-mangostin at 0, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps and histopathologically examined. To investigate the mechanisms of antitumor ability by α-mangostin, in vitro studies were also conducted. Results Not only were in vivo survival rates significantly higher in the 20 mg/kg/day α-mangostin group versus controls, but both tumor volume and the multiplicity of lymph node metastases were significantly suppressed. Apoptotic levels were significantly increased in the mammary tumors of mice receiving 20 mg/kg/day and were associated with increased expression of active caspase-3 and -9. Other significant effects noted at this dose level were decreased microvessel density and lower numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells in mammary carcinoma tissues. In vitro, α-mangostin induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and S-phase suppression in the cell cycle. Since activation by Akt phosphorylation plays a central role in a variety of oncogenic processes, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptotic cell death, angiogenesis and metastasis, we also investigated alterations in Akt phosphorylation induced by α-mangostin treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that α-mangostin significantly

  8. Anti-tumor innate immunity activated by intermittent metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment of 9L brain tumor xenografts is preserved by anti-angiogenic drugs that spare VEGF receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metronomic cyclophosphamide given on an intermittent, 6-day repeating schedule, but not on an exposure dose-equivalent daily schedule, activates an anti-tumor innate immune response that leads to major regression of large implanted gliomas, without anti-angiogenesis. Methods and approach Mice bearing implanted 9L gliomas were used to investigate the effects of this 6-day repeating, immunogenic cyclophosphamide schedule on myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are pro-angiogenic and can inhibit anti-tumor immunity, and to elucidate the mechanism whereby the innate immune cell-dependent tumor regression response to metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment is blocked by several anti-angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results Intermittent metronomic cyclophosphamide scheduling strongly increased glioma-associated CD11b+ immune cells but not CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells, while bone marrow and spleen reservoirs of the suppressor cells were decreased. The inhibition of immune cell recruitment and tumor regression by anti-angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, previously observed in several brain tumor models, was recapitulated in the 9L tumor model with the VEGFR2-specific inhibitory monoclonal antibody DC101 (p < 0.01), implicating VEGFR2 signaling as an essential step in metronomic cyclophosphamide-stimulated immune cell recruitment. In contrast, sorafenib, a multi-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with comparatively weak VEGF receptor phosphorylation inhibitory activity, was strongly anti-angiogenic but did not block metronomic cyclophosphamide-induced innate immunity or tumor regression (p > 0.05). Conclusions The interference by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the immunogenic actions of intermittent metronomic chemotherapy is not a consequence of anti-angiogenesis per se, as demonstrated in an implanted 9L tumor model. Furthermore, this undesirable interaction with tyrosine kinase inhibitors can be

  9. A human ovarian carcinoma murine xenograft model useful for preclinical trials.

    PubMed

    Elkas, John C; Baldwin, Rae Lynn; Pegram, Mark; Tseng, Yiou; Slamon, Dennis; Karlan, Beth Y

    2002-11-01

    To establish a murine xenograft model of human ovarian carcinoma. A slurry of fresh human tumor from patients with intraperitoneal malignancies was heterotransplanted intraperitoneally into nude (nu/nu) and severely combined immunodeficient mice (CB-17, SCID). Xenograft growth was assessed by serial examination and necropsy. The xenografts were passaged to new animals when tumors were palpably greater than 1 cm(3). Histopathologic analysis of the xenografts was performed at each passage as well as immunohistochemical staining for p53 mutations. Persistent expression of human genes by the xenografts at higher passages was assessed by RT-PCR amplification of the human beta-globin gene. This xenograft model was used in the preclinical evaluation of an adenoviral vector containing a beta-galactosidase reporter gene and a wild-type p53 gene. Tumor growth was not established in any of the nude mice heterotransplanted with tissue from six different ovarian cancer patients. Eleven of 13 specimens established xenograft growth when injected in SCID mice. Nine xenografts have been subsequently passaged between 6 and 24 animal generations to date. All xenografts retained histopathologic similarities to their original human tumors and the p53 expression patterns remained stable through higher passages. Within 24 h after intraperitoneal administration of an adenoviral vector, transduction of the reporter gene was evident in the xenografts. In addition, administration of an adenoviral vector containing a wild-type p53 gene significantly decreased the tumor burden compared to controls (P < 0.04). This murine xenograft model of human ovarian carcinoma appears to be reliable and reproducible and has utility for the study of novel therapeutics.

  10. CoQ0-induced mitochondrial PTP opening triggers apoptosis via ROS-mediated VDAC1 upregulation in HL-60 leukemia cells and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice/xenografted nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Ou, Ting-Tsz; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) analogs with variable numbers of isoprenoid units have been demonstrated as anticancer and antioxidant/pro-oxidant molecules. This study examined the in vitro and in vivo antitumor and apoptosis activities of CoQ 0 (2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, zero isoprenoid side-chains) through upregulation of the Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) signaling pathway on human promyelocytic leukemia. CoQ 0 (0-40 μg/mL) treatment significantly reduced HL-60 cell viability, and up-regulated mitochondrial VDAC1 expression. CoQ 0 treatment triggers intracellular ROS generation, calcium release, ΔΨm collapse and PTP opening in HL-60 cells. CoQ 0 treatment induced apoptosis, which was associated with DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 and PARP activation, and Bax/Bcl-2 dysregulation. Annexin V-PI staining indicated that CoQ 0 promotes late apoptosis. Furthermore, the blockade of CoQ 0 -induced ROS production by antioxidant NAC pretreatment substantially attenuated CoQ 0 -induced apoptosis. The activation of p-GSK3β expression, cyclophilin D inhibition, and p53 activation through ROS are involved in CoQ 0 -induced HL-60 apoptotic cell death. Notably, ROS-independent p38 activation is involved in CoQ 0 -mediated apoptosis in HL-60 cells. In addition, the silencing of VDAC1 also prevented CoQ 0 -induced mitochondrial translocation of Bax, activation of caspase-3, and reduction in Bcl-2. Intriguingly, VDAC1 silencing did not prevent ROS production induced by CoQ 0 , which in turn indicates that CoQ 0 induced ROS-mediated VDAC1 and then mitochondrial apoptosis in HL-60 cells. In vivo results revealed that CoQ 0 is effective in delaying tumor incidence and reducing the tumor burden in HL-60-xenografted nude mice. Taken together, CoQ 0 could be a promising anticancer agent for the treatment of human promyelocytic leukemia through upregulation of VDAC1 signaling pathways.

  11. Cantharidin-encapsulated thermal-sensitive liposomes coated with gold nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy on A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijia; Xin, Jing; Zhang, Luwei; Zhou, Yicheng; Yao, Cuiping; Wang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2018-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructure-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising alternative therapy for the treatment of skin cancer and other diseases. However, the insufficient efficiency of PTT at irradiation levels tolerable to tissues and the limited biodegradability of nanomaterials are still crucial challenges. In this study, a novel nanosystem for PTT based on liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) was established. Thermal-sensitive liposomes (TSLs) encapsulating cantharidin (CTD) were coated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and used in near-infrared (NIR) illumination-triggered PTT and thermally induced disruption on A431 cells. The coated GNPs disintegrated into small particles of 5-6 nm after disruption of TSLs, allowing their clearance by the liver and kidneys. CTD encapsulated in the TSLs was released into cytoplasm after PTT. The released CTD increased the apoptosis of PTT-treated tumor cells by blocking the heat shock response (HSR) and inhibiting the expression of HSP70 and BAG3 inhibiting the expression of HSP70 and BAG3 with the synergistic enhancement of CTD, the new nanosystem CTD-encapsulated TSLs coated with GNPs (CTD-TSL@GNPs) had an efficient PTT effect using clinically acceptable irradiation power (200 mW//cm 2 ) on A431 cells. The developed CTD-TSL@GNPs may be a promising PTT agent for clinical skin cancer therapy.

  12. Genetically engineered models have advantages over xenografts for preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Becher, Oren J; Holland, Eric C

    2006-04-01

    Mouse models of human cancer are valuable tools for cancer research. Although xenografts and genetically engineered models (GEMs) possess limitations as well as advantages, each system plays a significant role in preclinical testing. Tumor xenografts are easy to use, relatively inexpensive, and reproducible. The main drawback of xenografts is that the genetics and histology of the tumors are frequently not representative of the respective human tumor and, thus far, these models have not been as predictive of therapeutic success as one would like. By contrast, GEMs are histologically and genetically accurate models of human cancer but have disadvantages of heterogeneity with regard to frequency, latency, and growth. These disadvantages are reminiscent of the variable behavior of actual human tumors. Recently, these shortcomings have been partly overcome with the development of anatomic and molecular in vivo imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and bioluminescence imaging. These new technologies will hopefully support the use of GEMs in preclinical trials and help determine if trials in GEMs are more predicative than xenografts of human responses.

  13. Analysis of the Lipidome of Xenografts Using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M. Laura; Escribá, Pablo V.; Fernández, José A.

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  14. Analysis of the lipidome of xenografts using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M Laura; Escribá, Pablo V; Fernández, José A

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  15. Morphologic and molecular characterization of ATRT xenografts adapted for orthotopic therapeutic testing.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Gupta, Nalin; Berger, Mitchel S; Banerjee, Anu; Prados, Michael D; Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer; James, C David; VandenBerg, Scott R

    2010-04-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is a malignant tumor of the central nervous system that most commonly arises in young children. The aggressive growth and propensity for early dissemination throughout the neuraxis confers a dismal prognosis. Large clinical trials that could test new therapeutic agents are difficult to conduct due to the low incidence of this cancer. For this reason, high throughput preclinical testing with suitable animal models for ATRT would serve a critical need for identifying the most efficacious treatments. In response to this need, we have adapted ATRT cell lines for bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of intracranial (orthotopic) xenografts established in athymic mice. Our results indicate that following supratentorial or infratentorial injection in athymic mice, ATRT cells produce rapidly growing tumors, often with intraventricular spread or neuraxis dissemination. When established as orthotopic xenografts, the tumors predominantly display cells with a rhabdoid-like cellular morphology that show a spectrum of immunophenotypes similar to primary ATRT tumors. To demonstrate the feasibility of this orthotopic ATRT xenograft model for therapeutic testing with correlation to biomarker analysis, we examined the responses of luciferase-modified ATRT cells to temozolomide (TMZ). These xenografts, which highly express MGMT, are resistant to TMZ treatment when compared with an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft that is MGMT deficient and responsive to TMZ. These data suggest that an orthotopic ATRT xenograft model, in which BLI is used for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy, should contribute to the identification of effective therapeutics and regimens for treating this highly aggressive pediatric brain tumor.

  16. Nicotine Promotes Cholangiocarcinoma Growth in Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Allyson K; Jensen, Kendal; Hall, Chad; O'Brien, April; Ehrlich, Laurent; White, Tori; Meng, Fanyin; Zhou, Tianhao; Greene, John; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Invernizzi, Pietro; Dostal, David E; Lairmore, Terry; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2017-05-01

    Nicotine, the main addictive substance in tobacco, is known to play a role in the development and/or progression of a number of malignant tumors. However, nicotine's involvement in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma is controversial. Therefore, we studied the effects of nicotine on the growth of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro and the progression of cholangiocarcinoma in a mouse xenograft model. The predominant subunit responsible for nicotine-mediated proliferation in normal and cancer cells, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), was more highly expressed in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines compared with normal human cholangiocytes. Nicotine also stimulated the proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and promoted α7-nAChR-dependent activation of proliferation and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase in Mz-ChA-1 cells. In addition, nicotine and PNU282987 (α7-nAChR agonist) accelerated the growth of the cholangiocarcinoma tumors in our xenograft mouse model and increased fibrosis, proliferation of the tumor cells, and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase activation. Finally, α7-nAChR was expressed at significantly higher levels in human cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal human control liver samples. Taken together, results of this study suggest that nicotine acts through α7-nAChR and plays a novel role in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, nicotine may act as a mitogen in cholestatic liver disease processes, thereby facilitating malignant transformation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of tumor targeting with riboflavin-functionalized theranostic nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Beztsinna, Nataliia; Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Jose, Jithin; Rhourri-Frih, Boutayna; Al Rawashdeh, Wa’el; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Bestel, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging method in the molecular imaging field, providing high spatiotemporal resolution and sufficient imaging depths for many clinical applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use photoacoustic imaging as a tool to evaluate a riboflavin (RF)-based targeted nanoplatform. RF is internalized by the cells through a specific pathway, and its derivatives were recently shown as promising tumor-targeting vectors for the drug delivery systems. Here, the RF amphiphile synthesized from a PEGylated phospholipid was successfully inserted into a long-circulating liposome formulation labeled with the clinically approved photoacoustic contrast agent – indocyanine green (ICG). The obtained liposomes had a diameter of 124 nm (polydispersity index =0.17) and had a negative zeta potential of −26 mV. Studies in biological phantoms indicated a stable and concentration-dependent photoacoustic signal (Vevo® LAZR) of the ICG-containing RF-functionalized liposomes. In A431 cells, a high uptake of RF-functionalized liposomes was found and could be blocked competitively. First, studies in mice revealed ~3 times higher photoacoustic signal in subcutaneous A431 tumor xenografts (P<0.05) after injection of RF-functionalized liposomes compared to control particles. In this context, the application of a spectral unmixing protocol confirmed the initial quantitative data and improved the localization of liposomes in the tumor. In conclusion, the synthesized RF amphiphile leads to efficient liposomal tumor targeting and can be favorably detected by photoacoustic imaging with a perspective of theranostic applications. PMID:28572726

  18. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  19. Next generation patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Wu, Rebecca; Watahiki, Akira; Dong, Xin; Cheng, Hongwei; Wyatt, Alexander W; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for more effective therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer. Research in this area, however, has been seriously hampered by a lack of clinically relevant, experimental in vivo models of the disease. This review particularly focuses on the development of prostate cancer xenograft models based on subrenal capsule grafting of patients’ tumor tissue into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This technique allows successful development of transplantable, patient-derived cancer tissue xenograft lines not only from aggressive metastatic, but also from localized prostate cancer tissues. The xenografts have been found to retain key biological properties of the original malignancies, including histopathological and molecular characteristics, tumor heterogeneity, response to androgen ablation and metastatic ability. As such, they are highly clinically relevant and provide valuable tools for studies of prostate cancer progression at cellular and molecular levels, drug screening for personalized cancer therapy and preclinical drug efficacy testing; especially when a panel of models is used to cover a broader spectrum of the disease. These xenograft models could therefore be viewed as next-generation models of prostate cancer. PMID:24589467

  20. Erlotinib inhibits growth of a patient-derived chordoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease.

  1. Erlotinib Inhibits Growth of a Patient-Derived Chordoma Xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C.; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease. PMID:24260133

  2. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... works Sometimes benign tumors may be removed for cosmetic reasons or to improve symptoms. Benign tumors of the brain may be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a ...

  3. Cetuximab reduces the accumulation of radiolabeled bevacizumab in cancer xenografts without decreasing VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Heskamp, Sandra; Boerman, Otto C; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D M; Sweep, Fred C G J; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Engelhardt, Mallory S; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M

    2014-11-03

    Bevacizumab and cetuximab are approved for the treatment of cancer. However, in advanced colorectal cancer, addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy with bevacizumab did not improve survival. The reason for the lack of activity remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cetuximab on VEGF expression and targeting of bevacizumab to the tumor. Mice with subcutaneous SUM149 or WiDr xenografts were treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab, or a combination of the two. Before the start of cetuximab treatment and after 7 and 21 days of treatment, the uptake of radiolabeled bevacizumab in the tumor was measured by immunoSPECT/CT. Tumor growth of SUM149 xenografts was significantly inhibited by cetuximab, bevacizumab, or their combination, whereas growth of WiDr xenografts was not affected. Cetuximab caused a significant reduction of bevacizumab uptake in SUM149 xenografts, whereas tumor-to-blood ratios in mice with WiDr xenografts did not change. Biodistribution studies with an irrelevant antibody in the SUM149 model also showed significantly reduced tumor-to-blood ratios. Cetuximab treatment did not decrease VEGF expression. Without decreasing VEGF levels, cetuximab reduces tumor targeting of bevacizumab. This could, at least partly, explain why the combination of bevacizumab and cetuximab does not result in improved therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Discovery of N-(6-Fluoro-1-oxo-1,2-dihydroisoquinolin-7-yl)-5-[(3R)-3-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl]thiophene-2-sulfonamide (LSN 3213128), a Potent and Selective Nonclassical Antifolate Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Ribonucleotide Formyltransferase (AICARFT) Inhibitor Effective at Tumor Suppression in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Fales, Kevin R; Njoroge, F George; Brooks, Harold B; Thibodeaux, Stefan; Torrado, Alicia; Si, Chong; Toth, James L; Mc Cowan, Jefferson R; Roth, Kenneth D; Thrasher, Kenneth J; Frimpong, Kwame; Lee, Matthew R; Dally, Robert D; Shepherd, Timothy A; Durham, Timothy B; Margolis, Brandon J; Wu, Zhipei; Wang, Yong; Atwell, Shane; Wang, Jing; Hui, Yu-Hua; Meier, Timothy I; Konicek, Susan A; Geeganage, Sandaruwan

    2017-12-14

    A hallmark of cancer is unbridled proliferation that can result in increased demand for de novo synthesis of purine and pyrimidine bases required for DNA and RNA biosynthesis. These synthetic pathways are frequently upregulated in cancer and involve various folate-dependent enzymes. Antifolates have a proven record as clinically used oncolytic agents. Our recent research efforts have produced LSN 3213128 (compound 28a), a novel, selective, nonclassical, orally bioavailable antifolate with potent and specific inhibitory activity for aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (AICARFT), an enzyme in the purine biosynthetic pathway. Inhibition of AICARFT with compound 28a results in dramatic elevation of 5-aminoimidazole 4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (ZMP) and growth inhibition in NCI-H460 and MDA-MB-231met2 cancer cell lines. Treatment with this inhibitor in a murine based xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) resulted in tumor growth inhibition.

  5. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma

    DOE PAGES

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; ...

    2015-12-12

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER+ adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent withmore » “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44High subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44Low cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER+ cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development.« less

  6. Bispecific designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor inhibit A431 cell proliferation and receptor recycling.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Ykelien L; Chao, Ginger; Steiner, Daniel; Wittrup, K Dane; Plückthun, Andreas

    2011-12-02

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in the development and progression of many tumors. Although monoclonal antibodies directed against EGFR have been approved for the treatment of cancer in combination with chemotherapy, there are limitations in their clinical efficacy, necessitating the search for robust targeting molecules that can be equipped with new effector functions or show a new mechanism of action. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) may provide the targeting component for such novel reagents. Previously, four DARPins were selected against EGFR with (sub)nanomolar affinity. As any targeting module should preferably be able to inhibit EGFR-mediated signaling, their effect on A431 cells overexpressing EGFR was examined: three of them were shown to inhibit proliferation by inducing G(1) arrest, as seen for the Food and Drug Administration-approved antibody cetuximab. To understand this inhibitory mechanism, we mapped the epitopes of the DARPins using yeast surface display. The epitopes for the biologically active DARPins overlapped with the EGF-binding site, whereas the fourth DARPin bound to a different domain, explaining the lack of a biological effect. To optimize the biological activity of the DARPins, we combined two DARPins binding to different epitopes with a flexible linker or with a leucine zipper, leading to a homodimer. The latter DARPin was able to reduce surface EGFR by inhibiting receptor recycling, leading to a dramatic decrease in cell viability. These results indicate that multispecific EGFR-specific DARPins are superior to cetuximab and may form the basis of new opportunities in tumor targeting and tumor therapy.

  7. Multimodality imaging methods for assessing retinoblastoma orthotopic xenograft growth and development.

    PubMed

    Corson, Timothy W; Samuels, Brian C; Wenzel, Andrea A; Geary, Anna J; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J; Rogers, Pamela I; Pollok, Karen E; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux ([Formula: see text]) through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed [Formula: see text], as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, [Formula: see text] in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of [Formula: see text] modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future.

  8. A Real-Time Non-invasive Auto-bioluminescent Urinary Bladder Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    John, Bincy Anu; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2017-02-01

    The study was to develop an auto-bioluminescent urinary bladder cancer (UBC) xenograft animal model for pre-clinical research. The study used a humanized, bacteria-originated lux reporter system consisting of six (luxCDABEfrp) genes to express components required for producing bioluminescent signals in human UBC J82, J82-Ras, and SW780 cells without exogenous substrates. Immune-deficient nude mice were inoculated with Lux-expressing UBC cells to develop auto-bioluminescent xenograft tumors that were monitored by imaging and physical examination. Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Lux, J82-Ras-Lux, and SW780-Lux cell lines were established. Xenograft tumors derived from tumorigenic Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Ras-Lux cells allowed a serial, non-invasive, real-time monitoring by imaging of tumor development prior to the presence of palpable tumors in animals. Using Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent tumorigenic cells enabled us to monitor the entire course of xenograft tumor development through tumor cell implantation, adaptation, and growth to visible/palpable tumors in animals.

  9. Effective Treatment of Established Human Breast Tumor Xenografts in Immunodeficient Mice with a Single Dose of the α-Emitting Radioisotope Astatine-211 Conjugated to Anti-HER2/neu Diabodies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew K.; Shaller, Calvin; Garmestani, Kayhan; Plascjak, Paul S.; Hodge, Kathryn M.; Yuan, Qing-An; Marks, James D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Adams, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    Successful RAIT strategies depend upon selecting radioisotopes with physical properties complementary to the biological properties of the targeting vehicle. Small, engineered anti-tumor antibody fragments are capable of rapid, highly specific tumor targeting in immunodeficient mouse models. We hypothesized that their rapid systemic elimination would make them ideal radioisotope carriers for the radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) of established tumors. The C6.5 diabody, a non-covalent anti-HER2 single-chain Fv dimer, has a T1/2 α (equilibration phase) of 0.7 hrs, a T1/2 β (elimination phase) of 6 hrs, and a T1/2 in tumor of approximately 30 hrs that favors the use of short-lived radioisotopes. In particular, the α-particle emitting radioisotope 211At (T1/2 = 7.2 hrs) was hypothesized to be very promising for diabody-directed RAIT. This hypothesis was tested in immunodeficient nude mice bearing established HER2/neu positive MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors treated with 211At-SAPS C6.5 diabody (N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl)succinamate-C6.5 diabody) at or below the maximum tolerated dose. A single i.v. injection of 211At-SAPS C6.5 diabody lead to a 30 day delay in tumor growth when a 20 µCi dose was administered and a 57 day delay in tumor growth (60% tumor free after one year) when a 45 µCi dose was employed. Treatment of mice bearing the same tumors with 211At-SAPS T84.66 diabody targeting the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) at the same doses led to a delay in tumor growth, but no complete responses, likely due to substantially lower expression of this antigen on the MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors. A dose of 20 µCi of 211At-SAPS on an a diabody specific for the Müllerian Inhibiting Substance Type II Receptor which is minimally expressed on this tumor cell line did not impact tumor growth rate, demonstrating specificity. These findings indicate that diabody molecules can be effective agents for targeted radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors using powerful, short-lived

  10. Effective treatment of established human breast tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice with a single dose of the alpha-emitting radioisotope astatine-211 conjugated to anti-HER2/neu diabodies.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew K; Shaller, Calvin; Garmestani, Kayhan; Plascjak, Paul S; Hodge, Kathryn M; Yuan, Qing-An; Marks, James D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Brechbiel, Martin W; Adams, Gregory P

    2008-02-01

    Successful radioimmunotherapy strategies depend on selecting radioisotopes with physical properties complementary to the biological properties of the targeting vehicle. Small, engineered antitumor antibody fragments are capable of rapid, highly specific tumor targeting in immunodeficient mouse models. We hypothesized that the C6.5 diabody, a noncovalent anti-HER2 single-chain Fv dimer, would be an ideal radioisotope carrier for the radioimmunotherapy of established tumors using the short-lived alpha-emitting radioisotope (211)At. Immunodeficient nude mice bearing established HER2/neu-positive MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors treated with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[(211)At]astatophenethyl)succinamate ((211)At-SAPS)-C6.5 diabody. Additional cohorts of mice were treated with (211)At-SAPS T84.66 diabody targeting the carcinoembryonic antigen or (211)At-SAPS on a diabody specific for the Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor, which is minimally expressed on this tumor cell line. A single i.v. injection of (211)At-SAPS C6.5 diabody led to a 30-day delay in tumor growth when a 20 muCi dose was administered and a 57-day delay in tumor growth (60% tumor-free after 1 year) when a 45 muCi dose was used. Treatment of mice bearing the same tumors with (211)At-SAPS T84.66 diabody at the same doses led to a delay in tumor growth, but no complete responses, likely due to substantially lower expression of this antigen on the MDA-MB-361/DYT2 tumors. In contrast, a dose of 20 muCi of (211)At-SAPS on the anti-Müllerian-inhibiting substance type II receptor diabody did not affect tumor growth rate, demonstrating specificity of the therapeutic effect. These findings indicate that diabody molecules can be effective agents for targeted radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors using powerful, short-lived alpha-emitting radioisotopes.

  11. Patient-derived xenografts as preclinical neuroblastoma models.

    PubMed

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Bexell, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The prognosis for children with high-risk neuroblastoma is often poor and survivors can suffer from severe side effects. Predictive preclinical models and novel therapeutic strategies for high-risk disease are therefore a clinical imperative. However, conventional cancer cell line-derived xenografts can deviate substantially from patient tumors in terms of their molecular and phenotypic features. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) recapitulate many biologically and clinically relevant features of human cancers. Importantly, PDXs can closely parallel clinical features and outcome and serve as excellent models for biomarker and preclinical drug development. Here, we review progress in and applications of neuroblastoma PDX models. Neuroblastoma orthotopic PDXs share the molecular characteristics, neuroblastoma markers, invasive properties and tumor stroma of aggressive patient tumors and retain spontaneous metastatic capacity to distant organs including bone marrow. The recent identification of genomic changes in relapsed neuroblastomas opens up opportunities to target treatment-resistant tumors in well-characterized neuroblastoma PDXs. We highlight and discuss the features and various sources of neuroblastoma PDXs, methodological considerations when establishing neuroblastoma PDXs, in vitro 3D models, current limitations of PDX models and their application to preclinical drug testing.

  12. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar, E-mail: snimmag1@jhmi.edu; Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287; Pullambhatla, Mrudula

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeledmore » anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in

  13. The role of macrophages in xenograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Cadili, A; Kneteman, N

    2008-12-01

    Safe and effective xenotransplantation would provide a valuable answer to many of the limitations of allogenic transplantation. Such limitations include scarcity of organ supply and morbidity to donors in cases of living-related donor transplantation. The main hurdle to the efficacious application of xenotransplantation in clinical medicine is the fierce host immune response to xenografts. This immune response is embodied in 3 different types of xenograft rejection. Both hyperacute rejection and delayed xenograft rejection are mediated by natural antibodies and are concerned primarily with whole organ rejection. Cellular xenograft rejection (CXR), on the other hand, is concerned with both whole organ and CXR and is mediated by innate immunity rather than natural antibodies. Macrophages, which are cells of the innate immune system, play a role in all 3 types of xenograft rejection (not just CXR). They impart their effects both directly and through T-cell activation.

  14. Regression of prostate cancer xenografts by RLIP76 depletion

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Roth, Cherice; Leake, Kathryn; Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    RLIP76 plays a central role in radiation and chemotherapy resistance through its activity as a multi-specific ATP-dependent transporter which is over-expressed in a number of types of cancers. RLIP76 appears to be necessary for cancer cell survival because both in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal tumor studies show that depletion or inhibition of RLIP76 causes selective toxicity in malignant cells. RLIP76 induces apoptosis in cancer cells through the accumulation of endogenously formed GS-E. The results of our in vivo studies demonstrate that administration of RLIP76 antibodies, siRNA or anti-sense to mice bearing xenografts of PC-3 prostate cancer cells leads to near complete regression of established subcutaneous xenografts with no apparent toxic effects. Since anti-RLIP76 IgG (which inhibit RLIP76- mediated transport), siRNA and antisense (which deplete RLIP76) showed similar tumor regressing activities, our results indicate that the inhibition of RLIP76 transport activity at the cell surface is sufficient for observed anti-tumor activity. These studies indicate that RLIP76 serves a key effector function for the survival of prostate cancer cells and that it is a valid target for cancer therapy. PMID:19073149

  15. Phosphorylation of NFAT3 by CDK3 induces cell transformation and promotes tumor growth in skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, T; Zhu, J J; Huang, S; Peng, C; He, S; Du, J; Hong, R; Chen, X; Bode, A M; Jiang, W; Dong, Z; Zheng, D

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family proteins are transcription factors that regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other genes during the immune response. Although the NFAT proteins have been extensively investigated in the immune system, their role in cancer progression remains controversial. Here, we report that NFAT3 is highly expressed in various skin cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. Knockdown of endogenous NFAT3 expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation, colony formation and anchorage-independent cell growth. Furthermore, results of the mammalian two-hybrid assay showed that cyclin-dependent kinase 3 (CDK3) directly interacted with NFAT3 and phosphorylated NFAT3 at serine 259 (Ser259), which enhanced the transactivation and transcriptional activity of NFAT3. The phosphorylation site of NFAT3 was critical for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated cell transformation of the HaCaT immortalized skin cell line and mutation of NFAT3 at Ser259 led to a reduction of colony formation in soft agar. We also found that overexpressing wildtype NFAT3, but not mutant NFAT3-S259A, promoted A431 xenograft tumor growth. Importantly, we showed that CDK3, NFAT3 and phosphorylated NFAT3-Ser259 were highly expressed in skin cancer compared with normal skin tissues. These results provided evidence supporting the oncogenic potential of NFAT3 and suggested that CDK3-mediated phosphorylation of NFAT3 has an important role in skin tumorigenesis. PMID:27893713

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  17. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  18. Efficacy of Weekly Docetaxel and Bevacizumab in Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma: A New Theranostic Method Combining Xenografted Biopsies with a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Boris; Ziv, Irit; Shohat, Revital; Wick, Michael; Hankins, W. David; Sidransky, David; Agur, Zvia

    2011-01-01

    The paucity of clinical treatment data on rare tumors, such as mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MCS), emphasizes the need in theranostic tools for these diseases. We put forward and validated a new theranostic method, combining tumor xenografts and mathematical models, and used it to suggest an improved treatment schedule for a particular MCS patient. Growth curves and gene expression analysis of xenografts, derived from a patient’s lung metastasis, served for creating a mathematical model of MCS progression and adapting it to the xenograft setting. The pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of six drugs were modeled, with model variables being adjusted by patient-specific chemosensitivity tests. The xenografted animals were treated by various monotherapy and combination schedules, and the MCS xenograft model was computer simulated under the same treatment scenario. The mathematical model for xenograft growth was then up-scaled to retrieve the MCS patient’s tumor progression under different treatment schedules. An average accuracy of 87.1% was obtained when comparing model predictions with the observed tumor growth inhibition in the xenografted animals. Simulation results suggested that a regimen containing bevacizumab applied i.v. in combination with once-weekly docetaxel would be more efficacious in the MCS patient than all other simulated schedules. Weekly docetaxel in the patient resulted in stable metastatic disease and relief of pancytopenia due to tumor infiltration. We suggest that the advantage of weekly docetaxel on the triweekly regimen is directly related to the angiogenesis rate of the tumor. Further validation of this conclusion, and the theranostic method we provide, may facilitate personalization of solid cancer pharmacotherapy. PMID:18974149

  19. Efficacy of weekly docetaxel and bevacizumab in mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: a new theranostic method combining xenografted biopsies with a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Boris; Ziv, Irit; Shohat, Revital; Wick, Michael; Hankins, W David; Sidransky, David; Agur, Zvia

    2008-11-01

    The paucity of clinical treatment data on rare tumors, such as mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MCS), emphasizes the need in theranostic tools for these diseases. We put forward and validated a new theranostic method, combining tumor xenografts and mathematical models, and used it to suggest an improved treatment schedule for a particular MCS patient. Growth curves and gene expression analysis of xenografts, derived from a patient's lung metastasis, served for creating a mathematical model of MCS progression and adapting it to the xenograft setting. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of six drugs were modeled, with model variables being adjusted by patient-specific chemosensitivity tests. The xenografted animals were treated by various monotherapy and combination schedules, and the MCS xenograft model was computer simulated under the same treatment scenario. The mathematical model for xenograft growth was then up-scaled to retrieve the MCS patient's tumor progression under different treatment schedules. An average accuracy of 87.1% was obtained when comparing model predictions with the observed tumor growth inhibition in the xenografted animals. Simulation results suggested that a regimen containing bevacizumab applied i.v. in combination with once-weekly docetaxel would be more efficacious in the MCS patient than all other simulated schedules. Weekly docetaxel in the patient resulted in stable metastatic disease and relief of pancytopenia due to tumor infiltration. We suggest that the advantage of weekly docetaxel on the triweekly regimen is directly related to the angiogenesis rate of the tumor. Further validation of this conclusion, and the theranostic method we provide, may facilitate personalization of solid cancer pharmacotherapy.

  20. A Primary Xenograft Model of Small Cell Lung Cancer Reveals Irreversible Changes in Gene Expression Imposed by Culture In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Vincent C.; Marchionni, Luigi; Hierman, Jared S.; Rhodes, Jonathan T.; Devereux, Wendy L.; Rudin, Charles M.; Yung, Rex; Parmigani, Giovanni; Dorsch, Marion; Peacock, Craig D.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2009-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the preclinical investigation of cancer therapies rely on the use of established cell lines maintained in serum-based growth media. This is particularly true of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), where surgically resected tissue is rarely available. Recent attention has focused on the need for better models that preserve the integrity of cancer stem cell populations, as well as three-dimensional tumor-stromal interactions. Here we describe a primary xenograft model of SCLC in which endobronchial tumor specimens obtained from chemo-naive patients are serially propagated in vivo in immunodeficient mice. In parallel, cell lines grown in conventional tissue culture conditions were derived from each xenograft line, passaged for 6 months, and then re-implanted to generate secondary xenografts. Using the Affymetrix platform, we analyzed gene expression in primary xenograft, xenograft-derived cell line, and secondary xenograft, and compared these data to similar analyses of unrelated primary SCLC samples and laboratory models. When compared to normal lung, primary tumors, xenografts and cell lines displayed a gene expression signature specific for SCLC. Comparison of gene expression within the xenograft model identified a group of tumor-specific genes expressed in primary SCLC and xenografts that was lost during the transition to tissue culture, and that was not regained when the tumors were re-established as secondary xenografts. Such changes in gene expression may be a common feature of many cancer cell culture systems, with functional implications for the use of such models for preclinical drug development. PMID:19351829

  1. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-03-02

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic test systems that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limited amounts of primary tumor material. A popular assay is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice. The protocol includes injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice with subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated are then used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. Detailed in this unit are procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for use in basic research and translational studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and ‑negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  3. The RelB alternative NF-kappaB subunit promotes autophagy in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells in vitro and affects mouse xenograft tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The involvement of NF-κB signaling in prostate cancer (PCa) has largely been established through the study of the classical p65 subunit. Nuclear localization of p65 in PCa patient tissues has been shown to correlate with biochemical recurrence, while in vitro studies have demonstrated that the classical NF-κB signaling pathway promotes PCa progression and metastatic potential. More recently, the nuclear location of RelB, a member of the alternative NF-κB signaling, has also been shown to correlate with the Gleason score. The current study aims to clarify the role of alternative NF-κB in PCa cells by exploring, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of RelB overexpression on PCa biology. Methods Using a lentivirus-expression system, we constitutively overexpressed RelB or control GFP into 22Rv1 cells and monitored alternative transcriptional NF-κB activity. In vivo, tumor growth was assessed after the injection of 22Rv1-derived cells into SCID mice. In vitro, the impact of RelB on 22Rv1 cell proliferation was evaluated in monolayer culture. The anchorage-independent cell growth of derived-22Rv1 cells was assessed by soft agar assay. Apoptosis and autophagy were evaluated by Western blot analysis in 22Rv1-derived cells cultured in suspension using poly-HEMA pre-coated dishes. Results The overexpression of RelB in 22Rv1 cells induced the constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway. In vivo, RelB expression caused a lag in the initiation of 22Rv1-induced tumors in SCID mice. In vitro, RelB stimulated the proliferation of 22Rv1 cells and reduced their ability to grow in soft agar. These observations may be reconciled by our findings that, when cultured in suspension on poly-HEMA pre-coated dishes, 22Rv1 cells expressing RelB were more susceptible to cell death, and more specifically to autophagy controlled death. Conclusions This study highlights a role of the alternative NF-κB pathway in proliferation and the controlled autophagy. Thus, the

  4. Reproducibility of Differential Proteomic Technologies in CPTAC Fractionated Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Tabb, David L.; Wang, Xia; Carr, Steven A.

    2016-03-04

    The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) employed a pair of reference xenograft proteomes for initial platform validation and ongoing quality control of its data collection for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors. These two xenografts, representing basal and luminal-B human breast cancer, were fractionated and analyzed on six mass spectrometers in a total of 46 replicates divided between iTRAQ and label-free technologies, spanning a total of 1095 LC-MS/MS experiments. These data represent a unique opportunity to evaluate the stability of proteomic differentiation by mass spectrometry over many months of time for individual instruments or across instruments running dissimilarmore » workflows. We evaluated iTRAQ reporter ions, label-free spectral counts, and label-free extracted ion chromatograms as strategies for data interpretation. From these assessments we found that differential genes from a single replicate were confirmed by other replicates on the same instrument from 61-93% of the time. When comparing across different instruments and quantitative technologies, differential genes were reproduced by other data sets from 67-99% of the time. Projecting gene differences to biological pathways and networks increased the similarities. These overlaps send an encouraging message about the maturity of technologies for proteomic differentiation.« less

  5. Balancing Passive and Active Targeting to Different Tumor Compartments Using Riboflavin-Functionalized Polymeric Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Baues, Maike; Klein, Dionne; Rix, Anne; Golombek, Susanne K; Al Rawashdeh, Wa'el; Gremse, Felix; Barz, Matthias; Koynov, Kaloian; Banala, Srinivas; Lederle, Wiltrud; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-08-09

    Riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) are highly upregulated in many tumor cells, tumor stem cells, and tumor neovasculature, which makes them attractive targets for nanomedicines. Addressing cells in different tumor compartments requires drug carriers, which are not only able to accumulate via the EPR effect but also to extravasate, target specific cell populations, and get internalized by cells. Reasoning that antibodies are among the most efficient targeting systems developed by nature, we consider their size (∼10-15 nm) to be ideal for balancing passive and active tumor targeting. Therefore, small, short-circulating (10 kDa, ∼7 nm, t 1/2 ∼ 1 h) and larger, longer-circulating (40 kDa, ∼13 nm, t 1/2 ∼ 13 h) riboflavin-targeted branched PEG polymers were synthesized, and their biodistribution and target site accumulation were evaluated in mice bearing angiogenic squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and desmoplastic prostate cancer (PC3) xenografts. The tumor accumulation of the 10 kDa PEG was characterized by rapid intercompartmental exchange and significantly improved upon active targeting with riboflavin (RF). The 40 kDa PEG accumulated in tumors four times more efficiently than the small polymer, but its accumulation did not profit from active RF-targeting. However, RF-targeting enhanced the cellular internalization in both tumor models and for both polymer sizes. Interestingly, the nanocarriers' cell-uptake in tumors was not directly correlated with the extent of accumulation. For example, in both tumor models the small RF-PEG accumulated much less strongly than the large passively targeted PEG but showed significantly higher intracellular amounts 24 h after iv administration. Additionally, the size of the polymer determined its preferential uptake by different tumor cell compartments: the 10 kDa RF-PEGs most efficiently targeted cancer cells, whereas the highest uptake of the 40 kDa RF-PEGs was observed in tumor

  6. A novel patient-derived xenograft model for claudin-low triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matossian, Margarite D; Burks, Hope E; Bowles, Annie C; Elliott, Steven; Hoang, Van T; Sabol, Rachel A; Pashos, Nicholas C; O'Donnell, Benjamen; Miller, Kristin S; Wahba, Bahia M; Bunnell, Bruce A; Moroz, Krzysztof; Zea, Arnold H; Jones, Steven D; Ochoa, Augusto C; Al-Khami, Amir A; Hossain, Fokhrul; Riker, Adam I; Rhodes, Lyndsay V; Martin, Elizabeth C; Miele, Lucio; Burow, Matthew E; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M

    2018-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes are clinically aggressive and cannot be treated with targeted therapeutics commonly used in other breast cancer subtypes. The claudin-low (CL) molecular subtype of TNBC has high rates of metastases, chemoresistance and recurrence. There exists an urgent need to identify novel therapeutic targets in TNBC; however, existing models utilized in target discovery research are limited. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have emerged as superior models for target discovery experiments because they recapitulate features of patient tumors that are limited by cell-line derived xenograft methods. We utilize immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western Blot to visualize tumor architecture, cellular composition, genomic and protein expressions of a new CL-TNBC PDX model (TU-BcX-2O0). We utilize tissue decellularization techniques to examine extracellular matrix composition of TU-BcX-2O0. Our laboratory successfully established a TNBC PDX tumor, TU-BCX-2O0, which represents a CL-TNBC subtype and maintains this phenotype throughout subsequent passaging. We dissected TU-BCx-2O0 to examine aspects of this complex tumor that can be targeted by developing therapeutics, including the whole and intact breast tumor, specific cell populations within the tumor, and the extracellular matrix. Here, we characterize a claudin-low TNBC patient-derived xenograft model that can be utilized for therapeutic research studies.

  7. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG exhibits potent antitumor activity for pheochromocytoma in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Zhu, Qi; Chen, Dongning; Shen, Zhoujun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Zhu, Yu

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in the malignant pheochromocytoma using a xenograft mouse model. Treatment with 17-AAG induced a marked reduction in the volume and weight of PC12 pheochromocytoma cell tumor xenografts in mice. Furthermore, 17-AAG also significantly inhibited the expression of HSP90 and its client proteins. Our results validated HSP90 as an important target in pheochromocytoma and provided rationale for the testing of HSP90 inhibitors as a promising therapeutic agent in the antitumor therapy of pheochromocytoma.

  8. Dual effects of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 xenografts and colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Rhyu, Jung Joo; Yun, Jun-Won; Kwon, Euna; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-10-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hATMSCs) have great potential as a therapy for various diseases. However, emerging evidence shows that there are conflicting results concerning effects of hATMSCs on tumor progression. Our objective was to determine whether and how hATMSCs modulate tumor growth. After cancer cell lines were subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c-nude and hairless severe combined immunodeficient mice, hATMSCs were intratumorally injected into the mice. The growth of the A549 tumors was inhibited by hATMSCs, yet that of the HT-29 tumors was significantly promoted by hATMSCs in the in vivo xenograft models. In vitro study using a co-culture system of cancer cells and hATMSCs was consistent with the in vivo experiments. To reveal the molecular events induced by hATMSCs in the xenograft models, global gene expression profiles of the A549 and HT-29 tumors in the absence or presence of hATMSCs were determined. Significant numbers of genes involved in biological processes were altered in the hATMSC-treated A549 tumors, whereas no biological process was regulated by treatment with hATMSCs in the HT-29 tumors, reflecting the different effects of hATMSCs in the different types of cancer. Notably, histone cluster 1, H2aj and neuropeptide Y receptor Y4 were found to be expressed in direct or inverse proportion to tumor size in both xenograft models. In addition, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 was differentially phosphorylated by the hATMSCs dependent on the source of the cancer cells. In conclusion, the identified gene profiling and NF-κB signaling provide molecular evidence to explain the conflicting findings in tumor‑MSC studies, although further study is needed to confirm these findings using various types of cancer.

  9. A Xenograft Model of Vestibular Schwannoma and Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christine T; Bracho, Olena; Mei, Christine; Bas, Esperanza; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina; Telischi, Fred; Liu, Xue-Zhong

    2018-03-19

    Microsurgical implantation of mouse merlin-deficient Schwann cells (MD-SC) into the cerebellopontine angle of immunodeficient rats will initiate tumor formation, hearing loss, and vestibular dysfunction. The progress in identifying effective drug therapies for treatment of Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) is limited by the availability of animal models of VS that develop hearing loss and imbalance. A microsurgical technique for implanting MD-SCs onto the cochleovestibular nerve of rats was developed. Ten Rowett Nude rats were implanted with either ∼10 MD-SCs expressing luciferase (N = 5) or vehicle (N = 5). Rats received bioluminescence imaging, auditory brainstem response testing, and were observed for head tilt every 2 weeks after surgery, for a total of 6 weeks. Tumors were harvested and processed with hematoxylin & eosin staining and immunohistochemistry was performed for S100. Rats implanted with MD-SCs developed significantly higher tumor bioluminescence measurements and hearing threshold shifts at multiple frequencies by the 4th and 6th weeks post-implantation, compared with control rats. Rats implanted with MD-SCs also developed gross tumor. The tumor volume was significantly greater than nerve volumes obtained from rats in the control group. All rats with tumors developed a head tilt, while control rats had no signs of vestibular dysfunction. Tumors demonstrated histological features of schwannoma and express S100. Using this microsurgical technique, this xenograft rat model of VS develops tumors involving the cochleovestibular nerve, shifts in hearing thresholds, and vestibular dysfunction. This animal model can be used to investigate tumor-mediated hearing loss and perform preclinical drug studies for NF2.

  10. [Effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Huang, Yi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Chen, Bu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice in vivo and explore its mechanism. Xenograft tumor model of HL-60 cells in nude mice was established, which was divided randomly into 6 groups: negative control group (injection of 5% NaHCO(3)), 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg baicalin groups, combination group (50 mg/kg baicalin + 2 mg/kg VP16) and positive control group (VP16 4 mg/kg). The nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were treated with drugs via intraperitoneal injection daily. After treatment for 14 days average weigh and inhibitory rate of transplanted tumor stripped from 5 nude mice in each group were calculated, and the ultrastructure change of xenografts cells were tested by transmission electron microscopy. Histopathologic examination was used to observed the change of main organs in nude mice. The expression of signaling molecular PI3K/Akt proteins extracted from xenografts was detected by Western blot. The effects of baicalin on overall survival time in nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were evaluated. The results showed that baicalin could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in dose-dependent manner. There were more necrotic and apoptotic cells in mice of baicalin-treated groups and combination group than that in mice of negative control group. Baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells in vivo by down-regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, where the expressions of p-Akt, mTOR and p-mTOR proteins decreased compared with negative control group, and no significant difference of Akt expression was found between different groups. Compared with negative control group, the median survival time of mice in combination group was more prolongated (P < 0.05). It is concluded that baicalin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice, and prolong median survival time of nude mice. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of Akt activity and down

  11. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death induced by Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts in A431 skin cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grace Nirmala, J; Evangeline Celsia, S; Swaminathan, Akila; Narendhirakannan, R T; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2018-04-01

    Vitis vinifera. L is one of the most widely consumed fruits in the world and are rich in antioxidant abundant polyphenols. The present study was carried out to assess the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts in an in vitro model using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cell lines. Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts were incubated with A431 cells to evaluate the antiproliferative, apoptotic effects and the morphological apoptotic changes induced by the extracts. Mitochondrial membrane potential was also measured after incubating the cells with extracts. At the inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ), grape seed extract (111.11 µg/mL) and grape peel extract (319.14 µg/mL) were incubated for 24 h with A431 cells. Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts were able to impart cytotoxic effects, induced apoptosis and apoptotic morphological changes in A431 cells significantly (p < 0.01) and this effect is associated with the interference with mitochondrial membrane potential. This reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential probably initiated the apoptotic cascade in the extracts treated cells. Vitis vinifera peel and seed phytochemicals can selectively target cancer cells and the phytochemicals that are occluded can serve as potential anticancer agents providing better efficacy in killing cancer cells.

  12. Toxicity of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid toward human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Ibata, Kenji; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2007-08-01

    Chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated drinking water induces skin lesions and urinary bladder cancer in humans. It is now recognized that thioarsenicals such as dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA (V)) are commonly excreted in the urine of humans and animals and that the production of DMMTA (V) may be a risk factor for the development of the diseases caused by arsenic. The toxicity of DMMTA (V) was compared with that of related nonthiolated arsenicals with respect to cell viability, uptake ability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell cycle progression of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, arsenate (iAs (V)), arsenite (iAs (III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA (V)), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)) being used as reference nonthiolated arsenicals. DMMTA (V) (LC 50 = 10.7 microM) was shown to be much more cytotoxic than iAs (V) (LC 50 = 571 microM) and DMA (V) (LC 50 = 843 microM), and its potency was shown to be close to that of trivalent arsenicals iAs (III) (LC 50 = 5.49 microM) and DMA (III) (LC 50 = 2.16 microM). The greater cytotoxicity of DMMTA (V) was associated with greater cellular uptake and distribution, and the level of intracellular ROS remarkably increased in A431 cells upon exposure to DMMTA (V) compared to that after exposure to other trivalent arsenicals at the respective LC 50. Exposure of DMMTA (V) to cells for 24 h induced cell cycle perturbation. Namely, the percentage of cells residing in S and G2/M phases increased from 10.2 and 15.6% to 46.5 and 20.8%, respectively. These results suggest that although DMMTA (V) is a pentavalent arsenical, it is taken up efficiently by cells and causes various levels of toxicity, in a manner different from that of nonthiolated pentavalent arsenicals, demonstrating that DMMTA (V) is one of the most toxic arsenic metabolites. The high cytotoxicity of DMMTA (V) was explained and/or proposed by (1) efficient uptake by cells followed by (2) its transformation to DMA (V), (3) producing ROS

  13. Single-cell functional and chemosensitive profiling of combinatorial colorectal therapy in zebrafish xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fior, Rita; Póvoa, Vanda; Mendes, Raquel V.; Carvalho, Tânia; Gomes, António; Figueiredo, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is as unique as the person fighting it. With the exception of a few biomarker-driven therapies, patients go through rounds of trial-and-error approaches to find the best treatment. Using patient-derived cell lines, we show that zebrafish larvae xenotransplants constitute a fast and highly sensitive in vivo model for differential therapy response, with resolution to reveal intratumor functional cancer heterogeneity. We screened international colorectal cancer therapeutic guidelines and determined distinct functional tumor behaviors (proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis) and differential sensitivities to standard therapy. We observed a general higher sensitivity to FOLFIRI [5-fluorouracil(FU)+irinotecan+folinic acid] than to FOLFOX (5-FU+oxaliplatin+folinic acid), not only between isogenic tumors but also within the same tumor. We directly compared zebrafish xenografts with mouse xenografts and show that relative sensitivities obtained in zebrafish are maintained in the rodent model. Our data also illustrate how KRAS mutations can provide proliferation advantages in relation to KRASWT and how chemotherapy can unbalance this advantage, selecting for a minor clone resistant to chemotherapy. Zebrafish xenografts provide remarkable resolution to measure Cetuximab sensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of using primary patient samples to generate zebrafish patient-derived xenografts (zPDX) and provide proof-of-concept experiments that compare response to chemotherapy and biological therapies between patients and zPDX. Altogether, our results suggest that zebrafish larvae xenografts constitute a promising fast assay for precision medicine, bridging the gap between genotype and phenotype in an in vivo setting. PMID:28835536

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Hybrid Liposomes Against Xenograft Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer In Vivo Due to Long-term Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Hideaki; Okumura, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2016-11-01

    To examine therapeutic effects of hybrid liposomes (HL) composed of L-α-dimyristylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (25) dodecyl ether (C 12 (EO) 25 ) against human colorectal cancer (WiDr) cells in vitro and in vivo. HL composed of 90 mol% DMPC and 10 mol% C 12 (EO) 25 were prepared by the sonication method. Therapeutic effects of HL in the subcutaneous xenograft model mice of colorectal cancer were examined in vivo. Inhibitory effects of HL on the growth of WiDr cells were obtained along with apoptosis measurement. Selective accumulation of HL, including a fluorescence probe (indocyanine green; (ICG)), was observed for WiDr cells using a fluorescence microscope. Remarkable reduction of tumor volume in xenograft model of mice topically HL-treated without drugs after the subcutaneous inoculation of WiDr cells was verified in vivo. Induction of apoptosis in tumor cells of xenograft mice topically administered with HL was observed in micrographs on the basis of terminal deoxynucleotidyl tranferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Accumulation of HL, including ICG, for long-term into the tumor was obtained in the xenograft model. Therapeutic effects of HL without any drugs in the murine xenograft model after subcutaneous inoculation of human colorectal cancer were revealed for the first time in vivo due to long-term accumulation. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Andrographolide regulates epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin receptor trafficking in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Y; Chiow, KH; Huang, D; Wong, SH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Andrographolide is the active component of Andrographis paniculata, a plant used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine, and it has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. However, not much is known about how it may affect the key receptors implicated in cancer. Knowledge of how andrographolide affects receptor trafficking will allow us to better understand new mechanisms by which andrographolide may cause death in cancer cells. Experimental approach: We utilized the well-characterized epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfR) expressed in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells as a model to study the effect of andrographolide on receptor trafficking. Receptor distribution, the total number of receptors and surface receptors were analysed by immunofluorescence, Western blot as well as flow-cytometry respectively. Key results: Andrographolide treatment inhibited cell growth, down-regulated EGFRs on the cell surface and affected the degradation of EGFRs and TfRs. The EGFR was internalized into the cell at an increased rate, and accumulated in a compartment that co-localizes with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein in the late endosomes. Conclusion and implications: This study sheds light on how andrographolide may affect receptor trafficking by inhibiting receptor movement from the late endosomes to lysosomes. The down-regulation of EGFR from the cell surface also indicates a new mechanism by which andrographolide may induce cancer cell death. PMID:20233216

  16. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A.

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na+ adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na+/K+ ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na+ and K+ adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results.

  17. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na(+) adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na(+)/K(+) ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Ketogenic diets enhance oxidative stress and radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bryan G; Bhatia, Sudershan K; Buatti, John M; Brandt, Kristin E; Lindholm, Kaleigh E; Button, Anna M; Szweda, Luke I; Smith, Brian J; Spitz, Douglas R; Fath, Melissa A

    2013-07-15

    Ketogenic diets are high in fat and low in carbohydrates as well as protein which forces cells to rely on lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration rather than glycolysis for energy metabolism. Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) are believed to exist in a state of chronic oxidative stress mediated by mitochondrial metabolism. The current study tests the hypothesis that ketogenic diets enhance radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by enhancing oxidative stress. Mice bearing NCI-H292 and A549 lung cancer xenografts were fed a ketogenic diet (KetoCal 4:1 fats: proteins+carbohydrates) and treated with either conventionally fractionated (1.8-2 Gy) or hypofractionated (6 Gy) radiation as well as conventionally fractionated radiation combined with carboplatin. Mice weights and tumor size were monitored. Tumors were assessed for immunoreactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-(4HNE)-modified proteins as a marker of oxidative stress as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and γH2AX as indices of proliferation and DNA damage, respectively. The ketogenic diets combined with radiation resulted in slower tumor growth in both NCI-H292 and A549 xenografts (P < 0.05), relative to radiation alone. The ketogenic diet also slowed tumor growth when combined with carboplatin and radiation, relative to control. Tumors from animals fed a ketogenic diet in combination with radiation showed increases in oxidative damage mediated by lipid peroxidation as determined by 4HNE-modified proteins as well as decreased proliferation as assessed by decreased immunoreactive PCNA. These results show that a ketogenic diet enhances radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by a mechanism that may involve increased oxidative stress.

  19. [Effect of nobiletin on K562 cells xenograft in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Su, Mengqi; Yin, Jiale; Zhang, Hongquan

    2009-06-01

    To observe the inhibitory effect of citrus extract nobiletin on K562 cells xenograft in nude mice and discuss its anticancer activity and mechanism. The model of K562 cells xenograft was established in nude mice. Twenty-five nude mice were divided to five groups. After 24 hrs of inoculation with K562 tumor cells subcutaneously, 1% CMC-Na in the nude mice of model control group, nobiletin (12.5, 25, 50 mg x kg(-1)) in the nude mice of nobiletin groups and CTX (20 mg x kg(-1)) in positive control group were administered once every day. The nude mice were killed at 18th day-point of administration. The inhibitory rate of nobiletin on tumor was calculated according to the measured tumor weight. Immunohistochemistry assay was used to determine the effect of nobiletin on VEGF expression and MVD, and CAM assay was used to detect the effect of nobiletin on vessel regeneration. Nobiletin have notable inhibition on K562 cells xenograft in nude mice comparing with model control group (P < 0.01), the inhibitory rate of nobiletin groups were 36% -58%. The results of immunohistochemical technology showed that the expression of VEGF in nobiletin groups decreased significantly comparing with the model control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Nobiletin could remarkably decrease the angiogenesis within tumor tissues. The expression of CD34 in nobiletin low dose group and high dose group was lower than that in model control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The result of CAM indicated that 4 microg and 2 microg nobiletin could inhibit the new blood vessels of CAM (P < 0.01). Nobiletin inhibited the tumor growth and angiogenesis by reducing the VEGF expression of K562 cells xenograft in nude mice.

  20. Novel patient-derived xenograft and cell line models for therapeutic testing of pediatric liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Kettlun-Leyton, Claudia; Legras, Xavier D; Zorman, Barry; Barzi, Mercedes; Chen, Leon L; Amin, Mansi D; Huang, Yung-Hsin; Pautler, Robia G; Hampton, Oliver A; Prakash, Masand M; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Shi, Yan; Gaber, M Waleed; Hicks, M John; Thompson, Patrick A; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Finegold, Milton; Goss, John A; Parsons, D Williams; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Sumazin, Pavel; López-Terrada, Dolores; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric liver cancer is a rare but serious disease whose incidence is rising, and for which the therapeutic options are limited. Development of more targeted, less toxic therapies is hindered by the lack of an experimental animal model that captures the heterogeneity and metastatic capability of these tumors. Here we established an orthotopic engraftment technique to model a series of patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) from pediatric liver cancers of all major histologic subtypes: hepatoblastoma, hepatocellular cancer and hepatocellular malignant neoplasm. We utilized standard (immuno) staining methods for histological characterization, RNA sequencing for gene expression profiling and genome sequencing for identification of druggable targets. We also adapted stem cell culturing techniques to derive two new pediatric cancer cell lines from the xenografted mice. The patient-derived tumor xenografts recapitulated the histologic, genetic, and biological characteristics-including the metastatic behavior-of the corresponding primary tumors. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles of the two new liver cancer cell lines closely resemble those of the primary tumors. Targeted therapy of PDTX from an aggressive hepatocellular malignant neoplasm with the MEK1 inhibitor trametinib and pan-class I PI3 kinase inhibitor NVP-BKM120 resulted in significant growth inhibition, thus confirming this PDTX model as a valuable tool to study tumor biology and patient-specific therapeutic responses. The novel metastatic xenograft model and the isogenic xenograft-derived cell lines described in this study provide reliable tools for developing mutation- and patient-specific therapies for pediatric liver cancer. Pediatric liver cancer is a rare but serious disease and no experimental animal model currently captures the complexity and metastatic capability of these tumors. We have established a novel animal model using human tumor tissue that recapitulates the genetic and biological

  1. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  2. Dynamic clonal progression in xenografts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Paul. B.; Blair, Helen H.; Ryan, Sarra L.; Buechler, Lars; Cheng, Joanna; Clayton, Jake; Hanna, Rebecca; Hollern, Shaun; Hawking, Zoe; Bashton, Matthew; Schwab, Claire J.; Jones, Lisa; Russell, Lisa J.; Marr, Helen; Carey, Peter; Halsey, Christina; Heidenreich, Olaf; Moorman, Anthony V.; Harrison, Christine J.

    2018-01-01

    Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 is a heterogeneous chromosomal rearrangement occurring in 2% of cases of childhood precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These abnormalities are too complex to engineer faithfully in animal models and are unrepresented in leukemia cell lines. As a resource for future functional and preclinical studies, we have created xenografts from the leukemic blasts of patients with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 and characterized them by in-vivo and ex-vivo luminescent imaging, flow immunophenotyping, and histological and ultrastructural analyses of bone marrow and the central nervous system. Investigation of up to three generations of xenografts revealed phenotypic evolution, branching genomic architecture and, compared with other B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic subtypes, greater clonal diversity of leukemia-initiating cells. In support of intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 as a primary genetic abnormality, it was always retained through generations of xenografts, although we also observed the first example of structural evolution of this rearrangement. Clonal segregation in xenografts revealed convergent evolution of different secondary genomic abnormalities implicating several known tumor suppressor genes and a region, containing the B-cell adaptor, PIK3AP1, and nuclear receptor co-repressor, LCOR, in the progression of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tracking of mutations in patients and derived xenografts provided evidence for co-operation between abnormalities activating the RAS pathway in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and for their aggressive clonal expansion in the xeno-environment. Bi-allelic loss of the CDKN2A/B locus was recurrently maintained or emergent in xenografts and also strongly selected as RNA sequencing demonstrated a complete absence of reads for genes associated with the deletions. PMID:29449437

  3. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    membrane to regulate fatty acid oxidation by inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT- 1). Inhibition of CPT-1 has been shown to sensitize...Fat Storage" Granted U.S.application filed November 28, 1996; formal issuance occurred in 1999. Inhibition of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1...days before tumor inoculation. MCF7 cells (10’ 0.04 cells) were xenografted from culture in DMEM supplemented with 10% FBS and " 10 jig/ml insulin

  4. Dual HER2 Targeting Impedes Growth of HER2 Gene Amplified Uterine Serous Carcinoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Virginia F.; DiGloria, Celeste M.; Lopez, Hector; Scialabba, Vanessa; Kim, Minji; Zhang, Ling; Borger, Darrell R.; Tambouret, Rosemary; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Growdon, Whitfield B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is an aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer that commonly harbors HER2 gene amplification. We investigated the effectiveness of HER2 inhibition using lapatinib and trastuzumab in vitro and in xenografts derived from USC cell lines and USC patient derived xenografts (PDXs). Experimental Design Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed to assess HER2 expression in 42 primary USC specimens. ARK1, ARK2 and SPEC2 cell lines were treated with trastuzumab or lapatinib. Cohorts of mice harboring xenografts derived from ARK2 and SPEC2 cell lines and EnCa1 and EnCa2 primary human USC samples were treated with either vehicle, trastuzumab, lapatinib or the combination of trastuzumab and lapatinib. Acute and chronic post treatment tumor samples were assessed for downstream signaling alterations and examined for apoptosis and proliferation. Results HER2 gene amplification (24%) correlated significantly with HER2 protein over-expression (55%). All models were impervious to single agent trastuzumab treatment. Lapatinib decreased in vitro proliferation of all cell lines and in vivo growth of HER2 amplified xenografts (ARK2, EnCa1). In addition, dual therapy with trastuzumab and lapatinib resulted in significant anti-tumor activity only in ARK2 and EnCa1 tumors. Dual HER2 therapy induced on target alteration of downstream MAPK and PI3K pathway mediators only in HER2 amplified models, and was associated with increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Conclusions While trastuzumab alone did not impact USC growth, dual anti-HER2 therapy with lapatinib led to improved inhibition of tumor growth in HER2 amplified USC and may be a promising avenue for future investigation. PMID:25294905

  5. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Vines, Douglass C; Scollard, Deborah A; McKee, Trevor; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Vali, Reza; Shammas, Amer; Besanger, Travis; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15) compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2)). Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal), tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro , NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET), a molecular target for 131 I-MIBG therapy, low 123 I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123 I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy.

  6. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vines, Douglass C.; Scollard, Deborah A.; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Besanger, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15) compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2)). Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal), tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro, NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET), a molecular target for 131I-MIBG therapy, low 123I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy. PMID:29097943

  7. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R combined with recombinant methioninase and cisplatinum eradicates an osteosarcoma cisplatinum-resistant lung metastasis in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model: decoy, trap and kill chemotherapy moves toward the clinic.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Miyake, Masuyo; Li, Shukuan; Han, Qinghong; Tan, Yuying; Zhao, Ming; Li, Yunfeng; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Singh, Arun S; Elliott, Irmina A; Russell, Tara A; Eckardt, Mark A; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-04-10

    In the present study, a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model of recurrent cisplatinum (CDDP)-resistant metastatic osteosarcoma was treated with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R), which decoys chemoresistant quiescent cancer cells to cycle, and recombinant methioninase (rMETase), which selectively traps cancer cells in late S/G 2 , and chemotherapy. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups 14 days after implantation: G1, control without treatment; G2, CDDP (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks). G4, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks); G5, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks); G6, S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 10 7 CFU/100 μl, i.v., weekly, for 2 weeks) combined with rMETase (100 unit/mouse, i.p., daily, for 2 weeks) and CDDP (6 mg/kg, i.p. injection, weekly, for 2 weeks). On day 14 after initiation, all treatments except CDDP alone, significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to untreated control: (CDDP: p = 0.586; rMETase: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R: p = 0.002; S. typhimurium A1-R combined with rMETase: p = 0.0004; rMETase combined with both S. typhimurium A1-R and CDDP: p = 0.0001). The decoy, trap and kill combination of S. typhimurium A1-R, rMETase and CDDP was the most effective of all therapies and was able to eradicate the metastatic osteosarcoma PDOX.

  8. Merkel cell carcinoma expresses vasculogenic mimicry: demonstration in patients and experimental manipulation in xenografts.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Cecilia; Kleffel, Sonja; Lee, Nayoung; Larson, Allison R; Zhan, Qian; DoRosario, Andrew; Wang, Linda C; Schatton, Tobias; Murphy, George F

    2014-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly virulent cutaneous neoplasm that, like melanoma, is a frequent cause of patient morbidity and mortality. The cellular mechanisms responsible for the aggressive behavior of MCC remain unknown. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a phenomenon associated with cancer virulence, including in melanoma, whereby anastomosing laminin networks form in association with tumor cells that express certain endothelial genes. To determine whether VM is a factor in MCC, we employed a relevant xenograft model using two independent human MCC lines. Experimentally induced tumors were remarkably similar histologically to patient MCC, and both contained laminin networks associated with vascular endothelial-cadherin (CD144) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, as well as Nodal expression typical of VM in melanoma. Moreover, two established chemotherapeutic agents utilized for human MCC, etoposide and carboplatin, induced necrosis in xenografts on systemic administration while enriching for laminin networks in apparently resistant viable tumor regions that persisted. These findings for the first time establish VM-like laminin networks as a biomarker in MCC, demonstrate the experimental utility of the MCC xenograft model, and suggest that VM-rich regions of MCC may be refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. A Murine Xenograft Model for Human CD30+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Walther; Levi, Edi; Petrogiannis-Haliotis, Tina; Lehmann, Leslie; Wang, Zhenxi; Kadin, Marshall E.

    1999-01-01

    To develop a model for the biology and treatment of CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), we transplanted leukemic tumor cells from a 22-month-old girl with multiple relapsed ALCL. Tumor cells were inoculated intraperitoneally into a 4-week-old SCID/bg mouse and produced a disseminated tumor within 8 weeks; this tumor was serially transplanted by subcutaneous injections to other mice. Morphology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular genetics which demonstrated the NPM-ALK fusion protein, resulting from the t(2;5)(p23;q35), confirmed the identity of the xenograft with the original tumor. The tumor produced transcripts for interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ which could explain the patient’s B-symptoms. Treatment of mice with monoclonal antibody (HeFi-1) which activates CD30 antigen administered on day 1 after tumor transplantation prevented tumor growth. Treatment with HeFi-1 after tumors had reached a 0.2 cm3 volume caused tumor growth arrest and prevention of tumor dissemination. We conclude that transplantation of CD30+ ALCL to SCID/bg mice may provide a valuable model for the study of the biology and design of treatment modalities for CD30+ ALCL. PMID:10514417

  10. Collagen density and alignment in responsive and resistant trastuzumab-treated breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Lee, Jae H.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-02-01

    Tumor collagen characteristics influence tumor malignancy, invasion, and metastasis. This study investigates the effects of trastuzumab (Tz) on the collagen of Tz-responsive (BT474) and Tz-resistant (HR6) breast cancer xenografts. Collagen content was assessed by in vivo second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and histological trichrome staining of tumor sections. Collagen SHG imaging of control BT474 and HR6 tumors demonstrated increased collagen density after 14 days of treatment (p<0.05). Trichrome staining revealed decreased collagen in Tz-treated BT474 and HR6 tumors at 2, 5, and 14 days of treatment, suggesting that Tz affects the tumor microenvironment independent of epithelial cell response. Additionally, collagen alignment analysis revealed significantly less aligned collagen in the Tz-treated BT474 tumors at day 14 compared with control BT474 tumors. There was no correlation between SHG endpoints (collagen density and alignment) and trichrome staining (p>0.05), consistent with the physically distinctive nature of these measurements. There was also no correlation between tumor size and collagen endpoints (p>0.05). These results identify changes within the collagen compartment of the tumor microenvironment following Tz treatment, which are independent from the tumor cell response to Tz, and demonstrate that intravital collagen SHG imaging is capable of measuring dynamic changes in tumor microenvironment following treatment that complements trichrome staining.

  11. Ovarian and cervical cancer patient derived xenografts: The past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jonathan D; Dobbin, Zachary C; Straughn, J Michael; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical research in gynecologic malignancies has largely relied upon cloned cancer-derived cell lines and tumor xenografts derived from these cell lines. Unfortunately, the use of cell lines for translational research has disadvantages because genetic and phenotypic alterations from serial passaging have resulted in expression profiles that are different from the original patient tumors. The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model derived from human tumor not previously cultured has shown better representation of the heterogeneity of gynecologic malignancies and the human tumor microenvironment with preservation of cytogenetics, cellular complexity, and vascular and stromal tumor architecture. Studies have shown promise with these models to analyze tumor development and adaptation, test drug efficacy, and predict clinical outcomes. Their ultimate value may be seen with preclinical drug screening including novel targeted therapies, biomarker identification, and the development of individualized treatment plans. This article reviews PDX model development, current studies testing chemotherapeutics and targeted therapies, and limitations of the PDX model in gynecologic malignancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Cytarabine Against Ewing Sarcoma Xenografts by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Peter J.; Morton, Christopher L.; Kang, Min; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Billups, Catherine A.; Favours, Edward; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Tucker, Chandra; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with the nucleoside analog cytarabine has been shown to mimic changes in gene expression associated with down-regulation of the EWS-FLI1 oncogene in Ewing sarcoma cell lines, selectively inhibit their growth in vitro, and cause tumor regression in athymic nude mice. For this report cytarabine was studied in vitro against a panel of 23 pediatric cancer cell lines and in vivo against 6 Ewing sarcoma xenografts. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines were the most sensitive to cytarabine in vitro (median IC50 9 nM), while Ewing sarcoma cell lines showed intermediate sensitivity (median IC50 232 nM). Cytarabine at a dose of 150 mg/kg administered daily 5× failed to significantly inhibit growth of five xenograft models, but reduced growth rate of the A673 xenograft by 50%. Cytarabine shows no differential in vitro activity against Ewing sarcoma cell lines and is ineffective in vivo against Ewing sarcoma xenografts at the dose and schedule studied. PMID:20979180

  13. [Inhibitory effect of Biejiajian pills on HepG2 cell xenograft growth and expression of β-catenin and Tbx3 in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Sun, Hai-Tao; He, Song-Qi; LA, Lei; An, Hai-Yan; Pang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism by which Biejiajian pills inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma in a nude mouse model bearing HepG2 cell xenograft. The inhibitory effect of Biejiajian pills on the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice was observed. Immunohistochemical method was used to examine proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in HepG2 cell xenograft, and TUNEL method was employed to detect the cell apoptosis; the expression levels of β-catenin and Tbx3 were measured by Western blotting. Biejiajian pills significantly suppressed the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice treated with a high and a moderate dose of Biejiajian pills showed significantly increased apoptosis rate of the tumor cells [(22.9±1.220)% and (14.7±0.50)%, respectively] compared with the control group [(5.5±0.90)%, P<0.05]. Treatment with Biejiajian pills significantly decreased the expressions of PNCA, β-catenin, and Tbx3 in the cell xenograft (P<0.05). Biejiajian pills can inhibit the growth of HepG2 cell xenograft in nude mice and promote tumor cell apoptosis possibly by inhibiting PNCA expression and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  14. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  15. The ErbB inhibitors, trastuzumab and erlotinib, inhibit growth of vestibular schwannoma xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. Jason; Provenzano, Matthew; Diggelmann, Henry R.; Xu, Ningyong; Hansen, Skylar S.; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of ErbB inhibitors to reduce the growth of vestibular schwannoma (VS) xenografts. Methods VS xenografts were established in the interscapular fat pad in nude mice for 4 weeks. Initially, a small cohort of animals was treated with the ErbB2 inhibitor, trastuzumab, or saline for 2 weeks. Animals also received BrdU injections to label proliferating cells. In a longer-term experiment, animals were randomized to receive trastuzumab, erlotinib (an ErbB kinase inhibitor), or placebo for 12 weeks. Tumor growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over the treatment period. Cell death was analyzed by terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Tumors could be distinguished with T2 weighted MRI sequences. Trastuzumab significantly reduced the proliferation of VS cells compared to control (p<0.01) as determined by BrdU uptake. Control tumors demonstrated slight growth over the 12 week treatment period. Both trastuzumab and erlotinib significantly reduced the growth of VS xenografts (p<0.05). Erlotinib, but not trastuzumab, resulted in a significant increase in the percent of TUNEL-positive VS cells (p<0.01). Conclusions In this preliminary study, the ErbB inhibitors trastuzumab and erlotinib decreased growth of VS xenografts in nude mice raising the possibility of using ErbB inhibitors in the management of patients with schwannomas, particularly those with neurofibromatosis type 2. PMID:18636037

  16. Establishment and characterization of a human papillomavirus type 16-positive tonsillar carcinoma xenograft in BALB/c nude mice.

    PubMed

    Letsolo, Boitelo T; Faust, Helena; Ekblad, Lars; Wennerberg, Johan; Forslund, Ola

    2016-03-01

    Among head and neck cancers, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with tonsillar carcinomas. Despite this, no HPV16-positive tonsillar cancer cell line has been established in nude mice. Fresh tonsillar carcinoma biopsies were obtained from 23 patients and implanted subcutaneously into nude mice (BALB/c, nu/nu). After 7 months, one xenograft was established. The primary tumor harbored 2.7 copies (95% confidence interval = 2.4-2.9) of HPV16/cell and displayed 99.9% (7904/7906) nucleotide identity to HPV16 (EU118173.1). The xenograft showed increased methylation in two E2-binding sites of the HPV16 genome. Both episomal and integrated HPV16 were detected in the original tumor and in 14 xenografts from the second passage. From this passage, a viral load of 6.4 copies/cell (range = 4.6-9.6) and 3.7 (range = 1.0-5.5) E7-mRNA transcripts/HPV16-genome were detected. This xenograft represents the first established HPV16-positive tonsillar tumor in nude mice and could provide an experimental system of HPV16-positive tonsillar cancers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Downregulation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 by shRNA sensitizes U251 xenografts to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Jun; Ding, Hao; Du, Hua-Qing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Jin-Bing; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Zou, Yuan-Jie; Liu, Hong-Yi; Xiao, Hong

    2014-10-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) has been demonstrated to be involved in radioresistance. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of PGK1 on the radioresistance in vivo. U251 glioma cells were transfected with the short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-PGK1 and pcDNA3.1-PGK1 using Lipofectamine 2000. The radiosensitivity of U251 xenografts was observed by tumor growth curve following radiotherapy. Quantitative PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed to evaluate PGK1 expression in the xenografts from the different tumor models. The expression of PGK1 was maximally inhibited in response to shRNA4 at 24 h after the transfection in vitro. Tumor growth of the U251 xenografts was significantly inhibited following treatment with shRNA-PGK1 and radiotherapy. The expression of PGK1 in vivo at the mRNA and protein levels was downregulated by the treatment of shRNA1 when compared to levels following treatment with shNC and PBS after radiotherapy. The results showed that suppression of PGK1 enhanced the radiosensitivity of U251 xenografts and suggest that PGK1 may serve as a useful target in the treatment of radioresistant glioma.

  18. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Hypoxia in Human Xenografts: Comparing Hypoxia-Induced Gene Expression with Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers

    PubMed Central

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer 18F-FMISO and the reporter substrate 124I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: 124I-FIAU, 18F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. PMID:18922936

  19. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    PubMed

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  20. The effects of a picosecond pulsed electric field on angiogenesis in the cervical cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limei; Yao, Chenguo; Xiong, Zhengai; Zhang, Ruizhe; Wang, Zhiliang; Wu, Yutong; Qin, Qin; Hua, Yuanyuan

    2016-04-01

    The application of picosecond pulsed electric field (psPEF) is a new biomedical engineering technique used in cancer therapy. However, its effects on cervical cancer angiogenesis are not clear. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of psPEF on angiogenesis in cervical cancer xenograft models. Xenograft tumors were created by subcutaneously inoculating nude mice (athymic BALB/c nu/nu mice) with HeLa cells, then were placed closely between tweezer-type plate electrodes and subjected to psPEF with a gradually increased electric field intensity (0kV/cm, 50kV/cm, 60kV/cm, 70kV/cm). The direct effect on tumor tissue was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The changes of blood vessels and oxygen saturation (sO2) of tumors were monitored in vivo by photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) were detected by immunohistochemical technique (IHC). Their protein expressions and gene transcription levels were evaluated using western blot (WB) and quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PsPEF induced obvious necrosis of cervical cancer tissue; with the increasing of electric field intensity, the MVD, vascular PA signal and sO2 values declined significantly. The protein expression and gene transcription levels of VEGF, HIF1α and HIF2α were significantly decreased at the same time. PsPEF exhibited dramatic anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis effects in cervical cancer xenograft models by exerting direct effect on cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells and indirect effect on tumor angiogenesis-related factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relaxin receptor antagonist AT-001 synergizes with docetaxel in androgen-independent prostate xenografts.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H; Branch, Donald R; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Trachtenberg, John; Silvertown, Joshua D

    2014-06-01

    Androgen hormones and the androgen receptor (AR) pathway are the main targets of anti-hormonal therapies for prostate cancer. However, resistance inevitably develops to treatments aimed at the AR pathway resulting in androgen-independent or hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Therefore, there is a significant unmet need for new, non-androgen anti-hormonal strategies for the management of prostate cancer. We demonstrate that a relaxin hormone receptor antagonist, AT-001, an analog of human H2 relaxin, represents a first-in-class anti-hormonal candidate treatment designed to significantly curtail the growth of androgen-independent human prostate tumor xenografts. Chemically synthesized AT-001, administered subcutaneously, suppressed PC3 xenograft growth by up to 60%. AT-001 also synergized with docetaxel, standard first-line chemotherapy for HRPC, to suppress tumor growth by more than 98% in PC3 xenografts via a mechanism involving the downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and the hypoxia-induced response. Our data support developing AT-001 for clinical use as an anti-relaxin hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer.

  2. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  3. A Novel Chordoma Xenograft Allows In Vivo Drug Testing and Reveals the Importance of NF-κB Signaling in Chordoma Biology

    PubMed Central

    Trucco, Matteo M.; Awad, Ola; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Goldstein, Seth D.; Huang, Ruili; Walker, Robert L.; Shah, Preeti; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Gul, Naheed; Zhu, Yuelin J.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Paz-Priel, Ido; Meltzer, Paul S.; Austin, Christopher P.; Xia, Menghang; Loeb, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy that arises in the skull base, spine and sacrum and originates from remnants of the notochord. These tumors are typically resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and to date there are no FDA-approved agents to treat chordoma. The lack of in vivo models of chordoma has impeded the development of new therapies for this tumor. Primary tumor from a sacral chordoma was xenografted into NOD/SCID/IL-2R γ-null mice. The xenograft is serially transplantable and was characterized by both gene expression analysis and whole genome SNP genotyping. The NIH Chemical Genomics Center performed high-throughput screening of 2,816 compounds using two established chordoma cell lines, U-CH1 and U-CH2B. The screen yielded several compounds that showed activity and two, sunitinib and bortezomib, were tested in the xenograft. Both agents slowed the growth of the xenograft tumor. Sensitivity to an inhibitor of IκB, as well as inhibition of an NF-κB gene expression signature demonstrated the importance of NF-κB signaling for chordoma growth. This serially transplantable chordoma xenograft is thus a practical model to study chordomas and perform in vivo preclinical drug testing. PMID:24223206

  4. The Public Repository of Xenografts Enables Discovery and Randomized Phase II-like Trials in Mice.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth C; Murakami, Mark A; Christodoulou, Alexandra; Christie, Amanda L; Köster, Johannes; DeSouza, Tiffany A; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Kallgren, Scott P; Liu, Huiyun; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Plana, Olivia; Montero, Joan; Stevenson, Kristen E; Rao, Prakash; Vadhi, Raga; Andreeff, Michael; Armand, Philippe; Ballen, Karen K; Barzaghi-Rinaudo, Patrizia; Cahill, Sarah; Clark, Rachael A; Cooke, Vesselina G; Davids, Matthew S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Dorfman, David M; Eaton, Hilary; Ebert, Benjamin L; Etchin, Julia; Firestone, Brant; Fisher, David C; Freedman, Arnold S; Galinsky, Ilene A; Gao, Hui; Garcia, Jacqueline S; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Graubert, Timothy A; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Halilovic, Ensar; Harris, Marian H; Herbert, Zachary T; Horwitz, Steven M; Inghirami, Giorgio; Intlekofer, Andrew M; Ito, Moriko; Izraeli, Shai; Jacobsen, Eric D; Jacobson, Caron A; Jeay, Sébastien; Jeremias, Irmela; Kelliher, Michelle A; Koch, Raphael; Konopleva, Marina; Kopp, Nadja; Kornblau, Steven M; Kung, Andrew L; Kupper, Thomas S; LeBoeuf, Nicole R; LaCasce, Ann S; Lees, Emma; Li, Loretta S; Look, A Thomas; Murakami, Masato; Muschen, Markus; Neuberg, Donna; Ng, Samuel Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Orkin, Stuart H; Paquette, Rachel R; Place, Andrew E; Roderick, Justine E; Ryan, Jeremy A; Sallan, Stephen E; Shoji, Brent; Silverman, Lewis B; Soiffer, Robert J; Steensma, David P; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stone, Richard M; Tamburini, Jerome; Thorner, Aaron R; van Hummelen, Paul; Wadleigh, Martha; Wiesmann, Marion; Weng, Andrew P; Wuerthner, Jens U; Williams, David A; Wollison, Bruce M; Lane, Andrew A; Letai, Anthony; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Ritz, Jerome; Brown, Myles; Long, Henry; Aster, Jon C; Shipp, Margaret A; Griffin, James D; Weinstock, David M

    2016-04-11

    More than 90% of drugs with preclinical activity fail in human trials, largely due to insufficient efficacy. We hypothesized that adequately powered trials of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) in mice could efficiently define therapeutic activity across heterogeneous tumors. To address this hypothesis, we established a large, publicly available repository of well-characterized leukemia and lymphoma PDXs that undergo orthotopic engraftment, called the Public Repository of Xenografts (PRoXe). PRoXe includes all de-identified information relevant to the primary specimens and the PDXs derived from them. Using this repository, we demonstrate that large studies of acute leukemia PDXs that mimic human randomized clinical trials can characterize drug efficacy and generate transcriptional, functional, and proteomic biomarkers in both treatment-naive and relapsed/refractory disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to cancer xenografts via the nanoparticle of nano-diamino-tetrac.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Yalcin, Murat; Darwish, Noureldien He; Debreli Coskun, Melis; Keating, Kelly A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-01-01

    The tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) component of nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) is chemically bonded via a linker to a poly(lactic- co -glycolic acid) nanoparticle that can encapsulate anticancer drugs. Tetrac targets the plasma membrane of cancer cells at a receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of NDAT delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to, respectively, pancreatic and breast cancer orthotopic nude mouse xenografts. Intra-tumoral drug concentrations were 5-fold (paclitaxel; P <0.001) and 2.3-fold (doxorubicin; P <0.01) higher than with conventional systemic drug administration. Tumor volume reductions reflected enhanced xenograft drug uptake. Cell viability was estimated by bioluminescent signaling in pancreatic tumors and confirmed an increased paclitaxel effect with drug delivery by NDAT. NDAT delivery of chemotherapy increases drug delivery to cancers and increases drug efficacy.

  6. [Inhibitory effect of VEGF antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides on the growth of human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-guang; Wang, Xu-xia; Li, Teng-yu; Wang, Yan-xiu; Gao, Jing; Ni, Chun-xiao

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of VEGF antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleoiides on the growth of human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) xenografts in nude mice. The VEGF-ASODN was synthesised artificially. After the model of human SACC xenografts in nude mice was established, they were random1y divided into three groups: antisense group, scrambled group and normal saline group. A control group without cancer was also established. Antisense(66 μg), scrambled sequence(66 μg) and normal saline(once every 3 days and 7 times in all) were injected in three experimental groups, respectively. Two days after therapy, the mice were sacrificed. Serums were used for detection of VEGF protein. All tumors were measured and weighted. The quantity of VEGF mRNA and protein and PLI, MVD was detected by hybridization in situ and immunohistochemistry. SPSS13.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The VEGF-ASODN could suppress the expression of VEGF in human SACC xenografts in nude mice and reduce VEGF protein in serum of nude mice significantly. It cou1d also reduce the volume and weight of xenografts and could reduce the expression of VEGF mRNA and its protein, PCNA and CD34. By inhibiting the expression of VEGF, VEGF-ASODN can inhabit proliferation of human SACC xenografts in nude mice.

  7. DCE-MRI of the hypoxic fraction, radioresponsiveness, and metastatic propensity of cervical carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Christine; Hompland, Tord; Galappathi, Kanthi; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K

    2014-02-01

    Locoregional treatment failure and poor survival rates are associated with extensive hypoxia in the primary tumor in advanced cervical carcinoma. The potential of gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing the hypoxic fraction, radioresponsiveness, and metastatic propensity of cervical carcinomas was investigated in this preclinical study. CK-160 and TS-415 cervical carcinoma xenografts were used as tumor models. DCE-MRI was carried out at 1.5 T, and parametric images of K(trans) and v(e) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. Pimonidazole was used as a hypoxia marker. Tumor radioresponsiveness was determined by irradiating tumors with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h and measuring cell survival in vitro. Metastatic propensity was determined by examining host mice for tumor growth in lymph nodes. Low values of K(trans) were associated with extensive hypoxia and radiation resistance in tumors of both lines and with high incidence of metastases in CK-160 tumors. Associations between ve and hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic propensity were not found in any of the tumor lines. K(trans) is a potentially useful biomarker of tumor hypoxia, radiation resistance, and metastatic growth in advanced cervical carcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Global HDO uptake in human glioma xenografts is related to the perfused capillary distribution.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, B P; in't Zandt, H J; Hoofd, L; de Graaf, R A; Nicolay, K; Rijken, P F; van der Kogel, A J; Heerschap, A

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the existence of a possible relationship between global deuterium-labeled water (HDO) uptake rates and the diffusion geometry of human glioma xenografts in nude mice. HDO diffusion times in the whole extravascular tumor volume were estimated by combining quantitative (1)H-MR diffusion imaging and morphometric analysis of intercapillary distances in two tumor lines with a different perfused vascular architecture. HDO uptake was measured independently using (2)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Time constants of HDO-uptake curves (tau) were compared to estimations of maximum HDO diffusion times (t(difmax)). Tumors with a homogeneously perfused capillary distribution showed a mono-exponential HDO uptake. The t(difmax) was comparable to tau values of HDO uptake curves: t(difmax) varied between 74 and 368 sec and the range of tau values was 115-370 sec. Heterogeneously perfused tumors had a bi-exponential HDO uptake with t(difmax) in between the tau values of the fast and slow uptake phase. These findings indicate that the global HDO uptake is related to the perfused capillary distribution in human glioma xenografts. That HDO uptake rates indeed can depend on the perfused capillary distribution was substantiated in experiments with two-dimensional (2D) models. In these models with a diffusion-limited HDO uptake, HDO uptake curves could be approximated by curves derived from 2D HDO diffusion simulations. Magn Reson Med 42:479-489, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Regulation of apoptosis by resveratrol through JAK/STAT and mitochondria mediated pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Madan, Esha; Prasad, Sahdeo; Roy, Preeti

    2008-12-26

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin present mainly in grapes, red wine and berries, is known to possess strong chemopreventive and anticancer properties. Here, we demonstrated the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities of resveratrol in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Resveratrol has cytotoxic effects through inhibiting cellular proliferation of A431 cells, which leads to the induction of apoptosis, as evident by an increase in the fraction of cells in the sub-G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle and Annexin-V binding of externalized phosphatidylserine. Results revealed that inhibition of proliferation is associated with regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway, where resveratrol prevents phosphorylation ofmore » JAK, thereby inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment actively stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Consequently, an imbalance in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio triggered the caspase cascade and subsequent cleavage of PARP, thereby shifting the balance in favor of apoptosis. These observations indicate that resveratrol treatment inhibits JAK/STAT-mediated gene transcription and induce the mitochondrial cell death pathway.« less

  10. Epidermal growth factor, bradykinin, and histamine stimulate inositol phosphate formation in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lovenberg, T.W.; Hepler, J.R.; Earp, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of A431 cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF), bradykinin (BK), or histamine (HA) resulted in a 3-, 6-, or 3-fold increase, respectively, in the formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), InsP/sub 1/, and InsP/sub 2/, and InsP/sub 3/. The K/sub 0.5/ values for stimulation were 3 nM, 3 nM, and 10 ..mu..M for EGF, BK, and HA, respectively. Total InsP formation was essentially linear for each hormone for at least 10 min; the accumulation of InsP/sub 3/ was maximal within 15 sec. The efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ from /sup 45/Ca-preincubated cells was increased by all three hormones,more » suggesting that EGF-, BK-, and HA-stimulated breakdown of phosphoinositides results in Ca/sup + +/ mobilization in these cells. A431 cells should prove a useful model system for comparison of the mechanism(s) whereby EGF and other hormone receptors regulate phosphoinositide metabolism.« less

  11. Erlotinib Pretreatment Improves Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Xenografts via Multiple Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A; Putt, Mary E; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. Although EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for the treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small-molecule inhibitors (i.e., erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e., cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared with 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Erlotinib pretreatment improves photodynamic therapy of non-small cell lung carcinoma xenografts via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M.; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A.; Putt, Mary E.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. While EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small molecule inhibitors (i.e.- erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e.- cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared to 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT. PMID:26054596

  13. The Effect of Sunitinib Treatment in Human Melanoma Xenografts: Associations with Angiogenic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Simonsen, Trude G; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Rofstad, Einar K

    2017-04-01

    The effect of antiangiogenic agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) pathway has been reported to vary substantially in preclinical studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sunitinib treatment on tumor vasculature and oxygenation in melanoma xenografts with different angiogenic profiles. A-07, U-25, D-12, or R-18 melanoma xenografts were grown in dorsal window chambers and given daily treatments of sunitinib (40 mg/kg) or vehicle. Morphologic parameters of tumor vascular networks were assessed from high-resolution transillumination images, and tumor blood supply times (BSTs) were assessed from first-pass imaging movies. Tumor hypoxia was assessed with immunohistochemistry by using pimonidazole as hypoxia marker, and the gene expression and the protein secretion rate of angiogenic factors were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The melanoma lines differed substantially in the expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and platelet-derived growth factor A. Sunitinib treatment reduced vessel densities and induced hypoxia in all melanoma lines, and the magnitude of the effect was associated with the gene expression and protein secretion rate of VEGF-A. Sunitinib treatment also increased vessel segment lengths, reduced the number of small-diameter vessels, and inhibited growth-induced increases in the diameter of surviving vessels but did not change BST. In conclusion, sunitinib treatment did not improve vascular function but reduced vessel density and induced hypoxia in human melanoma xenografts. The magnitude of the treatment-induced effect was associated with the VEGF-A expression of the melanoma lines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antitumor activity of motesanib alone and in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel in multiple human non-small-cell lung cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Coxon, Angela; Ziegler, Beth; Kaufman, Stephen; Xu, Man; Wang, Hongyu; Weishuhn, Dawn; Schmidt, Joanna; Sweet, Heather; Starnes, Charlie; Saffran, Douglas; Polverino, Anthony

    2012-09-19

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is categorized into various histologic subtypes that play an important role in prognosis and treatment outcome. We investigated the antitumor activity of motesanib, a selective antagonist of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1, 2, and 3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and Kit, alone and combined with chemotherapy in five human NSCLC xenograft models (A549, Calu-6, NCI-H358, NCI-H1299, and NCI-H1650) containing diverse genetic mutations. Motesanib as a single agent dose-dependently inhibited tumor xenograft growth compared with vehicle in all five of the models (P < 0.05). When combined with cisplatin, motesanib significantly inhibited the growth of Calu-6, NCI-H358, and NCI-H1650 tumor xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P < 0.05). Similarly, the combination of motesanib plus docetaxel significantly inhibited the growth of A549 and Calu-6 tumor xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P < 0.05). In NCI-H358 and NCI-H1650 xenografts, motesanib with and without cisplatin significantly decreased tumor blood vessel area (P < 0.05 vs vehicle) as assessed by anti-CD31 staining. Motesanib alone or in combination with chemotherapy had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in vitro. These data demonstrate that motesanib had antitumor activity against five different human NSCLC xenograft models containing diverse genetic mutations, and that it had enhanced activity when combined with cisplatin or docetaxel. These effects appeared to be mediated primarily by antiangiogenic mechanisms.

  15. Antitumor activity of motesanib alone and in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel in multiple human non–small-cell lung cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is categorized into various histologic subtypes that play an important role in prognosis and treatment outcome. We investigated the antitumor activity of motesanib, a selective antagonist of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1, 2, and 3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and Kit, alone and combined with chemotherapy in five human NSCLC xenograft models (A549, Calu-6, NCI-H358, NCI-H1299, and NCI-H1650) containing diverse genetic mutations. Results Motesanib as a single agent dose-dependently inhibited tumor xenograft growth compared with vehicle in all five of the models (P < 0.05). When combined with cisplatin, motesanib significantly inhibited the growth of Calu-6, NCI-H358, and NCI-H1650 tumor xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P < 0.05). Similarly, the combination of motesanib plus docetaxel significantly inhibited the growth of A549 and Calu-6 tumor xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P < 0.05). In NCI-H358 and NCI-H1650 xenografts, motesanib with and without cisplatin significantly decreased tumor blood vessel area (P < 0.05 vs vehicle) as assessed by anti-CD31 staining. Motesanib alone or in combination with chemotherapy had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in vitro. Conclusions These data demonstrate that motesanib had antitumor activity against five different human NSCLC xenograft models containing diverse genetic mutations, and that it had enhanced activity when combined with cisplatin or docetaxel. These effects appeared to be mediated primarily by antiangiogenic mechanisms. PMID:22992329

  16. Addition of bevacizumab enhances antitumor activity of erlotinib against non-small cell lung cancer xenografts depending on VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Heyan; Takayama, Koichi; Wang, Shuo; Shiraishi, Yoshimasa; Gotanda, Keisuke; Harada, Taishi; Furuyama, Kazuto; Iwama, Eiji; Ieiri, Ichiro; Okamoto, Isamu; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), and bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent, are promising therapies for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our study was aimed to determine whether there were conditions under which the addition of bevacizumab would enhance the antitumor activity of erlotinib against NSCLC tumors in vitro and in vivo. MTS was for NSCLC cell (PC9, 11-18, H1975, H157, H460 and A549) growth assay in vitro. ELISA was for VEGF protein assay in cells and tumor tissues. Mouse xenograft models were established with H157, H460 and A549 with primary resistance to erlotinib and treated with erlotinib plus bevacizumab or each agent alone. Erlotinib concentrations in tumors were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Bevacizumab alone did not inhibit NSCLC cell growth in vitro. In primarily erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells, the levels of VEGF protein were highest in H157 cell followed in order by H460 and A549 cells. In vivo, bevacizumab alone significantly inhibited tumor growth only in xenograft models with high (H157) and/or moderate (H460) levels of VEGF protein. A combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab partially reversed resistance to erlotinib in H157 xenografts (high VEGF level) with increasing intratumoral erlotinib concentrations, but not in H460 (moderate) or A549 (low) xenografts. These results support that combined with anti-VEGF therapy could enhance antitumor activity of anti-EGFR therapy and/or partially reverse resistance to EGFR TKI, by increasing EGFR TKI concentration in specific tumors that express high levels of VEGF protein.

  17. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sectionsmore » demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.« less

  18. The growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effect of deferoxamine combined with arsenic trioxide on HL-60 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Runhong; Wang, Dao; Ren, Xiuhua; Zeng, Li; Liu, Yufeng

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effect of deferoxamine (DFO) combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO) on the human HL-60 xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism. The highly tumorigenic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice to establish a human leukemia xenograft model. The HL-60 xenograft nude mice models were randomly divided into four groups: control (Normal saline, NS), 50mg/kg DFO, 3mg/kg ATO, the combined treatment (50mg/kg DFO+1.5mg/kg ATO) once HL-60 cells were inoculated. Tumor sizes, growth curves, inhibitory rates, cell apoptosis, and the expression of apoptosis related markers were measured to evaluate the tumor growth. Xenografted tumors were observed in all nude mice since the 5th day of inoculation. The inhibitory rates of tumor weight were 2.67%, 10.69%, and 25.57% in DFO, ATO and combination therapy groups, respectively. The combination of DFO with ATO induces significantly more tumor cell apoptosis than either agent alone (p<0.05). The expression of NF-κBp65 and survivin proteins decreased significantly while the expression of Caspase-3 and Bax increased in the combination therapy group (p<0.05). Double immunofluorescence for Caspase-3 and NFκBp65 demonstrated an inverse relationship between Caspase-3-positive areas and NFκBp65-positive areas, as well as the co-localization of Bax and survivin in xenografted tumor cells. Combination of DFO and ATO has synergistic effects on tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis-inducing in vivo with no significant side effects. The DFO and ATO can up-regulate the expression of Caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulate the expression of NF-κBp65 and survivin, especially for their combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi

    2009-06-26

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition ofmore » A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.« less

  20. Patient-derived xenografts of gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to rapid and delayed B-lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Sebastian M; Giessler, Klara M; Kriegsmann, Mark; Dubash, Taronish D; Möhrmann, Lino; Schulz, Erik R; Siegl, Christine; Weber, Sarah; Strakerjahn, Hendrik; Oberlack, Ava; Heger, Ulrike; Gao, Jianpeng; Hartinger, Eva-Maria; Oppel, Felix; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Ha, Nati; Brors, Benedikt; Lasitschka, Felix; Ulrich, Alexis; Strobel, Oliver; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Schneider, Martin; Weichert, Wilko; Ehrenberg, K Roland; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2017-03-15

    Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDX) are widely used to identify and evaluate novel therapeutic targets, and to test therapeutic approaches in preclinical mouse avatar trials. Despite their widespread use, potential caveats of PDX models remain considerably underappreciated. Here, we demonstrate that EBV-associated B-lymphoproliferations frequently develop following xenotransplantation of human colorectal and pancreatic carcinomas in highly immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc scid Il2rg tm1Wjl /SzJ (NSG) mice (18/47 and 4/37 mice, respectively), and in derived cell cultures in vitro. Strikingly, even PDX with carcinoma histology can host scarce EBV-infected B-lymphocytes that can fully overgrow carcinoma cells during serial passaging in vitro and in vivo. As serial xenografting is crucial to expand primary tumor tissue for biobanks and cohorts for preclinical mouse avatar trials, the emerging dominance of B-lymphoproliferations in serial PDX represents a serious confounding factor in these models. Consequently, repeated phenotypic assessments of serial PDX are mandatory at each expansion step to verify "bona fide" carcinoma xenografts. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Inhibition of human breast cancer xenograft growth by cruciferous vegetable constituent benzyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Warin, Renaud; Xiao, Dong; Arlotti, Julie A; Bommareddy, Ajay; Singh, Shivendra V

    2010-05-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a constituent of cruciferous vegetables such as garden cress, inhibits growth of human breast cancer cell lines in culture. The present study was undertaken to determine in vivo efficacy of BITC against MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. The BITC administration retarded growth of MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously implanted in female nude mice without causing weight loss or any other side effects. The BITC-mediated suppression of MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth correlated with reduced cell proliferation as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67 expression. Analysis of the vasculature in the tumors from BITC-treated mice indicated smaller vessel area compared with control tumors based on immunohistochemistry for angiogenesis marker CD31. The BITC-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis in vivo correlated with downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 protein levels in the tumor. Consistent with these results, BITC treatment suppressed VEGF secretion and VEGF receptor 2 protein levels in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, the BITC-treated MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited reduced capacity for migration compared with vehicle-treated control cells. In contrast to cellular data, BITC administration failed to elicit apoptotic response as judged by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of BITC against MDA-MB-231 xenografts in association with reduced cell proliferation and suppression of neovascularization. These preclinical observations merit clinical investigation to determine efficacy of BITC against human breast cancers. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Antitumor activity of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in patient-derived xenograft models of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hung; Ong, Richard; Zopf, Dieter

    2015-10-29

    Unresectable gastric cancer is associated with poor outcomes, with few treatment options available after failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Clinical trials of targeted therapies have generally shown no survival benefit in gastric cancer, with the exceptions of the antibodies ramucirumab (anti-VEGFR2) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2/neu). Given the efficacy of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in other gastrointestinal tumors, we investigated its potential in gastric cancer. The antitumor activity of oral regorafenib was assessed in eight murine patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft models. Dose-response experiments assessed the efficacy and tolerability of oral regorafenib 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg/day in two models, with 10 mg/kg/day selected for further investigation in all eight models. Tumor weight and volume was monitored during treatment; tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and intracellular signaling were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting of total tumor lysates at the end of treatment. Regorafenib showed dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and was well tolerated, with no significant decreases in bodyweight or evident toxicity. Regorafenib 10 mg/kg/day significantly inhibited tumor growth in all eight models (72 to 96 %; all p < 0.01), resulting in reduced tumor weight versus vehicle controls. Regorafenib reduced tumor angiogenesis 3- to 11-fold versus controls in all models (all p < 0.05), reduced tumor proliferation 2- to 5-fold in six of the eight models (all p < 0.05), and induced apoptosis in seven models. Regorafenib was effective in patient-derived models of gastric cancer of different histological subtypes, with inhibition of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and tumor-cell proliferation observed in almost all models. These findings are consistent with the observed activity of regorafenib in preclinical models of other gastrointestinal tumors, and support further clinical investigation in gastric cancer.

  3. Rosiglitazone impairs proliferation of human adrenocortical cancer: preclinical study in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Luconi, Michaela; Mangoni, Monica; Gelmini, Stefania; Poli, Giada; Nesi, Gabriella; Francalanci, Michela; Pratesi, Nicola; Cantini, Giulia; Lombardi, Adriana; Pepi, Monica; Ercolino, Tonino; Serio, Mario; Orlando, Claudio; Mannelli, Massimo

    2010-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. The lack of a specific and effective medical treatment is due to the poor knowledge of the mechanisms underlying tumor growth. Research on potential drugs able to specifically interfere with tumor proliferation is essential to develop more efficacious therapies. We evaluated for the first time the in vivo effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ), an anti-diabetic drug with in vitro anti-tumor properties, on ACC proliferation in a xenograft model obtained by s.c. injection of human ACC H295R cells in athymic mice. When the tumor size reached 5 mm, animals were allocated to 5 mg/kg RGZ- or water-treated groups. Tumor volume was measured twice a week. A significant reduction of tumor growth in RGZ versus control (control) group was observed and was already maximal following 17 day treatment (1-T/C=75.4% (43.7-93.8%)). After 31 days of treatment, mice were killed and tumor analyzed. Tumor histological evaluation revealed characteristics of invasiveness, richness in small vessels and mitotic figures in control group, while RGZ group tumors presented non infiltrating borders, few vessels, and many apoptotic bodies. Tumor immunohistochemistry showed that Ki-67 was reduced in RGZ versus control group. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR demonstrated a significant reduction in the expression of angiogenic (VEGF), vascular (CD31), proliferation (BMI-1), and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) genes in RGZ versus control group tumors. The same inhibitory effects were confirmed in in vitro RGZ-treated H295R. Our findings support and expand the role of RGZ in controlling ACC proliferation and angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Upregulated stromal EGFR and vascular remodeling in mouse xenograft models of angiogenesis inhibitor–resistant human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cascone, Tina; Herynk, Matthew H.; Xu, Li; Du, Zhiqiang; Kadara, Humam; Nilsson, Monique B.; Oborn, Carol J.; Park, Yun-Yong; Erez, Baruch; Jacoby, Jörg J.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lin, Heather Y.; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Herbst, Roy S.; Langley, Robert R.; Heymach, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for tumor growth and metastasis, and several inhibitors of angiogenesis are currently in clinical use for the treatment of cancer. However, not all patients benefit from antiangiogenic therapy, and those tumors that initially respond to treatment ultimately become resistant. The mechanisms underlying this, and the relative contributions of tumor cells and stroma to resistance, are not completely understood. Here, using species-specific profiling of mouse xenograft models of human lung adenocarcinoma, we have shown that gene expression changes associated with acquired resistance to the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab occurred predominantly in stromal and not tumor cells. In particular, components of the EGFR and FGFR pathways were upregulated in stroma, but not in tumor cells. Increased activated EGFR was detected on pericytes of xenografts that acquired resistance and on endothelium of tumors with relative primary resistance. Acquired resistance was associated with a pattern of pericyte-covered, normalized revascularization, whereas tortuous, uncovered vessels were observed in relative primary resistance. Importantly, dual targeting of the VEGF and EGFR pathways reduced pericyte coverage and increased progression-free survival. These findings demonstrated that alterations in tumor stromal pathways, including the EGFR and FGFR pathways, are associated with, and may contribute to, resistance to VEGF inhibitors and that targeting these pathways may improve therapeutic efficacy. Understanding stromal signaling may be critical for developing biomarkers for angiogenesis inhibitors and improving combination regimens. PMID:21436589

  5. Kinetics and regulation of the tyrosine phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor in intact A431 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sturani, E; Zippel, R; Toschi, L; Morello, L; Comoglio, P M; Alberghina, L

    1988-01-01

    We have previously reported that antibodies to phosphotyrosine recognize the phosphorylated forms of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors (Zippel et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 881:54-61, 1986, and Sturani et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 137:343-350, 1986). In this report, the time course of receptor phosphorylation is investigated. In normal human fibroblasts, ligand-induced phosphorylation of PDGF and EGF receptors is followed by rapid dephosphorylation. However, in A431 cells the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of EGF receptor persists for many hours after EGF stimulation, allowing a detailed analysis of the conditions affecting receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. In A431 cells, the number of receptor molecules phosphorylated on tyrosine was quantitated and found to be about 10% of total EGF receptors. The phosphorylated receptor molecules are localized on the cell surface, and they are rapidly dephosphorylated upon removal of EGF from binding sites by a short acid wash of intact cells and upon a mild treatment with trypsin. ATP depletion also results in rapid dephosphorylation, indicating that continuous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions occur in the ligand-receptor complex at steady state. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate added shortly before EGF reduces the rate and the final extent of receptor phosphorylation. Moreover, it also reduces the amount of phosphorylated receptors if it is added after EGF. Down-regulation of protein kinase C by chronic treatment with phorbol dibutyrate increases the receptor phosphorylation induced by EGF, suggesting a homologous feedback regulation of EGF receptor functions. Images PMID:3367910

  6. EGF-induced dynamics of NF-κB and F-actin in A431 cells spread on fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Bolshakova, Anastasia; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Pinaev, George; Petukhova, Olga

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the role of actin cytoskeleton in the regulation of NF-κB transcription factor, we analyzed its involvement in the intracellular transport and nuclear translocation of the NF-κB RelA/p65 subunit in A431 epithelial cells stimulated with fibronectin and EGF. Live cell imaging and confocal microscopy showed that EGF activated the movement of RelA/p65 in the cytoplasm. Upon cell adhesion to fibronectin, RelA/p65 concentrated onto stress fibers, and EGF stimulated its subsequent allocation to membrane ruffles, newly organized stress fibers, and discrete cytoplasmic actin-rich patches. These patches also contained α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4, vinculin, paxillin, α-tubulin, and PI3-kinase. Cytochalasin D treatment resulted in RelA/p65 redistribution to actin-containing aggregates, with the number of cells with RelA/p65-containing clusters in the cytoplasm increasing under the effect of EGF. Furthermore, EGF proved to induce RelA/p65 accumulation in the nucleus after cell pretreatment with actin-stabilizing and actin-destabilizing agents, which was accompanied by changes in its DNA-binding activity after either EGF stimulation or cytochalasin D treatment. Thus, EGF treatment of A431 cells results in simultaneous nuclear RelA/p65 translocation and cytoplasmic redistribution, with part of RelA/p65 pool forming a very tight association with actin-rich structures. Apparently, nuclear transport is independent on drug stabilization or destabilization of the actin.

  7. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes between Original Breast Cancer and Xenograft Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deling; Li, Jia-Rui; Zhang, Yu-Hang

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model is a cutting-edge approach for drug research on breast cancer. However, PDX still exhibits differences from original human tumors, thereby challenging the molecular understanding of tumorigenesis. In particular, gene expression changes after tissues are transplanted from human to mouse model. In this study, we propose a novel computational method by incorporating several machine learning algorithms, including Monte Carlo feature selection (MCFS), random forest (RF), and rough set-based rule learning, to identify genes with significant expression differences between PDX and original human tumors. First, 831 breast tumors, including 657 PDX and 174 human tumors, were collected. Based on MCFS and RF, 32 genes were then identified to be informative for the prediction of PDX and human tumors and can be used to construct a prediction model. The prediction model exhibits a Matthews coefficient correlation value of 0.777. Seven interpretable interactions within the informative gene were detected based on the rough set-based rule learning. Furthermore, the seven interpretable interactions can be well supported by previous experimental studies. Our study not only presents a method for identifying informative genes with differential expression but also provides insights into the mechanism through which gene expression changes after being transplanted from human tumor into mouse model. This work would be helpful for research and drug development for breast cancer. PMID:29534550

  8. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes between Original Breast Cancer and Xenograft Using Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deling; Li, Jia-Rui; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2018-03-12

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model is a cutting-edge approach for drug research on breast cancer. However, PDX still exhibits differences from original human tumors, thereby challenging the molecular understanding of tumorigenesis. In particular, gene expression changes after tissues are transplanted from human to mouse model. In this study, we propose a novel computational method by incorporating several machine learning algorithms, including Monte Carlo feature selection (MCFS), random forest (RF), and rough set-based rule learning, to identify genes with significant expression differences between PDX and original human tumors. First, 831 breast tumors, including 657 PDX and 174 human tumors, were collected. Based on MCFS and RF, 32 genes were then identified to be informative for the prediction of PDX and human tumors and can be used to construct a prediction model. The prediction model exhibits a Matthews coefficient correlation value of 0.777. Seven interpretable interactions within the informative gene were detected based on the rough set-based rule learning. Furthermore, the seven interpretable interactions can be well supported by previous experimental studies. Our study not only presents a method for identifying informative genes with differential expression but also provides insights into the mechanism through which gene expression changes after being transplanted from human tumor into mouse model. This work would be helpful for research and drug development for breast cancer.

  9. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  10. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using ⁸⁹Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with (89)Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bevacizumab radiosensitizes non-small cell lung cancer xenografts by inhibiting DNA double-strand break repair in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Xue, Jianxin; Zhou, Lin; Lan, Jie; He, Jiazhuo; Na, Feifei; Yang, Lifei; Deng, Lei; Lu, You

    2015-08-28

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of biweekly bevacizumab administration on a tumor microenvironment and to investigate the mechanisms of radiosensitization that were induced by it. Briefly, bevacizumab was administered intravenously to Balb/c nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1975 xenografts; in addition, bevacizumab was added to NSCLC or endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro, followed by irradiation (IR). The anti-tumor efficacy, anti-angiogenic efficacy and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated. The activation of signaling pathways was determined using immunoprecipitation (IP) and WB analyses. Finally, biweekly bevacizumab administration inhibited the growth of H1975 xenografts and induced vascular normalization periodically. Bevacizumab more significantly increased cellular DSB and EC apoptosis when administered 1 h prior to 12 Gy/1f IR than when administered 5 days prior to IR, thereby inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. In vitro, bevacizumab more effectively increased DSBs and apoptosis prior to IR and inhibited the clonogenic survival of ECs but not NSCLC cells. Using IP and WB analyses, we confirmed that bevacizumab can directly inhibit the phosphorylation of components of the VEGR2/PI3K/Akt/DNA-PKcs signaling pathway that are induced by IR in ECs. In conclusion, bevacizumab radiosensitizes NSCLC xenografts mainly by inhibiting DSB repair in ECs rather than by inducing vascular normalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Inhibitory effects of luteolin on human gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue-ying; Li, Yan-hong; Xiao, Xiang-wen; Li, Xiao-bo

    2013-01-08

    To explore the in vivo anticancer effects of luteolin with BGC-823 gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and elucidate its mechanism. After modeling of gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, 40 BALB/c (nu/nu) nude mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8 each). And an intraperitoneal injection of luteolin was administered at 10 mg/kg (low-dose), 20 mg/kg (middle-dose) and 40 mg/kg (high-dose) groups. And 5-fluorouracil (30 mg/kg) and control groups were also established. The growth curves of xenografts in nude mice were drawn and weight inhibition rates measured. The morphological features were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. And the protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were measured by immunohistochemistry. In vivo tumor formation test showed that tumor volume in nude mice treated with luteolin was smaller than that of control group. Tumor weights of high-dose luteolin group were lighter than those of the control ((0.29 ± 0.01) vs (0.38 ± 0.03) g). And the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The rate of tumor inhibition in high-dose luteolin group was up to 24.87%. Lymphocytic invasion of tumor tissue was observed under light microscope in the treatment groups. Results of immunohistochemistry showed the positive cell integral of VEGF in middle and high-dose luteolin groups were 1.25 ± 0.17 and 1.00 ± 0.07 respectively. Both were significantly lower than that of control group (1.50 ± 0.15, both P < 0.05). The positive cell integral of MMP-9 in high-dose luteolin group was markedly lower than that of control group (3.75 ± 1.43 vs 9.00 ± 1.08, P < 0.01). Luteolin can effectively inhibit the in vivo growth of gastric tumor. The mechanism may be correlated with the stimulation of immune response and the down-regulated expressions of VEGF-A and MMP-9.

  13. Estradiol and nicotine exposure enhances A549 bronchioloalveolar carcinoma xenograft growth in mice through the stimulation of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jarzynka, Michael J; Guo, Ping; Bar-Joseph, Ifat; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    Angiogenesis is required for lung cancer growth, which is mediated by various growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF and angiogenesis have been correlated with poor prognosis and survival in patients with lung cancer. In addition, recent reports show that estradiol and nicotine play important roles in lung tumor initiation and progression. In this report, we demonstrate that estradiol and nicotine exposure enhances the growth of A549 bronchioloalveolar carcinoma xenografts in mice through the stimulation of cell proliferation, VEGF secretion and angiogenesis. We detect a four-fold increase in microvascular density in tumors from mice exposed to estradiol and nicotine compared to control tumors resulting in an increase in tumor growth. Intriguingly, the effects on angiogenesis and tumor growth by the combination of agents were additive when compared to either agent alone. Furthermore, estradiol promotes VEGF secretion from various non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells and this effect is augmented by nicotine in a tumor xenograft model. These results indicate that aside from their roles in promoting cell proliferation, estradiol and nicotine appear to have additive effects on the induction of angiogenesis through the stimulation of VEGF secretion during NSCLC progression.

  14. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  15. Interference of silibinin with IGF-1R signalling pathways protects human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells from UVB-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weiwei; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Li, Lingzhi

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Silibinin protects A431 cells from UVB irradiation-induced apoptosis. ► Up-regulation of the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways by UVB induces cell apoptosis. ► Silibinin inhibits IGF-1R pathways to repress caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet B (UVB) from sunlight is a major cause of cutaneous lesion. Silibinin, a traditional hepatic protectant, elicits protective effects against UVB-induced cellular damage. In A431 cells, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was markedly up-regulated by UVB irradiation. The activation of the IGF-1R signalling pathways contributed to apoptosis of the cells rather than rescuing the cells from death. Up-regulated IGF-1R stimulated downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), suchmore » as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). The subsequent activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 led to apoptosis. The activation of IGF-1R signalling pathways is the cause of A431 cell death. The pharmacological inhibitors and the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IGF-1R suppressed the downstream activation of JNK/ERK-caspases to help the survival of the UVB-irradiated A431 cells. Indeed, silibinin treatment suppressed the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways and thus protected the cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.« less

  16. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  17. Erythropoietin Receptor Antagonist Suppressed Ectopic Hemoglobin Synthesis in Xenografts of HeLa Cells to Promote Their Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yoshiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Koike, Eiji; Obata, Koshiro; Shiota, Mitsuru; Kotani, Yasushi; Musha, Terunaga; Tsuji-Kawahara, Sachiyo; Satou, Takao; Masuda, Seiji; Okano, Junko; Yamasaki, Harufumi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Uesugi, Tadao; Nakao, Shinichi; Hoshiai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore a cause-oriented therapy for patients with uterine cervical cancer that expresses erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR). Epo, by binding to EpoR, stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells into hemoglobin-containing red blood cells. In this study, we report that the HeLa cells in the xenografts expressed ε, γ, and α globins as well as myoglobin (Mb) to produce tetrameric α2ε2 and α2γ2 and monomeric Mb, most of which were significantly suppressed with an EpoR antagonist EMP9. Western blotting revealed that the EMP9 treatment inhibited the AKT-pAKT, MAPKs-pMAPKs, and STAT5-pSTAT5 signaling pathways. Moreover, the treatment induced apoptosis and suppression of the growth and inhibited the survival through disruption of the harmonized hemoprotein syntheses in the tumor cells concomitant with destruction of vascular nets in the xenografts. Furthermore, macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells with intense HIF-1α expression recruited significantly more in the degenerating foci of the xenografts. These findings were associated with the enhanced expressions of nNOS in the tumor cells and iNOS in macrophages and NK cells in the tumor sites. The treated tumor cells exhibited a substantial number of perforations on the cell surface, which indicates that the tumors were damaged by both the nNOS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in the tumor cells as well as the iNOS-induced NO production in the innate immune cells. Taken together, these data suggest that HeLa cells constitutively acquire ε, γ and Mb synthetic capacity for their survival. Therefore, EMP9 treatment might be a cause-oriented and effective therapy for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. PMID:25874769

  18. [Influence of rosiglitazone and all-trans-retinoic acid on angiogenesis and growth of myeloma xenograft in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-wen; Chen, Ping; Li, Bing-zong; Fu, Jin-xiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Rui; Fan, Yin-yin; Zhang, Hong; Chow, Howard C H; Leung, Anska Y H; Liang, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    To observe the effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) on the growth of myeloma xenograft in nude mice and to explore the influence of RGZ and ATRA on VEGF expression and angiogenesis in the tumor. VEGF gene expression in myeloma cell line U266 cells was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR after incubation with RGZ, ATRA, or RGZ + ATRA for 24 h. Myeloma xenograft was established by subcutaneous injection of 10(7) U266 cells in the scapula area of 4-week old nude mice. 7 days later, the nude mice were administered with RGZ, ATRA or RGZ + ATRA, respectively, by intraperitoneal injection once every day for 21 days. The control mice were given equal volume of normal saline instead of the drug. On the 21(st) day of treatment, the mice were sacrificed and the tumors were taken off, and the tumor volume and weight were measured. The tumors were examined by histopathology with HE staining, and microvessel density (MVD), CD34 and VEGF expression in the tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. VEGF mRNA was highly expressed in U266 cells and was decreased in a dose-dependent manner after incubation with RGZ. The VEGF mRNA level was further more decreased after RGZ + ATRA treatment. Xenografts of U266 cells were developed in all nude mice. The volume and weight of xenografts in the RGZ group were (785 ± 262) mm(3) and (1748 ± 365) mg, respectively, significantly lower than those of the control group (both P < 0.01). More significant inhibition was in the RGZ + ATRA group, (154 ± 89) mm(3) and (626 ± 102) mg, respectively, both were P < 0.05 vs. the RGZ group. RGZ inhibited the angiogenesis in U266 xenografts and immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor MVD and VEGF expression were significantly decreased by RGZ treatment, and further more inhibited in the RGZ + ATRA group. VEGF protein was expressed in all xenografts in the nude mice. Its immunohistochemical staining intensity was 2.20 ± 0.40 in the control group

  19. A single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platform for the authentication of patient derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    El-Hoss, Jad; Jing, Duohui; Evans, Kathryn; Toscan, Cara; Xie, Jinhan; Lee, Hyunjoo; Taylor, Renea A; Lawrence, Mitchell G; Risbridger, Gail P; MacKenzie, Karen L; Sutton, Rosemary; Lock, Richard B

    2016-09-13

    Patient derived xenografts (PDXs) have become a vital, frequently used, component of anti-cancer drug development. PDXs can be serially passaged in vivo for years, and shared across laboratories. As a consequence, the potential for mis-identification and cross-contamination is possible, yet authentication of PDXs appears limited. We present a PDX Authentication System (PAS), by combining a commercially available OpenArray assay of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with in-house R studio programs, to validate PDXs established in individual mice from acute lymphoblastic leukemia biopsies. The PAS is sufficiently robust to identify contamination at levels as low as 3%, similar to the gold standard of short tandem repeat (STR) profiling. We have surveyed a panel of PDXs established from 73 individual leukemia patients, and found that the PAS provided sufficient discriminatory power to identify each xenograft. The identified SNP-discrepant PDXs demonstrated distinct gene expression profiles, indicating a risk of contamination for PDXs at high passage number. The PAS also allows for the authentication of tumor cells with complex karyotypes from solid tumors including prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. This study highlights the demands of authenticating PDXs for cancer research, and evaluates a reliable authentication platform that utilizes a commercially available and cost-effective system.

  20. A single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platform for the authentication of patient derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kathryn; Toscan, Cara; Xie, Jinhan; Lee, Hyunjoo; Taylor, Renea A.; Lawrence, Mitchell G.; Risbridger, Gail P.; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Sutton, Rosemary; Lock, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Patient derived xenografts (PDXs) have become a vital, frequently used, component of anti-cancer drug development. PDXs can be serially passaged in vivo for years, and shared across laboratories. As a consequence, the potential for mis-identification and cross-contamination is possible, yet authentication of PDXs appears limited. We present a PDX Authentication System (PAS), by combining a commercially available OpenArray assay of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with in-house R studio programs, to validate PDXs established in individual mice from acute lymphoblastic leukemia biopsies. The PAS is sufficiently robust to identify contamination at levels as low as 3%, similar to the gold standard of short tandem repeat (STR) profiling. We have surveyed a panel of PDXs established from 73 individual leukemia patients, and found that the PAS provided sufficient discriminatory power to identify each xenograft. The identified SNP-discrepant PDXs demonstrated distinct gene expression profiles, indicating a risk of contamination for PDXs at high passage number. The PAS also allows for the authentication of tumor cells with complex karyotypes from solid tumors including prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. This study highlights the demands of authenticating PDXs for cancer research, and evaluates a reliable authentication platform that utilizes a commercially available and cost-effective system. PMID:27528024

  1. EGF-liposomes promote efficient EGFR targeting in xenograft colocarcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Zalba, Sara; Contreras, Ana Margarita; Merino, María; Navarro, Iñigo; de Ilarduya, Conchita Tros; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Koning, Gerben; Garrido, María J

    2016-01-01

    Development of EGF-liposomes (LP-EGF) for selective molecules delivery in tumors expressing EGFR. In vitro cellular interaction of EGF-LP and nontargeted liposomes (LP-N) was assayed at 37 and 4 °C in cells expressing different EGFR levels. Receptor-mediated uptake was investigated by competition with a monoclonal antibody anti-EGFR. Selective intracellular drug delivery and efficacy was tested by oxaliplatin encapsulation. In vivo biodistribution of LP-N and LP-EGF was done in xenograft model. LP-EGF was internalized by an active and selective mechanism through EGFR without receptor activation. Oxaliplatin LP-EGF decreased IC50 between 48 and 13% in cell EGFR+. LP-EGF was accumulated in tumor over 72 h postdosing, while LP-N in spleen. LP-EGF represents an attractive nanosystem for cancer therapy or diagnosis.

  2. Inhibition of Hedgehog Signaling Antagonizes Serous Ovarian Cancer Growth in a Primary Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Christopher K.; Growdon, Whitfield B.; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Curley, Michael D.; Friel, Anne M.; Proctor, Jennifer L.; Sheikh, Hana; Deyneko, Igor; Ferguson, Jeanne A.; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Birrer, Michael J.; Borger, Darrell R.; Mohapatra, Gayatry; Zukerberg, Lawrence R.; Foster, Rosemary; MacDougall, John R.; Rueda, Bo R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent evidence links aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling with the pathogenesis of several cancers including medulloblastoma, basal cell, small cell lung, pancreatic, prostate and ovarian. This investigation was designed to determine if inhibition of this pathway could inhibit serous ovarian cancer growth. Methodology We utilized an in vivo pre-clinical model of serous ovarian cancer to characterize the anti-tumor activity of Hh pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and a clinically applicable derivative, IPI-926. Primary human serous ovarian tumor tissue was used to generate tumor xenografts in mice that were subsequently treated with cyclopamine or IPI-926. Principal Findings Both compounds demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity as single agents. When IPI-926 was used in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatinum (T/C), no synergistic effect was observed, though sustained treatment with IPI-926 after cessation of T/C continued to suppress tumor growth. Hh pathway activity was analyzed by RT-PCR to assess changes in Gli1 transcript levels. A single dose of IPI-926 inhibited mouse stromal Gli1 transcript levels at 24 hours with unchanged human intra-tumor Gli1 levels. Chronic IPI-926 therapy for 21 days, however, inhibited Hh signaling in both mouse stromal and human tumor cells. Expression data from the micro-dissected stroma in human serous ovarian tumors confirmed the presence of Gli1 transcript and a significant association between elevated Gli1 transcript levels and worsened survival. Conclusions/Significance IPI-926 treatment inhibits serous tumor growth suggesting the Hh signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and may hold promise as a novel therapeutic target, especially in the maintenance setting. PMID:22140510

  3. Mechanisms of Therapy Resistance in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of BRCA1-Deficient Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ter Brugge, Petra; Kristel, Petra; van der Burg, Eline; Boon, Ute; de Maaker, Michiel; Lips, Esther; Mulder, Lennart; de Ruiter, Julian; Moutinho, Catia; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Majewski, Ian; Józwiak, Katarzyna; Kloosterman, Wigard; van Roosmalen, Markus; Duran, Karen; Hogervorst, Frans; Turner, Nick; Esteller, Manel; Cuppen, Edwin; Wesseling, Jelle; Jonkers, Jos

    2016-11-01

    Although BRCA1-deficient tumors are extremely sensitive to DNA-damaging drugs and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, recurrences do occur and, consequently, resistance to therapy remains a serious clinical problem. To study the underlying mechanisms, we induced therapy resistance in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of BRCA1-mutated and BRCA1-methylated triple-negative breast cancer. A cohort of 75 mice carrying BRCA1-deficient breast PDX tumors was treated with cisplatin, melphalan, nimustine, or olaparib, and treatment sensitivity was determined. In tumors that acquired therapy resistance, BRCA1 expression was investigated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Next-generation sequencing, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Target Locus Amplification (TLA)-based sequencing were used to determine mechanisms of BRCA1 re-expression in therapy-resistant tumors. BRCA1 protein was not detected in therapy-sensitive tumors but was found in 31 out of 42 resistant cases. Apart from previously described mechanisms involving BRCA1-intragenic deletions and loss of BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation, a novel resistance mechanism was identified in four out of seven BRCA1-methylated PDX tumors that re-expressed BRCA1 but retained BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation. In these tumors, we found de novo gene fusions that placed BRCA1 under the transcriptional control of a heterologous promoter, resulting in re-expression of BRCA1 and acquisition of therapy resistance. In addition to previously described clinically relevant resistance mechanisms in BRCA1-deficient tumors, we describe a novel resistance mechanism in BRCA1-methylated PDX tumors involving de novo rearrangements at the BRCA1 locus, demonstrating that BRCA1-methylated breast cancers may acquire therapy resistance via both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  4. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis, E-mail: Phyllis.wachsberger@jeffersonhospital.or; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1,more » 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.« less

  5. Biodegradable thermosensitive hydrogel for SAHA and DDP delivery: therapeutic effects on oral squamous cell carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Gong, Changyang; Feng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Xikun; Xu, Xiaoping; Xie, Liang; Wang, Ruinan; Zhang, Dunfang; Wang, Hui; Deng, Peng; Zhou, Min; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yun; Wang, Zhiyong; Liao, Ga; Geng, Ning; Chu, Liangyin; Qian, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Qianming

    2012-01-01

    OSCC is one of the most common malignancies and numerous clinical agents currently applied in combinative chemotherapy. Here we reported a novel therapeutic strategy, SAHA and DDP-loaded PECE (SAHA-DDP/PECE), can improve the therapeutic effects of intratumorally chemotherapy on OSCC cell xenografts. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the SAHA-DDP/PECE in situ controlled drug delivery system on OSCC cell xenografts. A biodegradable and thermosensitive hydrogel was successfully developed to load SAHA and DDP. Tumor-beared mice were intratumorally administered with SAHA-DDP/PECE at 50 mg/kg (SAHA) +2 mg/kg (DDP) in 100 ul PECE hydrogel every two weeks, SAHA-DDP at 50 mg/kg(SAHA) +2 mg/kg(DDP) in NS, 2 mg/kg DDP solution, 50 mg/kg SAHA solution, equal volume of PECE hydrogel, or equal volume of NS on the same schedule, respectively. The antineoplastic actions of SAHA and DDP alone and in combination were evaluated using the determination of tumor volume, immunohistochemistry, western blot, and TUNEL analysis. The hydrogel system was a free-flowing sol at 10 °C, become gel at body temperature, and could sustain more than 14 days in situ. SAHA-DDP/PECE was subsequently injected into tumor OSCC tumor-beared mice. The results demonstrated that such a strategy as this allows the carrier system to show a sustained release of SAHA and DDP in vivo, and could improved therapeutic effects compared with a simple additive therapeutic effect of SAHA and DDP on mouse model. Our research indicated that the novel SAHA-DDP/PECE system based on biodegradable PECE copolymer enhanced the therapeutic effects and could diminished the side effects of SAHA/DDP. The present work might be of great importance to the further exploration of the potential application of SAHA/DDP-hydrogel controlled drug release system in the treatment of OSCC.

  6. DHEA increases epithelial markers and decreases mesenchymal proteins in breast cancer cells and reduces xenograft growth.

    PubMed

    Colín-Val, Zaira; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Gómez, Erika Olivia; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2017-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most common neoplasias and the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its high mortality rate is linked to a great metastatic capacity associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During this process, a decrease in epithelial proteins expression and an increase of mesenchymal proteins are observed. On the other hand, it has been shown that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant steroid in human plasma, inhibits migration of breast cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, the in vitro effect of DHEA on the expression pattern of some EMT-related proteins, such as E-cadherin (epithelial), N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail (mesenchymal) was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with invasive, metastatic and mesenchymal phenotype. Also, the in vivo effect of DHEA on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice (nu - /nu - ) and on expression of the same epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in generated tumors was evaluated. We found that DHEA increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail expression both in MD-MB-231 cells and in the formed tumors, possibly by DHEA-induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotype. These results were correlated with a tumor size reduction in mouse xenografts following DHEA administration either a week earlier or concurrent with breast cancer cells inoculation. In conclusion, DHEA could be useful in the treatment of breast cancer with mesenchymal phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. External beam radiotherapy synergizes 188Re-liposome against human esophageal cancer xenograft and modulates 188Re-liposome pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsien; Liu, Shin-Yi; Chi, Chih-Wen; Yu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Tsui-Jung; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Lee, Te-Wei; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) treats gross tumors and local microscopic diseases. Radionuclide therapy by radioisotopes can eradicate tumors systemically. Rhenium 188 (188Re)-liposome, a nanoparticle undergoing clinical trials, emits gamma rays for imaging validation and beta rays for therapy, with biodistribution profiles preferential to tumors. We designed a combinatory treatment and examined its effects on human esophageal cancer xenografts, a malignancy with potential treatment resistance and poor prognosis. Human esophageal cancer cell lines BE-3 (adenocarcinoma) and CE81T/VGH (squamous cell carcinoma) were implanted and compared. The radiochemical purity of 188Re-liposome exceeded 95%. Molecular imaging by NanoSPECT/CT showed that BE-3, but not CE81T/VGH, xenografts could uptake the 188Re-liposome. The combination of EBRT and 188Re-liposome inhibited tumor regrowth greater than each treatment alone, as the tumor growth inhibition rate was 30% with EBRT, 25% with 188Re-liposome, and 53% with the combination treatment at 21 days postinjection. Combinatory treatment had no additive adverse effects and significant biological toxicities on white blood cell counts, body weight, or liver and renal functions. EBRT significantly enhanced the excretion of 188Re-liposome into feces and urine. In conclusion, the combination of EBRT with 188Re-liposome might be a potential treatment modality for esophageal cancer. PMID:26056445

  8. Biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles from three diverse family of plant extracts and their anticancer activity against epidermoid A431 carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Debasis; Pradhan, Sonali; Ashe, Sarbani; Rauta, Pradipta Ranjan; Nayak, Bismita

    2015-11-01

    Biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles is a cost effective natural process where the phytochemicals specifically phenols, flavonoids and terpenoids present in the plant extracts act as capping and reducing agent. Due to their nano size regime the silver nanoparticles may directly bind to the DNA of the pathogenic bacterial strains leading to higher antimicrobial activity. In the current study silver nanoparticles were synthesised using plant extracts from different origin Cucurbita maxima (petals), Moringa oleifera (leaves) and Acorus calamus (rhizome). The synthesised nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (Fe-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Highly crystalline, roughly spherical and cuboidal silver nanoparticles of 30-70 nm in size were synthesised. The nanoparticles provided strong antimicrobial activity against pathogenic strains. The effect of the synthesised nanoparticles against A431 skin cancer cell line was tested for their toxicity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye. The IC50 values of 82.39±3.1, 83.57±3.9 and 78.58±2.7 μg/ml were calculated for silver nanoparticles synthesised by C. maxima, M. oleifera and A. calamus respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Protracted dosing of the lipophilic camptothecin analogue AR-67 in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts and humans.

    PubMed

    Tsakalozou, Eleftheria; Adane, Eyob D; Liang, Yali; Arnold, Susanne M; Leggas, Markos

    2014-07-01

    Although preclinical studies on camptothecin antitumor effect have demonstrated the superiority of low-dose protracted dosing, these findings were not replicated in the clinic. 7-t-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67) is a camptothecin analogue currently under investigation in early phase clinical trials. To maximize the therapeutic potential of AR-67, we sought to identify factors that affect response to treatment. After determining the maximum tolerated dose using neutropenia as a toxicity endpoint, xenografts received AR-67 under varying dosing schedules and were monitored for survival. On the last treatment day, tumor tissue was collected and topoisomerase 1 (Top1), γH2AX, caspase 3 and PARP protein content was evaluated. AR-67 plasma and tumor pharmacokinetics were also studied in mice and cancer patients who were administered AR-67 as a 1-h intravenous infusion on days 1, 4, 8, 12 and 15 every 21 days. Low-dose protracted dosing schedules increased animal survival compared to less frequent, but higher-dose courses and the expression of Top1 and γH2AX were schedule dependent. Fatigue and neutropenia were the dose-limiting toxicities identified in patients receiving AR-67. Finally, elimination of AR-67 from the tumor site was slower in both xenografts and tumor of a patient enrolled in the pilot clinical trial. We demonstrated that low-dose protracted dosing schedules of AR-67 are therapeutically effective and Top1 reflects the biological activity of AR-67 in xenografts. Moreover, the tumor pharmacokinetics as well as the efficacy and safety of AR-67 given intermittently to cancer patients warrant further investigation.

  10. Antitumor effect of Deoxypodophyllotoxin on human breast cancer xenograft transplanted in BALB/c nude mice model.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Meyada; Belaaloui, Ghania; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, biologically active compounds isolated from plants used in herbal medicine have been the center of interest. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), structurally closely related to the lignan podophyllotoxin, was found to be a potent antitumor and antiproliferative agent, in several tumor cells, in vitro. However, DPT has not been used clinically yet because of the lack of in vivo studies. This study is the first report demonstrating the antitumor effect of DPT on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. DPT, significantly, inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft in BALB/c nude mice. The T/C value (the value of the relative tumor volume of treatment group compared to the control group) of groups treated with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of intravenous DPT-HP-β-CD was 42.87%, 34.04% and 9.63%, respectively, suggesting the positive antitumor activity of DPT. In addition, the antitumor effect of DPT-HP-β-CD (20 mg/kg) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft was more effective than etoposide (VP-16) (20 mg/kg) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg). These findings suggest that this drug is a promising chemotherapy candidate against human breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Effect of depsides salts from Salvia miltiorrhiza on human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangping; Song, Zhouye; Zhong, Haiying; Gong, Zhicheng; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Zanling; Zhou, Boting

    2015-02-01

    To exlpore the eff ect of depsides salts from Salvia miltiorrhiza on human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 xenograft tumors and the possible mechanisms. A total of 36 nude mice were divided into 6 groups: A model group, a negative control group, a positive control group, and 3 treatment groups at low, middle or high dose (n=6). The tumor model of nude mice was given depsides salts at a dose of 10, 20 or 50 mg/kg every 3 day for 16 days. Then samples of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice were collected. The morphological changes of tumor samples were observed by HE staining and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the tumor antigen Ki67 was detected by immunohistochemical method. The tumor growth was inhibited by all doses of depsides salts. The morphology of tumors was shrinkage, broken and irregularly arranged compared with the tumors in the model group and the negative control group. Morphological changes were more obvious in tumors with treatment at high dose. Expression of VEGF and Ki67 in treatment groups and the positive control group were lower than that in the model group and the negative control group, with a significant difference (P<0.05). Depsides salts from Salvia miltiorrhiza can inhibit the growth of human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 tumor in nude mice, which is related to the inhibition of Ki67 and VEGF.

  12. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Development of transplantable human chordoma xenograft for preclinical assessment of novel therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Fabio; Manenti, Giacomo; Conca, Elena; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Messina, Antonella; Dagrada, GianPaolo; Gronchi, Alessandro; Panizza, Pietro; Pierotti, Marco A.; Tamborini, Elena; Pilotti, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Background Chordomas are rare and indolent bone tumors that arise in the skull base and mobile spine. Distant metastases occur in >20% of cases, but morbidity and mortality are mainly related to local relapses that affect the majority of patients. Standard chemotherapy has modest activity, whereas new targeted therapies (alone or in combination) have some activity in controlling disease progression. However, the scarcity of preclinical models capable of testing in vivo responses to these therapies hampers the development of new medical strategies. Methods In this study, 8 chordoma samples taken from 8 patients were implanted in nude mice. Four engrafted successfully and gave rise to tumor masses that were analyzed histologically, by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization and biochemical techniques. The data relating to each of the mouse tumors were compared with those obtained from the corresponding human tumor. Results All 4 engraftments retained the histological, genetic and biochemical features of the human tumors they came from. In one epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-positive xenograft, responsiveness to lapatinib was evaluated by comparing the pre- and posttreatment findings. The treatment induced a low-level, heterogeneous switching off of EGFR and its downstream signaling effectors. Conclusions Overall, this model is very close to human chordoma and represents a new means of undertaking preclinical investigations and developing tailored therapies. PMID:24366975

  14. Ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery in prostate cancer xenografts by nanoparticles stabilizing microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Eggen, Siv; Fagerland, Stein-Martin; Mørch, Ýrr; Hansen, Rune; Søvik, Kishia; Berg, Sigrid; Furu, Håkon; Bøhn, Audun Dybvik; Lilledahl, Magnus B; Angelsen, Anders; Angelsen, Bjørn; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2014-08-10

    The delivery of nanoparticles to solid tumors is often ineffective due to the lack of specificity towards tumor tissue, limited transportation of the nanoparticles across the vascular wall and poor penetration through the extracellular matrix of the tumor. Ultrasound is a promising tool that can potentially improve several of the transportation steps, and the interaction between sound waves and microbubbles generates biological effects that can be beneficial for the successful delivery of nanocarriers and their contents. In this study, a novel platform consisting of nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles has been investigated for its potential for ultrasound-enhanced delivery to tumor xenografts. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to study the supply of nanoparticles from the vasculature and to evaluate the effect of different ultrasound parameters at a microscopic level. The results demonstrated that although the delivery is heterogeneous within tumors, there is a significant improvement in the delivery and the microscopic distribution of both nanoparticles and a released model drug when the nanoparticles are combined with microbubbles and ultrasound. The mechanisms that underlie the improved delivery are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guastella, Anthony R.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Klinger, Neil V.; Kupsky, William J.; Polin, Lisa A.; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  16. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor Dictionary Upcoming Webinars Anytime Learning Brain Tumor Educational Presentations Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor ...

  17. ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-IMS Localization Reveal Alterations in Phosphatidic Acid, Diacylglycerol, and DHA in Glioma Stem Cell Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wildburger, Norelle C; Wood, Paul L; Gumin, Joy; Lichti, Cheryl F; Emmett, Mark R; Lang, Frederick F; Nilsson, Carol L

    2015-06-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common adult primary brain tumor. Despite aggressive multimodal therapy, the survival of patients with GBM remains dismal. However, recent evidence has demonstrated the promise of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs) as a therapeutic delivery vehicle for anti-glioma agents due to their ability to migrate or home to human gliomas. While several studies have demonstrated the feasibility of harnessing the homing capacity of BM-hMSCs for targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics, it is now also evident, based on clinically relevant glioma stem cell (GSC) models of GBMs, that BM-hMSCs demonstrate variable tropism toward these tumors. In this study, we compared the lipid environment of GSC xenografts that attract BM-hMSCs (N = 9) with those that do not attract (N = 9) to identify lipid modalities that are conducive to homing of BM-hMSC to GBMs. We identified lipids directly from tissue by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of lipid extracts. Several species of signaling lipids, including phosphatidic acid (PA 36:2, PA 40:5, PA 42:5, and PA 42:7) and diacylglycerol (DAG 34:0, DAG 34:1, DAG 36:1, DAG 38:4, DAG 38:6, and DAG 40:6), were lower in attracting xenografts. Molecular lipid images showed that PA (36:2), DAG (40:6), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were decreased within tumor regions of attracting xenografts. Our results provide the first evidence for lipid signaling pathways and lipid-mediated tumor inflammatory responses in the homing of BM-hMSCs to GSC xenografts. Our studies provide new fundamental knowledge on the molecular correlates of the differential homing capacity of BM-hMSCs toward GSC xenografts.

  18. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; ...

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 ( 90Y) and lutetium-177 ( 177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potentialmore » of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  19. Discovery of the First Potent Inhibitors of Mutant IDH1 That Lower Tumor 2-HG in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Saunders, Jeffrey O; Salituro, Francesco G; Travins, Jeremy M; Yan, Shunqi; Zhao, Fang; Gross, Stefan; Dang, Lenny; Yen, Katharine E; Yang, Hua; Straley, Kimberly S; Jin, Shengfang; Kunii, Kaiko; Fantin, Valeria R; Zhang, Shunan; Pan, Qiongqun; Shi, Derek; Biller, Scott A; Su, Shinsan M

    2012-10-11

    Optimization of a series of R132H IDH1 inhibitors from a high throughput screen led to the first potent molecules that show robust tumor 2-HG inhibition in a xenograft model. Compound 35 shows good potency in the U87 R132H cell based assay and ∼90% tumor 2-HG inhibition in the corresponding mouse xenograft model following BID dosing. The magnitude and duration of tumor 2-HG inhibition correlates with free plasma concentration.

  20. MRI assessment of changes in tumor oxygenation post hypoxia-targeted therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shubhangi; Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Inge, Landon J.; Kodibagkar, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, the combination of compromised oxygen supply and high demand results in formation of regions of acute and chronic hypoxia, which promotes metastasis, proliferation, resistance to chemo and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Targeted, non-invasive in vivo imaging of hypoxia has the potential to determine regions with poor oxygenation in the target and differentiate between normoxic vs hypoxic tissues. MRI provides a powerful platform for generating quantitative maps of hypoxia with the use of a novel pO2 measuring technique PISTOL (Proton imaging of siloxanes to map tissue oxygenation levels) which could impact the therapeutic choices. In the present study, PISTOL was used to determine the changes in oxygenation of tumor in pre-clinical models of NSCLC (H1975) and epidermoid carcinoma (A431) in response to tirapzamine (TPZ), a hypoxia activated chemotherapeutic. The tumor volume measurements indicate that tirapazamine was more effective in slowing the tumor growth in H1975 as compared to A431 tumors, even though lower baseline pO2 was observed in A431 as compared to H1975 tumors. These results indicate that other factors such as tumor perfusion (essential for delivering TPZ) and relative expression of nitroreductases (essential for activating TPZ) may play an important role in conjunction with pO2.

  1. Celecoxib enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in chemo-resistant gastric cancer xenograft mouse models through a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Fu-Ming; Lv, Qian-Zhou

    2016-04-05

    Our previous study suggested that co-administration of celecoxib increased chemo-sensitivity of multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin (DDP) in vitro. The present study was designed to investigate whether celecoxib had the similar activities in vivo. SGC-7901/DDP and SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models were established. At the end of the experiment, cisplatin treatment alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in SGC-7901 xenograft, as compared with that in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, suggesting that it maintained cisplatin sensitivity. When cisplatin and celecoxib were co-administrated, their antitumor activities were augmented in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft. The levels of Ki67 and PCNA after combination therapy were significantly decreased in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, as compared with those of cisplatin treatment alone. Moreover, examining the apoptotic index by TUNEL assay showed similar results. Further studies demonstrated the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein expression was the possible reason to increase sensitivity of SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin in vivo. However, the ratio of thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin F1α was elevated after celecoxib treatment in mice. This has been proposed to increase the risk of thrombogenesis. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celecoxib for reducing chemo-resistance in gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolation and characterization of renal cancer stem cells from patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hasmim, Meriem; Bruno, Stefania; Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Michel, Julien Giron; Chiabotto, Giulia; Lecoz, Vincent; Romei, Cristina; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito; Angevin, Eric; Gad, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Messai, Yosra; Kieda, Claudine; Clay, Denis; Sabatini, Federica; Escudier, Bernard; Camussi, Giovanni; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-03-29

    As rapidly developing patient-derived xenografts (PDX) could represent potential sources of cancer stem cells (CSC), we selected and characterized non-cultured PDX cell suspensions from four different renal carcinomas (RCC). Only the cell suspensions from the serial xenografts (PDX-1 and PDX-2) of an undifferentiated RCC (RCC-41) adapted to the selective CSC medium. The cell suspension derived from the original tumor specimen (RCC-41-P-0) did not adapt to the selective medium and strongly expressed CSC-like markers (CD133 and CD105) together with the non-CSC tumor marker E-cadherin. In comparison, PDX-1 and PDX-2 cells exhibited evolution in their phenotype since PDX-1 cells were CD133high/CD105-/Ecadlow and PDX-2 cells were CD133low/CD105-/Ecad-. Both PDX subsets expressed additional stem cell markers (CD146/CD29/OCT4/NANOG/Nestin) but still contained non-CSC tumor cells. Therefore, using different cell sorting strategies, we characterized 3 different putative CSC subsets (RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+, RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133-/EpCAMlow and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+/EpCAMbright). In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed that RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133- over-expressed the pluripotency gene ERBB4, while RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ over-expressed several tumor suppressor genes. These three CSC subsets displayed ALDH activity, formed serial spheroids and developed serial tumors in SCID mice, although RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ displayed less efficiently the above CSC properties. RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ tumors showed vessels of human origin with CSC displaying peri-vascular distribution. By contrast, RCC-41-PDX-2 originated tumors exhibiting only vessels of mouse origin without CSC peri-vascular distribution.Altogether, our results indicate that PDX murine microenvironment promotes a continuous redesign of CSC phenotype, unmasking CSC subsets potentially present in a single RCC or generating ex novo different CSC-like subsets.

  3. Tubulin-Destabilizing Agent BPR0L075 Induces Vascular-Disruption in Human Breast Cancer Mammary Fat Pad Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Beck, Haley; Wang, Xiaolei; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Xinli

    2012-01-01

    BPR0L075, 6-methoxy-3-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxy-benzoyl)-1H-indole, is a tubulin-binding agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine-binding site. BPR0L075 has shown antimitotic and antiangiogenic activity in vitro. The current study evaluated the vascular-disrupting activity of BPR0L075 in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts using dynamic bioluminescence imaging. A single dose of BPR0L075 (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) induced rapid, temporary tumor vascular shutdown (at 2, 4, and 6 hours); evidenced by rapid and reproducible decrease of light emission from luciferase-expressing orthotopic MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumors after administration of luciferin substrate. A time-dependent reduction of tumor perfusion after BPR0L075 treatment was confirmed by immunohistological staining of the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342 and tumor vasculature marker CD31. The vasculature showed distinct recovery within 24 hours post therapy. A single i.p. injection of 50 mg/kg of BPR0L075 initially produced plasma concentrations in the micromolar range within 6 hours, but subsequent drug distribution and elimination caused BPR0L075 plasma levels to drop rapidly into the nanomolar range within 24 h. Tests with human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells and tumor cells in culture showed that BPR0L075 was cytotoxic to both tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells, and disrupted pre-established vessels in vitro and ex vivo. In conclusion, BPR0L075 caused rapid, albeit, temporary tumor vascular shutdown and led to reduction of tumor perfusion in orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts, suggesting that this antimitotic agent may be useful as a vascular-disrupting cancer therapy. PMID:22937031

  4. Enhanced Intratumoral Delivery of SN38 as a Tocopherol Oxyacetate Prodrug Using Nanoparticles in a Neuroblastoma Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ferro; Alferiev, Ivan S; Guan, Peng; Guerrero, David T; Kolla, Venkatadri; Moorthy, Ganesh S; Chorny, Michael; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2018-03-07

    Currently, <50% of high-risk pediatric solid tumors like neuroblastoma (NB), can be cured, and many survivors experience serious or life-threatening toxicities, so more effective, less toxic therapy is needed. One approach is to target drugs to tumors using nanoparticles, which take advantage of the enhanced permeability of tumor vasculature. SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan (CPT-11), is a potent therapeutic agent that is readily encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). Tocopherol oxyacetate (TOA) is a hydrophobic mitocan that was linked to SN38 to significantly increase hydrophobicity and enhance NP retention. We treated NBs with SN38-TOA NPs and compared the efficacy to the parent prodrug CPT-11 using a mouse xenograft model. NP treatment induced prolonged event-free survival (EFS) in most mice, compared to CPT-11. This was shown for both SH-SY5Y and IMR-32 NB xenografts. Enhanced efficacy was likely due to increased and sustained drug levels of SN38 in the tumor compared to conventional CPT-11 delivery. Interestingly, when recurrent CPT-11-treated tumors were retreated with SN38-TOA NPs, the tumors transformed from undifferentiated NBs to maturing ganglioneuroblastomas. Furthermore, these tumors were infiltrated with Schwann cells of mouse origin, which may have contributed to the differentiated histology. NP delivery of SN38-TOA produced increased drug delivery and prolonged EFS compared to conventional delivery of CPT-11. Also, lower total dose and drug entrapment in NPs during circulation should decrease toxicity. We propose that NP-based delivery of a rationally designed prodrug is an attractive approach to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy in pediatric and adult tumors. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Xenograft model for therapeutic drug testing in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin A; Akpeng, Belinda; Pai, Sara I; Best, Simon R A

    2015-02-01

    Identifying effective treatment for papillomatosis is limited by a lack of animal models, and there is currently no preclinical model for testing potential therapeutic agents. We hypothesized that xenografting of papilloma may facilitate in vivo drug testing to identify novel treatment options. A biopsy of fresh tracheal papilloma was xenografted into a NOD-scid-IL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) mouse. The xenograft began growing after 5 weeks and was serially passaged over multiple generations. Each generation showed a consistent log-growth pattern, and in all xenografts, the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the squamous architecture of the original papilloma was maintained in each generation. In vivo drug testing with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly for 3 weeks) showed a dramatic therapeutic response compared to saline control. We report here the first successful case of serial xenografting of a tracheal papilloma in vivo with a therapeutic response observed with drug testing. In severely immunocompromised mice, the HPV genome and squamous differentiation of the papilloma can be maintained for multiple generations. This is a feasible approach to identify therapeutic agents in the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Zebrafish Xenograft: An Evolutionary Experiment in Tumour Biology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Rachael A; Trieu, Nhu P V; Crawford, Bryan D

    2017-09-05

    Though the cancer research community has used mouse xenografts for decades more than zebrafish xenografts, zebrafish have much to offer: they are cheap, easy to work with, and the embryonic model is relatively easy to use in high-throughput assays. Zebrafish can be imaged live, allowing us to observe cellular and molecular processes in vivo in real time. Opponents dismiss the zebrafish model due to the evolutionary distance between zebrafish and humans, as compared to mice, but proponents argue for the zebrafish xenograft's superiority to cell culture systems and its advantages in imaging. This review places the zebrafish xenograft in the context of current views on cancer and gives an overview of how several aspects of this evolutionary disease can be addressed in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish are missing homologs of some human proteins and (of particular interest) several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases, which are known for their importance in tumour biology. This review draws attention to the implicit evolutionary experiment taking place when the molecular ecology of the xenograft host is significantly different than that of the donor.

  7. Orthotopic patient-derived xenografts of paediatric solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Federico, Sara M; Chen, Xiang; Shelat, Anang A; Bradley, Cori; Gordon, Brittney; Karlstrom, Asa; Twarog, Nathaniel R; Clay, Michael R; Bahrami, Armita; Freeman, Burgess B; Xu, Beisi; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Jianrong; Honnell, Victoria; Ocarz, Monica; Blankenship, Kaley; Dapper, Jason; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James; Zhang, Jinghui; Easton, John; Pappo, Alberto; Dyer, Michael A

    2017-09-07

    Paediatric solid tumours arise from endodermal, ectodermal, or mesodermal lineages. Although the overall survival of children with solid tumours is 75%, that of children with recurrent disease is below 30%. To capture the complexity and diversity of paediatric solid tumours and establish new models of recurrent disease, here we develop a protocol to produce orthotopic patient-derived xenografts at diagnosis, recurrence, and autopsy. Tumour specimens were received from 168 patients, and 67 orthotopic patient-derived xenografts were established for 12 types of cancer. The origins of the patient-derived xenograft tumours were reflected in their gene-expression profiles and epigenomes. Genomic profiling of the tumours, including detailed clonal analysis, was performed to determine whether the clonal population in the xenograft recapitulated the patient's tumour. We identified several drug vulnerabilities and showed that the combination of a WEE1 inhibitor (AZD1775), irinotecan, and vincristine can lead to complete response in multiple rhabdomyosarcoma orthotopic patient-derived xenografts tumours in vivo.

  8. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  9. Investigation of proNT/NMN secretion from small cell lung carcinoma cells using a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi-Nakao, Kanako; Maruyama, Koji; Ishii, Hidee; Muramatsu, Koji; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Ohshima, Keiichi; Ogura, Shun-Ichiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Ken; Mochizuki, Tohru

    2012-10-01

    Proneurotensin/neuromedin N (proNT/NMN), the precursor of neurotensin (NT) and neuromedin N (NMN), is produced by cancer tissues derived from the pancreas and colon. NT stimulates tumor growth and proliferation through its receptors; however, little is known about the precursor molecule in cancer tissues. We previously demonstrated that proNT/NMN is secreted from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines in serum-free conditioned medium, but not from non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines. It was suggested that this precursor may serve as a tumor marker for SCLC. In this study, we established in vivo xenograft models to evaluate the possibility of proNT/NMN as a specific tumor marker. SBC3 cells, derived from human SCLC, were inoculated into mice, and the proNT/NMN levels in plasma and tumor tissues were detected using specific antibodies. In contrast to control mouse plasma, the proNT/NMN levels in tumor-bearing mice increased as the tumors grew, and the elevated plasma proNT/NMN levels were decreased by tumor resection. Moreover, proNT/NMN was expressed in SBC3 tumors, suggesting that proNT/NMN was secreted into blood from the tumor, and this secretion may be specific to SCLC.

  10. Metoclopramide enhances the effect of ionizing radiation on xenografted squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Lybak, S.; Kjellen, E.; Wennerberg, J.

    1990-12-01

    The commonly used drug metoclopramide, a benzamide derivative, has been shown previously in our laboratory to enhance the effect of cisplatin on xenografted squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. In the present study, we show that metoclopramide also enhances the effect of ionizing radiation. Two human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck xenografted to nude mice have been used. Doses of radiation were chosen (5 and 8 Gy single doses) which caused only a slight retardation of tumor growth when administered alone. Tumor response to ionizing radiation was assessed with and without metoclopramide (2.0 mgmore » kg-1), and administered at the time of radiation and 24 and 48 hr after treatment. The effects of these schedules on the tumors were compared using the reduction of the area under the growth curves and specific growth delay. The dose schedu