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Sample records for a43r gene encodes

  1. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  2. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  3. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  4. Mollusk genes encoding lysine tRNA (UUU) contain introns.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, M; Abe, Y; Saruta, Y; Okada, N

    1995-11-20

    New intron-containing genes encoding tRNAs were discovered when genomic DNA isolated from various animal species was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers based on sequences of rabbit tRNA(Lys). From sequencing analysis of the products of PCR, we found that introns are present in several genes encoding tRNA(Lys) in mollusks, such as Loligo bleekeri (squid) and Octopus vulgaris (octopus). These introns were specific to genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and were not present in genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU). In addition, the sequences of the introns were different from one another. To confirm the results of our initial experiments, we isolated and sequenced genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and tRNA(Lys)(UUU). The gene for tRNA(Lys)(UUU) from squid contained an intron, whose sequence was the same as that identified by PCR, and the gene formed a cluster with a corresponding pseudogene. Several DNA regions of 2.1 kb containing this cluster appeared to be tandemly arrayed in the squid genome. By contrast, the gene encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) did not contain an intron, as shown also by PCR. The tRNA(Lys)(UUU) that corresponded to the analyzed gene was isolated and characterized. The present study provides the first example of an intron-containing gene encoding a tRNA in mollusks and suggests the universality of introns in such genes in higher eukaryotes.

  5. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  7. Genes encoding giant danio and golden shiner ependymin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D S; Kiyokawa, M; Getman, M E; Shashoua, V E

    1996-03-01

    Ependymin (EPN) is a brain glycoprotein that functions as a neurotrophic factor in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation in goldfish. To date, true epn genes have been characterized in one order of teleost fish, Cypriniformes. In the study presented here, polymerase chain reactions were used to analyze the complete epn genes, gd (1480 bp), and sh (2071 bp), from Cypriniformes giant danio and shiner, respectively. Southern hybridizations demonstrated the existence of one copy of each gene per corresponding haploid genome. Each gene was found to contain six exons and five introns. Gene gd encodes a predicted 218-amino acid (aa) protein GD 93 percent conserved to goldfish EPN, while sh encodes a predicted 214-aa protein SH 91 percent homologous to goldfish. Evidence is presented classifying proteins previously termed "EPNs" into two major categories: true EPNs and non-EPN cerebrospinal fluid glycoproteins. Proteins GD and SH contain all the hallmark, features of true EPNs.

  8. Capturing novel mouse genes encoding chromosomal and other nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Tate, P; Lee, M; Tweedie, S; Skarnes, W C; Bickmore, W A

    1998-09-01

    The burgeoning wealth of gene sequences contrasts with our ignorance of gene function. One route to assigning function is by determining the sub-cellular location of proteins. We describe the identification of mouse genes encoding proteins that are confined to nuclear compartments by splicing endogeneous gene sequences to a promoterless betageo reporter, using a gene trap approach. Mouse ES (embryonic stem) cell lines were identified that express betageo fusions located within sub-nuclear compartments, including chromosomes, the nucleolus and foci containing splicing factors. The sequences of 11 trapped genes were ascertained, and characterisation of endogenous protein distribution in two cases confirmed the validity of the approach. Three novel proteins concentrated within distinct chromosomal domains were identified, one of which appears to be a serine/threonine kinase. The sequence of a gene whose product co-localises with splicesome components suggests that this protein may be an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The majority of the other genes isolated represent novel genes. This approach is shown to be a powerful tool for identifying genes encoding novel proteins with specific sub-nuclear localisations and exposes our ignorance of the protein composition of the nucleus. Motifs in two of the isolated genes suggest new links between cellular regulatory mechanisms (ubiquitination and phosphorylation) and mRNA splicing and chromosome structure/function.

  9. A deep auto-encoder model for gene expression prediction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Wen, Jia; Quitadamo, Andrew; Cheng, Jianlin; Shi, Xinghua

    2017-11-17

    Gene expression is a key intermediate level that genotypes lead to a particular trait. Gene expression is affected by various factors including genotypes of genetic variants. With an aim of delineating the genetic impact on gene expression, we build a deep auto-encoder model to assess how good genetic variants will contribute to gene expression changes. This new deep learning model is a regression-based predictive model based on the MultiLayer Perceptron and Stacked Denoising Auto-encoder (MLP-SAE). The model is trained using a stacked denoising auto-encoder for feature selection and a multilayer perceptron framework for backpropagation. We further improve the model by introducing dropout to prevent overfitting and improve performance. To demonstrate the usage of this model, we apply MLP-SAE to a real genomic datasets with genotypes and gene expression profiles measured in yeast. Our results show that the MLP-SAE model with dropout outperforms other models including Lasso, Random Forests and the MLP-SAE model without dropout. Using the MLP-SAE model with dropout, we show that gene expression quantifications predicted by the model solely based on genotypes, align well with true gene expression patterns. We provide a deep auto-encoder model for predicting gene expression from SNP genotypes. This study demonstrates that deep learning is appropriate for tackling another genomic problem, i.e., building predictive models to understand genotypes' contribution to gene expression. With the emerging availability of richer genomic data, we anticipate that deep learning models play a bigger role in modeling and interpreting genomics.

  10. Gene Cluster Encoding Cholate Catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbrink, Maarten H.; Casabon, Israël; Stewart, Gordon R.; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as well as on its conjugates, taurocholate and glycocholate. The transcriptome of RHA1 growing on cholate revealed 39 genes upregulated on cholate, occurring in a single gene cluster. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed that selected genes in the cluster were upregulated 10-fold on cholate versus on cholesterol. One of these genes, kshA3, encoding a putative 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase, was deleted and found essential for growth on cholate. Two coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases encoded in the cluster, CasG and CasI, were heterologously expressed. CasG was shown to transform cholate to cholyl-CoA, thus initiating side chain degradation. CasI was shown to form CoA derivatives of steroids with isopropanoyl side chains, likely occurring as degradation intermediates. Orthologous gene clusters were identified in all available Rhodococcus genomes, as well as that of Thermomonospora curvata. Moreover, Rhodococcus equi 103S, Rhodococcus ruber Chol-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 each grew on cholate. In contrast, several mycolic acid bacteria lacking the gene cluster were unable to grow on cholate. Our results demonstrate that the above-mentioned gene cluster encodes cholate catabolism and is distinct from a more widely occurring gene cluster encoding cholesterol catabolism. PMID:23024343

  11. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  12. Cloning and sequencing the genes encoding goldfish and carp ependymin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D S; Shashoua, V E

    1994-04-20

    Ependymins (EPNs) are brain glycoproteins thought to function in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation. To date, epn genes have been characterized in two orders of teleost fish. In this study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were used to amplify the complete 1.6-kb epn genes, gf-I and cc-I, from genomic DNA of Cypriniformes, goldfish and carp, respectively. Amplified bands were cloned and sequenced. Each gene consists of six exons and five introns. The exon portion of gf-I encodes a predicted 215-amino-acid (aa) protein previously characterized as GF-I, while cc-I encodes a predicted 215-aa protein 95% homologous to GF-I.

  13. [High gene conversion frequency between genes encoding 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase in 3 Saccharomyces species].

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Sara-Pier; Drouin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Gene conversions are nonreciprocal sequence exchanges between genes. They are relatively common in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but few studies have investigated the evolutionary fate of gene conversions or their functional impacts. Here, we analyze the evolution and impact of gene conversions between the two genes encoding 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase in S. cerevisiae, Saccharomyces paradoxus and Saccharomyces mikatae. Our results demonstrate that the last half of these genes are subject to gene conversions among these three species. The greater similarity and the greater percentage of GC nucleotides in the converted regions, as well as the absence of long regions of adjacent common converted sites, suggest that these gene conversions are frequent and occur independently in all three species. The high frequency of these conversions probably result from the fact that they have little impact on the protein sequences encoded by these genes.

  14. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  15. Gene encoding a novel extracellular metalloprotease in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sloma, A; Rudolph, C F; Rufo, G A; Sullivan, B J; Theriault, K A; Ally, D; Pero, J

    1990-01-01

    The gene for a novel extracellular metalloprotease was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene (mpr) encodes a primary product of 313 amino acids that has little similarity to other known Bacillus proteases. The amino acid sequence of the mature protease was preceded by a signal sequence of approximately 34 amino acids and a pro sequence of 58 amino acids. Four cysteine residues were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein, indicating the possible presence of disulfide bonds. The mpr gene mapped in the cysA-aroI region of the chromosome and was not required for growth or sporulation. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 7 PMID:2105291

  16. Genes encoding intrinsic disorder in Eukaryota have high GC content

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We analyze a correlation between the GC content in genes of 12 eukaryotic species and the level of intrinsic disorder in their corresponding proteins. Comprehensive computational analysis has revealed that the disordered regions in eukaryotes are encoded by the GC-enriched gene regions and that this enrichment is correlated with the amount of disorder and is present across proteins and species characterized by varying amounts of disorder. The GC enrichment is a result of higher rate of amino acid coded by GC-rich codons in the disordered regions. Individual amino acids have the same GC-content profile between different species. Eukaryotic proteins with the disordered regions encoded by the GC-enriched gene segments carry out important biological functions including interactions with RNAs, DNAs, nucleotides, binding of calcium and metal ions, are involved in transcription, transport, cell division and certain signaling pathways, and are localized primarily in nucleus, cytosol and cytoplasm. We also investigate a possible relationship between GC content, intrinsic disorder and protein evolution. Analysis of a devised “age” of amino acids, their disorder-promoting capacity and the GC-enrichment of their codons suggests that the early amino acids are mostly disorder-promoting and their codons are GC-rich while most of late amino acids are mostly order-promoting. PMID:28232902

  17. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Hallen, Heather E.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode α-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. α-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable “toxin” region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7–10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes. PMID:18025465

  18. Characterization of the human gene (TBXAS1) encoding thromboxane synthase.

    PubMed

    Miyata, A; Yokoyama, C; Ihara, H; Bandoh, S; Takeda, O; Takahashi, E; Tanabe, T

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding human thromboxane synthase (TBXAS1) was isolated from a human EMBL3 genomic library using human platelet thromboxane synthase cDNA as a probe. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the human thromboxane synthase gene spans more than 75 kb and consists of 13 exons and 12 introns, of which the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. The exon-intron boundaries of the thromboxane synthase gene were similar to those of the human cytochrome P450 nifedipine oxidase gene (CYP3A4) except for introns 9 and 10, although the primary sequences of these enzymes exhibited 35.8% identity each other. The 1.2-kb of the 5'-flanking region sequence contained potential binding sites for several transcription factors (AP-1, AP-2, GATA-1, CCAAT box, xenobiotic-response element, PEA-3, LF-A1, myb, basic transcription element and cAMP-response element). Primer-extension analysis indicated the multiple transcription-start sites, and the major start site was identified as an adenine residue located 142 bases upstream of the translation-initiation site. However, neither a typical TATA box nor a typical CAAT box is found within the 100-b upstream of the translation-initiation site. Southern-blot analysis revealed the presence of one copy of the thromboxane synthase gene per haploid genome. Furthermore, a fluorescence in situ hybridization study revealed that the human gene for thromboxane synthase is localized to band q33-q34 of the long arm of chromosome 7. A tissue-distribution study demonstrated that thromboxane synthase mRNA is widely expressed in human tissues and is particularly abundant in peripheral blood leukocyte, spleen, lung and liver. The low but significant levels of mRNA were observed in kidney, placenta and thymus.

  19. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  20. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  1. The rice blast resistance gene Ptr encodes an atypical protein required for broad spectrum disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant resistance (R) genes typically encode proteins with nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NLR) domains. We identified a novel, broad-spectrum rice blast R gene, Ptr, encoding a non-NLR protein with four Armadillo repeats. Ptr was originally identified by fast neutron mutagenesis as a ...

  2. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-03

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fate of NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica lineage after split from A. thaliana. Here we present genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana. Through the employment of HMM search and manual curation, we identified 157, 206 and 167 NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis among 3 species classified NBS-encoding genes into 6 subgroups. Tandem duplication and whole genome triplication (WGT) analyses revealed that after WGT of the Brassica ancestor, NBS-encoding homologous gene pairs on triplicated regions in Brassica ancestor were deleted or lost quickly, but NBS-encoding genes in Brassica species experienced species-specific gene amplification by tandem duplication after divergence of B. rapa and B. oleracea. Expression profiling of NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs indicated the differential expression pattern of retained orthologous gene copies in B. oleracea and B. rapa. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of CNL type NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs among 3 species suggested that orthologous genes in B. rapa species have undergone stronger negative selection than those in B .oleracea species. But for TNL type, there are no significant differences in the orthologous gene pairs between the two species. This study is first identification and characterization of NBS-encoding genes in B. rapa and B. oleracea based on whole genome sequences. Through tandem duplication and whole genome

  3. Glycosulfatase-Encoding Gene Cluster in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Muireann; Jiang, Hao; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Oscarson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bifidobacteria constitute a specific group of commensal bacteria typically found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of humans and other mammals. Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of many healthy breastfed infants. In the present study, we investigated glycosulfatase activity in a bacterial isolate from a nursling stool sample, B. breve UCC2003. Two putative sulfatases were identified on the genome of B. breve UCC2003. The sulfated monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate (GlcNAc-6-S) was shown to support the growth of B. breve UCC2003, while N-acetylglucosamine-3-sulfate, N-acetylgalactosamine-3-sulfate, and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate did not support appreciable growth. By using a combination of transcriptomic and functional genomic approaches, a gene cluster designated ats2 was shown to be specifically required for GlcNAc-6-S metabolism. Transcription of the ats2 cluster is regulated by a repressor open reading frame kinase (ROK) family transcriptional repressor. This study represents the first description of glycosulfatase activity within the Bifidobacterium genus. IMPORTANCE Bifidobacteria are saccharolytic organisms naturally found in the digestive tract of mammals and insects. Bifidobacterium breve strains utilize a variety of plant- and host-derived carbohydrates that allow them to be present as prominent members of the infant gut microbiota as well as being present in the gastrointestinal tract of adults. In this study, we introduce a previously unexplored area of carbohydrate metabolism in bifidobacteria, namely, the metabolism of sulfated carbohydrates. B. breve UCC2003 was shown to metabolize N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate (GlcNAc-6-S) through one of two sulfatase-encoding gene clusters identified on its genome. GlcNAc-6-S can be found in terminal or branched positions of mucin oligosaccharides, the glycoprotein component of the mucous layer that covers the digestive tract. The results of

  4. Glycosulfatase-Encoding Gene Cluster in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Egan, Muireann; Jiang, Hao; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Oscarson, Stefan; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2016-11-15

    Bifidobacteria constitute a specific group of commensal bacteria typically found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of humans and other mammals. Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of many healthy breastfed infants. In the present study, we investigated glycosulfatase activity in a bacterial isolate from a nursling stool sample, B. breve UCC2003. Two putative sulfatases were identified on the genome of B. breve UCC2003. The sulfated monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate (GlcNAc-6-S) was shown to support the growth of B. breve UCC2003, while N-acetylglucosamine-3-sulfate, N-acetylgalactosamine-3-sulfate, and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate did not support appreciable growth. By using a combination of transcriptomic and functional genomic approaches, a gene cluster designated ats2 was shown to be specifically required for GlcNAc-6-S metabolism. Transcription of the ats2 cluster is regulated by a repressor open reading frame kinase (ROK) family transcriptional repressor. This study represents the first description of glycosulfatase activity within the Bifidobacterium genus. Bifidobacteria are saccharolytic organisms naturally found in the digestive tract of mammals and insects. Bifidobacterium breve strains utilize a variety of plant- and host-derived carbohydrates that allow them to be present as prominent members of the infant gut microbiota as well as being present in the gastrointestinal tract of adults. In this study, we introduce a previously unexplored area of carbohydrate metabolism in bifidobacteria, namely, the metabolism of sulfated carbohydrates. B. breve UCC2003 was shown to metabolize N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate (GlcNAc-6-S) through one of two sulfatase-encoding gene clusters identified on its genome. GlcNAc-6-S can be found in terminal or branched positions of mucin oligosaccharides, the glycoprotein component of the mucous layer that covers the digestive tract. The results of this study provide

  5. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (p<0.05), reinforcing the importance of S. aureus as a potential foodborne agent. However, the potential risk posed by CoNS in goat milk should not be ignored because it has a higher occurrence in goat milk and enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates.

  6. Isolation of a gene encoding a novel spectinomycin phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Suter, T M; Viswanathan, V K; Cianciotto, N P

    1997-06-01

    A gene capable of conferring spectinomycin resistance was isolated from Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease. The gene (aph) encoded a 36-kDa protein which has similarity to aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. Biochemical analysis confirmed that aph encodes a phosphotransferase which modifies spectinomycin but not hygromycin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. The strain that was the source of aph demonstrated resistance to spectinomycin, and Southern hybridizations determined that aph also exists in other legionellae.

  7. Isolation of a gene encoding a novel spectinomycin phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Suter, T M; Viswanathan, V K; Cianciotto, N P

    1997-01-01

    A gene capable of conferring spectinomycin resistance was isolated from Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease. The gene (aph) encoded a 36-kDa protein which has similarity to aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. Biochemical analysis confirmed that aph encodes a phosphotransferase which modifies spectinomycin but not hygromycin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. The strain that was the source of aph demonstrated resistance to spectinomycin, and Southern hybridizations determined that aph also exists in other legionellae. PMID:9174205

  8. Development of a gene synthesis platform for the efficient large scale production of small genes encoding animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Brás, Joana L A; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-12-01

    Gene synthesis is becoming an important tool in many fields of recombinant DNA technology, including recombinant protein production. De novo gene synthesis is quickly replacing the classical cloning and mutagenesis procedures and allows generating nucleic acids for which no template is available. In addition, when coupled with efficient gene design algorithms that optimize codon usage, it leads to high levels of recombinant protein expression. Here, we describe the development of an optimized gene synthesis platform that was applied to the large scale production of small genes encoding venom peptides. This improved gene synthesis method uses a PCR-based protocol to assemble synthetic DNA from pools of overlapping oligonucleotides and was developed to synthesise multiples genes simultaneously. This technology incorporates an accurate, automated and cost effective ligation independent cloning step to directly integrate the synthetic genes into an effective Escherichia coli expression vector. The robustness of this technology to generate large libraries of dozens to thousands of synthetic nucleic acids was demonstrated through the parallel and simultaneous synthesis of 96 genes encoding animal toxins. An automated platform was developed for the large-scale synthesis of small genes encoding eukaryotic toxins. Large scale recombinant expression of synthetic genes encoding eukaryotic toxins will allow exploring the extraordinary potency and pharmacological diversity of animal venoms, an increasingly valuable but unexplored source of lead molecules for drug discovery.

  9. A highly divergent gene cluster in honey bees encodes a novel silk family.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Tara D; Campbell, Peter M; Weisman, Sarah; Trueman, Holly E; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Wanjura, Wolfgang J; Haritos, Victoria S

    2006-11-01

    The pupal cocoon of the domesticated silk moth Bombyx mori is the best known and most extensively studied insect silk. It is not widely known that Apis mellifera larvae also produce silk. We have used a combination of genomic and proteomic techniques to identify four honey bee fiber genes (AmelFibroin1-4) and two silk-associated genes (AmelSA1 and 2). The four fiber genes are small, comprise a single exon each, and are clustered on a short genomic region where the open reading frames are GC-rich amid low GC intergenic regions. The genes encode similar proteins that are highly helical and predicted to form unusually tight coiled coils. Despite the similarity in size, structure, and composition of the encoded proteins, the genes have low primary sequence identity. We propose that the four fiber genes have arisen from gene duplication events but have subsequently diverged significantly. The silk-associated genes encode proteins likely to act as a glue (AmelSA1) and involved in silk processing (AmelSA2). Although the silks of honey bees and silkmoths both originate in larval labial glands, the silk proteins are completely different in their primary, secondary, and tertiary structures as well as the genomic arrangement of the genes encoding them. This implies independent evolutionary origins for these functionally related proteins.

  10. Asthma and genes encoding components of the vitamin D pathway

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic variants at the vitamin D receptor (VDR) locus are associated with asthma and atopy. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in other genes of the vitamin D pathway are associated with asthma or atopy. Methods Eleven candidate genes were chosen for this study, five of which code for proteins in the vitamin D metabolism pathway (CYP27A1, CYP27B1, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, GC) and six that are known to be transcriptionally regulated by vitamin D (IL10, IL1RL1, CD28, CD86, IL8, SKIIP). For each gene, we selected a maximally informative set of common SNPs (tagSNPs) using the European-derived (CEU) HapMap dataset. A total of 87 SNPs were genotyped in a French-Canadian family sample ascertained through asthmatic probands (388 nuclear families, 1064 individuals) and evaluated using the Family Based Association Test (FBAT) program. We then sought to replicate the positive findings in four independent samples: two from Western Canada, one from Australia and one from the USA (CAMP). Results A number of SNPs in the IL10, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, IL1RL1 and CD86 genes were modestly associated with asthma and atopy (p < 0.05). Two-gene models testing for both main effects and the interaction were then performed using conditional logistic regression. Two-gene models implicating functional variants in the IL10 and VDR genes as well as in the IL10 and IL1RL1 genes were associated with asthma (p < 0.0002). In the replicate samples, SNPs in the IL10 and CYP24A1 genes were again modestly associated with asthma and atopy (p < 0.05). However, the SNPs or the orientation of the risk alleles were different between populations. A two-gene model involving IL10 and VDR was replicated in CAMP, but not in the other populations. Conclusion A number of genes involved in the vitamin D pathway demonstrate modest levels of association with asthma and atopy. Multilocus models testing genes in the same pathway are potentially more effective to evaluate the risk of asthma, but the effects are not

  11. A Comprehensive Analysis of Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Cappi, Carolina; Hagen, Christian M; Sequeira, Adolfo; Vawter, Marquis P; Derkach, Andriy; Zai, Clement C; Hedley, Paula L; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Pouget, Jennie G; Cuperfain, Ari B; Sullivan, Patrick F; Christiansen, Michael; Kennedy, James L; Sun, Lei

    2018-05-01

    The genetic risk factors of schizophrenia (SCZ), a severe psychiatric disorder, are not yet fully understood. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in SCZ, but comprehensive association studies are lacking. We hypothesized that variants in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes influence susceptibility to SCZ. We conducted gene-based and gene-set analyses using summary association results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Schizophrenia Phase 2 (PGC-SCZ2) genome-wide association study comprising 35,476 cases and 46,839 control subjects. We applied the MAGMA method to three sets of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes: oxidative phosphorylation genes, other nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, and genes involved in nucleus-mitochondria crosstalk. Furthermore, we conducted a replication study using the iPSYCH SCZ sample of 2290 cases and 21,621 control subjects. In the PGC-SCZ2 sample, 1186 mitochondrial genes were analyzed, among which 159 had p values < .05 and 19 remained significant after multiple testing correction. A meta-analysis of 818 genes combining the PGC-SCZ2 and iPSYCH samples resulted in 104 nominally significant and nine significant genes, suggesting a polygenic model for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Gene-set analysis, however, did not show significant results. In an in silico protein-protein interaction network analysis, 14 mitochondrial genes interacted directly with 158 SCZ risk genes identified in PGC-SCZ2 (permutation p = .02), and aldosterone signaling in epithelial cells and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways appeared to be overrepresented in this network of mitochondrial and SCZ risk genes. This study provides evidence that specific aspects of mitochondrial function may play a role in SCZ, but we did not observe its broad involvement even using a large sample. Copyright © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic Regions in Local Endangered Sheep Encode Potentially Favorable Genes.

    PubMed

    Moioli, Bianca; Steri, Roberto; Catillo, Gennaro

    2018-01-02

    The economic evaluation of farm animal genetic resources plays a key role in developing conservation programs. However, to date, the link between diversity as assessed by neutral genetic markers and the functional diversity is not yet understood. Two genome-wide comparisons, using over 44,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, identified the markers with the highest difference in allele frequency between the Alpago endangered breed and two clusters, composed of four specialized dairy sheep, and four meat breeds respectively. The genes in proximity of these markers were mapped to known pathways of the Gene Ontology to determine which ones were most represented. Our results indicated that the differences of the Alpago breed from the more productive sheep rely upon genes involved in cellular defense and repair mechanisms. A higher number of different markers and genes were detected in the comparison with the specialized dairy sheep. These genes play a role in complex biological processes: metabolic, homeostatic, neurological system, and macromolecular organization; such processes may possibly explain the evolution of gene function as a result of selection to improve milk yield.

  13. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novelmore » regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.« less

  14. The EWS–Oct-4 fusion gene encodes a transforming gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoon; Kim, Ja Young; Kang, In Young; Kim, Hye Kyoung; Han, Yong-Mahn; Kim, Jungho

    2007-01-01

    The t(6;22)(p21;q12) translocation associated with human bone and soft-tissue tumours results in a chimaeric molecule fusing the NTD (N-terminal domain) of the EWS (Ewing's sarcoma) gene to the CTD (C-terminal domain) of the Oct-4 (octamer-4) embryonic gene. Since the N-terminal domains of EWS and Oct-4 are structurally different, in the present study we have assessed the functional consequences of the EWS–Oct-4 fusion. We find that this chimaeric gene encodes a nuclear protein which binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental Oct-4 protein. Comparison of the transactivation properties of EWS–Oct-4 and Oct-4 indicates that the former has higher transactivation activity for a known target reporter gene containing Oct-4 binding. Deletion analysis of the functional domains of EWS–Oct-4 indicates that the EWS (NTD), the POU domain and the CTD of EWS–Oct-4 are necessary for full transactivation potential. EWS–Oct-4 induced the expression of fgf-4 (fibroblast growth factor 4) and nanog, which are potent mitogens as well as Oct-4 downstream target genes whose promoters contain potential Oct-4-binding sites. Finally, ectopic expression of EWS–Oct-4 in Oct-4-null ZHBTc4 ES (embryonic stem) cells resulted in increased tumorigenic growth potential in nude mice. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(6;22) translocation is due to the EWS–Oct-4 chimaeric protein and that fusion of the EWS NTD to the Oct-4 DNA-binding domain produces a transforming chimaeric product. PMID:17564582

  15. The mitochondrial gene encoding ribosomal protein S12 has been translocated to the nuclear genome in Oenothera.

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, L; Brennicke, A; Schuster, W

    1992-01-01

    The Oenothera mitochondrial genome contains only a gene fragment for ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), while other plants encode a functional gene in the mitochondrion. The complete Oenothera rps12 gene is located in the nucleus. The transit sequence necessary to target this protein to the mitochondrion is encoded by a 5'-extension of the open reading frame. Comparison of the amino acid sequence encoded by the nuclear gene with the polypeptides encoded by edited mitochondrial cDNA and genomic sequences of other plants suggests that gene transfer between mitochondrion and nucleus started from edited mitochondrial RNA molecules. Mechanisms and requirements of gene transfer and activation are discussed. Images PMID:1454526

  16. Characterization of GM-CSF-inhibitory factor and Uracil DNA glycosylase encoding genes from camel pseudocowpoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, P K; Singh, Raghvendar; Tuteja, F C; Patil, N V

    2015-06-01

    The present study describes the PCR amplification of GM-CSF-inhibitory factor (GIF) and Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) encoding genes of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from the Indian Dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) infected with contagious ecthyma using the primers based on the corresponding gene sequences of human PCPV and reindeer PCPV, respectively. The length of GIF gene of PCPV obtained from camel is 795 bp and due to the addition of one cytosine residue at position 374 and one adenine residue at position 516, the open reading frame (ORF) got altered, resulting in the production of truncated polypeptide. The ORF of UDG encoding gene of camel PCPV is 696 bp encoding a polypeptide of 26.0 kDa. Comparison of amino acid sequence homologies of GIF and UDG of camel PCPV revealed that the camel PCPV is closer to ORFV and PCPV (reference stains of both human and reindeer), respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular comparison of the structural proteins encoding gene clusters of two related Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages.

    PubMed Central

    Vasala, A; Dupont, L; Baumann, M; Ritzenthaler, P; Alatossava, T

    1993-01-01

    Virulent phage LL-H and temperate phage mv4 are two related bacteriophages of Lactobacillus delbrueckii. The gene clusters encoding structural proteins of these two phages have been sequenced and further analyzed. Six open reading frames (ORF-1 to ORF-6) were detected. Protein sequencing and Western immunoblotting experiments confirmed that ORF-3 (g34) encoded the main capsid protein Gp34. The presence of a putative late promoter in front of the phage LL-H g34 gene was suggested by primer extension experiments. Comparative sequence analysis between phage LL-H and phage mv4 revealed striking similarities in the structure and organization of this gene cluster, suggesting that the genes encoding phage structural proteins belong to a highly conservative module. Images PMID:8497043

  18. Escherichia coli yjjPB genes encode a succinate transporter important for succinate production.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Keita; Nanatani, Kei; Hara, Yoshihiko; Yamakami, Suguru; Yahagi, Daiki; Chinen, Akito; Tokura, Mitsunori; Abe, Keietsu

    2017-09-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli produces succinate from glucose via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. To date, however, no genes encoding succinate exporters have been established in E. coli. Therefore, we attempted to identify genes encoding succinate exporters by screening an E. coli MG1655 genome library. We identified the yjjPB genes as candidates encoding a succinate transporter, which enhanced succinate production in Pantoea ananatis under aerobic conditions. A complementation assay conducted in Corynebacterium glutamicum strain AJ110655ΔsucE1 demonstrated that both YjjP and YjjB are required for the restoration of succinate production. Furthermore, deletion of yjjPB decreased succinate production in E. coli by 70% under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that YjjPB constitutes a succinate transporter in E. coli and that the products of both genes are required for succinate export.

  19. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  20. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  1. Smoking, genes encoding dopamine pathway and risk for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhuqin; Feng, Xiuli; Dong, Xiumin; Chan, Piu

    2010-09-20

    Smoking has been reported to be inversely associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) in many studies, but a recent study in China found that smoking increased the risk of PD. Variants in genes associated with dopamine metabolism found to increase the risk for PD have also been associated with smoking behavior. To investigate the association between smoking and PD in a Chinese population and determine whether the genetic variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism influence the relationship between smoking and risk for PD. Chinese PD patients were recruited from Xuanwu Hospital. Controls were sampled from community. Detailed information on life-long smoking behavior was collected by face-to-face interview. Genotypes were determined for SLC6A3 VNTR, COMT Val108/158Met and MAO-B intron13 A/G polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP, DHPLC and sequencing. Chi-square and logistic regression model were used in the analysis. 176 PD cases and 354 controls were enrolled in this study. 23.9% cases are smokers, compared to 48.0% in controls. Ever smoking is inversely associated with PD (odds ratio=0.14, 95% CI 0.08-0.26, adjusted for age and gender). None of the above-mentioned genetic polymorphisms was associated with PD risk or smoking. When each variant was included in the logistic regression model, the inverse association between smoking and PD remained the same, and the interactions between smoking and variants were not significant in the model. Our data support a reduction of PD risk associated with smoking in a Chinese population. These variants of genes associated with DA uptake and metabolism do not affect the inverse association between smoking and PD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacillus subtilis 168 Contains Two Differentially Regulated Genes Encoding l-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Susan H.; Wray, Lewis V.

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the two Bacillus subtilis genes encoding l-asparaginase is controlled by independent regulatory factors. The ansZ gene (formerly yccC) was shown by mutational analysis to encode a functional l-asparaginase, the expression of which is activated during nitrogen-limited growth by the TnrA transcription factor. Gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting experiments indicate that TnrA regulates ansZ expression by binding to a DNA site located upstream of the ansZ promoter. The expression of the ansA gene, which encodes the second l-asparaginase, was found to be induced by asparagine. The ansA repressor, AnsR, was shown to negatively regulate its own expression. PMID:11914346

  3. Bacillus subtilis 168 contains two differentially regulated genes encoding L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Susan H; Wray, Lewis V

    2002-04-01

    Expression of the two Bacillus subtilis genes encoding L-asparaginase is controlled by independent regulatory factors. The ansZ gene (formerly yccC) was shown by mutational analysis to encode a functional L-asparaginase, the expression of which is activated during nitrogen-limited growth by the TnrA transcription factor. Gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting experiments indicate that TnrA regulates ansZ expression by binding to a DNA site located upstream of the ansZ promoter. The expression of the ansA gene, which encodes the second L-asparaginase, was found to be induced by asparagine. The ansA repressor, AnsR, was shown to negatively regulate its own expression.

  4. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  5. The Yersinia pestis gcvB gene encodes two small regulatory RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Sarah D; Pulvermacher, Sarah C; Stauffer, George V

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent years it has become clear that small non-coding RNAs function as regulatory elements in bacterial virulence and bacterial stress responses. We tested for the presence of the small non-coding GcvB RNAs in Y. pestis as possible regulators of gene expression in this organism. Results In this study, we report that the Yersinia pestis KIM6 gcvB gene encodes two small RNAs. Transcription of gcvB is activated by the GcvA protein and repressed by the GcvR protein. The gcvB-encoded RNAs are required for repression of the Y. pestis dppA gene, encoding the periplasmic-binding protein component of the dipeptide transport system, showing that the GcvB RNAs have regulatory activity. A deletion of the gcvB gene from the Y. pestis KIM6 chromosome results in a decrease in the generation time of the organism as well as a change in colony morphology. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the Y. pestis gcvB gene encodes two small non-coding regulatory RNAs that repress dppA expression. A gcvB deletion is pleiotropic, suggesting that the sRNAs are likely involved in controlling genes in addition to dppA. PMID:16768793

  6. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in Ukraine: antibacterial resistance and virulence factor encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Netsvyetayeva, Irina; Fraczek, Mariusz; Piskorska, Katarzyna; Golas, Marlena; Sikora, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Andrzej; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa; Marusza, Wojciech; Palmieri, Beniamino; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2014-03-05

    The number of studies regarding the incidence of multidrug resistant strains and distribution of genes encoding virulence factors, which have colonized the post-Soviet states, is considerably limited. The aim of the study was (1) to assess the Staphylococcus (S.) aureus nasal carriage rate, including Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in adult Ukrainian population, (2) to determine antibiotic resistant pattern and (3) the occurrence of Panton Valentine Leukocidine (PVL)-, Fibronectin-Binding Protein A (FnBPA)- and Exfoliative Toxin (ET)-encoding genes. Nasal samples for S. aureus culture were obtained from 245 adults. The susceptibility pattern for several classes of antibiotics was determined by disk diffusion method according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guidelines. The virulence factor encoding genes, mecA, lukS-lukF, eta, etb, etd, fnbA, were detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The S. aureus nasal carriage rate was 40%. The prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage in adults was 3.7%. LukS-lukF genes were detected in over 58% of the strains. ET-encoding genes were detected in over 39% of the strains and the most prevalent was etd. The fnbA gene was detected in over 59% of the strains. All MRSA isolates tested were positive for the mecA gene. LukS-lukF genes and the etd gene were commonly co-present in MRSA, while lukS-lukF genes and the fnbA gene were commonly co-present in Methicillin Sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. No significant difference was detected between the occurrence of lukS-lukF genes (P > 0.05) and the etd gene (P > 0.05) when comparing MRSA and MSSA. The occurrence of the fnbA gene was significantly more frequent in MSSA strains (P < 0.05). In Ukraine, S. aureus is a common cause of infection. The prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in our cohort of patients from Ukraine was 40.4%. We found that 9.1% of the strains were classified as MRSA and all MRSA isolates tested

  7. A neurotransmitter transporter encoded by the Drosophila inebriated gene

    PubMed Central

    Soehnge, Holly; Huang, Xi; Becker, Marie; Whitley, Penn; Conover, Diana; Stern, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies on mutants defective in the Drosophila inebriated (ine) gene demonstrated increased excitability of the motor neuron. In this paper, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of ine. Mutations in ine were localized on cloned DNA by restriction mapping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping of ine mutants. DNA from the ine region was then used to isolate an ine cDNA. In situ hybridization of ine transcripts to developing embryos revealed expression of this gene in several cell types, including the posterior hindgut, Malpighian tubules, anal plate, garland cells, and a subset of cells in the central nervous system. The ine cDNA contains an open reading frame of 658 amino acids with a high degree of sequence similarity to members of the Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family. Members of this family catalyze the rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters released into the synapse and thereby play key roles in controlling neuronal function. We conclude that ine mutations cause increased excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron by causing the defective reuptake of the substrate neurotransmitter of the ine transporter and thus overstimulation of the motor neuron by this neurotransmitter. From this observation comes a unique opportunity to perform a genetic dissection of the regulation of excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron. PMID:8917579

  8. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  9. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  10. Structure, Expression, Chromosomal Location and Product of the Gene Encoding Adh2 in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Gregerson, R. G.; Cameron, L.; McLean, M.; Dennis, P.; Strommer, J.

    1993-01-01

    In most higher plants the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase comprise a small gene family, usually with two members. The Adh1 gene of Petunia has been cloned and analyzed, but a second identifiable gene was not recovered from any of three genomic libraries. We have therefore employed the polymerase chain reaction to obtain the major portion of a second Adh gene. From sequence, mapping and northern data we conclude this gene encodes ADH2, the major anaerobically inducible Adh gene of Petunia. The availability of both Adh1 and Adh2 from Petunia has permitted us to compare their structures and patterns of expression to those of the well-studied Adh genes of maize, of which one is highly expressed developmentally, while both are induced in response to hypoxia. Despite their evolutionary distance, evidenced by deduced amino acid sequence as well as taxonomic classification, the pairs of genes are regulated in strikingly similar ways in maize and Petunia. Our findings suggest a significant biological basis for the regulatory strategy employed by these distant species for differential expression of multiple Adh genes. PMID:8096485

  11. Direct cloning of the trxB gene that encodes thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Russel, M; Model, P

    1985-01-01

    A strain was constructed which contains mutations in the genes encoding thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) such that filamentous phage f1 cannot grow. The complementation of either mutation with its wild-type allele permits phage growth. We used this strain to select f1 phage which contain a cloned trxB gene. The location of the gene on the cloned fragment was determined, and its protein product was identified. Plasmid subclones that contain this gene overproduce thioredoxin reductase. Images PMID:2989245

  12. Gene 2 of the sigma rhabdovirus genome encodes the P protein, and gene 3 encodes a protein related to the reverse transcriptase of retroelements.

    PubMed

    Landès-Devauchelle, C; Bras, F; Dezélée, S; Teninges, D

    1995-11-10

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes 2 and 3 of the Drosophila rhabdovirus sigma was determined from cDNAs to viral genome and poly(A)+ mRNAs. Gene 2 comprises 1032 nucleotides and contains a long ORF encoding a molecular weight 35,208 polypeptide present in infected cells and in virions which migrates in SDS-PAGE as a doublet of M(r) about 60 kDa. The distribution of acidic charges as well as the electrophoretic properties of the protein are characteristic of the rhabdovirus P proteins. Gene 3 comprises 923 nucleotides and contains a long ORF capable of coding a polypeptide of 298 amino acids of MW 33,790. The putative protein (PP3) is similar in size to a minor component of the virions. Computer analysis shows that the sequence of PP3 contains three motifs related to the conserved motifs of reverse transcriptases.

  13. High-level expression of a synthetic gene encoding a sweet protein, monellin, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjun; Cai, Heng; Lu, Fuping; Du, Lianxiang

    2005-11-01

    The expression of a synthetic gene encoding monellin, a sweet protein, in E. coli under the control of T7 promoter from phage is described. The single-chain monellin gene was designed based on the biased codons of E. coli so as to optimize its expression. Monellin was produced and accounted for 45% of total soluble proteins. It was purified to yield 43 mg protein per g dry cell wt. The purity of the recombinant protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE.

  14. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes in four Gossypium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nucleotide binding site (NBS) genes encode a large family of disease resistance (R) proteins in plants. The availability of genomic data of the two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, and the two allotetraploid cotton species, Gossypium hirsutum (TM-1) and Gossypium ...

  15. Cloning and expression of clt genes encoding milk-clotting proteases from Myxococcus xanthus 422.

    PubMed

    Poza, M; Prieto-Alcedo, M; Sieiro, C; Villa, T G

    2004-10-01

    The screening of a gene library of the milk-clotting strain Myxococcus xanthus 422 constructed in Escherichia coli allowed the description of eight positive clones containing 26 open reading frames. Only three of them (cltA, cltB, and cltC) encoded proteins that exhibited intracellular milk-clotting ability in E. coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia pastoris expression systems.

  16. Identification of chitinolytic bacteria isolated from shrimp pond sediment and characterization of their chitinase encoding gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwijayani, A. U.; Puspita, I. D.; Murwantoko; Ustadi

    2018-03-01

    Chitinolytic bacteria are a group of bacteria owning enzymes that able to hydrolyze chitin. Previously, we isolated chitinolytic bacteria from shrimp pond sediment in Bantul, Yogyakarta, and obtained five isolates showing high chitinolytic index named as isolate PT1, PT2, PT5, PT6 and PB2. The aims of this study were to identify chitinolytic bacteria isolated from shrimp pond sediment and to characterize the chitinase encoding gene from each isolate. The molecular technique was performed by amplification of 16S rDNA, amplification of chitinase encoding gene and sequence analysis. Two chitinolytic bacteria of PT1 and PT2 were similar to Aeromonas bivalvium strain D15, PT5 to Pseudomonas stutzeri strain BD-2.2.1, PT6 to Serratia marcescens strain FZSF02 and PB2 to Streptomyces misionensis strain OsiRt-1. The comparison of chitinase encoding gene between three isolates with those in Gen Bank shows that PT1 had similar sequences with the chi1 gene in Aeromonas sp. 17m, PT2 with chi1 gene in A. caviae (CB101) and PT6 with chiB gene in S. Marcescens (BJL200).

  17. Screening of the Enterocin-Encoding Genes and Antimicrobial Activity in Enterococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Mayara Baptistucci; Rocha, Katia Real; Terra, MÁrcia Regina; Furlaneto, MÁrcia Cristina; Maia, Luciana Furlaneto

    2016-06-28

    In the current study, a total of 135 enterococci strains from different sources were screened for the presence of the enterocin-encoding genes entA, entP, entB, entL50A, and entL50B. The enterocin genes were present at different frequencies, with entA occurring the most frequently, followed by entP and entB; entL50A and L50B were not detected. The occurrence of single enterocin genes was higher than the occurrence of multiple enterocin gene combinations. The 80 isolates that harbor at least one enterocin-encoding gene (denoted "Gene(+) strains") were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 82.5% of the Gene(+) strains inhibited at least one of the indicator strains, and the isolates harboring multiple enterocin-encoding genes inhibited a larger number of indicator strains than isolates harboring a single gene. The indicator strains that exhibited growth inhibition included Listeria innocua strain CLIP 12612 (ATCC BAA-680), Listeria monocytogenes strain CDC 4555, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 6538, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella typhimurium strain UK-1 (ATCC 68169), and Escherichia coli BAC 49LT ETEC. Inhibition due to either bacteriophage lysis or cytolysin activity was excluded. The growth inhibition of antilisterial Gene+ strains was further tested under different culture conditions. Among the culture media formulations, the MRS agar medium supplemented with 2% (w/v) yeast extract was the best solidified medium for enterocin production. Our findings extend the current knowledge of enterocin-producing enterococci, which may have potential applications as biopreservatives in the food industry due to their capability of controlling food spoilage pathogens.

  18. Multiple conversion between the genes encoding bacterial class-I release factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria require two class-I release factors, RF1 and RF2, that recognize stop codons and promote peptide release from the ribosome. RF1 and RF2 were most likely established through gene duplication followed by altering their stop codon specificities in the common ancestor of extant bacteria. This scenario expects that the two RF gene families have taken independent evolutionary trajectories after the ancestral gene duplication event. However, we here report two independent cases of conversion between RF1 and RF2 genes (RF1-RF2 gene conversion), which were severely examined by procedures incorporating the maximum-likelihood phylogenetic method. In both cases, RF1-RF2 gene conversion was predicted to occur in the region encoding nearly entire domain 3, of which functions are common between RF paralogues. Nevertheless, the ‘direction’ of gene conversion appeared to be opposite from one another—from RF2 gene to RF1 gene in one case, while from RF1 gene to RF2 gene in the other. The two cases of RF1-RF2 gene conversion prompt us to propose two novel aspects in the evolution of bacterial class-I release factors: (i) domain 3 is interchangeable between RF paralogues, and (ii) RF1-RF2 gene conversion have occurred frequently in bacterial genome evolution. PMID:26257102

  19. [Divergence of paralogous growth-hormone-encoding genes and their promoters in Salmonidae].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2017-01-01

    In many fish species, including salmonids, the growth-hormone is encoded by two duplicated paralogous genes, gh1 and gh2. Both genes were already in place at the time of divergence of species in this group. A comparison of the entire sequence of these genes of salmonids has shown that their conserved regions are associated with exons, while their most variable regions correspond to introns. Introns C and D include putative regulatory elements (sites Pit-1, CRE, and ERE), that are also conserved. In chars, the degree of polymorphism of gh2 gene is 2-3 times as large as that in gh1 gene. However, a comparison across all Salmonidae species would not extent this observation to other species. In both these chars' genes, the promoters are conserved mainly because they correspond to putative regulatory sequences (TATA box, binding sites for the pituitary transcription factor Pit-1 (F1-F4), CRE, GRE and RAR/RXR elements). The promoter of gh2 gene has a greater degree of polymorphism compared with gh1 gene promoter in all investigated species of salmonids. The observed differences in the rates of accumulation of changes in growth hormone encoding paralogs could be explained by differences in the intensity of selection.

  20. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  1. Increased mitochondrial-encoded gene transcription in immortal DF-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; You, S; Kim, I J; Farris, J; Foster, L K; Foster, D N

    2001-05-01

    We have established, in continuous cell culture, a spontaneously immortalized chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cell line (DF-1) as well as several other immortal CEF cell lines. The immortal DF-1 cells divided more rapidly than primary and other immortal CEF cells. To identify the genes involved in rapidly dividing DF-1 cells, we have used differential display RT-PCR. Of the numerous genes analyzed, three mitochondrial-encoded genes (ATPase 8/6, 16S rRNA, and cytochrome b) were shown to express at higher levels in DF-1 cells compared to primary and other immortal CEF cells. The inhibition of mitochondrial translation by treatment with chloramphenicol markedly decreased ATP production and cell proliferation in DF-1 cells, while not affecting growth in either primary or other immortal CEF cells. This result suggests a correlation between rapid cell proliferation and the increased mitochondrial respiratory functions. We also determined that the increased transcription of mitochondrial-encoded genes in DF-1 cells is due to increased de novo transcript synthesis as shown by mitochondrial run-on assays, and not the result of either increased mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial transcript half-lives. Together, the present studies suggest that the transcriptional activation of mitochondrial-encoded genes and the elevated respiratory function should be one of the characteristics of rapidly dividing immortal cells. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E.; Segerson, Nicholas A.; Kannan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  3. Expression patterns of genes encoding plasma membrane aquaporins during fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Ren; Li, Dianbo; Xu, Fengfeng; Sun, Qianqian; Zhao, Bin; Mao, Ai-Jun; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels precisely regulating water movement through cell membranes in most living organisms. Despite the advances in the physiology of fruit development, their participation during fruit development in cucumber still barely understood. In this paper, the expressions of 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analyzed during cucumber fruit development in our work. Based on the homology search with known PIPs from rice, Arabidopsis and strawberry, 12 cucumber PIP genes subfamily members were identified. Cellular localization assays indicated that CsPIPs were localized in the plasma membrane. The qRT-PCR analysis of CsPIPs showed that 12 CsPIPs were differentially expressed during fruit development. These results suggest that 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (CsPIPs) play very important roles in cucumber life cycle and the data generated will be helpful in understanding their precise roles during fruit development in cucumber. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA methylation of miRNA-encoding genes in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Gerwin; Altenberger, Corinna; Steiner, Irene; Topakian, Thais; Ziegler, Barbara; Tomasich, Erwin; Lang, György; End-Pfützenreuter, Adelheid; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Döme, Balazs; Arns, Britt-Madeleine; Klepetko, Walter; Zielinski, Christoph C; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine

    2018-03-23

    De-regulated DNA methylation leading to transcriptional inactivation of certain genes occurs frequently in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Besides protein-encoding genes also microRNA (miRNA)-encoding genes may be targets for methylation in NSCLCs, however, the number of known methylated miRNA genes is still small. Thus, we investigated methylation of miRNA genes in primary tumours (TU) and corresponding non-malignant lung tissue samples (NL) of 50 NSCLC patients using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by custom designed tiling microarray analyses (MeDIP-chip) and 252 differentially methylated probes between TU and NL samples were identified. These probes were annotated which resulted in the identification of 34 miRNA-encoding genes with increased methylation in TU specimens. While some of these miRNA-encoding genes were already known to be methylated in NSCLCs (e.g. miR-9-3, miR-124), methylation of the vast majority of them was unknown so far. We selected six miRNA genes (miR-10b, miR-1179, miR-137, miR-572, miR-3150b and miR-129-2) for gene-specific methylation analyses in TU and corresponding NL samples of 104 NSCLC patients and observed a statistically significant increase of methylation of these miRNA genes in TU samples (p<0.0001, respectively). In silico target prediction of the six miRNAs identified several oncogenic/cell proliferation promoting factors (e.g. CCNE1 as miR-1179 target). To investigate if miR-1179 indeed targets CCNE1, we transfected miR-1179 mimics into CCNE1 expressing NSCLC cells and observed down-regulated CCNE1 mRNA expression in these cells compared to control cells. Similar effects on Cyclin E1 expression were seen in Western blot analyses. In addition, we found a statistically significant growth reduction of NSCLC cells transfected with miR-1179 mimics compared to control cells. In conclusion, we identified many methylated miRNA genes in NSCLC patients and found that miR-1179 is a potential tumour cell growth

  5. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  6. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  7. Bioinformatics Analysis of NBS-LRR Encoding Resistance Genes in Setaria italica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Weng, Qiaoyun; Song, Jinhui; Ma, Hailian; Yuan, Jincheng; Dong, Zhiping; Liu, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    In plants, resistance (R) genes are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. The nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes family forms the largest R-gene family among plant genomes and play an important role in plant disease resistance. In this paper, comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes is performed in the whole Setaria italica genome. A total of 96 NBS-LRR genes are identified, and comprehensive overview of the NBS-LRR genes is undertaken, including phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and gene expression. Based on the domain, these genes are divided into two groups and distributed in all Setaria italica chromosomes. Most NBS-LRR genes are located at the distal tip of the long arms of the chromosomes. Setaria italica NBS-LRR proteins share at least one nucleotide-biding domain and one leucine-rich repeat domain. Our results also show the duplication of NBS-LRR genes in Setaria italica is related to their gene structure.

  8. Characterization of two genes encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribonucleotide reductase small subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Curran, S C; Li, L S; Avarbock, D; Graf, J D; Chua, M M; Lu, G; Salem, J; Rubin, H

    1997-01-01

    Two nrdF genes, nrdF1 and nrdF2, encoding the small subunit (R2) of ribonucleotide reductase (RR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis have 71% identity at the amino acid level and are both highly homologous with Salmonella typhimurium R2F. The calculated molecular masses of R2-1 and R2-2 are 36,588 (322 amino acids [aa]) and 36,957 (324 aa) Da, respectively. Western blot analysis of crude M. tuberculosis extracts indicates that both R2s are expressed in vivo. Recombinant R2-2 is enzymatically active when assayed with pure recombinant M. tuberculosis R1 subunit. Both ATP and dATP are activators for CDP reduction up to 2 and 1 mM, respectively. The gene encoding M. tuberculosis R2-1, nrdF1, is not linked to nrdF2, nor is either gene linked to the gene encoding the large subunit, M. tuberculosis nrdE. The gene encoding MTP64 was found downstream from nrdF1, and the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase was found downstream from nrdF2. A nrdA(Ts) strain of E. coli (E101) could be complemented by simultaneous transformation with M. tuberculosis nrdE and nrdF2. An M. tuberculosis nrdF2 variant in which the codon for the catalytically necessary tyrosine was replaced by the phenylalanine codon did not complement E101 when cotransformed with M. tuberculosis nrdE. Similarly, M. tuberculosis nrdF1 and nrdE did not complement E101. Activity of recombinant M. tuberculosis RR was inhibited by incubating the enzyme with a peptide corresponding to the 7 C-terminal amino acid residues of the R2-2 subunit. M. tuberculosis is a species in which a nrdEF system appears to encode the biologically active species of RR and also the only bacterial species identified so far in which class I RR subunits are not arranged on an operon. PMID:9335290

  9. Characterization of Urtica dioica agglutinin isolectins and the encoding gene family.

    PubMed

    Does, M P; Ng, D K; Dekker, H L; Peumans, W J; Houterman, P M; Van Damme, E J; Cornelissen, B J

    1999-01-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) has previously been found in roots and rhizomes of stinging nettles as a mixture of UDA-isolectins. Protein and cDNA sequencing have shown that mature UDA is composed of two hevein domains and is processed from a precursor protein. The precursor contains a signal peptide, two in-tandem hevein domains, a hinge region and a carboxyl-terminal chitinase domain. Genomic fragments encoding precursors for UDA-isolectins have been amplified by five independent polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA from stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo. One amplified gene was completely sequenced. As compared to the published cDNA sequence, the genomic sequence contains, besides two basepair substitutions, two introns located at the same positions as in other plant chitinases. By partial sequence analysis of 40 amplified genes, 16 different genes were identified which encode seven putative UDA-isolectins. The deduced amino acid sequences share 78.9-98.9% identity. In extracts of roots and rhizomes of stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo six out of these seven isolectins were detected by mass spectrometry. One of them is an acidic form, which has not been identified before. Our results demonstrate that UDA is encoded by a large gene family.

  10. Cloning and characterization of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) myostatin encoding gene and its promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengjie; Bai, Junjie; Wang, Lin

    2008-08-01

    Myostatin or GDF-8, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, has been demonstrated to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. In the present study, we obtained a 5.64 kb sequence of myostatin encoding gene and its promoter from largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides). The myostatin encoding gene consisted of three exons (488 bp, 371 bp and 1779 bp, respectively) and two introns (390 bp and 855 bp, respectively). The intron-exon boundaries were conservative in comparison with those of mammalian myostatin encoding genes, whereas the size of introns was smaller than that of mammals. Sequence analysis of 1.569 kb of the largemouth bass myostatin gene promoter region revealed that it contained two TATA boxes, one CAAT box and nine putative E-boxes. Putative muscle growth response elements for myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), serum response factor (SRF), activator protein 1 (AP1), etc., and muscle-specific Mt binding site (MTBF) were also detected. Some of the transcription factor binding sites were conserved among five teleost species. This information will be useful for studying the transcriptional regulation of myostatin in fish.

  11. Intragenome Diversity of Gene Families Encoding Toxin-like Proteins in Venomous Animals.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Giraud, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of venoms is the story of how toxins arise and of the processes that generate and maintain their diversity. For animal venoms these processes include recruitment for expression in the venom gland, neofunctionalization, paralogous expansions, and functional divergence. The systematic study of these processes requires the reliable identification of the venom components involved in antagonistic interactions. High-throughput sequencing has the potential of uncovering the entire set of toxins in a given organism, yet the existence of non-venom toxin paralogs and the misleading effects of partial census of the molecular diversity of toxins make necessary to collect complementary evidence to distinguish true toxins from their non-venom paralogs. Here, we analyzed the whole genomes of two scorpions, one spider and one snake, aiming at the identification of the full repertoires of genes encoding toxin-like proteins. We classified the entire set of protein-coding genes into paralogous groups and monotypic genes, identified genes encoding toxin-like proteins based on known toxin families, and quantified their expression in both venom-glands and pooled tissues. Our results confirm that genes encoding toxin-like proteins are part of multigene families, and that these families arise by recruitment events from non-toxin genes followed by limited expansions of the toxin-like protein coding genes. We also show that failing to account for sequence similarity with non-toxin proteins has a considerable misleading effect that can be greatly reduced by comparative transcriptomics. Our study overall contributes to the understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of proteins involved in antagonistic interactions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase-encoding gene as a potential probe for environmental bacterial isolates capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, G; Lau, P C

    1997-01-01

    Homologs of the glutathione S-transferase (GST)-encoding gene were identified in a collection of aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading Sphingomonas spp. isolated from New Zealand, Antarctica, and the United States by using PCR primers designed from the GST-encoding gene of Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505. Sequence analysis of PCR fragments generated from these isolates and of the GST gene amplified from DNA extracted from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil revealed a high degree of conservation, which may make the GST-encoding gene a potentially useful marker for PAH-degrading bacteria. PMID:9251217

  13. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins. PMID:15777476

  14. The Evolutionary Fate of the Genes Encoding the Purine Catabolic Enzymes in Hominoids, Birds, and Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Thomas, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Gene loss has been proposed to play a major role in adaptive evolution, and recent studies are beginning to reveal its importance in human evolution. However, the potential consequence of a single gene-loss event upon the fates of functionally interrelated genes is poorly understood. Here, we use the purine metabolic pathway as a model system in which to explore this important question. The loss of urate oxidase (UOX) activity, a necessary step in this pathway, has occurred independently in the hominoid and bird/reptile lineages. Because the loss of UOX would have removed the functional constraint upon downstream genes in this pathway, these downstream genes are generally assumed to have subsequently deteriorated. In this study, we used a comparative genomics approach to empirically determine the fate of UOX itself and the downstream genes in five hominoids, two birds, and a reptile. Although we found that the loss of UOX likely triggered the genetic deterioration of the immediate downstream genes in the hominoids, surprisingly in the birds and reptiles, the UOX locus itself and some of the downstream genes were present in the genome and predicted to encode proteins. To account for the variable pattern of gene retention and loss after the inactivation of UOX, we hypothesize that although gene loss is a common fate for genes that have been rendered obsolete due to the upstream loss of an enzyme a metabolic pathway, it is also possible that same lack of constraint will foster the evolution of new functions or allow the optimization of preexisting alternative functions in the downstream genes, thereby resulting in gene retention. Thus, adaptive single-gene losses have the potential to influence the long-term evolutionary fate of functionally interrelated genes. PMID:20106906

  15. The evolutionary fate of the genes encoding the purine catabolic enzymes in hominoids, birds, and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Thomas, James W

    2010-06-01

    Gene loss has been proposed to play a major role in adaptive evolution, and recent studies are beginning to reveal its importance in human evolution. However, the potential consequence of a single gene-loss event upon the fates of functionally interrelated genes is poorly understood. Here, we use the purine metabolic pathway as a model system in which to explore this important question. The loss of urate oxidase (UOX) activity, a necessary step in this pathway, has occurred independently in the hominoid and bird/reptile lineages. Because the loss of UOX would have removed the functional constraint upon downstream genes in this pathway, these downstream genes are generally assumed to have subsequently deteriorated. In this study, we used a comparative genomics approach to empirically determine the fate of UOX itself and the downstream genes in five hominoids, two birds, and a reptile. Although we found that the loss of UOX likely triggered the genetic deterioration of the immediate downstream genes in the hominoids, surprisingly in the birds and reptiles, the UOX locus itself and some of the downstream genes were present in the genome and predicted to encode proteins. To account for the variable pattern of gene retention and loss after the inactivation of UOX, we hypothesize that although gene loss is a common fate for genes that have been rendered obsolete due to the upstream loss of an enzyme a metabolic pathway, it is also possible that same lack of constraint will foster the evolution of new functions or allow the optimization of preexisting alternative functions in the downstream genes, thereby resulting in gene retention. Thus, adaptive single-gene losses have the potential to influence the long-term evolutionary fate of functionally interrelated genes.

  16. Characterization of the aes gene of Escherichia coli encoding an enzyme with esterase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Peist, R; Koch, A; Bolek, P; Sewitz, S; Kolbus, T; Boos, W

    1997-01-01

    malQ mutants of Escherichia coli lacking amylomaltase cannot grow on maltose. They express the maltose system constitutively and are sensitive to maltose when grown on another carbon source. In an attempt to isolate a multicopy suppressor that would result in growth on maltose, we transformed a malQ mutant with a gene bank of E. coli DNA which had been digested with Sau3a and cloned in pBR322. We screened the transformants on MacConkey maltose plates. A colony was isolated that appeared to be resistant to maltose and was pink on these plates, but it was still unable to grow on minimal medium with maltose as the carbon source. The plasmid was isolated, and the gene causing this phenotype was characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of the encoded protein shows homology to that of lipases and esterases. We termed the gene aes, for acetyl esterase. Extracts of cells harboring plasmid-encoded aes under its own promoter exhibit a fivefold higher capacity to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate than do extracts of cells of plasmid-free strains. Similarly, strains harboring plasmid-encoded aes are able to grow on triacetyl glycerol (triacetin) whereas the plasmid-free strains are not. The expression of plasmid-encoded aes resulted in strong repression of the maltose transport genes in malT+ strains (10-fold reduction), but not in a malT(Con) strain which is independent of the inducer. Also, overproduction of MalT counteracted the Aes-dependent repression, indicating a direct interaction between MalT and Aes. PMID:9401025

  17. A tolerance gene for prenylated flavonoid encodes a 26S proteasome regulatory subunit in Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Kamimoto, Yoshihisa; Minami, Shota; Kubo, Mizuki; Ito, Kozue; Moriyasu, Masataka; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2011-01-01

    Yeast functional screening with a Sophora flavescens cDNA library was performed to identify the genes involved in the tolerant mechanism to the self-producing prenylated flavonoid sophoraflavanone G (SFG). One cDNA, which conferred SFG tolerance, encoded a regulatory particle triple-A ATPase 2 (SfRPT2), a member of the 26S proteasome subunit. The yeast transformant of SfRPT2 showed reduced SFG accumulation in the cells.

  18. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Vibrio halioticoli Genes Encoding Three Types of Polyguluronate Lyase.

    PubMed

    Sugimura; Sawabe; Ezura

    2000-01-01

    The alginate lyase-coding genes of Vibrio halioticoli IAM 14596(T), which was isolated from the gut of the abalone Haliotis discus hannai, were cloned using plasmid vector pUC 18, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Three alginate lyase-positive clones, pVHB, pVHC, and pVHE, were obtained, and all clones expressed the enzyme activity specific for polyguluronate. Three genes, alyVG1, alyVG2, and alyVG3, encoding polyguluronate lyase were sequenced: alyVG1 from pVHB was composed of a 1056-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 352 amino acid residues; alyVG2 gene from pVHC was composed of a 993-bp ORF encoding 331 amino acid residues; and alyVG3 gene from pVHE was composed of a 705-bp ORF encoding 235 amino acid residues. Comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among AlyVG1, AlyVG2, and AlyVG3 revealed low homologies. The identity value between AlyVG1 and AlyVG2 was 18.7%, and that between AlyVG2 and AlyVG3 was 17.0%. A higher identity value (26.0%) was observed between AlyVG1 and AlyVG3. Sequence comparison among known polyguluronate lyases including AlyVG1, AlyVG2, and AlyVG3 also did not reveal an identical region in these sequences. However, AlyVG1 showed the highest identity value (36.2%) and the highest similarity (73.3%) to AlyA from Klebsiella pneumoniae. A consensus region comprising nine amino acid (YFKAGXYXQ) in the carboxy-terminal region previously reported by Mallisard and colleagues was observed only in AlyVG1 and AlyVG2.

  19. Enterotoxin-Encoding Genes in Staphylococcus spp. from Food Handlers in a University Restaurant.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sabina Dos Santos Paulino; Cidral, Thiago André; Soares, Maria José dos Santos; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Food handlers carrying enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus are a potential source of food poisoning. The aim of this study was to analyze genes encoding enterotoxins in coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CoPS) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) isolated from the anterior nostrils and hands of food handlers at a university restaurant in the city of Natal, Northeast Brazil. Thirty food handlers were screened for the study. The isolates were subjected to Gram staining, a bacitracin sensitivity test, mannitol fermentation, and catalase and coagulase tests. CoNS and CoPS strains were subsequently identified by a Vitek 2 System (BioMerieux, France) and various biochemical tests. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect genes for enterotoxins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and I (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei) and a disc-diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to several classes of antimicrobials. All food handlers presented staphylococci on their hands and/or noses. The study found 58 Staphylococcus spp., of which 20.7% were CoPS and 79.3% were CoNS. S. epidermidis was the most prevalent species. Twenty-nine staphylococci (50%) were positive for one or more enterotoxin genes, and the most prevalent genes were seg and sei, each with a frequency of 29.3%. Indeed, CoNS encoded a high percentage of enterotoxin genes (43.5%). However, S. aureus encoded even more enterotoxin genes (75%). Most isolates showed sensitivity to the antibiotics used for testing, except for penicillin (only 35% sensitive). The results from this study reinforce that coagulase-negative as well as coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from food handlers are capable of genotypic enterotoxigenicity.

  20. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Antonia M; Jekat, Stephan B; Zielonka, Sascia; Müller, Boje; Neumann, Ulla; Rüping, Boris; Twyman, Richard M; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2012-07-10

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family originally was delimited to genes encoding structural components of forisomes, which are specialized crystalloid phloem proteins found solely in the Fabaceae. More recently, SEO genes discovered in various non-Fabaceae plants were proposed to encode the common phloem proteins (P-proteins) that plug sieve plates after wounding. We carried out a comprehensive characterization of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SEO genes (NtSEO). Reporter genes controlled by the NtSEO promoters were expressed specifically in immature sieve elements, and GFP-SEO fusion proteins formed parietal agglomerates in intact sieve elements as well as sieve plate plugs after wounding. NtSEO proteins with and without fluorescent protein tags formed agglomerates similar in structure to native P-protein bodies when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and the analysis of these protein complexes by electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural features resembling those of native P-proteins. NtSEO-RNA interference lines were essentially devoid of P-protein structures and lost photoassimilates more rapidly after injury than control plants, thus confirming the role of P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore provide direct evidence that SEO genes in tobacco encode P-protein subunits that affect translocation. We also found that peptides recently identified in fascicular phloem P-protein plugs from squash (Cucurbita maxima) represent cucurbit members of the SEO family. Our results therefore suggest a common evolutionary origin for P-proteins found in the sieve elements of all dicotyledonous plants and demonstrate the exceptional status of extrafascicular P-proteins in cucurbits.

  1. Recombinational inactivation of the gene encoding nitrate reductase in Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T S; Linz, J E

    1993-01-01

    Functional disruption of the gene encoding nitrate reductase (niaD) in Aspergillus parasiticus was conducted by two strategies, one-step gene replacement and the integrative disruption. Plasmid pPN-1, in which an internal DNA fragment of the niaD gene was replaced by a functional gene encoding orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (pyrG), was constructed. Plasmid pPN-1 was introduced in linear form into A. parasiticus CS10 (ver-1 wh-1 pyrG) by transformation. Approximately 25% of the uridine prototrophic transformants (pyrG+) were chlorate resistant (Chlr), demonstrating their inability to utilize nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. The genetic block in nitrate utilization was confirmed to occur in the niaD gene by the absence of growth of the A. parasiticus CS10 transformants on medium containing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and the ability to grow on several alternative nitrogen sources. Southern hybridization analysis of Chlr transformants demonstrated that the resident niaD locus was replaced by the nonfunctional allele in pPN-1. To generate an integrative disruption vector (pSKPYRG), an internal fragment of the niaD gene was subcloned into a plasmid containing the pyrG gene as a selectable marker. Circular pSKPYRG was transformed into A. parasiticus CS10. Chlr pyrG+ transformants were screened for nitrate utilization and by Southern hybridization analysis. Integrative disruption of the genomic niaD gene occurred in less than 2% of the transformants. Three gene replacement disruption transformants and two integrative disruption transformants were tested for mitotic stability after growth under nonselective conditions. All five transformants were found to stably retain the Chlr phenotype after growth on nonselective medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8215371

  2. Expression-based clustering of CAZyme-encoding genes of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Gruben, Birgit S; Mäkelä, Miia R; Kowalczyk, Joanna E; Zhou, Miaomiao; Benoit-Gelber, Isabelle; De Vries, Ronald P

    2017-11-23

    The Aspergillus niger genome contains a large repertoire of genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) that are targeted to plant polysaccharide degradation enabling A. niger to grow on a wide range of plant biomass substrates. Which genes need to be activated in certain environmental conditions depends on the composition of the available substrate. Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of a number of transcriptional regulators in plant biomass degradation and have identified sets of target genes for each regulator. In this study, a broad transcriptional analysis was performed of the A. niger genes encoding (putative) plant polysaccharide degrading enzymes. Microarray data focusing on the initial response of A. niger to the presence of plant biomass related carbon sources were analyzed of a wild-type strain N402 that was grown on a large range of carbon sources and of the regulatory mutant strains ΔxlnR, ΔaraR, ΔamyR, ΔrhaR and ΔgalX that were grown on their specific inducing compounds. The cluster analysis of the expression data revealed several groups of co-regulated genes, which goes beyond the traditionally described co-regulated gene sets. Additional putative target genes of the selected regulators were identified, based on their expression profile. Notably, in several cases the expression profile puts questions on the function assignment of uncharacterized genes that was based on homology searches, highlighting the need for more extensive biochemical studies into the substrate specificity of enzymes encoded by these non-characterized genes. The data also revealed sets of genes that were upregulated in the regulatory mutants, suggesting interaction between the regulatory systems and a therefore even more complex overall regulatory network than has been reported so far. Expression profiling on a large number of substrates provides better insight in the complex regulatory systems that drive the conversion of plant biomass by fungi. In

  3. Codon usage analysis of photolyase encoding genes of cyanobacteria inhabiting diverse habitats.

    PubMed

    Rajneesh; Pathak, Jainendra; Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Singh, Shailendra P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2017-07-01

    Nucleotide and amino acid compositions were studied to determine the genomic and structural relationship of photolyase gene in freshwater, marine and hot spring cyanobacteria. Among three habitats, photolyase encoding genes from hot spring cyanobacteria were found to have highest GC content. The genomic GC content was found to influence the codon usage and amino acid variability in photolyases. The third position of codon was found to have more effect on amino acid variability in photolyases than the first and second positions of codon. The variation of amino acids Ala, Asp, Glu, Gly, His, Leu, Pro, Gln, Arg and Val in photolyases of three different habitats was found to be controlled by first position of codon (G1C1). However, second position (G2C2) of codon regulates variation of Ala, Cys, Gly, Pro, Arg, Ser, Thr and Tyr contents in photolyases. Third position (G3C3) of codon controls incorporation of amino acids such as Ala, Phe, Gly, Leu, Gln, Pro, Arg, Ser, Thr and Tyr in photolyases from three habitats. Photolyase encoding genes of hot spring cyanobacteria have 85% codons with G or C at third position, whereas marine and freshwater cyanobacteria showed 82 and 60% codons, respectively, with G or C at third position. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that GC content has a profound effect in separating the genes along the first major axis according to their RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage) values, and neutrality analysis indicated that mutational pressure has resulted in codon bias in photolyase genes of cyanobacteria.

  4. Genome analysis and identification of gelatinase encoded gene in Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahimi, Safiyyah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Khalid, Rozida Abdul; Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Lamri, Mohd Fadly; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, bioinformatic analysis towards genome sequence of E. aerogenes was done to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hot spring water and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and fish gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species gelatine, respectively. Enterobacter aerogenes was partially genome sequenced resulting in 5.0 mega basepair (Mbp) total size of sequence. From pre-process pipeline, 87.6 Mbp of total reads, 68.8 Mbp of total high quality reads and 78.58 percent of high quality percentage was determined. Genome assembly produced 120 contigs with 67.5% of contigs over 1 kilo base pair (kbp), 124856 bp of N50 contig length and 55.17 % of GC base content percentage. About 4705 protein gene was identified from protein prediction analysis. Two candidate genes selected have highest similarity identity percentage against gelatinase enzyme available in Swiss-Prot and NCBI online database. They were NODE_9_length_26866_cov_148.013245_12 containing 1029 base pair (bp) sequence with 342 amino acid sequence and NODE_24_length_155103_cov_177.082458_62 which containing 717 bp sequence with 238 amino acid sequence, respectively. Thus, two paired of primers (forward and reverse) were designed, based on the open reading frame (ORF) of selected genes. Genome analysis of E. aerogenes resulting genes encoded gelatinase were identified.

  5. The dhnA gene of Escherichia coli encodes a class I fructose bisphosphate aldolase.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, G J; Howlett, G J; Ashcroft, A E; Berry, A

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding the Escherichia coli Class I fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBP aldolase) has been cloned and the protein overproduced in high amounts. This gene sequence has previously been identified as encoding an E. coli dehydrin in the GenBanktrade mark database [gene dhnA; entry code U73760; Close and Choi (1996) Submission to GenBanktrade mark]. However, the purified protein overproduced from the dhnA gene shares all its properties with those known for the E. coli Class I FBP aldolase. The protein is an 8-10-mer with a native molecular mass of approx. 340 kDa, each subunit consisting of 349 amino acids. The Class I enzyme shows low sequence identity with other known FBP aldolases, both Class I and Class II (in the order of 20%), which may be reflected by some novel properties of this FBP aldolase. The active-site peptide has been isolated and the Schiff-base-forming lysine residue (Lys236) has been identified by a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, kinetics and electrospray-ionization MS. A second lysine residue (Lys238) has been implicated in substrate binding. The cloning of this gene and the high levels of overexpression obtained will facilitate future structure-function studies. PMID:9531482

  6. The Stress-Responsive dgk Gene from Streptococcus mutans Encodes a Putative Undecaprenol Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Maciej; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed a previously constructed stress-sensitive Streptococcus mutans mutant Tn-1 strain resulting from disruption by transposon Tn916 of a gene encoding a protein exhibiting amino acid sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase. It was confirmed that the mutation led to significantly reduced lipid kinase activity, while expression of the intact gene on a plasmid restored both kinase activity and the wild-type phenotype. Further analysis revealed that the product of the dgk gene in S. mutans predominantly recognizes a lipid substrate other than diacylglycerol, most likely undecaprenol, as demonstrated by its efficient phosphorylation and the resistance of the product of the reaction to saponification. The physiological role of the product of the dgk gene as a putative undecaprenol kinase was further supported by a significantly higher sensitivity of the mutant to bacitracin compared with that of the parental strain. PMID:12654811

  7. Harvesting of novel polyhydroxyalkanaote (PHA) synthase encoding genes from a soil metagenome library using phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Schallmey, Marcus; Ly, Anh; Wang, Chunxia; Meglei, Gabriela; Voget, Sonja; Streit, Wolfgang R; Driscoll, Brian T; Charles, Trevor C

    2011-08-01

    We previously reported the construction of metagenomic libraries in the IncP cosmid vector pRK7813, enabling heterologous expression of these broad-host-range libraries in multiple bacterial hosts. Expressing these libraries in Sinorhizobium meliloti, we have successfully complemented associated phenotypes of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis mutants. DNA sequence analysis of three clones indicates that the complementing genes are homologous to, but substantially different from, known polyhydroxyalkanaote synthase-encoding genes. Thus we have demonstrated the ability to isolate diverse genes for polyhydroxyalkanaote synthesis by functional complementation of defined mutants. Such genes might be of use in the engineering of more efficient systems for the industrial production of bioplastics. The use of functional complementation will also provide a vehicle to probe the genetics of polyhydroxyalkanaote metabolism and its relation to carbon availability in complex microbial assemblages. 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiplex PCR for Rapid Detection of Genes Encoding Class A Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang Sook; Kim, Kyeongmi; Huh, Ji Young; Jung, Bochan; Kang, Myung Seo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing reports of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Korea. The modified Hodge test can be used as a phenotypic screening test for class A carbapenamase (CAC)-producing clinical isolates; however, it does not distinguish between carbapenemase types. The confirmation of type of CAC is important to ensure optimal therapy and to prevent transmission. This study applied a novel multiplex PCR assay to detect and differentiate CAC genes in a single reaction. Four primer pairs were designed to amplify fragments encoding 4 CAC families (SME, IMI/NMC-A, KPC, and GES). The multiplex PCR detected all genes tested for 4 CAC families that could be differentiated by fragment size according to gene type. This multiplex PCR offers a simple and useful approach for detecting and distinguishing CAC genes in carbapenem-resistant strains that are metallo-β-lactamase nonproducers. PMID:22950072

  9. Multiplex PCR for rapid detection of genes encoding class A carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Sook; Kim, Kyeongmi; Huh, Ji Young; Jung, Bochan; Kang, Myung Seo; Hong, Seong Geun

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing reports of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Korea. The modified Hodge test can be used as a phenotypic screening test for class A carbapenamase (CAC)-producing clinical isolates; however, it does not distinguish between carbapenemase types. The confirmation of type of CAC is important to ensure optimal therapy and to prevent transmission. This study applied a novel multiplex PCR assay to detect and differentiate CAC genes in a single reaction. Four primer pairs were designed to amplify fragments encoding 4 CAC families (SME, IMI/NMC-A, KPC, and GES). The multiplex PCR detected all genes tested for 4 CAC families that could be differentiated by fragment size according to gene type. This multiplex PCR offers a simple and useful approach for detecting and distinguishing CAC genes in carbapenem-resistant strains that are metallo-β-lactamase nonproducers.

  10. A Putative Gene Cluster from a Lyngbya wollei Bloom that Encodes Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Troco K.; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds. PMID:21347365

  11. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  12. A Bacillus subtilis Gene Induced by Cold Shock Encodes a Membrane Phospholipid Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Pablo S.; Cronan, John E.; de Mendoza, Diego

    1998-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis grown at 37°C synthesizes saturated fatty acids with only traces of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). However, when cultures growing at 37°C are transferred to 20°C, UFA synthesis is induced. We report the identification and characterization of the gene encoding the fatty acid desaturase of B. subtilis. This gene, called des, was isolated by complementation of Escherichia coli strains with mutations in either of two different genes of UFA synthesis. The des gene encodes a polypeptide of 352 amino acid residues containing the three conserved histidine cluster motifs and two putative membrane-spanning domains characteristic of the membrane-bound desaturases of plants and cyanobacteria. Expression of the des gene in E. coli resulted in desaturation of palmitic acid moieties of the membrane phospholipids to give the novel mono-UFA cis-5-hexadecenoic acid, indicating that the B. subtilis des gene product is a Δ5 acyl-lipid desaturase. The des gene was disrupted, and the resulting null mutant strains were unable to synthesize UFAs upon a shift to low growth temperatures. The des null mutant strain grew as well as its congenic parent at 20 or 37°C but showed severely reduced survival during stationary phase. Analysis of operon fusions in which the des promoter directed the synthesis of a lacZ reporter gene showed that des expression is repressed at 37°C, but a shift of cultures from 37 to 20°C resulted in a 10- to 15-fold increase in transcription. This is the first report of a membrane phospholipid desaturase in a nonphotosynthetic organism and the first direct evidence for cold induction of a desaturase. PMID:9555904

  13. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Wu, Jiayao; Song, Hyeunjeong; Asiegbu, Fred O; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi.

  14. Molecular characterization of genes encoding inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in the bed bug (Cimex lectularius).

    PubMed

    Mamidala, Praveen; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Jones, Susan C; Piermarini, Peter M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-04-01

    The molecular genetics of inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in insects is poorly understood. To date, Kir channel genes have been characterized only from a few representative dipterans (i.e., fruit flies and mosquitoes). The goal of the present study was to characterize Kir channel cDNAs in a hemipteran, the bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Using our previously reported bed bug transcriptome (RNA-seq), we identified two cDNAs that encode putative Kir channels. One was a full-length cDNA that encodes a protein belonging to the insect 'Kir3' clade, which we designate as 'ClKir3'. The other was a partial cDNA that encodes a protein with similarity to both the insect 'Kir1' and 'Kir2' clades, which we designate as 'ClKir1/2'. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ClKir1/2 and ClKir3 exhibited peak expression levels in late-instar nymphs and early-instar nymphs, respectively. Furthermore, ClKir3, but not ClKir1/2, showed tissue-specific expression in Malpighian tubules of adult bed bugs. Lastly, using an improved procedure for delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to male and female bed bugs (via the cervical membrane) we demonstrate rapid and systemic knockdown of ClKir3 transcripts. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the bed bug possesses at least two genes encoding Kir channels, and that RNAi is possible for at least Kir3, thereby offering a potential approach for elucidating the roles of Kir channel genes in bed bug physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L37 is encoded by duplicate genes that are differentially expressed.

    PubMed

    Tornow, J; Santangelo, G M

    1994-06-01

    A duplicate copy of the RPL37A gene (encoding ribosomal protein L37) was cloned and sequenced. The coding region of RPL37B is very similar to that of RPL37A, with only one conservative amino-acid difference. However, the intron and flanking sequences of the two genes are extremely dissimilar. Disruption experiments indicate that the two loci are not functionally equivalent: disruption of RPL37B was insignificant, but disruption of RPL37A severely impaired the growth rate of the cell. When both RPL37 loci are disrupted, the cell is unable to grow at all, indicating that rpL37 is an essential protein. The functional disparity between the two RPL37 loci could be explained by differential gene expression. The results of two experiments support this idea: gene fusion of RPL37A to a reporter gene resulted in six-fold higher mRNA levels than was generated by the same reporter gene fused to RPL37B, and a modest increase in gene dosage of RPL37B overcame the lack of a functional RPL37A gene.

  16. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yonglun; Blechingberg, Jenny; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders D; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-11-14

    FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins.

  17. Virulence properties of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus food isolates encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin gene.

    PubMed

    Sudagidan, Mert; Aydin, Ali

    2010-04-15

    In this study, three Panton-Valentine Leukocidin gene carrying methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains (M1-AAG42B, PY30C-b and YF1B-b) were isolated from different food samples in Kesan-Edirne, Turkey. These strains were characterized on the basis of MLST type, spa type, virulence factor gene contents, antibiotic susceptibilities against 21 antibiotics and biofilm formation. The genetic relatedness of the strains was determined by PFGE. In addition, the complete gene sequences of lukS-PV and lukF-PV were also investigated. All strains were found to be susceptible to tested antibiotics and they were mecA negative. Three strains showed the same PFGE band pattern, ST152 clonal type and t355 spa type. In the detection of virulence factor genes, sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei, sej, sek, sel, sem, sen, seo, sep, seq, seu, eta, etb, set1, geh and tst genes were not detected. All strains showed the positive results for alpha- and beta-haemolysin genes (hla and hlb), protease encoding genes (sspA, sspB and aur), lukE and lukD leukocidin genes (lukED). The strains were found to be non-biofilm formers. By this study, the virulence properties of the strains were described and this is one of the first reports regarding PVL-positive MSSA strains from food. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Multiple Spidroin 1 Genes Encoding Major Ampullate Silk Proteins in Nephila clavipes

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, William A.; Marcotte, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by non-repetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We have experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species. PMID:18828837

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Mapping of NBS-Encoding Resistance Genes in Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Roberto; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Mostajo, Nelly; Orjeda, Gisella

    2012-01-01

    The majority of disease resistance (R) genes identified to date in plants encode a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain containing protein. Additional domains such as coiled-coil (CC) and TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains can also be present. In the recently sequenced Solanum tuberosum group phureja genome we used HMM models and manual curation to annotate 435 NBS-encoding R gene homologs and 142 NBS-derived genes that lack the NBS domain. Highly similar homologs for most previously documented Solanaceae R genes were identified. A surprising ∼41% (179) of the 435 NBS-encoding genes are pseudogenes primarily caused by premature stop codons or frameshift mutations. Alignment of 81.80% of the 577 homologs to S. tuberosum group phureja pseudomolecules revealed non-random distribution of the R-genes; 362 of 470 genes were found in high density clusters on 11 chromosomes. PMID:22493716

  1. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N.; Simmons, Shaneka S.; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Ayensu, Wellington K.; Cohly, Hari H.; Brown, Shyretha D.; Dates, Centdrika R.; Hentz, Sonya D.; Hughes, Shawntae J.; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R.; Patterson, Carvey O.; Sims, Jennifer N.; Turner, Kelisha T.; Williams, Baraka S.; Johnson, Matilda O.; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V.; Anumudu, Chiaka I.; Adeoye, Grace O.; Thomas, Bolaji N.; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  3. Characterization and expression of genes encoding three small heat shock proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-12-12

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens.

  4. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens. PMID:25514417

  5. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding for a nucleotidase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Caballo, Cristina; Lambert, Rocío; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Nucleotidases are phosphatases that catalyze the removal of phosphate from nucleotides, compounds with an important role in plant metabolism. A phosphatase enzyme, with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate previously identified and purified in embryonic axes from French bean, has been analyzed by MALDI TOF/TOF and two internal peptides have been obtained. The information of these peptide sequences has been used to search in the genome database and only a candidate gene that encodes for the phosphatase was identified (PvNTD1). The putative protein contains the conserved domains (motif I-IV) for haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases superfamily. The residues involved in the catalytic activity are also conserved. A recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli has shown molybdate resistant phosphatase activity with nucleosides monophosphate as substrate, confirming that the identified gene encodes for the phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides purified in French bean embryonic axes. The activity of the purified protein was inhibited by adenosine. The expression of PvNTD1 gene was induced at the specific moment of radicle protrusion in embryonic axes. The gene was also highly expressed in young leaves whereas the level of expression in mature tissues was minimal. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  7. SUI-family genes encode phosphatidylserine synthases and regulate stem development in rice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hengfu; Gao, Peng; Liu, Chengwu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhongchi; Luo, Da

    2013-01-01

    In vascular plants, the regulation of stem cell niche determines development of aerial shoot which consists of stems and lateral organs. Intercalary meristem (IM) controls internode elongation in rice and other grasses, however little attention has been paid to the underlying mechanism of stem cell maintenance. Here, we investigated the stem development in rice and showed that the Shortened Uppermost Internode 1 (SUI1) family of genes are pivotal for development of rice stems. We demonstrated that SUI-family genes regulate the development of IM for internode elongation and also the cell expansion of the panicle stem rachis in rice. The SUI-family genes encoded base-exchange types of phosphatidylserine synthases (PSSs), which possessed enzymatic activity in a yeast complementary assay. Overexpression of SUI1 and SUI2 caused outgrowths of internodes during vegetative development, and we showed that expression patterns of Oryza Sativa Homeobox 15 (OSH15) and Histone4 were impaired. Furthermore, genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that overexpression and RNA knockdown of SUI-family genes affected downstream gene expression related to phospholipid metabolic pathways. Moreover, using Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry, we analyzed PS contents in different genetic backgrounds of rice and showed that the quantity of very long chain fatty acids PS is affected by transgene of SUI-family genes. Our study reveals a new mechanism conveyed by the SUI1 pathway and provides evidence to link lipid metabolism with plant stem cell maintenance.

  8. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocca, Jennifer D.; Hall, Edward K.; Lennon, Jay T.; Evans, Sarah E.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Cotner, James B.; Nemergut, Diana R.; Graham, Emily B.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes.

  9. Sequence of a second gene encoding bovine submaxillary mucin: implication for mucin heterogeneity and cloning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Woitach, J T; Gupta, D; Bhavanandan, V P

    1998-10-20

    Secreted epithelial mucins are extremely large and heterogeneous glycoproteins. We report the 5 kilobase DNA sequence of a second gene, BSM2, which encodes bovine submaxillary mucin. The determined nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of BSM2 are 95.2% and 92. 2% identical, respectively, to those of the previously described BSM1 gene isolated from the same cow. Further, the five predicted protein domains of the two genes are 100%, 94%, 93%, 77%, and 88% identical. Based on the above results, we propose that expression of multiple homologous core proteins from a single animal is a factor in generating diversity of saccharides in mucins and in providing resistance of the molecules to proteolysis. In addition, this work raises several important issues in mucin cloning such as assembling sequences from seemingly overlapping clones and deducing consensus sequences for nearly identical tandem repeats. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  10. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding IMP dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Collart, F R; Osipiuk, J; Trent, J; Olsen, G J; Huberman, E

    1996-10-03

    We have cloned and characterized the gene encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Arabidopsis thaliana (At). The transcription unit of the At gene spans approximately 1900 bp and specifies a protein of 503 amino acids with a calculated relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 54,190. The gene is comprised of a minimum of four introns and five exons with all donor and acceptor splice sequences conforming to previously proposed consensus sequences. The deduced IMPDH amino-acid sequence from At shows a remarkable similarity to other eukaryotic IMPDH sequences, with a 48% identity to human Type II enzyme. Allowing for conservative substitutions, the enzyme is 69% similar to human Type II IMPDH. The putative active-site sequence of At IMPDH conforms to the IMP dehydrogenase/guanosine monophosphate reductase motif and contains an essential active-site cysteine residue.

  11. Novel β-catenin target genes identified in thalamic neurons encode modulators of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background LEF1/TCF transcription factors and their activator β-catenin are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway. Although Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, its possible role in the adult brain remains enigmatic. To address this issue, we sought to identify the genetic program activated by β-catenin in neurons. We recently showed that β-catenin accumulates specifically in thalamic neurons where it activates Cacna1g gene expression. In the present study, we combined bioinformatics and experimental approaches to find new β-catenin targets in the adult thalamus. Results We first selected the genes with at least two conserved LEF/TCF motifs within the regulatory elements. The resulting list of 428 putative LEF1/TCF targets was significantly enriched in known Wnt targets, validating our approach. Functional annotation of the presumed targets also revealed a group of 41 genes, heretofore not associated with Wnt pathway activity, that encode proteins involved in neuronal signal transmission. Using custom polymerase chain reaction arrays, we profiled the expression of these genes in the rat forebrain. We found that nine of the analyzed genes were highly expressed in the thalamus compared with the cortex and hippocampus. Removal of nuclear β-catenin from thalamic neurons in vitro by introducing its negative regulator Axin2 reduced the expression of six of the nine genes. Immunoprecipitation of chromatin from the brain tissues confirmed the interaction between β-catenin and some of the predicted LEF1/TCF motifs. The results of these experiments validated four genes as authentic and direct targets of β-catenin: Gabra3 for the receptor of GABA neurotransmitter, Calb2 for the Ca2+-binding protein calretinin, and the Cacna1g and Kcna6 genes for voltage-gated ion channels. Two other genes from the latter cluster, Cacna2d2 and Kcnh8, appeared to be regulated by β-catenin, although the binding of β-catenin to the

  12. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-04

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  13. The genes encoding fructose bisphosphate aldolase in Trypanosoma brucei are interspersed with unrelated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayasarathy, S; Ernest, I; Itzhaki, J E; Sherman, D; Mowatt, M R; Michels, P A; Clayton, C E

    1990-01-01

    The fructose bisphosphate aldolase genes of Trypanosoma brucei are interspersed with unrelated genes whose transcript levels show no developmental modulation. Transcription appears approximately constant across the entire locus, suggesting that aldolase mRNA abundance is regulated post-transcriptionally. Images PMID:2349093

  14. Genes encoding cuticular proteins are components of the Nimrod gene cluster in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cinege, Gyöngyi; Zsámboki, János; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Uv, Anne; Csordás, Gábor; Honti, Viktor; Gábor, Erika; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Varga, Gergely I B; Kovács, Attila L; Juhász, Gábor; Williams, Michael J; Andó, István; Kurucz, Éva

    2017-08-01

    The Nimrod gene cluster, located on the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, is the largest synthenic unit of the Drosophila genome. Nimrod genes show blood cell specific expression and code for phagocytosis receptors that play a major role in fruit fly innate immune functions. We previously identified three homologous genes (vajk-1, vajk-2 and vajk-3) located within the Nimrod cluster, which are unrelated to the Nimrod genes, but are homologous to a fourth gene (vajk-4) located outside the cluster. Here we show that, unlike the Nimrod candidates, the Vajk proteins are expressed in cuticular structures of the late embryo and the late pupa, indicating that they contribute to cuticular barrier functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genes encoding novel lipid transporters and their use to increase oil production in vegetative tissues of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Changcheng; Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi

    The present invention discloses a novel gene encoding a transporter protein trigalactosyldiacylglycerol-5 (TGD5), mutations thereof and their use to enhance TAG production and retention in plant vegetative tissue.

  16. Identification of the Gene Encoding Isoprimeverose-producing Oligoxyloglucan Hydrolase in Aspergillus oryzae*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae produces a unique β-glucosidase, isoprimeverose-producing oligoxyloglucan hydrolase (IPase), that recognizes and releases isoprimeverose (α-d-xylopyranose-(1→6)-d-glucopyranose) units from the non-reducing ends of oligoxyloglucans. A gene encoding A. oryzae IPase, termed ipeA, was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. With the exception of cellobiose, IpeA hydrolyzes a variety of oligoxyloglucans and is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 3. Xylopyranosyl branching at the non-reducing ends was vital for IPase activity, and galactosylation at a α-1,6-linked xylopyranosyl side chain completely abolished IpeA activity. Hepta-oligoxyloglucan saccharide (Xyl3Glc4) substrate was preferred over tri- (Xyl1Glc2) and tetra- (Xyl2Glc2) oligoxyloglucan saccharides substrates. IpeA transferred isoprimeverose units to other saccharides, indicating transglycosylation activity. The ipeA gene was expressed in xylose and xyloglucan media and was strongly induced in the presence of xyloglucan endo-xyloglucanase-hydrolyzed products. This is the first study to report the identification of a gene encoding IPase in eukaryotes. PMID:26755723

  17. Role of sequence encoded κB DNA geometry in gene regulation by Dorsal

    PubMed Central

    Mrinal, Nirotpal; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins of the Rel family can act as both transcriptional activators and repressors. However, mechanism that discerns the ‘activator/repressor’ functions of Rel-proteins such as Dorsal (Drosophila homologue of mammalian NFκB) is not understood. Using genomic, biophysical and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that the underlying principle of this functional specificity lies in the ‘sequence-encoded structure’ of the κB-DNA. We show that Dorsal-binding motifs exist in distinct activator and repressor conformations. Molecular dynamics of DNA-Dorsal complexes revealed that repressor κB-motifs typically have A-tract and flexible conformation that facilitates interaction with co-repressors. Deformable structure of repressor motifs, is due to changes in the hydrogen bonding in A:T pair in the ‘A-tract’ core. The sixth nucleotide in the nonameric κB-motif, ‘A’ (A6) in the repressor motifs and ‘T’ (T6) in the activator motifs, is critical to confer this functional specificity as A6 → T6 mutation transformed flexible repressor conformation into a rigid activator conformation. These results highlight that ‘sequence encoded κB DNA-geometry’ regulates gene expression by exerting allosteric effect on binding of Rel proteins which in turn regulates interaction with co-regulators. Further, we identified and characterized putative repressor motifs in Dl-target genes, which can potentially aid in functional annotation of Dorsal gene regulatory network. PMID:21890896

  18. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has themore » same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.« less

  19. Pollen specific expression of maize genes encoding actin depolymerizing factor-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, I; Anthony, R G; Maciver, S K; Jiang, C J; Khan, S; Weeds, A G; Hussey, P J

    1996-01-01

    In pollen development, a dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton takes place during the passage of the pollen grain into dormancy and on activation of pollen tube growth. A role for actin-binding proteins is implicated and we report here the identification of a small gene family in maize that encodes actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)-like proteins. The ADF group of proteins are believed to control actin polymerization and depolymerization in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Two of the maize genes ZmABP1 and ZmABP2 are expressed specifically in pollen and germinating pollen suggesting that the protein products may be involved in pollen actin reorganization. A third gene, ZmABP3, encodes a protein only 56% and 58% identical to ZmABP1 and ZmABP2, respectively, and its expression is suppressed in pollen and germinated pollen. The fundamental biochemical characteristics of the ZmABP proteins has been elucidated using bacterially expressed ZmABP3 protein. This has the ability to bind monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, it decreases the viscosity of polymerized actin solutions consistent with an ability to depolymerize filaments. These biochemical characteristics, taken together with the sequence comparisons, support the inclusion of the ZmABP proteins in the ADF group. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8693008

  20. Comparative architecture of silks, fibrous proteins and their encoding genes in insects and spiders.

    PubMed

    Craig, Catherine L; Riekel, Christian

    2002-12-01

    The known silk fibroins and fibrous glues are thought to be encoded by members of the same gene family. All silk fibroins sequenced to date contain regions of long-range order (crystalline regions) and/or short-range order (non-crystalline regions). All of the sequenced fibroin silks (Flag or silk from flagelliform gland in spiders; Fhc or heavy chain fibroin silks produced by Lepidoptera larvae) are made up of hierarchically organized, repetitive arrays of amino acids. Fhc fibroin genes are characterized by a similar molecular genetic architecture of two exons and one intron, but the organization and size of these units differs. The Flag, Ser (sericin gene) and BR (Balbiani ring genes; both fibrous proteins) genes are made up of multiple exons and introns. Sequences coding for crystalline and non-crystalline protein domains are integrated in the repetitive regions of Fhc and MA exons, but not in the protein glues Ser1 and BR-1. Genetic 'hot-spots' promote recombination errors in Fhc, MA, and Flag. Codon bias, structural constraint, point mutations, and shortened coding arrays may be alternative means of stabilizing precursor mRNA transcripts. Differential regulation of gene expression and selective splicing of the mRNA transcript may allow rapid adaptation of silk functional properties to different physical environments.

  1. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  2. Directed mutagenesis of the Rickettsia prowazekii pld gene encoding phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Lonnie O; Yu, Xue-jie; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Yan; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, David H; Tucker, Aimee M; Wood, David O

    2009-08-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligately intracytoplasmic bacterium, a lifestyle that imposes significant barriers to genetic manipulation. The key to understanding how this unique bacterium evades host immunity is the mutagenesis of selected genes hypothesized to be involved in virulence. The R. prowazekii pld gene, encoding a protein with phospholipase D activity, has been associated with phagosomal escape. To demonstrate the feasibility of site-directed knockout mutagenesis of rickettsial genes and to generate a nonrevertible vaccine strain, we utilized homologous recombination to generate a pld mutant of the virulent R. prowazekii strain Madrid Evir. Using linear DNA for transformation, a double-crossover event resulted in the replacement of the rickettsial wild-type gene with a partially deleted pld gene. Linear DNA was used to prevent potentially revertible single-crossover events resulting in plasmid insertion. Southern blot and PCR analyses were used to confirm the presence of the desired mutation and to demonstrate clonality. While no phenotypic differences were observed between the mutant and wild-type strains when grown in tissue culture, the pld mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in the guinea pig model. In addition, animals immunized with the mutant strain were protected against subsequent challenge with the virulent Breinl strain, suggesting that this transformant could serve as a nonrevertible, attenuated vaccine strain. This study demonstrates the feasibility of generating site-directed rickettsial gene mutants, providing a new tool for understanding rickettsial biology and furthering advances in the prevention of epidemic typhus.

  3. Identification and functional analysis of the NLP-encoding genes from the phytopathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Huang, Shen-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Sheng, Gui-Lin; Li, Yan-Peng; Zhu, Feng

    2018-03-23

    Phytophthora capsici is a hemibiotrophic, phytopathogenic oomycete that infects a wide range of crops, resulting in significant economic losses worldwide. By means of a diverse arsenal of secreted effector proteins, hemibiotrophic pathogens may manipulate plant cell death to establish a successful infection and colonization. In this study, we described the analysis of the gene family encoding necrosis- and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1)-like proteins (NLPs) in P. capsici, and identified 39 real NLP genes and 26 NLP pseudogenes. Out of the 65 predicted NLP genes, 48 occur in groups with two or more genes, whereas the remainder appears to be singletons distributed randomly among the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the 39 real NLPs delineated three groups. Key residues/motif important for the effector activities are degenerated in most NLPs, including the nlp24 peptide consisting of the conserved region I (11-aa immunogenic part) and conserved region II (the heptapeptide GHRHDWE motif) that is important for phytotoxic activity. Transcriptional profiling of eight selected NLP genes indicated that they were differentially expressed during the developmental and plant infection phases of P. capsici. Functional analysis of ten cloned NLPs demonstrated that Pc11951, Pc107869, Pc109174 and Pc118548 were capable of inducing cell death in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and hot pepper. This study provides an overview of the P. capsici NLP gene family, laying a foundation for further elucidating the pathogenicity mechanism of this devastating pathogen.

  4. Systematic asymmetric nucleotide exchanges produce human mitochondrial RNAs cryptically encoding for overlapping protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2013-05-07

    GenBank's EST database includes RNAs matching exactly human mitochondrial sequences assuming systematic asymmetric nucleotide exchange-transcription along exchange rules: A→G→C→U/T→A (12 ESTs), A→U/T→C→G→A (4 ESTs), C→G→U/T→C (3 ESTs), and A→C→G→U/T→A (1 EST), no RNAs correspond to other potential asymmetric exchange rules. Hypothetical polypeptides translated from nucleotide-exchanged human mitochondrial protein coding genes align with numerous GenBank proteins, predicted secondary structures resemble their putative GenBank homologue's. Two independent methods designed to detect overlapping genes (one based on nucleotide contents analyses in relation to replicative deamination gradients at third codon positions, and circular code analyses of codon contents based on frame redundancy), confirm nucleotide-exchange-encrypted overlapping genes. Methods converge on which genes are most probably active, and which not, and this for the various exchange rules. Mean EST lengths produced by different nucleotide exchanges are proportional to (a) extents that various bioinformatics analyses confirm the protein coding status of putative overlapping genes; (b) known kinetic chemistry parameters of the corresponding nucleotide substitutions by the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (nucleotide DNA misinsertion rates); (c) stop codon densities in predicted overlapping genes (stop codon readthrough and exchanging polymerization regulate gene expression by counterbalancing each other). Numerous rarely expressed proteins seem encoded within regular mitochondrial genes through asymmetric nucleotide exchange, avoiding lengthening genomes. Intersecting evidence between several independent approaches confirms the working hypothesis status of gene encryption by systematic nucleotide exchanges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and characterization of an oleate hydratase-encoding gene from Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Hennessey, Alan A; Brodhun, Florian; Ross, R Paul; Feussner, Ivo; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are common commensals of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have suggested that a bifidobacterial myosin cross reactive antigen (MCRA) protein plays a role in bacterial stress tolerance, while this protein has also been linked to the biosynthesis of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in bifidobacteria. In order to increase our understanding on the role of MCRA in bifidobacteria we created and analyzed an insertion mutant of the MCRA-encoding gene of B. breve NCFB 2258. Our results demonstrate that the MCRA protein of B. breve NCFB 2258 does not appear to play a role in CLA production, yet is an oleate hydratase, which contributes to bifidobacterial solvent stress protection.

  6. Identification and characterization of an oleate hydratase-encoding gene from Bifidobacterium breve

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Hennessey, Alan A; Brodhun, Florian; Ross, R Paul; Feussner, Ivo; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are common commensals of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have suggested that a bifidobacterial myosin cross reactive antigen (MCRA) protein plays a role in bacterial stress tolerance, while this protein has also been linked to the biosynthesis of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in bifidobacteria. In order to increase our understanding on the role of MCRA in bifidobacteria we created and analyzed an insertion mutant of the MCRA-encoding gene of B. breve NCFB 2258. Our results demonstrate that the MCRA protein of B. breve NCFB 2258 does not appear to play a role in CLA production, yet is an oleate hydratase, which contributes to bifidobacterial solvent stress protection. PMID:23851389

  7. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Irie, S; Doi, S; Yorifuji, T; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed. Images PMID:3667527

  8. Expression Analysis of the Theileria parva Subtelomere-Encoded Variable Secreted Protein Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Stéfanie; Affentranger, Sarah; Parvanova, Iana; Kang'a, Simon; Nene, Vishvanath; Katzer, Frank; McKeever, Declan; Müller, Joachim; Bishop, Richard; Pain, Arnab; Dobbelaere, Dirk A. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva transforms bovine lymphocytes inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Proteins released from the parasite are assumed to contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell and parasite persistence. With 85 members, genes encoding subtelomeric variable secreted proteins (SVSPs) form the largest gene family in T. parva. The majority of SVSPs contain predicted signal peptides, suggesting secretion into the host cell cytoplasm. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed SVSP expression in T. parva-transformed cell lines established in vitro by infection of T or B lymphocytes with cloned T. parva parasites. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed mRNA expression for a wide range of SVSP genes. The pattern of mRNA expression was largely defined by the parasite genotype and not by host background or cell type, and found to be relatively stable in vitro over a period of two months. Interestingly, immunofluorescence analysis carried out on cell lines established from a cloned parasite showed that expression of a single SVSP encoded by TP03_0882 is limited to only a small percentage of parasites. Epitope-tagged TP03_0882 expressed in mammalian cells was found to translocate into the nucleus, a process that could be attributed to two different nuclear localisation signals. Conclusions Our analysis reveals a complex pattern of Theileria SVSP mRNA expression, which depends on the parasite genotype. Whereas in cell lines established from a cloned parasite transcripts can be found corresponding to a wide range of SVSP genes, only a minority of parasites appear to express a particular SVSP protein. The fact that a number of SVSPs contain functional nuclear localisation signals suggests that proteins released from the parasite could contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell. This initial characterisation will facilitate future studies on the regulation of SVSP gene expression and the potential

  9. Effects of TCDD on the Expression of Nuclear Encoded Mitochondrial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 μg/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 hrs) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change|>1.5 and P-value <0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a dose response (0.03 to 300 μg/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 hrs. Dose responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of the 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:20399798

  10. Characterization of gene encoding amylopullulanase from plant-originated lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum L137.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sunako, Michihiro; Ono, Hisayo; Murooka, Yoshikatsu; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2008-11-01

    A starch-hydrolyzing lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus plantarum L137, was isolated from traditional fermented food made from fish and rice in the Philippines. A gene (apuA) encoding an amylolytic enzyme from Lactobacillus plantarum L137 was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The apuA gene consisted of an open reading frame of 6171 bp encoding a protein of 2056 amino acids, the molecular mass of which was calculated to be 215,625 Da. The catalytic domains of amylase and pullulanase were located in the same region within the middle of the N-terminal region. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed four highly conserved regions that are common among amylolytic enzymes. In the N-terminal region, a six-amino-acid sequence (Asp-Ala/Thr-Ala-Asn-Ser-Thr) is repeated 39 times, and a three-amino-acid sequence (Gln-Pro-Thr) is repeated 50 times in the C-terminal region. The apuA gene was subcloned in L. plantarum NCL21, which is a plasmid-cured derivative of the wild-type L137 strain and has no amylopullulanase activity, and the gene was overexpressed under the control of its own promoter. The ApuA enzyme from this recombinant L. plantarum NCL21 harboring apuA gene was purified. The enzyme has both alpha-amylase and pullulanase activities. The N-terminal sequence of the purified enzyme showed that the signal peptide was cleaved at Ala(36) and the molecular mass of the mature extracellular enzyme is 211,537 Da. The major reaction products from soluble starch were maltotriose (G3) and maltotetraose (G4). Only maltotriose (G3) was produced from pullulan. From these results, we concluded that ApuA is an amylolytic enzyme belonging to the amylopullulanase family.

  11. Molecular evolution and expression profile of the chemerine encoding gene RARRES2 in baboon and chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    González-Alvarez, Rafael; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor Manuel; Canales-Del-Castillo, Ricardo; Martínez-De-Villarreal, Laura Elia; Lugo-Trampe, Ángel; Tejero, María Elizabeth; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E; Rocha-Pizaña, María Del Refugio; Cole, Shelley A; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Moises-Alvarez, Mario; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto; Garza-Guajardo, Raquel; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo

    2015-06-12

    Chemerin, encoded by the retinoic acid receptor responder 2 (RARRES2) gene is an adipocytesecreted protein with autocrine/paracrine functions in adipose tissue, metabolism and inflammation with a recently described function in vascular tone regulation, liver, steatosis, etc. This molecule is believed to represent a critical endocrine signal linking obesity to diabetes. There are no data available regarding evolution of RARRES2 in non-human primates and great apes. Expression profile and orthology in RARRES2 genes are unknown aspects in the biology of this multigene family in primates. Thus; we attempt to describe expression profile and phylogenetic relationship as complementary knowledge in the function of this gene in primates. To do that, we performed A RT-PCR from different tissues obtained during necropsies. Also we tested the hypotheses of positive evolution, purifying selection, and neutrality. And finally a phylogenetic analysis was made between primates RARRES2 protein. RARRES2 transcripts were present in liver, lung, adipose tissue, ovary, pancreas, heart, hypothalamus and pituitary tissues. Expression in kidney and leukocytes were not detectable in either species. It was determined that the studied genes are orthologous. RARRES2 evolution fits the hypothesis of purifying selection. Expression profiles of the RARRES2 gene are similar in baboons and chimpanzees and are also phylogenetically related.

  12. GRN2SBML: automated encoding and annotation of inferred gene regulatory networks complying with SBML.

    PubMed

    Vlaic, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Kupfer, Peter; Weber, Michael; Dräger, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    GRN2SBML automatically encodes gene regulatory networks derived from several inference tools in systems biology markup language. Providing a graphical user interface, the networks can be annotated via the simple object access protocol (SOAP)-based application programming interface of BioMart Central Portal and minimum information required in the annotation of models registry. Additionally, we provide an R-package, which processes the output of supported inference algorithms and automatically passes all required parameters to GRN2SBML. Therefore, GRN2SBML closes a gap in the processing pipeline between the inference of gene regulatory networks and their subsequent analysis, visualization and storage. GRN2SBML is freely available under the GNU Public License version 3 and can be downloaded from http://www.hki-jena.de/index.php/0/2/490. General information on GRN2SBML, examples and tutorials are available at the tool's web page.

  13. Isolation and expression of a Bacillus cereus gene encoding benzil reductase.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, R; Nishizawa, M; Itoi, Y; Ito, S; Inoue, M

    2001-12-20

    Benzil was reduced stereospecifically to (S)-benzoin by Bacillus cereus strain Tim-r01. To isolate the gene responsible for asymmetric reduction, we constructed a library consisting of Escherichia coli clones that harbored plasmids expressing Bacillus cereus genes. The library was screened using the halo formation assay, and one clone showed benzil reduction to (S)-benzoin. Thus, this clone seemed to carry a plasmid encoding a Bacillus cereus benzil reductase. The deduced amino acid sequence had marked homologies to the Bacillus subtilis yueD protein (41% identity), the yeast open reading frame YIR036C protein (31%), and the mammalian sepiapterin reductases (28% to 30%), suggesting that benzil reductase is a novel short-chain de-hydrogenases/ reductase. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  15. Characterization and developmental expression of genes encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in Citrus paradisi Macf.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio G C; Moreira, Cristina D; Melton, John R; Otoni, Wagner C; Moore, Gloria A

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequences of PSY, PDS, and ZDS, encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in the carotenoid pathway of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), were isolated and characterized for the first time. CpPSY contained a 1311-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 436 amino acids, CpPDS contained a 1659-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 552 amino acids, and CpZDS contained a 1713-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 570 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CpPSY shares homology with PSYs from Citrus, tomato, pepper, Arabidopsis, and the monocot PSY1 group, while CpPDS and CpZDS are most closely related to orthologs from Citrus and tomato. Expression analysis revealed fluctuations in CpPSY, CpPDS, and CpZDS transcript abundance and a non-coordinated regulation between the former and the two latter genes during fruit development in albedo and juice vesicles of white ('Duncan') and red ('Flame') grapefruits. A 3× higher upregulation of CpPSY expression in juice vesicles of red-fleshed 'Flame' as compared to white-fruited 'Duncan' was observed in the middle stages of fruit development, which correlates with the well documented accumulation pattern of lycopene in red grapefruit. Together with previous data, our results suggest that the primary mechanism controlling lycopene accumulation in red grapefruit involves the transcriptional upregulation of CpPSY, which controls the flux into the carotenoid pathway, and the downregulated expression of CpLCYB2, which controls the step of cyclization of lycopene in chromoplasts during fruit ripening. A correlation between CpPSY expression and fruit color evolution in red grapefruit is demonstrated.

  16. Relating genes to function: identifying enriched transcription factors using the ENCODE ChIP-Seq significance tool.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Raymond K; Chen, Bin; Butte, Atul J

    2013-08-01

    Biological analysis has shifted from identifying genes and transcripts to mapping these genes and transcripts to biological functions. The ENCODE Project has generated hundreds of ChIP-Seq experiments spanning multiple transcription factors and cell lines for public use, but tools for a biomedical scientist to analyze these data are either non-existent or tailored to narrow biological questions. We present the ENCODE ChIP-Seq Significance Tool, a flexible web application leveraging public ENCODE data to identify enriched transcription factors in a gene or transcript list for comparative analyses. The ENCODE ChIP-Seq Significance Tool is written in JavaScript on the client side and has been tested on Google Chrome, Apple Safari and Mozilla Firefox browsers. Server-side scripts are written in PHP and leverage R and a MySQL database. The tool is available at http://encodeqt.stanford.edu. abutte@stanford.edu Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought. PMID:24795641

  18. Cloning and characterization of a Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 gene cluster encoding toluene-4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, K M; Karl, M R; Blatt, L M; Simon, M J; Winter, R B; Fausset, P R; Lu, H S; Harcourt, A A; Chen, K K

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 metabolizes toluene as a carbon source by a previously unknown pathway. The initial step of the pathway is hydroxylation of toluene to form p-cresol by a multicomponent toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) system. The T4MO enzyme system has broad substrate specificity and provides a new opportunity for biodegradation of toxic compounds and bioconversions. Its known activities include conversion of a variety of phenyl compounds into the phenolic derivatives and the complete degradation of trichloroethylene. We have cloned and characterized a gene cluster from KR1 that determines the offO activity. To clone the T4MO genes, KR1 DNA libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli HB101 by using a broad-host-range vector and transferred to a KR1 mutant able to grow on p-cresol but not on toluene. An insert consisting of two SacI fragments of identical size (10.2 kb) was shown to complement the mutant for growth on toluene. One of the SacI fragments, when cloned into the E. coli vector pUC19, was found to direct the synthesis of indigo dye. The indigo-forming property was correlated with the presence of T4MO activity. The T4MO genes were mapped to a 3.6-kb region, and the direction of transcription was determined. DNA sequencing and N-terminal amino acid determination identified a five-gene cluster, tmoABCDE, within this region. Expression of this cluster carrying a single mutation in each gene demonstrated that each of the five genes is essential for T4MO activity. Other evidence presented indicated that none of the tmo genes was involved in the regulation of the tmo gene cluster, in the control of substrate transport for the T4MO system, or in major processing of the products of the tmo genes. It was tentatively concluded that the tmoABCDE genes encode structural polypeptides of the T4MO enzyme system. One of the tmo genes was tentatively identified as a ferredoxin gene. Images PMID:1885512

  19. Molecular cloning of ADIR, a novel interferon responsive gene encoding a protein related to the torsins.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Meritet, Jean François; Dandoy-Dron, Françoise; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Maury, Chantal; Tovey, Michael G

    2002-03-01

    The expression of the previously uncharacterized gene Adir (for ATP dependent interferon responsive gene) was increased by 5- to 15-fold in tissue of the oral cavity or in spleen and liver of mice treated orally or intraperitoneally with IFN-alpha, and in mouse cells treated in vitro with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. The level of Adir mRNA was also increased 20- to 40-fold in the brains of animals infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Adir is expressed ubiquitously in mouse tissues as 1.9-, 2.4-, and 3.5-kb mRNA transcripts encoding a 385-amino-acid protein with a conserved ATP binding domain containing typical nucleotide and Mg(2+) binding sites. We also characterized the human ortholog, ADIR, which is located on chromosome 1q25-q31 and contains six exons encoding a 397-amino-acid protein with 80% homology to the mouse protein. A single 2.3-kb mRNA was detected in all human tissues examined, except for placenta, which also contained a 1.25-kb tissue-specific transcript generated by alternative splicing and encoding a putative 336-amino-acid protein. Although ADIR exhibits low homology to DYT1 and TOR1B, the deduced ADIR protein sequences are highly homologous to torsin A and torsin B and more distantly related to members of the Clp/HSP100 family of proteins, suggesting that ADIR, like torsins, is related to the AAA chaperone-like family of ATPases. An ADIR-EGFP fusion protein expressed in HeLa cells was shown to be associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Nipah virus sequesters inactive STAT1 in the nucleus via a P gene-encoded mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Volchkova, Valentina A; Shaw, Megan L; Volchkov, Viktor E; Basler, Christopher F

    2009-08-01

    The Nipah virus (NiV) phosphoprotein (P) gene encodes the C, P, V, and W proteins. P, V, and W, have in common an amino-terminal domain sufficient to bind STAT1, inhibiting its interferon (IFN)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. P is also essential for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase function. C is encoded by an alternate open reading frame (ORF) within the common amino-terminal domain. Mutations within residues 81 to 113 of P impaired its polymerase cofactor function, as assessed by a minireplicon assay, but these mutants retained STAT1 inhibitory function. Mutations within the residue 114 to 140 region were identified that abrogated interaction with and inhibition of STAT1 by P, V, and W without disrupting P polymerase cofactor function. Recombinant NiVs were then generated. A G121E mutation, which abrogated inhibition of STAT1, was introduced into a C protein knockout background (C(ko)) because the mutation would otherwise also alter the overlapping C ORF. In cell culture, relative to the wild-type virus, the C(ko) mutation proved attenuating but the G121E mutant virus replicated identically to the C(ko) virus. In cells infected with the wild-type and C(ko) viruses, STAT1 was nuclear despite the absence of tyrosine phosphorylation. This latter observation mirrors what has been seen in cells expressing NiV W. In the G121E mutant virus-infected cells, STAT1 was not phosphorylated and was cytoplasmic in the absence of IFN stimulation but became tyrosine phosphorylated and nuclear following IFN addition. These data demonstrate that the gene for NiV P encodes functions that sequester inactive STAT1 in the nucleus, preventing its activation and suggest that the W protein is the dominant inhibitor of STAT1 in NiV-infected cells.

  1. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile. ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2%) and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30). Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) and ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  2. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V.; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena+/−ptenb−/− or ptena−/−ptenb+/−) are viable and fertile. ptena+/−ptenb−/− fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2%) and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30). Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena+/−ptenb−/− and ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena+/−ptenb−/− zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish. PMID:22071262

  3. Mendel's green cotyledon gene encodes a positive regulator of the chlorophyll-degrading pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yutaka; Morita, Ryouhei; Nishimura, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kusaba, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Mutants that retain greenness of leaves during senescence are known as “stay-green” mutants. The most famous stay-green mutant is Mendel's green cotyledon pea, one of the mutants used in determining the law of genetics. Pea plants homozygous for this recessive mutation (known as i at present) retain greenness of the cotyledon during seed maturation and of leaves during senescence. We found tight linkage between the I locus and stay-green gene originally found in rice, SGR. Molecular analysis of three i alleles including one with no SGR expression confirmed that the I gene encodes SGR in pea. Functional analysis of sgr mutants in pea and rice further revealed that leaf functionality is lowered despite a high chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) content in the late stage of senescence, suggesting that SGR is primarily involved in Chl degradation. Consistent with this observation, a wide range of Chl–protein complexes, but not the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit, were shown to be more stable in sgr than wild-type plants. The expression of OsCHL and NYC1, which encode the first enzymes in the degrading pathways of Chl a and Chl b, respectively, was not affected by sgr in rice. The results suggest that SGR might be involved in activation of the Chl-degrading pathway during leaf senescence through translational or posttranslational regulation of Chl-degrading enzymes. PMID:17709752

  4. Mendel's green cotyledon gene encodes a positive regulator of the chlorophyll-degrading pathway.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yutaka; Morita, Ryouhei; Nishimura, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kusaba, Makoto

    2007-08-28

    Mutants that retain greenness of leaves during senescence are known as "stay-green" mutants. The most famous stay-green mutant is Mendel's green cotyledon pea, one of the mutants used in determining the law of genetics. Pea plants homozygous for this recessive mutation (known as i at present) retain greenness of the cotyledon during seed maturation and of leaves during senescence. We found tight linkage between the I locus and stay-green gene originally found in rice, SGR. Molecular analysis of three i alleles including one with no SGR expression confirmed that the I gene encodes SGR in pea. Functional analysis of sgr mutants in pea and rice further revealed that leaf functionality is lowered despite a high chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) content in the late stage of senescence, suggesting that SGR is primarily involved in Chl degradation. Consistent with this observation, a wide range of Chl-protein complexes, but not the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit, were shown to be more stable in sgr than wild-type plants. The expression of OsCHL and NYC1, which encode the first enzymes in the degrading pathways of Chl a and Chl b, respectively, was not affected by sgr in rice. The results suggest that SGR might be involved in activation of the Chl-degrading pathway during leaf senescence through translational or posttranslational regulation of Chl-degrading enzymes.

  5. Gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme is mutated in artesunate- and chloroquine-resistant rodent malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Paul; Afonso, Ana; Creasey, Alison; Culleton, Richard; Sidhu, Amar Bir Singh; Logan, John; Valderramos, Stephanie G; McNae, Iain; Cheesman, Sandra; do Rosario, Virgilio; Carter, Richard; Fidock, David A; Cravo, Pedro

    2007-07-01

    Artemisinin- and artesunate-resistant Plasmodium chabaudi mutants, AS-ART and AS-ATN, were previously selected from chloroquine-resistant clones AS-30CQ and AS-15CQ respectively. Now, a genetic cross between AS-ART and the artemisinin-sensitive clone AJ has been analysed by Linkage Group Selection. A genetic linkage group on chromosome 2 was selected under artemisinin treatment. Within this locus, we identified two different mutations in a gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme. A distinct mutation occurred in each of the clones AS-30CQ and AS-ATN, relative to their respective progenitors in the AS lineage. The mutations occurred independently in different clones under drug selection with chloroquine (high concentration) or artesunate. Each mutation maps to a critical residue in a homologous human deubiquitinating protein structure. Although one mutation could theoretically account for the resistance of AS-ATN to artemisinin derivates, the other cannot account solely for the resistance of AS-ART, relative to the responses of its sensitive progenitor AS-30CQ. Two lines of Plasmodium falciparum with decreased susceptibility to artemisinin were also selected. Their drug-response phenotype was not genetically stable. No mutations in the UBP-1 gene encoding the P. falciparum orthologue of the deubiquitinating enzyme were observed. The possible significance of these mutations in parasite responses to chloroquine or artemisinin is discussed.

  6. The European Eel NCCβ Gene Encodes a Thiazide-resistant Na-Cl Cotransporter*

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Erika; Plata, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Gama, Alejandro; Argaiz, Eduardo R.; Vázquez, Norma; Leyva-Ríos, Karla; Islas, León; Cutler, Christopher; Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Mercado, Adriana; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian distal convoluted tubule. NCC plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure. Its inhibition with thiazides constitutes the primary baseline therapy for arterial hypertension. However, the thiazide-binding site in NCC is unknown. Mammals have only one gene encoding for NCC. The eel, however, contains a duplicate gene. NCCα is an ortholog of mammalian NCC and is expressed in the kidney. NCCβ is present in the apical membrane of the rectum. Here we cloned and functionally characterized NCCβ from the European eel. The cRNA encodes a 1043-amino acid membrane protein that, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, functions as an Na-Cl cotransporter with two major characteristics, making it different from other known NCCs. First, eel NCCβ is resistant to thiazides. Single-point mutagenesis supports that the absence of thiazide inhibition is, at least in part, due to the substitution of a conserved serine for a cysteine at position 379. Second, NCCβ is not activated by low-chloride hypotonic stress, although the unique Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) binding site in the amino-terminal domain is conserved. Thus, NCCβ exhibits significant functional differences from NCCs that could be helpful in defining several aspects of the structure-function relationship of this important cotransporter. PMID:27587391

  7. Identification and cloning of a gene encoding tannase (tannin acylhydrolase) from Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917(T).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kazuaki; Tsuruta, Hiroki; Nishitaini, Yosuke; Osawa, Ro

    2008-09-01

    The gene tanLpl, encoding a novel tannase enzyme (TanLpl), has been cloned from Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917(T). This is the first report of a tannase gene cloned from a bacterial source other than from Staphylococcus lugdunensis, which has been reported elsewhere. The open reading frame of tanLpl, spanning 1410 bp, encoded a 469-amino-acid protein that showed 28.8% identity to the tannase of S. lugdunensis with several commonly conserved sequences. These sequences could not be found in putative tannases reported for other bacteria and fungi. TanLpl was expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha from a pGEM-T expression system and purified. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that purified TanLpl was a monomer polypeptide of approximately 50 kDa in size. Subsequent enzymatic characterization revealed that TanLpl was most active in an alkaline pH range at 40 degrees C, which was quite different from that observed for a fungal tannase of Aspergillus oryzae. In addition, the Michaelis-Menten constant of TanLpl was markedly lower than that of A. oryzae tannase. The evidence suggests that TanLpl should be classified into a novel family of tannases.

  8. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end ofmore » the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.« less

  9. On the role of PDZ domain-encoding genes in Drosophila border cell migration.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Kudlaty, Elizabeth; Longworth, Michelle S; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2012-11-01

    Cells often move as collective groups during normal embryonic development and wound healing, although the mechanisms governing this type of migration are poorly understood. The Drosophila melanogaster border cells migrate as a cluster during late oogenesis and serve as a powerful in vivo genetic model for collective cell migration. To discover new genes that participate in border cell migration, 64 out of 66 genes that encode PDZ domain-containing proteins were systematically targeted by in vivo RNAi knockdown. The PDZ domain is one of the largest families of protein-protein interaction domains found in eukaryotes. Proteins that contain PDZ domains participate in a variety of biological processes, including signal transduction and establishment of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Targeting PDZ proteins effectively assesses a larger number of genes via the protein complexes and pathways through which these proteins function. par-6, a known regulator of border cell migration, was a positive hit and thus validated the approach. Knockdown of 14 PDZ domain genes disrupted migration with multiple RNAi lines. The candidate genes have diverse predicted cellular functions and are anticipated to provide new insights into the mechanisms that control border cell movement. As a test of this concept, two genes that disrupted migration were characterized in more detail: big bang and the Dlg5 homolog CG6509. We present evidence that Big bang regulates JAK/STAT signaling, whereas Dlg5/CG6509 maintains cluster cohesion. Moreover, these results demonstrate that targeting a selected class of genes by RNAi can uncover novel regulators of collective cell migration.

  10. NF-κB controls four genes encoding core enzymes of tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Xu, Xinhui; Wu, Jian; Wang, Danyang; Wang, Jinke

    2017-07-20

    NF-κB may promote tumor progression by altering cell metabolism. Hence, finding its target genes that are involved in cell metabolism is helpful for understanding its role in tumor growth. Here we discovered four metabolism-related target genes of this transcription factor. By analyzing a chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data that characterizing the global binding sites (BSs) of NF-κB RelA in the TNFα-stimulated HeLa cells, we found that four genes that encode core enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, including IDH1, IDH3A, ACO2, and SUCLA2, were multiply bound by this transcription factor. The subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that the NF-κB BSs contained many canonical κB sequences and the NF-κB-like DNA-binding motifs. Detection of ChIPed DNA with polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-PCR) also indicated that the NF-κB BSs were bound by NF-κB in both TNFα-treated HeLa and HepG2 cells. The reporter construct showed that the NF-κB BSs could activate the luciferase expression in cells in a NF-κB-specific manner. The quantitative PCR and Western blot detections demonstrated that NF-κB could regulate the expressions of IDH1, IDH3A, and ACO2 genes at both mRNA and protein levels and that of SUCLA2 gene at mRNA level in the TNFα-treated HeLa and HepG2 cells. Based on these investigations we identified the four genes as new target genes of NF-κB. The finding provides new insights into the role of NF-κB in cellular energetic metabolism, which may be beneficial for understanding the metabolic physiology of tumor growth. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Three copies of a single protein II-encoding sequence in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae JS3: evidence for gene conversion and gene duplication.

    PubMed

    van der Ley, P

    1988-11-01

    Gonococci express a family of related outer membrane proteins designated protein II (P.II). These surface proteins are subject to both phase variation and antigenic variation. The P.II gene repertoire of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain JS3 was found to consist of at least ten genes, eight of which were cloned. Sequence analysis and DNA hybridization studies revealed that one particular P.II-encoding sequence is present in three distinct, but almost identical, copies in the JS3 genome. These genes encode the P.II protein that was previously identified as P.IIc. Comparison of their sequences shows that the multiple copies of this P.IIc-encoding gene might have been generated by both gene conversion and gene duplication.

  12. Polymorphisms in genes encoding leptin, ghrelin and their receptors in German multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rey, Linda K; Wieczorek, Stefan; Akkad, Denis A; Linker, Ralf A; Chan, Andrew; Hoffjan, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuro-inflammatory, autoimmune disease influenced by environmental and polygenic components. There is growing evidence that the peptide hormone leptin, known to regulate energy homeostasis, as well as its antagonist ghrelin play an important role in inflammatory processes in autoimmune diseases, including MS. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding leptin, ghrelin and their receptors were evaluated, amongst others, in Wegener's granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome. The Lys656Asn SNP in the LEPR gene showed a significant but contrasting association with these vasculitides. We therefore aimed at investigating these polymorphisms in a German MS case-control cohort. Twelve SNPs in the LEP, LEPR, GHRL and GHSR genes were genotyped in 776 MS patients and 878 control subjects. We found an association of a haplotype in the GHSR gene with MS that could not be replicated in a second cohort. Otherwise, no significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies were observed between patients and controls in this particular cohort. Thus, the present results do not support the hypothesis that genetic variation in the leptin/ghrelin system contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of MS. However, a modest effect of GHSR variation cannot be ruled out and needs to be further evaluated in future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPR184w gene encodes the glycogen debranching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Teste, M A; Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    The YPR184w gene encodes a 1536-amino acid protein that is 34-39% identical to the mammal, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans glycogen debranching enzyme. The N-terminal part of the protein possesses the four conserved sequences of the alpha-amylase superfamily, while the C-terminal part displays 50% similarity with the C-terminal of other eukaryotic glycogen debranching enzymes. Reliable measurement of alpha-1,4-glucanotransferase and alpha-1, 6-glucosidase activity of the yeast debranching enzyme was determined in strains overexpressing YPR184w. The alpha-1, 4-glucanotransferase activity of a partially purified preparation of debranching enzyme preferentially transferred maltosyl units than maltotriosyl. Deletion of YPR184w prevents glycogen degradation, whereas overexpression had no effect on the rate of glycogen breakdown. In response to stress and growth conditions, the transcriptional control of YPR184w gene, renamed GDB1 (for Glycogen DeBranching gene), is strictly identical to that of other genes involved in glycogen metabolism.

  14. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chang Ying; Dang, Yunkun; Danne, Jillian C; Waller, Ross F; Green, Beverley R

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm) of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation) domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  15. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and antibacterial assay of Tenecin gene encoding an antibacterial peptide from Tenebrio molitor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yu-xin; Li, Chao-pin

    2011-12-01

    To clone tenecin gene, an antibacterial peptide gene, from Tenebrio molitor for its prokaryotic expression and explore the molecular mechanism for regulating the expression of antibacterial peptide in Tenebrio molitor larvae. The antibacterial peptide was induced from the larvae of Tenebrio molitor by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli DH-5α (1×10(8)/ml). RT-PCR was performed 72 h after the injection to clone Tenecin gene followed by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The recombinant expression vector pET-28a(+)-Tenecin was constructed and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells and the expression of tenecin protein was observed after IPTG induction. Tenecin expression was detected in transformed E.coli using SDS-PAGE after 1 mmol/L IPTG induction. Tenecin gene, which was about 255 bp in length, encoded Tenecin protein with a relative molecular mass of 9 kD. Incubation of E.coli with 80, 60, 40, and 20 µg/ml tenecin for 18 h resulted in a diameter of the inhibition zone of 25.1∓0.03, 20.7∓0.06, 17.2∓0.11 and 9.3∓0.04 mm, respectively. Tenecin protein possesses strong antibacterial activity against E. coli DH-5α, which warrants further study of this protein for its potential as an antibacterial agent in clinical application.

  16. Comprehensive search for accessory proteins encoded with archaeal and bacterial type III CRISPR-cas gene cassettes reveals 39 new cas gene families.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shiraz A; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Behler, Juliane; Han, Wenyuan; She, Qunxin; Hess, Wolfgang R; Garrett, Roger A; Backofen, Rolf

    2018-06-19

    A study was undertaken to identify conserved proteins that are encoded adjacent to cas gene cassettes of Type III CRISPR-Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats - CRISPR associated) interference modules. Type III modules have been shown to target and degrade dsDNA, ssDNA and ssRNA and are frequently intertwined with cofunctional accessory genes, including genes encoding CRISPR-associated Rossman Fold (CARF) domains. Using a comparative genomics approach, and defining a Type III association score accounting for coevolution and specificity of flanking genes, we identified and classified 39 new Type III associated gene families. Most archaeal and bacterial Type III modules were seen to be flanked by several accessory genes, around half of which did not encode CARF domains and remain of unknown function. Northern blotting and interference assays in Synechocystis confirmed that one particular non-CARF accessory protein family was involved in crRNA maturation. Non-CARF accessory genes were generally diverse, encoding nuclease, helicase, protease, ATPase, transporter and transmembrane domains with some encoding no known domains. We infer that additional families of non-CARF accessory proteins remain to be found. The method employed is scalable for potential application to metagenomic data once automated pipelines for annotation of CRISPR-Cas systems have been developed. All accessory genes found in this study are presented online in a readily accessible and searchable format for researchers to audit their model organism of choice: http://accessory.crispr.dk .

  17. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters.

    PubMed

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryoticmore » expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.« less

  19. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of the gene encoding aldolase from soybean cyst nematode by transformed soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Reham M; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Haroon, Sanaa A; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2013-06-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes cause approximately 157 billion US dollars in losses worldwide annually. The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is responsible for an estimated one billion dollars in losses to the US farmer each year. A promising new approach for control of plant parasitic nematode control is gene silencing. We tested this approach by silencing the SCN gene HgALD, encoding fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase. This enzyme is important in the conversion of glucose into energy and may be especially important in actin-based motility during parasite invasion of its host. An RNAi construct targeted to silence HgALD was transformed into soybean roots of composite plants to examine its efficacy to reduce the development of females formed by SCN. The number of mature females on roots transformed with the RNAi construct designed to silence the HgALD gene was reduced by 58%. These results indicate that silencing the aldolase gene of SCN +can greatly decrease the number of female SCN reaching maturity, and it is a promising step towards broadening resistance of plants against plant-parasitic nematodes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Recognition deficits in mice carrying mutations of genes encoding BLOC-1 subunits pallidin or dysbindin.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Chiu, A; James, A S; Jentsch, J D; Karlsgodt, K H

    2015-11-01

    Numerous studies have implicated DTNBP1, the gene encoding dystrobrevin-binding protein or dysbindin, as a candidate risk gene for schizophrenia, though this relationship remains somewhat controversial. Variation in dysbindin, and its location on chromosome 6p, has been associated with cognitive processes, including those relying on a complex system of glutamatergic and dopaminergic interactions. Dysbindin is one of the seven protein subunits that comprise the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1). Dysbindin protein levels are lower in mice with null mutations in pallidin, another gene in the BLOC-1, and pallidin levels are lower in mice with null mutations in the dysbindin gene, suggesting that multiple subunit proteins must be present to form a functional oligomeric complex. Furthermore, pallidin and dysbindin have similar distribution patterns in a mouse and human brain. Here, we investigated whether the apparent correspondence of pallid and dysbindin at the level of gene expression is also found at the level of behavior. Hypothesizing a mutation leading to underexpression of either of these proteins should show similar phenotypic effects, we studied recognition memory in both strains using the novel object recognition task (NORT) and social novelty recognition task (SNRT). We found that mice with a null mutation in either gene are impaired on SNRT and NORT when compared with wild-type controls. These results support the conclusion that deficits consistent with recognition memory impairment, a cognitive function that is impaired in schizophrenia, result from either pallidin or dysbindin mutations, possibly through degradation of BLOC-1 expression and/or function. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  1. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  2. Medicago truncatula contains a second gene encoding a plastid located glutamine synthetase exclusively expressed in developing seeds.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Ana R; Vieira, Cristina P; Cullimore, Julie V; Carvalho, Helena G

    2010-08-19

    Nitrogen is a crucial nutrient that is both essential and rate limiting for plant growth and seed production. Glutamine synthetase (GS), occupies a central position in nitrogen assimilation and recycling, justifying the extensive number of studies that have been dedicated to this enzyme from several plant sources. All plants species studied to date have been reported as containing a single, nuclear gene encoding a plastid located GS isoenzyme per haploid genome. This study reports the existence of a second nuclear gene encoding a plastid located GS in Medicago truncatula. This study characterizes a new, second gene encoding a plastid located glutamine synthetase (GS2) in M. truncatula. The gene encodes a functional GS isoenzyme with unique kinetic properties, which is exclusively expressed in developing seeds. Based on molecular data and the assumption of a molecular clock, it is estimated that the gene arose from a duplication event that occurred about 10 My ago, after legume speciation and that duplicated sequences are also present in closely related species of the Vicioide subclade. Expression analysis by RT-PCR and western blot indicate that the gene is exclusively expressed in developing seeds and its expression is related to seed filling, suggesting a specific function of the enzyme associated to legume seed metabolism. Interestingly, the gene was found to be subjected to alternative splicing over the first intron, leading to the formation of two transcripts with similar open reading frames but varying 5' UTR lengths, due to retention of the first intron. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alternative splicing on a plant GS gene. This study shows that Medicago truncatula contains an additional GS gene encoding a plastid located isoenzyme, which is functional and exclusively expressed during seed development. Legumes produce protein-rich seeds requiring high amounts of nitrogen, we postulate that this gene duplication represents a functional

  3. The Drosophila pigmentation gene pink (p) encodes a homologue of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5).

    PubMed

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Brooks, Elizabeth S; Krantz, David E; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2007-02-01

    Lysosome-related organelles comprise a group of specialized intracellular compartments that include melanosomes and platelet dense granules (in mammals) and eye pigment granules (in insects). In humans, the biogenesis of these organelles is defective in genetic disorders collectively known as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). Patients with HPS-2, and two murine HPS models, carry mutations in genes encoding subunits of adaptor protein (AP)-3. Other genes mutated in rodent models include those encoding VPS33A and Rab38. Orthologs of all of these genes in Drosophila melanogaster belong to the 'granule group' of eye pigmentation genes. Other genes associated with HPS encode subunits of three complexes of unknown function, named biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, -2 and -3, for which the Drosophila counterparts had not been characterized. Here, we report that the gene encoding the Drosophila ortholog of the HPS5 subunit of BLOC-2 is identical to the granule group gene pink (p), which was first studied in 1910 but had not been identified at the molecular level. The phenotype of pink mutants was exacerbated by mutations in AP-3 subunits or in the orthologs of VPS33A and Rab38. These results validate D. melanogaster as a genetic model to study the function of the BLOCs.

  4. The SdiA-Regulated Gene srgE Encodes a Type III Secreted Effector

    PubMed Central

    Habyarimana, Fabien; Sabag-Daigle, Anice

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a food-borne pathogen that causes severe gastroenteritis. The ability of Salmonella to cause disease depends on two type III secretion systems (T3SSs) encoded in two distinct Salmonella pathogenicity islands, 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2, respectively). S. Typhimurium encodes a solo LuxR homolog, SdiA, which can detect the acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by other bacteria and upregulate the rck operon and the srgE gene. SrgE is predicted to encode a protein of 488 residues with a coiled-coil domain between residues 345 and 382. In silico studies have provided conflicting predictions as to whether SrgE is a T3SS substrate. Therefore, in this work, we tested the hypothesis that SrgE is a T3SS effector by two methods, a β-lactamase activity assay and a split green fluorescent protein (GFP) complementation assay. SrgE with β-lactamase fused to residue 40, 100, 150, or 300 was indeed expressed and translocated into host cells, but SrgE with β-lactamase fused to residue 400 or 488 was not expressed, suggesting interference by the coiled-coil domain. Similarly, SrgE with GFP S11 fused to residue 300, but not to residue 488, was expressed and translocated into host cells. With both systems, translocation into host cells was dependent upon SPI2. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that srgE is found only within Salmonella enterica subspecies. It is found sporadically within both typhoidal and nontyphoidal serovars, although the SrgE protein sequences found within typhoidal serovars tend to cluster separately from those found in nontyphoidal serovars, suggesting functional diversification. PMID:24727228

  5. Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels Are Encoded by Duplicate slo1 Genes in Teleost Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Deitcher, David L.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium-activated, large conductance potassium (BK) channels in tetrapods are encoded by a single slo1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Alternative splicing generates a high level of functional diversity in BK channels that contributes to the wide range of frequencies electrically tuned by the inner ear hair cells of many tetrapods. To date, the role of BK channels in hearing among teleost fishes has not been investigated at the molecular level, although teleosts account for approximately half of all extant vertebrate species. We identified slo1 genes in teleost and nonteleost fishes using polymerase chain reaction and genetic sequence databases. In contrast to tetrapods, all teleosts examined were found to express duplicate slo1 genes in the central nervous system, whereas nonteleosts that diverged prior to the teleost whole-genome duplication event express a single slo1 gene. Phylogenetic analyses further revealed that whereas other slo1 duplicates were the result of a single duplication event, an independent duplication occurred in a basal teleost (Anguilla rostrata) following the slo1 duplication in teleosts. A third, independent slo1 duplication (autotetraploidization) occurred in salmonids. Comparison of teleost slo1 genomic sequences to their tetrapod orthologue revealed a reduced number of alternative splice sites in both slo1 co-orthologues. For the teleost Porichthys notatus, a focal study species that vocalizes with maximal spectral energy in the range electrically tuned by BK channels in the inner ear, peripheral tissues show the expression of either one (e.g., vocal muscle) or both (e.g., inner ear) slo1 paralogues with important implications for both auditory and vocal physiology. Additional loss of expression of one slo1 paralogue in nonneural tissues in P. notatus suggests that slo1 duplicates were retained via subfunctionalization. Together, the results predict that teleost fish achieve a diversity of BK channel subfunction via

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of bZIP-Encoding Genes in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kaifa; Chen, Juan; Wang, Yanmei; Chen, Yanhui; Chen, Shaoxiang; Lin, Yina; Pan, Si; Zhong, Xiaojun; Xie, Daoxin

    2012-01-01

    In plants, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins regulate numerous biological processes such as seed maturation, flower and vascular development, stress signalling and pathogen defence. We have carried out a genome-wide identification and analysis of 125 bZIP genes that exist in the maize genome, encoding 170 distinct bZIP proteins. This family can be divided into 11 groups according to the phylogenetic relationship among the maize bZIP proteins and those in Arabidopsis and rice. Six kinds of intron patterns (a–f) within the basic and hinge regions are defined. The additional conserved motifs have been identified and present the group specificity. Detailed three-dimensional structure analysis has been done to display the sequence conservation and potential distribution of the bZIP domain. Further, we predict the DNA-binding pattern and the dimerization property on the basis of the characteristic features in the basic and hinge regions and the leucine zipper, respectively, which supports our classification greatly and helps to classify 26 distinct subfamilies. The chromosome distribution and the genetic analysis reveal that 58 ZmbZIP genes are located in the segmental duplicate regions in the maize genome, suggesting that the segment chromosomal duplications contribute greatly to the expansion of the maize bZIP family. Across the 60 different developmental stages of 11 organs, three apparent clusters formed represent three kinds of different expression patterns among the ZmbZIP gene family in maize development. A similar but slightly different expression pattern of bZIPs in two inbred lines displays that 22 detected ZmbZIP genes might be involved in drought stress. Thirteen pairs and 143 pairs of ZmbZIP genes show strongly negative and positive correlations in the four distinct fungal infections, respectively, based on the expression profile and Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis. PMID:23103471

  7. Calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are encoded by duplicate slo1 genes in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Rohmann, Kevin N; Deitcher, David L; Bass, Andrew H

    2009-07-01

    Calcium-activated, large conductance potassium (BK) channels in tetrapods are encoded by a single slo1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Alternative splicing generates a high level of functional diversity in BK channels that contributes to the wide range of frequencies electrically tuned by the inner ear hair cells of many tetrapods. To date, the role of BK channels in hearing among teleost fishes has not been investigated at the molecular level, although teleosts account for approximately half of all extant vertebrate species. We identified slo1 genes in teleost and nonteleost fishes using polymerase chain reaction and genetic sequence databases. In contrast to tetrapods, all teleosts examined were found to express duplicate slo1 genes in the central nervous system, whereas nonteleosts that diverged prior to the teleost whole-genome duplication event express a single slo1 gene. Phylogenetic analyses further revealed that whereas other slo1 duplicates were the result of a single duplication event, an independent duplication occurred in a basal teleost (Anguilla rostrata) following the slo1 duplication in teleosts. A third, independent slo1 duplication (autotetraploidization) occurred in salmonids. Comparison of teleost slo1 genomic sequences to their tetrapod orthologue revealed a reduced number of alternative splice sites in both slo1 co-orthologues. For the teleost Porichthys notatus, a focal study species that vocalizes with maximal spectral energy in the range electrically tuned by BK channels in the inner ear, peripheral tissues show the expression of either one (e.g., vocal muscle) or both (e.g., inner ear) slo1 paralogues with important implications for both auditory and vocal physiology. Additional loss of expression of one slo1 paralogue in nonneural tissues in P. notatus suggests that slo1 duplicates were retained via subfunctionalization. Together, the results predict that teleost fish achieve a diversity of BK channel subfunction via

  8. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  9. Overproduction of lactimidomycin by cross-overexpression of genes encoding Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yijun; Pan, Guohui; Xiang, Wensheng; Shen, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The glutarimide-containing polyketides represent a fascinating class of natural products that exhibit a multitude of biological activities. We have recently cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene clusters for three members of the glutarimide-containing polyketides-iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993, lactimidomycin (LTM) from Streptomyces amphibiosporus ATCC 53964, and cycloheximide (CHX) from Streptomyces sp. YIM56141. Comparative analysis of the three clusters identified mgsA and chxA, from the mgs and chx gene clusters, respectively, that were predicted to encode the PimR-like Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) but failed to reveal any regulatory gene from the ltm gene cluster. Overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. platensis NRRL 18993, Streptomyces sp. YIM56141 or SB11024, and a recombinant strain of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 carrying the intact mgs gene cluster has no significant effect on iso-MGS or CHX production, suggesting that MgsA or ChxA regulation may not be rate-limiting for iso-MGS and CHX production in these producers. In contrast, overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. amphibiosporus ATCC 53964 resulted in a significant increase in LTM production, with LTM titer reaching 106 mg/L, which is five-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results support MgsA and ChxA as members of the SARP family of positive regulators for the iso-MGS and CHX biosynthetic machinery and demonstrate the feasibility to improve glutarimide-containing polyketide production in Streptomyces strains by exploiting common regulators.

  10. Analysis of a polygalacturonase gene of Ustilago maydis and characterization of the encoded enzyme.

    PubMed

    Castruita-Domínguez, José P; González-Hernández, Sandra E; Polaina, Julio; Flores-Villavicencio, Lérida L; Alvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Leal-Morales, Carlos A

    2014-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a pathogenic fungus that produces the corn smut. It is a biotrophic parasite that depends on living plant tissues for its proliferation and development. Polygalacturonases are secreted by pathogens to solubilize the plant cell-wall and are required for pathogen virulence. In this paper, we report the isolation of a U. maydis polygalacturonase gene (Pgu1) and the functional and structural characterization of the encoded enzyme. The U. maydis Pgu1 gene is expressed when the fungus is grown in liquid culture media containing different carbon sources. In plant tissue, the expression increased as a function of incubation time. Pgu1 gene expression was detected during plant infection around 10 days post-infection with U. maydis FB-D12 strain in combination with teliospore formation. Synthesis and secretion of active recombinant PGU1 were achieved using Pichia pastoris, the purified enzyme had a optimum temperature of 34 °C, optimum pH of 4.5, a Km of 57.84 g/L for polygalacturonic acid, and a Vmax of 28.9 µg/min mg. Structural models of PGU1 based on homologous enzymes yielded a typical right-handed β-helix fold of pectinolytic enzymes classified in the glycosyl hydrolases family 28, and the U. maydis PGU1 is related with endo rather than exo polygalacturonases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate biosynthesis in a diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: Identification of a gene encoding MTHB-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Shibata, Ayumi; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2018-05-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is one of the most abundant molecules on earth and plays a pivotal role in the marine sulfur cycle. DMSP is believed to be synthesized from methionine by a four-step reaction pathway in marine algae. The genes responsible for biosynthesis of DMSP remain unidentified. A diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP1335 is an important component of marine ecosystems and contributes greatly to the world's primary production. In this study, through genome search, in vivo activity and functional studies of cDNA products, a gene encoding Thalassiosira methyltransferase (TpMMT) which catalyzes the key step of DMSP synthesis formation of 4-methylthio-2-hydroxybutyrate (DMSHB) from 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate (MTHB), was identified. The amino acid sequence of TpMMT was homologous to the methyltransferase from Phaeodactylum tricornutum CCAP 1055/1, but not the recently identified bacterium gene. High salinity and nitrogen limitation stresses caused the increase of DMSP content and TpMMT protein in Thalassiosira. In addition to TpMMT, the enzyme activities for the first three steps could be detected and enhanced under high salinity, suggesting the importance of four-step DMSP synthetic pathway in Thalassiosira. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of a banana gene encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, P L; Do, Y Y; Huang, F C; Thay, T S; Chang, T W

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA encoding the banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase has previously been isolated from a cDNA library that was constructed by extracting poly(A)+ RNA from peels of ripening banana. This cDNA, designated as pMAO2, has 1,199 bp and contains an open reading frame of 318 amino acids. In order to identify ripening-related promoters of the banana ACC oxidase gene, pMAO2 was used as a probe to screen a banana genomic library constructed in the lambda EMBL3 vector. The banana ACC oxidase MAO2 gene has four exons and three introns, with all of the boundaries between these introns and exons sharing a consensus dinucleotide sequence of GT-AG. The expression of MAO2 gene in banana begins after the onset of ripening (stage 2) and continuous into later stages of the ripening process. The accumulation of MAO2 mRNA can be induced by 1 microliter/l exogenous ethylene, and it reached steady state level when 100 microliters/l exogenous ethylene was present.

  13. A splicing mutation in the gene encoding phytoene synthase causes orange coloration in Habanero pepper fruits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok Rye; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul; Kim, Byung-Dong; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2010-12-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) display a variety of fruit colors that are reflected by the composition and amount of diverse carotenoid pigments accumulated in the pericarp. Three independent loci, c1, c2, and y, are known to determine the mature color of pepper fruits by their allelic combinations. We examined the inheritance of fruit color in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from an interspecific cross between C. annuum cv. TF68 (red) and C. chinense cv. Habanero (orange). The c2 gene encodes phytoene synthase (PSY), a rate-limiting enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. TF68 has a dominant c2+ allele whereas Habanero is homozygous for the recessive c2 allele, which determined RIL fruit color. Here we report that the recessive c2 allele has a point mutation in the PSY gene that occurs at a splice acceptor site of the fifth intron leading to both a frame shift and premature translational termination, suggesting that impaired activity of PSY is responsible for orange fruit color. During ripening, PSY is expressed at a significantly high level in orange colored fruits compared to red ones. Interestingly, the PSY gene of red Habanero has a conserved splice acceptor dinucleotide AG. Further analysis suggests that red Habanero is a wild type revertant of the PSY mutant orange Habanero.

  14. Identification of Genes Encoding Granule-Bound Starch Synthase Involved in Amylose Metabolism in Banana Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weixin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage. PMID:24505384

  15. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produces a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins, and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous coding sequences (CDS). We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:25914708

  16. Identification of the gene encoding the major capsid protein of fish lymphocystis disease virus.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Darai, G

    1993-10-01

    The gene encoding the major capsid protein (MCP) of fish lymphocystis disease virus (flounder isolate; FLCDV-f) has been identified by PCR using oligonucleotide primers corresponding to different regions of the MCP of Tipula iridescent virus (TIV), iridescent virus 22 (IV22) and Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). DNA fragments of 0.4 kbp, 0.5 kbp and 0.27 kbp in size were amplified using oligonucleotide primers corresponding to amino acids (aa) 146 to 153 (primer 1) and 274 to 268 (primer 6), or aa 146 to 153 (primer 1) and 313 to 304 (primer 8), or aa 304 to 312 (primer 7) and 385 to 381 (primer 9) of the MCP of TIV, respectively. The PCR products were used as hybridization probes for screening the gene library of FLCDV-f. The MCP gene of FLCDV-f(1377 bp; 459 aa; 51.4K) was identified within the DNA sequence of the EcoRI FLCDV-f DNA fragment C (11.2 kbp; 0.611 to 0.718 map units). A high degree of aa sequence identity/similarity was detected between the MCP of FLCDV-f and TIV (50.3%/33.8%), IV22 (49.1%/34.2%). CIV (53%/29.5%) and African swine fever virus (16%/38.1%).

  17. A pituitary gene encodes a protein that produces differentiation of breast and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Platica, Micsunica; Ivan, Elena; Holland, James F; Ionescu, Alin; Chen, Sheryl; Mandeli, John; Unger, Pamela D; Platica, Ovidiu

    2004-02-10

    A cDNA clone of 1.1 kb encoding a 108-aa polypeptide was isolated from a human pituitary cDNA library by expression cloning. This protein was named tumor differentiation factor (TDF). The recombinant TDF protein and a 20-aa peptide, P1, selected from the ORF of the gene, induced morphological and biochemical changes consistent with differentiation of human breast and prostate cancer cells. Fibroblast, kidney, hepatoma, and leukemic lymphocytic cell lines were unaffected. Breast and prostate cancer cells aggregated in spheroid-like structures within 24 h of exposure to TDF. This effect was abrogated by a specific affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-P1 Ab. E-cadherin expression was increased in a dose-dependent manner by TDF. Treatment of MCF7 cells with TDF led to production of a lactalbumin-related protein. Peptide P1 significantly decreased the growth of androgen-independent DU145 prostate cancer in severe combined immunodeficient mice. The presence of TDF protein in human sera was detected by the anti-P1 Ab, suggesting a role of TDF in endocrine metabolism. The fact that all activities of TDF can be mimicked by a peptide derived from the encoding TDF sequence opens the possibility of therapeutic applications.

  18. Structure of a gene encoding a murine thymus leukemia antigen, and organization of Tla genes in the BALB/c mouse

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of a gene encoding a thymus leukemia (TL) antigen in the BALB/c mouse, and have more definitively mapped the cloned BALB/c Tla-region class I gene clusters. Analysis of the sequence shows that the Tla gene is less closely related to the H-2 genes than H-2 genes are to one another or to a Qa-2,3-region genes. The Tla gene, 17.3A, contains an apparent gene conversion. Comparison of the BALB/c Tla genes with those from C57BL shows that BALB/c has more Tla-region class I genes, and that one of the genes absent in C57BL is gene 17.3A. PMID:3894562

  19. Reduction of antinutritional glucosinolates in Brassica oilseeds by mutation of genes encoding transporters.

    PubMed

    Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Madsen, Svend Roesen; Engelen, Steven; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Andersen, Jonathan Sonne; Seynnaeve, David; Verhoye, Thalia; Fulawka, Rudy; Denolf, Peter; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-04-01

    The nutritional value of Brassica seed meals is reduced by the presence of glucosinolates, which are toxic compounds involved in plant defense. Mutation of the genes encoding two glucosinolate transporters (GTRs) eliminated glucosinolates from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, but translation of loss-of-function phenotypes into Brassica crops is challenging because Brassica is polyploid. We mutated one of seven and four of 12 GTR orthologs and reduced glucosinolate levels in seeds by 60-70% in two different Brassica species (Brassica rapa and Brassica juncea). Reduction in seed glucosinolates was stably inherited over multiple generations and maintained in field trials of two mutant populations at three locations. Successful translation of the gtr loss-of-function phenotype from model plant to two Brassica crops suggests that our transport engineering approach could be broadly applied to reduce seed glucosinolate content in other oilseed crops, such as Camelina sativa or Crambe abyssinica.

  20. Cloning and high level expression of gene encoding ES antigen from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Xu, W; Chen, H; Ma, Z; Zhu, Y; Cai, S

    1994-01-01

    The partial structure gene encoding ES antigen derived from Trichinella spiralis (TSP) muscle larvae was cloned, characterized, and expressed in E. coli. The target DNA (0.7 kb) was directly obtained from the TSP total RNA by using RNA PCR technique. Based on the analysis with the RE digestion, the fragment was cloned into the fusion expression vector pEX31C. It was shown that a kind of 37kDa fusion protein was expressed in E. coli containing the recombinant plasmid by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The expressed protein was over 22% of the total cell protein, and it was aggregated in the form of inclusion bodies in E. coli. The purified protein could be recognized in ELISA both by sera from swine-infected with TSP and by the monoclonal antibody against TSP. These findings suggest that the recombinant protein is a potentially valuable antigen both for immunodiagnosis and vaccine development of trichinellosis.

  1. Immunochemical Proof that a Novel Rearranging Gene Encodes the T Cell Receptor δ Subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Hamid; Hochstenbach, Frans; McLean, Joanne; Hata, Shingo; Krangel, Michael S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    1987-10-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) δ protein is expressed as part of a heterodimer with TCR γ , in association with the CD3 polypeptides on a subset of functional peripheral blood T lymphocytes, thymocytes, and certain leukemic T cell lines. A monoclonal antibody directed against TCR δ was produced that binds specifically to the surface of several TCR γ δ cell lines and immunoprecipitates the TCR γ δ as a heterodimer from Triton X-100 detergent lysates and also immunoprecipitates the TCR δ subunit alone after chain separation. A candidate human TCR δ complementary DNA clone (IDP2 O-240/38), reported in a companion paper, was isolated by the subtractive library approach from a TCR γ δ cell line. This complementary DNA clone was used to direct the synthesis of a polypeptide that is specifically recognized by the monoclonal antibody to TCR δ . This complementary DNA clone thus corresponds to the gene that encodes the TCR δ subunit.

  2. The chromosomal mapping of four genes encoding winged helix proteins expressed early in mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Labosky, P.A.; Sakaki, Hiroshi; Hogan, B.L.M.

    1996-06-01

    Members of the winged helix family of transcription factors are required for the normal embryonic development of the mouse. Using the interspecific backcross panel from The Jackson Laboratory, we have determined the chromosomal locations of four genes that encode winged helix containing proteins. Mf1 was assigned to mouse Chromosome 8, Mf2 to Chromosome 4, Mf3 to Chromosome 9, and Mf4 to Chromosome 13. Since Mf3 is located in a region of Chromosome 9 containing many well-characterized mouse mutations such as short ear (se), ashen (ash), and dilute (d), we have analyzed deletion mutants to determine the location of Mf3 moremore » precisely. 14 refs., 3 figs.« less

  3. De Novo Mutations of the Gene Encoding the Histone Acetyltransferase KAT6B Cause Genitopatellar Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Michael A.; Deshpande, Charu; Dafou, Dimitra; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Woollard, Wesley J.; Holder, Susan E.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Derks, Ronny; White, Susan M.; Cohen-Snuijf, Ruthy; Kant, Sarina G.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Reardon, Willie; Brunner, Han G.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Trembath, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Genitopatellar syndrome (GPS) is a rare disorder in which patellar aplasia or hypoplasia is associated with external genital anomalies and severe intellectual disability. Using an exome-sequencing approach, we identified de novo mutations of KAT6B in five individuals with GPS; a single nonsense variant and three frameshift indels, including a 4 bp deletion observed in two cases. All identified mutations are located within the terminal exon of the gene and are predicted to generate a truncated protein product lacking evolutionarily conserved domains. KAT6B encodes a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltranferases. We demonstrate a reduced level of both histone H3 and H4 acetylation in patient-derived cells suggesting that dysregulation of histone acetylation is a direct functional consequence of GPS alleles. These findings define the genetic basis of GPS and illustrate the complex role of the regulation of histone acetylation during development. PMID:22265017

  4. The abp gene in Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 encodes a GH27 β-L-arabinopyranosidase.

    PubMed

    Salama, Rachel; Alalouf, Onit; Tabachnikov, Orly; Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2012-07-30

    In this study we demonstrate that the abp gene in Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 encodes a family 27 glycoside hydrolase β-L-arabinopyranosidase. The catalytic constants towards the chromogenic substrate pNP-β-L-arabinopyranoside were 0.8±0.1 mM, 6.6±0.3 s(-1), and 8.2±0.3 s(-1) mM(-1) for K(m), k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), respectively. (13)C NMR spectroscopy unequivocally showed that Abp is capable of removing β-L-arabinopyranose residues from the natural arabino-polysaccharide, larch arabinogalactan. Most family 27 enzymes are active on galactose and contain a conserved Asp residue, whereas in Abp this residue is Ile67, which shifts the specificity of the enzyme towards arabinopyranoside. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Allelic variation of soybean flower color gene W4 encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fan; Di, Shaokang; Rojas Rodas, Felipe; Rodriguez Torrico, Tito; Murai, Yoshinori; Iwashina, Tsukasa; Anai, Toyoaki; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2014-03-06

    Flower color of soybean is primarily controlled by six genes, viz., W1, W2, W3, W4, Wm and Wp. This study was conducted to investigate the genetic and chemical basis of newly-identified flower color variants including two soybean mutant lines, 222-A-3 (near white flower) and E30-D-1 (light purple flower), a near-isogenic line (Clark-w4), flower color variants (T321 and T369) descended from the w4-mutable line and kw4 (near white flower, Glycine soja). Complementation tests revealed that the flower color of 222-A-3 and kw4 was controlled by the recessive allele (w4) of the W4 locus encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase 2 (DFR2). In 222-A-3, a single base was deleted in the first exon resulting in a truncated polypeptide consisting of 24 amino acids. In Clark-w4, base substitution of the first nucleotide of the fourth intron abolished the 5' splice site, resulting in the retention of the intron. The DFR2 gene of kw4 was not expressed. The above results suggest that complete loss-of-function of DFR2 gene leads to near white flowers. Light purple flower of E30-D-1 was controlled by a new allele at the W4 locus, w4-lp. The gene symbol was approved by the Soybean Genetics Committee. In E30-D-1, a single-base substitution changed an amino acid at position 39 from arginine to histidine. Pale flowers of T369 had higher expression levels of the DFR2 gene. These flower petals contained unique dihydroflavonols that have not yet been reported to occur in soybean and G. soja. Complete loss-of-function of DFR2 gene leads to near white flowers. A new allele of the W4 locus, w4-lp regulates light purple flowers. Single amino acid substitution was associated with light purple flowers. Flower petals of T369 had higher levels of DFR2 gene expression and contained unique dihydroflavonols that are absent in soybean and G. soja. Thus, mutants of the DFR2 gene have unique flavonoid compositions and display a wide variety of flower color patterns in soybean, from near white, light purple

  6. Gene encoding prolactin in cinnamon clownfish Amphiprion melanopus and its expression upon acclimation to low salinities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin (PRL) is a key hormone for osmoregulation in fish. Levels of PRL in the pituitary gland and plasma ion composition of clownfish seem to change to regulate their hydromineral balance during adaptation to waters of different salinities. In order to understand osmoregulatory mechanism and its association with growth performance and PRL in fish, the gene encoding PRL and its expression level in cinnamon clownfish Amphiprion melanopus upon acclimation to low salinity was analyzed. Results The PRL gene of A. melanopus encoded a protein of 212 amino acid residues comprised of a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids and a mature protein of 188 amino acids. Analysis of growth performance under different salinities of 34, 25, 15, and 10 ppt indicated that cinnamon clownfish could survive under salinities as low as 10 ppt. A higher rate of growth was observed at the lower salinities as compared to that of 34 ppt. Upon shifting the salinity of the surrounding water from 34 ppt to 15 ppt, the level of the PRL transcripts gradually increased to reach the peak level until 24 h of acclimation at 15 ppt, but decreased back as adaptation continued to 144 h. In contrast, levels of plasma Na+, Cl-, and osmolality decreased at the initial stage (4–8 h) of acclimation at 15 pt but increased back as adaptation continued till 144 h. Conclusion Cinnamon clownfish could survive under salinities as low as 10 ppt. Upon shifting the salinity of the surrounding water from 34 ppt to 15 ppt, the level of the PRL transcripts gradually increased during the initial stage of acclimation but decreased back to the normal level as adaptation continued. An opposite pattern of changes - decrease at the beginning followed by an increase - in the levels of plasma Na+, Cl-, and osmolality was found upon acclimation to low salinity. The results suggest an involvement of PRL in the processes of osmoregulation and homeostasis in A. melanopus. PMID:23276106

  7. Gene encoding prolactin in cinnamon clownfish Amphiprion melanopus and its expression upon acclimation to low salinities.

    PubMed

    Noh, Gyeong Eon; Rho, Sum; Chang, Yong Jin; Min, Byung Hwa; Kim, Jong-Myoung

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a key hormone for osmoregulation in fish. Levels of PRL in the pituitary gland and plasma ion composition of clownfish seem to change to regulate their hydromineral balance during adaptation to waters of different salinities. In order to understand osmoregulatory mechanism and its association with growth performance and PRL in fish, the gene encoding PRL and its expression level in cinnamon clownfish Amphiprion melanopus upon acclimation to low salinity was analyzed. The PRL gene of A. melanopus encoded a protein of 212 amino acid residues comprised of a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids and a mature protein of 188 amino acids. Analysis of growth performance under different salinities of 34, 25, 15, and 10 ppt indicated that cinnamon clownfish could survive under salinities as low as 10 ppt. A higher rate of growth was observed at the lower salinities as compared to that of 34 ppt. Upon shifting the salinity of the surrounding water from 34 ppt to 15 ppt, the level of the PRL transcripts gradually increased to reach the peak level until 24 h of acclimation at 15 ppt, but decreased back as adaptation continued to 144 h. In contrast, levels of plasma Na+, Cl-, and osmolality decreased at the initial stage (4-8 h) of acclimation at 15 pt but increased back as adaptation continued till 144 h. Cinnamon clownfish could survive under salinities as low as 10 ppt. Upon shifting the salinity of the surrounding water from 34 ppt to 15 ppt, the level of the PRL transcripts gradually increased during the initial stage of acclimation but decreased back to the normal level as adaptation continued. An opposite pattern of changes - decrease at the beginning followed by an increase - in the levels of plasma Na+, Cl-, and osmolality was found upon acclimation to low salinity. The results suggest an involvement of PRL in the processes of osmoregulation and homeostasis in A. melanopus.

  8. Post-translational modification of Rauscher leukemia virus precursor polyproteins encoded by the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, A M; Rabin, E H; Oroszlan, S

    1979-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of retrovirus gag gene-encoded polyproteins include proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, and glycosylation. To study the sequence of these events, we labeled JLS-V9 cells chronically infected with Rauscher murine leukemia virus in pulse-chase experiments with the radioactive precursors [35S]methionine, [14C]mannose, [3H]glucosamine, and [32P]phosphate. Newly synthesized gag polyproteins which incorporated label, and the modified products derived from them, were identified by immunoprecipitation of cell lysates with anti-p30 rabbit serum, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Pulse-chase experiments were carried out in the presence as well as in the absence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation. Among the three major polyproteins synthesized in the absence of tunicamycin, two were found to be glycosylated but not phosphorylated. These were designated gPr80gag and gP94gag. Both shared identical [35S]methionine peptides with Pr65gag and p30. Of the two nonglycosylated precursors, Pr65gag and Pr75gag, only Pr65gag was found to be detectably phosphorylated, and Pr75gag could be readily identified only when glycosylation was inhibited. On the basis of these results, a scheme for the post-translational modification of gag polyproteins is proposed. According to this scheme the gag gene-encoded polyproteins are processed from a common precursor, Pr75gag, by two divergent pathways: one leading through the intermediate Pr65gag to internal virion components via cleavage and phosphorylation and the other via tunicamycin-sensitive mannosylation to the intermediate gPr80gag, which is further glycosylated to yield cell surface polyprotein gP94gag. Images PMID:480454

  9. Complementary DNA characterization and chromosomal localization of a human gene related to the poliovirus receptor-encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M; Eberlé, F; Mattei, M G; Gabert, J; Birg, F; Bardin, F; Maroc, C; Dubreuil, P

    1995-04-03

    The human poliovirus (PV) receptor (PVR) is a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily with unknown cellular function. We have isolated a human PVR-related (PRR) cDNA. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of PRR showed, in the extracellular region, 51.7 and 54.3% similarity with human PVR and with the murine PVR homolog, respectively. The cDNA coding sequence is 1.6-kb long and encodes a deduced 57-kDa protein; this protein has a structural organization analogous to that of PVR, that is, one V- and two C-set Ig domains, with a conserved number of aa. Northern blot analysis indicated that a major 5.9-kb transcript is present in all normal human tissues tested. In situ hybridization showed that the PRR gene is located at bands q23-q24 of human chromosome 11.

  10. MitoRes: a resource of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes and their products in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Domenico; Licciulli, Flavio; Turi, Antonio; Grillo, Giorgio; Saccone, Cecilia; D'Elia, Domenica

    2006-01-24

    Mitochondria are sub-cellular organelles that have a central role in energy production and in other metabolic pathways of all eukaryotic respiring cells. In the last few years, with more and more genomes being sequenced, a huge amount of data has been generated providing an unprecedented opportunity to use the comparative analysis approach in studies of evolution and functional genomics with the aim of shedding light on molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. In this context, the problem of the optimal extraction of representative datasets of genomic and proteomic data assumes a crucial importance. Specialised resources for nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related proteins already exist; however, no mitochondrial database is currently available with the same features of MitoRes, which is an update of the MitoNuc database extensively modified in its structure, data sources and graphical interface. It contains data on nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related products for any metazoan species for which this type of data is available and also provides comprehensive sequence datasets (gene, transcript and protein) as well as useful tools for their extraction and export. MitoRes http://www2.ba.itb.cnr.it/MitoRes/ consolidates information from publicly external sources and automatically annotates them into a relational database. Additionally, it also clusters proteins on the basis of their sequence similarity and interconnects them with genomic data. The search engine and sequence management tools allow the query/retrieval of the database content and the extraction and export of sequences (gene, transcript, protein) and related sub-sequences (intron, exon, UTR, CDS, signal peptide and gene flanking regions) ready to be used for in silico analysis. The tool we describe here has been developed to support lab scientists and bioinformaticians alike in the characterization of molecular features and evolution of mitochondrial targeting sequences. The

  11. A gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase is present in Phytomonas but absent in Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Van Hellemond, J J; Simons, B; Millenaar, F F; Tielens, A G

    1998-01-01

    The constituents of the respiratory chain are believed to differ among the trypanosomatids; bloodstream stages of African trypanosomes and Phytomonas promastigotes oxidize ubiquinol by a ubiquinol:oxygen oxidoreductase, also known as alternative oxidase, whereas Leishmania spp. oxidize ubiquinol via a classic cytochrome-containing respiratory chain. The molecular basis for this elementary difference in ubiquinol oxidation by the mitochondrial electron-transport chain in distinct trypanosomatids was investigated. The presence of a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase could be demonstrated in Phytomonas and Trypanosoma brucei, trypanosomatids that are known to contain alternative oxidase activity. Our results further demonstrated that Leishmania spp. lack a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase, and therefore, all stages of Leishmania spp. will lack the alternative oxidase protein. The observed fundamental differences between the respiratory chains of distinct members of the trypanosomatid family are thus caused by the presence or absence of a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase.

  12. Detection with synthetic oligonucleotide probes of nucleotide sequence variations in the genes encoding enterotoxins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, M; Murakami, A; Arita, M; Jikuya, H; Takano, J; Honda, T; Miwatani, T

    1989-01-01

    We examined variations in the genes encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) in 88 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from individuals with traveler's diarrhea to find suitable sequences for use as oligonucleotide probes. Four oligonucleotide probes of the gene encoding ST of human origin (STIb or STh), one oligonucleotide probe of the gene encoding ST of porcine origin (STIa or STp), and three oligonucleotide probes of the gene encoding LT of human origin (LTIh) were used in DNA colony hybridization tests. In 15 of 22 strains possessing the STh gene and 28 of 42 strains producing LT, the sequences of all regions tested were identical to the published sequences. One region in the STh gene examined with a 18-mer probe was relatively well conserved and was shown to be closely associated with the enterotoxicity of the E. coli strains in suckling mice. This oligonucleotide, however, hybridized with strains of Vibrio cholerae O1, V. parahaemolyticus, and Yersinia enterocolitica that gave negative results in the suckling mouse assay. PMID:2685027

  13. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-08

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins.

  14. All genes encoding enzymes participating in melatonin biosynthesis in the chicken pineal gland are transcribed rhythmically.

    PubMed

    Adamska, I; Marhelava, K; Walkiewicz, D; Kedzierska, U; Markowska, M; Majewski, P M

    2016-08-01

    Our recent research on the pineal gland of young chickens confirmed that three genes encoding enzymes involved in pineal melatonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) and acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (Asmt), are transcribed rhythmically under light:dark (L:D) 12:12 conditions in vivo. Additionally, in the pineal gland of maturing chickens, the dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene is transcribed rhythmically at a specific stage of the developmental process. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to verify whether all of these genes are transcribed rhythmically in vivo under constant darkness (D:D) and in pinealocyte cultures under both L:D and D:D. Experiments were performed on chickens maintained under L:D 12:12 conditions. Chickens at 15 days of age were divided into two groups; chickens from the first group remained under the same conditions, whereas those from the second group were kept in darkness. Subsequently, 16-day-old animals were sacrificed every 2 hours over a 24-h period. For the in vitro experiments, 16-day-old chickens were sacrificed at ZT 6, and their pineal glands were isolated. Pineal cultures were maintained for up to two days in L:D conditions. Then, the pinealocyte cultures were divided into two groups: the first remained under L:D conditions, whereas the second was transferred to D:D conditions. Pinealocytes were subsequently collected every 2 hours over a 24-h period. Transcription was evaluated using the RT-qPCR method, and the rhythm percentage was calculated through Cosinor analysis. The mRNA levels of all genes examined were rhythmic under all conditions. Moreover, in silico analysis of the promoters of all of the genes examined revealed the presence of enhancer box sequences in all of the promoters as well as DBP/E4BP4 binding elements in the promoters of Tph1 and Asmt. This suggests that these genes may all be regulated transcriptionally by the molecular clock mechanism and may

  15. A survey of genes encoding H2O2-producing GMC oxidoreductases in 10 Polyporales genomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Carro, Juan; Serrano, Ana; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) recently were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity and distribution of genes involved in degradation of plant polymers in this Basidiomycota order, which includes most wood-rotting fungi. Oxidases, including members of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, play a central role in the above degradative process because they generate extracellular H2O2 acting as the ultimate oxidizer in both white-rot and brown-rot decay. The survey was completed by analyzing the GMC genes in the available genomes of seven more species to cover the four Polyporales clades. First, an in silico search for sequences encoding members of the aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, methanol oxidase, pyranose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase families was performed. The curated sequences were subjected to an analysis of their evolutionary relationships, followed by estimation of gene duplication/reduction history during fungal evolution. Second, the molecular structures of the near one hundred GMC oxidoreductases identified were modeled to gain insight into their structural variation and expected catalytic properties. In contrast to ligninolytic peroxidases, whose genes are present in all white-rot Polyporales genomes and absent from those of brown-rot species, the H2O2-generating oxidases are widely distributed in both fungal types. This indicates that the GMC oxidases provide H2O2 for both ligninolytic peroxidase activity (in white-rot decay) and Fenton attack on cellulose (in brown-rot decay), after the transition between both decay patterns in Polyporales occurred. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Discovery of Nuclear-Encoded Genes for the Neurotoxin Saxitoxin in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J. S.; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A.; Neilan, Brett A.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×106 mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment. PMID:21625593

  17. Discovery of nuclear-encoded genes for the neurotoxin saxitoxin in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J S; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A; Neilan, Brett A; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×10(6) mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment.

  18. Genes encoding the vacuolar Na+/H+ exchanger and flower coloration.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Fukada-Tanaka, S; Inagaki, Y; Saito, N; Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T; Iida, S

    2001-05-01

    Vacuolar pH plays an important role in flower coloration: an increase in the vacuolar pH causes blueing of flower color. In the Japanese morning glory (Ipomoea nil or Pharbitis nil), a shift from reddish-purple buds to blue open flowers correlates with an increase in the vacuolar pH. We describe details of the characterization of a mutant that carries a recessive mutation in the Purple (Pr) gene encoding a vacuolar Na+/H+ exchanger termed InNHX1. The genome of I. nil carries one copy of the Pr (or InNHX1) gene and its pseudogene, and it showed functional complementation to the yeast nhx1 mutation. The mutant of I. nil, called purple (pr), showed a partial increase in the vacuolar pH during flower-opening and its reddish-purple buds change into purple open flowers. The vacuolar pH in the purple open flowers of the mutant was significantly lower than that in the blue open flowers. The InNHX1 gene is most abundantly expressed in the petals at around 12 h before flower-opening, accompanying the increase in the vacuolar pH for the blue flower coloration. No such massive expression was observed in the petunia flowers. Since the NHX1 genes that promote the transport of Na+ into the vacuoles have been regarded to be involved in salt tolerance by accumulating Na+ in the vacuoles, we can add a new biological role for blue flower coloration in the Japanese morning glory by the vacuolar alkalization.

  19. Genetic and functional analysis of the gene encoding GAP-43 in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Ho-Min; Cheng, Min-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Fen; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-02-01

    In earlier reports, growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) has been shown to be critical for initial establishment or reorganization of synaptic connections, a process thought to be disrupted in schizophrenia. Additionally, abnormal GAP-43 expression in different brain regions has been linked to this disorder in postmortem brain studies. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the gene encoding GAP-43 in the susceptibility to schizophrenia. We searched for genetic variants in the promoter region and 3 exons (including both UTR ends) of the GAP-43 gene using direct sequencing in a sample of patients with schizophrenia (n=586) and non-psychotic controls (n=576), both being Han Chinese from Taiwan, and conducted an association and functional study. We identified 11 common polymorphisms in the GAP-43 gene. SNP and haplotype-based analyses displayed no associations with schizophrenia. Additionally, we identified 4 rare variants in 5 out of 586 patients, including 1 variant located at the promoter region (c.-258-4722G>T) and 1 synonymous (V110V) and 2 missense (G150R and P188L) variants located at exon 2. No rare variants were found in the control subjects. The results of the reporter gene assay demonstrated that the regulatory activity of construct containing c.-258-4722T was significantly lower as compared to the wild type construct (c.-258-4722G; p<0.001). In silico analysis also demonstrated the functional relevance of other rare variants. Our study lends support to the hypothesis of multiple rare mutations in schizophrenia, and it provides genetic clues that indicate the involvement of GAP-43 in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sequence and genetic organization of a Zymomonas mobilis gene cluster that encodes several enzymes of glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Barnell, W.O.; Kyung Cheol Yi; Conway, T.

    1990-12-01

    The Zymomonas mobilis genes that encode glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (zwf), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (edd), and glucokinase (glk) were cloned independently by genetic complementation of specific defects in Escherichia coli metabolism. The identify of these cloned genes was confirmed by various biochemical means. Nucleotide sequence analysis established that these three genes are clustered on the genome and revealed an additional open reading frame in this region that has significant amino acid identity to the E.coli xylose-proton symporter and the human glucose transporter. On the basis of this evidence and structural analysis of the deduced primary amino acid sequence, this gene is believed tomore » encode the Z. mobilis glucose-facilitated diffusion protein, glf. The four genes in the 6-kb cluster are organized in the order glf, zwf, edd, glk. The glf and zwf genes are separated by 146 bp. The zwf and edd genes overlap by 8 bp, and their expression may be translationally coupled. The edd and glk genes are separated by 203 bp. The glk gene is followed by tandem transcriptional terminators. The four genes appear to be organized in an operon. Such an arrangement of the genes that govern glucose uptake and the first three steps of the Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway provides the organism with a mechanism for carefully regulating the levels of the enzymes that control carbon flux into the pathway.« less

  1. Androgenic correlates of genetic variation in the gene encoding 5alpha-reductase type 1.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Justine A; Panagiotopoulos, Sianna; Akdeniz, Aysel; Jerums, George; Harrap, Stephen B

    2005-01-01

    Androgens determine male secondary sexual characteristics and influence a variety of metabolic pathways. Circulating levels of androgens are highly heritable; however, the genes involved are largely unknown. The 5alpha-reductase enzymes types 1 and 2 responsible for converting testosterone to the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone are encoded by the SRD5A1 and SRD5A2 genes, respectively. We performed indirect genetic association studies of SRD5A1 and SRD5A2 and the dihydrotestosterone/testosterone ratio that reflects the activity of 5alpha-reductase in 57 males with type 2 diabetes. We found evidence of significant association between a single nucleotide polymorphism in SRD5A1 and the dihydrotestosterone/testosterone ratio (median 0.10, interquartile range 0.08 vs. median 0.06, interquartile range 0.04, P = 0.009). The polymorphism was not associated with any diabetic phenotypes. These results suggest that functional genetic variants might exist in or around SRD5A1 that affect the activity of the 5alpha-reductase enzyme type 1 and influence androgen levels.

  2. An evolutionarily conserved gene family encodes proton-selective ion channels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yu-Hsiang; Cooper, Alexander J; Teng, Bochuan; Chang, Rui B; Artiga, Daniel J; Turner, Heather N; Mulhall, Eric M; Ye, Wenlei; Smith, Andrew D; Liman, Emily R

    2018-03-02

    Ion channels form the basis for cellular electrical signaling. Despite the scores of genetically identified ion channels selective for other monatomic ions, only one type of proton-selective ion channel has been found in eukaryotic cells. By comparative transcriptome analysis of mouse taste receptor cells, we identified Otopetrin1 (OTOP1), a protein required for development of gravity-sensing otoconia in the vestibular system, as forming a proton-selective ion channel. We found that murine OTOP1 is enriched in acid-detecting taste receptor cells and is required for their zinc-sensitive proton conductance. Two related murine genes, Otop2 and Otop3 , and a Drosophila ortholog also encode proton channels. Evolutionary conservation of the gene family and its widespread tissue distribution suggest a broad role for proton channels in physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  3. Molecular cloning of a gene encoding translation initiation factor (TIF) from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mirbod, F; Nakashima, S; Kitajima, Y; Ghannoum, M A; Cannon, R D; Nozawa, Y

    1996-01-01

    The differential display technique was applied to compare mRNAs from two clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different virulence; high (potent strain, 16240) and low (weak strain, 18084) extracellular phospholipase activities. Complementary DNA fragments corresponding to several apparently differentially expressed mRNAs were recovered and sequenced. A complementary DNA fragment seen distinctly in the potent phospholipase producing strain was highly homologous to the yeast translation initiation factor (TIF). The selected DNA fragment was then used as a probe to isolate its corresponding complementary DNA clone from a library of C. albicans genomic DNA. The sequence of isolated gene revealed an open reading frame of 1194 nucleotides with the potential to encode a protein of 397 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 43 kDa. Over its entire length, the amino acid sequence showed strong homology (78-89%) to Saccharomyces cerevisiae TIF and (63-80%) to mouse eIF-4A proteins. Therefore, our C. albicans gene was identified to be TIF (Ca TIF). Northern blot analysis in the two strains of C. albicans revealed that Ca TIF expression is 1.5-fold higher in the potent phospholipase producing strain. The restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from this potent strain revealed at least two hybridized bands in Southern blot analysis, suggesting two or more closely related sequences in the C. albicans genome.

  4. Novel Genes Encoding Hexadecanoic Acid Δ6-Desaturase Activity in a Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Araki, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Hiroshi; Takigawa, Hirofumi; Tsujino, Yukiharu; Ozaki, Katsuya

    2016-11-01

    cis-6-Hexadecenoic acid, a major component of human sebaceous lipids, is involved in the defense mechanism against Staphylococcus aureus infection in healthy skin and closely related to atopic dermatitis. Previously, Koike et al. (Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 64:1064-1066, 2000) reported that a mutant strain of Rhodococcus sp. produced cis-6-hexadecenoate derivatives from palmitate alkyl esters. From the mutant Rhodococcus strain, we identified and sequenced two open reading frames present in an amplified 5.7-kb region; these open reading frames encoded tandemly repeated Δ6-desaturase-like genes, Rdes1 and Rdes2. A phylogenetic tree indicated that Rdes1 and Rdes2 were different from previously known Δ6-desaturase genes, and that they formed a new cluster. Rdes1 and Rdes2 were each introduced into vectors and then expressed separately in Escherichia coli, and the fatty acid composition of the transformed cells was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The amount of cis-6-hexadecenoic acid was significantly higher in Rdes1- or Rdes2-transformed E. coli cells (twofold and threefold, respectively) than in vector-only control cells. These results showed that cis-6-hexadecenoic acid was produced in E. coli cells by the rhodococcal Δ6-desaturase-like proteins.

  5. Identification of the gene encoding a 38-kilodalton immunogenic and protective antigen of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Okwumabua, Ogi; Chinnapapakkagari, Sharmila

    2005-04-01

    In our continued effort to search for a Streptococcus suis protein(s) that can serve as a vaccine candidate or a diagnostic reagent, we constructed and screened a gene library with a polyclonal antibody raised against the whole-cell protein of S. suis type 2. A clone that reacted with the antibody was identified and characterized. Analysis revealed that the gene encoding the protein is localized within a 2.0-kbp EcoRI DNA fragment. The nucleotide sequence contained an open reading frame that encoded a polypeptide of 445 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 46.4 kDa. By in vitro protein synthesis and Western blot experiments, the protein exhibited an electrophoretic mobility of approximately 38 kDa. At the amino acid level the deduced primary sequence shared homology with sequences of unknown function from Streptococcus pneumoniae (89%), Streptococcus mutans (86%), Lactococcus lactis (80%), Listeria monocytogenes (74%), and Clostridium perfringens (64%). Except for strains of serotypes 20, 26, 32, and 33, Southern hybridization analysis revealed the presence of the gene in strains of other S. suis serotypes and demonstrated restriction fragment length differences caused by a point mutation in the EcoRI recognition sequence. We confirmed expression of the 38-kDa protein in the hybridization-positive isolates using specific antiserum against the purified protein. The recombinant protein was reactive with serum from pigs experimentally infected with virulent strains of S. suis type 2, suggesting that the protein is immunogenic and may serve as an antigen of diagnostic importance for the detection of most S. suis infections. Pigs immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa protein mounted antibody responses to the protein and were completely protected against challenge with a strain of a homologous serotype, the wild-type virulent strain of S. suis type 2, suggesting that it may be a good candidate for the development of a vaccine that can be used as

  6. Cloning of gene-encoded stem bromelain on system coming from Pichia pastoris as therapeutic protein candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, Y.; Hidayati, W.

    2018-01-01

    The process of identifying bacterial recombination using PCR, and restriction, and then sequencing process was done after identifying the bacteria. This research aimed to get a yeast cell of Pichia pastoris which has an encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The production of recombinant stem bromelain enzymes using yeast cells of P. pastoris can produce pure bromelain rod enzymes and have the same conformation with the enzyme’s conformation in pineapple plants. This recombinant stem bromelain enzyme can be used as a therapeutic protein in inflammatory, cancer and degenerative diseases. This study was an early stage of a step series to obtain bromelain rod protein derived from pineapple made with genetic engineering techniques. This research was started by isolating the RNA of pineapple stem which was continued with constructing cDNA using reserve transcriptase-PCR technique (RT-PCR), doing the amplification of bromelain enzyme encoder gene with PCR technique using a specific premiere couple which was designed. The process was continued by cloning into bacterium cells of Escherichia coli. A vector which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme was inserted into the yeast cell of P. pastoris and was continued by identifying the yeast cell of P. pastoris which brought the encoder gene of stem bromelain enzyme. The research has not found enzyme gene of stem bromelain in yeast cell of P. pastoris yet. The next step is repeating the process by buying new reagent; RNase inhibitor, and buying liquid nitrogen.

  7. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  8. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Polina S.; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V.; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V.; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and ApcMin mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver. PMID:23792645

  9. Characterization of a Thioredoxin-1 Gene from Taenia solium and Its Encoding Product

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Lucía; Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; Ochoa-Sánchez, Alicia; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium thioredoxin-1 gene (TsTrx-1) has a length of 771 bp with three exons and two introns. The core promoter gene presents two putative stress transcription factor binding sites, one putative TATA box, and a transcription start site (TSS). TsTrx-1 mRNA is expressed higher in larvae than in adult. This gene encodes a protein of 107 amino acids that presents the Trx active site (CGPC), the classical secondary structure of the thioredoxin fold, and the highest degree of identity with the Echinococcus granulosus Trx. A recombinant TsTrx-1 (rTsTrx-1) was produced in Escherichia coli with redox activity. Optimal activity for rTsTrx-1 was at pH 6.5 in the range of 15 to 25°C. The enzyme conserved activity for 3 h and lost it in 24 h at 37°C. rTsTrx-1 lost 50% activity after 1 h and lost activity completely in 24 h at temperatures higher than 55°C. Best storage temperature for rTsTrx-1 was at −70°C. It was inhibited by high concentrations of H2O2 and methylglyoxal (MG), but it was inhibited neither by NaCl nor by anti-rTsTrx-1 rabbit antibodies that strongly recognized a ~12 kDa band in extracts from several parasites. These TsTrx-1 properties open the opportunity to study its role in relationship T. solium-hosts. PMID:26090410

  10. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. Results To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Conclusion Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo. PMID:24308601

  11. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-05

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain.

  12. Identification and characterization of an autolysin-encoding gene of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yukie; Kawada, Miki; Nakano, Yoshio; Toyoshima, Kuniaki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2005-06-01

    We identified a gene (atlA) encoding autolytic activity from Streptococcus mutans Xc. The AtlA protein predicted to be encoded by atlA is composed of 979 amino acids with a molecular weight of 107,279 and has a conserved beta-1,4-N-acetylmuramidase (lysozyme) domain in the C-terminal portion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate extracts of strain Xc showed two major bacteriolytic bands with molecular masses of 107 and 79 kDa, both of which were absent from a mutant with inactivated atlA. Western blot analysis revealed that the 79-kDa band was derived from the 107-kDa peptide by cleavage of its N-terminal portion. The inactivation of atlA resulted in a marked decrease in autolysis and the formation of very long chains of cells compared to the case for the parent strain. Although both the parent and mutant strains formed biofilms in the presence of sucrose, the biofilms formed by the mutant had a sponge-like architecture with large gaps and contained 30% less biomass than those formed by the parent strain. Furthermore, strain Xc formed glucose-dependent, loose biofilms in the absence of sucrose, but the mutant lost this ability. These results suggest that AtlA may play an important role in biofilm formation by S. mutans. The antibody produced against the C-terminal peptide containing the beta-1,4-N-acetylmuramidase domain drastically inhibited the autolytic activity of strain Xc. This inhibition was specific among the oral streptococci to S. mutans. These results indicate that the catalytic domain of AtlA is located at the C terminus, suggesting that further characterization of this domain may provide a means to control cariogenic dental plaque formation.

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance genes in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y B; Xie, X Q; Li, Z Y; Bai, H; Dong, L; Dong, Z P; Dong, J G

    2014-08-28

    The nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease-resistance genes are the largest category of plant disease-resistance gene analogs. The complete set of disease-resistant candidate genes, which encode the NBS sequence, was filtered in the genomes of two varieties of foxtail millet (Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu'). This study investigated a number of characteristics of the putative NBS genes, such as structural diversity and phylogenetic relationships. A total of 269 and 281 NBS-coding sequences were identified in Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu', respectively. When the two databases were compared, 72 genes were found to be identical and 164 genes showed more than 90% similarity. Physical positioning and gene family analysis of the NBS disease-resistance genes in the genome revealed that the number of genes on each chromosome was similar in both varieties. The eighth chromosome contained the largest number of genes and the ninth chromosome contained the lowest number of genes. Exactly 34 gene clusters containing the 161 genes were found in the Yugu1 genome, with each cluster containing 4.7 genes on average. In comparison, the 'Zhang gu' genome possessed 28 gene clusters, which had 151 genes, with an average of 5.4 genes in each cluster. The largest gene cluster, located on the eighth chromosome, contained 12 genes in the Yugu1 database, whereas it contained 16 genes in the 'Zhang gu' database. The classification results showed that the CC-NBS-LRR gene made up the largest part of each chromosome in the two databases. Two TIR-NBS genes were also found in the Yugu1 genome.

  14. Overexpression of the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of prenyl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Chikara; Muramatsu, Masayoshi; Obata, Shusei; Sakuradani, Eiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2009-04-01

    To develop microbial production method for prenyl alcohols (e.g., (E,E)-farnesol (FOH), (E)-nerolidol (NOH), and (E,E,E)-geranylgeraniol (GGOH)), the genes encoding enzymes in the mevalonate and prenyl diphosphate pathways were overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the resultant transformants were evaluated as to the production of these alcohols. Overexpression of the gene encoding hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase was most effective among the genes tested. A derivative of S. cerevisiae ATCC 200589, which was selected through screening, was found to be the most suitable host for the production. On cultivation of the resultant transformant, in which the HMG-CoA reductase gene was overexpressed, in a 5-liter bench-scale jar fermenter for 7 d, the production of FOH, NOH, and GGOH reached 145.7, 98.8, and 2.46 mg/l, respectively.

  15. Detection of virulence and β-lactamase encoding genes in Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae clinical isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Paola Aparecida Alves; Furlan, João Pedro Rueda; Oliveira-Silva, Mariana; Nakamura-Silva, Rafael; Gomes, Carolina Nogueira; Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Pitondo-Silva, André

    2018-05-21

    Enterobacter cloacae and E. aerogenes have been increasingly reported as important opportunistic pathogens. In this study, a high prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates from Brazil, harboring several β-lactamase encoding genes was found. Several virulence genes were observed in E. aerogenes, contrasting with the E. cloacae isolates which presented none. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-31

    00 0 Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus (Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid ODiagnosis and Vaccine DevelopmentN| ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT...11. TITLE (include Security Classification) Cloning and Expression of Genes f or Dengue Virus Type 2 Fncoded Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine ...epidemics in Central and South Americas and the Caribbean is a cause of major concern. An effective vaccine is not available to protect individuals

  17. Disruption of the psbA gene by the copy correction mechanism reveals that the expression of plastid-encoded genes is regulated by photosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Hameed, Waqar; Nozoe, Mikio; Shiina, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    The functional analysis of genes encoded by the chloroplast genome of tobacco by reverse genetics is routine. Nevertheless, for a small number of genes their deletion generates heteroplasmic genotypes, complicating their analysis. There is thus the need for additional strategies to develop deletion mutants for these genes. We have developed a homologous copy correction-based strategy for deleting/mutating genes encoded on the chloroplast genome. This system was used to produce psbA knockouts. The resulting plants are homoplasmic and lack photosystem II (PSII) activity. Further, the deletion mutants exhibit a distinct phenotype; young leaves are green, whereas older leaves are bleached, irrespective of light conditions. This suggests that senescence is promoted by the absence of psbA. Analysis of the transcript levels indicates that NEP (nuclear-encoded plastid RNA polymerase)-dependent plastid genes are up regulated in the psbA deletion mutants, whereas the bleached leaves retain plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase activity. Hence, the expression of NEP-dependent plastid genes may be regulated by photosynthesis, either directly or indirectly.

  18. Characterization of the Genes Encoding the Cytosolic and Plastidial Forms of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase in Wheat Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Rachel A.; Johnson, Philip E.; Beckles, Diane M.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Jenner, Helen L.; Naldrett, Mike J.; Denyer, Kay

    2002-01-01

    In most species, the synthesis of ADP-glucose (Glc) by the enzyme ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) occurs entirely within the plastids in all tissues so far examined. However, in the endosperm of many, if not all grasses, a second form of AGPase synthesizes ADP-Glc outside the plastid, presumably in the cytosol. In this paper, we show that in the endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum), the cytosolic form accounts for most of the AGPase activity. Using a combination of molecular and biochemical approaches to identify the cytosolic and plastidial protein components of wheat endosperm AGPase we show that the large and small subunits of the cytosolic enzyme are encoded by genes previously thought to encode plastidial subunits, and that a gene, Ta.AGP.S.1, which encodes the small subunit of the cytosolic form of AGPase, also gives rise to a second transcript by the use of an alternate first exon. This second transcript encodes an AGPase small subunit with a transit peptide. However, we could not find a plastidial small subunit protein corresponding to this transcript. The protein sequence of the purified plastidial small subunit does not match precisely to that encoded by Ta.AGP.S.1 or to the predicted sequences of any other known gene from wheat or barley (Hordeum vulgare). Instead, the protein sequence is most similar to those of the plastidial small subunits from chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa) seeds. These data suggest that the gene encoding the major plastidial small subunit of AGPase in wheat endosperm has yet to be identified. PMID:12428011

  19. The bglA Gene of Aspergillus kawachii Encodes Both Extracellular and Cell Wall-Bound β-Glucosidases

    PubMed Central

    Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Nagahara, Tatsuya; Kimura, Hitoshi; Takano, Makoto; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Ito, Kiyoshi

    1999-01-01

    We cloned the genomic DNA and cDNA of bglA, which encodes β-glucosidase in Aspergillus kawachii, based on a partial amino acid sequence of purified cell wall-bound β-glucosidase CB-1. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned bglA gene revealed a 2,933-bp open reading frame with six introns that encodes an 860-amino-acid protein. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, we concluded that the bglA gene encodes cell wall-bound β-glucosidase CB-1. The amino acid sequence exhibited high levels of homology with the amino acid sequences of fungal β-glucosidases classified in subfamily B. We expressed the bglA cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and detected the recombinant β-glucosidase in the periplasm fraction of the recombinant yeast. A. kawachii can produce two extracellular β-glucosidases (EX-1 and EX-2) in addition to the cell wall-bound β-glucosidase. A. kawachii in which the bglA gene was disrupted produced none of the three β-glucosidases, as determined by enzyme assays and a Western blot analysis. Thus, we concluded that the bglA gene encodes both extracellular and cell wall-bound β-glucosidases in A. kawachii. PMID:10584016

  20. Identification of a Polymorphic Gene, BCL2A1, Encoding Two Novel Hematopoietic Lineage-specific Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Nishida, Tetsuya; Kondo, Eisei; Miyazaki, Mikinori; Taji, Hirohumi; Iida, Hiroatsu; Tsujimura, Kunio; Yazaki, Makoto; Naoe, Tomoki; Morishima, Yasuo; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Toshitada

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification of two novel minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs), encoded by two separate single nucleotide polymorphisms on a single gene, BCL2A1, and restricted by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*2402 (the most common HLA-A allele in Japanese) and B*4403, respectively. Two cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for these mHAgs were first isolated from two distinct recipients after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Both clones lyse only normal and malignant cells within the hematopoietic lineage. To localize the gene encoding the mHAgs, two-point linkage analysis was performed on the CTL lytic patterns of restricting HLA-transfected B lymphoblastoid cell lines obtained from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain. Both CTL clones showed a completely identical lytic pattern for 4 pedigrees and the gene was localized within a 3.6-cM interval of 15q24.3–25.1 region that encodes at least 46 genes. Of those, only BCL2A1 has been reported to be expressed in hematopoietic cells and possess three nonsynonymous nucleotide changes. Minigene transfection and epitope reconstitution assays with synthetic peptides identified both HLA-A*2402– and B*4403-restricted mHAg epitopes to be encoded by distinct polymorphisms within BCL2A1. PMID:12771180

  1. Mutations of the X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 are associated with autism.

    PubMed

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Betancur, Catalina; Råstam, Maria; Colineaux, Catherine; Gillberg, I Carina; Soderstrom, Henrik; Giros, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    Many studies have supported a genetic etiology for autism. Here we report mutations in two X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 in siblings with autism-spectrum disorders. These mutations affect cell-adhesion molecules localized at the synapse and suggest that a defect of synaptogenesis may predispose to autism.

  2. Differential regulation of mnp2, a new manganese peroxidase-encoding gene from the ligninolytic fungus Trametes versicolor PRL 572

    Treesearch

    Tomas Johansson; Per Olof Nyman; Daniel Cullen

    2002-01-01

    A peroxidase-encoding gene, mnp2, and its corresponding cDNA were characterized from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor PRL 572. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to identify mnp2 transcripts in nutrient-limited stationary cultures. Although mnp2 lacks upstream metal response elements (MREs), addition of MnSO4 to cultures increased...

  3. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  4. Expression of the Immediate-Early Gene-Encoded Protein Egr-1 ("zif268") during in Vitro Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink…

  5. [Cloning, mutagenesis and symbiotic phenotype of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes from Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanan; Zeng, Xiaobo; Zhou, Xuejuan; Li, Youguo

    2016-12-04

    Lipid transfer protein superfamily is involved in lipid transport and metabolism. This study aimed to construct mutants of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes in Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R, and to study the phenotypes and function of mutations during symbiosis with Astragalus sinicus. We used bioinformatics to predict structure characteristics and biological functions of lipid transfer proteins, and conducted semi-quantitative and fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR to analyze the expression levels of target genes in free-living and symbiotic conditions. Using pK19mob insertion mutagenesis to construct mutants, we carried out pot plant experiments to observe symbiotic phenotypes. MCHK-5577, MCHK-2172 and MCHK-2779 genes encoding proteins belonged to START/RHO alpha_C/PITP/Bet_v1/CoxG/CalC (SRPBCC) superfamily, involved in lipid transport or metabolism, and were identical to M. loti at 95% level. Gene relative transcription level of the three genes all increased compared to free-living condition. We obtained three mutants. Compared with wild-type 7653R, above-ground biomass of plants and nodulenitrogenase activity induced by the three mutants significantly decreased. Results indicated that lipid transfer protein encoding genes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R may play important roles in symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and the mutations significantly affected the symbiotic phenotypes. The present work provided a basis to study further symbiotic function mechanism associated with lipid transfer proteins from rhizobia.

  6. Identification of the gene for fly non-muscle myosin heavy chain: Drosophila myosin heavy chains are encoded by a gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehart, D P; Lutz, M S; Chan, D; Ketchum, A S; Laymon, R A; Nguyen, B; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate species Drosophila has a single myosin heavy chain gene that apparently encodes all sarcomeric heavy chain polypeptides. Flies also contain a cytoplasmic myosin heavy chain polypeptide that by immunological and peptide mapping criteria is clearly different from the major thoracic muscle isoform. Here, we identify the gene that encodes this cytoplasmic isoform and demonstrate that it is distinct from the muscle myosin heavy chain gene. Thus, fly myosin heavy chains are the products of a gene family. Our data suggest that the contractile function required to power myosin based movement in non-muscle cells requires myosin diversity beyond that available in a single heavy chain gene. In addition, we show, that accumulation of cytoplasmic myosin transcripts is regulated in a developmental stage specific fashion, consistent with a key role for this protein in the movements of early embryogenesis. Images PMID:2498088

  7. Temperature-sensitive albino gene TCD5, encoding a monooxygenase, affects chloroplast development at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Jianhui; Shi, Xiaoliang; Peng, Yu; Li, Ping; Lin, Dongzhi; Dong, Yanjun; Teng, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Chloroplasts are essential for photosynthesis and play critical roles in plant development. In this study, we characterized the temperature-sensitive chlorophyll-deficient rice mutant tcd5, which develops albino leaves at low temperatures (20 °C) and normal green leaves at high temperatures (32 °C). The development of chloroplasts and etioplasts is impaired in tcd5 plants at 20 °C, and the temperature-sensitive period for the albino phenotype is the P4 stage of leaf development. The development of thylakoid membranes is arrested at the mid-P4 stage in tcd5 plants at 20 °C. We performed positional cloning of TCD5 and then complementation and knock-down experiments, and the results showed that the transcript LOC_Os05g34040.1 from the LOC_Os05g34040 gene corresponded to the tcd5 phenotype. TCD5 encodes a conserved plastid-targeted monooxygenase family protein which has not been previously reported associated with a temperature-sensitive albino phenotype in plants. TCD5 is abundantly expressed in young leaves and immature spikes, and low temperatures increased this expression. The transcription of some genes involved in plastid transcription/translation and photosynthesis varied in the tcd5 mutant. Although the phenotype and temperature dependence of the TCD5 orthologous mutant phenotype were different in rice and Arabidopsis, OsTCD5 could rescue the phenotype of the Arabidopsis mutant, suggesting that TCD5 function is conserved between monocots and dicots. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. StAR Enhances Transcription of Genes Encoding the Mitochondrial Proteases Involved in Its Own Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  9. The life-extending gene Indy encodes an exchanger for Krebs-cycle intermediates.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Teichert, Carsten; Herold, Diana; Rogina, Blanka; Helfand, Stephen; Gollasch, Maik; Luft, Friedrich C; Aronson, Peter S

    2006-07-01

    A longevity gene called Indy (for 'I'm not dead yet'), with similarity to mammalian genes encoding sodium-dicarboxylate cotransporters, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster. Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that INDY mediates the flux of dicarboxylates and citrate across the plasma membrane, but the specific transport mechanism mediated by INDY was not identified. To test whether INDY functions as an anion exchanger, we examined whether substrate efflux is stimulated by transportable substrates added to the external medium. Efflux of [14C]citrate from INDY-expressing oocytes was greatly accelerated by the addition of succinate to the external medium, indicating citrate-succinate exchange. The succinate-stimulated [14C]citrate efflux was sensitive to inhibition by DIDS (4,4'-di-isothiocyano-2,2'-disulphonic stilbene), as demonstrated previously for INDY-mediated succinate uptake. INDY-mediated efflux of [14C]citrate was also stimulated by external citrate and oxaloacetate, indicating citrate-citrate and citrate-oxaloacetate exchange. Similarly, efflux of [14C]succinate from INDY-expressing oocytes was stimulated by external citrate, alpha-oxoglutarate and fumarate, indicating succinate-citrate, succinate-alpha-oxoglutarate and succinate-fumarate exchange respectively. Conversely, when INDY-expressing Xenopus oocytes were loaded with succinate and citrate, [14C]succinate uptake was markedly stimulated, confirming succinate-succinate and succinate-citrate exchange. Exchange of internal anion for external citrate was markedly pH(o)-dependent, consistent with the concept that citrate is co-transported with a proton. Anion exchange was sodium-independent. We conclude that INDY functions as an exchanger of dicarboxylate and tricarboxylate Krebs-cycle intermediates. The effect of decreasing INDY activity, as in the long-lived Indy mutants, may be to alter energy metabolism in a manner that favours lifespan extension.

  10. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Two Genes Encoding Dihydroflavonol-4-Reductase from Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhichun; Yang, Li; Sun, Yimin; Xiao, Xunyan; Song, Feng; Luo, Keming

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR, EC 1.1.1.219) is a rate-limited enzyme in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins and condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins) that catalyzes the reduction of dihydroflavonols to leucoanthocyanins. In this study, two full-length transcripts encoding for PtrDFR1 and PtrDFR2 were isolated from Populus trichocarpa. Sequence alignment of the two PtrDFRs with other known DFRs reveals the homology of these genes. The expression profile of PtrDFRs was investigated in various tissues of P. trichocarpa. To determine their functions, two PtrDFRs were overexpressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The associated color change in the flowers was observed in all 35S:PtrDFR1 lines, but not in 35S:PtrDFR2 lines. Compared to the wild-type control, a significantly higher accumulation of anthocyanins was detected in transgenic plants harboring the PtrDFR1. Furthermore, overexpressing PtrDFR1 in Chinese white poplar (P. tomentosa Carr.) resulted in a higher accumulation of both anthocyanins and condensed tannins, whereas constitutively expressing PtrDFR2 only improved condensed tannin accumulation, indicating the potential regulation of condensed tannins by PtrDFR2 in the biosynthetic pathway in poplars. PMID:22363429

  11. Improving flavour and quality of tomatoes by expression of synthetic gene encoding sweet protein monellin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chinreddy Subramanyam; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Kaul, Tanushri; Islam, Tahmina; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2015-05-01

    Monellin a sweet-tasting protein exists naturally as a heterodimer of two non-covalently linked subunits chain A and B, which loses its sweetness on denaturation. In this study, we validated the expression of a synthetic monellin gene encoding a single polypeptide chain covalently linking the two subunits under T7 and fruit-ripening-specific promoters in Escherichia coli and tomato fruits, respectively. Purified recombinant monellin protein retained its sweet flavour at 70 °C and pH 2. We developed 15 transgenic T0 tomato plants overexpressing monellin, which were devoid of any growth penalty or phenotypic abnormalities during greenhouse conditions. T-DNA integration and fruit-specific heterologous expression of monellin had occurred in these transgenic tomato lines. ELISA revealed that expression of monellin was 4.5% of the total soluble fruit protein. Functional analyses of transgenic tomatoes of T2-5 and T2-14 lines revealed distinctly strong sweetness compared with wild type. Monellin a potential non-carbohydrate sweetener, if expressed in high amounts in fruits and vegetables, would enhance their flavour and quality.

  12. Biochemical characterization of two thermostable xylanolytic enzymes encoded by a gene cluster of Caldicellulosiruptor owensensis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Shuofu; Jia, Xiaojing; Wang, Jinzhi; Qiao, Weibo; Peng, Xiaowei; Han, Yejun

    2014-01-01

    The xylanolytic extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor owensensis provides a promising platform for xylan utilization. In the present study, two novel xylanolytic enzymes, GH10 endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Coxyn A) and GH39 β-1,4-xylosidase (Coxyl A) encoded in one gene cluster of C.owensensis were heterogeneously expressed and biochemically characterized. The optimum temperature of the two xylanlytic enzymes was 75°C, and the respective optimum pH for Coxyn A and Coxyl A was 7.0 and 5.0. The difference of Coxyn A and Coxyl A in solution was existing as monomer and homodimer respectively, it was also observed in predicted secondary structure. Under optimum condition, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of Coxyn A was 366 mg ml(-1) s(-1) on beechwood xylan, and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of Coxyl A was 2253 mM(-1) s(-1) on pNP-β-D-xylopyranoside. Coxyn A degraded xylan to oligosaccharides, which were converted to monomer by Coxyl A. The two intracellular enzymes might be responsible for xylooligosaccharides utilization in C.owensensis, also provide a potential way for xylan degradation in vitro.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Ao, Pingxing; Yang, Shuanglong; Zou, Zhurong; Wang, Shasha; Gong, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) (EC 1.5.99.8) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of proline. The enzyme JcProDH and its complementary DNA (cDNA) were isolated from Jatropha curcas L., an important woody oil plant used as a raw material for biodiesels. It has been classified as a member of the Pro_dh superfamily based on multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic characterization, and its role in proline catabolism. Its cDNA is 1674 bp in length with a complete open reading frame of 1485 bp, which encodes a polypeptide chain of 494 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 54 kD and a pI of 8.27. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that JcProDH showed high similarity with ProDH from other plants. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that JcProDH was especially abundant in the seeds and flowers but scarcely present in the stems, roots, and leaves. In addition, the expression of JcProDH increased in leaves experiencing environmental stress such as cold (5 °C), heat (42 °C), salt (300 mM), and drought (30 % PEG6000). The JcProDH protein was successfully expressed in the yeast strain INVSc1 and showed high enzyme activity in proline catabolism. This result confirmed that the JcProDH gene negatively participated in the stress response.

  14. Epistatic interaction between the lipase-encoding genes Pnpla2 and Lipe causes liposarcoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu Pei; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bo; Gladdy, Rebecca; Andelfinger, Gregor; Mitchell, Grant A.

    2017-01-01

    Liposarcoma is an often fatal cancer of fat cells. Mechanisms of liposarcoma development are incompletely understood. The cleavage of fatty acids from acylglycerols (lipolysis) has been implicated in cancer. We generated mice with adipose tissue deficiency of two major enzymes of lipolysis, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), encoded respectively by Pnpla2 and Lipe. Adipocytes from double adipose knockout (DAKO) mice, deficient in both ATGL and HSL, showed near-complete deficiency of lipolysis. All DAKO mice developed liposarcoma between 11 and 14 months of age. No tumors occurred in single knockout or control mice. The transcriptome of DAKO adipose tissue showed marked differences from single knockout and normal controls as early as 3 months. Gpnmb and G0s2 were among the most highly dysregulated genes in premalignant and malignant DAKO adipose tissue, suggesting a potential utility as early markers of the disease. Similar changes of GPNMB and G0S2 expression were present in a human liposarcoma database. These results show that a previously-unknown, fully penetrant epistatic interaction between Pnpla2 and Lipe can cause liposarcoma in mice. DAKO mice provide a promising model for studying early premalignant changes that lead to late-onset malignant disease. PMID:28459858

  15. Amtyr1: characterization of a gene from honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain encoding a functional tyramine receptor.

    PubMed

    Blenau, W; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A

    2000-03-01

    Biogenic amine receptors are involved in the regulation and modulation of various physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. We have cloned a member of this gene family from the CNS of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. The deduced amino acid sequence is homologous to tyramine receptors cloned from Locusta migratoria and Drosophila melanogaster as well as to an octopamine receptor cloned from Heliothis virescens. Functional properties of the honeybee receptor were studied in stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Tyramine reduced forskolin-induced cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of approximately 130 nM. A similar effect of tyramine was observed in membrane homogenates of honeybee brains. Octopamine also reduced cyclic AMP production in the transfected cell line but was both less potent (EC50 of approximately 3 microM) and less efficacious than tyramine. Receptor-encoding mRNA has a wide-spread distribution in the brain and subesophageal ganglion of the honeybee, suggesting that this tyramine receptor is involved in sensory signal processing as well as in higher-order brain functions.

  16. Genetic analysis of the VP2-encoding gene of canine parvovirus strains from Africa.

    PubMed

    Dogonyaro, Banenat B; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Venter, Estelle H; van Vuuren, Moritz

    2013-08-30

    Since the emergence of canine parvovirus type-2 (CPV-2) in the early 1970s, it has been evolving into novel genetic and antigenic variants (CPV-2a, 2b and 2c) that are unevenly distributed throughout the world. Genetic characterization of CPV-2 has not been documented in Africa since 1998 apart from the study carried out in Tunisia 2009. A total of 139 field samples were collected from South Africa and Nigeria, detected using PCR and the full length VP2-encoding gene of 27 positive samples were sequenced and genetically analyzed. Nigerian samples (n=6), South Africa (n=19) and vaccine strains (n=2) were compared with existing sequences obtained from GenBank. The results showed the presence of both CPV-2a and 2b in South Africa and only CPV-2a in Nigeria. No CPV-2c strain was detected during this study. Phylogenetic analysis showed a clustering not strictly associated with the geographical origin of the analyzed strains, although most of the South African strains tended to cluster together and the viral strains analyzed in this study were not completely distinct from CPV-2 strains from other parts of the world. Amino acid analysis showed predicted amino acid changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and characterization of a cellulase-encoding gene from the buffalo rumen metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung Hong; Maruset, Lalita; Uengwetwanit, Tanaporn; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Champreda, Verawat; Tanapongpipat, Sutipa; Jirajaroenrat, Kanya; Rakshit, Sudip K; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Pongpattanakitshote, Somchai

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms residing in the rumens of cattle represent a rich source of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes, since their diet consists of plant-based materials that are high in cellulose and hemicellulose. In this study, a metagenomic library was constructed from buffalo rumen contents using pCC1FOS fosmid vector. Ninety-three clones from the pooled library of approximately 10,000 clones showed degrading activity against AZCL-HE-Cellulose, whereas four other clones showed activity against AZCL-Xylan. Contig analysis of pyrosequencing data derived from the selected strongly positive clones revealed 15 ORFs that were closely related to lignocellulose-degrading enzymes belonging to several glycosyl hydrolase families. Glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5) was the most abundant glycosyl hydrolase found, and a majority of the GHF5s in our metagenomes were closely related to several ruminal bacteria, especially ones from other buffalo rumen metagenomes. Characterization of BT-01, a selected clone with highest cellulase activity from the primary plate screening assay, revealed a cellulase encoding gene with optimal working conditions at pH 5.5 at 50 °C. Along with its stability over acidic pH, the capability efficiently to hydrolyze cellulose in feed for broiler chickens, as exhibited in an in vitro digestibility test, suggests that BT-01 has potential application as a feed supplement.

  18. Transgenic tomatoes express an antigenic polypeptide containing epitopes of the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins, encoded by a synthetic gene.

    PubMed

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Márquez-Mercado, Crisóforo; López-Revilla, Rubén; Castillo-Collazo, Rosalba; Alpuche-Solís, Angel Gabriel

    2007-07-01

    A current priority of vaccinology is the development of multicomponent vaccines that protect against several pathogens. The diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine prevents the symptoms of three serious and often fatal diseases due to the exotoxins produced by Corynebacterium diphteriae, Bordetella pertussis and Clostridium tetani. We are attempting to develop an edible DPT multicomponent vaccine in plants, based on the fusion of protective exotoxin epitopes encoded by synthetic genes. By means of Agrobacterium mediated transformation we generated transgenic tomatoes with a plant-optimised synthetic gene encoding a novel polypeptide containing two adjuvant and six DPT immunoprotective exotoxin epitopes joined by peptide linkers. In transformed tomato plants, integration of the synthetic DPT (sDPT) gene detected by PCR was confirmed by Southern blot, and specific transcripts of the expected molecular size were detected by RT-PCR. Expression of the putative polypeptide encoded by the sDPT gene was detected by immunoassay with specific antibodies to the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins. The sDPT gene is therefore integrated, transcribed and translated as the expected recombinant sDPT multiepitope polypeptide in transgenic tomatoes that constitute a potential edible vaccine.

  19. Detection of β-lactamase encoding genes in feces, soil and water from a Brazilian pig farm.

    PubMed

    Furlan, João Pedro Rueda; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2018-01-10

    β-lactam antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of different types of infections worldwide and the resistance to these antibiotics has grown sharply, which is of great concern. Resistance to β-lactams in gram-negative bacteria is mainly due to the production of β-lactamases, which are classified according to their functional activities. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of β-lactamases encoding genes in feces, soil, and water from a Brazilian pig farm. Different β-lactamases encoding genes were found, including bla CTX-M-Gp1 , bla CTX-M-Gp9 , bla SHV , bla OXA-1-like , bla GES , and bla VEB . The bla SHV and bla CTX-M-Gp1 genes have been detected in all types of samples, indicating the spread of β-lactam resistant bacteria among farm pigs and the environment around them. These results indicate that β-lactamase encoding genes belonging to the cloxacillinase, ESBL, and carbapenemase and they have high potential to spread in different sources, due to the fact that genes are closely related to mobile genetic elements, especially plasmids.

  20. The rgg0182 gene encodes a transcriptional regulator required for the full Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Romain; Bruneau, Emmanuelle; Gardan, Rozenn; Bertin, Stéphane; Fleuchot, Betty; Decaris, Bernard; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2011-10-07

    Streptococcus thermophilus is an important starter strain for the production of yogurt and cheeses. The analysis of sequenced genomes of four strains of S. thermophilus indicates that they contain several genes of the rgg familly potentially encoding transcriptional regulators. Some of the Rgg proteins are known to be involved in bacterial stress adaptation. In this study, we demonstrated that Streptococcus thermophilus thermal stress adaptation required the rgg0182 gene which transcription depends on the culture medium and the growth temperature. This gene encoded a protein showing similarity with members of the Rgg family transcriptional regulator. Our data confirmed that Rgg0182 is a transcriptional regulator controlling the expression of its neighboring genes as well as chaperones and proteases encoding genes. Therefore, analysis of a Δrgg0182 mutant revealed that this protein played a role in the heat shock adaptation of Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311. These data showed the importance of the Rgg0182 transcriptional regulator on the survival of S. thermophilus during dairy processes and more specifically during changes in temperature.

  1. Molecular cloning and expression of the gene encoding the kinetoplast-associated type II DNA topoisomerase of Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Pasion, S G; Hines, J C; Aebersold, R; Ray, D S

    1992-01-01

    A type II DNA topoisomerase, topoIImt, was shown previously to be associated with the kinetoplast DNA of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata. The gene encoding this kinetoplast-associated topoisomerase has been cloned by immunological screening of a Crithidia genomic expression library with monoclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. The gene CfaTOP2 is a single copy gene and is expressed as a 4.8-kb polyadenylated transcript. The nucleotide sequence of CfaTOP2 has been determined and encodes a predicted polypeptide of 1239 amino acids with a molecular mass of 138,445. The identification of the cloned gene is supported by immunoblot analysis of the beta-galactosidase-CfaTOP2 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli and by analysis of tryptic peptide sequences derived from purified topoIImt. CfaTOP2 shares significant homology with nuclear type II DNA topoisomerases of other eukaryotes suggesting that in Crithidia both nuclear and mitochondrial forms of topoisomerase II are encoded by the same gene.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the metE gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, R R; Perkins, J B; Howitt, C L; Pero, J

    1996-01-01

    The metE gene, encoding S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (EC 2.5.1.6) from Bacillus subtilis, was cloned in two steps by normal and inverse PCR. The DNA sequence of the metE gene contains an open reading frame which encodes a 400-amino-acid sequence that is homologous to other known S-adenosylmethionine synthetases. The cloned gene complements the metE1 mutation and integrates at or near the chromosomal site of metE1. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is reduced by only a factor of about 2 by exogenous methioinine. Overproduction of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from a strong constitutive promoter leads to methionine auxotrophy in B. subtilis, suggesting that S-adenosylmethionine is a corepressor of methionine biosynthesis in B. subtilis, as others have already shown for Escherichia coli. PMID:8755891

  3. Cloning and characterization of the metE gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yocum, R R; Perkins, J B; Howitt, C L; Pero, J

    1996-08-01

    The metE gene, encoding S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (EC 2.5.1.6) from Bacillus subtilis, was cloned in two steps by normal and inverse PCR. The DNA sequence of the metE gene contains an open reading frame which encodes a 400-amino-acid sequence that is homologous to other known S-adenosylmethionine synthetases. The cloned gene complements the metE1 mutation and integrates at or near the chromosomal site of metE1. Expression of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is reduced by only a factor of about 2 by exogenous methioinine. Overproduction of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from a strong constitutive promoter leads to methionine auxotrophy in B. subtilis, suggesting that S-adenosylmethionine is a corepressor of methionine biosynthesis in B. subtilis, as others have already shown for Escherichia coli.

  4. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarraymore » analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of

  5. Cloning, characterization, expression analysis and inhibition studies of a novel gene encoding Bowman-Birk type protease inhibitor from rice bean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents the first study describing the isolation, cloning and characterization of a full length gene encoding Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (RbTI) from rice bean (Vigna umbellata). A full-length protease inhibitor gene with complete open reading frame of 327bp encoding 109 amino acids w...

  6. The Bacillus subtilis ywjI (glpX) gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the class III Fbp enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jules, Matthieu; Le Chat, Ludovic; Aymerich, Stéphane; Le Coq, Dominique

    2009-05-01

    We present here experimental evidence that the Bacillus subtilis ywjI gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the fbp-encoded class III enzyme, and constitutes with the upstream gene, murAB, an operon transcribed at the same level under glycolytic or gluconeogenic conditions.

  7. The Bacillus subtilis ywjI (glpX) Gene Encodes a Class II Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatase, Functionally Equivalent to the Class III Fbp Enzyme▿

    PubMed Central

    Jules, Matthieu; Le Chat, Ludovic; Aymerich, Stéphane; Le Coq, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    We present here experimental evidence that the Bacillus subtilis ywjI gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the fbp-encoded class III enzyme, and constitutes with the upstream gene, murAB, an operon transcribed at the same level under glycolytic or gluconeogenic conditions. PMID:19270101

  8. Genomic polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium in human major histocompatibility complex-encoded antigen-processing genes.

    PubMed Central

    van Endert, P M; Lopez, M T; Patel, S D; Monaco, J J; McDevitt, H O

    1992-01-01

    Recently, two subunits of a large cytosolic protease and two putative peptide transporter proteins were found to be encoded by genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These genes have been suggested to be involved in the processing of antigenic proteins for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Because of the high degree of polymorphism in MHC genes, and previous evidence for both functional and polypeptide sequence polymorphism in the proteins encoded by the antigen-processing genes, we tested DNA from 27 consanguineous human cell lines for genomic polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. These studies demonstrate a strong linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and LMP2 RFLPs. Moreover, RFLPs, as well as a polymorphic stop codon in the telomeric TAP2 gene, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR alleles and RFLPs in the HLA-DO gene. A high rate of recombination, however, seems to occur in the center of the complex, between the TAP1 and TAP2 genes. Images PMID:1360671

  9. Transcriptional Modulation of Genes Encoding Structural Characteristics of Differentiating Enterocytes During Development of a Polarized Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Halbleib, Jennifer M.; Sääf, Annika M.

    2007-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence implicating posttranslational mechanisms in the development of epithelial cell polarity, little is known about the patterns of gene expression and transcriptional regulation during this process. We characterized the temporal program of gene expression during cell–cell adhesion–initiated polarization of human Caco-2 cells in tissue culture, which develop structural and functional polarity similar to that of enterocytes in vivo. A distinctive switch in gene expression patterns occurred upon formation of cell–cell contacts between neighboring cells. Expression of genes involved in cell proliferation was down-regulated concomitant with induction of genes necessary for functional specialization of polarized epithelial cells. Transcriptional up-regulation of these latter genes correlated with formation of important structural and functional features in enterocyte differentiation and establishment of structural and functional cell polarity; components of the apical microvilli were induced as the brush border formed during polarization; as barrier function was established, expression of tight junction transmembrane proteins peaked; transcripts encoding components of the apical, but not the basal-lateral trafficking machinery were increased during polarization. Coordinated expression of genes encoding components of functional cell structures were often observed indicating temporal control of expression and assembly of multiprotein complexes. PMID:17699590

  10. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  11. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N [Idaho Falls, ID; Thompson, Vicki S [Idaho Falls, ID; Schaller, Kastli D [Ammon, ID; Apel, William A [Jackson, WY; Lacey, Jeffrey A [Idaho Falls, ID; Reed, David W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-04-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  12. Evidence for the bacterial origin of genes encoding fermentation enzymes of the amitochondriate protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, B; Mai, Z; Caplivski, D; Ghosh, S; de la Vega, H; Graf, T; Samuelson, J

    1997-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an amitochondriate protozoan parasite with numerous bacterium-like fermentation enzymes including the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), ferredoxin (FD), and alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE). The goal of this study was to determine whether the genes encoding these cytosolic E. histolytica fermentation enzymes might derive from a bacterium by horizontal transfer, as has previously been suggested for E. histolytica genes encoding heat shock protein 60, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. In this study, the E. histolytica por gene and the adhE gene of a second amitochondriate protozoan parasite, Giardia lamblia, were sequenced, and their phylogenetic positions were estimated in relation to POR, ADHE, and FD cloned from eukaryotic and eubacterial organisms. The E. histolytica por gene encodes a 1,620-amino-acid peptide that contained conserved iron-sulfur- and thiamine pyrophosphate-binding sites. The predicted E. histolytica POR showed fewer positional identities to the POR of G. lamblia (34%) than to the POR of the enterobacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae (49%), the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. (44%), and the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis (46%), which targets its POR to anaerobic organelles called hydrogenosomes. Maximum-likelihood, neighbor-joining, and parsimony analyses also suggested as less likely E. histolytica POR sharing more recent common ancestry with G. lamblia POR than with POR of bacteria and the T. vaginalis hydrogenosome. The G. lamblia adhE encodes an 888-amino-acid fusion peptide with an aldehyde dehydrogenase at its amino half and an iron-dependent (class 3) ADH at its carboxy half. The predicted G. lamblia ADHE showed extensive positional identities to ADHE of Escherichia coli (49%), Clostridium acetobutylicum (44%), and E. histolytica (43%) and lesser identities to the class 3 ADH of eubacteria and yeast (19 to 36%). Phylogenetic analyses inferred a closer relationship of the E

  13. Cloning, sequence, and disruption of the Saccharomyces diastaticus DAR1 gene encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H T; Rahaim, P; Robbins, P; Yocum, R R

    1994-01-01

    The Saccharomyces diastaticus DAR1 gene was cloned by complementation in an Escherichia coli strain auxogrophic for glycerol-3-phosphate. DAR1 encodes an NADH-dependent dihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase (sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [G3PDase; EC 1.1.1.8]) homologous to several other eukaryotic G3PDases. DAR1 is distinct from GUT2, which encodes a glucose-repressed mitochondrial G3PDase, but is identical to GPD1 from S. cerevisiae, a close relative of S. diastaticus. The level of DAR1-encoded G3PDase was increased about threefold in a medium of high osmolarity. Disruption of DAR1 in a haploid S. cerevisiae was not lethal but led to a decrease in cytoplasmic NADH-dependent G3PDase activity, an increase in osmotic sensitivity, and a 25% reduction in glycerol secretion from cells grown anaerobically on glucose. PMID:7961476

  14. Cloning, sequence, and disruption of the Saccharomyces diastaticus DAR1 gene encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Rahaim, P; Robbins, P; Yocum, R R

    1994-11-01

    The Saccharomyces diastaticus DAR1 gene was cloned by complementation in an Escherichia coli strain auxogrophic for glycerol-3-phosphate. DAR1 encodes an NADH-dependent dihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase (sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [G3PDase; EC 1.1.1.8]) homologous to several other eukaryotic G3PDases. DAR1 is distinct from GUT2, which encodes a glucose-repressed mitochondrial G3PDase, but is identical to GPD1 from S. cerevisiae, a close relative of S. diastaticus. The level of DAR1-encoded G3PDase was increased about threefold in a medium of high osmolarity. Disruption of DAR1 in a haploid S. cerevisiae was not lethal but led to a decrease in cytoplasmic NADH-dependent G3PDase activity, an increase in osmotic sensitivity, and a 25% reduction in glycerol secretion from cells grown anaerobically on glucose.

  15. Prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of intensive care units (ICU)

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Marzieh; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan; Bahador, Abas; Jafari, Rasool; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes among A. baumannii isolates. In this cross sectional study, 100 A. baumannii strains were isolated from ICU wards of 3 educational hospitals of Hamadan City, Iran in 2011. Phenotypic identification of the production of ESBLs and MBLs has been carried out by using E-test and DDST methods, respectively. PCR technique was used for amplification of the ESBL and MBL encoding genes, namely: CTX-M, SHV, TEM, OXA-51, VIM-Family, IMP-Family, SPM-1, SIM-1, and GIM-1. Eighty seven (87%), 95 (95%), 98 (98%) and 95 (95%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates were resistant to imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, respectively. Also, 99% and 7% of the isolates were MBLs and ESBLs produced phenotypically. Thirty (30%), 20 (20%) and 58 (58%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates have been confirmed to harbor the blaVIM-family, TEM and SHV genes, respectively. Our results show no significant relationship between the detected gens with production of MBLs and ESBLs in spite of high prevalence of MBL encoding and drug resistant A. baumannii. Probably some other genes rather than what we studied are involved in phenotypic production of MBLs and ESBLs and subsequent drug resistance in Hamadan area, Iran. PMID:26150748

  16. A cDNA from a mouse pancreatic beta cell encoding a putative transcription factor of the insulin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M D; Park, C W; Rosen, A; Aronheim, A

    1990-01-01

    Cell specific expression of the insulin gene is achieved through transcriptional mechanisms operating on multiple DNA sequence elements located in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Of particular importance in the rat insulin I gene are two closely similar 9 bp sequences (IEB1 and IEB2): mutation of either of these leads to 5-10 fold reduction in transcriptional activity. We have screened an expression cDNA library derived from mouse pancreatic endocrine beta cells with a radioactive DNA probe containing multiple copies of the IEB1 sequence. A cDNA clone (A1) isolated by this procedure encodes a protein which shows efficient binding to the IEB1 probe, but much weaker binding to either an unrelated DNA probe or to a probe bearing a single base pair insertion within the recognition sequence. DNA sequence analysis indicates a protein belonging to the helix-loop-helix family of DNA-binding proteins. The ability of the protein encoded by clone A1 to recognize a number of wild type and mutant DNA sequences correlates closely with the ability of each sequence element to support transcription in vivo in the context of the insulin 5' flanking DNA. We conclude that the isolated cDNA may encode a transcription factor that participates in control of insulin gene expression. Images PMID:2181401

  17. The Retrovirus pol Gene Encodes a Product Required for DNA Integration: Identification of a Retrovirus int Locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panganiban, Antonito T.; Temin, Howard M.

    1984-12-01

    We mutagenized cloned spleen necrosis virus DNA to identify a region of the retrovirus genome encoding a polypeptide required for integration of viral DNA. Five plasmids bearing different lesions in the 3' end of the pol gene were examined for the ability to integrate or replicate following transfection of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Transfection with one of these DNAs resulted in the generation of mutant virus incapable of integrating but able to replicate at low levels; this phenotype is identical to that of mutants bearing alterations in the cis-acting region, att. To determine whether the 3' end of the pol gene encodes a protein that interacts with att, we did a complementation experiment. Cells were first infected with an att- virus and then superinfected with the integration-deficient virus containing a lesion in the pol gene and a wild-type att site. The results showed that the att- virus provided a trans-acting function allowing integration of viral DNA derived from the mutant bearing a wild-type att site. Thus, the 3' end of the pol gene serves as an ``int'' locus and encodes a protein mediating integration of retrovirus DNA through interaction with att.

  18. Two Closely Related Genes of Arabidopsis Encode Plastidial Cytidinediphosphate Diacylglycerol Synthases Essential for Photoautotrophic Growth1[C

    PubMed Central

    Haselier, André; Akbari, Hana; Weth, Agnes; Baumgartner, Werner; Frentzen, Margrit

    2010-01-01

    Cytidinediphosphate diacylglycerol synthase (CDS) catalyzes the formation of cytidinediphosphate diacylglycerol, an essential precursor of anionic phosphoglycerolipids like phosphatidylglycerol or -inositol. In plant cells, CDS isozymes are located in plastids, mitochondria, and microsomes. Here, we show that these isozymes are encoded by five genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Alternative translation initiation or alternative splicing of CDS2 and CDS4 transcripts can result in up to 10 isoforms. Most of the cDNAs encoding the various plant isoforms were functionally expressed in yeast and rescued the nonviable phenotype of the mutant strain lacking CDS activity. The closely related genes CDS4 and CDS5 were found to encode plastidial isozymes with similar catalytic properties. Inactivation of both genes was required to obtain Arabidopsis mutant lines with a visible phenotype, suggesting that the genes have redundant functions. Analysis of these Arabidopsis mutants provided further independent evidence for the importance of plastidial phosphatidylglycerol for structure and function of thylakoid membranes and, hence, for photoautotrophic growth. PMID:20442275

  19. A study of Staphylococcus aureusnasal carriage, antibacterial resistance and virulence factor encoding genes in a tertiary care hospital, Kayseri, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Oguzkaya-Artan, M; Artan, C; Baykan, Z; Sakalar, C; Turan, A; Aksu, H

    2015-01-01

    This study was to determine the virulence encoding genes, and the antibiotic resistance patterns of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates, which were isolated from the nasal samples of chest clinic patients. The nasal samples of the in-patients (431) and out-patients (1857) in Kayseri Training and Research Hospital's Chest Clinic, Kayseri, Turkey, were cultured on CHROMagar (Biolife, Italiana) S. aureus, and subcultured on sheep blood agar for the isolation of S. aureus. Disc diffusion method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The occurrence of the staphylococcal virulence encoding genes (enterotoksins [sea, seb, sec, see, seg, seh, sei, sej], fibronectin-binding proteins A, B [fnbA, fnbB], toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 [tst]) were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Forty-five of the 55 (81.8%) S. aureus isolates from inpatients, and 319 (90.6%) isolates from tested 352 out-patient's isolates were suspected to all the antibiotics tested. methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in 1.2% of S. aureus isolates. Rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin resistance rates were 1.2%, 1.7%, 2.0%, 8.8%, and 1.2%, respectively. The isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin and vancomycin. The genes most frequently found were tst (92.7%), seg (85.8%), sea (83.6%), fnbA (70.9%). There was no statistical significance detected between MRSA and mecA-negative S. aureus isolates in encoding genes distribution (P > 0.05). Our results show that virulence factor encoding genes were prevalent in patients with S. aureus carriage, whereas antibiotic resistance was low. These virulence determinants may increase the risk for subsequent invasive infections in carriers.

  20. The Down regulated in Adenoma (dra) gene encodes an intestine-specific membrane sulfate transport protein.

    PubMed

    Silberg, D G; Wang, W; Moseley, R H; Traber, P G

    1995-05-19

    A gene has been described, Down Regulated in Adenoma (dra), which is expressed in normal colon but is absent in the majority of colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas. However, the function of this protein is unknown. Because of sequence similarity to a recently cloned membrane sulfate transporter in rat liver, the transport function of Dra was examined. We established that dra encodes for a Na(+)-independent transporter for both sulfate and oxalate using microinjected Xenopus oocytes as an assay system. Sulfate transport was sensitive to the anion exchange inhibitor DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2' disulfonic acid stilbene). Using an RNase protection assay, we found that dra mRNA expression is limited to the small intestine and colon in mouse, therefore identifying Dra as an intestine-specific sulfate transporter. dra also had a unique pattern of expression during intestinal development. Northern blot analysis revealed a low level of expression in colon at birth with a marked increase in the first 2 postnatal weeks. In contrast, there was a lower, constant level of expression in small intestine in the postnatal period. Caco-2 cells, a colon carcinoma cell line that differentiates over time in culture, demonstrated a marked induction of dra mRNA as cells progressed from the preconfluent (undifferentiated) to the postconfluent (differentiated) state. These results show that Dra is an intestine-specific Na(+)-independent sulfate transporter that has differential expression during colonic development. This functional characterization provides the foundation for investigation of the role of Dra in intestinal sulfate transport and in the malignant phenotype.

  1. Coexistence of metallo-beta-lactamase-encoding genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mohanam, Lavanya; Menon, Thangam

    2017-07-01

    independent. Our results showed 10.3 per cent of carbapenem resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates, and the coexistence of MBL-encoding genes among P. aeruginosa mediated by class I integron.

  2. Identification of a melanosomal membrane protein encoded by the pink-eyed dilution (type II oculocutaneous albinism) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemblat, S; Durham-Pierre, D; Gardner, J M; Nakatsu, Y; Brilliant, M H; Orlow, S J

    1994-01-01

    The pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in the mouse is critical to melanogenesis; mutations in the homologous locus in humans, P, are a cause of type II oculocutaneous albinism. Although a cDNA encoded by the p gene has recently been identified, nothing is known about the protein product of this gene. To characterize the protein encoded by the p gene, we performed immunoblot analysis of extracts of melanocytes cultured from wild-type mice with an antiserum from rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to amino acids 285-298 of the predicted protein product of the murine p gene. This antiserum recognized a 110-kDa protein. The protein was absent from extracts of melanocytes cultured from mice with two mutations (pcp and p) in which transcripts of the p gene are absent or greatly reduced. Introduction of the cDNA for the p gene into pcp melanocytes by electroporation resulted in expression of the 3.3-kb mRNA and the 110-kDa protein. Upon subcellular fractionation of cultured melanocytes, the 110-kDa protein was found to be present in melanosomes but absent from the vesicular fraction; phase separation performed with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 confirmed the predicted hydrophobic nature of the protein. These results demonstrate that the p gene encodes a 110-kDa integral melanosomal membrane protein and establish a framework by which mutations at this locus, which diminish pigmentation, can be analyzed at the cellular and biochemical levels. Images PMID:7991586

  3. Effect of hypoxia on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Minchenko, O H; Riabovol, O O; Tsymbal, D O; Minchenko, D O; Ratushna, O O

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the effect of hypoxia on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells under the inhibition of IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme-1), which controls cell proliferation and tumor growth as a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress. It was shown that hypoxia down-regulated gene expression of malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2), malic enzyme 2 (ME2), mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (GOT2), and subunit B of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) in control (transfected by empty vector) glioma cells in a gene specific manner. At the same time, the expression level of mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and subunit D of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHD) genes in these cells does not significantly change in hypoxic conditions. It was also shown that the inhibition of ІRE1 signaling enzyme function in U87 glioma cells decreases the effect of hypoxia on the expression of ME2, GOT2, and SDHB genes and introduces the sensitivity of IDH2 gene to hypoxia. Furthermore, the expression of all studied genes depends on IRE1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in gene specific manner, because ІRE1 knockdown significantly decreases their expression in normoxic conditions, except for IDH2 gene, which expression level is strongly up-regulated. Therefore, changes in the expression level of nuclear genes encoding ME2, MDH2, IDH2, SDHB, SDHD, and GOT2 proteins possibly reflect metabolic reprogramming of mitochondria by hypoxia and IRE1-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling and correlate with suppression of glioma cell proliferation under inhibition of the IRE1 enzyme function.

  4. The maize brown midrib2 (bm2) gene encodes a methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase that contributes to lignin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ho Man; Liu, Sanzhen; Hill-Skinner, Sarah; Wu, Wei; Reed, Danielle; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S

    2014-02-01

    The midribs of maize brown midrib (bm) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown color associated with reductions in lignin concentration and alterations in lignin composition. Here, we report the mapping, cloning, and functional and biochemical analyses of the bm2 gene. The bm2 gene was mapped to a small region of chromosome 1 that contains a putative methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, which is down-regulated in bm2 mutant plants. Analyses of multiple Mu-induced bm2-Mu mutant alleles confirmed that this constitutively expressed gene is bm2. Yeast complementation experiments and a previously published biochemical characterization show that the bm2 gene encodes a functional MTHFR. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the bm2 mutants accumulate substantially reduced levels of bm2 transcript. Alteration of MTHFR function is expected to influence accumulation of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM). Because SAM is consumed by two methyltransferases in the lignin pathway (Ye et al., ), the finding that bm2 encodes a functional MTHFR is consistent with its lignin phenotype. Consistent with this functional assignment of bm2, the expression patterns of genes in a variety of SAM-dependent or -related pathways, including lignin biosynthesis, are altered in the bm2 mutant. Biochemical assays confirmed that bm2 mutants accumulate reduced levels of lignin with altered composition compared to wild-type. Hence, this study demonstrates a role for MTHFR in lignin biosynthesis. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The maize brown midrib2 (bm2) gene encodes a methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase that contributes to lignin accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ho Man; Liu, Sanzhen; Hill-Skinner, Sarah; Wu, Wei; Reed, Danielle; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    The midribs of maize brown midrib (bm) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown color associated with reductions in lignin concentration and alterations in lignin composition. Here, we report the mapping, cloning, and functional and biochemical analyses of the bm2 gene. The bm2 gene was mapped to a small region of chromosome 1 that contains a putative methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, which is down-regulated in bm2 mutant plants. Analyses of multiple Mu-induced bm2-Mu mutant alleles confirmed that this constitutively expressed gene is bm2. Yeast complementation experiments and a previously published biochemical characterization show that the bm2 gene encodes a functional MTHFR. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the bm2 mutants accumulate substantially reduced levels of bm2 transcript. Alteration of MTHFR function is expected to influence accumulation of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). Because SAM is consumed by two methyltransferases in the lignin pathway (Ye et al., 1994), the finding that bm2 encodes a functional MTHFR is consistent with its lignin phenotype. Consistent with this functional assignment of bm2, the expression patterns of genes in a variety of SAM-dependent or -related pathways, including lignin biosynthesis, are altered in the bm2 mutant. Biochemical assays confirmed that bm2 mutants accumulate reduced levels of lignin with altered composition compared to wild-type. Hence, this study demonstrates a role for MTHFR in lignin biosynthesis. PMID:24286468

  6. Discovery of novel cold-induced CISP genes encoding small RNA-binding proteins related to cold adaptation in barley.

    PubMed

    Ying, Mengchao; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    To adapt to cold conditions, barley plants rely on specific mechanisms, which have not been fully understood. In this study, we characterized a novel barley cold-induced gene identified using a PCR-based high coverage gene expression profiling method. The identified gene encodes a small protein that we named CISP1 (Cold-induced Small Protein 1). Homology searches of sequence databases revealed that CISP1 homologs (CISP2 and CISP3) exist in barley genome. Further database analyses showed that the CISP1 homologs were widely distributed in cold-tolerant plants such as wheat and rye. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR analyses indicated that the expression of barley CISP genes was markedly increased in roots exposed to cold conditions. In situ hybridization analyses showed that the CISP1 transcripts were localized in the root tip and lateral root primordium. We also demonstrated that the CISP1 protein bound to RNA. Taken together, these findings indicate that CISP1 and its homologs encoding small RNA-binding proteins may serve as RNA chaperones playing a vital role in the cold adaptation of barley root. This is the first report describing the likely close relationship between root-specific genes and the cold adaptation process, as well as the potential function of the identified genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic isoleucyl-, glutamyl- and arginyl-tRNA synthetases of yeast are encoded by separate genes.

    PubMed

    Tzagoloff, A; Shtanko, A

    1995-06-01

    Three complementation groups of a pet mutant collection have been found to be composed of respiratory-deficient deficient mutants with lesions in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Recombinant plasmids capable of restoring respiration were cloned by transformation of representatives of each complementation group with a yeast genomic library. The plasmids were used to characterize the complementing genes and to institute disruption of the chromosomal copies of each gene in respiratory-proficient yeast. The sequences of the cloned genes indicate that they code for isoleucyl-, arginyl- and glutamyl-tRNA synthetases. The properties of the mutants used to obtain the genes and of strains with the disrupted genes indicate that all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases function exclusively in mitochondrial proteins synthesis. The ISM1 gene for mitochondrial isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase has been localized to chromosome XVI next to UME5. The MSR1 gene for the arginyl-tRNA synthetase was previously located on yeast chromosome VIII. The third gene MSE1 for the mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase has not been localized. The identification of three new genes coding for mitochondrial-specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases indicates that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at least 11 members of this protein family are encoded by genes distinct from those coding for the homologous cytoplasmic enzymes.

  8. Targeted knock-out of a gene encoding sulfite reductase in the moss Physcomitrella patens affects gametophytic and sporophytic development.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Gertrud; Hermsen, Corinna; Melzer, Michael; Büttner-Mainik, Annette; Rennenberg, Heinz; Reski, Ralf; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-06-03

    A key step in sulfate assimilation into cysteine is the reduction of sulfite to sulfide by sulfite reductase (SiR). This enzyme is encoded by three genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To obtain a first insight into the roles of the individual isoforms, we deleted the gene encoding the SiR1 isoform in P. patens by homologous recombination and subsequently analysed the DeltaSiR1 mutants. While DeltaSiR1 mutants showed no obvious alteration in sulfur metabolism, their regeneration from protoplasts and their ability to produce mature spores was significantly affected, highlighting an unexpected link between moss sulfate assimilation and development, that is yet to be characterized. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Global gene expression during stringent response in Corynebacterium glutamicum in presence and absence of the rel gene encoding (p)ppGpp synthase

    PubMed Central

    Brockmann-Gretza, Olaf; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2006-01-01

    Background The stringent response is the initial reaction of microorganisms to nutritional stress. During stringent response the small nucleotides (p)ppGpp act as global regulators and reprogram bacterial transcription. In this work, the genetic network controlled by the stringent response was characterized in the amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results The transcriptome of a C. glutamicum rel gene deletion mutant, unable to synthesize (p)ppGpp and to induce the stringent response, was compared with that of its rel-proficient parent strain by microarray analysis. A total of 357 genes were found to be transcribed differentially in the rel-deficient mutant strain. In a second experiment, the stringent response was induced by addition of DL-serine hydroxamate (SHX) in early exponential growth phase. The time point of the maximal effect on transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR using the histidine and serine biosynthetic genes. Transcription of all of these genes reached a maximum at 10 minutes after SHX addition. Microarray experiments were performed comparing the transcriptomes of SHX-induced cultures of the rel-proficient strain and the rel mutant. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into three classes. Class A comprises genes which are differentially regulated only in the presence of an intact rel gene. This class includes the non-essential sigma factor gene sigB which was upregulated and a large number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism which were downregulated. Class B comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX in both strains, independent of the rel gene. A large number of genes encoding ribosomal proteins fall into this class, all being downregulated. Class C comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX only in the rel mutant. This class includes genes encoding putative stress proteins and global transcriptional regulators that might be responsible for the complex

  10. [Polymorphism of genes encoding proteins of DNA repair vs. occupational and environmental exposure to lead, arsenic and pesticides].

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Karol; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2018-03-09

    Genetic polymorphism is associated with the occurrence of at least 2 different alleles in the locus with a frequency higher than 1% in the population. Among polymorphisms we can find single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and polymorphism of variable number of tandem repeats. The presence of certain polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes is associated with the speed and efficiency of DNA repair and can protect or expose humans to the effects provoked by xenobiotics. Chemicals, such as lead, arsenic pesticides are considered to exhibit strong toxicity. There are many different polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, which determine the speed and efficiency of DNA damage repair induced by these xenobiotics. In the case of lead, the influence of various polymorphisms, such as APE1 (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1) (rs1130409), hOGG1 (human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase) (rs1052133), XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 1) (rs25487), XRCC1 (rs1799782) and XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 3) (rs861539) were described. For arsenic polymorphisms, such as ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing) (rs13181), XRCC3 (rs861539), APE1 (rs1130409) and hOGG1 (rs1052133) were examined. As to pesticides, separate and combined effects of polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, such as XRCC1 (rs1799782), hOGG1 (rs1052133), XRCC4 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 4) (rs28360135) and the gene encoding the detoxification enzyme PON1 paraoxonase (rs662) were reported. Med Pr 2018;69(2):225-235. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of F-box protein-encoding genes in the Malus domestica genome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Zheng-Rong; Lv, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-08-01

    The F-box protein family is a large family that is characterized by conserved F-box domains of approximately 40-50 amino acids in the N-terminus. F-box proteins participate in diverse cellular processes, such as development of floral organs, signal transduction and response to stress, primarily as a component of the Skp1-cullin-F-box (SCF) complex. In this study, using a global search of the apple genome, 517 F-box protein-encoding genes (F-box genes for short) were identified and further subdivided into 12 groups according to the characterization of known functional domains, which suggests the different potential functions or processes that they were involved in. Among these domains, the galactose oxidase domain was analyzed for the first time in plants, and this domain was present with or without the Kelch domain. The F-box genes were distributed in all 17 apple chromosomes with various densities and tended to form gene clusters. Spatial expression profile analysis revealed that F-box genes have organ-specific expression and are widely expressed in all organs. Proteins that contained the galactose oxidase domain were highly expressed in leaves, flowers and seeds. From a fruit ripening expression profile, 166 F-box genes were identified. The expressions of most of these genes changed little during maturation, but five of them increased significantly. Using qRT-PCR to examine the expression of F-box genes encoding proteins with domains related to stress, the results revealed that F-box proteins were up- or down-regulated, which suggests that F-box genes were involved in abiotic stress. The results of this study helped to elucidate the functions of F-box proteins, especially in Rosaceae plants.

  12. The pkI gene encoding pyruvate kinase I links to the luxZ gene which enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lu, H C; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1997-10-09

    Partial 3'-end nucleotide sequence of the pkI gene (GenBank accession No. AF019143) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 has been determined, and the encoded pyruvate kinase I is deduced. Pyruvate kinase I is the key enzyme of glycolysis, which converts phosphoenol pyruvate to pyruvate. Alignment and comparison of pyruvate kinase Is from P. leiognathi, E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium show that they are homologous. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the pkI gene is linked to the luxZ gene that enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi. The gene order of the pkI and luxZ genes is-pk1-ter-->-R&R"-luxZ-ter"-->, whereas ter is transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes, and R&R" is the regulatory region and ter" is transcriptional terminator for the luxZ gene. It clearly elicits that the pkI gene and luxZ gene are divided to two operons. Functional analysis confirms that the potential hairpin loop omega T is the transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes. It infers that the pkI and related genes are simply linked to the luxZ gene in P. leiognathi genome.

  13. Digital encoding of cellular mRNAs enabling precise and absolute gene expression measurement by single-molecule counting.

    PubMed

    Fu, Glenn K; Wilhelmy, Julie; Stern, David; Fan, H Christina; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2014-03-18

    We present a new approach for the sensitive detection and accurate quantitation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) gene transcripts in single cells. First, the entire population of mRNAs is encoded with molecular barcodes during reverse transcription. After amplification of the gene targets of interest, molecular barcodes are counted by sequencing or scored on a simple hybridization detector to reveal the number of molecules in the starting sample. Since absolute quantities are measured, calibration to standards is unnecessary, and many of the relative quantitation challenges such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias are avoided. We apply the method to gene expression analysis of minute sample quantities and demonstrate precise measurements with sensitivity down to sub single-cell levels. The method is an easy, single-tube, end point assay utilizing standard thermal cyclers and PCR reagents. Accurate and precise measurements are obtained without any need for cycle-to-cycle intensity-based real-time monitoring or physical partitioning into multiple reactions (e.g., digital PCR). Further, since all mRNA molecules are encoded with molecular barcodes, amplification can be used to generate more material for multiple measurements and technical replicates can be carried out on limited samples. The method is particularly useful for small sample quantities, such as single-cell experiments. Digital encoding of cellular content preserves true abundance levels and overcomes distortions introduced by amplification.

  14. Molecular and Mutational Analysis of a Gelsolin-Family Member Encoded by the Flightless I Gene of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    de-Couet, H. G.; Fong, KSK.; Weeds, A. G.; McLaughlin, P. J.; Miklos, GLG.

    1995-01-01

    The flightless locus of Drosophila melanogaster has been analyzed at the genetic, molecular, ultrastructural and comparative crystallographic levels. The gene encodes a single transcript encoding a protein consisting of a leucine-rich amino terminal half and a carboxyterminal half with high sequence similarity to gelsolin. We determined the genomic sequence of the flightless landscape, the breakpoints of four chromosomal rearrangements, and the molecular lesions in two lethal and two viable alleles of the gene. The two alleles that lead to flight muscle abnormalities encode mutant proteins exhibiting amino acid replacements within the S1-like domain of their gelsolin-like region. Furthermore, the deduced intronexon structure of the D. melanogaster gene has been compared with that of the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue. Furthermore, the sequence similarities of the flightless protein with gelsolin allow it to be evaluated in the context of the published crystallographic structure of the S1 domain of gelsolin. Amino acids considered essential for the structural integrity of the core are found to be highly conserved in the predicted flightless protein. Some of the residues considered essential for actin and calcium binding in gelsolin S1 and villin V1 are also well conserved. These data are discussed in light of the phenotypic characteristics of the mutants and the putative functions of the protein. PMID:8582612

  15. A Brassica oleracea gene expressed in a variety-specific manner may encode a novel plant transmembrane receptor.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J E; Dikeman, D A; Fujinuma, T; Kim, B; Jones, J I; Denda, M; Martínez-Zapater, J M; Cruz-Alvarez, M

    2001-04-01

    The species Brassica oleracea includes several agricultural varieties characterized by the proliferation of different types of meristems. Using a combination of subtractive hybridization and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) techniques we have identified several genes which are expressed in the reproductive meristems of the cauliflower curd (B. oleracea var. botrytis) but not in the vegetative meristems of Brussels sprouts (B. oleracea var. gemmifera) axillary buds. One of the cloned genes, termed CCE1 (CAULIFLOWER CURD EXPRESSION 1) shows specific expression in the botrytis variety. Preferential expression takes place in this variety in the meristems of the curd and in the stem throughout the vegetative and reproductive stages of plant growth. CCE1 transcripts are not detected in any of the organs of other B. oleracea varieties analyzed. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA encompassing the complete coding region, we predict that this gene encodes a transmembrane protein, with three transmembrane domains. The deduced amino acid sequence includes motifs conserved in G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from yeast and animal species. Our results suggest that the cloned gene encodes a protein belonging to a new, so far unidentified, family of transmembrane receptors in plants. The expression pattern of the gene suggests that the receptor may be involved in the control of meristem development/arrest that takes place in cauliflower.

  16. Metabolic gene clusters encoding the enzymes of two branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gérecová, Gabriela; Neboháčová, Martina; Zeman, Igor; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans utilizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene via the catechol and hydroxyhydroquinone branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The genetic basis and evolutionary origin of this catabolic pathway in yeasts are unknown. In this study, we identified C. albicans genes encoding the enzymes involved in the degradation of hydroxybenzenes. We found that the genes coding for core components of the 3-oxoadipate pathway are arranged into two metabolic gene clusters. Our results demonstrate that C. albicans cells cultivated in media containing hydroxybenzene substrates highly induce the transcription of these genes as well as the corresponding enzymatic activities. We also found that C. albicans cells assimilating hydroxybenzenes cope with the oxidative stress by upregulation of cellular antioxidant systems such as alternative oxidase and catalase. Moreover, we investigated the evolution of the enzymes encoded by these clusters and found that most of them share a particularly sparse phylogenetic distribution among Saccharomycotina, which is likely to have been caused by extensive gene loss. We exploited this fact to find co-evolving proteins that are suitable candidates for the missing enzymes of the pathway. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Characterization of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus orf68 gene that encodes a novel structural protein of budded virus.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masashi; Kurihara, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Kang, WonKyung

    2002-05-25

    All lepidopteran baculovirus genomes sequenced to date encode a homolog of the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf68 gene, suggesting that it performs an important role in the virus life cycle. In this article we describe the characterization of BmNPV orf68 gene. Northern and Western analyses demonstrated that orf68 gene was expressed as a late gene and encoded a structural protein of budded virus (BV). Immunohistochemical analysis by confocal microscopy showed that ORF68 protein was localized mainly in the nucleus of infected cells. To examine the function of orf68 gene, we constructed orf68 deletion mutant (BmD68) and characterized it in BmN cells and larvae of B. mori. BV production was delayed in BmD68-infected cells. The larval bioassays also demonstrated that deletion of orf68 did not reduce the infectivity, but mutant virus took 70 h longer to kill the host than wild-type BmNPV. In addition, dot-blot analysis showed viral DNA accumulated more slowly in mutant infected cells. Further examination suggested that BmD68 was less efficient in entry and budding from cells, although it seemed to possess normal attachment ability. These results suggest that ORF68 is a BV-associated protein involved in secondary infection from cell-to-cell. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  18. DLEU2 encodes an antisense RNA for the putative bicistronic RFP2/LEU5 gene in humans and mouse.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Martin M; Hammarsund, Marianne; Zhu, Chaoyong; Lerner, Mikael; Kapanadze, Bagrat; Wilson, Bill; Larsson, Catharina; Forsberg, Lars; Ibbotson, Rachel E; Einhorn, Stefan; Oscier, David G; Grandér, Dan; Sangfelt, Olle

    2004-08-01

    Our group previously identified two novel genes, RFP2/LEU5 and DLEU2, within a 13q14.3 genomic region of loss seen in various malignancies. However, no specific inactivating mutations were found in these or other genes in the vicinity of the deletion, suggesting that a nonclassical tumor-suppressor mechanism may be involved. Here, we present data showing that the DLEU2 gene encodes a putative noncoding antisense RNA, with one exon directly overlapping the first exon of the RFP2/LEU5 gene in the opposite orientation. In addition, the RFP2/LEU5 transcript can be alternatively spliced to produce either several monocistronic transcripts or a putative bicistronic transcript encoding two separate open-reading frames, adding to the complexity of the locus. The finding that these gene structures are conserved in the mouse, including the putative bicistronic RFP2/LEU5 transcript as well as the antisense relationship with DLEU2, further underlines the significance of this unusual organization and suggests a biological function for DLEU2 in the regulation of RFP2/LEU5. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. A Lepidopteran-Specific Gene Family Encoding Valine-Rich Midgut Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  20. aes, the gene encoding the esterase B in Escherichia coli, is a powerful phylogenetic marker of the species.

    PubMed

    Lescat, Mathilde; Hoede, Claire; Clermont, Olivier; Garry, Louis; Darlu, Pierre; Tuffery, Pierre; Denamur, Erick; Picard, Bertrand

    2009-12-29

    Previous studies have established a correlation between electrophoretic polymorphism of esterase B, and virulence and phylogeny of Escherichia coli. Strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are more frequently implicated in extraintestinal infections and include esterase B2 variants, whereas phylogenetic groups A, B1 and D contain less virulent strains and include esterase B1 variants. We investigated esterase B as a marker of phylogeny and/or virulence, in a thorough analysis of the esterase B-encoding gene. We identified the gene encoding esterase B as the acetyl-esterase gene (aes) using gene disruption. The analysis of aes nucleotide sequences in a panel of 78 reference strains, including the E. coli reference (ECOR) strains, demonstrated that the gene is under purifying selection. The phylogenetic tree reconstructed from aes sequences showed a strong correlation with the species phylogenetic history, based on multi-locus sequence typing using six housekeeping genes. The unambiguous distinction between variants B1 and B2 by electrophoresis was consistent with Aes amino-acid sequence analysis and protein modelling, which showed that substituted amino acids in the two esterase B variants occurred mostly at different sites on the protein surface. Studies in an experimental mouse model of septicaemia using mutant strains did not reveal a direct link between aes and extraintestinal virulence. Moreover, we did not find any genes in the chromosomal region of aes to be associated with virulence. Our findings suggest that aes does not play a direct role in the virulence of E. coli extraintestinal infection. However, this gene acts as a powerful marker of phylogeny, illustrating the extensive divergence of B2 phylogenetic group strains from the rest of the species.

  1. Effect of long-term actual spaceflight on the expression of key genes encoding serotonin and dopamine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Nina; Shenkman, Boris; Naumenko, Vladimir; Kulikov, Alexander; Kondaurova, Elena; Tsybko, Anton; Kulikova, Elisabeth; Krasnov, I. B.; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Sinyakova, Nadezhda

    The effect of long-term spaceflight on the central nervous system represents important but yet undeveloped problem. The aim of our work was to study the effect of 30-days spaceflight of mice on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 on the expression in the brain regions of key genes of a) serotonin (5-HT) system (main enzymes in 5-HT metabolism - tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), monoamine oxydase A (MAO A), 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors); b) pivotal enzymes in DA metabolism (tyrosine hydroxylase, COMT, MAO A, MAO B) and D1, D2 receptors. Decreased expression of genes encoding the 5-HT catabolism (MAO A) and 5-HT2A receptor in some brain regions was shown. There were no differences between “spaceflight” and control mice in the expression of TPH-2 and 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 receptor genes. Significant changes were found in genetic control of DA system. Long-term spaceflight decreased the expression of genes encoding the enzyme in DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase in s.nigra), DA metabolism (MAO B in the midbrain and COMT in the striatum), and D1 receptor in hypothalamus. These data suggested that 1) microgravity affected genetic control of 5-HT and especially the nigrostriatal DA system implicated in the central regulation of muscular tonus and movement, 2) the decrease in the expression of genes encoding key enzyme in DA synthesis, DA degradation and D1 receptor contributes to the movement impairment and dyskinesia produced by the spaceflight. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant No. 14-04-00173.

  2. Detection of different β-lactamases encoding genes, including blaNDM, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in different water sources from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Danilo Garcia; de Melo, Fernanda Maciel; Savazzi, Eduardo Angelino; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2018-06-16

    Bacterial resistance occurs by spontaneous mutations or horizontal gene transfer mediated by mobile genetic elements, which represents a great concern. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is mainly due to the production of β-lactamases, and an important mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance is the acquisition plasmid determinants. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of β-lactamase-encoding genes and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in different water samples obtained from São Paulo state, Brazil. A high level of these resistance genes was detected, being the bla SHV , bla GES , and qnr the most prevalent. Besides that, the bla NDM gene, which codify an important and hazardous metallo-β-lactamase, was detected.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a novel extracellular neutral proteinase from Streptomyces sp. strain C5 and expression of the gene in Streptomyces lividans 1326.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, J S; Aphale, J S; Lampel, K A; Strohl, W R

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding a novel milk protein-hydrolyzing proteinase was cloned on a 6.56-kb SstI fragment from Streptomyces sp. strain C5 genomic DNA into Streptomyces lividans 1326 by using the plasmid vector pIJ702. The gene encoding the small neutral proteinase (snpA) was located within a 2.6-kb BamHI-SstI restriction fragment that was partially sequenced. The molecular mass of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein was determined to be 15,740, which corresponds very closely with the relative molecular mass of the purified protein (15,500) determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified neutral proteinase was determined, and the DNA encoding this sequence was found to be located within the sequenced DNA. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a conserved zinc binding site, although secondary ligand binding and active sites typical of thermolysinlike metalloproteinases are absent. The combination of its small size, deduced amino acid sequence, and substrate and inhibition profile indicate that snpA encodes a novel neutral proteinase. Images PMID:1569011

  4. Cluster of Genes That Encode Positive and Negative Elements Influencing Filament Length in a Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

  5. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  6. The number of genes encoding repeat domain-containing proteins positively correlates with genome size in amoebal giant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Avi; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Curiously, in viruses, the virion volume appears to be predominantly driven by genome length rather than the number of proteins it encodes or geometric constraints. With their large genome and giant particle size, amoebal viruses (AVs) are ideally suited to study the relationship between genome and virion size and explore the role of genome plasticity in their evolutionary success. Different genomic regions of AVs exhibit distinct genealogies. Although the vertically transferred core genes and their functions are universally conserved across the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) families and are essential for their replication, the horizontally acquired genes are variable across families and are lineage-specific. When compared with other giant virus families, we observed a near–linear increase in the number of genes encoding repeat domain-containing proteins (RDCPs) with the increase in the genome size of AVs. From what is known about the functions of RDCPs in bacteria and eukaryotes and their prevalence in the AV genomes, we envisage important roles for RDCPs in the life cycle of AVs, their genome expansion, and plasticity. This observation also supports the evolution of AVs from a smaller viral ancestor by the acquisition of diverse gene families from the environment including RDCPs that might have helped in host adaption. PMID:29308275

  7. Molecular cloning of a putative gene encoding isopentenyltransferase from pingyitiancha (Malus hupehensis) and characterization of its response to nitrate.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Peng, Futian; Zhu, Chunfu; Wei, Shaochong

    2008-06-01

    A putative isopentenyltransferase (IPT) encoding gene was identified from a pingyitiancha (Malus hupehensis Rehd.) expressed sequence tag database, and the full-length gene was cloned by RACE. Based on expression profile and sequence alignment, the nucleotide sequence of the clone, named MhIPT3, was most similar to AtIPT3, an IPT gene in Arabidopsis. The full-length cDNA contained a 963-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 321 amino acids with a molecular mass of 37.3 kDa. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA revealed the absence of introns in the frame. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that the gene was expressed in roots, stems and leaves. Application of nitrate to roots of nitrogen-deprived seedlings strongly induced expression of MhIPT3 and was accompanied by the accumulation of cytokinins, whereas MhIPT3 expression was little affected by ammonium application to roots of nitrogen-deprived seedlings. Application of nitrate to leaves also up-regulated the expression of MhIPT3 and corresponded closely with the accumulation of isopentyladenine and isopentyladenosine in leaves.

  8. A second cistron in the CACNA1A gene encodes a transcription factor that mediates cerebellar development and SCA6

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaofei; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Haipeng; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Lamar, Kay-Marie; Palmenberg, Ann C.; Hansel, Christian; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The CACNA1A gene, encoding the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit α1A, is involved in pre- and postsynaptic Ca2+ signaling, gene expression, and several genetic neurological disorders. We found that CACNA1A employs a novel strategy to directly coordinate a gene expression program, using a bicistronic mRNA bearing a cryptic internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). The first cistron encodes the well-characterized α1A subunit. The second expresses a newly-recognized transcription factor, α1ACT, that coordinates expression of a program of genes involved in neural and Purkinje cell development. α1ACT also contains the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract that, when expanded, causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). When expressed as an independent polypeptide, α1ACT, bearing an expanded polyQ tract, lacks transcription factor function and neurite outgrowth properties, causes cell death in culture, and leads to ataxia and cerebellar atrophy in transgenic mice. Suppression of CACNA1A IRES function in SCA6 may be a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:23827678

  9. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kast, Alene; Voges, Raphael; Schroth, Michael; Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-05-01

    Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs) from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl), Pichia acaciae (Pa) and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr) are extremely A/T-rich (>75%) and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases) along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5) results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE) as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A) site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle.

  10. The hmuQ and hmuD Genes from Bradyrhizobium japonicum Encode Heme-Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sumant; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of heme by bacteria as a nutritional iron source involves the transport of exogenous heme, followed by cleavage of the heme macrocycle to release iron. Bradyrhizobium japonicum can use heme as an iron source, but no heme-degrading oxygenase has been described. Here, bioinformatics analyses of the B. japonicum genome identified two paralogous genes renamed hmuQ (bll7075) and hmuD (bll7423) that encode proteins with weak similarity to the heme-degrading monooxygenase IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus. The hmuQ gene is clustered with known heme transport genes in the genome. Recombinant HmuQ bound heme with a Kd value of 0.8 μM and showed spectral properties consistent with a heme oxygenase. In the presence of a reductant, HmuQ catalyzed the degradation of heme and the formation of biliverdin. The hmuQ and hmuD genes complemented a Corynebacterium ulcerans heme oxygenase mutant in trans for utilization of heme as the sole iron source for growth. Furthermore, homologs of hmuQ and hmuD were identified in many bacterial genera, and the recombinant homolog from Brucella melitensis bound heme and catalyzed its degradation. The findings show that hmuQ and hmuD encode heme oxygenases and indicate that the IsdG family of heme-degrading monooxygenases is not restricted to gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:16952937

  11. The Escherichia coli Serogroup O1 and O2 Lipopolysaccharides Are Encoded by Multiple O-antigen Gene Clusters.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Fleiss, Aubin; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to serogroups O1 and O2 are frequently associated with human infections, especially extra-intestinal infections such as bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections. These strains can be associated with a large array of flagellar antigens. Because of their frequency and clinical importance, a reliable detection of E. coli O1 and O2 strains and also the frequently associated K1 capsule is important for diagnosis and source attribution of E. coli infections in humans and animals. By sequencing the O-antigen clusters of various O1 and O2 strains we showed that the serogroups O1 and O2 are encoded by different sets of O-antigen encoding genes and identified potentially new O-groups. We developed qPCR-assays to detect the various O1 and O2 variants and the K1-encoding gene. These qPCR assays proved to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific and could be valuable tools for the investigations of zoonotic and food-borne infection of humans with O1 and O2 extra-intestinal (ExPEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains.

  12. The Escherichia coli Serogroup O1 and O2 Lipopolysaccharides Are Encoded by Multiple O-antigen Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Fleiss, Aubin; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to serogroups O1 and O2 are frequently associated with human infections, especially extra-intestinal infections such as bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections. These strains can be associated with a large array of flagellar antigens. Because of their frequency and clinical importance, a reliable detection of E. coli O1 and O2 strains and also the frequently associated K1 capsule is important for diagnosis and source attribution of E. coli infections in humans and animals. By sequencing the O-antigen clusters of various O1 and O2 strains we showed that the serogroups O1 and O2 are encoded by different sets of O-antigen encoding genes and identified potentially new O-groups. We developed qPCR-assays to detect the various O1 and O2 variants and the K1-encoding gene. These qPCR assays proved to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific and could be valuable tools for the investigations of zoonotic and food-borne infection of humans with O1 and O2 extra-intestinal (ExPEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains. PMID:28224115

  13. AtMRP1 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a glutathione S-conjugate pump: isolation and functional definition of a plant ATP-binding cassette transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Rea, P A

    1997-07-22

    Because plants produce cytotoxic compounds to which they, themselves, are susceptible and are exposed to exogenous toxins (microbial products, allelochemicals, and agrochemicals), cell survival is contingent on mechanisms for detoxifying these agents. One detoxification mechanism is the glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed glutathionation of the toxin, or an activated derivative, and transport of the conjugate out of the cytosol. We show here that a transporter responsible for the removal of glutathione S-conjugates from the cytosol, a specific Mg2+-ATPase, is encoded by the AtMRP1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. The sequence of AtMRP1 and the transport capabilities of membranes prepared from yeast cells transformed with plasmid-borne AtMRP1 demonstrate that this gene encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates of xenobiotics and endogenous substances, including herbicides and anthocyanins.

  14. Impact of recombination on polymorphism of genes encoding Kunitz-type protease inhibitors in the genus Solanum.

    PubMed

    Speranskaya, Anna S; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo; Oparina, Nina Y; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Guseva, Marina A; Shevelev, Alexei B

    2012-08-01

    The group of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors (KPI) from potato is encoded by a polymorphic family of multiple allelic and non-allelic genes. The previous explanations of the KPI variability were based on the hypothesis of random mutagenesis as a key factor of KPI polymorphism. KPI-A genes from the genomes of Solanum tuberosum cv. Istrinskii and the wild species Solanum palustre were amplified by PCR with subsequent cloning in plasmids. True KPI sequences were derived from comparison of the cloned copies. "Hot spots" of recombination in KPI genes were independently identified by DnaSP 4.0 and TOPALi v2.5 software. The KPI-A sequence from potato cv. Istrinskii was found to be 100% identical to the gene from Solanum nigrum. This fact illustrates a high degree of similarity of KPI genes in the genus Solanum. Pairwise comparison of KPI A and B genes unambiguously showed a non-uniform extent of polymorphism at different nt positions. Moreover, the occurrence of substitutions was not random along the strand. Taken together, these facts contradict the traditional hypothesis of random mutagenesis as a principal source of KPI gene polymorphism. The experimentally found mosaic structure of KPI genes in both plants studied is consistent with the hypothesis suggesting recombination of ancestral genes. The same mechanism was proposed earlier for other resistance-conferring genes in the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Based on the data obtained, we searched for potential motifs of site-specific binding with plant DNA recombinases. During this work, we analyzed the sequencing data reported by the Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium (PGSC), 2011 and found considerable inconsistence of their data concerning the number, location, and orientation of KPI genes of groups A and B. The key role of recombination rather than random point mutagenesis in KPI polymorphism was demonstrated for the first time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissemination of Genes Encoding Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and armA Among Enterobacteriaceae Isolates in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh Sefidan, Fatemeh; Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh Asl, Yalda

    2017-10-01

    Enzymatic inactivation is one of the most important mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of armA and diversity of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and their associations with resistance phenotypes in Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Three hundred and seven Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected from five hospitals in northwest Iran. The disk diffusion method for amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, kanamycin, and streptomycin, as well as the minimum inhibitory concentration for amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin were done for susceptibility testing. Thirteen AME genes and armA methylase were screened using the PCR and sequencing assays. Two hundred and twenty (71.7%) of isolates were resistant to aminoglycosides and 155 (70.5%) of them were positive for aminoglycoside resistance genes. The most prevalent AME genes were ant(3″)-Ia and aph(3″)-Ib with the frequency 35.9% and 30.5%, respectively. Also, 21 (9.5%) of resistant isolates were positive for armA methylase gene. The prevalence of resistance to aminoglycoside is high and AME genes frequently are disseminated in Enterobacteriaceae isolates. There is an association between phenotypic resistance and the presence of some aminoglycoside genes.

  16. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  17. Degradation of triglycerides by a pseudomonad isolated from milk: molecular analysis of a lipase-encoding gene and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L A; Beacham, I R; MacRae, I C; Free, M L

    1992-01-01

    Psychrotrophic lipolytic bacteria represent a significant problem in the storage of refrigerated dairy products. A lipase-encoding gene has been cloned and characterized from a highly lipolytic strain of Pseudomonas. The nucleotide sequence of the gene predicts a polypeptide of M(r) 49,905, which was identified when the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:1622251

  18. Differential regulation of mnp2, a new manganese peroxidase-encoding gene from the ligninolytic fungus Trametes versicolor PRL 572.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Tomas; Nyman, Per Olof; Cullen, Daniel

    2002-04-01

    A peroxidase-encoding gene, mnp2, and its corresponding cDNA were characterized from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor PRL 572. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to identify mnp2 transcripts in nutrient-limited stationary cultures. Although mnp2 lacks upstream metal response elements (MREs), addition of MnSO(4) to cultures increased mnp2 transcript levels 250-fold. In contrast, transcript levels of an MRE-containing gene of T. versicolor, mnp1, increased only eightfold under the same conditions. Thus, the manganese peroxidase genes in T. versicolor are differentially regulated, and upstream MREs are not necessarily involved. Our results support the hypothesis that fungal and plant peroxidases arose through an ancient duplication and folding of two structural domains, since we found the mnp1 and mnp2 polypeptides to have internal homology.

  19. Differential Regulation of mnp2, a New Manganese Peroxidase-Encoding Gene from the Ligninolytic Fungus Trametes versicolor PRL 572

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Tomas; Nyman, Per Olof; Cullen, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    A peroxidase-encoding gene, mnp2, and its corresponding cDNA were characterized from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor PRL 572. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to identify mnp2 transcripts in nutrient-limited stationary cultures. Although mnp2 lacks upstream metal response elements (MREs), addition of MnSO4 to cultures increased mnp2 transcript levels 250-fold. In contrast, transcript levels of an MRE-containing gene of T. versicolor, mnp1, increased only eightfold under the same conditions. Thus, the manganese peroxidase genes in T. versicolor are differentially regulated, and upstream MREs are not necessarily involved. Our results support the hypothesis that fungal and plant peroxidases arose through an ancient duplication and folding of two structural domains, since we found the mnp1 and mnp2 polypeptides to have internal homology. PMID:11916737

  20. Recombinant expression of rt-PA gene (encoding Reteplase) in gametophytes of the seaweed Laminaria japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyta).

    PubMed

    Zhang, YiChen; Jiang, Peng; Gao, JiangTao; Liao, JianMin; Sun, ShiJing; Shen, ZiLong; Qin, Song

    2008-12-01

    The life cycle of seaweed Laminaria japonica involves a generation alternation between diploid sporophyte and haploid gametophte. The expression of foreign genes in sporophte has been proved. In this research, the recombinant expression in gametophyte was investigated by particle bombardment with the rt-PA gene encoding the recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (Reteplase), which is a thrombolytic agent for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Transgenic gametophytes were selected by their resistance to herbicide phosphiothricin (PPT), and proliferated in an established bubble column photo-bioreactor. According to the results from quantitative ELISA, Southern blotting, and fibrin agarose plate assay (FAPA) for bioactivity, it was showed that the rt-PA gene had been integrated into the genome of gametophytes of L. japonica, and the expression product showed the expected bioactivity, implying the proper post-transcript modification in haploid gametophyte.

  1. Genes encoding p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clinton C. S.; Franke, Rochus; Ruegger, Max O.

    2006-07-04

    The present invention is directed to a method for altering secondary metabolism in plants, specifically phenylpropanoid metabolism. The present invention is further directed to a mutant p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase gene, referred to herein as the ref8 gene, its protein product which can be used to prepare gene constructs and transgenic plants. The gene constructs and transgenic plants are further aspects of the present invention.

  2. Nucleotide sequence analysis reveals linked N-acetyl hydrolase, thioesterase, transport, and regulatory genes encoded by the bialaphos biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed Central

    Raibaud, A; Zalacain, M; Holt, T G; Tizard, R; Thompson, C J

    1991-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5,000-bp region of the bialaphos antibiotic production (bap) gene cluster defined five open reading frames (ORFs) which predicted structural genes in the order bah, ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 followed by the regulatory gene, brpA (H. Anzai, T. Murakami, S. Imai, A. Satoh, K. Nagaoka, and C.J. Thompson, J. Bacteriol. 169:3482-3488, 1987). The four structural genes were translationally coupled and apparently cotranscribed from an undefined promoter(s) under the positive control of the brpA gene product. S1 mapping experiments indicated that brpA was transcribed by two promoters (brpAp1 and brpAp2) which initiate transcription 150 and 157 bp upstream of brp A within an intergenic region and at least one promoter further upstream within the bap gene cluster (brpAp3). All three transcripts were present at low levels during exponential growth and increased just before the stationary phase. The levels of the brpAp3 band continued to increase at the onset of stationary phase, whereas brpAp1-and brpAp2-protected fragments showed no further change. BrpA contained a possible helix-turn-helix motif at its C terminus which was similar to the C-terminal regulatory motif found in the receiver component of a family of two-component transcriptional activator proteins. This motif was not associated with the N-terminal domain conserved in other members of the family. The structural gene cluster sequenced began with bah, encoding a bialaphos acetylhydrolase which removes the N-acetyl group from bialaphos as one of the final steps in the biosynthetic pathway. The observation that Bah was similar to a rat and to a bacterial (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus) lipase probably reflects the fact that the ester bonds of triglycerides and the amide bond linking acetate to phosphinothricin are similar and hydrolysis is catalyzed by structurally related enzymes. This was followed by two regions encoding ORF1 and ORF2 which were similar to each other (48% nucleotide

  3. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  4. Heterogeneous genetic diversity pattern in Plasmodium vivax genes encoding merozoite surface proteins (MSP) -7E, -7F and -7L.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Ospina, Diego; Forero-Rodríguez, Johanna; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2014-12-13

    The msp-7 gene has become differentially expanded in the Plasmodium genus; Plasmodium vivax has the highest copy number of this gene, several of which encode antigenic proteins in merozoites. DNA sequences from thirty-six Colombian clinical isolates from P. vivax (pv) msp-7E, -7F and -7L genes were analysed for characterizing and studying the genetic diversity of these pvmsp-7 members which are expressed during the intra-erythrocyte stage; natural selection signals producing the variation pattern so observed were evaluated. The pvmsp-7E gene was highly polymorphic compared to pvmsp-7F and pvmsp-7L which were seen to have limited genetic diversity; pvmsp-7E polymorphism was seen to have been maintained by different types of positive selection. Even though these copies seemed to be species-specific duplications, a search in the Plasmodium cynomolgi genome (P. vivax sister taxon) showed that both species shared the whole msp-7 repertoire. This led to exploring the long-term effect of natural selection by comparing the orthologous sequences which led to finding signatures for lineage-specific positive selection. The results confirmed that the P. vivax msp-7 family has a heterogeneous genetic diversity pattern; some members are highly conserved whilst others are highly diverse. The results suggested that the 3'-end of these genes encode MSP-7 proteins' functional region whilst the central region of pvmsp-7E has evolved rapidly. The lineage-specific positive selection signals found suggested that mutations occurring in msp-7s genes during host switch may have succeeded in adapting the ancestral P. vivax parasite population to humans.

  5. A novel gene encoding a TIG multiple domain protein is a positional candidate for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huaqi; Chen, Yongxiong; Yi, Yajun; Tsuchiya, Karen; Moeckel, Gilbert; Cheung, Joseph; Liang, Dan; Tham, Kyi; Xu, Xiaohu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Pei, York; Zhao, Zhizhuang Jeo; Wu, Guanqing

    2002-07-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a common hereditary renal cystic disease in infants and children. By genetic linkage analyses, the gene responsible for this disease, termed polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1), was mapped on human chromosome 6p21.1-p12, and has been further localized to a 1-cM genetic interval flanked by the D6S1714/D6S243 (telomeric) and D6S1024 (centromeric) markers. We recently identified a novel gene in this genetic interval from kidney cDNA, using cloning strategies. The gene PKHD1 (PKHD1-tentative) encodes a novel 3396-amino-acid protein with no apparent homology with any known proteins. We named its gene product "tigmin" because it contains multiple TIG domains, which usually are seen in proteins containing immunoglobulin-like folds. PKHD1 encodes an 11.6-kb transcript and is composed of 61 exons spanning an approximately 365-kb genomic region on chromosome 6p12-p11.2 adjacent to the marker D6S1714. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the gene has discrete bands with one peak signal at approximately 11 kb, indicating that PKHD1 is likely to have multiple alternative transcripts. PKHD1 is highly expressed in adult and infant kidneys and weakly expressed in liver in northern blot analysis. This expression pattern parallels the tissue involvement observed in ARPKD. In situ hybridization analysis further revealed that the expression of PKHD1 in the kidney is mainly localized to the epithelial cells of the collecting duct, the specific tubular segment involved in cyst formation in ARPKD. These features of PKHD1 make it a strong positional candidate gene for ARPKD.

  6. The divergently transcribed genes encoding yeast ribosomal proteins L46 and S24 are activated by shared RPG-boxes.

    PubMed Central

    Kraakman, L S; Mager, W H; Maurer, K T; Nieuwint, R T; Planta, R J

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the majority of the ribosomal protein (rp) genes in yeast is activated through common cis-acting elements, designated RPG-boxes. These elements have been shown to act as specific binding sites for the protein factor TUF/RAP1/GRF1 in vitro. Two such elements occur in the intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes encoding L46 and S24. To investigate whether the two RPG-boxes mediate transcription activation of both the L46 and S24 gene, two experimental strategies were followed: cloning of the respective genes on multicopy vectors and construction of fusion genes. Cloning of the L46 + S24 gene including the intergenic region in a multicopy yeast vector indicated that both genes are transcriptionally active. Using constructs in which only the S24 or the L46 gene is present, with or without the intergenic region, we obtained evidence that the intergenic region is indispensable for transcription activation of either gene. To demarcate the element(s) responsible for this activation, fusions of the intergenic region in either orientation to the galK reporter gene were made. Northern analysis of the levels of hybrid mRNA demonstrated that the intergenic region can serve as an heterologous promoter when it is in the 'S24-orientation'. Surprisingly, however, when fused in the reverse orientation the intergenic region did hardly confer transcription activity on the fusion gene. Furthermore, a 274 bp FnuDII-FnuDII fragment from the intergenic region that contains the RPG-boxes, could replace the naturally occurring upstream activation site (UASrpg) of the L25 rp-gene only when inserted in the 'S24-orientation'. Removal of 15 bp from the FnuDII fragment appeared to be sufficient to obtain transcription activation in the 'L46 orientation' as well. Analysis of a construct in which the RPG-boxes were selectively deleted from the promoter region of the L46 gene indicated that the RPG-boxes are needed for efficient transcriptional activation of

  7. The divergently transcribed genes encoding yeast ribosomal proteins L46 and S24 are activated by shared RPG-boxes.

    PubMed

    Kraakman, L S; Mager, W H; Maurer, K T; Nieuwint, R T; Planta, R J

    1989-12-11

    Transcription of the majority of the ribosomal protein (rp) genes in yeast is activated through common cis-acting elements, designated RPG-boxes. These elements have been shown to act as specific binding sites for the protein factor TUF/RAP1/GRF1 in vitro. Two such elements occur in the intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes encoding L46 and S24. To investigate whether the two RPG-boxes mediate transcription activation of both the L46 and S24 gene, two experimental strategies were followed: cloning of the respective genes on multicopy vectors and construction of fusion genes. Cloning of the L46 + S24 gene including the intergenic region in a multicopy yeast vector indicated that both genes are transcriptionally active. Using constructs in which only the S24 or the L46 gene is present, with or without the intergenic region, we obtained evidence that the intergenic region is indispensable for transcription activation of either gene. To demarcate the element(s) responsible for this activation, fusions of the intergenic region in either orientation to the galK reporter gene were made. Northern analysis of the levels of hybrid mRNA demonstrated that the intergenic region can serve as an heterologous promoter when it is in the 'S24-orientation'. Surprisingly, however, when fused in the reverse orientation the intergenic region did hardly confer transcription activity on the fusion gene. Furthermore, a 274 bp FnuDII-FnuDII fragment from the intergenic region that contains the RPG-boxes, could replace the naturally occurring upstream activation site (UASrpg) of the L25 rp-gene only when inserted in the 'S24-orientation'. Removal of 15 bp from the FnuDII fragment appeared to be sufficient to obtain transcription activation in the 'L46 orientation' as well. Analysis of a construct in which the RPG-boxes were selectively deleted from the promoter region of the L46 gene indicated that the RPG-boxes are needed for efficient transcriptional activation of

  8. Metadata Analysis of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Gene Expression Data Identified Common CAZymes Encoding Gene Expression Profiles Involved in Cellulose and Hemicellulose Degradation.

    PubMed

    Kameshwar, Ayyappa Kumar Sista; Qin, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    In literature, extensive studies have been conducted on popular wood degrading white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium about its lignin degrading mechanisms compared to the cellulose and hemicellulose degrading abilities. This study delineates cellulose and hemicellulose degrading mechanisms through large scale metadata analysis of P. chrysosporium gene expression data (retrieved from NCBI GEO) to understand the common expression patterns of differentially expressed genes when cultured on different growth substrates. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolase classes commonly expressed during breakdown of cellulose such as GH-5,6,7,9,44,45,48 and hemicellulose are GH-2,8,10,11,26,30,43,47 were found to be highly expressed among varied growth conditions including simple customized and complex natural plant biomass growth mediums. Genes encoding carbohydrate esterase class enzymes CE (1,4,8,9,15,16) polysaccharide lyase class enzymes PL-8 and PL-14, and glycosyl transferases classes GT (1,2,4,8,15,20,35,39,48) were differentially expressed in natural plant biomass growth mediums. Based on these results, P. chrysosporium, on natural plant biomass substrates was found to express lignin and hemicellulose degrading enzymes more than cellulolytic enzymes except GH-61 (LPMO) class enzymes, in early stages. It was observed that the fate of P. chrysosporium transcriptome is significantly affected by the wood substrate provided. We believe, the gene expression findings in this study plays crucial role in developing genetically efficient microbe with effective cellulose and hemicellulose degradation abilities.

  9. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  10. Methods for the Isolation of Genes Encoding Novel PHA Metabolism Enzymes from Complex Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiujun; Nordeste, Ricardo; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2017-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bio-plastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Pseudomonas putida, allows the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates the functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  11. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Kumar, Dhakchinamoorthi Krishna; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual's genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs) and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1) with Indian perspective.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal heterotrimeric G protein-encoding genes and their expression during dimorphism in Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Valle-Maldonado, Marco Iván; Jácome-Galarza, Irvin Eduardo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Martínez-Cadena, Guadalupe; Campos-García, Jesús; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha Isela; Reyes-De la Cruz, Homero; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Díaz-Pérez, César; Meza-Carmen, Víctor

    2015-12-01

    In fungi, heterotrimeric G proteins are key regulators of biological processes such as mating, virulence, morphology, among others. Mucor circinelloides is a model organism for many biological processes, and its genome contains the largest known repertoire of genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G protein subunits in the fungal kingdom: twelve Gα (McGpa1-12), three Gβ (McGpb1-3), and three Gγ (McGpg1-3). Phylogenetic analysis of fungal Gα showed that they are divided into four distinct groups as reported previously. Fungal Gβ and Gγ are also divided into four phylogenetic groups, and to our understanding this is the first report of a phylogenetic classification for fungal Gβ and Gγ subunits. Almost all genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G subunits in M. circinelloides are differentially expressed during dimorphic growth, except for McGpg1 (Gγ) that showed very low mRNA levels at all developmental stages. Moreover, several of the subunits are expressed in a similar pattern and at the same level, suggesting that they constitute discrete complexes. For example, McGpb3 (Gβ), and McGpg2 (Gγ), are co-expressed during mycelium growth, and McGpa1, McGpb2, and McGpg2, are co-expressed during yeast development. These findings provide the conceptual framework to study the biological role of these genes during M. circinelloides morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biosynthesis of actinorhodin and related antibiotics: discovery of alternative routes for quinone formation encoded in the act gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Susumu; Taguchi, Takaaki; Ochi, Kozo; Ichinose, Koji

    2009-02-27

    All known benzoisochromanequinone (BIQ) biosynthetic gene clusters carry a set of genes encoding a two-component monooxygenase homologous to the ActVA-ORF5/ActVB system for actinorhodin biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Here, we conducted molecular genetic and biochemical studies of this enzyme system. Inactivation of actVA-ORF5 yielded a shunt product, actinoperylone (ACPL), apparently derived from 6-deoxy-dihydrokalafungin. Similarly, deletion of actVB resulted in accumulation of ACPL, indicating a critical role for the monooxygenase system in C-6 oxygenation, a biosynthetic step common to all BIQ biosyntheses. Furthermore, in vitro, we showed a quinone-forming activity of the ActVA-ORF5/ActVB system in addition to that of a known C-6 monooxygenase, ActVA-ORF6, by using emodinanthrone as a model substrate. Our results demonstrate that the act gene cluster encodes two alternative routes for quinone formation by C-6 oxygenation in BIQ biosynthesis.

  14. Structure of genes for dermaseptins B, antimicrobial peptides from frog skin. Exon 1-encoded prepropeptide is conserved in genes for peptides of highly different structures and activities.

    PubMed

    Vouille, V; Amiche, M; Nicolas, P

    1997-09-01

    We cloned the genes of two members of the dermaseptin family, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides isolated from the skin of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The dermaseptin gene Drg2 has a 2-exon coding structure interrupted by a small 137-bp intron, wherein exon 1 encoded a 22-residue hydrophobic signal peptide and the first three amino acids of the acidic propiece; exon 2 contained the 18 additional acidic residues of the propiece plus a typical prohormone processing signal Lys-Arg and a 32-residue dermaseptin progenitor sequence. The dermaseptin genes Drg2 and Drg1g2 have conserved sequences at both untranslated ends and in the first and second coding exons. In contrast, Drg1g2 comprises a third coding exon for a short version of the acidic propiece and a second dermaseptin progenitor sequence. Structural conservation between the two genes suggests that Drg1g2 arose recently from an ancestral Drg2-like gene through amplification of part of the second coding exon and 3'-untranslated region. Analysis of the cDNAs coding precursors for several frog skin peptides of highly different structures and activities demonstrates that the signal peptides and part of the acidic propieces are encoded by conserved nucleotides encompassed by the first coding exon of the dermaseptin genes. The organization of the genes that belong to this family, with the signal peptide and the progenitor sequence on separate exons, permits strikingly different peptides to be directed into the secretory pathway. The recruitment of such a homologous 'secretory' exon by otherwise non-homologous genes may have been an early event in the evolution of amphibian.

  15. Stress tolerances of nullmutants of function-unknown genes encoding menadione stress-responsive proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Éva; Bálint, Mihály; Miskei, Márton; Orosz, Erzsébet; Szabó, Zsuzsa; Pócsi, István

    2016-07-01

    A group of menadione stress-responsive function-unkown genes of Aspergillus nidulans (Locus IDs ANID_03987.1, ANID_06058.1, ANID_10219.1, and ANID_10260.1) was deleted and phenotypically characterized. Importantly, comparative and phylogenetic analyses of the tested A. nidulans genes and their orthologs shed light only on the presence of a TANGO2 domain with NRDE protein motif in the translated ANID_06058.1 gene but did not reveal any recognizable protein-encoding domains in other protein sequences. The gene deletion strains were subjected to oxidative, osmotic, and metal ion stress and, surprisingly, only the ΔANID_10219.1 mutant showed an increased sensitivity to 0.12 mmol l(-1) menadione sodium bisulfite. The gene deletions affected the stress sensitivities (tolerances) irregularly, for example, some strains grew more slowly when exposed to various oxidants and/or osmotic stress generating agents, meanwhile the ΔANID_10260.1 mutant possessed a wild-type tolerance to all stressors tested. Our results are in line with earlier studies demonstrating that the deletions of stress-responsive genes do not confer necessarily any stress-sensitivity phenotypes, which can be attributed to compensatory mechanisms based on other elements of the stress response system with overlapping functions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. SOA genes encode proteins controlling lipase expression in response to triacylglycerol utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Thomas; Haddouche, Ramdane; Fudalej, Franck; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes hydrophobic substrates such as alkanes, fatty acids or triacylglycerol. This yeast has been identified in oil-polluted water and in lipid-rich food. The enzymes involved in lipid breakdown, for use as a carbon source, are known, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes are still poorly understood. The study of mRNAs obtained from cells grown on oleic acid identified a new group of genes called SOA genes (specific for oleic acid). SOA1 and SOA2 are two small genes coding for proteins with no known homologs. Single- and double-disrupted strains were constructed. Wild-type and mutant strains were grown on dextrose, oleic acid and triacylglycerols. The double mutant presents a clear phenotype consisting of a growth defect on tributyrin and triolein, but not on dextrose or oleic acid media. Lipase activity was 50-fold lower in this mutant than in the wild-type strain. The impact of SOA deletion on the expression of the main extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) was monitored using a LIP2-beta-galactosidase promoter fusion protein. These data suggest that Soa proteins are components of a molecular mechanism controlling lipase gene expression in response to extracellular triacylglycerol.

  17. Chloroplast-encoded serotonin N-acetyltransferase in the red alga Pyropia yezoensis: gene transition to the nucleus from chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Yool Lee, Hyoung; Choi, Dong-Woog; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-02-01

    Melatonin biosynthesis involves the N-acetylation of arylalkylamines such as serotonin, which is catalysed by serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), the penultimate enzyme of melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. Here, we report the functional characterization of a putative N-acetyltransferase gene in the chloroplast genome of the alga laver (Pyropia yezoensis, formerly known as Porphyra yezoensis) with homology to the rice SNAT gene. To confirm that the putative Pyropia yezoensis SNAT (PySNAT) gene encodes an SNAT, we cloned the full-length chloroplastidic PySNAT gene by PCR and purified the recombinant PySNAT protein from Escherichia coli. PySNAT was 174 aa and had 50% amino acid identity with cyanobacteria SNAT. Purified recombinant PySNAT showed a peak activity at 55 °C with a K m of 467 µM and V max of 28 nmol min-1 mg(-1) of protein. Unlike other plant SNATs, PySNAT localized to the cytoplasm due to a lack of N-terminal chloroplast transit peptides. Melatonin was present at 0.16ng g(-1) of fresh mass but increased during heat stress. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence suggested that PySNAT has evolved from the cyanobacteria SNAT gene via endosymbiotic gene transfer. Additionally, the chloroplast transit peptides of plant SNATs were acquired 1500 million years ago, concurrent with the appearance of green algae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER)

    PubMed Central

    Munfus, Delicia L; Haga, Christopher L; Burrows, Peter D; Cooper, Max D

    2007-01-01

    Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7) is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER). The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules. PMID:17854505

  19. The thiostrepton-resistance-encoding gene in Streptomyces laurentii is located within a cluster of ribosomal protein operons.

    PubMed

    Smith, T M; Jiang, Y F; Shipley, P; Floss, H G

    1995-10-16

    A common approach to identify and clone biosynthetic gene from an antibiotic-producing streptomycete is to clone the resistance gene for the antibiotic of interest and then use that gene to clone DNA that is linked to it. As a first step toward cloning the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of thiostrepton (Th) in Streptomyces laurentii (Sl), the Th resistance-encoding gene (tsnR) was cloned as a 1.5-kb BamHI-PvuII fragment in Escherichia coli (Ec), and shown to confer Th resistance when introduced into S. lividans TK24. The tsnR-containing DNA fragment was used as a probe to isolate clones from cosmid libraries of DNA in the Ec cosmid vector SuperCos, and pOJ446 (an Ec/streptomycete) cosmid vector. Sequence and genetic analysis of the DNA flanking the tsnR indicates that the Sl tsnR is not closely linked to biosynthetic genes. Instead it is located within a cluster of ribosomal protein operons.

  20. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Olin D; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Gu, Yong Q; Heath, Sekou

    2010-06-16

    Among the dietary essential amino acids, the most severely limiting in the cereals is lysine. Since cereals make up half of the human diet, lysine limitation has quality/nutritional consequences. The breakdown of lysine is controlled mainly by the catabolic bifunctional enzyme lysine ketoglutarate reductase - saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH). The LKR/SDH gene has been reported to produce transcripts for the bifunctional enzyme and separate monofunctional transcripts. In addition to lysine metabolism, this gene has been implicated in a number of metabolic and developmental pathways, which along with its production of multiple transcript types and complex exon/intron structure suggest an important node in plant metabolism. Understanding more about the LKR/SDH gene is thus interesting both from applied standpoint and for basic plant metabolism. The current report describes a wheat genomic fragment containing an LKR/SDH gene and adjacent genes. The wheat LKR/SDH genomic segment was found to originate from the A-genome of wheat, and EST analysis indicates all three LKR/SDH genes in hexaploid wheat are transcriptionally active. A comparison of a set of plant LKR/SDH genes suggests regions of greater sequence conservation likely related to critical enzymatic functions and metabolic controls. Although most plants contain only a single LKR/SDH gene per genome, poplar contains at least two functional bifunctional genes in addition to a monofunctional LKR gene. Analysis of ESTs finds evidence for monofunctional LKR transcripts in switchgrass, and monofunctional SDH transcripts in wheat, Brachypodium, and poplar. The analysis of a wheat LKR/SDH gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes show lineage-specific differences between monocots and dicots, and findings suggest variation in activity of LKR/SDH genes

  1. Cloning and Characterization of the Genes Encoding the Murine Homologues of the Human Melanoma Antigens MART1 and gp100

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yifan; Yang, James C.; Spiess, Paul; Nishimura, Michael I.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Roberts, Bruce; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    The recent identification of genes encoding melanoma-associated antigens has opened new possibilities for the development of cancer vaccines designed to cause the rejection of established tumors. To develop a syngeneic animal model for evaluating antigen-specific vaccines in cancer therapy, the murine homologues of the human melanoma antigens MART1 and gp 100, which were specifically recognized by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with melanoma, were cloned and sequenced from a murine B16 melanoma cDNA library. The open reading frames of murine MART1 and gp 100 encode proteins of 113- and 626-amino acids with 68.8 and 77% identity to the respective human proteins. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the murine MART1 genes, derived from normal melanocytes, the immortalized nontumorgenic melanocyte line Melan-a and the B16 melanoma, showed all to be identical. Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed that both genes encoded products that were melanocyte lineage proteins. Mice immunized with murine MART1 or gp 100 using recombinant vaccinia virus failed to produce any detectable T-cell responses or protective immunity against B16 melanoma. In contrast, immunization of mice with human gp 100 using recombinant adenoviruses elicited T cells specific for hgp100, but these T cells also cross reacted with B16 tumor in vitro and induced significant but weak protection against B16 challenge. Immunization with human and mouse gp100 together [adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-hep100 plus recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV)-mgp100], or immunization with human gp100 (Ad2-hgp100) and boosting with heterologous vector (rVV-hgp100 or rVV-mgp100) or homologous vector (Ad2-hgp100), did not significantly enhance the protective response against B16 melanoma. These results may suggest that immunization with heterologous tumor antigen, rather than self, may be more effective as an immunotherapeutic reagent in designing antigen-specific cancer vaccines. PMID:9101410

  2. Genes encoding major light-harvesting polypeptides are clustered on the genome of the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, P B; Lemaux, P G; Lomax, T L; Grossman, A R

    1986-01-01

    The polypeptide composition of the phycobilisome, the major light-harvesting complex of prokaryotic cyanobacteria and certain eukaryotic algae, can be modulated by different light qualities in cyanobacteria exhibiting chromatic adaptation. We have identified genomic fragments encoding a cluster of phycobilisome polypeptides (phycobiliproteins) from the chromatically adapting cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon using previously characterized DNA fragments of phycobiliprotein genes from the eukaryotic alga Cyanophora paradoxa and from F. diplosiphon. Characterization of two lambda-EMBL3 clones containing overlapping genomic fragments indicates that three sets of phycobiliprotein genes--the alpha- and beta-allophycocyanin genes plus two sets of alpha- and beta-phycocyanin genes--are clustered within 13 kilobases on the cyanobacterial genome and transcribed off the same strand. The gene order (alpha-allophycocyanin followed by beta-allophycocyanin and beta-phycocyanin followed by alpha-phycocyanin) appears to be a conserved arrangement found previously in a eukaryotic alga and another cyanobacterium. We have reported that one set of phycocyanin genes is transcribed as two abundant red light-induced mRNAs (1600 and 3800 bases). We now present data showing that the allophycocyanin genes and a second set of phycocyanin genes are transcribed into major mRNAs of 1400 and 1600 bases, respectively. These transcripts are present in RNA isolated from cultures grown in red and green light, although lower levels of the 1600-base phycocyanin transcript are present in cells grown in green light. Furthermore, a larger transcript of 1750 bases hybridizes to the allophycocyanin genes and may be a precursor to the 1400-base species. Images PMID:3086870

  3. DNA inversion within the apolipoproteins AI/CIII/AIV-encoding gene cluster of certain patients with premature atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Karathanasis, S.K.; Ferris, E.; Haddad, I.A.

    1987-10-01

    The genes coding for apolipoproteins (apo) AI, CIII, and AIV, designated APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4, respectively, are closely linked and tandemly organized in the long arm of the human chromosome 11. A DNA rearrangement involving the genes encoding apoAI and apoCIII in certain patients with premature atherosclerosis has been associated with deficiency of both apoAI and apoCIII in the plasma of these patients. Structural characterization of the genes for apoAI and apoCIII in one of these patients indicates that this rearrangement consists of a DNA inversion containing portions of the 3' ends of the apoAI and apoCIII genes, including themore » DNA region between these genes. The breakpoints of this DNA inversion are located within the fourth exon of the apoAI gene and the first intron of the apoCIII gene. Thus, this DNA inversion results in reciprocal fusion of the apoAI and apoCIII gene transcriptional units. Expression of these gene fusions in cultured mammalian cells results in stable mRNA transcripts with sequences representing fusions of the apoAI and apoCIII mRNAs. These results indicate that absence of transcripts with correct apoAI and apoCIII mRNA sequences causes apoAI and apoCIII deficiency in the plasma of these patients and suggest that these apolipoproteins are involved in cholesterol homeostasis and protection against premature atherosclerosis.« less

  4. Flower-predominant expression of a gene encoding a novel class I chitinase in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Takakura, Y; Ito, T; Saito, H; Inoue, T; Komari, T; Kuwata, S

    2000-04-01

    A flower-predominant cDNA for a gene, termed OsChia 1;175, was isolated from a cDNA library of rice pistils. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that the OsChia 1;175 gene is highly expressed in floral organs (pistils, stamens and lodicules at the heading stage) but not or at an extremely low level in vegetative organs. OsChia 1;175 encodes a protein that consists of 340 amino acid residues, and the putative mature protein shows 52% to 63% amino acid identity to class I chitinases of rice or other plants. The phylogenetic tree shows that the OsChia 1;175 protein is a new type of plant class I chitinase in rice. The expression of OsChia 1;175 in vegetative organs is not induced by several chemicals, UV, and wounding. The soluble putative mature OsChia 1;175 protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited chitinase activity in the assay with colloidal chitin as a substrate. Genomic Southern analysis revealed that the OsChia 1;175 gene was organized as a low-copy gene family. The rice genomic library was screened and a genome clone corresponding to OsChia 1;175 was isolated. The transcription start sites of the OsChia 1;175 gene were mapped by primer extension analysis. The 1.2 kb putative promoter region of the OsChia 1;175 gene was fused to the GUS (beta-glucuronidase) gene, and this chimeric gene was introduced to rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The flower-predominant gene expression was identified also in the transgenic rice plants. The high promoter activity was detected in the stigmas, styles, stamens and lodicules in transgenic plants. The possible functions of OsChia 1;175 are discussed.

  5. De novo mutations in the gene encoding the synaptic scaffolding protein SHANK3 in patients ascertained for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Julie; Champagne, Nathalie; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Xiong, Lan; Spiegelman, Dan; Brustein, Edna; Lapointe, Mathieu; Peng, Huashan; Côté, Mélanie; Noreau, Anne; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Addington, Anjené M.; Rapoport, Judith L.; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Joober, Ridha; Fathalli, Ferid; Mouaffak, Fayçal; Haghighi, Ali P.; Néri, Christian; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Samuels, Mark E.; Marineau, Claude; Stone, Eric A.; Awadalla, Philip; Barker, Philip A.; Carbonetto, Salvatore; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia likely results from poorly understood genetic and environmental factors. We studied the gene encoding the synaptic protein SHANK3 in 285 controls and 185 schizophrenia patients with unaffected parents. Two de novo mutations (R1117X and R536W) were identified in two families, one being found in three affected brothers, suggesting germline mosaicism. Zebrafish and rat hippocampal neuron assays revealed behavior and differentiation defects resulting from the R1117X mutant. As mutations in SHANK3 were previously reported in autism, the occurrence of SHANK3 mutations in subjects with a schizophrenia phenotype suggests a molecular genetic link between these two neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:20385823

  6. Comparative Analysis of AGPase Genes and Encoded Proteins in Eight Monocots and Three Dicots with Emphasis on Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Ritu; Saripalli, Gautam; Mohan, Amita; Gupta, Saurabh; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Varadwaj, Pritish K.; Balyan, Harindra S.; Gupta, Pushpendra K.

    2017-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a heterotetrameric enzyme with two large subunits (LS) and two small subunits (SS). It plays a critical role in starch biosynthesis. We are reporting here detailed structure, function and evolution of the genes encoding the LS and the SS among monocots and dicots. “True” orthologs of maize Sh2 (AGPase LS) and Bt2 (AGPase SS) were identified in seven other monocots and three dicots; structure of the enzyme at protein level was also studied. Novel findings of the current study include the following: (i) at the DNA level, the genes controlling the SS are more conserved than those controlling the LS; the variation in both is mainly due to intron number, intron length and intron phase distribution; (ii) at protein level, the SS genes are more conserved relative to those for LS; (iii) “QTCL” motif present in SS showed evolutionary differences in AGPase belonging to wheat 7BS, T. urartu, rice and sorghum, while “LGGG” motif in LS was present in all species except T. urartu and chickpea; SS provides thermostability to AGPase, while LS is involved in regulation of AGPase activity; (iv) heterotetrameric structure of AGPase was predicted and analyzed in real time environment through molecular dynamics simulation for all the species; (v) several cis-acting regulatory elements were identified in the AGPase promoters with their possible role in regulating spatial and temporal expression (endosperm and leaf tissue) and also the expression, in response to abiotic stresses; and (vi) expression analysis revealed downregulation of both subunits under conditions of heat and drought stress. The results of the present study have allowed better understanding of structure and evolution of the genes and the encoded proteins and provided clues for exploitation of variability in these genes for engineering thermostable AGPase. PMID:28174576

  7. Identification of potential platelet alloantigens in the Equidae family by comparison of gene sequences encoding major platelet membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Mary K; Humphries, Drew M

    2013-12-01

    Platelet alloantigens in horses may play an important role in the development of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). The objective of this study was to evaluate genes encoding major platelet glycoproteins within the Equidae family in an effort to identify potential alloantigens. DNA was isolated from blood samples obtained from Equidae family members, including a Holsteiner-Oldenburg cross, a Quarter horse, a donkey, and a Plains zebra (Equus burchelli). Gene sequences encoding equine platelet membrane glycoproteins IIb, IIIa (integrin subunits αIIb and β3), Ia (integrin subunit α2), and Ibα were determined using PCR. Gene sequences were compared to the equine genome available on GenBank. Polymorphisms that would be predicted to result in amino acid changes on platelet surfaces were documented and compared with known alloantigenic sites documented on human platelets. Amino acid differences were predicted based on nucleotide sequences for all 4 genes. Nine differences were documented for αIIb, 5 differences were documented for β3, 7 differences were documented for α2, and 16 differences were documented for Ibα outside the macroglycopeptide region. This study represents the first effort at identifying potential platelet alloantigens in members of the Equidae Family based on evaluation of gene sequences. The data obtained form the groundwork for identifying potential platelet alloantigens involved in transfusion reactions and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). More work is required to determine whether the predicted amino acid differences documented in this study play a role in alloimmunity, and whether other polymorphisms not detected in this study are present that may result in alloimmunity. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Export of l-Isoleucine from Corynebacterium glutamicum: a Two-Gene-Encoded Member of a New Translocator Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennerknecht, Nicole; Sahm, Hermann; Yen, Ming-Ren; Pátek, Miroslav; Saier, Jr., Milton H.; Eggeling, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria possess amino acid export systems, and Corynebacterium glutamicum excretes l-isoleucine in a process dependent on the proton motive force. In order to identify the system responsible for l-isoleucine export, we have used transposon mutagenesis to isolate mutants of C. glutamicum sensitive to the peptide isoleucyl-isoleucine. In one such mutant, strong peptide sensitivity resulted from insertion into a gene designated brnF encoding a hydrophobic protein predicted to possess seven transmembrane spanning helices. brnE is located downstream of brnF and encodes a second hydrophobic protein with four putative membrane-spanning helices. A mutant deleted of both genes no longer exports l-isoleucine, whereas an overexpressing strain exports this amino acid at an increased rate. BrnF and BrnE together are also required for the export of l-leucine and l-valine. BrnFE is thus a two-component export permease specific for aliphatic hydrophobic amino acids. Upstream of brnFE and transcribed divergently is an Lrp-like regulatory gene required for active export. Searches for homologues of BrnFE show that this type of exporter is widespread in prokaryotes but lacking in eukaryotes and that both gene products which together comprise the members of a novel family, the LIV-E family, generally map together within a single operon. Comparisons of the BrnF and BrnE phylogenetic trees show that gene duplication events in the early bacterial lineage gave rise to multiple paralogues that have been retained in α-proteobacteria but not in other prokaryotes analyzed. PMID:12081967

  9. An antisense RNA in a lytic cyanophage links psbA to a gene encoding a homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew D; Gierga, Gregor; Clokie, Martha R J; Evans, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J

    2010-09-01

    Cyanophage genomes frequently possess the psbA gene, encoding the D1 polypeptide of photosystem II. This protein is believed to maintain host photosynthetic capacity during infection and enhance phage fitness under high-light conditions. Although the first documented cyanophage-encoded psbA gene contained a group I intron, this feature has not been widely reported since, despite a plethora of new sequences becoming available. In this study, we show that in cyanophage S-PM2, this intron is spliced during the entire infection cycle. Furthermore, we report the widespread occurrence of psbA introns in marine metagenomic libraries, and with psbA often adjacent to a homing endonuclease (HE). Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic region between psbA and the adjacent HE gene F-CphI in S-PM2 showed the presence of an antisense RNA (asRNA) connecting these two separate genetic elements. The asRNA is co-regulated with psbA and F-CphI, suggesting its involvement with their expression. Analysis of scaffolds from global ocean survey datasets shows this asRNA to be commonly associated with the 3' end of cyanophage psbA genes, implying that this potential mechanism of regulating marine 'viral' photosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved. Although antisense transcription is commonly found in eukaryotic and increasingly also in prokaryotic organisms, there has been no indication for asRNAs in lytic phages so far. We propose that this asRNA also provides a means of preventing the formation of mobile group I introns within cyanophage psbA genes.

  10. Cloning of the canine gene encoding transcription factor Pit-1 and its exclusion as candidate gene in a canine model of pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Lantinga-van Leeuwen, I S; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S; Rijnberk, A; Breen, M; Renier, C; van Oost, B A

    2000-01-01

    Combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease of German shepherd dogs characterized primarily by dwarfism. In mice and humans a similar genetic disorder has been described that results from an alteration in the gene encoding the transcription factor Pit-1. In this study we characterized the canine Pit-1 gene, determined the chromosomal localization of the Pit-1 gene, and screened dwarf German shepherd dogs for the presence of mutations in this gene. The full-length canine Pit-1 cDNA contained an open reading frame encoding 291 amino acids, 92 bp of 5'-untranslated region, and 1959 bp of 3'-untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly homologous with Pit-1 of other mammalian species. Using a Pit-1 BAC clone as probe, the Pit-1 gene was mapped by FISH to canine Chromosome (Chr) 31. In dwarf German shepherd dogs a C to A transversion was detected, causing a Phe (TTC) to Leu (TTA) substitution at codon 81. This alteration was present neither in other canine breeds analyzed nor in other mammalian species. However, healthy German shepherd dogs were also homozygous for the mutant allele, indicating that it is not the primary disease-causing mutation. In addition, linkage analysis of polymorphic DNA markers flanking the Pit-1 gene, 41K19 and 52L05, revealed no co-segregation between the Pit-1 locus and the CPHD phenotype. These findings suggest that a gene other than Pit-1 is responsible for the pituitary anomaly in dwarf German shepherd dogs.

  11. Expression analysis of genes encoding double B-box zinc finger proteins in maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlan; Wang, Jingchao; Sun, Qi; Li, Wencai; Yu, Yanli; Zhao, Meng; Meng, Zhaodong

    2017-11-01

    The B-box proteins play key roles in plant development. The double B-box (DBB) family is one of the subfamily of the B-box family, with two B-box domains and without a CCT domain. In this study, 12 maize double B-box genes (ZmDBBs) were identified through a genome-wide survey. Phylogenetic analysis of DBB proteins from maize, rice, Sorghum bicolor, Arabidopsis, and poplar classified them into five major clades. Gene duplication analysis indicated that segmental duplications made a large contribution to the expansion of ZmDBBs. Furthermore, a large number of cis-acting regulatory elements related to plant development, response to light and phytohormone were identified in the promoter regions of the ZmDBB genes. The expression patterns of the ZmDBB genes in various tissues and different developmental stages demonstrated that ZmDBBs might play essential roles in plant development, and some ZmDBB genes might have unique function in specific developmental stages. In addition, several ZmDBB genes showed diurnal expression pattern. The expression levels of some ZmDBB genes changed significantly under light/dark treatment conditions and phytohormone treatments, implying that they might participate in light signaling pathway and hormone signaling. Our results will provide new information to better understand the complexity of the DBB gene family in maize.

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of genes encoding ubiquitin conjugating domain-containing enzymes in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Jue, Dengwei; Sang, Xuelian; Shu, Bo; Liu, Liqin; Wang, Yicheng; Jia, Zhiwei; Zou, Yu; Shi, Shengyou

    2017-01-01

    Ripening affects the quality and nutritional contents of fleshy fruits and is a crucial process of fruit development. Although several studies have suggested that ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2s or UBC enzymes) are involved in the regulation of fruit ripening, little is known about the function of E2s in papaya (Carica papaya). In the present study, we searched the papaya genome and identified 34 putative UBC genes, which were clustered into 17 phylogenetic subgroups. We also analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the papaya UBC (CpUBC) genes and found that both exon-intron junctions and sequence motifs were highly conserved among the phylogenetic subgroups. Using real-time PCR analysis, we also found that all the CpUBC genes were expressed in roots, stems, leaves, male and female flowers, and mature fruit, although the expression of some of the genes was increased or decreased in one or several specific organs. We also found that the expression of 13 and two CpUBC genes were incresesd or decreased during one and two ripening stages, respectively. Expression analyses indicates possible E2s playing a more significant role in fruit ripening for further studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported genome-wide analysis of the papaya UBC gene family, and the results will facilitate further investigation of the roles of UBC genes in fruit ripening and will aide in the functional validation of UBC genes in papaya.

  13. Shiga Toxins, and the Genes Encoding Them, in Fecal Samples from Native Idaho Ungulates▿

    PubMed Central

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Shields, Malcolm S.; Smith, Rebekah L.; Farrell, Larry D.; Sheridan, Peter P.; Spiegel, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Cattle are a known reservoir of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. The prevalence and stability of Shiga toxin and/or Shiga toxin genes among native wild ungulates in Idaho were investigated. The frequency of both Shiga genes and toxin was similar to that reported for Idaho cattle (∼19%). PMID:19060170

  14. Shiga toxins, and the genes encoding them, in fecal samples from native Idaho ungulates.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Shields, Malcolm S; Smith, Rebekah L; Farrell, Larry D; Sheridan, Peter P; Spiegel, Kathleen M

    2009-02-01

    Cattle are a known reservoir of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. The prevalence and stability of Shiga toxin and/or Shiga toxin genes among native wild ungulates in Idaho were investigated. The frequency of both Shiga genes and toxin was similar to that reported for Idaho cattle ( approximately 19%).

  15. Five Genes Encoding Surface-Exposed LPXTG Proteins Are Enriched in Hospital-Adapted Enterococcus faecium Clonal Complex 17 Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; van Wamel, Willem J. B.; Posthuma, George; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2007-01-01

    Most Enterococcus faecium isolates associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections belong to a distinct genetic subpopulation called clonal complex 17 (CC17). It has been postulated that the genetic evolution of CC17 involves the acquisition of various genes involved in antibiotic resistance, metabolic pathways, and virulence. To gain insight into additional genes that may have favored the rapid emergence of this nosocomial pathogen, we aimed to identify surface-exposed LPXTG cell wall-anchored proteins (CWAPs) specifically enriched in CC17 E. faecium. Using PCR and Southern and dot blot hybridizations, 131 E. faecium isolates (40 CC17 and 91 non-CC17) were screened for the presence of 22 putative CWAP genes identified from the E. faecium TX0016 genome. Five genes encoding LPXTG surface proteins were specifically enriched in E. faecium CC17 isolates. These five LPXTG surface protein genes were found in 28 to 40 (70 to 100%) of CC17 and in only 7 to 24 (8 to 26%) of non-CC17 isolates (P < 0.05). Three of these CWAP genes clustered together on the E. faecium TX0016 genome, which may comprise a novel enterococcal pathogenicity island covering E. faecium contig 609. Expression at the mRNA level was demonstrated, and immunotransmission electron microscopy revealed an association of the five LPXTG surface proteins with the cell wall. Minimal spanning tree analysis based on the presence and absence of 22 CWAP genes revealed grouping of all 40 CC17 strains together with 18 hospital-derived but evolutionary unrelated non-CC17 isolates in a distinct CWAP-enriched cluster, suggesting horizontal transfer of CWAP genes and a role of these CWAPs in hospital adaptation. PMID:17873043

  16. Reduced Neuronal Transcription of Escargot, the Drosophila Gene Encoding a Snail-Type Transcription Factor, Promotes Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Symonenko, Alexander V.; Roshina, Natalia V.; Krementsova, Anna V.; Pasyukova, Elena G.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, several genes involved in complex neuron specification networks have been shown to control life span. However, information on these genes is scattered, and studies to discover new neuronal genes and gene cascades contributing to life span control are needed, especially because of the recognized role of the nervous system in governing homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Previously, we demonstrated that several genes that encode RNA polymerase II transcription factors and that are involved in the development of the nervous system affect life span in Drosophila melanogaster. Among other genes, escargot (esg) was demonstrated to be causally associated with an increase in the life span of male flies. Here, we present new data on the role of esg in life span control. We show that esg affects the life spans of both mated and unmated males and females to varying degrees. By analyzing the survival and locomotion of the esg mutants, we demonstrate that esg is involved in the control of aging. We show that increased longevity is caused by decreased esg transcription. In particular, we demonstrate that esg knockdown in the nervous system increased life span, directly establishing the involvement of the neuronal esg function in life span control. Our data invite attention to the mechanisms regulating the esg transcription rate, which is changed by insertions of DNA fragments of different sizes downstream of the structural part of the gene, indicating the direction of further research. Our data agree with the previously made suggestion that alterations in gene expression during development might affect adult lifespan, due to epigenetic patterns inherited in cell lineages or predetermined during the development of the structural and functional properties of the nervous system. PMID:29760717

  17. High prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli carrying toxin-encoding genes isolated from children and adults in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Spano, Liliana Cruz; da Cunha, Keyla Fonseca; Monfardini, Mariane Vedovatti; de Cássia Bergamaschi Fonseca, Rita; Scaletsky, Isabel Christina Affonso

    2017-12-18

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important bacterial causes of childhood diarrhea in Brazil, but its impact in adults is unknown. This study aimed at investigating DEC among children and adults living in endemic areas. A total of 327 stools specimens were collected from children (n = 141) and adults (n = 186) with diarrhea attending health centers. Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) were identified by their virulence genes (multiplex polymerase chain reaction) and HEp-2 cell adherence patterns. DEC were detected in 56 (40%) children and 74 (39%) adults; enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) (23%) was the most prevalent pathotype, followed by diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) (13%), and occurred at similar frequencies in both diarrheal groups. Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) strains were recovered more frequently from children (6%) than from adults (1%). Twenty-six percent of the EAEC were classified as typical EAEC possessing aggR gene, and carried the aap gene. EAEC strains carrying aggR-aap-aatA genes were significantly more frequent among children than adults (p < 0.05). DAEC strains possessing Afa/Dr. genes were detected from children (10%) and adults (6%). EAEC and DAEC strains harboring genes for the EAST1 (astA), Pet, Pic, and Sat toxins were common in both diarrheal groups. The astA and the porcine AE/associated adhesin (paa) genes were found in most of aEPEC strains. High levels of resistance to antimicrobial drugs were found among DAEC and aEPEC isolates. The results show a high proportion of EAEC and DAEC carrying toxin-encoding genes among adults with diarrhea.

  18. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development.

  19. Polymorphisms in genes encoding dopamine signalling pathway and risk of alcohol dependence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Lakkakula V K S; Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Arun

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is one of the major elements that significantly influence drinking pattern that provoke the alcohol-induced organ damage. The structural and neurophysiologic abnormalities in the frontal lobes of chronic alcoholics were revealed by magnetic resonance imaging scans. It is well known that candidate genes involved in dopaminergic pathway are of immense interest to the researchers engaged in a wide range of addictive disorders. Dopaminergic pathway gene polymorphisms are being extensively studied with respect to addictive and behavioral disorders. From the broad literature available, the current review summarizes the specific polymorphisms of dopaminergic genes that play a role in alcohol dependence. No evidence indicating any strong association between AD and polymorphisms of dopamine pathway genes has emerged from the literature. Further studies are warranted, considering a range of alcohol-related traits to determine the genes that influence alcohol dependence.

  20. Multiplex PCR for the detection of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes and methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Su Mi; Kim, Seung-Han; Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kang, Jin-Han; Shin, Wan-Shik; Kang, Moon-Won

    2003-01-01

    We developed multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect aac(6 ')/aph(2 "), aph(3 ')-IIIa, and ant(4 ')-Ia, the genes encoding the most clinically relevant amino-glycoside modifying enzymes (AME), and simultaneously, the methicillin resistant gene, mecA, in Staphylococcus species. Clinical isolates of 45 S. aureus and 47 coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) from tertiary university hospitals were tested by conventional susceptibility testing, using the agar dilution method and by multiplex PCR. Of a total of 92 isolates, 61 isolates were found to be methicillin-resistant. Of these, 54 isolates (89%) were found to be harboring mecA. Seventy-five percent of the 92 isolates demonstrated resistance to at least one of the aminoglycosides tested. Moreover, resistance to aminoglycosides was closely associated with methicillin-resistance (p<0.05). The most prevalent AME gene was aac(6 ')/aph(2 ") which was found in 65% of the isolates, and ant(4 ')-Ia and aph(3 ')-IIIa were present in 41% and 9% of the isolates, respectively. The concordance between methicillin-resistance and the presence of mecA gene was 98% in S. aureus and 81% in CNS. The concordance between gentamicin resistance and the presence of aac(6 ')/aph(2 ") gene was 100% in S. aureus and 85% in CNS. The multiplex PCR method that we developed appears to be both a more rapid and reliable than conventional method. PMID:14555812

  1. The compositional transition of vertebrate genomes: an analysis of the secondary structure of the proteins encoded by human genes.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Giuseppe; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2005-01-17

    Fluctuations and increments of both C(3) and G(3) levels along the human coding sequences were investigated comparing two sets of Xenopus/human orthologous genes. The first set of genes shows minor differences of the GC(3) levels, the second shows considerable increments of the GC(3) levels in the human genes. In both data sets, the fluctuations of C(3) and G(3) levels along the coding sequences correlated with the secondary structures of the encoded proteins. The human genes that underwent the compositional transition showed a different increment of the C(3) and G(3) levels within and among the structural units of the proteins. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) of several amino acids were also affected during the compositional transition, showing that there exists a correlation between RSCU and protein secondary structures in human genes. The importance of natural selection for the formation of isochore organization of the human genome has been discussed on the basis of these results.

  2. The L locus, one of complementary genes required for anthocyanin production in onions (Allium cepa), encodes anthocyanidin synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Jones, Rick; Yoo, Kil-Sun; Pike, Leonard M

    2005-06-01

    Bulb color in onions (Allium cepa) is an important trait, but its complex, unclear mechanism of inheritance has been a limiting factor in onion cultivar improvement. The identity of the L locus, which is involved in the color difference between Brazilian yellow and red onions, is revealed in this study. A cross was made between a US-type yellow breeding line and a Brazilian yellow cultivar. The segregation ratio of nine red to seven yellow onions in the F(2) population supports the involvement of two complementary genes in anthocyanin production in the F(1) hybrids. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis of the Brazilian yellow onions indicated that the genes are involved late in the anthocyanin synthesis pathway. The genomic sequence of the anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) gene in Brazilian yellow onions showed a point mutation, which results in an amino acid change of a glycine to an arginine at residue 229. Because this residue is located adjacent to a highly conserved iron-binding active site, this mutation is likely responsible for the inactivation of the ANS gene in Brazilian yellow onions. Following the isolation of the promoter sequence of the mutant allele, a PCR-based marker for allelic selection of the ANS gene was designed. This assay is based on an insertion (larger than 3 kb) mutation. The marker perfectly co-segregated with the color phenotypes in the F(2) populations, thereby indicating that the L locus encodes ANS.

  3. Isolation, sequencing and expression of RED, a novel human gene encoding an acidic-basic dipeptide repeat.

    PubMed

    Assier, E; Bouzinba-Segard, H; Stolzenberg, M C; Stephens, R; Bardos, J; Freemont, P; Charron, D; Trowsdale, J; Rich, T

    1999-04-16

    A novel human gene RED, and the murine homologue, MuRED, were cloned. These genes were named after the extensive stretch of alternating arginine (R) and glutamic acid (E) or aspartic acid (D) residues that they contain. We term this the 'RED' repeat. The genes of both species were expressed in a wide range of tissues and we have mapped the human gene to chromosome 5q22-24. MuRED and RED shared 98% sequence identity at the amino acid level. The open reading frame of both genes encodes a 557 amino acid protein. RED fused to a fluorescent tag was expressed in nuclei of transfected cells and localised to nuclear dots. Co-localisation studies showed that these nuclear dots did not contain either PML or Coilin, which are commonly found in the POD or coiled body nuclear compartments. Deletion of the amino terminal 265 amino acids resulted in a failure to sort efficiently to the nucleus, though nuclear dots were formed. Deletion of a further 50 amino acids from the amino terminus generates a protein that can sort to the nucleus but is unable to generate nuclear dots. Neither construct localised to the nucleolus. The characteristics of RED and its nuclear localisation implicate it as a regulatory protein, possibly involved in transcription.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the Bacillus subtilis birA gene encoding a repressor of the biotin operon.

    PubMed

    Bower, S; Perkins, J; Yocum, R R; Serror, P; Sorokin, A; Rahaim, P; Howitt, C L; Prasad, N; Ehrlich, S D; Pero, J

    1995-05-01

    The Bacillus subtilis birA gene, which regulates biotin biosynthesis, has been cloned and characterized. The birA gene maps at 202 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome and encodes a 36,200-Da protein that is 27% identical to Escherichia coli BirA protein. Three independent mutations in birA that lead to deregulation of biotin synthesis alter single amino acids in the amino-terminal end of the protein. The amino-terminal region that is affected by these three birA mutations shows sequence similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif previously identified in E. coli BirA protein. B. subtilis BirA protein also possesses biotin-protein ligase activity, as judged by its ability to complement a conditional lethal birA mutant of E. coli.

  5. Cloning and characterization of the Bacillus subtilis birA gene encoding a repressor of the biotin operon.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, S; Perkins, J; Yocum, R R; Serror, P; Sorokin, A; Rahaim, P; Howitt, C L; Prasad, N; Ehrlich, S D; Pero, J

    1995-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis birA gene, which regulates biotin biosynthesis, has been cloned and characterized. The birA gene maps at 202 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome and encodes a 36,200-Da protein that is 27% identical to Escherichia coli BirA protein. Three independent mutations in birA that lead to deregulation of biotin synthesis alter single amino acids in the amino-terminal end of the protein. The amino-terminal region that is affected by these three birA mutations shows sequence similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif previously identified in E. coli BirA protein. B. subtilis BirA protein also possesses biotin-protein ligase activity, as judged by its ability to complement a conditional lethal birA mutant of E. coli. PMID:7730294

  6. The C. elegans che-1 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor required for specification of the ASE chemosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Okiko; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Koga, Makoto; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2003-04-01

    Chemotaxis to water-soluble chemicals such as NaCl is an important behavior of C. elegans when seeking food. ASE chemosensory neurons have a major role in this behavior. We show that che-1, defined by chemotaxis defects, encodes a zinc-finger protein similar to the GLASS transcription factor required for photoreceptor cell differentiation in Drosophila, and that che-1 is essential for specification and function of ASE neurons. Expression of a che-1::gfp fusion construct was predominant in ASE. In che-1 mutants, expression of genes characterizing ASE such as seven-transmembrane receptors, guanylate cyclases and a cyclic-nucleotide gated channel is lost. Ectopic expression of che-1 cDNA induced expression of ASE-specific marker genes, a dye-filling defect in neurons other than ASE and dauer formation.

  7. Characterization of genes encoding ABA 8'-hydroxylase in ethylene-induced stem growth of deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Dongsu

    2006-11-24

    Ethylene and submergence enhance stem elongation of deepwater rice, at least in part, by reducing in the internode the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) content and increasing the level of gibberellin A1 (GA1). We cloned and characterized the CYP707A5 and CYP707A6 genes, which encode putative ABA 8'-hydroxylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of ABA. Expression of CYP707A5 was upregulated significantly by ethylene treatment, whereas that of CYP707A6 was not altered. Recombinant proteins from both genes expressed in yeast cells showed activity of ABA 8'-hydroxylase. This finding indicates that CYP707A5 may play a role in ABA catabolism during submergence- or ethylene-induced stem elongation in deepwater rice. Taken together, these results provide links between the molecular mechanisms and physiological phenomena of submergence- and ethylene-induced stem elongation in deepwater rice.

  8. A gene encoding maize caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase confers quantitative resistance to multiple pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; He, Yijian; Kabahuma, Mercy; Chaya, Timothy; Kelly, Amy; Borrego, Eli; Bian, Yang; El Kasmi, Farid; Yang, Li; Teixeira, Paulo; Kolkman, Judith; Nelson, Rebecca; Kolomiets, Michael; L Dangl, Jeffery; Wisser, Randall; Caplan, Jeffrey; Li, Xu; Lauter, Nick; Balint-Kurti, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Alleles that confer multiple disease resistance (MDR) are valuable in crop improvement, although the molecular mechanisms underlying their functions remain largely unknown. A quantitative trait locus, qMdr 9.02 , associated with resistance to three important foliar maize diseases-southern leaf blight, gray leaf spot and northern leaf blight-has been identified on maize chromosome 9. Through fine-mapping, association analysis, expression analysis, insertional mutagenesis and transgenic validation, we demonstrate that ZmCCoAOMT2, which encodes a caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase associated with the phenylpropanoid pathway and lignin production, is the gene within qMdr 9.02 conferring quantitative resistance to both southern leaf blight and gray leaf spot. We suggest that resistance might be caused by allelic variation at the level of both gene expression and amino acid sequence, thus resulting in differences in levels of lignin and other metabolites of the phenylpropanoid pathway and regulation of programmed cell death.

  9. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  10. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  11. Product-induced gene expression, a product-responsive reporter assay used to screen metagenomic libraries for enzyme-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-11-01

    A reporter assay-based screening method for enzymes, which we named product-induced gene expression (PIGEX), was developed and used to screen a metagenomic library for amidases. A benzoate-responsive transcriptional activator, BenR, was placed upstream of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein and used as a sensor. Escherichia coli sensor cells carrying the benR-gfp gene cassette fluoresced in response to benzoate concentrations as low as 10 μM but were completely unresponsive to the substrate benzamide. An E. coli metagenomic library consisting of 96,000 clones was grown in 96-well format in LB medium containing benzamide. The library cells were then cocultivated with sensor cells. Eleven amidase genes were recovered from 143 fluorescent wells; eight of these genes were homologous to known bacterial amidase genes while three were novel genes. In addition to their activity toward benzamide, the enzymes were active toward various substrates, including d- and l-amino acid amides, and displayed enantioselectivity. Thus, we demonstrated that PIGEX is an effective approach for screening novel enzymes based on product detection.

  12. Identification of a Linked Set of Genes in Serpulina hyodysenteriae (B204) Predicted To Encode Closely Related 39-Kilodalton Extracytoplasmic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gabe, Jeffrey D.; Dragon, Elizabeth; Chang, Ray-Jen; McCaman, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A tandem pair of nearly identical genes from Serpulina hyodysenteriae (B204) were cloned and sequenced. The full open reading frame of one gene and the partial open reading frame of the neighboring gene appear to encode secreted proteins which are homologous to, yet distinct from, the 39-kDa extracytoplasmic protein purified from the membrane fraction of S. hyodysenteriae. We have designated these newly identified genes vspA and vspB (for variable surface protein). PMID:9440540

  13. Molecular characterization of the rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) ORF4 gene and the RRV complement control protein it encodes.

    PubMed

    Mark, Linda; Spiller, O Brad; Okroj, Marcin; Chanas, Simon; Aitken, Jim A; Wong, Scott W; Damania, Blossom; Blom, Anna M; Blackbourn, David J

    2007-04-01

    The diversity of viral strategies to modulate complement activation indicates that this component of the immune system has significant antiviral potential. One example is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) complement control protein (KCP), which inhibits progression of the complement cascade. Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV), like KSHV, is a member of the subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae and currently provides the only in vivo model of KSHV pathobiology in primates. In the present study, we characterized the KCP homologue encoded by RRV, RRV complement control protein (RCP). Two strains of RRV have been sequenced to date (H26-95 and 17577), and the RCPs they encode differ substantially in structure: RCP from strain H26-95 has four complement control protein (CCP) domains, whereas RCP from strain 17577 has eight CCP domains. Transcriptional analyses of the RCP gene (ORF4, referred to herein as RCP) in infected rhesus macaque fibroblasts mapped the ends of the transcripts of both strains. They revealed that H26-95 encodes a full-length, unspliced RCP transcript, while 17577 RCP generates a full-length unspliced mRNA and two alternatively spliced transcripts. Western blotting confirmed that infected cells express RCP, and immune electron microscopy disclosed this protein on the surface of RRV virions. Functional studies of RCP encoded by both RRV strains revealed their ability to suppress complement activation by the classical (antibody-mediated) pathway. These data provide the foundation for studies into the biological significance of gammaherpesvirus complement regulatory proteins in a tractable, non-human primate model.

  14. The pink gene encodes the Drosophila orthologue of the human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5) gene.

    PubMed

    Syrzycka, Monika; McEachern, Lori A; Kinneard, Jennifer; Prabhu, Kristel; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen; Schulze, Sandra; Rawls, John M; Lloyd, Vett K; Sinclair, Donald A R; Honda, Barry M

    2007-06-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) consists of a set of human autosomal recessive disorders, with symptoms resulting from defects in genes required for protein trafficking in lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules. A number of human HPS genes and rodent orthologues have been identified whose protein products are key components of 1 of 4 different protein complexes (AP-3 or BLOC-1, -2, and -3) that are key participants in the process. Drosophila melanogaster has been a key model organism in demonstrating the in vivo significance of many genes involved in protein trafficking pathways; for example, mutations in the "granule group" genes lead to changes in eye colour arising from improper protein trafficking to pigment granules in the developing eye. An examination of the chromosomal positioning of Drosophila HPS gene orthologues suggested that CG9770, the Drosophila HPS5 orthologue, might correspond to the pink locus. Here we confirm this gene assignment, making pink the first eye colour gene in flies to be identified as a BLOC complex gene.

  15. Analysis of the aac(3)-VIa gene encoding a novel 3-N-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Mann, P A; Mierzwa, R; Hare, R S; Miller, G H; Shaw, K J

    1993-01-01

    Biochemical analysis (G. A. Papanicolaou, R. S. Hare, R. Mierzwa, and G. H. Miller, abstr. 152, Program Abstr. 29th Intersci. Conf. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 1989) demonstrated the presence of a novel 3-N-acetyltransferase in Enterobacter cloacae 88020217. This organism was resistant to gentamicin, and the MIC of 2'-N-ethylnetilmicin for it was fourfold lower than that of 6'-N-ethylnetilmicin, a resistance pattern which suggested 2'-acetylating activity. However, high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that the enzyme acetylated sisomicin in the 3 position. We have cloned the structural gene for this enzyme from a large (> 70-kb) conjugative plasmid present in E. cloacae. Subcloning experiments have localized the aac(3)-VIa gene to a 2.1-kb Sau3A fragment. The deduced AAC(3)-VIa protein showed 48% amino acid identity to the AAC(3)-IIa protein and 39% identity to the AAC(3)-VII protein. Examination of the 5'-flanking sequences demonstrated that the aac(3)-VIa gene was located 167 bp downstream of the aadA1 gene and was present in an integron. In addition, the aac(3)-VIa gene is also downstream of a 59-base element often seen in an integron environment. Primer extension analysis has identified a promoter for the aac(3)-VIa gene downstream of both the aadA1 gene and a 59-base element. Images PMID:8257126

  16. Gene Disruption in Scedosporium aurantiacum: Proof of Concept with the Disruption of SODC Gene Encoding a Cytosolic Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Pateau, Victoire; Razafimandimby, Bienvenue; Vandeputte, Patrick; Thornton, Christopher R; Guillemette, Thomas; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Giraud, Sandrine

    2018-02-01

    Scedosporium species are opportunistic pathogens responsible for a large variety of infections in humans. An increasing occurrence was observed in patients with underlying conditions such as immunosuppression or cystic fibrosis. Indeed, the genus Scedosporium ranks the second among the filamentous fungi colonizing the respiratory tracts of the CF patients. To date, there is very scarce information on the pathogenic mechanisms, at least in part because of the limited genetic tools available. In the present study, we successfully developed an efficient transformation and targeted gene disruption approach on the species Scedosporium aurantiacum. The disruption cassette was constructed using double-joint PCR procedure, and resistance to hygromycin B as the selection marker. This proof of concept was performed on the functional gene SODC encoding the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase. Disruption of the SODC gene improved susceptibility of the fungus to oxidative stress. This technical advance should open new research areas and help to better understand the biology of Scedosporium species.

  17. A Gene Encoding a Hevein-Like Protein from Elderberry Fruits Is Homologous to PR-4 and Class V Chitinase Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Els J.M.; Charels, Diana; Roy, Soma; Tierens, Koenraad; Barre, Annick; Martins, José C.; Rougé, Pierre; Van Leuven, Fred; Does, Mirjam; Peumans, Willy J.

    1999-01-01

    We isolated SN-HLPf (Sambucus nigra hevein-like fruit protein), a hevein-like chitin-binding protein, from mature elderberry fruits. Cloning of the corresponding gene demonstrated that SN-HLPf is synthesized as a chimeric precursor consisting of an N-terminal chitin-binding domain corresponding to the mature elderberry protein and an unrelated C-terminal domain. Sequence comparisons indicated that the N-terminal domain of this precursor has high sequence similarity with the N-terminal domain of class I PR-4 (pathogenesis-related) proteins, whereas the C terminus is most closely related to that of class V chitinases. On the basis of these sequence homologies the gene encoding SN-HLPf can be considered a hybrid between a PR-4 and a class V chitinase gene. PMID:10198114

  18. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a glutamate and aspartate carrier of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, B; Yang, Y J; Hong, J S; Lum, D

    1990-01-01

    A gene encoding a carrier protein for glutamate and aspartate was cloned into Escherichia coli K-12 strain BK9MDG by using the high-copy-number plasmid pBR322. The gene (designated gltP) is probably identical to a gene recently cloned from E. coli B (Y. Deguchi, I. Yamato, and Y. Anraku, J. Bacteriol. 171:1314-1319). A 1.6-kilobase DNA fragment containing gltP was subcloned into the expression plasmids pT7-5 and pT7-6, and its product was identified by a phage T7 RNA polymerase-T7 promoter coupled system (S. Tabor and C. C. Richardson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1074-1078) as a polypeptide with an apparent mass of 38 kilodaltons. A portion of the gltP polypeptide was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The nucleotide sequence of the 1.6-kilobase fragment was determined. It contained an open reading frame capable of encoding a highly hydrophobic polypeptide of 395 amino acids, containing four possible transmembrane segments. Uptake of glutamate and aspartate was increased 5.5- and 4.5-fold, respectively, in strains containing gltP plasmids. Glutamate uptake was insensitive to the concentration of Na+ and was inhibited by L-cysteate and beta-hydroxyaspartate. These results suggest that gltP is a structural gene for a carrier protein of the Na(+)-independent, binding-protein-independent glutamate-aspartate transport system. Images PMID:1971622

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pirA gene encodes a second receptor for ferrienterobactin and synthetic catecholate analogues.

    PubMed

    Ghysels, Bart; Ochsner, Urs; Möllman, Ute; Heinisch, Lothar; Vasil, Michael; Cornelis, Pierre; Matthijs, Sandra

    2005-05-15

    Actively secreted iron chelating agents termed siderophores play an important role in the virulence and rhizosphere competence of fluorescent pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa which secretes a high affinity siderophore, pyoverdine, and the low affinity siderophore, pyochelin. Uptake of the iron-siderophore complexes is an active process that requires specific outer membrane located receptors, which are dependent of the inner membrane-associated protein TonB and two other inner membrane proteins, ExbB and ExbC. P. aeruginosa is also capable of using a remarkable variety of heterologous siderophores as sources of iron, apparently by expressing their cognate receptors. Illustrative of this feature are the 32 (of which 28 putative) siderophore receptor genes observed in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. However, except for a few (pyoverdine, pyochelin, enterobactin), the vast majority of P. aeruginosa siderophore receptor genes still remain to be characterized. Ten synthetic iron chelators of catecholate type stimulated growth of a pyoverdine/pyochelin deficient P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant under condition of severe iron limitation. Null mutants of the 32 putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor encoding genes engineered in the same genetic background were screened for obvious deficiencies in uptake of the synthetic siderophores, but none showed decreased growth stimulation in the presence of the different siderophores. However, a double knock-out mutant of ferrienterobactin receptor encoding gene pfeA (PA 2688) and pirA (PA0931) failed to be stimulated by 4 of the tested synthetic catecholate siderophores whose chemical structures resemble enterobactin. Ferric-enterobactin also failed to stimulate growth of the double pfeA-pirA mutant although, like its synthetic analogues, it stimulated growth of the corresponding single mutants. Hence, we confirmed that pirA represents a second P. aeruginosa ferric-enterobactin receptor. The example of these two

  20. Brassica rapa Has Three Genes That Encode Proteins Associated with Different Neutral Lipids in Plastids of Specific Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Wu, Sherry S.H.; Ratnayake, Chandra; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2001-01-01

    Plastid lipid-associated protein (PAP), a predominant structural protein associated with carotenoids and other non-green neutral lipids in plastids, was shown to be encoded by a single nuclear gene in several species. Here we report three PAP genes in the diploid Brassica rapa; the three PAPs are associated with different lipids in specific tissues. Pap1 and Pap2 are more similar to each other (84% amino acid sequence identity) than to Pap3 (46% and 44%, respectively) in the encoded mature proteins. Pap1 transcript was most abundant in the maturing anthers (tapetum) and in lesser amounts in leaves, fruit coats, seeds, and sepals; Pap2 transcript was abundant only in the petals; and Pap3 transcript had a wide distribution, but at minimal levels in numerous organs. Immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that most organs had several nanograms of PAP1 or PAP2 per milligram of total protein, the highest amounts being in the anthers (10.9 μg mg−1 PAP1) and petals (6.6 μg mg−1 PAP2), and that they had much less PAP3 (<0.02 μg mg−1). In these organs PAP was localized in isolated plastid fractions. Plants were subjected to abiotic stresses; drought and ozone reduced the levels of the three Pap transcripts, whereas mechanical wounding and altering the light intensity enhanced their levels. We conclude that the PAP gene family consists of several members whose proteins are associated with different lipids and whose expressions are controlled by distinct mechanisms. Earlier reports of the expression of one Pap gene in various organs in a species need to be re-examined. PMID:11351096

  1. Arabidopsis cop8 and fus4 mutations define the same gene that encodes subunit 4 of the COP9 signalosome.

    PubMed Central

    Serino, G; Tsuge, T; Kwok, S; Matsui, M; Wei, N; Deng, X W

    1999-01-01

    The pleiotropic constitutive photomorphogenic/deetiolated/fusca (cop/det/fus) mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit features of light-grown seedlings when grown in the dark. Cloning and biochemical analysis of COP9 have revealed that it is a component of a multiprotein complex, the COP9 signalosome (previously known as the COP9 complex). Here, we compare the immunoaffinity and the biochemical purification of the COP9 signalosome from cauliflower and confirm its eight-subunit composition. Molecular cloning of subunit 4 of the complex revealed that it is a proteasome-COP9 complex-eIF3 domain protein encoded by a gene that maps to chromosome 5, near the chromosomal location of the cop8 and fus4 mutations. Genetic complementation tests showed that the cop8 and fus4 mutations define the same locus, now designated as COP8. Molecular analysis of the subunit 4-encoding gene in both cop8 and fus4 mutants identified specific molecular lesions, and overexpression of the subunit 4 cDNA in a cop8 mutant background resulted in complete rescue of the mutant phenotype. Thus, we conclude that COP8 encodes subunit 4 of the COP9 signalosome. Examination of possible molecular interactions by using the yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that COP8 is capable of strong self-association as well as interaction with COP9, FUS6/COP11, FUS5, and Arabidopsis JAB1 homolog 1, the latter four proteins being previously defined subunits of the Arabidopsis COP9 signalosome. A comparative sequence analysis indicated that COP8 is highly conserved among multicellular eukaryotes and is also similar to a subunit of the 19S regulatory particle of the 26S proteasome. PMID:10521526

  2. Cloning and Expression Pattern of a Gene Encoding an α-Xylosidase Active against Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides from Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Sampedro, Javier; Sieiro, Carmen; Revilla, Gloria; González-Villa, Tomás; Zarra, Ignacio

    2001-01-01

    An α-xylosidase active against xyloglucan oligosaccharides was purified from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) leaves. Two peptide sequences were obtained from this protein, the N-terminal and an internal one, and these were used to identify an Arabidopsis gene coding for an α-xylosidase that we propose to call AtXYL1. It has been mapped to a region of chromosome I between markers at 100.44 and 107.48 cM. AtXYL1 comprised three exons and encoded a peptide that was 915 amino acids long, with a potential signal peptide of 22 amino acids and eight possible N-glycosylation sites. The protein encoded by AtXYL1 showed the signature regions of family 31 glycosyl hydrolases, which comprises not only α-xylosidases, but also α-glucosidases. The α-xylosidase activity is present in apoplastic extractions from Arabidopsis seedlings, as suggested by the deduced signal peptide. The first eight leaves from Arabidopsis plants were harvested to analyze α-xylosidase activity and AtXYL1 expression levels. Both increased from older to younger leaves, where xyloglucan turnover is expected to be higher. When this gene was introduced in a suitable expression vector and used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae, significantly higher α-xylosidase activity was detected in the yeast cells. α-Glucosidase activity was also increased in the transformed cells, although to a lesser extent. These results show that AtXYL1 encodes for an apoplastic α-xylosidase active against xyloglucan oligosaccharides that probably also has activity against p-nitrophenyl-α-d-glucoside. PMID:11402218

  3. Cloning and expression pattern of a gene encoding an alpha-xylosidase active against xyloglucan oligosaccharides from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, J; Sieiro, C; Revilla, G; González-Villa, T; Zarra, I

    2001-06-01

    An alpha-xylosidase active against xyloglucan oligosaccharides was purified from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) leaves. Two peptide sequences were obtained from this protein, the N-terminal and an internal one, and these were used to identify an Arabidopsis gene coding for an alpha-xylosidase that we propose to call AtXYL1. It has been mapped to a region of chromosome I between markers at 100.44 and 107.48 cM. AtXYL1 comprised three exons and encoded a peptide that was 915 amino acids long, with a potential signal peptide of 22 amino acids and eight possible N-glycosylation sites. The protein encoded by AtXYL1 showed the signature regions of family 31 glycosyl hydrolases, which comprises not only alpha-xylosidases, but also alpha-glucosidases. The alpha-xylosidase activity is present in apoplastic extractions from Arabidopsis seedlings, as suggested by the deduced signal peptide. The first eight leaves from Arabidopsis plants were harvested to analyze alpha-xylosidase activity and AtXYL1 expression levels. Both increased from older to younger leaves, where xyloglucan turnover is expected to be higher. When this gene was introduced in a suitable expression vector and used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae, significantly higher alpha-xylosidase activity was detected in the yeast cells. alpha-Glucosidase activity was also increased in the transformed cells, although to a lesser extent. These results show that AtXYL1 encodes for an apoplastic alpha-xylosidase active against xyloglucan oligosaccharides that probably also has activity against p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucoside.

  4. Gene Encoding the Hydrolase for the Product of the meta-Cleavage Reaction in Testosterone Degradation by Comamonas testosteroni

    PubMed Central

    Horinouchi, Masae; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takako; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2003-01-01

    In a previous study we isolated the meta-cleavage enzyme gene, tesB, that encodes an enzyme that carries out a meta-cleavage reaction in the breakdown of testosterone by Comamonas testeroni TA441 (M. Horinouchi et al., Microbiology 147:3367-3375, 2001). Here we report the isolation of a gene, tesD, that encodes a hydrolase which acts on the product of the meta-cleavage reaction. We isolated tesD by using a Tn5 mutant of TA441 that showed limited growth on testosterone. TesD exhibited ca. 40% identity in amino acid sequence with BphDs, known hydrolases of biphenyl degradation in Pseudomonas spp. The TesD-disrupted mutant showed limited growth on testosterone, and the culture shows an intense yellow color. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the culture of TesD-disrupted mutant incubated with testosterone detected five major intermediate compounds, one of which, showing yellow color under neutral conditions, was considered to be the product of the meta-cleavage reaction. The methylation product was analyzed and identified as methyl-4,5-9,10-diseco-3-methoxy-5,9,17-trioxoandrosta-1(10),2-dien-4-oate, indicating that the substrate of TesD in testosterone degradation is 4,5-9,10-diseco-3-hydroxy-5,9,17-trioxoandrosta-1(10),2-dien-4-oic acid. 4,5-9,10-Diseco-3-hydroxy-5,9,17-trioxoandrosta-1(10),2-dien-4-oic acid was transformed by Escherichia coli-expressed TesD. Downstream of tesD, we identified tesE, F, and G, which encode for enzymes that degrade one of the products of 4,5-9,10-diseco-3-hydroxy-5,9,17-trioxoandrosta-1(10),2-dien-4-oic acid converted by TesD. PMID:12676694

  5. Two genes in Arabidopsis thaliana encoding GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase are required for ascorbate biosynthesis and seedling viability.

    PubMed

    Dowdle, John; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Gatzek, Stephan; Rolinski, Susanne; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2007-11-01

    Plants synthesize ascorbate from guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-mannose via L-galactose/L-gulose, although uronic acids have also been proposed as precursors. Genes encoding all the enzymes of the GDP-mannose pathway have previously been identified, with the exception of the step that converts GDP-L-galactose to L-galactose 1-P. We show that a GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, encoded by the Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 gene, catalyses this step in the ascorbate biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, a homologue of VTC2, At5g55120, encodes a second GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase with similar properties to VTC2. Two At5g55120 T-DNA insertion mutants (vtc5-1 and vtc5-2) have 80% of the wild-type ascorbate level. Double mutants were produced by crossing the loss-of-function vtc2-1 mutant with each of the two vtc5 alleles. These show growth arrest immediately upon germination and the cotyledons subsequently bleach. Normal growth was restored by supplementation with ascorbate or L-galactose, indicating that both enzymes are necessary for ascorbate generation. vtc2-1 leaves contain more mannose 6-P than wild-type. We conclude that the GDP-mannose pathway is the only significant source of ascorbate in A. thaliana seedlings, and that ascorbate is essential for seedling growth. A. thaliana leaves accumulate more ascorbate after acclimatization to high light intensity. VTC2 expression and GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase activity rapidly increase on transfer to high light, but the activity of other enzymes in the GDP-mannose pathway is little affected. VTC2 and At5g55120 (VTC5) expression also peak in at the beginning of the light cycle and are controlled by the circadian clock. The GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase step may therefore play an important role in controlling ascorbate biosynthesis.

  6. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, G; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the Pyrococcus furiosus hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase (APU) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a single 827-residue polypeptide with a 26-residue signal peptide. The protein sequence had very low homology (17 to 21% identity) with other APUs and enzymes of the alpha-amylase family. In particular, none of the consensus regions present in the alpha-amylase family could be identified. P. furiosus APU showed similarity to three proteins, including the P. furiosus intracellular alpha-amylase and Dictyoglomus thermophilum alpha-amylase A. The mature protein had a molecular weight of 89,000. The recombinant P. furiosus APU remained folded after denaturation at temperatures of < or = 70 degrees C and showed an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Denaturating temperatures of above 100 degrees C were required for complete unfolding. The enzyme was extremely thermostable, with an optimal activity at 105 degrees C and pH 5.5. Ca2+ increased the enzyme activity, thermostability, and substrate affinity. The enzyme was highly resistant to chemical denaturing reagents, and its activity increased up to twofold in the presence of surfactants. PMID:9293009

  7. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, M.L.; Cascieri, M.A.; Kelder, B.

    1987-05-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fibroblasts, directs synthesis of the fusion protein, subsequent proteolytic removal of the bovine growth hormone signal peptide, and secretion of hIGF-I into the culture medium. Conditioned medium frommore » transfected cells inhibits binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I to type I IGF receptors on human placental membranes and to acid-stable human serum carrier proteins. The recombinant hIGF-I produced is biologically active, as monitored by the stimulation of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.« less

  8. Correlation of rare coding variants in the gene encoding human glucokinase regulatory protein with phenotypic, cellular, and kinetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rees, Matthew G; Ng, David; Ruppert, Sarah; Turner, Clesson; Beer, Nicola L; Swift, Amy J; Morken, Mario A; Below, Jennifer E; Blech, Ilana; Mullikin, James C; McCarthy, Mark I; Biesecker, Leslie G; Gloyn, Anna L; Collins, Francis S

    2012-01-01

    Defining the genetic contribution of rare variants to common diseases is a major basic and clinical science challenge that could offer new insights into disease etiology and provide potential for directed gene- and pathway-based prevention and treatment. Common and rare nonsynonymous variants in the GCKR gene are associated with alterations in metabolic traits, most notably serum triglyceride levels. GCKR encodes glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), a predominantly nuclear protein that inhibits hepatic glucokinase (GCK) and plays a critical role in glucose homeostasis. The mode of action of rare GCKR variants remains unexplored. We identified 19 nonsynonymous GCKR variants among 800 individuals from the ClinSeq medical sequencing project. Excluding the previously described common missense variant p.Pro446Leu, all variants were rare in the cohort. Accordingly, we functionally characterized all variants to evaluate their potential phenotypic effects. Defects were observed for the majority of the rare variants after assessment of cellular localization, ability to interact with GCK, and kinetic activity of the encoded proteins. Comparing the individuals with functional rare variants to those without such variants showed associations with lipid phenotypes. Our findings suggest that, while nonsynonymous GCKR variants, excluding p.Pro446Leu, are rare in individuals of mixed European descent, the majority do affect protein function. In sum, this study utilizes computational, cell biological, and biochemical methods to present a model for interpreting the clinical significance of rare genetic variants in common disease.

  9. Inactivation of a Pleurotus ostreatus versatile peroxidase-encoding gene (mnp2) results in reduced lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Lignin biodegradation by white-rot fungi is pivotal to the earth's carbon cycle. Manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the most common extracellular ligninolytic peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi, are considered key in ligninolysis. Pleurotus ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a preferential lignin degrader occupying niches rich in lignocellulose such as decaying trees. Here, we provide direct, genetically based proof for the functional significance of MnP to P. ostreatus ligninolytic capacity under conditions mimicking its natural habitat. When grown on a natural lignocellulosic substrate of cotton stalks under solid-state culture conditions, gene and isoenzyme expression profiles of its short MnP and versatile peroxidase (VP)-encoding gene family revealed that mnp2 was predominately expressed. mnp2, encoding the versatile short MnP isoenzyme 2 was disrupted. Inactivation of mnp2 resulted in three interrelated phenotypes, relative to the wild-type strain: (i) reduction of 14% and 36% in lignin mineralization of stalks non-amended and amended with Mn(2+), respectively; (ii) marked reduction of the bioconverted lignocellulose sensitivity to subsequent bacterial hydrolyses; and (iii) decrease in fungal respiration rate. These results may serve as the basis to clarify the roles of the various types of fungal MnPs and VPs in their contribution to white-rot decay of wood and lignocellulose in various ecosystems. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme is mutated in artesunate- and chloroquine-resistant rodent malaria parasites§

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Paul; Afonso, Ana; Creasey, Alison; Culleton, Richard; Sidhu, Amar Bir Singh; Logan, John; Valderramos, Stephanie G; McNae, Iain; Cheesman, Sandra; do Rosario, Virgilio; Carter, Richard; Fidock, David A; Cravo, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    Artemisinin- and artesunate-resistant Plasmodium chabaudi mutants, AS-ART and AS-ATN, were previously selected from chloroquine-resistant clones AS-30CQ and AS-15CQ respectively. Now, a genetic cross between AS-ART and the artemisinin-sensitive clone AJ has been analysed by Linkage Group Selection. A genetic linkage group on chromosome 2 was selected under artemisinin treatment. Within this locus, we identified two different mutations in a gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme. A distinct mutation occurred in each of the clones AS-30CQ and AS-ATN, relative to their respective progenitors in the AS lineage. The mutations occurred independently in different clones under drug selection with chloroquine (high concentration) or artesunate. Each mutation maps to a critical residue in a homologous human deubiquitinating protein structure. Although one mutation could theoretically account for the resistance of AS-ATN to artemisinin derivates, the other cannot account solely for the resistance of AS-ART, relative to the responses of its sensitive progenitor AS-30CQ. Two lines of Plasmodium falciparum with decreased susceptibility to artemisinin were also selected. Their drug-response phenotype was not genetically stable. No mutations in the UBP-1 gene encoding the P. falciparum orthologue of the deubiquitinating enzyme were observed. The possible significance of these mutations in parasite responses to chloroquine or artemisinin is discussed. PMID:17581118

  11. Analysis of the genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 in Bulgarian patients with autism.

    PubMed

    Avdjieva-Tzavella, D M; Todorov, T P; Todorova, A P; Kirov, A V; Hadjidekova, S P; Rukova, B B; Litvinenko, I O; Hristova-Naydenova, D N; Tincheva, R S; Toncheva, D I

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have supported a genetic aetiology for autism. Neuroligins are postsynaptically located cell-adhesion molecules. Mutations in two X-linked neuroligin genes, NLGN3 and NLGN4, have been implicated in pathogenesis of autism. In order to confirm these causative mutations in our autistic population and to determine their frequency we screened 20 individuals affected with autism. We identified one patient with a point mutation in NLGN4 gene that substituted a Met for Thr 787 - c.2360C > T, p.(Thr787Met) and three patients with identical polymorphisms in the same gene: c.933C > T, p.(Thr311Thr) in combination with c.[1777C > T+1779C > G, p.(Leu593Leu)]. All patients tested for NLGN3 mutations were negative. These results indicate that mutations in these genes are responsible for at most a small fraction of autism cases.

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of gene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase in 'Vidal blanc' grape berries.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiu-Hong; Chen, Fang; Zhu, Bao-Qing; Ma, Li-Yan; Li, Li; Li, Jing-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The pleasantly fruity and floral 2-phenylethanol are a dominant aroma compound in post-ripening 'Vidal blanc' grapes. However, to date little has been reported about its synthetic pathway in grapevine. In the present study, a full-length cDNA of VvAADC (encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase) was firstly cloned from the berries of 'Vidal blanc', an interspecific hybrid variety of Vitis vinifera × Vitis riparia. This sequence encodes a complete open reading frame of 482 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 54 kDa and isoelectric point value (pI) of 5.73. The amino acid sequence deduced shared about 79% identity with that of aromatic L: -amino acid decarboxylases (AADCs) from tomato. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that VvAADC transcript abundance presented a small peak at 110 days after full bloom and then a continuous increase at the berry post-ripening stage, which was consistent with the accumulation of 2-phenylethanol, but did not correspond to the trends of two potential intermediates, phenethylamine and 2-phenylacetaldehyde. Furthermore, phenylalanine still exhibited a continuous increase even in post-ripening period. It is thus suggested that 2-phenylethanol biosynthetic pathway mediated by AADC exists in grape berries, but it has possibly little contribution to a considerable accumulation of 2-phenylethanol in post-ripening 'Vidal blanc' grapes.

  13. Identification and Analysis of a Gene from Calendula officinalis Encoding a Fatty Acid Conjugase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiao; Reed, Darwin W.; Hong, Haiping; MacKenzie, Samuel L.; Covello, Patrick S.

    2001-01-01

    Two homologous cDNAs, CoFad2 and CoFac2, were isolated from a Calendula officinalis developing seed by a polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy. Both sequences share similarity to FAD2 desaturases and FAD2-related enzymes. In C. officinalis plants CoFad2 was expressed in all tissues tested, whereas CoFac2 expression was specific to developing seeds. Expression of CoFad2 cDNA in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) indicated it encodes a Δ12 desaturase that introduces a double bond at the 12 position of 16:1(9Z) and 18:1(9Z). Expression of CoFac2 in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme acts as a fatty acid conjugase converting 18:2(9Z, 12Z) to calendic acid 18:3(8E, 10E, 12Z). The enzyme also has weak activity on the mono-unsaturates 16:1(9Z) and 18:1(9Z) producing compounds with the properties of 8,10 conjugated dienes. PMID:11161042

  14. Comparative analysis of genes encoding key steroid core oxidation enzymes in fast-growing Mycobacterium spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Bragin, E Yu; Shtratnikova, V Yu; Dovbnya, D V; Schelkunov, M I; Pekov, Yu A; Malakho, S G; Egorova, O V; Ivashina, T V; Sokolov, S L; Ashapkin, V V; Donova, M V

    2013-11-01

    A comparative genome analysis of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D, 1816D and 1817D strains used for efficient production of key steroid intermediates (androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, AD, androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, ADD, 9α-hydroxy androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, 9-OH-AD) from phytosterol has been carried out by deep sequencing. The assembled contig sequences were analyzed for the presence putative genes of steroid catabolism pathways. Since 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (KSH) and 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase (Δ(1) KSTD) play key role in steroid core oxidation, special attention was paid to the genes encoding these enzymes. At least three genes of Δ(1) KSTD (kstD), five genes of KSH subunit A (kshA), and one gene of KSH subunit B of 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (kshB) have been found in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D. Strains of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D and 1816D were found to possess at least one kstD, one kshB and two kshA genes. The assembled genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D differs from those of 1815D and 1816D strains, whereas these last two are nearly identical, differing by 13 single nucleotide substitutions (SNPs). One of these SNPs is located in the coding region of a kstD gene and corresponds to an amino acid substitution Lys (135) in 1816D for Ser (135) in 1815D. The findings may be useful for targeted genetic engineering of the biocatalysts for biotechnological application. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Isolation and expression analysis of FTZ-F1 encoding gene of black rock fish ( Sebastes schlegelii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Muhammad; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Xiaosu; Ma, Liman; Muhammad, Faiz; Qi, Jie; Zhang, Quanqi

    2013-03-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene. In this study, FTZ-F1 gene ( FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning. The full-length cDNA of S. schlegeli FTZ-F1 ( ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5' UTR, a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3' UTR. Sequence, tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F1 belonged to FTZ group, holding highly conserved regions including I, II and III FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer. Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages. In juveniles (105 days old), the transcript of ssFTZ-F1 can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis, ovary, spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues. In mature fish, the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis, ovary, spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount), and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues. The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish. In addition, the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts ( P<0.05).

  16. Role of the DLGAP2 Gene Encoding the SAP90/PSD-95-Associated Protein 2 in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Ming; Lu, Chao-Lin; Cheng, Min-Chih; Luu, Sy-Ueng; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant synaptic dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The DLGAP2 gene encoding the SAP90/PSD-95-associated protein 2 (SAPAP2) located at the post-synaptic density of neuronal cells is involved in the neuronal synaptic function. This study aimed to investigate whether the DLGAP2 gene is associated with schizophrenia. We resequenced the putative promoter region and all the exons of the DLGAP2 gene in 523 patients with schizophrenia and 596 non-psychotic controls from Taiwan and conducted a case-control association analysis. We identified 19 known SNPs in this sample. Association analysis of 9 SNPs with minor allele frequency greater than 5% showed no association with schizophrenia. However, we found a haplotype (CCACCAACT) significantly associated with schizophrenia (odds ratio:2.5, p<0.001). We also detected 16 missense mutations and 1 amino acid-insertion mutation in this sample. Bioinformatic analysis showed some of these mutations were damaging or pathological to the protein function, but we did not find increased burden of these mutations in the patient group. Notably, we identified 5 private rare variants in 5 unrelated patients, respectively, including c.−69+9C>T, c.−69+13C>T, c.−69+47C>T, c.−69+55C>T at intron 1 and c.−32A>G at untranslated exon 2 of the DLGAP2 gene. These rare variants were not detected in 559 control subjects. Further reporter gene assay of these rare variants except c.−69+13C>T showed significantly elevated promoter activity than the wild type, suggesting increased DLGAP2 gene expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Our results indicate that DLGAP2 is a susceptible gene of schizophrenia. PMID:24416398

  17. Characterization and Heterologous Expression of the Genes Encoding Enterocin A Production, Immunity, and Regulation in Enterococcus faecium DPC1146

    PubMed Central

    O’Keeffe, Triona; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    1999-01-01

    Enterocin A is a small, heat-stable, antilisterial bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium DPC1146. The sequence of a 10,879-bp chromosomal region containing at least 12 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of which are predicted to play a role in enterocin biosynthesis, is presented. The genes entA, entI, and entF encode the enterocin A prepeptide, the putative immunity protein, and the induction factor prepeptide, respectively. The deduced proteins EntK and EntR resemble the histidine kinase and response regulator proteins of two-component signal transducing systems of the AgrC-AgrA type. The predicted proteins EntT and EntD are homologous to ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters and accessory factors, respectively, of several other bacteriocin systems and to proteins implicated in the signal-sequence-independent export of Escherichia coli hemolysin A. Immediately downstream of the entT and entD genes are two ORFs, the product of one of which, ORF4, is very similar to the product of the yteI gene of Bacillus subtilis and to E. coli protease IV, a signal peptide peptidase known to be involved in outer membrane lipoprotein export. Another potential bacteriocin is encoded in the opposite direction to the other genes in the enterocin cluster. This putative bacteriocin-like peptide is similar to LafX, one of the components of the lactacin F complex. A deletion which included one of two direct repeats upstream of the entA gene abolished enterocin A activity, immunity, and ability to induce bacteriocin production. Transposon insertion upstream of the entF gene also had the same effect, but this mutant could be complemented by exogenously supplied induction factor. The putative EntI peptide was shown to be involved in the immunity to enterocin A. Cloning of a 10.5-kb amplicon comprising all predicted ORFs and regulatory regions resulted in heterologous production of enterocin A and induction factor in Enterococcus faecalis, while a four-gene construct (entAITD) under the

  18. Characterization and expression analysis of genes encoding ubiquitin conjugating domain-containing enzymes in Carica papaya

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Dengwei; Sang, Xuelian; Shu, Bo; Liu, Liqin; Wang, Yicheng; Jia, Zhiwei; Zou, Yu; Shi, Shengyou

    2017-01-01

    Background Ripening affects the quality and nutritional contents of fleshy fruits and is a crucial process of fruit development. Although several studies have suggested that ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2s or UBC enzymes) are involved in the regulation of fruit ripening, little is known about the function of E2s in papaya (Carica papaya). Methodology/Principal findings In the present study, we searched the papaya genome and identified 34 putative UBC genes, which were clustered into 17 phylogenetic subgroups. We also analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the papaya UBC (CpUBC) genes and found that both exon-intron junctions and sequence motifs were highly conserved among the phylogenetic subgroups. Using real-time PCR analysis, we also found that all the CpUBC genes were expressed in roots, stems, leaves, male and female flowers, and mature fruit, although the expression of some of the genes was increased or decreased in one or several specific organs. We also found that the expression of 13 and two CpUBC genes were incresesd or decreased during one and two ripening stages, respectively. Expression analyses indicates possible E2s playing a more significant role in fruit ripening for further studies. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported genome-wide analysis of the papaya UBC gene family, and the results will facilitate further investigation of the roles of UBC genes in fruit ripening and will aide in the functional validation of UBC genes in papaya. PMID:28231288

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding glutaminase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, K; Nagasaki, H; Yuasa, A; Kataoka, J; Kitamoto, K

    2000-07-01

    A glutaminase from Aspergillus oryzae was purified and its molecular weight was determined to be 82,091 by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Purified glutaminase catalysed the hydrolysis not only of L-glutamine but also of D-glutamine. Both the molecular weight and the substrate specificity of this glutaminase were different from those reported previously [Yano et al. (1998) J Ferment Technol 66: 137-143]. On the basis of its internal amino acid sequences, we have isolated and characterized the glutaminase gene (gtaA) from A. oryzae. The gtaA gene had an open reading frame coding for 690 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 20 amino acid residues and a mature protein of 670 amino acid residues. In the 5'-flanking region of the gene, there were three putative CreAp binding sequences and one putative AreAp binding sequence. The gtaA structural gene was introduced into A. oryzae NS4 and a marked increase in activity was detected in comparison with the control strain. The gtaA gene was also isolated from Aspergillus nidulans on the basis of the determined nucleotide sequence of the gtaA gene from A. oryzae.

  20. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae. Progress report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novelmore » regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. {beta}-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for {beta}-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.« less

  1. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-01-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  2. Gene encoding the human. beta. -hexosaminidase. beta. chain: Extensive homology of intron placement in the. alpha. - and. beta. -chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Proia, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-hexosaminidase is composed of two structurally similar chains, {alpha} and {beta}, that are the products of different genes. Mutations in either gene causing {beta}-hexosaminidase deficiency result in the lysosomal storage disease GM2-gangliosidosis. To enable the investigation of the molecular lesions in this disorder and to study the evolutionary relationship between the {alpha} and {beta} chains, the {beta}-chain gene was isolated, and its organization was characterized. The {beta}-chain coding region is divided into 14 exons distributed over {approx}40 kilobases of DNA. Comparison with the {alpha}-chain gene revealed that 12 of the 13 introns interrupt the coding regions at homologous positions.more » This extensive sharing of intron placement demonstrates that the {alpha} and {beta} chains evolved by way of the duplication of a common ancestor.« less

  3. Cloning and characterization of soybean gene Fg1 encoding flavonol 3-O-glucoside/galactoside (1→6) glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Rojas Rodas, Felipe; Di, Shaokang; Murai, Yoshinori; Iwashina, Tsukasa; Sugawara, Satoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2016-11-01

    Flavonoids are important secondary metabolites in plants. Sugar-sugar glycosyltransferases are involved in the final step of flavonoid biosynthesis and contribute to the structural diversity of flavonoids. This manuscript describes the first cloning of a sugar-sugar glucosyltransferase gene in the UGT family that attaches glucose to the 6″-position of sugar bound to a flavonol. The results provide a glimpse on the possible evolution of sugar-sugar glycosyltransferase genes and identify putative amino acids responsible for the recognition of the hydroxyl group of the sugar moiety and specification of sugar. A scheme for the genetic control of flavonol glycoside biosynthesis is proposed. Flavonol glycosides (FGs) are predominant in soybean leaves and they show substantial differences among genotypes. In previous studies, we identified two flavonoid glycoside glycosyltransferase genes that segregated in recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between cultivars Nezumisaya and Harosoy; one was responsible for the attachment of glucose to the 2″-position of glucose or galactose that is bound to the 3-position of kaempferol and the other was involved in the attachment of glucose to the 6″-position. This study was conducted to clone and characterize the 6″-glucosyltransferase gene. Linkage mapping indicated that the gene was located in the molecular linkage group I (chromosome 20). Based on the genome sequence, we cloned a candidate cDNA, GmF3G6"Gt from Harosoy but the corresponding cDNA could not be amplified by PCR from Nezumisaya. The coding region of GmF3G6″Gt in Harosoy is 1386 bp long encoding 462 amino acids. This gene was not expressed in leaves of Nezumisaya. The GmF3G6″Gt recombinant protein converted UDP-glucose and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside or kaempferol 3-O-galactoside to kaempferol 3-O-glucosyl-(1→6)-glucoside or kaempferol 3-O-glucosyl-(1→6)-galactoside, respectively. These results indicate that GmF3G6″Gt encodes a flavonol 3-O

  4. SOX9 regulates multiple genes in chondrocytes, including genes encoding ECM proteins, ECM modification enzymes, receptors, and transporters.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chun-do; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX9 plays an essential role in determining the fate of several cell types and is a master factor in regulation of chondrocyte development. Our aim was to determine which genes in the genome of chondrocytes are either directly or indirectly controlled by SOX9. We used RNA-Seq to identify genes whose expression levels were affected by SOX9 and used SOX9 ChIP-Seq to identify those genes that harbor SOX9-interaction sites. For RNA-Seq, the RNA expression profile of primary Sox9flox/flox mouse chondrocytes infected with Ad-CMV-Cre was compared with that of the same cells infected with a control adenovirus. Analysis of RNA-Seq data indicated that, when the levels of Sox9 mRNA were decreased more than 8-fold by infection with Ad-CMV-Cre, 196 genes showed a decrease in expression of at least 4-fold. These included many cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and a number of genes for ECM modification enzymes (transferases), membrane receptors, transporters, and others. In ChIP-Seq, 75% of the SOX9-interaction sites had a canonical inverted repeat motif within 100 bp of the top of the peak. SOX9-interaction sites were found in 55% of the genes whose expression was decreased more than 8-fold in SOX9-depleted cells and in somewhat fewer of the genes whose expression was reduced more than 4-fold, suggesting that these are direct targets of SOX9. The combination of RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq has provided a fuller understanding of the SOX9-controlled genetic program of chondrocytes.

  5. The 987P fimbrial gene cluster of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is plasmid encoded.

    PubMed Central

    Schifferli, D M; Beachey, E H; Taylor, R K

    1990-01-01

    A clone containing the 987P fimbrial gene cluster was selected from a cosmid library of total DNA of the prototype Escherichia coli strain 987 by using 987P-specific antiserum. A subclone of 12 kilobases containing all of the genes required for fimbrial expression on a nonfimbriated K-12 strain of E. coli and a DNA fragment internal to the fimbrial subunit gene were used to probe the prototype strain and various isolates of 987P-fimbriated enterotoxigenic E. coli. All strains had several plasmids, as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis, and each of five strains which expressed 987P fimbriae showed a plasmid of 35 to 40 megadaltons (MDa) hybridizing to both 987P-specific probes. Hybridization to restricted DNA of strain 987 supported a plasmid origin for the cloned 987P gene cluster. Moreover, an isogenic strain which had lost its 35-MDa plasmid was no longer capable of synthesizing fimbrial subunits, but regained fimbrial expression after reintroduction of the TnphoA (Tn5 IS50L::phoA)-tagged 35-MDa plasmid. Absence of fimbrial subunit synthesis in K-12 strains transformed with the 35-MDa plasmid alone suggested the requirement of regulatory elements existing in strain 987 but missing in K-12 strains. A probe for the heat-stable enterotoxin STIa hybridized in each of the 987P-fimbriated strains to the plasmid containing the 987P genes and in most of these strains to an additional plasmid which contained the gene for the heat-stable enterotoxin STII. Occurrence of the 987P and STIa genes on the same replicon correlates with epidemiological observations, STIa being the most prevalent toxin produced by 987P-fimbriated E. coli. Images PMID:1967167

  6. The TORMOZ Gene Encodes a Nucleolar Protein Required for Regulated Division Planes and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Megan E.; Mayer, Ulrike; Capron, Arnaud; Ngo, Quy A.; Surendrarao, Anandkumar; McClinton, Regina; Jürgens, Gerd; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is marked by a predictable sequence of oriented cell divisions, which precede cell fate determination. We show that mutation of the TORMOZ (TOZ) gene yields embryos with aberrant cell division planes and arrested embryos that appear not to have established normal patterning. The defects in toz mutants differ from previously described mutations that affect embryonic cell division patterns. Longitudinal division planes of the proembryo are frequently replaced by transverse divisions and less frequently by oblique divisions, while divisions of the suspensor cells, which divide only transversely, appear generally unaffected. Expression patterns of selected embryo patterning genes are altered in the mutant embryos, implying that the positional cues required for their proper expression are perturbed by the misoriented divisions. The TOZ gene encodes a nucleolar protein containing WD repeats. Putative TOZ orthologs exist in other eukaryotes including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the protein is predicted to function in 18S rRNA biogenesis. We find that disruption of the Sp TOZ gene results in cell division defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies in yeast and animal cells have identified nucleolar proteins that regulate the exit from M phase and cytokinesis, including factors involved in pre-rRNA processing. Our study suggests that in plant cells, nucleolar functions might interact with the processes of regulated cell divisions and influence the selection of longitudinal division planes during embryogenesis. PMID:17616738

  7. A novel immediate-early response gene of endothelium is induced by cytokines and encodes a secreted protein.

    PubMed

    Holzman, L B; Marks, R M; Dixit, V M

    1990-11-01

    We have previously described the cloning of a group of novel cellular immediate-early response genes whose expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells is induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha in the presence of cycloheximide. These genes are likely to participate in mediating the response of the vascular endothelium to proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we further characterized one of these novel gene products named B61. Sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding B61 revealed that its protein product has no significant homology to previously described proteins. Southern analysis suggested that B61 is an evolutionarily conserved single-copy gene. B61 is primarily a hydrophilic molecule but contains both a hydrophobic N-terminal and a hydrophobic C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is typical of a signal peptide, which is consistent with the secreted nature of the protein. The mature form of the predicted protein consists of 187 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 22,000. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cell preparations revealed that B61 is a 25-kilodalton secreted protein which is markedly induced by tumor necrosis factor.

  8. A novel immediate-early response gene of endothelium is induced by cytokines and encodes a secreted protein.

    PubMed Central

    Holzman, L B; Marks, R M; Dixit, V M

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the cloning of a group of novel cellular immediate-early response genes whose expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells is induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha in the presence of cycloheximide. These genes are likely to participate in mediating the response of the vascular endothelium to proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we further characterized one of these novel gene products named B61. Sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding B61 revealed that its protein product has no significant homology to previously described proteins. Southern analysis suggested that B61 is an evolutionarily conserved single-copy gene. B61 is primarily a hydrophilic molecule but contains both a hydrophobic N-terminal and a hydrophobic C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is typical of a signal peptide, which is consistent with the secreted nature of the protein. The mature form of the predicted protein consists of 187 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 22,000. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cell preparations revealed that B61 is a 25-kilodalton secreted protein which is markedly induced by tumor necrosis factor. Images PMID:2233719

  9. Expression cloning and characterization of a novel gene that encodes the RNA-binding protein FAU-1 from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Akio; Oida, Hanako; Matsuura, Nana; Doi, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    We systematically screened a genomic DNA library to identify proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using an expression cloning method. One gene product, which we named FAU-1 (P. furiosus AU-binding), demonstrated the strongest binding activity of all the genomic library-derived proteins tested against an AU-rich RNA sequence. The protein was purified to near homogeneity as a 54 kDa single polypeptide, and the gene locus corresponding to this FAU-1 activity was also sequenced. The FAU-1 gene encoded a 472-amino-acid protein that was characterized by highly charged domains consisting of both acidic and basic amino acids. The N-terminal half of the gene had a degree of similarity (25%) with RNase E from Escherichia coli. Five rounds of RNA-binding-site selection and footprinting analysis showed that the FAU-1 protein binds specifically to the AU-rich sequence in a loop region of a possible RNA ligand. Moreover, we demonstrated that the FAU-1 protein acts as an oligomer, and mainly as a trimer. These results showed that the FAU-1 protein is a novel heat-stable protein with an RNA loop-binding characteristic. PMID:12614195

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Target Gene Encoding a Novel Angiopoietin-Related Protein Associated with Adipose Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, J. Cliff; Chickering, Troy W.; Rosen, Evan D.; Dussault, Barry; Qin, Yubin; Soukas, Alexander; Friedman, Jeffrey M.; Holmes, William E.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ regulates adipose differentiation and systemic insulin signaling via ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of target genes. However, the identities of the biologically relevant target genes are largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel target gene induced by PPARγ ligands, termed PGAR (for PPARγ angiopoietin related), which encodes a novel member of the angiopoietin family of secreted proteins. The transcriptional induction of PGAR follows a rapid time course typical of immediate-early genes and occurs in the absence of protein synthesis. The expression of PGAR is predominantly localized to adipose tissues and placenta and is consistently elevated in genetic models of obesity. Hormone-dependent adipocyte differentiation coincides with a dramatic early induction of the PGAR transcript. Alterations in nutrition and leptin administration are found to modulate the PGAR expression in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role for PGAR in the regulation of systemic lipid metabolism or glucose homeostasis. PMID:10866690

  11. Woodpecker drumming behavior is linked to the elevated expression of genes that encode calcium handling proteins in the neck musculature.

    PubMed

    Schuppe, Eric R; Petersen, John O; Fuxjager, Matthew J

    2018-05-31

    Many animals perform elaborate physical displays for social communication. Identifying molecular mechanisms that co-evolve with these complex behavioral signals can therefore help reveal how forces of selection shape animal design. To study this issue, we examine gene expression profiles in select skeletal muscles that actuate woodpecker drum displays. This remarkable whole-body signal is produced when individuals rapidly hammer their bill against trees. We find that, compared to muscles that play no part in producing this behavior, the main muscle used to drum abundantly expresses two genes that encode proteins that support myocytic calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling dynamics-namely parvalbumin (PV) and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase (SERCA1). Meanwhile, we find no such difference in the expression of another gene similarly vital to Ca 2+ handling, the ryanodine receptor (RYR1). These differences are not present in a non-woodpecker species, which readily produce much slower drum-like movements for foraging (but not social signaling). Our data therefore point to an association between the fast drum displays of woodpeckers and muscle-specific expression of genes whose protein products enhance select aspects of myocytic Ca 2+ handling. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  13. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  14. Functional characterization of an apple (Malus x domestica) LysM domain receptor encoding gene for its role in defense response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple gene MDP0000136494 was identified as the only LysM containing protein encoding gene which was specifically up-regulated in P. ultimum infected apple root by a previous transcriptome analysis. In current study, the functional identity of MDP0000136494 was investigated using combined genomic, tr...

  15. Identification of an Amino Acid Domain Encoded by the Capsid Protein Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 that Modulates Viral Protein Distribution During Replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous work showed that distinct amino acid motifs are encoded by the Rep, Cap and ORF3 genes of two subgroups of porcine circoviruses (PCV), PCV2a and PCV2b. At a specific location of the gene, a certain amino acid residue or sequence is preferred. Specifically, two amino acid domains located in ...

  16. Genes encoding Xenopus laevis Ig L chains: Implications for the evolution of [kappa] and [lambda] chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zezza, D.J.; Stewart, S.E.; Steiner, L.A.

    1992-12-15

    Xenopus laevis Ig contain two distinct types of L chains, designated [rho] or L1 and [sigma] or L2. The authors have analyzed Xenopus genomic DNA by Southern blotting with cDNA probes specific for L1 V and C regions. Many fragments hybridized to the V probe, but only one or two fragments hybridized to the C probe. Corresponding C, J, and V gene segments were identified on clones isolated from a genomic library prepared from the same DNA. One clone contains a C gene segment separated from a J gene segment by an intron of 3.4 kb. The J and Cmore » gene segments are nearly identical in sequence to cDNA clones analyzed previously. The C segment is somewhat more similar and the J segment considerably more similar in sequence to the corresponding segments of mammalian [kappa] chains than to those of mammalian [lambda] chains. Upstream of the J segment is a typical recombination signal sequence with a spacer of 23 bp, as in J[kappa]. A second clone from the library contains four V gene segments, separated by 2.1 to 3.6 kb. Two of these, V1 and V3, have the expected structural and regulatory features of V genes, and are very similar in sequence to each other and to mammalian V[kappa]. A third gene segment, V2, resembles V1 and V3 in its coding region and nearby 5[prime]-flanking region, but diverges in sequence 5[prime] to position [minus]95 with loss of the octamer promoter element. The fourth V-like segment is similar to the others at the 3[prime]-end, but upstream of codon 64 bears no resemblance in sequence to any Ig V region. All four V segments have typical recombination signal sequences with 12-bp spacers at their 3[prime]-ends, as in V[kappa]. Taken together, the data suggest that Xenopus L1 L chain genes are members of the [kappa] gene family. 80 refs., 9 figs.« less

  17. The white gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a protein with a role in courtship behavior.

    PubMed

    Anaka, Matthew; MacDonald, C Danielle; Barkova, Eva; Simon, Karl; Rostom, Reem; Godoy, Ruth A; Haigh, Andrew J; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Lloyd, Vett

    2008-01-01

    The white gene of Drosophila melanogaster has been extensively studied, yet it is still not understood how its ectopic overexpression induces male-male courtship. To investigate the cellular basis of this behavior, we examined the sexual behavior of several classes of mutants. We find that male-male courtship is seen not only in flies overexpressing the white gene, but also in mutants expected to have mislocalized White protein. This finding confirms that mislocalizing White transporter in the cells in which it is normally expressed will produce male-male courtship behaviors; the courtship behavior is not an indirect consequence of aberrant physiological changes elsewhere in the body. Male-male courtship is also seen in some mutants with altered monoamine metabolism and deficits in learning and memory, but can be distinguished from that produced by White mislocalization by its reduced intensity and locomotor activity. Double mutants overexpressing white and with mutations in genes for serotonergic neurons suggest that male-male courtship produced by mislocalizing White may not be mediated exclusively by serotonergic neurons. We also find decreased olfactory learning in white mutants and in individuals with mutations in the genes for White's binding partners, brown and scarlet. Finally, in cultured Drosophila and mammalian cells, the White transporter is found in the endosomal compartment. The additional genes identified here as being involved in male-male courtship increase the repertoire of mutations available to study sexual behavior in Drosophila.

  18. Chromosomal Organization and Sequence Diversity of Genes Encoding Lachrymatory Factor Synthase in Allium cepa L.

    PubMed Central

    Masamura, Noriya; McCallum, John; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Kenel, Fernand; Pither-Joyce, Meegham; Shono, Jinji; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamauchi,, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) catalyzes the formation of lachrymatory factor, one of the most distinctive traits of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Therefore, we used LFS as a model for a functional gene in a huge genome, and we examined the chromosomal organization of LFS in A. cepa by multiple approaches. The first-level analysis completed the chromosomal assignment of LFS gene to chromosome 5 of A. cepa via the use of a complete set of A. fistulosum–shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group) monosomic addition lines. Subsequent use of an F2 mapping population from the interspecific cross A. cepa × A. roylei confirmed the assignment of an LFS locus to this chromosome. Sequence comparison of two BAC clones bearing LFS genes, LFS amplicons from diverse germplasm, and expressed sequences from a doubled haploid line revealed variation consistent with duplicated LFS genes. Furthermore, the BAC-FISH study using the two BAC clones as a probe showed that LFS genes are localized in the proximal region of the long arm of the chromosome. These results suggested that LFS in A. cepa is transcribed from at least two loci and that they are localized on chromosome 5. PMID:22690373

  19. The oil palm Shell gene controls oil yield and encodes a homologue of SEEDSTICK

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajinder; Leslie Low, Eng-Ti; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Chin, Ting Ngoot; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Amiruddin, Mohd Din; Rosli, Rozana; Abdul Manaf, Mohamad Arif; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; Budiman, Muhammad A; Hogan, Michael; Bacher, Blaire; Van Brunt, Andrew; Wang, Chunyan; Ordway, Jared M; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    A key event in the domestication and breeding of the oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, was loss of the thick coconut-like shell surrounding the kernel. Modern E. guineensis has three fruit forms, dura (thick-shelled), pisifera (shell-less) and tenera (thin-shelled), a hybrid between dura and pisifera1–4. The pisifera palm is usually female-sterile but the tenera yields far more oil than dura, and is the basis for commercial palm oil production in all of Southeast Asia5. Here, we describe the mapping and identification of the Shell gene responsible for the different fruit forms. Using homozygosity mapping by sequencing we found two independent mutations in the DNA binding domain of a homologue of the MADS-box gene SEEDSTICK (STK) which controls ovule identity and seed development in Arabidopsis. The Shell gene is responsible for the tenera phenotype in both cultivated and wild palms from sub-Saharan Africa, and our findings provide a genetic explanation for the single gene heterosis attributed to Shell, via heterodimerization. This gene mutation explains the single most important economic trait in oil palm, and has implications for the competing interests of global edible oil production, biofuels and rainforest conservation6. PMID:23883930

  20. Mutations in genes encoding condensin complex proteins cause microcephaly through decatenation failure at mitosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Murray, Jennie E; Carroll, Paula; Leitch, Andrea; Mackenzie, Karen J; Halachev, Mihail; Fetit, Ahmed E; Keith, Charlotte; Bicknell, Louise S; Fluteau, Adeline; Gautier, Philippe; Hall, Emma A; Joss, Shelagh; Soares, Gabriela; Silva, João; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Wise, Carol A; Quigley, Alan J; Phadke, Shubha R; Wood, Andrew J; Vagnarelli, Paola; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-10-01

    Compaction of chromosomes is essential for accurate segregation of the genome during mitosis. In vertebrates, two condensin complexes ensure timely chromosome condensation, sister chromatid disentanglement, and maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure. Here, we report that biallelic mutations in NCAPD2, NCAPH, or NCAPD3, encoding subunits of these complexes, cause microcephaly. In addition, hypomorphic Ncaph2 mice have significantly reduced brain size, with frequent anaphase chromatin bridge formation observed in apical neural progenitors during neurogenesis. Such DNA bridges also arise in condensin-deficient patient cells, where they are the consequence of failed sister chromatid disentanglement during chromosome compaction. This results in chromosome segregation errors, leading to micronucleus formation and increased aneuploidy in daughter cells. These findings establish "condensinopathies" as microcephalic disorders, with decatenation failure as an additional disease mechanism for microcephaly, implicating mitotic chromosome condensation as a key process ensuring mammalian cerebral cortex size. © 2016 Martin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Encodes a cAMP-Dependent Chloride Channel in Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Padraig; Warth, John D.; Levesque, Paul C.; Collier, Mei Lin; Geary, Yvonne; Horowitz, Burton; Hume, Joseph R.

    1996-06-01

    cAMP-dependent chloride channels in heart contribute to autonomic regulation of action potential duration and membrane potential and have been inferred to be due to cardiac expression of the epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In this report, a cDNA from rabbit ventricle was isolated and sequenced, which encodes an exon 5 splice variant (exon 5-) of CFTR, with >90% identity to human CFTR cDNA present in epithelial cells. Expression of this cDNA in Xenopus oocytes gave rise to robust cAMP-activated chloride currents that were absent in control water-injected oocytes. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against CFTR significnatly reduced the density of cAMP-dependent chloride currents in acutely cultured myocytes, thereby establishing a direct functional link between cardiac expression of CFTR protein and an endogenous chloride channel in native cardiac myocytes.

  2. Mutations in genes encoding condensin complex proteins cause microcephaly through decatenation failure at mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Murray, Jennie E.; Carroll, Paula; Leitch, Andrea; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Halachev, Mihail; Fetit, Ahmed E.; Keith, Charlotte; Bicknell, Louise S.; Fluteau, Adeline; Gautier, Philippe; Hall, Emma A.; Joss, Shelagh; Soares, Gabriela; Silva, João; Bober, Michael B.; Duker, Angela; Wise, Carol A.; Quigley, Alan J.; Phadke, Shubha R.; Wood, Andrew J.; Vagnarelli, Paola; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of chromosomes is essential for accurate segregation of the genome during mitosis. In vertebrates, two condensin complexes ensure timely chromosome condensation, sister chromatid disentanglement, and maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure. Here, we report that biallelic mutations in NCAPD2, NCAPH, or NCAPD3, encoding subunits of these complexes, cause microcephaly. In addition, hypomorphic Ncaph2 mice have significantly reduced brain size, with frequent anaphase chromatin bridge formation observed in apical neural progenitors during neurogenesis. Such DNA bridges also arise in condensin-deficient patient cells, where they are the consequence of failed sister chromatid disentanglement during chromosome compaction. This results in chromosome segregation errors, leading to micronucleus formation and increased aneuploidy in daughter cells. These findings establish “condensinopathies” as microcephalic disorders, with decatenation failure as an additional disease mechanism for microcephaly, implicating mitotic chromosome condensation as a key process ensuring mammalian cerebral cortex size. PMID:27737959

  3. Mutation of CDH23, encoding a new member of the cadherin gene family, causes Usher syndrome type 1D.

    PubMed

    Bolz, H; von Brederlow, B; Ramírez, A; Bryda, E C; Kutsche, K; Nothwang, H G; Seeliger, M; del C-Salcedó Cabrera, M; Vila, M C; Molina, O P; Gal, A; Kubisch, C

    2001-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I (USH1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction and visual impairment due to early onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP). So far, six loci (USH1A-USH1F) have been mapped, but only two USH1 genes have been identified: MYO7A for USH1B and the gene encoding harmonin for USH1C. We identified a Cuban pedigree linked to the locus for Usher syndrome type 1D (MIM 601067) within the q2 region of chromosome 10). Affected individuals present with congenital deafness and a highly variable degree of retinal degeneration. Using a positional candidate approach, we identified a new member of the cadherin gene superfamily, CDH23. It encodes a protein of 3,354 amino acids with a single transmembrane domain and 27 cadherin repeats. In the Cuban family, we detected two different mutations: a severe course of the retinal disease was observed in individuals homozygous for what is probably a truncating splice-site mutation (c.4488G-->C), whereas mild RP is present in individuals carrying the homozygous missense mutation R1746Q. A variable expression of the retinal phenotype was seen in patients with a combination of both mutations. In addition, we identified two mutations, Delta M1281 and IVS51+5G-->A, in a German USH1 patient. Our data show that different mutations in CDH23 result in USH1D with a variable retinal phenotype. In an accompanying paper, it is shown that mutations in the mouse ortholog cause disorganization of inner ear stereocilia and deafness in the waltzer mouse.

  4. The desA and desB genes from Clostridium scindens ATCC 35704 encode steroid-17,20-desmolase.

    PubMed

    Devendran, Saravanan; Mythen, Sean M; Ridlon, Jason M

    2018-06-01

    Clostridium scindens is a gut microbe capable of removing the side-chain of cortisol, forming 11β-hydro-xyandrostenedione. A cortisol-inducible operon ( desABCD ) was previously identified in C. scindens ATCC 35704 by RNA-Seq. The desC gene was shown to encode a cortisol 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSDH). The desD encodes a protein annotated as a member of the major facilitator family, predicted to function as a cortisol transporter. The desA and desB genes are annotated as N-terminal and C-terminal transketolases, respectively. We hypothesized that the DesAB forms a complex and has steroid-17,20-desmolase activity. We cloned the desA and desB genes from C. scindens ATCC 35704 in pETDuet for overexpression in Escherichia coli The purified recombinant DesAB was determined to be a 142 ± 5.4 kDa heterotetramer. We developed an enzyme-linked continuous spectrophotometric assay to quantify steroid-17,20-desmolase. This was achieved by coupling DesAB-dependent formation of 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione with the NADPH-dependent reduction of the steroid 17-keto group by a recombinant 17β-HSDH from the filamentous fungus, Cochliobolus lunatus The pH optimum for the coupled assay was 7.0 and kinetic constants using cortisol as substrate were K m of 4.96 ± 0.57 µM and k cat of 0.87 ± 0.076 min -1 Substrate-specificity studies revealed that rDesAB recognized substrates regardless of 11β-hydroxylation, but had an absolute requirement for 17,21-dihydroxy 20-ketosteroids. Copyright © 2018 Devendran et al.

  5. Molecular characterization of a phloem-specific gene encoding the filament protein, phloem protein 1 (PP1), from Cucurbita maxima.

    PubMed

    Clark, A M; Jacobsen, K R; Bostwick, D E; Dannenhoffer, J M; Skaggs, M I; Thompson, G A

    1997-07-01

    Sieve elements in the phloem of most angiosperms contain proteinaceous filaments and aggregates called P-protein. In the genus Cucurbita, these filaments are composed of two major proteins: PP1, the phloem filament protein, and PP2, the phloem lactin. The gene encoding the phloem filament protein in pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima Duch.) has been isolated and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the reconstructed gene gPP1 revealed a continuous 2430 bp protein coding sequence, with no introns, encoding an 809 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced polypeptide had characteristics of PP1 and contained a 15 amino acid sequence determined by N-terminal peptide sequence analysis of PP1. The sequence of PP1 was highly repetitive with four 200 amino acid sequence domains containing structural motifs in common with cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Expression of the PP1 gene was detected in roots, hypocotyls, cotyledons, stems, and leaves of pumpkin plants. PP1 and its mRNA accumulated in pumpkin hypocotyls during the period of rapid hypocotyl elongation after which mRNA levels declined, while protein levels remained elevated. PP1 was immunolocalized in slime plugs and P-protein bodies in sieve elements of the phloem. Occasionally, PP1 was detected in companion cells. PP1 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization in companion cells at early stages of vascular differentiation. The developmental accumulation and localization of PP1 and its mRNA paralleled the phloem lactin, further suggesting an interaction between these phloem-specific proteins.

  6. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations featured similar genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters: a DMET Plus microarray assessment.

    PubMed

    Yi, SoJeong; An, Hyungmi; Lee, Howard; Lee, Sangin; Ieiri, Ichiro; Lee, Youngjo; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hirota, Takeshi; Fukae, Masato; Yoshida, Kenji; Nagatsuka, Shinichiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Shin, Dong Wan; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Chung, Jae-Yong; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Interethnic differences in genetic polymorphism in genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters are one of the major factors that cause ethnic differences in drug response. This study aimed to investigate genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism, transport, and excretion among Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations, the three major East Asian ethnic groups. The frequencies of 1936 variants representing 225 genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters were determined from 786 healthy participants (448 Korean, 208 Japanese, and 130 Chinese) using the Affymetrix Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters Plus microarray. To compare allele or genotype frequencies in the high-dimensional data among the three East Asian ethnic groups, multiple testing, principal component analysis (PCA), and regularized multinomial logit model through least absolute shrinkage and selection operator were used. On microarray analysis, 1071 of 1936 variants (>50% of markers) were found to be monomorphic. In a large number of genetic variants, the fixation index and Pearson's correlation coefficient of minor allele frequencies were less than 0.034 and greater than 0.95, respectively, among the three ethnic groups. PCA identified 47 genetic variants with multiple testing, but was unable to discriminate ethnic groups by the first three components. Multinomial least absolute shrinkage and selection operator analysis identified 269 genetic variants that showed different frequencies among the three ethnic groups. However, none of those variants distinguished between the three ethnic groups during subsequent PCA. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations are not pharmacogenetically distant from one another, at least with regard to drug disposition, metabolism, and elimination.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi has not lost its S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase: characterization of the gene and the encoded enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, K; Aslund, L; Grahn, B; Hanke, J; Heby, O

    1998-01-01

    All attempts to identify ornithine decarboxylase in the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi have failed. The parasites have instead been assumed to depend on putrescine uptake and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) for their synthesis of the polyamines spermidine and spermine. We have now identified the gene encoding AdoMetDC in T. cruzi by PCR cloning, with degenerate primers corresponding to conserved amino acid sequences in AdoMetDC proteins of other trypanosomatids. The amplified DNA fragment was used as a probe to isolate the complete AdoMetDC gene from a T. cruzi genomic library. The AdoMetDC gene was located on chromosomes with a size of approx. 1.4 Mbp, and contained a coding region of 1110 bp, specifying a sequence of 370 amino acid residues. The protein showed a sequence identity of only 25% with human AdoMetDC, the major differences being additional amino acids present in the terminal regions of the T. cruzi enzyme. As expected, a higher sequence identity (68-72%) was found in comparison with trypanosomatid AdoMetDCs. When the coding region was expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant protein underwent autocatalytic cleavage, generating a 33-34 kDa alpha subunit and a 9 kDa beta subunit. The encoded protein catalysed the decarboxylation of AdoMet (Km 0.21 mM) and was stimulated by putrescine but inhibited by the polyamines, weakly by spermidine and strongly by spermine. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a potent inhibitor of human AdoMetDC, was a poor inhibitor of the T. cruzi enzyme. This differential sensitivity to MGBG suggests that the two enzymes are sufficiently different to warrant the search for compounds that might interfere with the progression of Chagas' disease by selectively inhibiting T. cruzi AdoMetDC. PMID:9677309

  8. Identifying the Viral Genes Encoding Envelope Glycoproteins for Differentiation of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jee Eun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Renault, Tristan; Choresca, Casiano; Shin, Sang Phil; Jun, Jin Woo; Park, Se Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) diseases have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of koi (Cyprinus carpio). Although little work has been conducted on the molecular analysis of this virus, glycoprotein genes identified in the present study seem to be valuable targets for genetic comparison of this virus. Three envelope glycoprotein genes (ORF25, 65 and 116) of the CyHV-3 isolates from the USA, Israel, Japan and Korea were compared, and interestingly, sequence insertions or deletions were observed in these target regions. In addition, polymorphisms were presented in microsatellite zones from two glycoprotein genes (ORF65 and 116). In phylogenetic tree analysis, the Korean isolate was remarkably distinguished from USA, Israel, Japan isolates. These findings may be suitable for many applications including isolates differentiation and phylogeny studies. PMID:23435236

  9. Population structuring of multi-copy, antigen-encoding genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Rorick, Mary M; Day, Karen; Chen, Donald; Dobson, Andrew P; Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple independently circulating strains in pathogen populations that undergo sexual recombination is a central question of epidemiology with profound implications for control. An agent-based model is developed that extends earlier ‘strain theory’ by addressing the var gene family of Plasmodium falciparum. The model explicitly considers the extensive diversity of multi-copy genes that undergo antigenic variation via sequential, mutually exclusive expression. It tracks the dynamics of all unique var repertoires in a population of hosts, and shows that even under high levels of sexual recombination, strain competition mediated through cross-immunity structures the parasite population into a subset of coexisting dominant repertoires of var genes whose degree of antigenic overlap depends on transmission intensity. Empirical comparison of patterns of genetic variation at antigenic and neutral sites supports this role for immune selection in structuring parasite diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00093.001 PMID:23251784

  10. Identifying the viral genes encoding envelope glycoproteins for differentiation of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 isolates.

    PubMed

    Han, Jee Eun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Renault, Tristan; Choresca, Casiano; Shin, Sang Phil; Jun, Jin Woo; Park, Se Chang

    2013-01-31

    Cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) diseases have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of koi (Cyprinus carpio). Although little work has been conducted on the molecular analysis of this virus, glycoprotein genes identified in the present study seem to be valuable targets for genetic comparison of this virus. Three envelope glycoprotein genes (ORF25, 65 and 116) of the CyHV-3 isolates from the USA, Israel, Japan and Korea were compared, and interestingly, sequence insertions or deletions were observed in these target regions. In addition, polymorphisms were presented in microsatellite zones from two glycoprotein genes (ORF65 and 116). In phylogenetic tree analysis, the Korean isolate was remarkably distinguished from USA, Israel, Japan isolates. These findings may be suitable for many applications including isolates differentiation and phylogeny studies.

  11. The Cremeomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster Encodes a Pathway for Diazo Formation.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abraham J; Pechersky, Yakov; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jennifer X; Balskus, Emily P

    2015-10-12

    Diazo groups are found in a range of natural products that possess potent biological activities. Despite longstanding interest in these metabolites, diazo group biosynthesis is not well understood, in part because of difficulties in identifying specific genes linked to diazo formation. Here we describe the discovery of the gene cluster that produces the o-diazoquinone natural product cremeomycin and its heterologous expression in Streptomyces lividans. We used stable isotope feeding experiments and in vitro characterization of biosynthetic enzymes to decipher the order of events in this pathway and establish that diazo construction involves late-stage N-N bond formation. This work represents the first successful production of a diazo-containing metabolite in a heterologous host, experimentally linking a set of genes with diazo formation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding the high-molecular-weight cytochrome c from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, W B; Loutfi, M; Bruschi, M; Rapp-Giles, B J; Wall, J D; Voordouw, G

    1991-01-01

    By using a synthetic deoxyoligonucleotide probe designed to recognize the structural gene for cytochrome cc3 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a 3.7-kb XhoI genomic DNA fragment containing the cc3 gene was isolated. The gene encodes a precursor polypeptide of 58.9 kDa, with an NH2-terminal signal sequence of 31 residues. The mature polypeptide (55.7 kDa) has 16 heme binding sites of the form C-X-X-C-H. Covalent binding of heme to these 16 sites gives a holoprotein of 65.5 kDa with properties similar to those of the high-molecular-weight cytochrome c (Hmc) isolated from the same strain by Higuchi et al. (Y. Higuchi, K. Inaka, N. Yasuoka, and T. Yagi, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 911:341-348, 1987). Since the data indicate that cytochrome cc3 and Hmc are the same protein, the gene has been named hmc. The Hmc polypeptide contains 31 histidinyl residues, 16 of which are integral to heme binding sites. Thus, only 15 of the 16 hemes can have bis-histidinyl coordination. A comparison of the arrangement of heme binding sites and coordinated histidines in the amino acid sequences of cytochrome c3 and Hmc from D. vulgaris Hildenborough suggests that the latter contains three cytochrome c3-like domains. Cloning of the D. vulgaris Hildenborough hmc gene into the broad-host-range vector pJRD215 and subsequent conjugational transfer of the recombinant plasmid into D. desulfuricans G200 led to expression of a periplasmic Hmc gene product with covalently bound hemes. Images PMID:1846136

  13. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3′-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix–hairpin–Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway. PMID:27026054

  14. Distribution of genes encoding resistance to aminoglycoside modifying enzymes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Jenabi, Atefeh; Montazeri, Effat Abbasi

    2017-12-01

    Today Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have acquired multiple resistance to a wide range of antibiotics including aminoglycosides. So, this study was aimed to investigate the rate of aminoglycoside resistance and the frequency of aminoglycoside resistance mediated genes of aac(Ia)-2, aph(3)-IIIa and ant(4')-Ia among MRSA strains. A total of 467 staphylococci isolates were collected from various clinical samples. S. aureus strains were identified by standard culture and identification criteria and investigating of presence of 16S rRNA and nuc genes. Cefoxitin disk diffusion, and oxacillin-salt agar screening methods were used to detect the MRSA strains with subsequent molecular identification for the presence of mecA gene. Antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA strains against aminoglycoside antibiotics was evaluated by using agar disk diffusion method. Multiplex PCR for the presence of aac(Ia)-2, aph(3)-IIIa and ant(4')-Ia encoding genes for aminoglycosides were performed for MRSA strains. From total staphylococci tested isolates, 262 (56.1%) were identified as S. aureus, of which 161 (61.45%) were detected as MRSA and all comprised mecA gene. The resistance pattern of MRSA strains to aminoglycoside antibiotics were: gentamicin 136 (84.5%); amikacin 125 (77.6%); kanamycin 139 (86.3%); tobramycin 132 (82%); and neomycin 155 (96.3%). The frequency of aac(Ia)-2, aph(3)-IIIa, and ant(4')-Ia genes among MRSA strains, were 64%, 42% and 11.8% respectively. In conclusion, as MRSA strains are of great concern in human infections, the results of present study could provide a useful resource for health sectors for choosing appropriate antibiotics for the effective treatment of infections due to MRSA strains. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  15. Evaluation of 10 genes encoding cardiac proteins in Doberman Pinschers with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, M Lynne; O'Grady, Michael R; Pyle, W Glen; Dawson, John F

    2011-07-01

    To identify a causative mutation for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Doberman Pinschers by sequencing the coding regions of 10 cardiac genes known to be associated with familial DCM in humans. 5 Doberman Pinschers with DCM and congestive heart failure and 5 control mixed-breed dogs that were euthanized or died. RNA was extracted from frozen ventricular myocardial samples from each dog, and first-strand cDNA was synthesized via reverse transcription, followed by PCR amplification with gene-specific primers. Ten cardiac genes were analyzed: cardiac actin, α-actinin, α-tropomyosin, β-myosin heavy chain, metavinculin, muscle LIM protein, myosinbinding protein C, tafazzin, titin-cap (telethonin), and troponin T. Sequences for DCM-affected and control dogs and the published canine genome were compared. None of the coding sequences yielded a common causative mutation among all Doberman Pinscher samples. However, 3 variants were identified in the α-actinin gene in the DCM-affected Doberman Pinschers. One of these variants, identified in 2 of the 5 Doberman Pinschers, resulted in an amino acid change in the rod-forming triple coiled-coil domain. Mutations in the coding regions of several genes associated with DCM in humans did not appear to consistently account for DCM in Doberman Pinschers. However, an α-actinin variant was detected in some Doberman Pinschers that may contribute to the development of DCM given its potential effect on the structure of this protein. Investigation of additional candidate gene coding and noncoding regions and further evaluation of the role of α-actinin in development of DCM in Doberman Pinschers are warranted.

  16. Transformation of pickling cucumber with chitinase-encoding genes using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Raharjo, S H; Hernandez, M O; Zhang, Y Y; Punja, Z K

    1996-04-01

    Transformation of cucumber cv. Endeavor was attempted using three Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (a supervirulent leucinopine type, an octopine type and a nopaline type), each harbouring one of three binary vectors which contained an acidic chitinase gene from petunia, and basic chitinase genes from tobacco and bean, respectively, driven by the CaMV 35S promoter. Petiole explants were inoculated with a bacterial suspension (10(8) cells·ml(-1)), cocultivated for 48-96 h and placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 5.0 μM each of 2,4-D and BA, 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin and 500 mg·l(-1) carbenicillin. The frequency of embryogenic callus formation ranged from 0 to 12%, depending on strains/vectors used and length of cocultivation, with the highest being obtained using the leucinopine strain with petunia acidic chitinase gene. The kanamycin-resistant embryogenic calli were used to initiate suspension cultures (in liquid MS medium with 1.0/1.0 μM 2,4-D/BA, 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin) for multiplication of embryogenic cell aggregates. Upon plating of cell aggregates onto solid MS medium with 1.0/1.0 μM NAA/BA and 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin, calli continued to grow and later differentiated into plantlets. Transformation by the leucinopine strain and all three vectors was confirmed by PCR amplification of the NPT II gene in transgenic calli and plants, in addition to Southern analysis. Expression of the acidic chitinase gene (from petunia) and both basic chitinase genes (from tobacco and bean) in different transgenic cucumber lines was confirmed by Western analyses.

  17. Functional differentiation and spatial-temporal co-expression networks of the NBS-encoding gene family in Jilin ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wang, Kangyu; Lin, Yanping; Wang, Yanfang; Sun, Chunyu; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Meiping

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, is one of the most important medicinal plants for human health and medicine. It has been documented that over 80% of genes conferring resistance to bacteria, viruses, fungi and nematodes are contributed by the nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding gene family. Therefore, identification and characterization of NBS genes expressed in ginseng are paramount to its genetic improvement and breeding. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in ginseng. Here we report genome-wide identification and systems analysis of the NBS genes actively expressed in ginseng (PgNBS genes). Four hundred twelve PgNBS gene transcripts, derived from 284 gene models, were identified from the transcriptomes of 14 ginseng tissues. These genes were classified into eight types, including TNL, TN, CNL, CN, NL, N, RPW8-NL and RPW8-N. Seven conserved motifs were identified in both the Toll/interleukine-1 receptor (TIR) and coiled-coil (CC) typed genes whereas six were identified in the RPW8 typed genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PgNBS gene family is an ancient family, with a vast majority of its genes originated before ginseng originated. In spite of their belonging to a family, the PgNBS genes have functionally dramatically differentiated and been categorized into numerous functional categories. The expressions of the across tissues, different aged roots and the roots of different genotypes. However, they are coordinating in expression, forming a single co-expression network. These results provide a deeper understanding of the origin, evolution and functional differentiation and expression dynamics of the NBS-encoding gene family in plants in general and in ginseng particularly, and a NBS gene toolkit useful for isolation and characterization of disease resistance genes and for enhanced disease resistance breeding in ginseng and related species.

  18. Functional differentiation and spatial-temporal co-expression networks of the NBS-encoding gene family in Jilin ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangyu; Lin, Yanping; Wang, Yanfang; Sun, Chunyu; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, is one of the most important medicinal plants for human health and medicine. It has been documented that over 80% of genes conferring resistance to bacteria, viruses, fungi and nematodes are contributed by the nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding gene family. Therefore, identification and characterization of NBS genes expressed in ginseng are paramount to its genetic improvement and breeding. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in ginseng. Here we report genome-wide identification and systems analysis of the NBS genes actively expressed in ginseng (PgNBS genes). Four hundred twelve PgNBS gene transcripts, derived from 284 gene models, were identified from the transcriptomes of 14 ginseng tissues. These genes were classified into eight types, including TNL, TN, CNL, CN, NL, N, RPW8-NL and RPW8-N. Seven conserved motifs were identified in both the Toll/interleukine-1 receptor (TIR) and coiled-coil (CC) typed genes whereas six were identified in the RPW8 typed genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PgNBS gene family is an ancient family, with a vast majority of its genes originated before ginseng originated. In spite of their belonging to a family, the PgNBS genes have functionally dramatically differentiated and been categorized into numerous functional categories. The expressions of the across tissues, different aged roots and the roots of different genotypes. However, they are coordinating in expression, forming a single co-expression network. These results provide a deeper understanding of the origin, evolution and functional differentiation and expression dynamics of the NBS-encoding gene family in plants in general and in ginseng particularly, and a NBS gene toolkit useful for isolation and characterization of disease resistance genes and for enhanced disease resistance breeding in ginseng and related species. PMID:28727829

  19. Genetic and physical analyses of Methylobacterium organophilum XX genes encoding methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Machlin, S.M.; Tam, P.E.; Bastien, C.A.

    When allyl alcohol was used as a suicide substrate, spontaneous mutants and UV light- and nitrous acid-generated mutants of Methylobacterium organophilum XX were selected which grew on methylamine but not on methanol. There was no detectable methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) activity in crude extracts of these mutants, yet Western blots revealed that some mutants still produced MDH protein. Complementation of 50 mutants by a cosmid gene bank of M. organophilum XX demonstrated that three major regions of the genome, each of which was separated by a minimum of 40 kilobases, were required for expression of active MDH. By subcloning and Tn5more » insertion mutagenesis of subcloned fragments, at least 11 genes clustered within these three regions were subsequently identified. The identity of the MDH structural gene, which was initially determined by hybridization to the structural gene of Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1, was confirmed by Western blot analysis of an MDH-..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein.« less

  20. Organization and sequence of four flagellin-encoding genes of Edwardsiella icataluri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, the cause of enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), is motile by means of peritrichous flagella. We determined the complete flagellin gene sequences and their organization in E. ictaluri by sequencing genomic segments selected from a lambda-ZAP phage gen...

  1. Molecular characterization of the Hansenula polymorpha FLD1 gene encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase.

    Treesearch

    Richard J. Baerends; Grietje J. Sulter; Thomas W. Jeffries; James M. Cregg; Marten Veenhuis

    2002-01-01

    Glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD) is a key enzyme required for the catabolism of methanol as a carbon source and certain primary amines, such as methylamine as nitrogen sources in methylotrophic yeasts. Here we describe the molecular characterization of the FLD1 gene from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. Unlike the recently described Pichia pastoris...

  2. Development of a Plant Transformation Selection System Based on Expression of Genes Encoding Gentamicin Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Maria B.; Medford, June I.; Hoffman, Nancy L.; Rogers, Stephen G.; Klee, Harry J.

    1988-01-01

    The development of selectable markers for transformation has been a major factor in the successful genetic manipulation of plants. A new selectable marker system has been developed based on bacterial gentamicin-3-N-acetyltransferases [AAC(3)]. These enzymes inactivate aminoglycoside antibiotics by acetylation. Two examples of AAC(3) enzymes have been manipulated to be expressed in plants. Chimeric AAC(3)-III and AAC(3)-IV genes were assembled using the constitutively expressed cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase 3′ nontranslated region. These chimeric genes were engineered into vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. Petunia hybrida and Arabidopsis thaliana tissue transformed with these vectors grew in the presence of normally lethal levels of gentamicin. The transformed nature of regenerated Arabidopsis plants was confirmed by DNA hybridization analysis and inheritance of the selectable phenotype in progeny. The chimeric AAC(3)-IV gene has also been used to select transformants in several additional plant species. These results show that the bacterial AAC(3) genes will serve as useful selectable markers in plant tissue culture. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16666057

  3. Xanthomonas adaptation to common bean is associated with horizontal transfers of genes encoding TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Mylène; Briand, Martial; Bonneau, Sophie; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Chen, Nicolas W G

    2017-08-30

    Common bacterial blight is a devastating bacterial disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) caused by Xanthomonas citri pv. fuscans and Xanthomonas phaseoli pv. phaseoli. These phylogenetically distant strains are able to cause similar symptoms on common bean, suggesting that they have acquired common genetic determinants of adaptation to common bean. Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors are bacterial type III effectors that are able to induce the expression of host genes to promote infection or resistance. Their capacity to bind to a specific host DNA sequence suggests that they are potential candidates for host adaption. To study the diversity of tal genes from Xanthomonas strains responsible for common bacterial blight of bean, whole genome sequences of 17 strains representing the diversity of X. citri pv. fuscans and X. phaseoli pv. phaseoli were obtained by single molecule real time sequencing. Analysis of these genomes revealed the existence of four tal genes named tal23A, tal20F, tal18G and tal18H, respectively. While tal20F and tal18G were chromosomic, tal23A and tal18H were carried on plasmids and shared between phylogenetically distant strains, therefore suggesting recent horizontal transfers of these genes between X. citri pv. fuscans and X. phaseoli pv. phaseoli strains. Strikingly, tal23A was present in all strains studied, suggesting that it played an important role in adaptation to common bean. In silico predictions of TAL effectors targets in the common bean genome suggested that TAL effectors shared by X. citri pv. fuscans and X. phaseoli pv. phaseoli strains target the promoters of genes of similar functions. This could be a trace of convergent evolution among TAL effectors from different phylogenetic groups, and comforts the hypothesis that TAL effectors have been implied in the adaptation to common bean. Altogether, our results favour a model where plasmidic TAL effectors are able to contribute to host adaptation by being horizontally

  4. A novel chlorophyll a/b binding (Cab) protein gene from petunia which encodes the lower molecular weight Cab precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Stayton, M M; Black, M; Bedbrook, J; Dunsmuir, P

    1986-12-22

    The 16 petunia Cab genes which have been characterized are all closely related at the nucleotide sequence level and they encode Cab precursor polypeptides which are similar in sequence and length. Here we describe a novel petunia Cab gene which encodes a unique Cab precursor protein. This protein is a member of the smallest class of Cab precursor proteins for which no gene has previously been assigned in petunia or any other species. The features of this Cab precursor protein are that it is shorter by 2-3 amino acids than the formerly characterized Cab precursors, its transit peptide sequence is unrelated, and the mature polypeptide is significantly diverged at the functionally important N terminus from other petunia Cab proteins. Gene structure also discriminates this gene which is the only intron containing Cab gene in petunia genomic DNA.

  5. Two modes of control of pilA, the gene encoding type 1 pilin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Orndorff, P E; Spears, P A; Schauer, D; Falkow, S

    1985-01-01

    Type 1 piliation in Escherichia coli is subject to metastable regulation at the transcriptional level (B. I. Eisenstein, Science 214:337-339, 1981). However, the genes controlling in this fashion are not known. We present evidence that the pilA gene, encoding the structural subunit of type 1 pili, is subject to metastable transcriptional regulation. A pilA'-lacZ fusion, constructed in vitro on a recombinant plasmid, was used in conjunction with a recBC sbcB mutant of E. coli K-12 to introduce the fusion into the chromosomal region encoding Pil. This fusion was found to be subject to metastable transcriptional control. The rate of switching from the Lac+ to the Lac- phenotype was 4 X 10(-4) per cell per generation and 6.2 X 10(-4) in the opposite direction. A ca. 10-fold difference in beta-galactosidase activity was observed between phenotypically "ON" (Lac+) and "OFF" (Lac-) populations. P1 transduction experiments showed that the element determining the ON or OFF phenotype was tightly linked to pilA. In addition to the metastable regulation of pilA, a second type of transcriptional regulation was effected by the product of a gene, hyp, adjacent to pilA. By using a recombinant plasmid containing just a pilA'-lacZ fusion and the putative pilA promoter, we found that a lesion in hyp conferred a beta-galactosidase activity about fivefold higher than that of a strain possessing the parental hyp gene. Mutants constructed to have a pilA'-lacZ fusion and a hyp::Tn5-132 mutation in the chromosome exhibited a frequency of switching from Lac+ to Lac- and vice versa indistinguishable from that of the parental strain. However, in the ON mode, hyp::Tn5-132 mutants showed a twofold-higher beta-galactosidase activity. Thus, hyp does not appear to affect metastable variation but does affect the level of transcription of the pilA gene in the ON (transcribed) mode. Images PMID:3930469

  6. Unique variations of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Fu; Luo, Bing

    2012-06-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) gene is frequently expressed in EBV-associated epithelial malignancies and involves in oncogenicity and immunomodulation. To characterize the variations of BARF1 gene in different populations, the sequences of BARF1 gene in Northern Chinese nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) and healthy donors were analyzed. The correlation of BARF1 variation with polymorphisms of BamHI F fragment (type F and f variants) and EBV-coded viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10) gene (B95-8 and SPM patterns) was also explored. Two major subtypes of BARF1 gene, designated as B95-8 and V29A, were identified. B95-8 subtype had identical amino acid sequence to B95-8 and was the dominant subtype among the EBV isolates from Northern China. V29A subtype, with one consistent amino acid change at residue 29 (V→A) and several nucleotide changes, showed higher frequency in NPC cases (25.3%, 20/79) than in EBVaGC cases (0/45) or healthy donors (4.3%, 2/46) (NPC vs. EBVaGC: P=0.0001; NPC vs. healthy donor: P=0.004). A preferential linkage between BamHI F and BARF1/vIL-10 polymorphisms was found. Type f isolates was specially correlated with the V29A/SPM genotype in NPC isolates and type f/V29A/SPM was preferentially found in NPC. BARF1/c-fms homology domain, transforming domain and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes of BARF1 were highly conserved in most isolates, suggesting the important role of BARF1 in virus infection and the potential usefulness in EBV-targeting immunotherapy of EBV-associated tumors. The relatively higher prevalence of type f/V29A/SPM strains in NPC may also suggest the association between these variations in multiple viral genes and NPC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Acid Phosphatase-Encoding Gene GmACP1 Contributes to Soybean Tolerance to Low-Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Derong; Wang, Hui; Kan, Guizhen; Jin, Hangxia; Yu, Deyue

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for all living cells and organisms, and low-P stress is a major factor constraining plant growth and yield worldwide. In plants, P efficiency is a complex quantitative trait involving multiple genes, and the mechanisms underlying P efficiency are largely unknown. Combining linkage analysis, genome-wide and candidate-gene association analyses, and plant transformation, we identified a soybean gene related to P efficiency, determined its favorable haplotypes and developed valuable functional markers. First, six major genomic regions associated with P efficiency were detected by performing genome-wide associations (GWAs) in various environments. A highly significant region located on chromosome 8, qPE8, was identified by both GWAs and linkage mapping and explained 41% of the phenotypic variation. Then, a regional mapping study was performed with 40 surrounding markers in 192 diverse soybean accessions. A strongly associated haplotype (P = 10−7) consisting of the markers Sat_233 and BARC-039899-07603 was identified, and qPE8 was located in a region of approximately 250 kb, which contained a candidate gene GmACP1 that encoded an acid phosphatase. GmACP1 overexpression in soybean hairy roots increased P efficiency by 11–20% relative to the control. A candidate-gene association analysis indicated that six natural GmACP1 polymorphisms explained 33% of the phenotypic variation. The favorable alleles and haplotypes of GmACP1 associated with increased transcript expression correlated with higher enzyme activity. The discovery of the optimal haplotype of GmACP1 will now enable the accurate selection of soybeans with higher P efficiencies and improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying P efficiency in plants. PMID:24391523

  8. Expression in Escherichia coli of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCT gene encoding cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukagoshi, Y; Nikawa, J; Hosaka, K; Yamashita, S

    1991-01-01

    The coding region of the CCT gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned into the pUC18 expression vector. The plasmid directed the synthesis of an active cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase in Escherichia coli, confirming that CCT is the structural gene for this enzyme. The enzyme produced in E. coli efficiently utilized cholinephosphate and N,N-dimethylethanolaminephosphate, but N-methylethanolamine-phosphate and ethanolaminephosphate were poor substrates. Consistently, disruption of the CCT locus in the wild-type yeast cells resulted in a drastic decrease in activities with respect to the former two substrates. When activity was expressed in E. coli, over 90% was recovered in the cytosol, whereas most of the activity of yeast cells was associated with membranes, suggesting that yeast cells possess a mechanism that promotes membrane association of cytidylyltransferase. Images PMID:1848222

  9. Mutations in the Gene Encoding IFT Dynein Complex Component WDR34 Cause Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Vodopiutz, Julia; Christou-Savina, Sonia; Cortés, Claudio R.; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M.; Emes, Richard D.; Arts, Heleen H.; Tüysüz, Beyhan; D’Silva, Jason; Leo, Paul J.; Giles, Tom C.; Oud, Machteld M.; Harris, Jessica A.; Koopmans, Marije; Marshall, Mhairi; Elçioglu, Nursel; Kuechler, Alma; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Moore, Anthony T.; Wilson, Louise C.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Emmet, Warren; Gardiner, Brooke; Streubel, Berthold; Dopita, Belinda; Zankl, Andreas; Kayserili, Hülya; Scambler, Peter J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Beales, Philip L.; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional (anterograde and retrograde) motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) governs cargo transport and delivery processes that are essential for primary cilia growth and maintenance and for hedgehog signaling functions. The IFT dynein-2 motor complex that regulates ciliary retrograde protein transport contains a heavy chain dynein ATPase/motor subunit, DYNC2H1, along with other less well functionally defined subunits. Deficiency of IFT proteins, including DYNC2H1, underlies a spectrum of skeletal ciliopathies. Here, by using exome sequencing and a targeted next-generation sequencing panel, we identified a total of 11 mutations in WDR34 in 9 families with the clinical diagnosis of Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy). WDR34 encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein orthologous to Chlamydomonas FAP133, a dynein intermediate chain associated with the retrograde intraflagellar transport motor. Three-dimensional protein modeling suggests that the identified mutations all affect residues critical for WDR34 protein-protein interactions. We find that WDR34 concentrates around the centrioles and basal bodies in mammalian cells, also showing axonemal staining. WDR34 coimmunoprecipitates with the dynein-1 light chain DYNLL1 in vitro, and mining of proteomics data suggests that WDR34 could represent a previously unrecognized link between the cytoplasmic dynein-1 and IFT dynein-2 motors. Together, these data show that WDR34 is critical for ciliary functions essential to normal development and survival, most probably as a previously unrecognized component of the mammalian dynein-IFT machinery. PMID:24183451

  10. Genes encoding chavicol/eugenol synthase from the creosote bush Larrea tridentata

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kim, Sung -Jin; Vassao, Daniel Giddings; Patten, Ann M.; Eichinger, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Particular aspects provide novel methods for redirecting carbon allocation in plants or cell culture from lignification to inherently more useful and tractable materials, and to facilitate the generation of, e.g., biofuels from the remaining plant ro culture biomass. Particular aspects provided novel methods for converting monolignols into allyl/propenyl phenols, and for chavicol/eugenol formation or production. Additional aspects relate to the discovery of novel chavicol/eugenol synthases that convert p-coumaryl/coniferyl alcohol esters into chavicol/eugenol, and to novel compositions (e.g., novel proteins and nucleic acids encoding same), and novel methods using same for producing or forming chavicol/eugenol and other derivatives in cell culture and/or genetically modified plants, and for re-engineering the composition of plant biomass. Particular aspects provide novel methods for generation in culture or in planta of liquid/combustible allyl/propenyl phenols, and these phenolic products are utilized for (non-ethanol) biofuel/bioenergy purposes, while the remaining plant biomass facilitates the generation of other biofuels.

  11. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Liao, Liao; Gu, Chao; Lu, Ziqi; Allan, Andrew C.; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavor and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs) via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5) via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants. PMID:26579158

  12. Cloning and expression of Bartonella henselae sucB gene encoding an immunogenic dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase homologous protein.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Hidenori; Maruyama, Soichi; Hirano, Kouji; Mikami, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    Immunoscreening of a ZAP genomic library of Bartonella henselae strain Houston-1 expressed in Escherichia coli resulted in the isolation of a clone containing 3.5 kb BamHI genomic DNA fragment. This 3.5 kb DNA fragment was found to contain a sequence of a gene encoding a protein with significant homology to the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase of Brucella melitensis (sucB). Subsequent cloning and DNA sequence analysis revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence from the cloned gene showed 66.5% identity to SucB protein of B. melitensis, and 43.4 and 47.2% identities to those of Coxiella burnetii and E. coli, respectively. The gene was expressed as a His-Nus A-tagged fusion protein. The recombinant SucB protein (rSucB) was shown to be an immunoreactive protein of about 115 kDa by Western blot analysis with sera from B. henselae-immunized mice. Therefore the rSucB may be a candidate antigen for a specific serological diagnosis of B. henselae infection.

  13. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-11-09

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology.

  14. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  15. Disruption in Candida albicans of the TPS2 gene encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase affects cell integrity and decreases infectivity.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; de Virgilio, Claudio; Pontón, José; Gancedo, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    The gene CaTPS2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) phosphatase from Candida albicans has been cloned and disrupted in this organism. The Catps2/Catps2 mutant did not accumulate trehalose but accumulated high levels of T6P. Disruption of the two copies of the CaTPS2 gene did not abolish growth even at 42 degrees C, but decreased the growth rate. In the stationary phase, the Catps2/Catps2 mutant aggregated, more than 50% of its cells became permeable to propidium iodide and a large amount of protein was found in the culture medium. Aggregation occurred only at pH values higher than 7 and was avoided by osmoprotectants; it was never observed during the exponential phase of growth. The mutant formed colonies with a smooth border on Spider medium. Mice inoculated with 1.5 x 10(6) c.f.u. of wild-type cells died after 8 days, while 80% of those inoculated with the same number of c.f.u. of the Catps2/Catps2 mutant survived for at least 1 month. Reintroduction of the wild-type CaTPS2 gene in the Catps2/Catps2 mutant abolished the phenotypes described. It is hypothesized that the accumulation of T6P interferes with the assembly of a normal cell wall.

  16. Acetate ester production by Chinese yellow rice wine yeast overexpressing the alcohol acetyltransferase-encoding gene ATF2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhang, C; Qi, Y; Dai, L; Ma, H; Guo, X; Xiao, D

    2014-11-27

    Acetate ester, which are produced by fermenting yeast cells in an enzyme-catalyzed intracellular reaction, are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages such as Chinese yellow rice wine. Alcohol acetyltransferase (AATase) is currently believed to be the key enzyme responsible for the production of acetate ester. In order to determine the precise role of the ATF2 gene in acetate ester production, an ATF2 gene encoding a type of AATase was overexpressed and the ability of the mutant to form acetate esters (including ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and isobutyl acetate) was investigated. The results showed that after 5 days of fermentation, the concentrations of ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and isobutyl acetate in yellow rice wines fermented with EY2 (pUC-PIA2K) increased to 137.79 mg/L (an approximate 4.9-fold increase relative to the parent cell RY1), 26.68 mg/L, and 7.60 mg/L, respectively. This study confirms that the ATF2 gene plays an important role in the production of acetate ester production during Chinese yellow rice wine fermentation, thereby offering prospects for the development of yellow rice wine yeast starter strains with optimized ester-producing capabilities.

  17. The arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Rosen, E.; Caspar, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589-1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes.

  18. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  19. Enhanced Delivery of Plasmid Encoding Interleukin-12 Gene by Diethylene Triamine Penta-Acetic Acid (DTPA)-Conjugated PEI Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Keykhaee, Maryam; Khalvati, Bahman; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins have been considered as an efficient category of medications used for the treatment of various diseases. Despite their effectiveness, there are some reports on the systemic adverse effects of recombinant therapeutic proteins limiting their wide clinical applications. Among different cytokines used for cancer immunotherapy, interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown great ability as a powerful antitumor and antiangiogenic agent. However, significant toxic reactions following the systemic administration of IL-12 have led researchers to seek for alternative approaches such as the delivery and local expression of the IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissues. In order to transfer the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene, the most extensively investigated polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), was modified by diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) to modulate the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance of the polymer as well as its toxicity. DTPA-conjugated PEI derivatives were able to form complexes in the size range around 100-180 nm with great condensation ability and protection of the plasmid against enzymatic degradation. The highest gene transfer ability was achieved by the DTPA-conjugated PEI at the conjugation degree of 0.1 % where the level of IL-12 production increased up to twofold compared with that of the unmodified PEI. Results of the present study demonstrated that modulation of the surface positive charge of PEI along with the improvement of the polymer hydrophobic balance could be considered as a successful strategy to develop safe and powerful nanocarriers.

  20. cDNA cloning and characterization of a novel gene encoding the MLF1-interacting protein MLF1IP.

    PubMed

    Hanissian, Silva H; Akbar, Umar; Teng, Bin; Janjetovic, Zorica; Hoffmann, Anne; Hitzler, Johann K; Iscove, Norman; Hamre, Kristin; Du, Xiaoping; Tong, Yiai; Mukatira, Suraj; Robertson, Jon H; Morris, Stephan W

    2004-04-29

    Myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) is characterized by a t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) chromosomal translocation that forms a fusion gene between nucleophosmin (NPM) and MDS/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1). We identified a novel protein, MLF1-interacting protein (MLF1IP), that specifically associates with MLF1 by yeast two-hybrid analysis and in pulldown assays, and colocalizes with it in both the nuclei and cytoplasm of cells. The MLF1IP gene locus is at chromosome 4q35.1 and is composed of 14 exons spanning 75.8 kb of genomic DNA. The MLF1IP cDNA encodes a 46-kDa protein that contains two bipartite and two classical nuclear localization signals, two nuclear receptor-binding motifs (LXXLL), two leucine zippers, two PEST residues and several potential phosphorylation sites. MLF1IP transcripts are expressed in a variety of tissues (e.g. fetal liver, bone marrow, thymus and testis). MLF1IP appears to be a lineage-specific gene whose expression is confined exclusively to the CFU-E erythroid precursor cells, but not in mature erythrocytes. These observations, together with previous data demonstrating a role for MLF1 in suppressing red cell maturation, suggest a possible role for MLF1IP and MLF1 deregulation in the genesis of erythroleukemias.

  1. Immune responses of mice immunized by DNA plasmids encoding PCV2 ORF 2 gene, porcine IL-15 or the both.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Feng, Jing; Lin, Hai; Li, Lanxiang; Su, Dingding; Tu, Di; Zhu, Weijuan; Yang, Qing; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-11-19

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is associated with many kinds of diseases including postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). It affects the immune system of swine and causes huge epidemic losses every year. In our previous study, we provided evidence that DNA plasmid bearing porcine IL-15 (pVAX-pIL-15) might serve as an immune enhancer for DNA plasmid encoding porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP5 gene. In this study, PCV2 open reading frame (ORF)2 gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX, resulting in the plasmid pVAX-PCV2-ORF2. Transient expression of the plasmid in BHK-21 cells could be detected using immunofluorescence assay. Experimental mice were divided into 5 groups and immunized with PBS, pVAX, pVAX-pIL-15, pVAX-PCV2-ORF2 or pVAX-pIL-15 plus pVAX-PCV2-ORF2. The results showed that the mice co-inoculated with pVAX-PCV2-ORF2 plus pVAX-pIL-15 had higher humoral and cellular immune responses than the others. In addition, DNA plasmid bearing PCV2 ORF2 gene had a protective effect against challenge with PCV2 in mice which could be promoted with the utilization of pIL-15. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

  3. Multiplex PCR assay for detection of recombinant genes encoding fatty acid desaturases fused with lichenase reporter protein in GM plants.

    PubMed

    Berdichevets, Iryna N; Shimshilashvili, Hristina R; Gerasymenko, Iryna M; Sindarovska, Yana R; Sheludko, Yuriy V; Goldenkova-Pavlova, Irina V

    2010-07-01

    Thermostable lichenase encoded by licB gene of Clostridium thermocellum can be used as a reporter protein in plant, bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cells. It has important advantages of high sensitivity and specificity in qualitative and quantitative assays. Deletion variants of LicB (e.g., LicBM3) retain its enzymatic activity and thermostability and can be expressed in translational fusion with target proteins without compromising with their properties. Fusion with the lichenase reporter is especially convenient for the heterologous expression of proteins whose analysis is difficult or compromised by host enzyme activities, as it is in case of fatty acid desaturases occurring in all groups of organisms. Recombinant desaturase-lichenase genes can be used for creating genetically modified (GM) plants with improved chill tolerance. Development of an analytical method for detection of fused desaturase-lichenase transgenes is necessary both for production of GM plants and for their certification. Here, we report a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for detection of desA and desC desaturase genes of cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus vulcanus, respectively, fused to licBM3 reporter in GM plants.

  4. The Arabidopsis thaliana REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 Gene Encodes an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Involved in Ferulic Acid and Sinapic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh B.; Bastress, Kristen L.; Ruegger, Max O.; Denault, Jeff W.; Chapple, Clint

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has significantly advanced our understanding of the phenylpropanoid pathway but has left in doubt the pathway by which sinapic acid is synthesized in plants. The reduced epidermal fluorescence1 (ref1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates only 10 to 30% of the sinapate esters found in wild-type plants. Positional cloning of the REF1 gene revealed that it encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a member of a large class of NADP+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Consistent with this finding, extracts of ref1 leaves exhibit low sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. These data indicate that REF1 encodes a sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase required for sinapic acid and sinapate ester biosynthesis. When expressed in Escherichia coli, REF1 was found to exhibit both sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and further phenotypic analysis of ref1 mutant plants showed that they contain less cell wall–esterified ferulic acid. These findings suggest that both ferulic acid and sinapic acid are derived, at least in part, through oxidation of coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. This route is directly opposite to the traditional representation of phenylpropanoid metabolism in which hydroxycinnamic acids are instead precursors of their corresponding aldehydes. PMID:14729911

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 gene encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in ferulic acid and sinapic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramesh B; Bastress, Kristen L; Ruegger, Max O; Denault, Jeff W; Chapple, Clint

    2004-02-01

    Recent research has significantly advanced our understanding of the phenylpropanoid pathway but has left in doubt the pathway by which sinapic acid is synthesized in plants. The reduced epidermal fluorescence1 (ref1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates only 10 to 30% of the sinapate esters found in wild-type plants. Positional cloning of the REF1 gene revealed that it encodes an aldehyde dehydrogenase, a member of a large class of NADP(+)-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Consistent with this finding, extracts of ref1 leaves exhibit low sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. These data indicate that REF1 encodes a sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase required for sinapic acid and sinapate ester biosynthesis. When expressed in Escherichia coli, REF1 was found to exhibit both sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and further phenotypic analysis of ref1 mutant plants showed that they contain less cell wall-esterified ferulic acid. These findings suggest that both ferulic acid and sinapic acid are derived, at least in part, through oxidation of coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde. This route is directly opposite to the traditional representation of phenylpropanoid metabolism in which hydroxycinnamic acids are instead precursors of their corresponding aldehydes.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis and characteristics of VP23 encoded by the newly identified UL18 gene of duck enteritis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiwen; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the predicted information about structures and functions of VP23 encoded by the newly identified DEV UL18 gene through bioinformatics softwares and tools. The DEV UL18 was predicted to encode a polypeptide with 322 amino acids, termed VP23, with a putative molecular mass of 35.250 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (PI) of 8.37, no signal peptide and transmembrane domain in the polypeptide. The prediction of subcellular localization showed that the DEV-VP23 located at endoplasmic reticulum with 33.3%, mitochondrial with 22.2%, extracellular, including cell wall with 11.1%, vesicles of secretory system with 11.1%, Golgi with 11.1%, and plasma membrane with 11.1%. The acid sequence of analysis showed that the potential antigenic epitopes are situated in 45-47, 53-60, 102-105, 173-180, 185-189, 260-265, 267-271, and 292-299 amino acids. All the consequences inevitably provide some insights for further research about the DEV-VP23 and also provide a fundament for further study on the the new type clinical diagnosis of DEV and can be used for the development of new DEV vaccine.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation and Characterization of a Novel β-Fructofuranosidase-Encoding Gene from Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sinéad M.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-01-01

    An operon involved in fructooligosaccharide breakdown was identified in the genome of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. This 2.6-kb transcriptional unit was comprised of three genes that encoded a putative permease, a conserved hypothetical protein, and a β-fructofuranosidase. Active transcription of the operon was observed when B. breve UCC2003 was grown on sucrose or Actilight, while transcription appeared to be repressed when the organism was grown on glucose, fructose, a combination of glucose and sucrose, or a combination of fructose and sucrose. The β-fructofuranosidase encoded by this operon was purified and biochemically characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for catalytic activity were determined to be pH 6.0 and 37°C, respectively, and there was a dependence on bivalent cations, particularly manganese. The Km and Vmax values for sucrose hydrolysis were determined to be 25 ± 2 mM and 24 ± 3 μmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. Interestingly, the enzyme was shown to specifically catalyze cleavage of the β(2-1) glycosidic bond between glucose and its neighboring fructose moiety in sucrose and other fructooligosaccharides with a relatively low degree of polymerization, and there was no detectable activity towards the β(2-1) glycosidic bond between two fructose moieties within the same substrate. To our knowledge, such an enzymatic activity has not previously been described in bifidobacteria or other gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16000751

  8. ngs (notochord granular surface) gene encodes a novel type of intermediate filament family protein essential for notochord maintenance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiangjun; Xia, Zhidan; Zu, Yao; Telfer, Helena; Hu, Jing; Yu, Jingyi; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-25

    The notochord is an important organ involved in embryonic patterning and locomotion. In zebrafish, the mature notochord consists of a single stack of fully differentiated, large vacuolated cells called chordocytes, surrounded by a single layer of less differentiated notochordal epithelial cells called chordoblasts. Through genetic analysis of zebrafish lines carrying pseudo-typed retroviral insertions, a mutant exhibiting a defective notochord with a granular appearance was isolated, and the corresponding gene was identified as ngs (notochord granular surface), which was specifically expressed in the notochord. In the mutants, the notochord started to degenerate from 32 hours post-fertilization, and the chordocytes were then gradually replaced by smaller cells derived from chordoblasts. The granular notochord phenotype was alleviated by anesthetizing the mutant embryos with tricaine to prevent muscle contraction and locomotion. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ngs encodes a new type of intermediate filament (IF) family protein, which we named chordostatin based on its function. Under the transmission electron microcopy, bundles of 10-nm-thick IF-like filaments were enriched in the chordocytes of wild-type zebrafish embryos, whereas the chordocytes in ngs mutants lacked IF-like structures. Furthermore, chordostatin-enhanced GFP (EGFP) fusion protein assembled into a filamentous network specifically in chordocytes. Taken together, our work demonstrates that ngs encodes a novel type of IF protein and functions to maintain notochord integrity for larval development and locomotion. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of notochord structural maintenance, as well as the evolution and biological function of IF family proteins.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding the 69-kDa extracellular chitinase of Janthinobacterium lividum.

    PubMed

    Gleave, A P; Taylor, R K; Morris, B A; Greenwood, D R

    1995-09-15

    Janthinobacterium lividum secretes a major 56-kDa chitinase and a minor 69-kDa chitinase. A chitinase gene was defined on a 3-kb fragment of clone pRKT10, by virtue of fluorescent colonies in the presence of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-chitotrioside. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an 1998-bp open reading frame with the potential to encode a 69,716-Da protein with amino acid sequences similar to those in other chitinases, suggesting it encodes the minor chitinase (Chi69). Chitinase activity of Escherichia coli (pRKT10) lysates was detected mainly in the periplasmic fraction and immunoblotting detected a 70-kDa protein in this fraction. Chi69 has an N-terminal secretory leader peptide preceding two probable chitin-binding domains and a catalytic domain. These functional domains are separated by linker regions of proline-threonine repeats. Amino acid sequencing of cyanogen bromide cleavage-derived peptides from the major 56-kDa chitinase suggested that Chi69 may be a precursor of Chi56. In addition, an N-terminally truncated version of Chi69 retained chitinase activity as expected if in vivo processing of Chi69 generates Chi56.

  10. Characterization of two trpE genes encoding anthranilate synthase {alpha}-subunit in Azospirillum brasilense

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Shimei; Xie Baoen; Chen Sanfeng

    2006-03-10

    The previous report from our laboratory has recently identified a new trpE gene (termed trpE {sub 2}) which exists independently in Azospirillum brasilense Yu62. In this study, amplification of trpE(G) (termed trpE {sub 1}(G) here) confirmed that there are two copies of trpE gene, one trpE being fused into trpG while the other trpE existed independently. This is First report to suggest that two copies of the trpE gene exist in this bacterium. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence demonstrated that putative leader peptide, terminator, and anti-terminator were found upstream of trpE {sub 1}(G) while these sequence features did not existmore » in front of trpE {sub 2}. The {beta}-galactosidase activity of an A. brasilense strain carrying a trpE {sub 2}-lacZ fusion remained constant at different tryptophan concentrations, but the {beta}-galactosidase activity of the same strain carrying a trpE {sub 1}(G)-lacZ fusion decreased as the tryptophan concentration increased. These data suggest that the expression of trpE {sub 1}(G) is regulated at the transcriptional level by attenuation while trpE {sub 2} is constantly expressed. The anthranilate synthase assays with trpE {sub 1}(G){sup -} and trpE {sub 2} {sup -} mutants demonstrated that TrpE{sub 1}(G) fusion protein is feedback inhibited by tryptophan while TrpE{sub 2} protein is not. We also found that both trpE {sub 1}(G) and trpE {sub 2} gene products were involved in IAA synthesis.« less

  11. Identification of Genes Encoding Conjugated Bile Salt Hydrolase and Transport in Lactobacillus johnsonii 100-100

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Christopher A.; Savage, Dwayne C.

    1998-01-01

    Cytosolic extracts of Lactobacillus johnsonii 100-100 (previously reported as Lactobacillus sp. strain 100-100) contain four heterotrimeric isozymes composed of two peptides, α and β, with conjugated bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity. We now report cloning, from the genome of strain 100-100, a 2,977-bp DNA segment that expresses BSH activity in Escherichia coli. The sequencing of this segment showed that it contained one complete and two partial open reading frames (ORFs). The 3′ partial ORF (927 nucleotides) was predicted by BLAST and confirmed with 5′ and 3′ deletions to be a BSH gene. Thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR was used to extend and complete the 948-nucleotide sequence of the BSH gene 3′ of the cloned segment. The predicted amino acid sequence of the 5′ partial ORF (651 nucleotides) was about 80% similar to the C-terminal half of the largest, complete ORF (1,353 nucleotides), and these two putative proteins were similar to several amine, multidrug resistance, and sugar transport proteins of the major facilitator superfamily. E. coli DH5α cells transformed with a construct containing these ORFs, in concert with an extracellular factor produced by strain 100-100, demonstrated levels of uptake of [14C]taurocholic acid that were increased as much as threefold over control levels. [14C]Cholic acid was taken up in similar amounts by strain DH5α pSportI (control) and DH5α p2000 (transport clones). These findings support a hypothesis that the ORFs are conjugated bile salt transport genes which may be arranged in an operon with BSH genes. PMID:9721268

  12. A large gene family in fission yeast encodes spore killers that subvert Mendel’s law

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Jiang, Zhao-Di; Suo, Fang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; He, Wan-Zhong; Du, Li-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Spore killers in fungi are selfish genetic elements that distort Mendelian segregation in their favor. It remains unclear how many species harbor them and how diverse their mechanisms are. Here, we discover two spore killers from a natural isolate of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both killers belong to the previously uncharacterized wtf gene family with 25 members in the reference genome. These two killers act in strain-background-independent and genome-location-independent manners to perturb the maturation of spores not inheriting them. Spores carrying one killer are protected from its killing effect but not that of the other killer. The killing and protecting activities can be uncoupled by mutation. The numbers and sequences of wtf genes vary considerably between S. pombe isolates, indicating rapid divergence. We propose that wtf genes contribute to the extensive intraspecific reproductive isolation in S. pombe, and represent ideal models for understanding how segregation-distorting elements act and evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26057.001 PMID:28631610

  13. The Arabidopsis gene MONOPTEROS encodes a transcription factor mediating embryo axis formation and vascular development.

    PubMed Central

    Hardtke, C S; Berleth, T

    1998-01-01

    The vascular tissues of flowering plants form networks of interconnected cells throughout the plant body. The molecular mechanisms directing the routes of vascular strands and ensuring tissue continuity within the vascular system are not known, but are likely to depend on general cues directing plant cell orientation along the apical-basal axis. Mutations in the Arabidopsis gene MONOPTEROS (MP) interfere with the formation of vascular strands at all stages and also with the initiation of the body axis in the early embryo. Here we report the isolation of the MP gene by positional cloning. The predicted protein product contains functional nuclear localization sequences and a DNA binding domain highly similar to a domain shown to bind to control elements of auxin inducible promoters. During embryogenesis, as well as organ development, MP is initially expressed in broad domains that become gradually confined towards the vascular tissues. These observations suggest that the MP gene has an early function in the establishment of vascular and body patterns in embryonic and post-embryonic development. PMID:9482737

  14. The nagA gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Díez, Bruno; Rodríguez-Sáiz, Marta; de la Fuente, Juan Luis; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Barredo, José Luis

    2005-01-15

    We purified the beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and its N-terminal sequence was determined, showing the presence of a mixture of two proteins (P1 and P2). A genomic DNA fragment was cloned by using degenerated oligonucleotides from the Nt sequences. The nucleotide sequence showed the presence of an ORF (nagA gene) lacking introns, with a length of 1791 bp, and coding for a protein of 66.5 kDa showing similarity to acetylglucosaminidases. The NagA deduced protein includes P1 and P2 as incomplete forms of the mature protein, and contains putative features for protein maturation: an 18-amino acid signal peptide, a KEX2 processing site, and four glycosylation motifs. The sequence just after the signal peptide corresponds to P2 and that after the KEX2 site to P1. The nagA transcript has a size of about 2.1 kb and is present until the end of the fermentation process for penicillin production. NagA is one of the most largely represented proteins in P. chrysogenum, increasing along the fermentation process. The suitability of the nagA promoter (PnagA) for gene expression in fungi was demonstrated by expressing the bleomycin resistance gene (ble(R)) from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus in P. chrysogenum.

  15. Acral peeling skin syndrome resulting from a homozygous nonsense mutation in the CSTA gene encoding cystatin A.

    PubMed

    Krunic, Aleksandar L; Stone, Kristina L; Simpson, Michael A; McGrath, John A

    2013-01-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular basis of APSS in a consanguineous Jordanian-American pedigree. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.Lys22X) in the CSTA gene, encoding cystatin A, that was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Cystatin A is a protease inhibitor found in the cornified cell envelope, and loss-of-function mutations have previously been reported in two cases of exfoliative ichthyosis. Our study expands the molecular pathology of APSS and demonstrates the value of next-generation sequencing in the genetic characterization of inherited skin diseases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Haloarcula marismortui cytochrome b-561 is encoded by the narC gene in the dissimilatory nitrate reductase operon.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Araya, Osamu; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2007-01-01

    The composition of membrane-bound electron-transferring proteins from denitrif