Science.gov

Sample records for a533b pressure vessel

  1. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  2. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.S.; Rosinski, S.T.; Cannon, N.S.

    1991-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. [Delta]USE, the difference between the USE's of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. [Delta]USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and themore » stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the [Delta]USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.« less

  3. Subsize specimen testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.S.; Rosinski, S.T.; Cannon, N.S.

    1991-12-31

    A new methodology is proposed to correlate the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size and subsize Charpy specimens of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel plate material, A533B. The methodology appears to be more satisfactory than the methodologies proposed earlier. USE of a notched-only specimen is partitioned into macro-crack initiation and crack propagation energies. USE of a notched and precracked specimen provides the crack propagation energy. {Delta}USE, the difference between the USE`s of notched-only and precracked specimens, is an estimate of the crack initiation energy. {Delta}USE was normalized by a factor involving the dimensions of the Charpy specimen and themore » stress concentration factor at the notch root. The normalized values of the {Delta}USE were found to be invariant with specimen size.« less

  4. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  5. Pressure vessel bottle mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A mounting assembly for mounting a composite pressure vessel to a vehicle includes a saddle having a curved surface extending between two pillars for receiving the vessel. The saddle also has flanged portions which can be bolted to the vehicle. Each of the pillars has hole in which is mounted the shaft portion of an attachment member. A resilient member is disposed between each of the shaft portions and the holes and loaded by a tightening nut. External to the holes, each of the attachment members has a head portion to which a steel band is attached. The steel band circumscribes the vessel and translates the load on the springs into a clamping force on the vessel. As the vessel expands and contracts, the resilient members expand and contract so that the clamping force applied by the band to the vessel remains constant.

  6. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  7. Annealing effect on microstructural recovery in 316L and A533B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Goto, S.; Inoue, S.; Suzuki, E.

    2017-11-01

    An austenitic model alloy (316L) and a low alloy steel (A533B) were exposed to constant or fluctuating temperature after electron irradiation to a cumulative damage level of 1 displacement per atom. 316L model alloy was exposed to LWR operating temperature during electron irradiation, and were exposed to a higher temperature at a high heating and cooling rates. The annealing experiment after irradiation to 316L resulted in the change in irradiation-induced microstructure; both the size and the number density of Frank loop and black dots were decreased, while the volume fraction of void was increased. In the case of A533B, the aging experiment after electron irradiation resulted in the shrinkage or the disappearance of black dots and the growth of dislocation loops. It is suggested that during annealing and/or aging at a high temperature the excess vacancies could be provided and flew into each defect feature, resulting in that interstitial type feature could be diminished, while vacancy type increased in volume fraction if exists.

  8. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  10. High pressure storage vessel

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  11. Analysis of the irradiation data for A302B and A533B correlation monitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The results of Charpy V-notch impact tests for A302B and A533B-1 Correlation Monitor Materials (CMM) listed in the surveillance power reactor data base (PR-EDB) and material test reactor data base (TR-EDB) are analyzed. The shift of the transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (T{sub 30}) is considered as the primary measure of radiation embrittlement in this report. The hyperbolic tangent fitting model and uncertainty of the fitting parameters for Charpy impact tests are presented in this report. For the surveillance CMM data, the transition temperature shifts at 30 ft-lb ({Delta}T{sub 30}) generally follow the predictions provided by Revision 2 of Regulatorymore » Guide 1.99 (R.G. 1.99). Difference in capsule temperatures is a likely explanation for large deviations from R.G. 1.99 predictions. Deviations from the R.G. 1.99 predictions are correlated to similar deviations for the accompanying materials in the same capsules, but large random fluctuations prevent precise quantitative determination. Significant scatter is noted in the surveillance data, some of which may be attributed to variations from one specimen set to another, or inherent in Charpy V-notch testing. The major contributions to the uncertainty of the R.G. 1.99 prediction model, and the overall data scatter are from mechanical test results, chemical analysis, irradiation environments, fluence evaluation, and inhomogeneous material properties. Thus in order to improve the prediction model, control of the above-mentioned error sources needs to be improved. In general the embrittlement behavior of both the A302B and A533B-1 plate materials is similar. There is evidence for a fluence-rate effect in the CMM data irradiated in test reactors; thus its implication on power reactor surveillance programs deserves special attention.« less

  12. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  13. Multilayer Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    A method has been devised to enable the fabrication of lightweight pressure vessels from multilayer composite materials. This method is related to, but not the same as, the method described in gMaking a Metal- Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel h (MFS-31814), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 59. The method is flexible in that it poses no major impediment to changes in tank design and is applicable to a wide range of tank sizes. The figure depicts a finished tank fabricated by this method, showing layers added at various stages of the fabrication process. In the first step of the process, a mandrel that defines the size and shape of the interior of the tank is machined from a polyurethane foam or other suitable lightweight tooling material. The mandrel is outfitted with metallic end fittings on a shaft. Each end fitting includes an outer flange that has a small step to accommodate a thin layer of graphite/epoxy or other suitable composite material. The outer surface of the mandrel (but not the fittings) is covered with a suitable release material. The composite material is filament- wound so as to cover the entire surface of the mandrel from the step on one end fitting to the step on the other end fitting. The composite material is then cured in place. The entire workpiece is cut in half in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry at its mid-length point, yielding two composite-material half shells, each containing half of the foam mandrel. The halves of the mandrel are removed from within the composite shells, then the shells are reassembled and bonded together with a belly band of cured composite material. The resulting composite shell becomes a mandrel for the subsequent steps of the fabrication process and remains inside the final tank. The outer surface of the composite shell is covered with a layer of material designed to be impermeable by the pressurized fluid to be contained in the tank. A second step on the outer flange of

  14. Carbon fiber internal pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Internal pressure vessels were designed; the filament was wound of carbon fibers and epoxy resin and tested to burst. The fibers used were Thornel 400, Thornel 75, and Hercules HTS. Additional vessels with type A fiber were made. Polymeric linears were used, and all burst testing was done at room temperature. The objective was to produce vessels with the highest attainable PbV/W efficiencies. The type A vessels showed the highest average efficiency: 2.56 x 10 to the 6th power cm. Next highest efficiency was with Thornel 400 vessels: 2.21 x 10 to the 6th power cm. These values compare favorably with efficiency values from good quality S-glass vessels, but strains averaged 0.97% or less, which is less than 1/3 the strain of S-glass vessels.

  15. Fractography and mechanisms of environmentally enhanced fatigue crack propagation of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Torronen, K.; Kemppainen, M.

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes the findings and interpretations of the fractographic survey conducted for the International Cyclic Crack Growth Rate (ICCGR) cooperative group round-robin specimens. Specimens of A533B pressure vessel steel were tested at several laboratories in the United States and elsewhere with the same nominal test parameters. A rather wide scatter of the results was found. A fractographic and metallographic survey was carried out in order to clarify the scatter and to evaluate the micromechanism of the crack growth. The fractographic findings are reported in detail and correlated to the crack growth behavior. A hydrogen-assisted crack propagation mechanism based onmore » the fractography is proposed and applied to the observed crack growth behavior.« less

  16. Common pressure vessel battery performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otzinger, B.

    1978-01-01

    Performance tests run on two common pressure vessel type nickel hydrogen batteries are described and the results presented. The study included: (1) charge retention tests, (2) synchronous eclipse season cycling tests, and (3) temperature differential tests.

  17. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  18. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  19. Pressure vessel having continuous sidewall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spacecraft pressure vessel has a tub member. A sidewall member is coupled to the tub member so that a bottom section of the sidewall member extends from an attachment intersection with the tub member and away from the tub member. The bottom section of the sidewall member receives and transfers a load through the sidewall member.

  20. Pressure vessel and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, Timothy

    2017-09-05

    A pressure vessel includes a pump having a passage that extends between an inlet and an outlet. A duct at the pump outlet includes at least one dimension that is adjustable to facilitate forming a dynamic seal that limits backflow of gas through the passage.

  1. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements...

  2. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements...

  3. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use ofmore » insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.« less

  4. Kendall Analysis of Cannon Pressure Vessels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-11

    corrections in the expressions to account for the reduction in compressive yield strength near the bore of an autofrettaged vessel; [iii] Fatigue life...see Table 1. Pressure vessel results are shown in Table 1 for breech sections of four ASTM A723 steel cannon tubes that were pressurized in small...ID ratio of 1.87 and degree of autofrettage (c-a)/(b-a) = 0.51. For A723 steel pressure vessels near this configuration and degree of autofrettage

  5. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  6. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  7. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  8. Method of manufacturing an overwrapped pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Emory J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A pressure vessel of the type wherein a metallic liner in the shape of a cylindrical portion with a dome-shaped portion at each end thereof is overwrapped by a plurality of layers of resin coated, single fiberglass filaments. A four-step wrapping technique reinforces the vessel with overwrap material at the most likely areas for vessel failure. Overwrapping of the vessel is followed by a sizing pressurization cycle which induces a compressive prestress into the liner and thereby permits the liner to deform elastically through an increased strain range.

  9. Pure Niobium as a Pressure Vessel Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Carter, H. F.; Foley, M. H.; Klebaner, A. L.; Nicol, T. H.; Page, T. M.; Theilacker, J. C.; Wands, R. H.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Wu, G.

    2010-04-01

    Physics laboratories around the world are developing niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for use in particle accelerators. These SRF cavities are typically cooled to low temperatures by direct contact with a liquid helium bath, resulting in at least part of the helium container being made from pure niobium. In the U.S., the Code of Federal Regulations allows national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel rules or use of alternative rules which provide a level of safety greater than or equal to that afforded by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up also being treated as a material for pressure vessels. This report summarizes what we have learned about the use of niobium as a pressure vessel material, with a focus on issues for compliance with pressure vessel codes. We present results of a literature search for mechanical properties and tests results, as well as a review of ASME pressure vessel code requirements and issues.

  10. Discontinuity stresses in metallic pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The state of the art, criteria, and recommended practices for the theoretical and experimental analyses of discontinuity stresses and their distribution in metallic pressure vessels for space vehicles are outlined. The applicable types of pressure vessels include propellant tanks ranging from main load-carrying integral tank structure to small auxiliary tanks, storage tanks, solid propellant motor cases, high pressure gas bottles, and pressurized cabins. The major sources of discontinuity stresses are discussed, including deviations in geometry, material properties, loads, and temperature. The advantages, limitations, and disadvantages of various theoretical and experimental discontinuity analysis methods are summarized. Guides are presented for evaluating discontinuity stresses so that pressure vessel performance will not fall below acceptable levels.

  11. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels, A Primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlan, Pat B.; Forth, Scott C.; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie R.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the extensive amount of detailed information that has been published on composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), this document has been written to serve as a primer for those who desire an elementary knowledge of COPVs and the factors affecting composite safety. In this application, the word "composite" simply refers to a matrix of continuous fibers contained within a resin and wrapped over a pressure barrier to form a vessel for gas or liquid containment. COPVs are currently used at NASA to contain high pressure fluids in propulsion, science experiments, and life support applications. They have a significant weight advantage over all metal vessels but require unique design, manufacturing, and test requirements. COPVs also involve a much more complex mechanical understanding due to the interplay between the composite overwrap and the inner liner. A metallic liner is typically used in a COPV as a fluid permeation barrier. The liner design concepts and requirements have been borrowed from all-metal vessels. However, application of metallic vessel design standards to a very thin liner is not straightforward. Different failure modes exist for COPVs than for all-metal vessels, and understanding of these failure modes is at a much more rudimentary level than for metal vessels.

  12. Flexible Composite-Material Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Glen; Haggard, Roy; Harris, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed lightweight pressure vessel would be made of a composite of high-tenacity continuous fibers and a flexible matrix material. The flexibility of this pressure vessel would render it (1) compactly stowable for transport and (2) more able to withstand impacts, relative to lightweight pressure vessels made of rigid composite materials. The vessel would be designed as a structural shell wherein the fibers would be predominantly bias-oriented, the orientations being optimized to make the fibers bear the tensile loads in the structure. Such efficient use of tension-bearing fibers would minimize or eliminate the need for stitching and fill (weft) fibers for strength. The vessel could be fabricated by techniques adapted from filament winding of prior composite-material vessels, perhaps in conjunction with the use of dry film adhesives. In addition to the high-bias main-body substructure described above, the vessel would include a low-bias end substructure to complete coverage and react peak loads. Axial elements would be overlaid to contain damage and to control fiber orientation around side openings. Fiber ring structures would be used as interfaces for connection to ancillary hardware.

  13. Liquid Nitrogen Subcooler Pressure Vessel Engineering Note

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1997-04-24

    The normal operating pressure of this dewar is expected to be less than 15 psig. This vessel is open to atmospheric pressure thru a non-isolatable vent line. The backpressure in the vent line was calculated to be less than 1.5 psig at maximum anticipated flow rates.

  14. Nickel hydrogen common pressure vessel battery development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth R.; Zagrodnik, Jeffrey P.

    1992-01-01

    Our present design for a common pressure vessel (CPV) battery, a nickel hydrogen battery system to combine all of the cells into a common pressure vessel, uses an open disk which allows the cell to be set into a shallow cavity; subsequent cells are stacked on each other with the total number based on the battery voltage required. This approach not only eliminates the assembly error threat, but also more readily assures equal contact pressure to the heat fin between each cell, which further assures balanced heat transfer. These heat fin dishes with their appropriate cell stacks are held together with tie bars which in turn are connected to the pressure vessel weld rings at each end of the tube.

  15. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The firstmore » inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.« less

  16. Proactive life extension of pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Lloyd

    1998-03-01

    For a company to maintain its competitive edge in today's global market every opportunity to gain an advantage must be exploited. Many companies are strategically focusing on improved utilization of existing equipment as well as regulatory compliance. Abbott Laboratories is no exception. Pharmaceutical companies such as Abbott Laboratories realize that reliability and availability of their production equipment is critical to be successful and competitive. Abbott Laboratories, like many of our competitors, is working to improve safety, minimize downtime and maximize the productivity and efficiency of key production equipment such as the pressure vessels utilized in our processes. The correct strategy in obtaining these objectives is to perform meaningful inspection with prioritization based on hazard analysis and risk. The inspection data gathered in Abbott Laboratories pressure vessel program allows informed decisions leading to improved process control. The results of the program are reduced risks to the corporation and employees when operating pressure retaining equipment. Accurate and meaningful inspection methods become the cornerstone of a program allowing proper preventative maintenance actions to occur. Successful preventative/predictive maintenance programs must utilize meaningful nondestructive evaluation techniques and inspection methods. Nondestructive examination methods require accurate useful tools that allow rapid inspection for the entire pressure vessel. Results from the examination must allow the owner to prove compliance of all applicable regulatory laws and codes. At Abbott Laboratories the use of advanced NDE techniques, primarily B-scan ultrasonics, has provided us with the proper tools allowing us to obtain our objectives. Abbott Laboratories uses B-scan ultrasonics utilizing a pulse echo pitch catch technique to provide essential data on our pressure vessels. Equipment downtime is reduced because the nondestructive examination usually takes

  17. Guidelines for pressure vessel safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, S.

    1990-04-01

    A technical overview and information on metallic pressure containment vessels and tanks is given. The intent is to provide Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) personnel and other persons with information to assist in the evaluation of the safety of operating pressure vessels and low pressure storage tanks. The scope is limited to general industrial application vessels and tanks constructed of carbon or low alloy steels and used at temperatures between -75 and 315 C (-100 and 600 F). Information on design codes, materials, fabrication processes, inspection and testing applicable to the vessels and tanks are presented. The majority of the vessels and tanks are made to the rules and requirements of ASME Code Section VIII or API Standard 620. The causes of deterioration and damage in operation are described and methods and capabilities of detecting serious damage and cracking are discussed. Guidelines and recommendations formulated by various groups to inspect for the damages being found and to mitigate the causes and effects of the problems are presented.

  18. Cavity closure arrangement for high pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1981-01-01

    A closure arrangement for a pressure vessel such as the pressure vessel of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor wherein a liner is disposed within a cavity penetration in the reactor vessel and defines an access opening therein. A closure is adapted for sealing relation with an annular mounting flange formed on the penetration liner and has a plurality of radially movable locking blocks thereon having outer serrations adapted for releasable interlocking engagement with serrations formed internally of the upper end of the penetration liner so as to effect high strength closure hold-down. In one embodiment, ramping surfaces are formed on the locking block serrations to bias the closure into sealed relation with the mounting flange when the locking blocks are actuated to locking positions.

  19. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  20. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's Certificate of Inspection is renewed...: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration... refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic accumulators. (4) Pressure vessels which have been satisfactorily examined...

  1. Eddy current testing of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, R.; Pohl, R.; Munzke, D.; Becker, B.; Pelkner, M.

    2018-04-01

    The use of composite pressure vessels instead of conventional vessels made of steel or aluminum grew strongly over the last decade. The reason for this trend is the tremendous weight saving in the case of composite vessels. However, the long-time behavior is not fully understood for filling and discharging cycles and creep strength and their influence on the CFRP coating (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) and the internal liner (steel, aluminum, or plastics). The CFRP ensures the pressure resistance while the inner liner is used as a container for liquid or gas. To overcome the missing knowledge of aging, BAM started an internal project to investigate degradation of these material systems. Therefore, applicable testing methods like eddy current testing are needed. Normally, high-frequency eddy current testing (HF-ET, f > 10 MHz) is deployed for CFRP due to its low conductivity of the fiber, which is in the order of 0.01 MS/s, and the capacitive coupling between the fibers. Nevertheless, in some cases conventional ET can be applied. We show a concise summary of studies on the application of conventional ET of composite pressure vessels.

  2. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  3. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  4. Guide for certifying pressure vessels and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundy, Floyd; Krusa, Paul W.

    1992-01-01

    This guide is intended to provide methodology and describe the intent of the Pressure Vessel and System (PV/S) Certification program. It is not meant to be a mandated document, but is intended to transmit a basic understanding of the PV/S program, and include examples. After the reader has familiarized himself with this publication, he should have a basic understanding of how to go about developing a PV/S certification program.

  5. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  6. Modeling Scala Media as a Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Eric; Olofsson, A.˚Ke

    2011-11-01

    The clinical condition known as endolymphatic hydrops is the swelling of scala media and may result in loss in hearing sensitivity consistent with other forms of low-frequency biasing. Because outer hair cells (OHCs) are displacement-sensitive and hearing levels tend to be preserved despite large changes in blood pressure and CSF pressure, it seems unlikely that the OHC respond passively to changes in static pressures in the chambers. This suggests the operation of a major feedback control loop which jointly regulates homeostasis and hearing sensitivity. Therefore the internal forces affecting the cochlear signal processing amplifier cannot be just motile responses. A complete account of the cochlear amplifier must include static pressures. To this end we have added a third, pressure vessel to our 1-D 140-segment, wave-digital filter active model of cochlear mechanics, incorporating the usual nonlinear forward transduction. In each segment the instantaneous pressure is the sum of acoustic pressure and global static pressure. The object of the model is to maintain stable OHC operating point despite any global rise in pressure in the third chamber. Such accumulated pressure is allowed to dissipate exponentially. In this first 3-chamber implementation we explore the possibility that acoustic pressures are rectified. The behavior of the model is critically dependent upon scaling factors and time-constants, yet by initial assumption, the pressure tends to accumulate in proportion to sound level. We further explore setting of the control parameters so that the accumulated pressure either stays within limits or may rise without bound.

  7. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested... testing requirements for boilers are contained in § 61.05 in subchapter F of this chapter. [CGD 85-080, 61...

  8. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  9. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  10. Plating Repair Of Nickel-Alloy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steve K.; Chagnon, Kevin M.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for localized electrodeposition of nickel enables repair of small damaged nickel-based pressure vessels. Electrodeposition restores weakened areas of vessel wall to at least their former strength.

  11. Chemical Safety Alert: Rupture Hazard of Pressure Vessels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pressure vessels or boilers can fail catastrophically if they are not properly designed, constructed, operated, inspected, tested, or repaired. Risk increases if vessels contents are toxic, corrosive, reactive, or flammable.

  12. Acoustic emission testing of 12-nickel maraging steel pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunegan, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were obtained from three point bend fracture toughness specimens of 12-nickel maraging steel, and two pressure vessels of the same material. One of the pressure vessels contained a prefabricated flaw which was extended and sharpened by fatigue cycling. It is shown that the flawed vessel had similar characteristics to the fracture specimens, thereby allowing estimates to be made of its nearness to failure during a proof test. Both the flawed and unflawed pressure vessel survived the proof pressure and 5 cycles to the working pressure, but it was apparent from the acoustic emission response during the proof cycle and the 5 cycles to the working pressure that the flawed vessel was very near failure. The flawed vessel did not survive a second cycle to the proof pressure before failure due to flaw extension through the wall (causing a leak).

  13. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  14. Fracture complexity of pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2017-11-01

    Significant volume of literatures are already available in the published domain reporting the mechanical and fracture behaviour of different pressure vessel steels under various testing conditions and other potential circumstances. There have been limited researches available in the open domain to correlate the tensile properties of these steels with their corresponding fracture features at various testing temperatures, which are primarily aimed at in the current investigation. A comprehensive literature review has been performed to realise this fact critically. There has been high probability that fracture features are the signature of the entire deformation history which was operated in the material. In order to understand this hypothesis, many tensile experiments are carried out at a constant strain rate by systematic variation in temperature of a reactor pressure vessel steel. The initial inclusion content and their distribution pattern are kept unaltered for all the specimens before tests, and temperatures are varied methodically to vary the nucleation sites of micro-voids (i.e. carbides, phase interfaces, etc.) which result in change of ductile fracture features. Conventional metallographic technique has been employed to characterise the microstructures at various temperatures. Fractographic characterisation of all broken tensile specimens is done to measure the two-dimensional fracture features (i.e. dimple geometry, extent of tearing ridge pattern and dimple number density) under secondary mode of imaging in scanning electron microscope. Quantitative fractography and image processing have been extensively employed to measure the two-dimensional fractographic features. An excellent correlation has been drawn between the ductile fractographic features, microstructures and corresponding tensile properties of the material as a function of test temperature. This study brings to the fore that from the systematic fractographic features, it is possible to determine

  15. Development of a Filament-Overwrapped Cryoformed Metal Pressure Vessel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    ABSTRACT High performance ARDEFORM cryoformed 301 stainless steel glass fiber reinforced (GFR) vessels were demonstrated by room temperature tests of 13 1...Appendix 6 - Vessel Testing ........... . A-54 7.7 Appendix 7 - Increased Ductility Liner High Performance Spherical GFR Vessel A-62 7.8 Appendix 8...vessel consisting of a load-bearing cryogenically stretched ARDEFORM 301 stainless steel liner overwrapped with fiber- glass for high pressure fluid

  16. Pressure vessel burst test program - Initial program paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Maurice R.; Sharp, Douglas E.; Coleman, Michael D.; Webb, Bobby L.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of a pressure vessel burst test program, aimed at the study of the blast waves and fragmentation characteristics of ruptured gas-filled pressure vessels, is reported. The program includes a series of test plans, each involving multiple bursts with burst pressures ranging to 7500 psig. The discussion covers the identification of concerns and hazards, application of the data generated, and a brief review of the current methods for assessing vessel safety and burst parameters. Attention is also given to pretest activities, including completed vessel and facility/instrumentation preparation and results of completed preliminary burst tests.

  17. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... conditions at each inspection for certification: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all...: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration... normally be subjected to a hydrostatic test: (1) Tubular heat exchangers. (2) Pressure vessels used in...

  18. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... conditions at each inspection for certification: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all...: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration... normally be subjected to a hydrostatic test: (1) Tubular heat exchangers. (2) Pressure vessels used in...

  19. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... conditions at each inspection for certification: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all...: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration... normally be subjected to a hydrostatic test: (1) Tubular heat exchangers. (2) Pressure vessels used in...

  20. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conditions at each inspection for certification: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all...: all tubular heat exchangers, hydraulic accumulators, and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration... normally be subjected to a hydrostatic test: (1) Tubular heat exchangers. (2) Pressure vessels used in...

  1. Large boron--epoxy filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.; Bailey, R. L.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Advanced composite material used to fabricate pressure vessel is prepeg (partially cured) consisting of continuous, parallel boron filaments in epoxy resin matrix arranged to form tape. To fabricate chamber, tape is wound on form which must be removable after composite has been cured. Configuration of boron--epoxy composite pressure vessel was determined by computer program.

  2. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a.... (b) Periodic inspection and testing requirements for boilers are contained in § 61.05 in subchapter F...

  3. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must meet...

  4. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must meet...

  5. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must meet...

  6. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must meet...

  7. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must meet...

  8. A Guide for Recertification of Ground Based Pressure Vessels and Liquid Holding Tanks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-15

    Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code , Section...Requirements 202 Calculate Vessel MAWP Using ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section VUI, Division 1. 203 Assess Vessel MAWP Using ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section...Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (B&PV) Section VIll, Division 1, or other applicable standard. This activity involves the

  9. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  10. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R [Murrysville, PA

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  11. Firefighter's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The research to design, fabricate, test, and deliver a pressure vessel for the main component in an improved high-performance firefighter's breathing system is reported. The principal physical and performance characteristics of the vessel which were required are: (1) maximum weight of 9.0 lb; (2) maximum operating pressure of 4500 psig (charge pressure of 4000 psig); (3) minimum contained volume of 280 in. 3; (4) proof pressure of 6750 psig; (5) minimum burst pressure of 9000 psig following operational and service life; and (6) a minimum service life of 15 years. The vessel developed to fulfill the requirements described was completely sucessful, i.e., every category of performence was satisfied. The average weight of the vessel was found to be about 8.3 lb, well below the 9.0 lb specification requirement.

  12. Common/Dependent-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The term "common/dependent pressure vessel" (C/DPV) denotes a proposed alternative configuration for a nickelhydrogen battery. The C/DPV configuration is so named because it is a hybrid of two prior configurations called "common pressure vessel" (CPV) and "dependent pressure vessel" (DPV). The C/DPV configuration has been proposed as a basis for designing highly reliable, long-life Ni/H2-batteries and cells for anticipated special applications in which it is expected that small charge capacities will suffice and sizes and weights must be minimized.

  13. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the C C! end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be sued to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament would pressure vessels of all types of shells-of-revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  14. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be used to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament wound pressure vessels of all types of shells-of -revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  15. Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular fuel storage

    DOEpatents

    Aceves, Salvador; Berry, Gene; Weisberg, Andrew H.

    2004-03-23

    A lightweight, cryogenic-compatible pressure vessel for flexibly storing cryogenic liquid fuels or compressed gas fuels at cryogenic or ambient temperatures. The pressure vessel has an inner pressure container enclosing a fuel storage volume, an outer container surrounding the inner pressure container to form an evacuated space therebetween, and a thermal insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited in the evacuated space by, for example, lining the container liner with a layer of fuel-impermeable material, capturing the permeated fuel in the evacuated space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space.

  16. The Assessment and Validation of Mini-Compact Tension Test Specimen Geometry and Progress in Establishing Technique for Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of smallmore » specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Assessment and validation of mini-CT specimen geometry has been performed on previously well characterized HSST Plate 13B, an A533B class 1 steel. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature measured by these Mini-CT specimens is within the range of To values that were derived from various large fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, the scatter of the fracture toughness values measured by Mini-CT specimens perfectly follows the Weibull distribution function providing additional proof for validation of this geometry for the Master Curve evaluation of rector pressure vessel steels. Moreover, the International collaborative program has been developed to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated weld metal. The program is underway and involves ORNL, CRIEPI, and

  17. Common pressure vessel development for the nickel hydrogen technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cell is described. The cell has the following key features: it eliminates electrolyte bridging; provides for independent electrolyte management for each unit stack; provides for independent oxygen management for each unit stack; has good heat dissipation; has a mechanically sound and practical interconnection; and has the maximum in common with state of the art individual pressure vessel technology.

  18. Progressive Fracture and Damage Tolerance of Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Structural performance (integrity, durability and damage tolerance) of fiber reinforced composite pressure vessels, designed for pressured shelters for planetary exploration, is investigated via computational simulation. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of damage initiation, growth, and propagation under pressure. Aramid fibers are considered in a rubbery polymer matrix for the composite system. Effects of fiber orientation and fabrication defect/accidental damages are investigated with regard to the safety and durability of the shelter. Results show the viability of fiber reinforced pressure vessels as damage tolerant shelters for planetary colonization.

  19. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  20. STEEL FOR PRESSURE VESSELS FOR POWER REACTORS (in German)

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, E.

    1960-11-01

    Both gas-cooled and water-cooled reactors place on the steel pressure vessel rigid requirements with respect to the design, radiation stability, gamma -induced internal stresses, and inability to, or difficulty in, repairing the vessel once it is installed. The factors to be considered in the selection of a given steel for a pressure vessel are reviewed, and the properties of steels previously used for this purpose are tabulated. The studies being raade at present to improve the desirable properties of steels for pressure vessels are briefly summarized. The corrosion stability and irradiation stability of steel are discussed. Neutron activation of themore » steel is also briefly reviewed. (J.S.R.)« less

  1. Stress analysis and evaluation of a rectangular pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, M. A.; Ziada, H. H.; Shurrab, M. S.

    1992-10-01

    This study addresses structural analysis and evaluation of an abnormal rectangular pressure vessel, designed to house equipment for drilling and collecting samples from Hanford radioactive waste storage tanks. It had to be qualified according to ASME boiler and pressure vessel code, section 8; however, it had the cover plate bolted along the long face, a configuration not addressed by the code. Finite element method was used to calculate stresses resulting from internal pressure; these stresses were then used to evaluate and qualify the vessel. Fatigue is not a concern; thus, it can be built according to section 8, division 1 instead of division 2. Stress analysis was checked against the code. A stayed plate was added to stiffen the long side of the vessel.

  2. Validation and Verification of Composite Pressure Vessel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Stephen T.; Ortyl, Nicholas; Grant, Joseph; Taylor, F. Tad

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors and pressure tested Through burst. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and also compare the fiber Bragg grating sensor data with data obtained against that obtained from foil strain gages.

  3. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  4. Isotropic thin-walled pressure vessel experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Nancy L.; Hillsman, Vernon S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) to investigate the stress and strain distributions on the surface of a thin walled cylinder subject to internal pressure and/or axial load; and (2) to relate stress and strain distributions to material properties and cylinder geometry. The experiment, supplies, and procedure are presented.

  5. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except as...

  6. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations...

  7. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations...

  8. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations...

  9. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations...

  10. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations...

  11. Fracture mechanics technology for optimum pressure vessel design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjeletich, J. G.; Morton, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    A technique has been developed to design a maximum efficiency reliable pressure vessel of given geometry and service life. The technique for ensuring reliability of the minimum weight vessel relies on the application of linear elastic fracture mechanics and fracture mechanics concepts. The resultant design incorporates potential fatigue and stress corrosion crack extension during service of a worst case initial flaw. Maximum stress for safe life is specified by the design technique, thereby minimizing weight. Ratios of pressure and toughness parameters are employed to avoid arbitrary specification of design stress level which would lead to a suboptimum design.

  12. Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Performance Under LEO Cycling Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.; Lewis, Harlan L.

    2004-01-01

    LEO life cycle testing of Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen cell packs have been sponsored by the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program. The cell packs have cycled under both 35% and 60% depth-of- discharge and temperature conditions of -5 C and +lO C. The packs have been on test since as early as 1992 and have generated a substantial database. This report will provide insight into performance trends as a function of the specific cell configuration and manufacturer for eight separate nickel-hydrogen battery cell packs.

  13. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  14. Design Guide for glass fiber reinforced metal pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design Guide has been prepared for pressure vessel engineers concerned with specific glass fiber reinforced metal tank design or general tank tradeoff study. Design philosophy, general equations, and curves are provided for safelife design of tanks operating under anticipated space shuttle service conditions.

  15. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief Engineer...

  16. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  17. New techniques for modeling the reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.I.; Simonen, F.A.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years several probabilistic fracture mechanics codes, including the VISA code, have been developed to predict the reliability of reactor pressure vessels. This paper describes several new modeling techniques used in a second generation of the VISA code entitled VISA-II. Results are presented that show the sensitivity of vessel reliability predictions to such factors as inservice inspection to detect flaws, random positioning of flaws within the vessel wall thickness, and fluence distributions that vary throughout the vessel. The algorithms used to implement these modeling techniques are also described. Other new options in VISA-II are also described in this paper.more » The effect of vessel cladding has been included in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics solutions in VISA-II. The algorithms for simulating flaws has been changed to consider an entire vessel rather than a single flaw in a single weld. The flaw distribution was changed to include the distribution of both flaw depth and length. A menu of several alternate equations has been included to predict the shift in RT/sub NDT/. For flaws that arrest and later re-initiate, an option was also included to allow correlating the current arrest toughness with subsequent initiation toughnesses.« less

  18. New techniques for modeling the reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.I.; Simonen, F.A.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1985-12-01

    In recent years several probabilistic fracture mechanics codes, including the VISA code, have been developed to predict the reliability of reactor pressure vessels. This paper describes new modeling techniques used in a second generation of the VISA code entitled VISA-II. Results are presented that show the sensitivity of vessel reliability predictions to such factors as inservice inspection to detect flaws, random positioning of flaws within the vessel walls thickness, and fluence distributions that vary through-out the vessel. The algorithms used to implement these modeling techniques are also described. Other new options in VISA-II are also described in this paper. Themore » effect of vessel cladding has been included in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics solutions in VISA-II. The algorithm for simulating flaws has been changed to consider an entire vessel rather than a single flaw in a single weld. The flaw distribution was changed to include the distribution of both flaw depth and length. A menu of several alternate equations has been included to predict the shift in RTNDT. For flaws that arrest and later re-initiate, an option was also included to allow correlating the current arrest thoughness with subsequent initiation toughnesses. 21 refs.« less

  19. Material Issues in Space Shuttle Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Jensen, Brian J.; Gates, Thomas S.; Morgan, Roger J.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) store gases used in four subsystems for NASA's Space Shuttle Fleet. While there are 24 COPV on each Orbiter ranging in size from 19-40", stress rupture failure of a pressurized Orbiter COPV on the ground or in flight is a catastrophic hazard and would likely lead to significant damage/loss of vehicle and/or life and is categorized as a Crit 1 failure. These vessels were manufactured during the late 1970's and into the early 1980's using Titanium liners, Kevlar 49 fiber, epoxy matrix resin, and polyurethane coating. The COPVs are pressurized periodically to 3-5ksi and therefore experience significant strain in the composite overwrap. Similar composite vessels were developed in a variety of DOE Programs (primarily at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories or LLNL), as well as for NASA Space Shuttle Fleet Leader COPV program. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) formed an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team whose primary focus was to investigate whether or not enough composite life remained in the Shuttle COPV in order to provide a strategic rationale for continued COPV use aboard the Space Shuttle Fleet with the existing 25-year-old vessels. Several material science issues were examined and will be discussed in this presentation including morphological changes to Kevlar 49 fiber under stress, manufacturing changes in Kevlar 49 and their effect on morphology and tensile strength, epoxy resin strain, composite creep, degradation of polyurethane coatings, and Titanium yield characteristics.

  20. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and Containers, Other Than Ship's Equipment § 1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Portable, unfired pressure...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and Containers, Other Than Ship's Equipment § 1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Portable, unfired pressure...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and Containers, Other Than Ship's Equipment § 1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Portable, unfired pressure...

  4. Corrosion fatigue characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1982-12-01

    During routine operation, light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels are subjected to a variety of transients that result in time-varying stresses. Consequently, fatigue and environmentally-assisted fatigue are mechanisms of growth relevant to flaws in these pressure vessels. To provide a better understanding of the resistance of nuclear pressure vessel steels to these flaw growth processes, fracture mechanics data were generated on the rates of fatigue crack growth for SA508-2 and SA533B-1 steels in both room temperature air and 288/sup 0/C water. Areas investigated were: the relationship of crack growth rate to prior loading history; the effects of loading frequency andmore » R ratio (K/sub min//K/sub max/) on crack growth rate as a function of the stress intensity factor range (..delta..K); transient aspects of the fatigue crack growth behavior; the effect of material chemistry (sulphur content) on fatigue crack; and growth rate; water chemistry effects (high-purity water versus simulated pressurized water reactotr (PWR) primary coolant).« less

  5. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  6. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  7. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  8. Fractographic study of a thick wall pressure vessel failure

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, D.A.; Crouse, R.S.; Henson, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure vessel described in this paper is identified as Intermediate Test Vessel 1 (ITV-1) and was fabricated of SA508, Class 2 Steel. It was tested to failure at 54/sup 0/C (130/sup 0/F). The gross failure appeared to be a brittle fracture although accompanied by a measured strain of 0.9%. Seven regions of the fracture were examined in detail and the observed surfaces were compared to Charpy V-notch (C/sub v/) specimens of SA508, Class 2 steel broken at temperatures above and below the ductile to brittle transition temperature. Three samples from the vessel were taken in the region around themore » fatigue notch and four from areas well removed from the notch. All these were carefully examined both optically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was established that early crack extension was by ductile mode until a large flaw approximately 500 mm long 83 mm wide was developed. At this point the vessel could no longer contain the internal pressure and final rupture was by brittle fracture.« less

  9. Niobium Application, Metallurgy and Global Trends in Pressure Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansto, Steven G.

    Niobium-containing high strength steel materials have been developed for a variety of pressure vessel applications. Through the application of these Nb-bearing steels in demanding applications, the designer and end user experience improved toughness at low temperature, excellent fatigue resistance and fracture toughness and excellent weldability. These enhancements provide structural engineers the opportunity to further improve the pressure vessel design and performance. The Nb-microalloy alloy designs also result in reduced operational production cost at the steel operation, thereby embracing the value-added attribute Nb provides to both the producer and the end user throughout the supply chain. For example, through the adoption of these Nb-containing structural materials, several design-manufacturing companies are considering improved designs which offer improved manufacturability, lower overall cost and better life cycle performance.

  10. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  11. Glass Fiber Reinforced Metal Pressure Vessel Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Engineering Guide presents curves and general equations for safelife design of lightweight glass fiber reinforced (GFR) metal pressure vessels operating under anticipated Space Shuttle service conditions. The high composite vessel weight efficiency is shown to be relatively insensitive to shape, providing increased flexibility to designers establishing spacecraft configurations. Spheres, oblate speroids, and cylinders constructed of GFR Inconel X-750, 2219-T62 aluminum, and cryoformed 301 stainless steel are covered; design parameters and performance efficiencies for each configuration are compared at ambient and cryogenic temperature for an operating pressure range of 690 to 2760 N/sq cm (1000 to 4000 psi). Design variables are presented as a function of metal shell operating to sizing (proof) stress ratios for use with fracture mechanics data generated under a separate task of this program.

  12. Temperature and pressure influence on explosion pressures of closed vessel propane-air deflagrations.

    PubMed

    Razus, Domnina; Brinzea, Venera; Mitu, Maria; Oancea, Dumitru

    2010-02-15

    An experimental study on pressure evolution during closed vessel explosions of propane-air mixtures was performed, for systems with various initial concentrations and pressures ([C(3)H(8)]=2.50-6.20 vol.%, p(0)=0.3-1.2 bar). The explosion pressures and explosion times were measured in a spherical vessel (Phi=10 cm), at various initial temperatures (T(0)=298-423 K) and in a cylindrical vessel (Phi=10 cm; h=15 cm), at ambient initial temperature. The experimental values of explosion pressures are examined against literature values and compared to adiabatic explosion pressures, computed by assuming chemical equilibrium within the flame front. The influence of initial pressure, initial temperature and fuel concentration on explosion pressures and explosion times are discussed. At constant temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio, the explosion pressures are linear functions of total initial pressure, as reported for other fuel-air mixtures. At constant initial pressure and composition, both the measured and calculated (adiabatic) explosion pressures are linear functions of reciprocal value of initial temperature. Such correlations are extremely useful for predicting the explosion pressures of flammable mixtures at elevated temperatures and/or pressures, when direct measurements are not available.

  13. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  14. Terahertz NDE of Stressed Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels - Initial Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz radiation nondestructive evaluation was applied to a set of Kevlar composite overwrapped pressure vessel bottles that had undergone a series of thermal and pressure tests to simulate stress rupture effects. The bottles in these nondestructive evaluation tests were bottles that had not ruptured but had survived various times at the elevated load and temperature levels. Some of the bottles showed evidence of minor composite failures. The terahertz radiation did detect visible surface flaws, but did not detect any internal chemical or material degradation of the thin overwraps.

  15. A mathematical model for the stressed state analysis of cylindrical laminated-composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Roman; Matyja, Tomasz

    An algorithm and a computer program have been developed for calculating the strength of pressure vessels made of laminated composites. Numerical results for pressure vessels of Kevlar 49 laminates are compared with experimental data in the literature.

  16. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer shall...

  17. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. 50... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the marine...

  18. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  19. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  20. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  1. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  2. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  3. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  4. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  5. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  6. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  7. Jam proof closure assembly for lidded pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, Olisse C.

    1992-01-01

    An expendable closure assembly is provided for use (in multiple units) with a lockable pressure vessel cover along its rim, such as of an autoclave. This assembly is suited to variable compressive contact and locking with the vessel lid sealing gasket. The closure assembly consists of a thick walled sleeve insert for retention in the under bores fabricated in the cover periphery and the sleeve is provided with internal threading only. A snap serves as a retainer on the underside of the sleeve, locking it into an under bore retention channel. Finally, a standard elongate externally threaded bolt is sized for mating cooperation with the so positioned sleeve, whereby the location of the bolt shaft in the cover bore hole determines its compressive contact on the underlying gasket.

  8. Obesity, Blood Pressure, and Retinal Vessels: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Köchli, Sabrina; Endes, Katharina; Infanger, Denis; Zahner, Lukas; Hanssen, Henner

    2018-06-01

    Retinal vessel imaging is a noninvasive diagnostic tool used to evaluate cardiovascular risk. Childhood obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) are associated with retinal microvascular alterations. To systematically review and meta-analyze associations between obesity, BP, and physical activity with retinal vessel diameters in children. We conducted a literature search through the databases of PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. School- and population-based cross-sectional data. General information, study design, participants, exposure, and outcomes. A total of 1751 studies were found, and 30 full-text articles were analyzed for eligibility. Twenty-two articles (18 865 children and adolescents) were used for further assessment and reflection. Eleven articles were finally included in the meta-analysis. We found that a higher BMI is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar (pooled estimate effect size -0.37 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.50 to -0.24]) and wider venular diameters (0.35 [95% CI: 0.07 to 0.63]). Systolic and diastolic BP are associated with retinal arteriolar narrowing (systolic BP: -0.63 [95% CI: -0.92 to -0.34]; diastolic BP: -0.60 [95% CI -0.95 to -0.25]). Increased physical activity and fitness are associated with favorable retinal vessel diameters. Long-term studies are needed to substantiate the prognostic relevance of retinal vessel diameters for cardiovascular risk in children. Our results indicate that childhood obesity, BP, and physical inactivity are associated with retinal microvascular abnormalities. Retinal vessel diameters seem to be sensitive microvascular biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification in children. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  10. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Materials Aging Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning the aging of the materials in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The basic composition of the COPV is a Boss, a composite overwrap, and a metallic liner. The lifetime of a COPV is affected by the age of the overwrap, the cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner, and stress rupture life, a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. There is information about the coupon tests that were performed, and a test on a flight COPV.

  11. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  12. Burst pressure investigation of filament wound type IV composite pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhood, Naseer H.; Karuppanan, Saravanan; Ya, H. H.; Baharom, Mohamad Ariff

    2017-12-01

    Currently, composite pressure vessels (PVs) are employed in many industries such as aerospace, transportations, medical etc. Basically, the use of PVs in automotive application as a compressed natural gas (CNG) storage cylinder has been growing rapidly. Burst failure due to the laminate failure is the most critical failure mechanism for composite pressure vessels. It is predominantly caused by excessive internal pressure due to an overfilling or an overheating. In order to reduce fabrication difficulties and increase the structural efficiency, researches and studies are conducted continuously towards the proper selection of vessel design parameters. Hence, this paper is focused on the prediction of first ply failure pressure for such vessels utilizing finite element simulation based on Tsai-Wu and maximum stress failure criterions. The effects of laminate stacking sequence and orientation angle on the burst pressure were investigated in this work for a constant layered thickness PV. Two types of winding design, A [90°2/∓θ16/90°2] and B [90°2/∓θ]ns with different orientations of helical winding reinforcement were analyzed for carbon/epoxy composite material. It was found that laminate A sustained a maximum burst pressure of 55 MPa for a sequence of [90°2/∓15°16/90°2] while the laminate B returned a maximum burst pressure of 45 MPa corresponding to a stacking sequence of [90°2/±15°/90°2/±15°/90°2/±15° ....] up to 20 layers for a constant vessel thickness. For verification, a comparison was done with the literature under similar conditions of analysis and good agreement was achieved with a maximum difference of 4% and 10% for symmetrical and unsymmetrical layout, respectively.

  13. Improved fireman's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. A.; Morris, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prototype high pressure glass filament-wound, aluminum-lined pressurant vessels suitable for use in a fireman's compressed air breathing system were designed, fabricated, and acceptance tested in order to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such high performance, lightweight units. The 4000 psi tanks have a 60 standard cubic foot (SCF) air capacity, and have a 6.5 inch diamter, 19 inch length, 415 inch volume, weigh 13 pounds when empty, and contain 33 percent more air than the current 45 SCF (2250 psi) steel units. The current steel 60 SCF (3000 psi) tanks weigh approximately twice as much as the prototype when empty, and are 2 inches, or 10 percent shorter. The prototype units also have non-rusting aluminum interiors, which removes the hazard of corrosion, the need for internal coatings, and the possibility of rust particles clogging the breathing system.

  14. Fracture strength of flawed cylindrical pressure vessels under cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, T.; Sankarnarayanasamy, K.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2002-11-01

    Damage tolerant and fail-safe approaches have been employed increasingly in the design of critical engineering components. In these approaches, one has to assess the residual strength of a component with an assumed pre-existing crack. In other cases, cracks may be detected during service. Then, there is a need to evaluate the residual strength of the cracked components in order to decide whether they can be continued safely or repair and replacement are imperative. A three-parameter fracture criterion is applied to correlate the fracture data on aluminium, titanium and steel materials from test results on cylindrical tanks/pressure vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Fracture parameters to generate the failure assessment diagram are determined for the materials considered in the present study. Failure pressure estimates were found to be in good agreement with test results.

  15. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regardingmore » Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.« less

  16. Flux effect analysis in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Blagoeva, D.; Debarberis, L.

    2013-11-01

    The results of long term research programme concerning the determination of irradiation embrittlement dependence on fast neutron flux for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels before and after annealing are presented in this paper. The study of flux effect was carried out on commercial WWER-440 steels which differ significantly in phosphorous (0.013-0.036 wt%) and copper (0.08-0.20 wt%) contents. All specimens were irradiated in surveillance channel positions under similar conditions at high ˜4 × 1012 сm-2 s-1 and low ˜6 × 1011 сm-2 s-1 fluxes (E > 0.5 MeV) at a temperature of 270 °С. The radiation embrittlement was evaluated by transition temperature shift on the basis of Charpy specimens test results. In case of low flux, the measured Tk shifts could be 25-50 °C bigger than the Tk shifts obtained from high flux data. A significant flux effect is observed in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels with higher copper content (>0.13 wt%).

  17. Prediction of Composite Pressure Vessel Failure Location using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Steven T.; Taylor, F. Tad; Ortyl, Nicholas E.; Grant, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors in order to assess the strain levels of the vessel under various loading conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and present a possible methodology for predicting the failure location and strain level of composite pressure vessels.

  18. NASA Requirements for Ground-Based Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems (PVS). Revision C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to ensure the structural integrity of PVS through implementation of a minimum set of requirements for ground-based PVS in accordance with this document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 8710.5, NASA Safety Policy for Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements, applicable Federal Regulations, and national consensus codes and standards (NCS).

  19. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Wound Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt; Myers, George; Sharma, A.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. Incorporating these FBG sensors for monitoring the integrity of structures during their life cycle will provide valuable information about viability of the usage of such material. The use of these sensors by surface bonding or embedding in this composite will measure internal strain and temperature, and hence the integrity of the assembled engineering structures. This paper focuses on such a structure, called a composite wound pressure vessel. This vessel was fabricated from the composite material: TRH50 (a Mitsubishi carbon fiber with a 710-ksi tensile strength and a 37 Msi modulus) impregnated with an epoxy resin from NEWPORT composites (WDE-3D-1). This epoxy resin in water dispersed system without any solvents and it cures in the 240-310 degrees F range. This is a toughened resin system specifically designed for pressure applications. These materials are a natural fit for fiber sensors since the polyimide outer buffer coating of fiber can be integrated into the polymer matrix of the composite material with negligible residual stress. The tank was wound with two helical patterns and 4 hoop wraps. The order of winding is: two hoops, two helical and two hoops. The wall thickness of the composite should be about 80 mil or less. The tank should burst near 3,000 psi or less. We can measure the actual wall thickness by ultrasonic or we can burst the tank and measure the pieces. Figure 1 shows a cylinder fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composite material. The strain in different directions is measured with a surface bonded fiber Bragg gratings and with embedded fiber Bragg gratings as the cylinder is pressurized to burst pressures. Figure 2 shows the strain as a function of pressure of carbon-epoxy cylinder as it is pressurized with water. Strain is measured in different directions by multiple gratings

  20. Thin-metal lined PRD 49-III composite vessels. [evaluation of pressure vessels for burst strength and fatigue performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels of various configurations were evaluated for burst strength and fatigue performance. The dimensions and characteristics of the vessels are described. The types of tests conducted are explained. It was determined that all vessels leaked in a relatively few cycles (20 to 60 cycles) with failure occurring in all cases in the metallic liner. The thin liner would de-bond from the composite and buckling took place during depressurization. No composite failures or indications of impeding composite failures were obtained in the metal-lined vessels.

  1. Simply actuated closure for a pressure vessel - Design for use to trap deep-sea animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yayanos, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A pressure vessel is described that can be closed by a single translational motion within 1 sec. The vessel is a key component of a trap for small marine animals and operates automatically on the sea floor. As the vessel descends to the sea floor, it is subjected both internally and externally to the high pressures of the deep sea. The mechanism for closing the pressure vessel on the sea floor is activated by the timed release of the ballast which was used to sink the trap. As it rises to the sea surface, the internal pressure of the vessel remains near the value present on the sea floor. The pressure vessel has been used in simulated ocean deployments and in the deep ocean (9500 m) with a 75%-85% retention of the deep-sea pressure. Nearly 100% retention of pressure can be achieved by using an accumulator filled with a gas.

  2. Structural design, analysis, and code evaluation of an odd-shaped pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, M. A.; Ziada, H. H.

    1992-12-01

    An effort to design, analyze, and evaluate a rectangular pressure vessel is described. Normally pressure vessels are designed in circular or spherical shapes to prevent stress concentrations. In this case, because of operational limitations, the choice of vessels was limited to a rectangular pressure box with a removable cover plate. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code is used as a guideline for pressure containments whose width or depth exceeds 15.24 cm (6.0 in.) and where pressures will exceed 103.4 KPa (15.0 lbf/in(sup 2)). This evaluation used Section 8 of this Code, hereafter referred to as the Code. The dimensions and working pressure of the subject vessel fall within the pressure vessel category of the Code. The Code design guidelines and rules do not directly apply to this vessel. Therefore, finite-element methodology was used to analyze the pressure vessel, and the Code then was used in qualifying the vessel to be stamped to the Code. Section 8, Division 1 of the Code was used for evaluation. This action was justified by selecting a material for which fatigue damage would not be a concern. The stress analysis results were then checked against the Code, and the thicknesses adjusted to satisfy Code requirements. Although not directly applicable, the Code design formulas for rectangular vessels were also considered and presented.

  3. Techniques for Embedding Instrumentation in Pressure Vessel Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Many interesting structural and thermal events occur in materials that are housed within a surrounding pressure vessel. In order to measure the environment during these events and explore their causes instrumentation must be installed on or in the material. Transducers can be selected that are small enough to be embedded within the test material but these instruments must interface with an external system in order to apply excitation voltages and output the desired data. The methods for installing the instrumentation and creating an interface are complicated when the material is located in a case or housing containing high pressures and hot gases. Installation techniques for overcoming some of these difficulties were developed while testing a series of small-scale solid propellant and hybrid rocket motors at Marshall Space Flight Center. These techniques have potential applications in other test articles where data are acquired from materials that require containment due to the severe environment encountered during the test process. This severe environment could include high pressure, hot gases, or ionized atmospheres. The development of these techniques, problems encountered, and the lessons learned from the ongoing testing process are summarized.

  4. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  5. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  6. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 logmore » (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.« less

  7. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system's eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware. Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  8. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  9. Macrosegregation and Microstructural Evolution in a Pressure-Vessel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, E. J.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-06-01

    This work assesses the consequences of macrosegregation on microstructural evolution during solid-state transformations in a continuously cooled pressure-vessel steel (SA508 Grade 3). Stark spatial variations in microstructure are observed following a simulated quench from the austenitization temperature, which are found to deliver significant variations in hardness. Partial-transformation experiments are used to show the development of microstructure in segregated material. Evidence is presented which indicates the bulk microstructure is not one of upper bainite, as it has been described in the past, but one comprised of Widmanstätten ferrite and pockets of lower bainite. Segregation is observed on three different length scales, and the origins of each type are proposed. Suggestions are put forward for how the segregation might be minimized, and its detrimental effects suppressed by heat treatments.

  10. Continuous Cooling Transformations in Nuclear Pressure Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pous-Romero, Hector; Bhadeshia, Harry K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    A class of low-alloy steels often referred to as SA508 represent key materials for the manufacture of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The alloys have good properties, but the scatter in properties is of prime interest in safe design. Such scatter can arise from microstructural variations but most studies conclude that large components made from such steels are, following heat treatment, fully bainitic. In the present work, we demonstrate with the help of a variety of experimental techniques that the microstructures of three SA508 Gr.3 alloys are far from homogeneous when considered in the context of the cooling rates encountered in practice. In particular, allotriomorphic ferrite that is expected to lead to a deterioration in toughness, is found in the microstructure for realistic combinations of austenite grain size and the cooling rate combination. Parameters are established to identify the domains in which SA508 Gr.3 steels transform only into the fine bainitic microstructures.

  11. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures themore » effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.« less

  12. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  13. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  14. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  15. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  16. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The development of structurally efficient, metal-lined, glass-fiber composite pressure vessels. Both the current state-of-the-art and current problems are discussed along with fracture mechanics considerations for the metal liner. The design concepts used for metal-lined, glass-fiber, composite pressure vessels are described and the structural characteristics of the composite designs are compared with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. Results of a current program to evaluate flaw growth and fracture characteristics of the metal liners are reviewed and the impact of these results on composite pressure vessel designs is discussed.

  17. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with themore » very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that

  18. A Neural Network/Acoustic Emission Analysis of Impact Damaged Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Erik v. K.; Workman, Gary L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effects of impact damage on burst pressure in 5.75 inch diameter, inert propellant filled, filament wound pressure vessels. The AE data were collected from fifteen graphite/epoxy pressure vessels featuring five damage states and three resin systems. A burst pressure prediction model was developed by correlating the AE amplitude (frequency) distribution, generated during the first pressure ramp to 800 psig (approximately 25% of the average expected burst pressure for an undamaged vessel) to known burst pressures using a four layered back propagation neural network. The neural network, trained on three vessels from each resin system, was able to predict burst pressures with a worst case error of 5.7% for the entire fifteen bottle set.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Composite Pressure Vessel Performance and Joint Stiffness for Pyramid and Inverted Pyramid Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joseph M.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the suitability in the application of classical laminate theory analysis tools for filament wound pressure vessels with adhesive laminated joints in particular: pressure vessel wall performance, joint stiffness and failure prediction. Two 18-inch diameter 12-ply filament wound pressure vessels were fabricated. One vessel was fabricated with a 24-ply pyramid laminated adhesive double strap butt joint. The second vessel was fabricated with the same number of plies in an inverted pyramid joint. Results from hydrostatic tests are presented. Experimental results were used as input to the computer programs GENLAM and Laminate, and the output compared to test. By using the axial stress resultant, the classical laminate theory results show a correlation within 1% to the experimental results in predicting the pressure vessel wall pressure performance. The prediction of joint stiffness for the two adhesive joints in the axial direction is within 1% of the experimental results. The calculated hoop direction joint stress resultant is 25% less than the measured resultant for both joint configurations. A correction factor is derived and used in the joint analysis. The correction factor is derived from the hoop stress resultant from the tank wall performance investigation. The vessel with the pyramid joint is determined to have failed in the joint area at a hydrostatic pressure 33% value below predicted failure. The vessel with the inverted pyramid joint failed in the wall acreage at a hydrostatic pressure within 10% of the actual failure pressure.

  20. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels...

  1. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section 109.421 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessel...

  2. Study on Material Selection of Reactor Pressure Vessel of SCWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuli; Luo, Ying; Yin, Qinwei; Li, Changxiang; Xie, Guofu

    This paper first analyzes the feasibility of SA-508 Grade 3 Class 1 Steel as an alternative material for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This kind of steel is limited to be applied in SCWR RPV due to its quenching property, though large forging could be accomplished by domestic manufacturers in forging aspect. Therefore, steels with higher strength and better quenching property are needed for SWCR RPV. The chemical component of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel is similar to that of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.1 steel, and more appropriate matching of strength and toughness could be achieved by the adjusting the elements contents, as well as proper control of tempering temperature and time. In light of the fact that Cl.2 steel has been successfully applied to steam generator, it could be an alternative material for SWCR RPV. SA-508 Gr.4N steel with high strength and good toughness is another alternative material for SCWR RPV. But large amount of research work before application is still needed for the lack of data on welding and irradiation etc.

  3. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperaturemore » (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  4. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis which is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the NRC for evaluation of the integrity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. It is anticipated that there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code which is accepted by the NRC and utilities, as more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracturemore » Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) PTS PFM code, which is intended to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as PFM global modeling methodology, the capability to approximate the effects of thermal streaming on circumferential flaws located inside a plume region created by fluid and thermal stratification, a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an adequate range of two and three dimensional inside surface flaws, the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports, and user friendliness.« less

  5. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis which is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the NRC for evaluation of the integrity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. It is anticipated that there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code which is accepted by the NRC and utilities, as more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracturemore » Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) PTS PFM code, which is intended to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as PFM global modeling methodology, the capability to approximate the effects of thermal streaming on circumferential flaws located inside a plume region created by fluid and thermal stratification, a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an adequate range of two and three dimensional inside surface flaws, the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports, and user friendliness.« less

  6. Some Observations on Damage Tolerance Analyses in Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Dawicke, David S.; Hampton, Roy W.

    2017-01-01

    AIAA standards S080 and S081 are applicable for certification of metallic pressure vessels (PV) and composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPV), respectively. These standards require damage tolerance analyses with a minimum reliable detectible flaw/crack and demonstration of safe life four times the service life with these cracks at the worst-case location in the PVs and oriented perpendicular to the maximum principal tensile stress. The standards require consideration of semi-elliptical surface cracks in the range of aspect ratios (crack depth a to half of the surface length c, i.e., (a/c) of 0.2 to 1). NASA-STD-5009 provides the minimum reliably detectible standard crack sizes (90/95 probability of detection (POD) for several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods (eddy current (ET), penetrant (PT), radiography (RT) and ultrasonic (UT)) for the two limits of the aspect ratio range required by the AIAA standards. This paper tries to answer the questions: can the safe life analysis consider only the life for the crack sizes at the two required limits, or endpoints, of the (a/c) range for the NDE method used or does the analysis need to consider values within that range? What would be an appropriate method to interpolate 90/95 POD crack sizes at intermediate (a/c) values? Several procedures to develop combinations of a and c within the specified range are explored. A simple linear relationship between a and c is chosen to compare the effects of seven different approaches to determine combinations of aj and cj that are between the (a/c) endpoints. Two of the seven are selected for evaluation: Approach I, the simple linear relationship, and a more conservative option, Approach III. For each of these two Approaches, the lives are computed for initial semi-elliptic crack configurations in a plate subjected to remote tensile fatigue loading with an R-ratio of 0.1, for an assumed material evaluated using NASGRO (registered 4) version 8.1. These calculations demonstrate

  7. Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture Analysis Capabilities in Grizzly

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Chakraborty, Pritam

    2015-03-01

    Efforts have been underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Development in prior years has resulted a capability to calculate -integrals. For this application, these are used to calculate stress intensity factors for cracks to be used in deterministic linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) assessments of fracture in degraded RPVs. The -integral can only be used to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws because it can only be used to obtain the stress intensity factor for pure Mode Imore » loading. Off-axis flaws will be subjected to mixed-mode loading. For this reason, work has continued to expand the set of fracture mechanics capabilities to permit it to evaluate off-axis flaws. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture mechanics capabilities for RPVs: • Interaction Integral and -stress: To obtain mixed-mode stress intensity factors, a capability to evaluate interaction integrals for 2D or 3D flaws has been developed. A -stress evaluation capability has been developed to evaluate the constraint at crack tips in 2D or 3D. Initial verification testing of these capabilities is documented here. • Benchmarking for axis-aligned flaws: Grizzly’s capabilities to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws have been benchmarked against calculations for the same conditions in FAVOR. • Off-axis flaw demonstration: The newly-developed interaction integral capabilities are demon- strated in an application to calculate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for off-axis flaws. • Other code enhancements: Other enhancements to the thermomechanics capabilities that relate to the solution of the engineering RPV fracture problem are documented here.« less

  8. Pressure vessel fracture, fatigue, and life management: PVP-Volume 233

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, S.; Milella, P.P.; Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on the effects of aging. The papers are organized in the following five areas: (1) pressure vessel life management; (2) fracture characterization using local and dual-parameter approaches; (3) stratification and thermal fatigue; (4) creep, fatigue, and fracture; and (5) integrated approach to integrity assessment of pressure components. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 papers in this conference.

  9. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along with applications to pressure vessel experiments.

  10. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  11. Non-invasive method and apparatus for measuring pressure within a pliable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A non-invasive method and apparatus is disclosed for measuring pressure within a pliable vessel such as a blood vessel. The blood vessel is clamped by means of a clamping structure having a first portion housing a pressure sensor and a second portion extending over the remote side of the blood vessel for pressing the blood vessel into engagement with the pressure sensing device. The pressure sensing device includes a flat deflectable diaphragm portion arranged to engage a portion of the blood vessel flattened against the diaphragm by means of the clamp structure. In one embodiment, the clamp structure includes first and second semicylindrical members held together by retaining rings. In a second embodiment the clamp structure is of one piece construction having a solid semicylindrical portion and a hollow semicylindrical portion with a longitudinal slot in the follow semicylindrical portion through which a slip the blood vessel. In a third embodiment, an elastic strap is employed for clamping the blood vessel against the pressure sensing device.

  12. Structural Integrity of Gas-Filled Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Subjected to Orbital Debris Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telichev, Igor; Cherniaev, Aleksandr

    Gas-filled pressure vessels are extensively used in spacecraft onboard systems. During operation on the orbit they exposed to the space debris environment. Due to high energies they contain, pressure vessels have been recognized as the most critical spacecraft components requiring protection from orbital debris impact. Major type of pressurized containers currently used in spacecraft onboard systems is composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) manufactured by filament winding. In the present work we analyze the structural integrity of vessels of this kind in case of orbital debris impact at velocities ranging from 2 to 10 km/s. Influence of such parameters as projectile energy, shielding standoff, internal pressure and filament winding pattern on COPVs structural integrity has been investigated by means of numerical and physical experiments.

  13. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  14. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  15. Designing of a Fleet-Leader Program for Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L.N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases on board spacecraft when mass saving is a prime requirement. Substantial weight savings can be achieved compared to all metallic pressure vessels. For example, on the space shuttle, replacement of all metallic pressure vessels with Kevlar COPVs resulted in a weight savings of about 30 percent. Mass critical space applications such as the Ares and Orion vehicles are currently being planned to use as many COPVs as possible in place of all-metallic pressure vessels to minimize the overall mass of the vehicle. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads during long periods of a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is, therefore, important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since it is practically impossible to show by experimental testing the reliability of flight quality vessels. Also, it is a common practice to set aside flight quality vessels as "fleet leaders" in a test program where these vessels are subjected to slightly accelerated operating conditions so that they lead the actual flight vessels both in time and load. The intention of fleet leaders is to provide advanced warning if there is a serious design flaw in the vessels so that a major disaster in the flight vessels can be averted with advance warning. On the other hand, the accelerating conditions must be not so severe as to be prone to false alarms. The primary focus of the present paper is to provide an analytical basis for designing a viable fleet leader program for carbon COPVs. The analysis is based on a stress rupture behavior model incorporating Weibull statistics and power-law sensitivity of life to fiber stress level.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.

    2010-04-13

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPamore » (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.« less

  17. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  18. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0070] Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft..., ``Updated Aging Management Criteria for PWR Reactor Vessel Internal Components.'' This draft LR-ISG revises...

  19. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0070] Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft...-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-04, ``Updated Aging Management Criteria for PWR Reactor Vessel Internal Components...

  20. Pressure vessels fabricated with high-strength wire and electroformed nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, B.

    1966-01-01

    Metal pressure vessels of various shapes having high strength-to-weight ratios are fabricated by using known techniques of filament winding and electroforming. This eliminates nonuniform wall thickness and unequal wall strength which resulted from welding formed vessel segments together.

  1. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1963. They shall be subjected to a hydrostatic pressure test of one and one-half times the working... quarterly by a competent person. They shall be subjected yearly to a hydrostatic pressure test of one and... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels...

  2. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  3. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  4. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Updated January 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skow, Miles G.

    2014-01-01

    This three year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap.

  5. Structural design and stress analysis program for advanced composite filament-wound axisymmetric pressure vessels (COMTANK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program has been specifically developed to handle, in an efficient and cost effective manner, planar wound pressure vessels fabricated of either boron-epoxy or graphite-epoxy advanced composite materials.

  6. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure... (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, insofar as they relate to tests and inspection of cargo vessels...

  7. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure... (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, insofar as they relate to tests and inspection of cargo vessels...

  8. Workbook for predicting pressure wave and fragment effects of exploding propellant tanks and gas storage vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Kulesz, J. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Bessey, R. L.; Westine, P. S.; Parr, V. B.; Oldham, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Technology needed to predict damage and hazards from explosions of propellant tanks and bursts of pressure vessels, both near and far from these explosions is introduced. Data are summarized in graphs, tables, and nomographs.

  9. Adaptation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels to prolonged changes in transmural pressure.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Nguyen, T L; Quick, C M; Hardy, J; Laine, G A; Wilson, E; Stewart, R H

    2013-07-15

    In vitro studies have revealed that acute increases in transmural pressure increase lymphatic vessel contractile function. However, adaptive responses to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo have not been reported. Therefore, we developed a novel bovine mesenteric lymphatic partial constriction model to test the hypothesis that lymphatic vessels exposed to higher transmural pressures adapt functionally to become stronger pumps than vessels exposed to lower transmural pressures. Postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels were partially constricted for 3 days. On postoperative day 3, constricted vessels were isolated, and divided into upstream (UP) and downstream (DN) segment groups, and instrumented in an isolated bath. Although there were no differences between the passive diameters of the two groups, both diastolic diameter and systolic diameter were significantly larger in the UP group than in the DN group. The pump index of the UP group was also higher than that in the DN group. In conclusion, this is the first work to report how lymphatic vessels adapt to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo. Our results suggest that vessel segments upstream of the constriction adapt to become both better fluid conduits and lymphatic pumps than downstream segments.

  10. Analysis and Design of Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for Automotive Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco Javier

    Cryogenic pressure vessels maximize hydrogen storage density by combining the high pressure (350-700 bar) typical of today's composite pressure vessels with the cryogenic temperature (as low as 25 K) typical of low pressure liquid hydrogen vessels. Cryogenic pressure vessels comprise a high-pressure inner vessel made of carbon fiber-coated metal (similar to those used for storage of compressed gas), a vacuum space filled with numerous sheets of highly reflective metalized plastic (for high performance thermal insulation), and a metallic outer jacket. High density of hydrogen storage is key to practical hydrogen-fueled transportation by enabling (1) long-range (500+ km) transportation with high capacity vessels that fit within available spaces in the vehicle, and (2) reduced cost per kilogram of hydrogen stored through reduced need for expensive structural material (carbon fiber composite) necessary to make the vessel. Low temperature of storage also leads to reduced expansion energy (by an order of magnitude or more vs. ambient temperature compressed gas storage), potentially providing important safety advantages. All this is accomplished while simultaneously avoiding fuel venting typical of cryogenic vessels for all practical use scenarios. This dissertation describes the work necessary for developing and demonstrating successive generations of cryogenic pressure vessels demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The work included (1) conceptual design, (2) detailed system design (3) structural analysis of cryogenic pressure vessels, (4) thermal analysis of heat transfer through cryogenic supports and vacuum multilayer insulation, and (5) experimental demonstration. Aside from succeeding in demonstrating a hydrogen storage approach that has established all the world records for hydrogen storage on vehicles (longest driving range, maximum hydrogen storage density, and maximum containment of cryogenic hydrogen without venting), the work also

  11. Development of a Numerical Model of Hypervelocity Impact into a Pressurized Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M. A.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    As the outlook for space exploration becomes more ambitious and spacecraft travel deeper into space than ever before, it is increasingly important that propulsion systems perform reliably within the space environment. The increased reliability compels designers to increase design margin at the expense of system mass, which contrasts with the need to limit vehicle mass to maximize payload. Such are the factors that motivate the integration of high specific strength composite materials in the construction of pressure vessels commonly referred to as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV). The COPV consists of a metallic liner for the inner shell of the COPV that is stiff, negates fluid permeation and serves as the anchor for composite laminates or filaments, but the liner itself cannot contain the stresses from the pressurant it contains. The compo-site-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is wound around the liner using a combination of hoop (circumferential) and helical orientations. Careful consideration of wrap orientation allows the composite to evenly bear structural loading and creates the COPV's characteristic high strength to weight ratio. As the CFRP overwrap carries most of the stresses induced by pressurization, damage to the overwrap can affect mission duration, mission success and potentially cause loss-of-vehicle/loss-of-crew. For this reason, it is critical to establish a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the failure of a stressed composite such as that of the COPV. One of the greatest external threats to the integrity of a spacecraft's COPV is an impact from the meteoroid and orbital debris environments (MMOD). These impacts, even from submillimeter particles, generate extremely high stress states in the CFRP that can damage numerous fibers. As a result of this possibility, initial assumptions in survivability analysis for some human-rated NASA space-craft have assumed that any alteration of the vessel due to impact is

  12. Constriction of isolated collecting lymphatic vessels in response to acute increases in downstream pressure

    PubMed Central

    Scallan, Joshua P; Wolpers, John H; Davis, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Collecting lymphatic vessels generate pressure to transport lymph downstream to the subclavian vein against a significant pressure head. To investigate their response to elevated downstream pressure, collecting lymphatic vessels containing one valve (incomplete lymphangion) or two valves (complete lymphangion) were isolated from the rat mesentery and tied to glass cannulae capable of independent pressure control. Downstream pressure was selectively raised to various levels, either stepwise or ramp-wise, while keeping upstream pressure constant. Diameter and valve positions were tracked under video microscopy, while intralymphangion pressure was measured concurrently with a servo-null micropipette. Surprisingly, a potent lymphatic constriction occurred in response to the downstream pressure gradient due to (1) a pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and (2) a frequency-dependent decrease in diastolic diameter. The myogenic index of the lymphatic constriction (−3.3 ± 0.6, in mmHg) was greater than that of arterioles or collecting lymphatic vessels exposed to uniform increases in pressure (i.e. upstream and downstream pressures raised together). Additionally, the constriction was transmitted to the upstream lymphatic vessel segment even though it was protected from changes in pressure by a closed intraluminal valve; the conducted constriction was blocked by loading only the pressurized half of the vessel with either ML-7 (0.5 mm) to block contraction, or cromakalim (3 μm) to hyperpolarize the downstream muscle layer. Finally, we provide evidence that the lymphatic constriction is important to maintain normal intraluminal valve closure during each contraction cycle in the face of an adverse pressure gradient, which probably protects the lymphatic capillaries from lymph backflow. PMID:23045335

  13. Mechanical Behavior of A Metal Composite Vessels Under Pressure At Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaplin, A. I.; Bochkarev, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into the deformation and destruction of a metal composite vessel with a cryogenic gas are presented. Its structure is based on basalt, carbon, and organic fibers. The vessel proved to be serviceable at cryogenic temperatures up to a burst pressure of 45 MPa, and its destruction was without fragmentation. A mathematical model adequately describing the rise of pressure in the cryogenic vessel due to the formation of a gaseous phase upon boiling of the liquefied natural gas during its storage without drainage at the initial stage is proposed.

  14. Pressure Vessel with Impact and Fire Resistant Coating and Method of Making Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An impact and fire resistant coating laminate is provided which serves as an outer protective coating for a pressure vessel such as a composite overwrapped vessel with a metal lining. The laminate comprises a plurality of fibers (e.g., jute twine or other, stronger fibers) which are wound around the pressure vessel and an epoxy matrix resin for the fibers. The epoxy matrix resin including a plurality of microspheres containing a temperature responsive phase change material which changes phase in response to exposure thereof to a predetermined temperature increase so as to afford increased insulation and hear absorption.

  15. Pressure vessel with impact and fire resistant coating and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An impact and fire resistant coating laminate is provided which serves as an outer protective coating for a pressure vessel such as a composite overwrapped vessel with a metal lining. The laminate comprises a plurality of fibers (e.g., jute twine or other, stronger fibers) which are wound around the pressure vessel and an epoxy matrix resin for the fibers. The epoxy matrix resin including a plurality of microspheres containing a temperature responsive phase change material which changes phase in response to exposure thereof to a predetermined temperature increase so as to afford increased insulation and heat absorption.

  16. Predicting Structural Behavior of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessel Using Three Dimensional Shell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi, M.; Venkat, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials with their higher specific strength, moduli and tailorability characteristics will result in reduction of weight of the structure. The composite pressure vessels with integrated end domes develop hoop stresses that are twice longitudinal stresses and when isotropic materials like metals are used for development of the hardware and the material is not fully utilized in the longitudinal/meridional direction resulting in over weight components. The determination of a proper winding angles and thickness is very important to decrease manufacturing difficulties and to increase structural efficiency. In the present study a methodology is developed to understand structural characteristics of filament wound pressure vessels with integrated end domes. Progressive ply wise failure analysis of composite pressure vessel with geodesic end domes is carried out to determine matrix crack failure, burst pressure values at various positions of the shell. A three dimensional finite element analysis is computed to predict the deformations and stresses in the composite pressure vessel. The proposed method could save the time to design filament wound structures, to check whether the ply design is safe for the given input conditions and also can be adapted to non-geodesic structures. The results can be utilized to understand structural characteristics of filament wound pressure vessels with integrated end domes. This approach can be adopted for various applications like solid rocket motor casings, automobile fuel storage tanks and chemical storage tanks. Based on the predictions a composite pressure vessel is designed and developed. Hydraulic test is performed on the composite pressure vessel till the burst pressure.

  17. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This reportmore » serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.« less

  18. Guide for inservice inspection of ground-based pressure vessels and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This guide includes recommendations for inservice inspection and recertification of ground based, unfired pressure vessels and all pressurized systems including those served by fired pressure vessels hereinafter referred to as pressure vessels, systems and components of systems. It covers the vast array of pound based industrial and special purpose pressurized components and systems used at NASA field installations for research and development and those utility systems and components that require more than routine maintenance to insure continued structural integrity for their useful life. Through surveillance and correction of inservice deterioration, NASA will maintain a safe working environment for their own and contractor personnel, safety for the public sector and protection against loss of capital investment.

  19. Reliability of Space-Shuttle Pressure Vessels with Random Batch Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Kulkarni, Pandurang M.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we revisit the problem of estimating the joint reliability against failure by stress rupture of a group of fiber-wrapped pressure vessels used on Space-Shuttle missions. The available test data were obtained from an experiment conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in which scaled-down vessels were subjected to life testing at four accelerated levels of pressure. We estimate the reliability assuming that both the Shuttle and LLL vessels were chosen at random in a two-stage process from an infinite population with spools of fiber as the primary sampling unit. Two main objectives of this work are: (1) to obtain practical estimates of reliability taking into account random spool effects and (2) to obtain a realistic assessment of estimation accuracy under the random model. Here, reliability is calculated in terms of a 'system' of 22 fiber-wrapped pressure vessels, taking into account typical pressures and exposure times experienced by Shuttle vessels. Comparisons are made with previous studies. The main conclusion of this study is that, although point estimates of reliability are still in the 'comfort zone,' it is advisable to plan for replacement of the pressure vessels well before the expected Lifetime of 100 missions per Shuttle Orbiter. Under a random-spool model, there is simply not enough information in the LLL data to provide reasonable assurance that such replacement would not be necessary.

  20. Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) Concept that Enables Mass Efficient Packageable Pressure Vessels with Sealable Openings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Jones, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.; Moore, David F.; Watson, Judith J.; Warren, Jerry E.; Makino, Alberto; Yount, Bryan; Selig, Molly; Shariff, Khadijah; hide

    2016-01-01

    Achieving minimal launch volume and mass are always important for space missions, especially for deep space manned missions where the costs required to transport mass to the destination are high and volume in the payload shroud is limited. Pressure vessels are used for many purposes in space missions including habitats, airlocks, and tank farms for fuel or processed resources. A lucrative approach to minimize launch volume is to construct the pressure vessels from soft goods so that they can be compactly packaged for launch and then inflated en route or at the final destination. In addition, there is the potential to reduce system mass because the packaged pressure vessels are inherently robust to launch loads and do not need to be modified from their in-service configuration to survive the launch environment. A novel concept is presented herein, in which sealable openings or hatches into the pressure vessels can also be fabricated from soft goods. To accomplish this, the structural shape is designed to have large regions where one principal stress is near zero. The pressure vessel is also required to have an elongated geometry for applications such as airlocks.

  1. Review Of Piping And Pressure Vessel Code Design Criteria. Technical Report 217.

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1969-04-18

    This Technical Report summarizes a review of the design philosophies and criteria of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the USASI Code for Pressure Piping. It traces the history of the Codes since their inception and critically reviews their present status. Recommendations are made concerning the applicability of the Codes to the special needs of LMFBR liquid sodium piping.

  2. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172 Section 1915.172 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Portable, Unfired Pressure...

  3. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  4. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  5. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  6. Variabilities detected by acoustic emission from filament-wound Aramid fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty Aramid fiber/epoxy pressure vessels were filament-wound over spherical aluminum mandrels under controlled conditions typical for advanced filament-winding. A random set of 30 vessels was proof-tested to 74% of the expected burst pressure; acoustic emission data were obtained during the proof test. A specially designed fixture was used to permit in situ calibration of the acoustic emission system for each vessel by the fracture of a 4-mm length of pencil lead (0.3 mm in diameter) which was in contact with the vessel. Acoustic emission signatures obtained during testing showed larger than expected variabilities in the mechanical damage done during the proof tests. To date, identification of the cause of these variabilities has not been determined.

  7. Using the adaptive SMA composite cylinder concept to reduce radial dilation in composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1995-05-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the design of pressurized gas and fluid vessels for applications ranging from underground gasoline storage tanks to rocket motors for the space shuttle. In the design of a high pressure composite vessel (Pi > 12 Ksi), thick-wall (R/h < 15) vessels are required. For efficient material use in composite material vessels, the radial dilation (expansion or swelling) of the composite vessel can often approach values nearing 2 percent of the diameter. Over long periods of internal pressure loading over elevated temperatures, composite material cylinders may also experience substantial creep. The short term dilation and long term creep are not problematic for applications requiring only the containment of the pressurized fluid. In applications where metallic liners are required, however, substantial dilation and creep causes plastic yielding which leads to reduced fatigue life. To applications such as a hydraulic accumulator, where a piston is employed to fit and seal the fluid in the composite cylinder, the dilation and creep may allow leakage and pressure loss around the piston. A concept called the adaptive composite cylinder is experimentally presented. Shape memory alloy wire in epoxy resin is wrapped around or within polymer matrix composite cylinders to reduce radial dilation of the cylinder. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ability of the SMA wire layers to reduce radial dilation. Results from experimental testing of the recovery stress fatigue response of nitinol shape memory alloy wires is also presented.

  8. Influence and Modeling of Residual Stresses in Thick Walled Pressure Vessels with Through Holes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    9 FIGURE 4 ENVIRONMENTAL CRACKING OBSERVED IN EVACUATOR HOLE .......... 9 FIGURE 5 STRESSES PRESENT IN STRAIGHT EVACUATOR... ASSESMENT OF INITIAL DAMAGE Through investigation was undertaken on vessels similar in size and strength level to pressure vessels 85A and 85B...suggesting that the source of the residual stresses required to initiate and propagate these environmental cracks is not a resultant of the typical

  9. Simple method for forming thin-wall pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, A. L.; Guist, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Application of internal hydrostatic pressure to seam-welded circular cylindrical tanks having corner-welded, flat, circular ends forms large thin-walled high quality tanks. Form limits expansion of cylindrical portion of final tank while hemispherical ends develop freely; no external form or restraint is required to fabricate spherical tanks.

  10. Pressure vessel with improved impact resistance and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor); Patterson, James E. (Inventor); Olson, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A composite overwrapped pressure vessel is provided which includes a composite overwrapping material including fibers disposed in a resin matrix. At least first and second kinds of fibers are used. These fibers typically have characteristics of high strength and high toughness to provide impact resistance with increased pressure handling capability and low weight. The fibers are applied to form a pressure vessel using wrapping or winding techniques with winding angles varied for specific performance characteristics. The fibers of different kinds are dispersed in a single layer of winding or wound in distinct separate layers. Layers of fabric comprised of such fibers are interspersed between windings for added strength or impact resistance. The weight percentages of the high toughness and high strength materials are varied to provide specified impact resistance characteristics. The resin matrix is formed with prepregnated fibers or through wet winding. The vessels are formed with or without liners.

  11. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  12. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  13. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  14. Design of Semi-composite Pressure Vessel using Fuzzy and FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabour, Mohammad H.; Foghani, Mohammad F.

    2010-04-01

    The present study attempts to present a new method to design a semi-composite pressure vessel (known as hoop-wrapped composite cylinder) using fuzzy decision making and finite element method. A metal-composite vessel was designed based on ISO criteria and then the weight of the vessel was optimized for various fibers of carbon, glass and Kevlar in the cylindrical vessel. Failure criteria of von-Mises and Hoffman were respectively employed for the steel liner and the composite reinforcement to characterize the yielding/ buckling of the cylindrical pressure vessel. The fuzzy decision maker was used to estimate the thickness of the steel liner and the number of composite layers. The ratio of stresses on the composite fibers and the working pressure as well as the ratio of stresses on the composite fibers and the burst (failure) pressure were assessed. ANSYS nonlinear finite element solver was used to analyze the residual stress in the steel liner induced due to an auto-frettage process. Result of analysis verified that carbon fibers are the most suitable reinforcement to increase strength of cylinder while the weight stayed appreciably low.

  15. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick; Skow, Miles

    2013-01-01

    This three-year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap. The sensors are being tested at White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) where the results will be correlated with a known nondestructive technique acoustic emission. The gages will be produced utilizing Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM) and/or MWM array eddy current technology. The ultimate goal is to utilize this technology for the health monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for all future flight programs. The first full-scale pressurization test was performed at WSTF in June 2012. The goals of this test were to determine adaptations of the magnetic stress gauge instrumentation that would be necessary to allow multiple sensors to monitor the vessel's condition simultaneously and to determine how the sensor response changes with sensor selection and orientation. The second full scale pressurization test was performed at WSTF in August 2012. The goals of this test were to monitor the vessel's condition with multiple sensors simultaneously, to determine the viability of the multiplexing units (MUX) for the application, and to determine if the sensor responses in different orientations are repeatable. For both sets of tests the vessel was pressured up to 6,000 psi to simulate maximum operating pressure. Acoustic events were observed during the first pressurization cycle. This suggested that the extended storage period prior to use of this bottle led to a relaxation of the residual stresses imparted during auto-frettage. The pressurization tests successfully demonstrated the use of multiplexers with multiple MWM arrays to monitor a vessel. It was discovered that depending upon the sensor orientation, the frequencies, and the sense element, the MWM arrays can provide a variety of complementary information about the composite overwrapped pressure

  16. Motor-driven screwing and transporting tool for reactor pressure vessel head retaining fastenings

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, M.

    1977-09-13

    The invention concerns a motor-driven screwing and transporting tool for tightening or loosening the threaded studs and associated tightening nuts of the head bolting of pressure vessels. After the tightening nuts are loosened or before they are tightened, the weight of the studs is taken over by rotating bearings that can be lifted, so that the studs with their tightening nuts can be screwed in or out, the screw threads of the studs being thus weight-relieved. The invention is intended primarily for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. 21 claims, 6 figures.

  17. New Developments in Nickel-Hydrogen Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, Chris L.; Miller, Lee E.

    1997-01-01

    THe Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) design is being developed as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced part count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risk.

  18. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs) . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  19. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  20. Performance features of 22-cell, 19Ah single pressure vessel nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1996-01-01

    Two 22-cells 19Ah Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Single Pressure Vessel (SPV) Qual batteries, one each from EPI/Joplin and EPI/Butler, were designed and procured. The two batteries differ in the cell encapsulation technology, stack preload, and activation procedure. Both the Butler and Joplin batteries met the specified requirements when subjected to qualification testing and completed 2100 and 1300 LEO cycles respectively, with nominal performance. This paper discusses advantages, design features, testing procedures, and results of the two single pressure vessel Ni-H2 batteries.

  1. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as

  2. Ten year environmental test of glass fiber/epoxy pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    By the beginning of the 1970's composite pressure vessels had received a significant amount of development effort, and applications were beginning to be investigated. One of the first applications grew out of NASA Johnson Space Center efforts to develop a superior emergency breathing system for firemen. While the new breathing system provided improved wearer comfort and an improved mask and regulator, the primary feature was low weight which was achieved by using a glass fiber reinforced aluminum pressure vessel. Part of the development effort was to evaluate the long term performance of the pressure vessel and as a consequence, some 30 bottles for a test program were procured. These bottles were then provided to NASA Lewis Research Center where they were maintained in an outdoor environment in a pressurized condition for a period of up to 10 yr. During this period, bottles were periodically subjected to cyclic and burst testing. There was no protective coating applied to the fiberglass/epoxy composite, and significant loss in strength did occur as a result of the environment. Similar bottles stored indoors showed little, if any, degradation. This report contains a description of the pressure vessels, a discussion of the test program, data for each bottle, and appropriate plots, comparisons, and conclusions.

  3. Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Newhouse, Norman L.

    2016-04-29

    Hexagon Lincoln started this DOE project as part of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) contract on 1 February 2009. The purpose of the HSECoE was the research and development of viable material based hydrogen storage systems for on-board vehicular applications to meet DOE performance and cost targets. A baseline design was established in Phase 1. Studies were then conducted to evaluate potential improvements, such as alternate fiber, resin, and boss materials. The most promising concepts were selected such that potential improvements, compared with the baseline Hexagon Lincoln tank, resulted in a projected weight reduction of 11 percent,more » volume increase of 4 percent, and cost reduction of 10 percent. The baseline design was updated in Phase 2 to reflect design improvements and changes in operating conditions specified by HSECoE Partners. Evaluation of potential improvements continued during Phase 2. Subscale prototype cylinders were designed and fabricated for HSECoE Partners’ use in demonstrating their components and systems. Risk mitigation studies were conducted in Phase 3 that focused on damage tolerance of the composite reinforcement. Updated subscale prototype cylinders were designed and manufactured to better address the HSECoE Partners’ requirements for system demonstration. Subscale Type 1, Type 3, and Type 4 tanks were designed, fabricated and tested. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate vacuum insulated systems for cooling the tanks during fill, and maintaining low temperatures during service. Full scale designs were prepared based on results from the studies of this program. The operating conditions that developed during the program addressed adsorbent systems operating at cold temperatures. A Type 4 tank would provide the lowest cost and lightest weight, particularly at higher pressures, as long as issues with liner compatibility and damage tolerance could be resolved. A Type 1 tank might be the choice if

  4. A rigid disc for protection of exposed blood vessels during negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Anesäter, Erik; Borgquist, Ola; Torbrand, Christian; Roupé, K Markus; Ingemansson, Richard; Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin

    2013-02-01

    There are increasing reports of serious complications and deaths associated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Bleeding may occur when NPWT is applied to a wound with exposed blood vessels. Inserting a rigid disc in the wound may protect these structures. The authors examined the effects of rigid discs on wound bed tissue pressure and blood flow through a large blood vessel in the wound bed during NPWT. Wounds were created over the femoral artery in the groin of 8 pigs. Rigid discs were inserted. Wound bed pressures and arterial blood flow were measured during NPWT. Pressure transduction to the wound bed was similar for control wounds and wounds with discs. Blood flow through the femoral artery decreased in control wounds. When a disc was inserted, the blood flow was restored. NPWT causes hypoperfusion in the wound bed tissue, presumably as a result of mechanical deformation. The insertion of a rigid barrier alleviates this effect and restores blood flow.

  5. An automated program for reinforcement requirements for openings in cylindrical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. F.; Taylor, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    An automated interactive program for calculating the reinforcement requirements for openings in cylindrical pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure is described. The program is written for an electronic desk top calculator. The program calculates the required area of reinforcement for a given opening and compares this value with the area of reinforcement provided by a proposed design. All program steps, operating instructions, and example problems with input and sample output are documented.

  6. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng; Han, Huai-Yue

    1994-03-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCr13Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. Such joints are important parts in, e.g. the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This kind of joint requires both good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and a stable magnetic permeability besides good weldability. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. The results of various tests indicated that the quality of the tube/tube joints is satisfactory for meeting all the design requirements.

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Shuttle Transportation System Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for Stress Rupture Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Carillo, Marlene; Thesken, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing stress rupture testing on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose for Testing; 2) NASA WSTF COPV Test Program; 3) NASA WSTF Test Facilities; 4) COPV Impact Study; 5) Fluids Compatibility Testing; 6) Stress Rupture Testing; and 7) COPV Lifting.

  8. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... engineering regulations in parts 50 to 63, inclusive, of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (2... part 52 of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. All alterations, replacements or repairs...

  9. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... engineering regulations in parts 50 to 63, inclusive, of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (2... part 52 of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. All alterations, replacements or repairs...

  10. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section 57.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  11. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section 56.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  12. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section 57.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  13. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section 57.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  14. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section 56.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  15. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section 56.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  16. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section 57.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  17. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section 56.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  18. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section 57.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  19. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section 56.13001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers §...

  20. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  1. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The

  2. Optimization of Composite Material System and Lay-up to Achieve Minimum Weight Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Haris Hameed; Wang, Gang; Dar, Uzair Ahmed; Zhang, Weihong

    2013-10-01

    The use of composite pressure vessels particularly in the aerospace industry is escalating rapidly because of their superiority in directional strength and colossal weight advantage. The present work elucidates the procedure to optimize the lay-up for composite pressure vessel using finite element analysis and calculate the relative weight saving compared with the reference metallic pressure vessel. The determination of proper fiber orientation and laminate thickness is very important to decrease manufacturing difficulties and increase structural efficiency. In the present work different lay-up sequences for laminates including, cross-ply [ 0 m /90 n ] s , angle-ply [ ±θ] ns , [ 90/±θ] ns and [ 0/±θ] ns , are analyzed. The lay-up sequence, orientation and laminate thickness (number of layers) are optimized for three candidate composite materials S-glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and Carbon/epoxy. Finite element analysis of composite pressure vessel is performed by using commercial finite element code ANSYS and utilizing the capabilities of ANSYS Parametric Design Language and Design Optimization module to automate the process of optimization. For verification, a code is developed in MATLAB based on classical lamination theory; incorporating Tsai-Wu failure criterion for first-ply failure (FPF). The results of the MATLAB code shows its effectiveness in theoretical prediction of first-ply failure strengths of laminated composite pressure vessels and close agreement with the FEA results. The optimization results shows that for all the composite material systems considered, the angle-ply [ ±θ] ns is the optimum lay-up. For given fixed ply thickness the total thickness of laminate is obtained resulting in factor of safety slightly higher than two. Both Carbon/epoxy and Kevlar/Epoxy resulted in approximately same laminate thickness and considerable percentage of weight saving, but S-glass/epoxy resulted in weight increment.

  3. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test: Part 2. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezirian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Leifeste, Mark; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2010-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPY has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. A more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F, was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval ofthe model. In phase 3, the vessel pressure was increased to above maximum operating pressure while maintaining the phase 2 temperature. After reaching enough effectives hours to reach the 99.99% confidence level of the model phase 4 testing began when the temperature was increased to greater than 170 F. The vessel was maintained at phase 4 conditions until it failed after over 3 million effect hours. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  4. Dosimetry analyses of the Ringhals 3 and 4 reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, J.A.; Fero, A.H.; Rouden, J.

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive series of neutron dosimetry measurements consisting of surveillance capsules, reactor pressure vessel cladding samples, and ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been analyzed and compared to the results of three-dimensional, cycle-specific neutron transport calculations for the Ringhals Unit 3 and Unit 4 reactors in Sweden. The comparisons show excellent agreement between calculations and measurements. The measurements also demonstrate that it is possible to perform retrospective dosimetry measurements using the {sup 93}Nb (n,n') {sup 93m}Nb reaction on samples of 18-8 austenitic stainless steel with only trace amounts of elemental niobium. (authors)

  5. Strength and reliability analysis of metal-composite overwrapped pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, A. E.; Lepikhin, A. M.; Moskvichev, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Metal-composite overwrapped pressure vessels (MCOPV) have found a wide application in aerospace and aeronautical industries. Such vessels should combine impermeability and high weight efficiency with enhanced long-term safety and durability. To meet these requirements, theoretical and experimental studies on the mechanics of deformation and failure of MCOPV are required. In the paper, the analysis on strength, lifetime and reliability of MCOPV is presented. A high performance of the MCOPV is justified by comparing the calculation results with experiment data obtained on full-scale samples.

  6. Develop Critical Profilometers to Meet Current and Future Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Interior Inspection Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop laser profilometer technology that can efficiently inspect and map the inside of composite pressure vessels for flaws such as liner buckling, pitting, or other surface imperfections. The project will also provide profilometers that can directly support inspections of flight vessels during development and qualification programs and subsequently be implemented into manufacturing inspections to screen out vessels with "out of family" liner defects. An example interior scan of a carbon overwrapped bottle is shown in comparison to an external view of the same bottle (Fig. 1). The internal scan is primarily of the cylindrical portion, but extends about 0.15 in. into the end cap area.

  7. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick

    2012-01-01

    This new start project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of nondestructive evaluation sensors for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap. Results will be correlated with other nondestructive evaluation technologies such as Acoustic Emission. The project will build upon a proof of concept study performed at KSC which demonstrated the ability of Magnetic Stress Gages to measure stresses at internal overwraps and upon current acoustic emission research being performed at WSTF; The gages will be produced utilizing Maundering Winding Magnetometer and/or Maundering Winding Magnetometer-array eddy current technology. The proof-of-concept study demonstrated a correlation between the sensor response and pressure or strain. The study also demonstrated the ability of Maundering Winding Magnetometer technology to monitor the stresses in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel at different orientations and depths. The ultimate goal is to utilize this technology for the health monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for all future flight programs.

  8. A Multiscale Modeling Approach to Analyze Filament-Wound Composite Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-07-22

    A multiscale modeling approach to analyze filament-wound composite pressure vessels is developed in this article. The approach, which extends the Nguyen et al. model [J. Comp. Mater. 43 (2009) 217] developed for discontinuous fiber composites to continuous fiber ones, spans three modeling scales. The microscale considers the unidirectional elastic fibers embedded in an elastic-plastic matrix obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J2 deformation theory of plasticity. The mesoscale behavior representing the composite lamina is obtained through an incremental Mori-Tanaka type model and the Eshelby equivalent inclusion method [Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A241 (1957) 376]. The implementation of the micro-meso constitutive relationsmore » in the ABAQUS® finite element package (via user subroutines) allows the analysis of a filament-wound composite pressure vessel (macroscale) to be performed. Failure of the composite lamina is predicted by a criterion that accounts for the strengths of the fibers and of the matrix as well as of their interface. The developed approach is demonstrated in the analysis of a filament-wound pressure vessel to study the effect of the lamina thickness on the burst pressure. The predictions are favorably compared to the numerical and experimental results by Lifshitz and Dayan [Comp. Struct. 32 (1995) 313].« less

  9. Cyclic crack growth behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.; Emanuelson, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    During normal operation light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels are subjected to a variety of transients resulting in time varying stresses. Consequently, fatigue and environmentally assisted fatigue are growth mechanisms relevant to flaws in these pressure vessels. In order to provide a better understanding of the resistance of nuclear pressure vessel steels to flaw growth process, a series of fracture mechanics experiments were conducted to generate data on the rate of cyclic crack growth in SA508-2 and SA533b-1 steels in simulated 550/sup 0/F boiling water reactor (BWR) and 550/sup 0/F pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. Areas investigated over the coursemore » of the test program included the effects of loading frequency and r ratio (Kmin-Kmax) on crack growth rate as a function of the stress intensity factor (deltaK) range. In addition, the effect of sulfur content of the test material on the cyclic crack growth rate was studied. Cyclic crack growth rates were found to be controlled by deltaK, R ratio, and loading frequency. The sulfur impurity content of the reactor pressure vessel steels studied had a significant effect on the cyclic crack growth rates. The higher growth rates were always associated with materials of higher sulfur content. For a given level of sulfur, growth rates were in a 550/sup 0/F simulated BWR environment than in a 550/sup 0/F simulated PWR environment. In both environments cyclic crack growth rates were a strong function of the loading frequency.« less

  10. The prospect of modern thermomechanics in structural integrity calculations of large-scale pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Tamás

    2018-05-01

    Structural integrity calculations play a crucial role in designing large-scale pressure vessels. Used in the electric power generation industry, these kinds of vessels undergo extensive safety analyses and certification procedures before deemed feasible for future long-term operation. The calculations are nowadays directed and supported by international standards and guides based on state-of-the-art results of applied research and technical development. However, their ability to predict a vessel's behavior under accidental circumstances after long-term operation is largely limited by the strong dependence of the analysis methodology on empirical models that are correlated to the behavior of structural materials and their changes during material aging. Recently a new scientific engineering paradigm, structural integrity has been developing that is essentially a synergistic collaboration between a number of scientific and engineering disciplines, modeling, experiments and numerics. Although the application of the structural integrity paradigm highly contributed to improving the accuracy of safety evaluations of large-scale pressure vessels, the predictive power of the analysis methodology has not yet improved significantly. This is due to the fact that already existing structural integrity calculation methodologies are based on the widespread and commonly accepted 'traditional' engineering thermal stress approach, which is essentially based on the weakly coupled model of thermomechanics and fracture mechanics. Recently, a research has been initiated in MTA EK with the aim to review and evaluate current methodologies and models applied in structural integrity calculations, including their scope of validity. The research intends to come to a better understanding of the physical problems that are inherently present in the pool of structural integrity problems of reactor pressure vessels, and to ultimately find a theoretical framework that could serve as a well

  11. Relaxin 2 fails to lower intraocular pressure and to dilate retinal vessels in rats.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Ulrike; Träger, Katharina; Liu, Hanhan; Teister, Julia; Grus, Franz; Prokosch-Willing, Verena

    2018-03-13

    Recently, the vasodilator relaxin 2 has been introduced as a treatment for acute heart failure. However, its role on vessels of the eye and intraocular pressure (IOP) remains unclear though it has been hypothesized to induce a decrease IOP after intramuscular injection in humans. We aimed to test whether the hormone relaxin 2 lowers IOP and dilates retinal vessels in animals. The IOP of female Sprague-Dawley rats before and after application of relaxin 2 was measured using an Icare Tonolab device calibrated for rats. Recombinant human relaxin 2 in phosphate-buffered saline with 0.1% bovine serum albumin was either applied as eye drops (1000, 2000 or 3000 ng/ml), injected intravitreally (500 ng/ml) or intravenously (13.3 μg/kg body weight). Retinal vessel thickness was monitored using infrared fundus images compiled with optical coherence tomography (Heidelberg Engineering) before and several time points after application of relaxin 2. Neither topical nor intravitreous or intravenous application of relaxin 2 lowered the IOP or changed the arterial or venous vessel diameter after 1 or 3 h after application. Now that relaxin 2 is more easily available, the hormone came again into focus as a potential glaucoma therapeutic. However, our study in rats could not support the hypothesis that relaxin 2 lowers IOP or dilates retinal vessels.

  12. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs). Corrected Copy, Aug. 25, 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  13. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Steele, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracturemore » mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.« less

  14. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  15. Effect of Silicon Content on Carbide Precipitation and Low-Temperature Toughness of Pressure Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, L. H.; Wu, K. M.; Qiu, J. A.; Shirzadi, A. A.; Rodionova, I. G.

    2017-05-01

    Cr - Mn - Mo - Ni pressure vessel steels containing 0.54 and 1.55% Si are studied. Metallographic and fractographic analyses of the steels after tempering at 650 and 700°C are performed. The impact toughness at - 30°C and the hardness of the steels are determined. The mass fraction of the carbide phase in the steels is computed with the help of the J-MatPro 4.0 software.

  16. Pressure vessel sliding support unit and system using the sliding support unit

    DOEpatents

    Breach, Michael R.; Keck, David J.; Deaver, Gerald A.

    2013-01-15

    Provided is a sliding support and a system using the sliding support unit. The sliding support unit may include a fulcrum capture configured to attach to a support flange, a fulcrum support configured to attach to the fulcrum capture, and a baseplate block configured to support the fulcrum support. The system using the sliding support unit may include a pressure vessel, a pedestal bracket, and a plurality of sliding support units.

  17. Placement of trans-sternal wires according to an ellipsoid pressure vessel model of sternal forces.

    PubMed

    Casha, Aaron R; Manché, Alex; Gauci, Marilyn; Camilleri-Podesta, Marie-Therese; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre; Sant, Zdenka; Gatt, Ruben; Grima, Joseph N

    2012-03-01

    Dehiscence of median sternotomy wounds remains a clinical problem. Wall forces in thin-walled pressure vessels can be calculated by membrane stress theory. An ellipsoid pressure vessel model of sternal forces is presented together with its application for optimal wire placement in the sternum. Sternal forces were calculated by computational simulation using an ellipsoid chest wall model. Sternal forces were correlated with different sternal thicknesses and radio-density as measured by computerized tomography (CT) scans of the sternum. A comparison of alternative placement of trans-sternal wires located either at the levels of the costal cartilages or the intercostal spaces was made. The ellipsoid pressure vessel model shows that higher levels of stress are operative at increasing chest diameter (P < 0.001). CT scans show that the thickness of the sternal body is on average 3 mm and 30% thicker (P < 0.001) and 53% more radio-dense (P < 0.001) at the costal cartilage levels when compared with adjacent intercostal spaces. This results in a decrease of average sternal stress from 438 kPa at the intercostal space level to 338 kPa at the costal cartilage level (P = 0.003). Biomechanical modelling suggests that placement of trans-sternal wires at the thicker bone and more radio-dense level of the costal cartilages will result in reduced stress.

  18. Environmental crack-growth behavior of high strength pressure vessel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of sustained-load environmental crack growth threshold tests performed on six spacecraft pressure vessel alloys are presented. The alloys were Inconel 718, 6Al-4V titanium, A-286 steel, AM-350 stainless steel, cryoformed AISI 301 stainless steel; and cryoformed AISI 304L steel. The test environments for the program were air, pressurized gases of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, and liquid environments of distilled water, sea water, nitrogen tetroxide, hydrazine, aerozine 50, monomethyl hydrazine, and hydrogen peroxide. Surface flaw type specimens were used with flaws located in both base metal and weld metal.

  19. Numerical investigations on pressurized AL-composite vessel response to hypervelocity impacts: Comparison between experimental works and a numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mespoulet, Jérôme; Plassard, Fabien; Hereil, Pierre-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Response of pressurized composite-Al vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum spheres have been numerically investigated to evaluate the influence of initial pressure on the vulnerability of these vessels. Investigated tanks are carbon-fiber overwrapped prestressed Al vessels. Explored internal air pressure ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from experiments (Xray radiographies, particle velocity measurement and post-mortem vessels) have been compared to numerical results given from LS-DYNA ALE-Lagrange-SPH full coupling models. Simulations exhibit an under estimation in term of debris cloud evolution and shock wave propagation in pressurized air but main modes of damage/rupture on the vessels given by simulations are coherent with post-mortem recovered vessels from experiments. First results of this numerical work are promising and further simulation investigations with additional experimental data will be done to increase the reliability of the simulation model. The final aim of this crossed work is to numerically explore a wide range of impact conditions (impact angle, projectile weight, impact velocity, initial pressure) that cannot be explore experimentally. Those whole results will define a rule of thumbs for the definition of a vulnerability analytical model for a given pressurized vessel.

  20. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, P. K.; Logsdon, W. A.; Begley, J. A.

    1989-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 C1 2a and SA533 Gr A C1 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged are weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288 °C (550°F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.02 and 0.50. The HPW enviromment FCGR properties of these pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments were generally conservative, compared with the approrpriate American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI water environmental reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was considerably faster in the HPW environment than in a corresponding 288°C (550°F) base line air environment. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged are weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a significantly lesser degree than that demonstrated by the corresponding base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials, as compared with the weldments, was attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology.

  1. Interrelationship of Nondestructive Evaluation Methodologies Applied to Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifeste, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are commonly used in spacecraft for containment of pressurized gases and fluids, incorporating strength and weight savings. The energy stored is capable of extensive spacecraft damage and personal injury in the event of sudden failure. These apparently simple structures, composed of a metallic media impermeable liner and fiber/resin composite overwrap are really complex structures with numerous material and structural phenomena interacting during pressurized use which requires multiple, interrelated monitoring methodologies to monitor and understand subtle changes critical to safe use. Testing of COPVs at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands T est Facility (WSTF) has employed multiple in-situ, real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies as well as pre- and post-test comparative techniques to monitor changes in material and structural parameters during advanced pressurized testing. The use of NDE methodologies and their relationship to monitoring changes is discussed based on testing of real-world spacecraft COPVs. Lessons learned are used to present recommendations for use in testing, as well as a discussion of potential applications to vessel health monitoring in future applications.

  2. Design and Analysis of Boiler Pressure Vessels based on IBR codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, B.; Kanimozhi, B.

    2017-05-01

    Pressure vessels components are widely used in the thermal and nuclear power plants for generating steam using the philosophy of heat transfer. In Thermal power plant, Coal is burnt inside the boiler furnace for generating the heat. The amount of heat produced through the combustion of pulverized coal is used in changing the phase transfer (i.e. Water into Super-Heated Steam) in the Pressure Parts Component. Pressure vessels are designed as per the Standards and Codes of the country, where the boiler is to be installed. One of the Standards followed in designing Pressure Parts is ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers). The mandatory requirements of ASME code must be satisfied by the manufacturer. In our project case, A Shell/pipe which has been manufactured using ASME code has an issue during the drilling of hole. The Actual Size of the drilled holes must be, as per the drawing, but due to error, the size has been differentiate from approved design calculation (i.e. the diameter size has been exceeded). In order to rectify this error, we have included an additional reinforcement pad to the drilled and modified the design of header in accordance with the code requirements.

  3. Monitoring Composite Material Pressure Vessels with a Fiber-Optic/Microelectronic Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimcak, C.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the concept of an integrated, fiber-optic/microelectronic distributed sensor system that can monitor composite material pressure vessels for Air Force space systems to provide assessments of the overall health and integrity of the vessel throughout its entire operating history from birth to end of life. The fiber optic component would include either a semiconductor light emitting diode or diode laser and a multiplexed fiber optic sensing network incorporating Bragg grating sensors capable of detecting internal temperature and strain. The microelectronic components include a power source, a pulsed laser driver, time domain data acquisition hardware, a microprocessor, a data storage device, and a communication interface. The sensing system would be incorporated within the composite during its manufacture. The microelectronic data acquisition and logging system would record the environmental conditions to which the vessel has been subjected to during its storage and transit, e.g., the history of thermal excursions, pressure loading data, the occurrence of mechanical impacts, the presence of changing internal strain due to aging, delamination, material decomposition, etc. Data would be maintained din non-volatile memory for subsequent readout through a microcomputer interface.

  4. Interpreting ASME limits and philosophy in FEA of pressure vessel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, L.M.; Cruz, J.R.B.; Miranda, C.A.J.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years there has been an effort to interpret finite element (FE) stress results on the light of the ASME B and PV rules and philosophy. Many task groups have issued guidelines on stress linearization and classifications. All those attempts have come up trying to cope modern FE techniques with the rules imposed by the ASME Code. This paper is an independent contribution to the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) groups which are studying the stress classification and the failure mechanism in a FE framework. This work tries to complement the interesting work by Hollinger and Hechmer presented inmore » the PVP-94 in Minneapolis. In that paper, the authors examined a typical support skirt and showed relations between the skirt collapse load obtained by finite element analysis and the loads allowed from the ASME stress limits. To complement such paper, in the present article, different skirt geometry configurations are analyzed. The configurations here investigated consist of similar support skirts but with different angles of attachments between cylinder and cone parts. It will be possible to observe the influence of the bending stress in the collapse load and its relation to the allowable loads inferred from the ASME limits. A pressure vessel with torispherical head under internal pressure is also examined. Using elastic and limit load FEA, the present paper determines the collapse loads of the configurations. It sets up the relations between these collapse loads, stress categories, and limits dictated by the ASME Code Subsection NB. On the light of NB rules and philosophy, this paper shows how different methods of stress assessment, classification, and limits may influence in the design of a pressure vessel.« less

  5. Definition of mutually optimum NDI and proof test criteria for 2219 aluminum pressure vessels. Volume 1: Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; King, R. G.; Todd, P. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements for proof testing and nondestructive inspection of aluminum pressure vessels were discussed. The following conclusions are (1) lack-of-fusion weld defects are sufficiently tight in the as-welded condition to be considered undetectable; (2) proof-level loads are required to fully open lack-of-fusion weld defects; (3) significant crack opening occurs at subproof levels so that an inspection enhancement loading treatment designed to avoid catastrophic failure is feasible; (4) currently used proof levels for 2219 pressure vessels are adequate for postproof inspection; (5) quantification of defect size and location using collimated ultrasonic pitch-catch techniques appears sufficiently feasible for tankage to warrant developmental work; (6) for short-time single-cycle pressure-vessel applications, postproof inspection is desirable; and (7) for long-term multiple-cycle pressure-vessel applications, postproof inspection is essential for life assurance.

  6. 46 CFR 50.30-10 - Class I, I-L and II-L pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... II-L pressure vessels shall be subject to shop inspection at the plant where they are being... for shop inspection at such stages of fabrication as may be requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine...

  7. 46 CFR 50.30-10 - Class I, I-L and II-L pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... II-L pressure vessels shall be subject to shop inspection at the plant where they are being... for shop inspection at such stages of fabrication as may be requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine...

  8. 46 CFR 50.30-10 - Class I, I-L and II-L pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... II-L pressure vessels shall be subject to shop inspection at the plant where they are being... for shop inspection at such stages of fabrication as may be requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine...

  9. 46 CFR 50.30-10 - Class I, I-L and II-L pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... II-L pressure vessels shall be subject to shop inspection at the plant where they are being... for shop inspection at such stages of fabrication as may be requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine...

  10. 46 CFR 50.30-10 - Class I, I-L and II-L pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... II-L pressure vessels shall be subject to shop inspection at the plant where they are being... for shop inspection at such stages of fabrication as may be requested by the Officer in Charge, Marine...

  11. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m 1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lowermore » frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  12. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m 1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lowermore » frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  13. Research and Development of Automated Eddy Current Testing for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, Kyle L.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Spencer, Paul R.; Lucero, Ralph E.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy current testing (ET) was used to scan bare metallic liners used in the fabrication of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) for flaws which could result in premature failure of the vessel. The main goal of the project was to make improvements in the areas of scan signal to noise ratio, sensitivity of flaw detection, and estimation of flaw dimensions. Scan settings were optimized resulting in an increased signal to noise ratio. Previously undiscovered flaw indications were observed and investigated. Threshold criteria were determined for the system software's flaw report and estimation of flaw dimensions were brought to an acceptable level of accuracy. Computer algorithms were written to import data for filtering and a numerical derivative filtering algorithm was evaluated.

  14. Weld Repair of a Stamped Pressure Vessel in a Radiologically Controlled Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Cannell, Gary L.; Huth, Ralph J.; Hallum, Randall T.

    2013-08-26

    In September 2012 an ASME B&PVC Section VIII stamped pressure vessel located at the DOE Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) developed a through-wall leak. The vessel, a steam/brine heat exchanger, operated in a radiologically controlled zone (by the CH2MHill PRC or CHPRC), had been in service for approximately 17 years. The heat exchanger is part of a single train evaporator process and its failure caused the entire system to be shut down, significantly impacting facility operations. This paper describes the activities associated with failure characterization, technical decision making/planning for repair by welding, logistical challenges associated with performing work inmore » a radiologically controlled zone, performing the repair, and administrative considerations related to ASME code requirements.« less

  15. Damage Control Plan for International Space Station Recharge Tank Assembly Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA has retired the Space Shuttle Program, a new method of transporting compressed gaseous nitrogen and oxygen needed to be created for delivery of these crucial life support resources to the International Space Station (ISS). One of the methods selected by NASA includes the use of highly pressurized, unprotected Recharge Tank Assemblies (RTAs) utilizing Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). A COPV consists of a thin liner wrapped with a fiber composite and resin or epoxy. It is typically lighter weight than an all metal pressure vessel of similar volume and therefore provides a higher-efficiency means for gas storage. However COPVs are known to be susceptible to damage resulting from handling, tool drop impacts, or impacts from other objects. As a result, a comprehensive Damage Control Plan has been established to mitigate damage to the RTA COPV throughout its life cycle. The DCP is intended to evaluate and mitigate defined threats during manufacturing, shipping and handling, test, assembly level integration, shipment while pressurized, launch vehicle integration and mission operations by defining credible threats and methods for preventing potential damage while still maintaining the primary goal of resupplying ISS gas resources. A comprehensive threat assessment is performed to identify all threats posed to the COPV during the different phases of its lifecycle. The threat assessment is then used as the basis for creating a series of general inspection, surveillance and reporting requirements which apply across all phases of the COPV's life, targeted requirements only applicable to specific work phases and a series of training courses for both ground personnel and crew aboard the ISS. A particularly important area of emphasis deals with creating DCP requirements for a highly pressurized, large and unprotected RTA COPV for use during Inter Vehicular Activities (IVA) operations in the micro gravity environment while supplying pressurized gas to the

  16. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Heating...

  17. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Heating...

  18. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52.01-2 Section 52.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Main power...

  19. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52.01-2 Section 52.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Main power...

  20. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Heating...

  1. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52.01-2 Section 52.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Main power...

  2. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Heating...

  3. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52.01-2 Section 52.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Main power...

  4. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52.01-2 Section 52.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Main power...

  5. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Heating...

  6. Ex-Vivo Lymphatic Perfusion System for Independently Controlling Pressure Gradient and Transmural Pressure in Isolated Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2015-01-01

    In addition to external forces, collecting lymphatic vessels intrinsically contract to transport lymph from the extremities to the venous circulation. As a result, the lymphatic endothelium is routinely exposed to a wide range of dynamic mechanical forces, primarily fluid shear stress and circumferential stress, which have both been shown to affect lymphatic pumping activity. Although various ex-vivo perfusion systems exist to study this innate pumping activity in response to mechanical stimuli, none are capable of independently controlling the two primary mechanical forces affecting lymphatic contractility: transaxial pressure gradient, ΔP, which governs fluid shear stress; and average transmural pressure, Pavg, which governs circumferential stress. Hence, the authors describe a novel ex-vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling these two outputs using a linear, explicit model predictive control (MPC) algorithm. The ELPS is capable of reproducing arbitrary waveforms within the frequency range observed in the lymphatics in vivo, including a time-varying ΔP with a constant Pavg, time-varying ΔP and Pavg, and a constant ΔP with a time-varying Pavg. In addition, due to its implementation of syringes to actuate the working fluid, a post-hoc method of estimating both the flow rate through the vessel and fluid wall shear stress over multiple, long (5 sec) time windows is also described. PMID:24809724

  7. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  8. Alternative welding reconditioning solutions without post welding heat treatment of pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicic, D. T.; Rontescu, C.; Bogatu, A. M.; Dijmărescu, M. C.

    2017-08-01

    In pressure vessels, working on high temperature and high pressure may appear some defects, cracks for example, which may lead to failure in operation. When these nonconformities are identified, after certain examination, testing and result interpretation, the decision taken is to repair or to replace the deteriorate component. In the current legislation it’s stipulated that any repair, alteration or modification to an item of pressurised equipment that was originally post-weld heat treated after welding (PWHT) should be post-weld heat treated again after repair, requirement that cannot always be respected. For that reason, worldwide, there were developed various welding repair techniques without PWHT, among we find the Half Bead Technique (HBT) and Controlled Deposition Technique (CDT). The paper presents the experimental results obtained by applying the welding reconditioning techniques HBT and CDT in order to restore as quickly as possible the pressure vessels made of 13CrMo4-5. The effects of these techniques upon the heat affected zone are analysed, the graphics of the hardness variation are drawn and the resulted structures are compared in the two cases.

  9. Thermal mathematical modeling of a multicell common pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Junbom; Nguyen, T. V.; White, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional and time-dependent thermal model of a multicell common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen battery was developed. A finite element solver called PDE/Protran was used to solve this model. The model was used to investigate the effects of various design parameters on the temperature profile within the cell. The results were used to help find a design that will yield an acceptable temperature gradient inside a multicell CPV nickel-hydrogen battery. Steady-state and unsteady-state cases with a constant heat generation rate and a time-dependent heat generation rate were solved.

  10. Calculation of Prestressed Pressure Vessel Taking into Account the Concrete Temperature Inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the problem of determining the stress state of the pressure vessel (PV) with considering the concrete temperature inhomogeneity. Such structures are widely used in heat power engineering, for example, in nuclear power engineering. The structures of such buildings are quite complex and a comprehensive analysis of the stress state in them can be carried out either by numerical or experimental methods. However, a number of fundamental questions can be solved on the basis of simplified models, in particular, studies of the effect on the stressed state of the inhomogeneity caused by the temperature field.

  11. The Safety Course Design and Operations of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Prosser, William

    2015-01-01

    Following a Commercial Launch Vehicle On-Pad COPV (Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels) failure, a request was received by the NESC (NASA Engineering and Safety Center) June 14, 2014. An assessment was approved July 10, 2014, to develop and assess the capability of scanning eddy current (EC) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for mapping thickness and inspection for flaws. Current methods could not identify thickness reduction from necking and critical flaw detection was not possible with conventional dye penetrant (PT) methods, so sensitive EC scanning techniques were needed. Developmental methods existed, but had not been fully developed, nor had the requisite capability assessment (i.e., a POD (Probability of Detection) study) been performed.

  12. Fatal and non-fatal injuries from vessels under air pressure in construction.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Weeks, J; Hunting, K L

    1999-02-01

    Using a surveillance system that captures data on construction workers treated in an urban emergency department, we identified a series of injuries caused by vessels and tools under air pressure. We describe those six cases, as well as similar cases found in the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries; we also review data from the National Surveillance for Traumatic Occupational Fatalities database and data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Among the injuries and deaths for which we had good case descriptions, the majority would have been prevented by adherence to existing Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards in the construction industry.

  13. Overview of NASA White Sands Test Facility Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines the White Sands Test Facility testing of Composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV). A COPV is typically a metallic liner overwrapped with a fiber epoxy matrix. There is a weight advantage over the traditional all metal design. The presentation shows pictures of the facilities at White Sands, and then examines some of the testing performed. The tests include fluids compatibility, and Kevlar COPV. Data for the Kevlar tests are given, and an analysis is reviewed. There is also a comparison between Carbon COPVs and the Kevlar COPVs.

  14. Viscoelastic/damage modeling of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Robert M.; Dozier, Jan D.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the viscoelastic/damage response of a filament-wound spherical vessel used for long-term pressure containment is developed. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal accumulated damage based upon a quadratic relationship between transverse modulus and maximum circumferential strain is postulated. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved by an iterative routine. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence is employed to produce, in the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution for the maximum circumferential strain which is inverted by the method of collocation to yield the time-dependent solution. Results obtained with the model are compared to experimental observations.

  15. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  16. Distributed Sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  17. The effect of compression on individual pressure vessel nickel/hydrogen components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1988-01-01

    Compression tests were performed on representative Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) Nickel/Hydrogen cell components in an effort to better understand the effects of force on component compression and the interactions of components under compression. It appears that the separator is the most easily compressed of all of the stack components. It will typically partially compress before any of the other components begin to compress. The compression characteristics of the cell components in assembly differed considerably from what would be predicted based on individual compression characteristics. Component interactions played a significant role in the stack response to compression. The results of the compression tests were factored into the design and selection of Belleville washers added to the cell stack to accommodate nickel electrode expansion while keeping the pressure on the stack within a reasonable range of the original preset.

  18. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessels using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. These materials offer a wide range of possibilities within the space program. But before they can be reliably incorporated into space flight applications, additional understanding is required in the area of damage tolerance of these materials. Efforts to enhance our understanding of failure modes, mechanical properties, long and short term environmental effects, cyclic damage accumulation and residual strength are needed. Thus we have employed the use of fiber optical sensors which offers an excellent opportunity exploit these materials through monitoring and characterizing their mechanical properties and thus the integrity of structures made from such materials during their life cycle. Use of these optical innovations provides an insight into structures that have not been available in the past, as well as the technology available to provide real time health monitoring throughout its life cycle. The embedded fiber optical sensor shows a clearly detectable sensitivity to changes in the near strain and stress fields of the host structure promoted by mechanical or thermal loading or, in certain conditions, structural damage. The last ten years have seen a large increase in the use of FBG based monitoring systems in a broad range of applications. Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in composite structures. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around

  19. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV): Flight Rationale for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.; Johnson, Kevin L.; Phoenix, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Each Orbiter Vehicle (Space Shuttle Program) contains up to 24 Kevlar49/Epoxy Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) for storage of pressurized gases. In the wake of the Columbia accident and the ensuing Return To Flight (RTF) activities, Orbiter engineers reexamined COPV flight certification. The original COPV design calculations were updated to include recently declassified Kevlar COPV test data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to incorporate changes in how the Space Shuttle was operated as opposed to orinigially envisioned. 2005 estimates for the probability of a catastrophic failure over the life of the program (from STS-1 through STS-107) were one-in-five. To address this unacceptable risk, the Orbiter Project Office (OPO) initiated a comprehensive investigation to understand and mitigate this risk. First, the team considered and eventually deemed unfeasible procuring and replacing all existing flight COPVs. OPO replaced the two vessels with the highest risk with existing flight spare units. Second, OPO instituted operational improvements in ground procedures to signficiantly reduce risk, without adversely affecting Shuttle capability. Third, OPO developed a comprehensive model to quantify the likelihood of occurrance. A fully-instrumented burst test (recording a lower burst pressure than expected) on a flight-certified vessel provided critical understanding of the behavior of Orbiter COPVs. A more accurate model was based on a newly-compiled comprehensive database of Kevlar data from LLNL and elsewhere. Considering hardware changes, operational improvements and reliability model refinements, the mean reliability was determined to be 0.998 for the remainder of the Shuttle Program (from 2007, for STS- 118 thru STS-135). Since limited hardware resources precluded full model validation through multiple tests, additional model confidence was sought through the first-ever Accelerated Stress Rupture Test (ASRT) of a flown flight article

  20. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kern, Kyle C; Wright, Clinton B; Bergfield, Kaitlin L; Fitzhugh, Megan C; Chen, Kewei; Moeller, James R; Nabizadeh, Nooshin; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L; Stern, Yaakov; DeCarli, Charles S; Alexander, Gene E

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1) identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2) compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3) relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60-86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  1. Stress Rupture Testing and Analysis of the NASA WSTF-JPL Carbon Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Yoder, Tommy; Saulsberry, Regor; Grimes, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Carbon composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are widely used in applications from spacecraft to life support. COPV technology provides a pressurized media storage advantage over amorphous technology with weight savings on the order of 30 percent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been supporting the development of this technology since the early 1970's with an interest in safe application of these components to reduce mass to orbit. NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been testing components in support of this objective since the 1980s and has been involved in test development and analysis to address affects of impact, propellant and cryogenic fluids exposure on Kevlar and carbon epoxy. The focus of this paper is to present results of a recent joint WSTF-Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) effort to assess safe life of these components. The WSTF-JPL test articles consisted of an aluminum liner and a carbon fiber overwrap in an industry standard epoxy resin system. The vessels were specifically designed with one plus-minus helical wrap and one hoop wrap over the helical and they measured 4.23 x 11.4 in. long. 120 test articles were manufactured in August of 1998 of one lot fiber and resin and the 110 test articles were delivered to WSTF for test. Ten of the 120 test articles were burst tested at the manufacturer to establish the delivered fiber stress. Figure 1 shows a test article in a pre burst condition and with a hoop fiber failure (no leak of pressurized media) and post burst (failure of liner and loss of pressurized media).

  2. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Hoffman, William; Sen, Sonat

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtainmore » stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can

  3. Root pressure and beyond: energetically uphill water transport into xylem vessels?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Lars H

    2014-02-01

    The thermodynamics of root pressure remains an enigma up to the present day. Water is transported radially into xylem vessels, under some conditions even when the xylem sap is more dilute than the ambient medium (soil solution). It is suggested here that water secretion across the plasma membrane of xylem parenchyma cells is driven by a co-transport of water and solutes as previously shown for mammalian epithelia (Zeuthen T. 2010. Water-transporting proteins. Journal of Membrane Biology 234, 57-73.). This process could drive volume flow 'energetically uphill', against the free energy gradient of water. According to the model, solutes released by xylem parenchyma cells are subsequently retrieved from the sap at the expense of metabolic energy to maintain the concentration gradient that drives the water secretion. Transporters of the CCC type known to mediate water secretion in mammalian cells have also been found in Arabidopsis and in rice. The mechanism proposed here for root pressure could also explain refilling of embolized vessels. Moreover, it could contribute to long-distance water transport in trees when the cohesion-tension mechanism of water ascent fails. This is discussed with respect to the old and the more recent literature on these subjects.

  4. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Kumawat, Bhupendra K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-07-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel were studied. Tensile strength and LCF properties were examined at room temperature (RT) using specimens cut from rolling direction of a rolled block. The fully reversed strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant total strain rate with different axial strain amplitude levels. The cyclic strain-stress relationships and the strain-life relationships were obtained through the test results, and related LCF parameters of the steel were calculated. The studied steel exhibits cyclic softening behavior. Furthermore, analysis of stabilized hysteresis loops showed that the steel exhibits non-Masing behavior. Complementary scanning electron microscopy examinations were also carried out on fracture surfaces to reveal dominant damage mechanisms during crack initiation, propagation and fracture. Multiple crack initiation sites were observed on the fracture surface. The investigated LCF behavior can provide reference for pressure vessel life assessment and fracture mechanisms analysis.

  5. Isothermal and thermal-mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Balazs; Trampus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin-Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  6. Assessment of Radiation Embrittlement in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzar, Davor

    2010-10-01

    The radiation-enhanced formation of small (1-2 nm) copper-rich precipitates (CRPs) is critical for the occurrence of embrittlement in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. Small CRPs are coherent with the bcc matrix, which causes local matrix strain and interaction with the dislocation strain fields, thus impeding dislocation mobility. As CRPs grow, there is a critical size at which a phase transformation occurs, whereby the CRPs are no longer coherent with the matrix, and the strain is relieved. Diffraction-line-broadening analysis (DLBA) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to characterize the precipitate formation in surrogate ferritic reactor-pressure vessel steels. The materials were aged for different times at elevated temperature to produce a series of specimens with different degrees of copper precipitation. SANS measurements showed that the precipitate size distribution broadens and shifts toward larger sizes as a function of ageing time. Mechanical hardness showed an increase with ageing time, followed by a decrease, which can be associated with the reduction in the number density as well as the loss of coherency at larger sizes. Inhomogeneous strain correlated with mechanical hardness.

  7. Digital Cellular Solid Pressure Vessels: A Novel Approach for Human Habitation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellucci, Daniel; Jenett, Benjamin; Cheung, Kenneth C.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely assumed that human exploration beyond Earth's orbit will require vehicles capable of providing long duration habitats that simulate an Earth-like environment - consistent artificial gravity, breathable atmosphere, and sufficient living space- while requiring the minimum possible launch mass. This paper examines how the qualities of digital cellular solids - high-performance, repairability, reconfigurability, tunable mechanical response - allow the accomplishment of long-duration habitat objectives at a fraction of the mass required for traditional structural technologies. To illustrate the impact digital cellular solids could make as a replacement to conventional habitat subsystems, we compare recent proposed deep space habitat structural systems with a digital cellular solids pressure vessel design that consists of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) digital cellular solid cylindrical framework that is lined with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) skin. We use the analytical treatment of a linear specific modulus scaling cellular solid to find the minimum mass pressure vessel for a structure and find that, for equivalent habitable volume and appropriate safety factors, the use of digital cellular solids provides clear methods for producing structures that are not only repairable and reconfigurable, but also higher performance than their conventionally manufactured counterparts.

  8. Effect of Macrosegregation on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Pressure-Vessel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanghua; Han, Lizhan; Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng

    2017-07-01

    Macrosegregation refers to the chemical segregation, which occurs quite commonly in the large forgings such as nuclear reactor pressure vessel. This work assesses the effect of macrosegregation and homogenization treatment on the mechanical properties of a pressure-vessel steel (SA508 Gr.3). It was found that the primary reason for the inhomogeneity of the microstructure was the segregation of Mn, Mo, and Ni. Martensite, and coarse upper bainite with M-A (martensite-austenite) islands have been obtained, respectively, in the positive and negative segregation zone during a simulated quenching process. During tempering, the carbon-rich M-A islands decomposed into a mixture of ferrite and numerous carbides which deteriorated the toughness of the material. The segregation has been substantially minimized by a homogenizing treatment. The results indicate that the material homogenized has a higher impact toughness than the material with segregation, due to the reduction in M-A island in the negative segregation zone. It can be concluded that the microstructure and mechanical properties have been improved remarkably by means of homogenization treatment.

  9. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  10. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Engine Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and... any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer shall submit a report covering...

  11. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  12. Significance of reheat cracks to the integrity of pressure vessels for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, D.A.

    1979-05-01

    Reheat cracks manifest themselves as macroscopic defects detectable by nondestructive testing (NDT) procedures or as microscopic grain boundary decohesions (GBD) that are beyond the limit of detection by NDT. The significance of the microscopic cracks that may go undetected are discussed. The probability that GBD exist in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of weldments of pressure vessel steels is high; particularly in SA508 Class 2 weldments. GBD reside in the coarse-grained region of the HAZ. The microstructure of this region tends to be a tempered martensite or lower bainite, a structure whose fracture toughness is superior to that of a highermore » temperature transformation product. This region should be less sensitive to irradiation embrittlement. Toughness data for this region in either the unirradiated or irradiated condition are sparse; however, those data that are available indicate that this area is superior in toughness to the base metal. A sample of the HAZ from the prolongation-weldment from the Heavy Section Steel Technology program Intermediate Test Vessel (ITV) No. 4 was examined by the Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA). They reported GBD 5 mm (0.2 in.) long. This prompted an examination of the HAZ from the ITV vessel that had been tested to failure at 24 C (75 F). During testing, the region of the weld which contained the flaw that initiated the failure was strained up to 0.5%. A metallographic examination of this region of the weldment revealed GBD, but none of the size reported by the MPA. Further, there was no evidence that the GBD had extended as a consequence of the tests. Fracture toughness tests were made of the HAZ of welds from ITV-4. The electron-beam welding procedure, which permits more accurate siting of the crack, was used. Fracture toughness values in excess of 220 MPa/m (200 ksi/in.) were obtained at -18 C (O F).« less

  13. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Logsdon, W.A.; Begley, J.A.

    1989-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 Cl 2a and SA533 Gr A Cl 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged arc weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288{degrees} C (550{degrees} F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.20 and 0.50. The properties were generally conservative compared to American Society of Mechanical Engineers Section XI water environment reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was faster in the HPW environment than in a 288{degrees} C (550{degrees} F) base line air environment. Themore » growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged arc weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a lesser degree than that demonstrated by the base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials compared the weldments attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology.« less

  14. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; ...

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  15. Corrosion monitoring on a large steel pressure vessel by thin-layer activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G.; Boulton, L.H.; Hodder, D.

    1989-12-01

    Thin-layer activation (TLA) is a technique in which a surface is irradiated by a nuclear accelerator and thereby labeled with an accurate depth profile of low-level radioactivity. By monitoring this activity it is possible to calculate how much of that surface has been removed by corrosion. As the radioactivity is marked by the emission of penetrating gamma rays, it is possible to monitor this corrosion remotely through several centimeters of steel. This technique has been used to monitor erosion-corrosion occurring on the inner carbon steel wall of a continuous Kraft pulp digester at a paper mill. Representative coupons of themore » same steel as the digester wall were irradiated and fixed to the walls in the liquor extraction zone during a maintenance shutdown. The loss of metal over the six months was measured by external monitoring of gamma radiation through the vessel wall, and converted to a corrosion rate. Subsequent weight-loss measurements and comparison with ultrasonic thickness measurements established that the corrosion rate measured gave accurate results over a much shorter time scale. TLA thus enables current, rather than historical corrosion rates to be measured in a large steel pressure vessel.« less

  16. Proof-test-based life prediction of high-toughness pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L.; Hill, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The paper examines the problems associated with applying proof-test-based life prediction to vessels made of high-toughness metals. Two A106 Gr B pipe specimens containing long, through-wall circumferential flaws were tested. One failed during hydrostatic testing and the other during tension-tension cycling following a hydrostatic test. Quantitative fractography was used to verify experimentally obtained fatigue crack growth rates and a variety of LEFM and EPFM techniques were used to analyze the experimental results. The results show that: plastic collapse analysis provides accurate predictions of screened (initial) crack size when the flow stress is determined experimentally; LEFM analysis underestimates the crack sizemore » screened by the proof test and overpredicts the subsequent fatigue life of the vessel when retardation effects are small (i.e., low proof levels); and, at a high proof-test level (2.4 {times} operating pressure), the large retardation effect on fatigue crack growth due to the overload overwhelmed the deleterious effect on fatigue life from stable tearing during the proof test and alleviated the problem of screening only long cracks due to the high toughness of the metal.« less

  17. Evaluation of Carbon Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels Fabricated Using Ionic Liquid Epoxies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The intent of the work proposed here is to ascertain the viability of ionic liquid (IL) epoxy based carbon fiber composites for use as storage tanks at cryogenic temperatures. This IL epoxy has been specifically developed to address composite cryogenic tank challenges associated with achieving NASA's in-space propulsion and exploration goals. Our initial work showed that an unadulterated ionic liquid (IL) carbon-fiber composite exhibited improved properties over an optimized commercial product at cryogenic temperatures. Subsequent investigative work has significantly improved the IL epoxy and our first carbon-fiber Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessel (COPV) was successfully fabricated. Here additional COPVs, using a further improved IL epoxy, will be fabricated and pressure tested at cryogenic temperatures with the results rigorously analyzed. Investigation of the IL composite for lower pressure liner-less cryogenic tank applications will also be initiated. It is expected that the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) will be raised from about TRL 3 to TRL 5 where unambiguous predictions for subsequent development/testing can be made.

  18. The influence of fire exposure on austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel fitness-for-service assessment: Experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Shu, Wenhua; Zuo, Yantian

    2017-04-01

    The austenitic stainless steels are widely applied to pressure vessel manufacturing. The fire accident risk exists in almost all the industrial chemical plants. It is necessary to make safety evaluation on the chemical equipment including pressure vessels after fire. Therefore, the present research was conducted on the influences of fire exposure testing under different thermal conditions on the mechanical performance evolution of S30408 austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel equipment. The metallurgical analysis described typical appearances in micro-structure observed in the material suffered by fire exposure. Moreover, the quantitative degradation of mechanical properties was investigated. The material thermal degradation mechanism and fitness-for-service assessment process of fire damage were further discussed.

  19. ANSI/AIAA S-081A, Pressure Vessel Standards Implementation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.

    2009-01-01

    The stress rupture specification for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is discussed. The composite shell of the COPV shall be designed to meet the design life considering the time it is under sustained load. A Mechcanical Damage Control Plan (MDCP) shall be created and implemented that assures the COPV will not fail due to mechanical damage due to manufacturing, testing, shipping, installation, or flight. Proven processes and procedures for fabrication and repair shall be used to preclude damage or material degradation during material processing, manufacturing operations, and refurbushment.Selected NDI techniques for the liner and/or boss(es) shall be performed before overwrapping with composite. When visual inspection reveals mechanical damage or defects exceeding manufacturing specification levels (and standard repair procedures), the damaged COPV shall be submitted to a material review board (MRB) for disposition. Every COPV shall be subjected to visual and other non-destructive inspection (NDI), per the inspection plan.

  20. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Gou, Perng-Fei; Chu, Cherk Lam; Oliver, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block.

  1. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Gou, P.F.; Chu, C.L.; Oliver, R.P.

    1999-07-27

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block. 6 figs.

  2. Advances in the design of common pressure vessel nickel hydrogen batteries for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagrodnik, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Over 7000 low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycles were demonstrated on a full-size aerospace common pressure vessel (CPV) prototype. The battery demonstrated the capability of the basic CPV design to meet the life and reliability requirements of aerospace missions. Subsequent design modifications have been employed to address the shortcomings of the original design and several new prototypes have been fabricated. These include a 12-cell 125 amp-hour geosynchronous earth-orbit (GEO) battery and a 22-cell 10.5 amp-hour LEO battery. Cells for an 80-cell battery intended to demonstrate the high voltage capability of the CPV design have also been fabricated. In addition, assembly of a 20-cell aircraft starting battery prototype is in progress, and testing of a group of 12-volt, 160 amp-hour terrestrial batteries is continuing.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  4. PIONEER VENUS 2 MULTI-PROBE PARACHUTE TESTS IN VAB PRIOR TO ATTACHING PRESSURE VESSEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A parachute system, designed to carry an instrument-laden probe down through the dense atmosphere of torrid, cloud-shrouded Venus, was tested in KSC's Vehicle Assembly Building. The tests are in preparation for a Pioneer multi-probe mission to Venus scheduled for launch from KSC in 1978. Full-scale (12-foot diameter) parachutes with simulated pressure vessels weighing up to 45 pounds were dropped from heights of up to 450 feet tot he floor of the VAB where the impact was cushioned by a honeycomb cardboard impact arrestor. The VAB offers an ideal, wind-free testing facility at no additional construction cost and was used for similar tests of the parachute system for the twin Viking spacecraft scheduled for launch toward Mars in August.

  5. Underclad cracking of pressure vessel steels for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, H.F.

    1987-06-01

    Although fracture mechanics analyses have shown that underclad cracks have no detrimental effect on the integrity of thick walled pressure vessels (40 year service), in order to avoid unexpected failures the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued Regulatory Guide 1.43 which sets limits on the extent of fissures permitted and describes acceptable means of controlling the weld cladding processes. Cavitation and intergranular fissuring in SA508-2 and 22NiMoCr37 steels can occur in the presence or absence of intergranular particles. The observations of intergranular fissuring and cavitation in those HAZ free from overlapping effects are attributed to grain boundary segregation. Other probablemore » void nucleation sites are the grain boundary-lath interface intersections which facilitate the formation of grain boundary discontinuities.« less

  6. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, N.; Thesken, J. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Palko, J.; Eldridge, J.; Sutter, J.; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar(TradeMark) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar(TradeMark) filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However, due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to the experimental investigation reported in [1] and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel's residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  7. Three-dimensional flows in a hyperelastic vessel under external pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sen; Luo, Xiaoyu; Cai, Zongxi

    2018-05-09

    We study the collapsible behaviour of a vessel conveying viscous flows subject to external pressure, a scenario that could occur in many physiological applications. The vessel is modelled as a three-dimensional cylindrical tube of nonlinear hyperelastic material. To solve the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction, we have developed a novel approach based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method and the frontal solver. The method of rotating spines is used to enable an automatic mesh adaptation. The numerical code is verified extensively with published results and those obtained using the commercial packages in simpler cases, e.g. ANSYS for the structure with the prescribed flow, and FLUENT for the fluid flow with prescribed structure deformation. We examine three different hyperelastic material models for the tube for the first time in this context and show that at the small strain, all three material models give similar results. However, for the large strain, results differ depending on the material model used. We further study the behaviour of the tube under a mode-3 buckling and reveal its complex flow patterns under various external pressures. To understand these flow patterns, we show how energy dissipation is associated with the boundary layers created at the narrowest collapsed section of the tube, and how the transverse flow forms a virtual sink to feed a strong axial jet. We found that the energy dissipation associated with the recirculation does not coincide with the flow separation zone itself, but overlaps with the streamlines that divide the three recirculation zones. Finally, we examine the bifurcation diagrams for both mode-3 and mode-2 collapses and reveal that multiple solutions exist for a range of the Reynolds number. Our work is a step towards modelling more realistic physiological flows in collapsible arteries and veins.

  8. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  9. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Williams, Paul

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decisionmore » making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.« less

  10. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  11. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  12. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  13. Neural Network Prediction of Failure of Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels from Strain Field Data Acquired by a Computer Vision Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1997-01-01

    This effort used a new and novel method of acquiring strains called Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation (SDVIC) on impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels during a proof test. To predict the burst pressure, the hoop strain field distribution around the impact location from three vessels was used to train a neural network. The network was then tested on additional pressure vessels. Several variations on the network were tried. The best results were obtained using a single hidden layer. SDVIC is a fill-field non-contact computer vision technique which provides in-plane deformation and strain data over a load differential. This method was used to determine hoop and axial displacements, hoop and axial linear strains, the in-plane shear strains and rotations in the regions surrounding impact sites in filament wound pressure vessels (FWPV) during proof loading by internal pressurization. The relationship between these deformation measurement values and the remaining life of the pressure vessels, however, requires a complex theoretical model or numerical simulation. Both of these techniques are time consuming and complicated. Previous results using neural network methods had been successful in predicting the burst pressure for graphite/epoxy pressure vessels based upon acoustic emission (AE) measurements in similar tests. The neural network associates the character of the AE amplitude distribution, which depends upon the extent of impact damage, with the burst pressure. Similarly, higher amounts of impact damage are theorized to cause a higher amount of strain concentration in the damage effected zone at a given pressure and result in lower burst pressures. This relationship suggests that a neural network might be able to find an empirical relationship between the SDVIC strain field data and the burst pressure, analogous to the AE method, with greater speed and simplicity than theoretical or finite element modeling. The process of testing SDVIC

  14. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV): Developing Flight Rationale for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Introducing composite vessels into the Space Shuttle Program represented a significant technical achievement. Each Orbiter vehicle contains 24 (nominally) Kevlar tanks for storage of pressurized helium (for propulsion) and nitrogen (for life support). The use of composite cylinders saved 752 pounds per Orbiter vehicle compared with all-metal tanks. The weight savings is significant considering each Shuttle flight can deliver 54,000 pounds of payload to the International Space Station. In the wake of the Columbia accident and the ensuing Return to Flight activities, the Space Shuttle Program, in 2005, re-examined COPV hardware certification. Incorporating COPV data that had been generated over the last 30 years and recognizing differences between initial Shuttle Program requirements and current operation, a new failure mode was identified, as composite stress rupture was deemed credible. The Orbiter Project undertook a comprehensive investigation to quantify and mitigate this risk. First, the engineering team considered and later deemed as unfeasible the option to replace existing all flight tanks. Second, operational improvements to flight procedures were instituted to reduce the flight risk and the danger to personnel. Third, an Orbiter reliability model was developed to quantify flight risk. Laser profilometry inspection of several flight COPVs identified deep (up to 20 mil) depressions on the tank interior. A comprehensive analysis was performed and it confirmed that these observed depressions were far less than the criterion which was established as necessary to lead to liner buckling. Existing fleet vessels were exonerated from this failure mechanism. Because full validation of the Orbiter Reliability Model was not possible given limited hardware resources, an Accelerated Stress Rupture Test of a flown flight vessel was performed to provide increased confidence. A Bayesian statistical approach was developed to evaluate possible test results with respect to the

  15. Calculation and benchmarking of an azimuthal pressure vessel neutron fluence distribution using the BOXER code and scraping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Holzgrewe, F.; Hegedues, F.; Paratte, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    The light water reactor BOXER code was used to determine the fast azimuthal neutron fluence distribution at the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel after the tenth cycle of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using a cross-section library in 45 groups, fixed-source calculations in transport theory and x-y geometry were carried out to determine the fast azimuthal neutron flux distribution at the inner surface of the pressure vessel for four different cycles. From these results, the fast azimuthal neutron fluence after the tenth cycle was estimated and compared with the results obtained from scraping test experiments. In these experiments,more » small samples of material were taken from the inner surface of the pressure vessel. The fast neutron fluence was then determined form the measured activity of the samples. Comparing the BOXER and scraping test results have maximal differences of 15%, which is very good, considering the factor of 10{sup 3} neutron attenuation between the reactor core and the pressure vessel. To compare the BOXER results with an independent code, the 21st cycle of the PWR was also calculated with the TWODANT two-dimensional transport code, using the same group structure and cross-section library. Deviations in the fast azimuthal flux distribution were found to be <3%, which verifies the accuracy of the BOXER results.« less

  16. Investigation of the design of a metal-lined fully wrapped composite vessel under high internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaycıoğlu, Barış; Husnu Dirikolu, M.

    2010-09-01

    In this study, a Type III composite pressure vessel (ISO 11439:2000) loaded with high internal pressure is investigated in terms of the effect of the orientation of the element coordinate system while simulating the continuous variation of the fibre angle, the effect of symmetric and non-symmetric composite wall stacking sequences, and lastly, a stacking sequence evaluation for reducing the cylindrical section-end cap transition region stress concentration. The research was performed using an Ansys® model with 2.9 l volume, 6061 T6 aluminium liner/Kevlar® 49-Epoxy vessel material, and a service internal pressure loading of 22 MPa. The results show that symmetric stacking sequences give higher burst pressures by up to 15%. Stacking sequence evaluations provided a further 7% pressure-carrying capacity as well as reduced stress concentration in the transition region. Finally, the Type III vessel under consideration provides a 45% lighter construction as compared with an all metal (Type I) vessel.

  17. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Simplified failure sequence evaluation of reactor pressure vessel head corroding in-core instrumentation assembly

    SciTech Connect

    McVicker, J.P.; Conner, J.T.; Hasrouni, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    In-Core Instrumentation (ICI) assemblies located on a Reactor Pressure Vessel Head have a history of boric acid leakage. The acid tends to corrode the nuts and studs which fasten the flanges of the assembly, thereby compromising the assembly`s structural integrity. This paper provides a simplified practical approach in determining the likelihood of an undetected progressing assembly stud deterioration, which would lead to a catastrophic loss of reactor coolant. The structural behavior of the In-Core Instrumentation flanged assembly is modeled using an elastic composite section assumption, with the studs transmitting tension and the pressure sealing gasket experiencing compression. Using the abovemore » technique, one can calculate the flange relative deflection and the consequential coolant loss flow rate, as well as the stress in any stud. A solved real life example develops the expected failure sequence and discusses the exigency of leak detection for safe shutdown. In the particular case of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) it is concluded that leak detection occurs before catastrophic failure of the ICI flange assembly.« less

  19. Risk Assessment for Titanium Pressure Vessels Operating Inside the ARES I's Liquid Hydrogen Tank Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium alloy (Ti-6-4) is currently being proposed for the manufacturing of pressure vessels (PV) for storage of compressed helium gas, which are mounted inside the ARES I's liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. At cryogenic temperature, titanium alloys usually have the highest strength-to-weight ratio property and have been considered as the metallic materials of choice for lightweight PV operating in LH2 environment. Titanium PV s are also considered as heritage hardware because they have been used by NASA for the Saturn IV-B rocket s LH2 tank in the mid 1960 s. However, hydrogen embrittlement is possible if Ti-6-4 alloy is exposed to gaseous hydrogen at certain pressure and temperature during the LH2 tank filling and draining operations on the launch pad, and during the J2X engine burn period for the ARES I s upper stage. Additionally, the fracture toughness and ductility properties of Ti-6-4 are significantly decreased at cryogenic temperature. These factors do not necessary preclude the use of titanium PV in hydrogen or at cryogenic applications; however, their synergistic effects and the material damage tolerance must be accounted for in the mission life assessment for PV s, which are considered as fracture critical hardware. In this paper, an overview of the risk assessment for Ti-6-4 alloy, strategy to control hydrogen embrittlement and brief metallic material trade study for PV operating in LH2 tank will be presented.

  20. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y.

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In ordermore » to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.« less

  1. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences,more » VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.« less

  2. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences,more » VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.« less

  3. SURROGATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOR RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, William M.; Riley, Matthew E.; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    In nuclear light water reactors (LWRs), the reactor coolant, core and shroud are contained within a massive, thick walled steel vessel known as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Given the tremendous size of these structures, RPVs typically contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced in the manufacturing process. After many years of operation, irradiation-induced embrittlement makes these vessels increasingly susceptible to fracture initiation at the locations of the pre-existing flaws. Because of the uncertainty in the loading conditions, flaw characteristics and material properties, probabilistic methods are widely accepted and used in assessing RPV integrity. The Fracture Analysis of Vesselsmore » – Oak Ridge (FAVOR) computer program developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used for this purpose. This program can be used in order to perform deterministic and probabilistic risk-informed analyses of the structural integrity of an RPV subjected to a range of thermal-hydraulic events. FAVOR uses a one-dimensional representation of the global response of the RPV, which is appropriate for the beltline region, which experiences the most embrittlement, and employs an influence coefficient technique to rapidly compute stress intensity factors for axis-aligned surface-breaking flaws. The Grizzly code is currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to be used as a general multiphysics simulation tool to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled RPVs. Grizzly can be used to model the thermo-mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local 3D models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which

  4. Review of a Metdology for Tracking the Neutron Exposure of Pwr Pressure Vessels during the License Renewal Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Stan L.; Fero, Arnold H.; Roberts, George K.

    2003-06-01

    The neutron fluence associated with each material in the pressure vessel beltline region is determined on a plant specific basis at each surveillance capsule withdrawal. Based on an assumed mode of operation, fluence projections to account for future operation are then made for use in vessel integrity evaluations. The applicability of these assumed projections is normally verified and updated, if necessary, at each subsequent surveillance capsule withdrawal. However, following the last scheduled withdrawal of a surveillance capsule, there is generally no formal mechanism in place to assure that fluence projections for the remainder of plant operating lifetime remain valid. This paper provides a review of a methodology that can be efficiently used in conjunction with future fuel loading patterns or on-line core power distribution monitoring systems to track the actual fluence accrued by each of the pressure vessel beltline materials in the operating period following the last capsule withdrawal.

  5. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    PubMed

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  6. Temperature and pressure influence on maximum rates of pressure rise during explosions of propane-air mixtures in a spherical vessel.

    PubMed

    Razus, D; Brinzea, V; Mitu, M; Movileanu, C; Oancea, D

    2011-06-15

    The maximum rates of pressure rise during closed vessel explosions of propane-air mixtures are reported, for systems with various initial concentrations, pressures and temperatures ([C(3)H(8)]=2.50-6.20 vol.%, p(0)=0.3-1.3 bar; T(0)=298-423 K). Experiments were performed in a spherical vessel (Φ=10 cm) with central ignition. The deflagration (severity) index K(G), calculated from experimental values of maximum rates of pressure rise is examined against the adiabatic deflagration index, K(G, ad), computed from normal burning velocities and peak explosion pressures. At constant temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio, both the maximum rates of pressure rise and the deflagration indices are linear functions of total initial pressure, as reported for other fuel-air mixtures. At constant initial pressure and composition, the maximum rates of pressure rise and deflagration indices are slightly influenced by the initial temperature; some influence of the initial temperature on maximum rates of pressure rise is observed only for propane-air mixtures far from stoichiometric composition. The differentiated temperature influence on the normal burning velocities and the peak explosion pressures might explain this behaviour. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Does Physical Fitness Buffer the Relationship between Psychosocial Stress, Retinal Vessel Diameters, and Blood Pressure among Primary Schoolchildren?

    PubMed Central

    Endes, Katharina; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Brand, Serge; Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Pühse, Uwe; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Strong evidence exists showing that psychosocial stress plays an important part in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Because physical inactivity is associated with less favourable retinal vessel diameter and blood pressure profiles, this study explores whether physical fitness is able to buffer the negative effects of psychosocial stress on retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure in young children. Methods. 325 primary schoolchildren (51% girls, Mage = 7.28 years) took part in this cross-sectional research project. Retinal arteriolar diameters, retinal venular diameters, arteriolar to venular ratio, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed in all children. Interactions terms between physical fitness (performance in the 20 m shuttle run test) and four indicators of psychosocial stress (parental reports of critical life events, family, peer and school stress) were tested in a series of hierarchical regression analyses. Results. Critical life events and family, peer, and school-related stress were only weakly associated with retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure. No support was found for a stress-buffering effect of physical fitness. Conclusion. More research is needed with different age groups to find out if and from what age physical fitness can protect against arteriolar vessel narrowing and the occurrence of other cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:27795958

  8. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Overwrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter uncertainties are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  9. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  10. Basis of the tubesheet heat exchanger design rules used in the French pressure vessel code

    SciTech Connect

    Osweiller, F.

    1992-02-01

    For about 40 years most tubessheet exchangers have been designed according to the standards of TEMA. Partly due to their simplicity, these rules do not assure a safe heat-exchanger design in all cases. This is the main reason why new tubesheet design rules were developed in 1981 in France for the French pressure vessel code CODAP. For fixed tubesheet heat exchangers, the new rules account for the elastic rotational restraint of the shell and channel at the outer edge of the tubesheet, as proposed in 1959 by Galletly. For floating-head and U-tube heat exchangers, the approach developed by Gardner inmore » 1969 was selected with some modifications. In both cases, the tubesheet is replaced by an equivalent solid plate with adequate effective elastic constants, and the tube bundle is simulated by an elastic foundation. The elastic restraint at the edge of the tubesheet due the shell and channel is accounted for in different ways in the two types of heat exchangers. The purpose of the paper is to present the main basis of these rules and to compare them to TEMA rules.« less

  11. Effects of Surface Roughness, Oxidation, and Temperature on the Emissivity of Reactor Pressure Vessel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. L.; Jo, H.; Tirawat, R.

    Thermal radiation will be an important mode of heat transfer in future high-temperature reactors and in off-normal high-temperature scenarios in present reactors. In this work, spectral directional emissivities of two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) candidate materials were measured at room temperature after exposure to high-temperature air. In the case of SA508 steel, significant increases in emissivity were observed due to oxidation. In the case of Grade 91 steel, only very small increases were observed under the tested conditions. Effects of roughness were also investigated. To study the effects of roughening, unexposed samples of SA508 and Grade 91 steel were roughenedmore » via one of either grinding or shot-peening before being measured. Significant increases were observed only in samples having roughness exceeding the roughness expected of RPV surfaces. While the emissivity increases for SA508 from oxidation were indeed significant, the measured emissivity coefficients were below that of values commonly used in heat transfer models. Based on the observed experimental data, recommendations for emissivity inputs for heat transfer simulations are provided.« less

  12. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices ofmore » Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.« less

  13. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  14. On the Analysis of Clustering in an Irradiated Low Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Weld.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Kristina; Stiller, Krystyna; Efsing, Pål; Thuvander, Mattias

    2017-04-01

    Radiation induced clustering affects the mechanical properties, that is the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT), of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of nuclear power plants. The combination of low Cu and high Ni used in some RPV welds is known to further enhance the DBTT shift during long time operation. In this study, RPV weld samples containing 0.04 at% Cu and 1.6 at% Ni were irradiated to 2.0 and 6.4×1023 n/m2 in the Halden test reactor. Atom probe tomography (APT) was applied to study clustering of Ni, Mn, Si, and Cu. As the clusters are in the nanometer-range, APT is a very suitable technique for this type of study. From APT analyses information about size distribution, number density, and composition of the clusters can be obtained. However, the quantification of these attributes is not trivial. The maximum separation method (MSM) has been used to characterize the clusters and a detailed study about the influence of the choice of MSM cluster parameters, primarily on the cluster number density, has been undertaken.

  15. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  16. WRC bulletin. A review of underclad cracking in pressure-vessel components

    SciTech Connect

    Vinckier, A.G.; Pense, A.W.

    1974-01-01

    This review of cracking underneath the weld cladding is to determine what factors contribute to this condition, and to outline means for alleviating or eliminating this condition. Considerable data on manufacture, heat treatment, and cladding of heavy-section pressure-vessel steels for nuclear service are also included. Three factors in combination that promote underclad cracking are susceptible microstructure, favorable residual-stress pattern, and a thermal treatment bringing the steel into a critical temperature region (600-650/sup 0/C) where creep ductility is low. High-heat-input weld-overlay cladding produces the susceptible microstructure and residual-stress pattern and postweld heat treatment produces the critical temperature. Most underclad cracking wasmore » found in SA508 Class 2 steel forgings clad with one-layer submerged-arc strip electrodes or multi-electrode processes. It was not produced in SA533 Grade B plate or when multilayer overlay processes were used. Underclad cracking can be reduced or eliminated by a two-layer cladding technique, by controlling welding process variables (low heat input), renormalizing the sensitive HAZ region prior to heat treatment, by use of nonsusceptible materials, or by eliminating the postweld heat treatment. Results of a questionnaire survey are also included. 50 references. (DLC)« less

  17. Effect of collagen and elastin content on the burst pressure of human blood vessel seals formed with a bipolar tissue sealing system.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Cassandra A; Nelson, Meghan; Moore, Camille M; Martin, Kimberly E

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar devices are routinely used to seal blood vessels instead of sutures and clips. Recent work examining the impact of vascular proteins on bipolar seal performance found that collagen and elastin (CE) content within porcine arteries was a significant predictor of a vessel's burst pressure (VBPr). This study examined seal performance across a range of human blood vessels to investigate whether a similar relationship existed. In addition, we compared VBPr and CE content between porcine and human blood vessels. Our primary hypothesis is that higher collagen-to-elastin ratio will predict higher VBPr in human vasculature. In six cadavers, 185 blood vessels from nine anatomic locations were sealed using a bipolar electrosurgical system. A linear mixed model framework was used to evaluate the impact of vessel diameter and CE content on VBPr. The effect of CE ratio on VBPr is modified by vessel size, with CE ratio having larger influence on VBPr in smaller diameter vessels. Seal burst pressure of vessels 2-5 mm in diameter was significantly associated with their CE content. Comparison of average VBPr between species revealed porcine carotid and iliac arteries (440-670 mmHg) to be the best vessel types for predicting the seal strength of most human blood vessels (420-570 mmHg) examined. CE content significantly modified the seal strength of small to medium sized blood vessels but had limited impact on vessels >5 mm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dual-pump CARS of Air in a Heated Pressure Vessel up to 55 Bar and 1300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantu, Luca; Gallo, Emanuela; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Dual-pump Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements have been performed in a heated pressure vessel at NASA Langley Research Center. Each measurement, consisting of 500 single shot spectra, was recorded at a fixed location in dry air at various pressures and temperatures, in a range of 0.03-55×10(exp 5) Pa and 300-1373 K, where the temperature was varied using an electric heater. The maximum output power of the electric heater limited the combinations of pressures and temperatures that could be obtained. Charts of CARS signal versus temperature (at constant pressure) and signal versus pressure (at constant temperature) are presented and fit with an empirical model to validate the range of capability of the dual-pump CARS technique; averaged spectra at different conditions of pressure and temperature are also shown.

  19. Documentation of probabilistic fracture mechanics codes used for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock loading: Parts 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balkey, K.; Witt, F.J.; Bishop, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    Significant attention has been focused on the issue of reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) for many years. Pressurized thermal shock transient events are characterized by a rapid cooldown at potentially high pressure levels that could lead to a reactor vessel integrity concern for some pressurized water reactors. As a result of regulatory and industry efforts in the early 1980`s, a probabilistic risk assessment methodology has been established to address this concern. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are performed as part of this methodology to determine conditional probability of significant flaw extension for given pressurized thermal shock events. While recent industrymore » efforts are underway to benchmark probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes that are currently used by the nuclear industry, Part I of this report describes the comparison of two independent computer codes used at the time of the development of the original U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pressurized thermal shock rule. The work that was originally performed in 1982 and 1983 to compare the U.S. NRC - VISA and Westinghouse (W) - PFM computer codes has been documented and is provided in Part I of this report. Part II of this report describes the results of more recent industry efforts to benchmark PFM computer codes used by the nuclear industry. This study was conducted as part of the USNRC-EPRI Coordinated Research Program for reviewing the technical basis for pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analyses of the reactor pressure vessel. The work focused on the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis codes and methods used to perform the PTS calculations. An in-depth review of the methodologies was performed to verify the accuracy and adequacy of the various different codes. The review was structured around a series of benchmark sample problems to provide a specific context for discussion and examination of the fracture mechanics methodology.« less

  20. A new automated high pressure reaction vessel for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Ropchan, J.R.; Ricci, T.; Low, J.

    A continual growth in positron emission tomography (PET) has placed an increasing need for routine production of radiopharmaceuticals with minimization of radiation exposure to the chemist. The authors have developed the first remote, completely automated stainless-steel reaction vessel (SSRV) for the high temperature and pressure syntheses of any radiolabeled organic compounds (i.e. amino acids). The SSRV is composed of six major parts: (1) a top plate, which contains the four ports for the addition and withdrawal of solutions (2) a rotating inner disc, which controls the opening and closing of the four ports (3) a housing unit, for the O-ringsmore » and rotating disc (4) a fluid chamber, (5) a stepping motor, which drives the rotating disc and (6) a push-button control box, which operates the entire system. After cyclotron production of the radiolabeled precursor, activation of the appropriate buttons on the control box advance the rotating disc to the desired ports in the sequence of events where the reagents are added or withdrawn from the SSRV. Heating is supplied by a specially made hot plate mounted on an electrically operated jack. The SSRV is cooled via an external cooling system (nitrogen gas cooled in liquid nitrogen). The present system is easily adaptable to a microprocessing unit. This SSRV is successfully employed in the preparation of pure C-11 labeled DL-leucine, DL-alanine and DL-phenylalanine with high radiochemical yields (50-75%) and activities (typical activity in the final product(s) 240-400 mCi).« less

  1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessments with the Grizzly Aging Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Hoffman, William

    Grizzly is a simulation tool being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of the US Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program to provide improved safety assessments of systems, components, and structures in nuclear power plants subjected to age-related degradation. Its goal is to provide an improved scientific basis for decisions surrounding license renewal, which would permit operation of commercial nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE framework, which enables multiphysics simulations in a parallel computing environment. It will address a wide variety of aging issues in nuclear power plant systems, components,more » and structures, modelling both the aging processes and the ability of age-degraded components to perform safely. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen as the initial application for Grizzly. Grizzly solves tightly coupled equations of heat conduction and solid mechanics to simulate the global response of the RPV to accident conditions, and uses submodels to represent regions with pre-existing flaws. Domain integrals are used to calculate stress intensity factors on those flaws. A physically based empirical model is used to evaluate material embrittlement, and is used to evaluate whether crack growth would occur. Grizzly can represent the RPV in 2D or 3D, allowing it to evaluate effects that require higher dimensionality models to capture. Work is underway to use lower length scale models of material evolution to inform engineering models of embrittlement. This paper demonstrates an application of Grizzly to RPV failure assessment, and summarizes on-going work.« less

  2. A computational microscopy study of nanostructural evolution in irradiated pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    1997-11-01

    Nanostructural features that form in reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation at around 300°C lead to significant hardening and embrittlement. Continuum thermodynamic-kinetic based rate theories have been very successful in modeling the general characteristics of the copper and manganese nickel rich precipitate evolution, often the dominant source of embrittlement. However, a more detailed atomic scale understanding of these features is needed to interpret experimental measurements and better underpin predictive embrittlement models. Further, other embrittling features, believed to be subnanometer defect (vacancy)-solute complexes and small regions of modest enrichment of solutes are not well understood. A general approach to modeling embrittlement nanostructures, based on the concept of a computational microscope, is described. The objective of the computational microscope is to self-consistently integrate atomic scale simulations with other sources of information, including a wide range of experiments. In this work, lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) simulations are used to resolve the chemically and structurally complex nature of CuMnNiSi precipitates. The LMC simulations unify various nanoscale analytical characterization methods and basic thermodynamics. The LMC simulations also reveal that significant coupled vacancy and solute clustering takes place during cascade aging. The cascade clustering produces the metastable vacancy-cluster solute complexes that mediate flux effects. Cascade solute clustering may also play a role in the formation of dilute atmospheres of solute enrichment and enhance the nucleation of manganese-nickel rich precipitates at low Cu levels. Further, the simulations suggest that complex, highly correlated processes (e.g. cluster diffusion, formation of favored vacancy diffusion paths and solute scavenging vacancy cluster complexes) may lead to anomalous fast thermal aging kinetics at temperatures below about 450°C. The

  3. Determination of toughness and embrittlement for reactor pressure vessel steels using ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiser, Allen Lee, Jr.

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels results in a loss of fracture toughness (e.g., reduction in load carrying capacity of the steel). For the setting of operational limits and assuring the continued safe operation of the plant, current procedures estimate the effects of neutron embrittlement using empirical relations or the results of small samples irradiated in the plant. These procedures account for uncertainties in the estimates through the use of margin terms to ensure the conservatism of the resultant estimate vis-a-vis the "real" material toughness. Therefore, the ability to develop non destructive measurements that can estimate the actual RPV steel fracture toughness in situ would provide more accurate evaluations of operating limits for plants. This study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of ultrasonic attenuation measurements for estimating the fracture toughness of RPV steels. Ultrasonic measurements were made on samples in three distinct phases: (1) a heat treated RPV steel to induce changes in its fracture toughness; (2) several irradiated RPV steels to assess actual neutron embrittlement changes in fracture toughness; and (3) a matrix of unirradiated RPV steels with a range of as fabricated toughness levels. The results indicate that ultrasonic attenuation is generally able to identify differences in responses for samples with different toughness levels, although in some cases the differences in ultrasonic responses are small. The results from the three phases are not consistent, as in some cases reduced toughness results in higher attenuation and in other cases lower attenuation. This trend is not surprising given the different types of microstructural changes that result in the toughness changes for each phase of this work. In addition, different trends were identified for plate and weld materials.

  4. The Relationship of Retinal Vessel Diameters and Fractal Dimensions with Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaowei; Yuan, Yin; Gao, Zhonghai; Chen, Falin

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the correlation between quantitative retinal vascular parameters such as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and retinal vascular fractal dimension (D(f)), and cardiovascular risk factors in the Chinese Han population residing in the in islands of southeast China. Methodology/Principle Findings In this cross-sectional study, fundus photographs were collected and semi-automated analysis software was used to analyze retinal vessel diameters and fractal dimensions. Cardiovascular risk factors such as relevant medical history, blood pressure (BP), lipids, and blood glucose data were collected. Subjects had a mean age of 51.9±12.0 years and included 812 (37.4%) males and 1,357 (62.6%) females. Of the subjects, 726 (33.5%) were overweight, 226 (10.4%) were obese, 272 (12.5%) had diabetes, 738 (34.0%) had hypertension, and 1,156 (53.3%) had metabolic syndrome. After controlling for the effects of potential confounders, multivariate analyses found that age (β = 0.06, P = 0.008), sex (β = 1.33, P = 0.015), mean arterial blood pressure (β = −0.12, P<0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (β = −0.22, P = 0.008), and CRVE (β = 0.23, P<0.001) were significantly associated with CRAE. Age (β = −0.0012, P<0.001), BP classification (prehypertension: β = −0.0075, P = 0.014; hypertension: β = −0.0131, P = 0.002), and hypertension history (β = −0.0007, P = 0.009) were significantly associated with D(f). Conclusions/Significance D(f) exhibits a stronger association with BP than CRAE. Thus, D(f) may become a useful indicator of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25188273

  5. Evaluation of polyimide/glass fiber composites for construction of light weight pressure vessels for cryogenic propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petker, I.; Segimoto, M.

    1973-01-01

    The application of polyimide resin as a matrix for glass filament-wound thin metal-lined pressure vessels was studied over a temperature range of (minus) 320 to 600 F. Keramid 601 polyimide was found to perform quite well over the entire range of temperature. Hoop stress values of 425 ksi were determined at 75 F which is equivalent to epoxy resin in similar structures. At -320 and 600 F, 125 and 80% of this strength was retained. Thermal ageing at 500 F for up to 50 hours was studied with severe reduction in strength, but there is evidence that this reduction could be improved. Another polyimide resin studied was P10PA which was found to have processing characteristics inappropriate for filament-winding. NOL ring tensile and shear data was determined from both resins with S-glass. Pressure vessel design, fabrication and test procedures are described in detail.

  6. The Combined Effects of Stress Concentration and Tensile Stresses from Autofrettage on the Life of Pressure Vessels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17011 THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF STRESS CONCENTRATION AND TENSILE STRESSES FROM AUTOFRETTAGE ON THE LIFE OF...SUBTITLE THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF STRESS CONCENTRATION AND TENSILE STRESSES FROM AUTOFRETTAGE ON THE LIFE OF PRESSURE VESSELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...hydraulically or mechanically overstrained in order to impart favorable near bore residual compressive hoop stresses in an attempt to enhance fatigue life. As a

  7. THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF STRESS CONCENTRATION AND TENSILE STRESSES FROM AUTOFRETTAGE ON THE LIFE OF PRESSURE VESSELS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-22

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17011 THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF STRESS CONCENTRATION AND TENSILE STRESSES FROM AUTOFRETTAGE ON THE LIFE OF...SUBTITLE THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF STRESS CONCENTRATION AND TENSILE STRESSES FROM AUTOFRETTAGE ON THE LIFE OF PRESSURE VESSELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...hydraulically or mechanically overstrained in order to impart favorable near bore residual compressive hoop stresses in an attempt to enhance fatigue life. As a

  8. Reactor moderator, pressure vessel, and heat rejection system of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyke, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-megawatt open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 196,600 newtons (44,200 lb) and a specific impulse of 4400 seconds. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel, and waste heat rejection system) were considered conceptually and were sized.

  9. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  10. Spin-rolling, welding, and heat treatment of aluminium 2219 for Ariane 5 GAM high pressure vessel liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, W.

    1992-10-01

    Cylindrical liners made of Al 2219 may be spinrolled if both recrystallization and metastable precipitates can be avoided during forging or preparatory heat treatment. So welding is to be limited to circumferential joints. Pore-free welds are attainable immediately after hydroxide layer removal by diamond cutting without grease application. The EB vacuum is favorable to porosity suppression. A complete heat treatment of the liner incorporating solutionizing, water quenching and ageing leads to 100 percent weld efficiency. Pressure stabilization avoids buckling. Subsequent carbon fiber winding, curing and plastic prestressing of the liner results in an efficient high pressure vessel for hydrogen service.

  11. Blood pressure regulation V: in vivo mechanical properties of precapillary vessels as affected by long-term pressure loading and unloading.

    PubMed

    Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kölegård, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies are reviewed, concerning the in vivo wall stiffness of arteries and arterioles in healthy humans, and how these properties adapt to iterative increments or sustained reductions in local intravascular pressure. A novel technique was used, by which arterial and arteriolar stiffness was determined as changes in arterial diameter and flow, respectively, during graded increments in distending pressure in the blood vessels of an arm or a leg. Pressure-induced increases in diameter and flow were smaller in the lower leg than in the arm, indicating greater stiffness in the arteries/arterioles of the leg. A 5-week period of intermittent intravascular pressure elevations in one arm reduced pressure distension and pressure-induced flow in the brachial artery by about 50%. Conversely, prolonged reduction of arterial/arteriolar pressure in the lower body by 5 weeks of sustained horizontal bedrest, induced threefold increases of the pressure-distension and pressure-flow responses in a tibial artery. Thus, the wall stiffness of arteries and arterioles are plastic properties that readily adapt to changes in the prevailing local intravascular pressure. The discussion concerns mechanisms underlying changes in local arterial/arteriolar stiffness as well as whether stiffness is altered by changes in myogenic tone and/or wall structure. As regards implications, regulation of local arterial/arteriolar stiffness may facilitate control of arterial pressure in erect posture and conditions of exaggerated intravascular pressure gradients. That increased intravascular pressure leads to increased arteriolar wall stiffness also supports the notion that local pressure loading may constitute a prime mover in the development of vascular changes in hypertension.

  12. Blood pressure levels post mechanical thrombectomy and outcomes in non-recanalized large vessel occlusion patients.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nitin; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Pandhi, Abhi; Dillard, Kira; Alsbrook, Diana; Chang, Jason J; Krishnaiah, Balaji; Nickele, Christopher; Hoit, Daniel; Alsherbini, Khalid; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Arthur, Adam S; Elijovich, Lucas

    2018-01-11

    Permissive hypertension may benefit patients with non-recanalized large vessel occlusion (nrLVO) post mechanical thrombectomy (MT) by maintaining brain perfusion. Data evaluating the impact of post-MT blood pressure (BP) levels on outcomes in nrLVO patients are scarce. We investigated the association of the post-MT BP course with safety and efficacy outcomes in nrLVO. Hourly systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) values were prospectively recorded for 24 hours following MT in consecutive nrLVO patients. Maximum, minimum, and mean BP levels were documented. Three-month functional independence (FI) was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores of 0-2. A total of 88 nrLVO patients were evaluated post MT. Patients with FI had lower maximum SBP (160±19 mmHg vs 179±23 mmHg; P=0.001) and higher minimum SBP levels (119±12 mmHg vs 108±25 mmHg; P=0.008). Maximum SBP (183±20 mmHg vs 169±23 mmHg; P=0.008) and DBP levels (105±20 mmHg vs 89±18 mmHg; P=0.001) were higher in patients who died at 3 months while minimum SBP values were lower (102±28 mmHg vs 115±16 mmHg; P=0.007). On multivariable analyses, both maximum SBP (OR per 10 mmHg increase: 0.55, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.79; P=0.001) and minimum SBP (OR per 10 mmHg increase: 1.64, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.60; P=0.033) levels were independently associated with the odds of FI. Maximum DBP (OR per 10 mmHg increase: 1.61; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.36; P=0.014) and minimum SBP (OR per 10 mmHg increase: 0.65, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.90; P=0.009) values were independent predictors of 3-month mortality. Our study demonstrates that wide BP excursions from the mean during the first 24 hours post MT are associated with worse outcomes in patients with nrLVO. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Characterizing the effects of cladding on semi-elliptical longitudinal surface flaws in cylindrical vessels subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, D.E.; Yoon, K.K.

    1996-12-01

    Flaws on the inside surface of cladded reactor vessels are often analyzed by modelling the carbon steel base metal without consideration of a layer of stainless steel cladding material, thus ignoring the effects of this bimetallic discontinuity. Adding cladding material to the inside surface of a finite element model of a vessel raises concerns regarding adequate mesh refinement in the vicinity of the base metal/cladding interface. This paper presents results of three-dimensional linear stress analysis that has been performed to obtain stress intensity factors for clad and unclad reactor vessels subjected to internal pressure loading. The study concentrates on semi-ellipticalmore » longitudinal surface flaws with a 6 to 1 length-to-depth ratio and flaw depths of 1/8 and 1/4 of the base metal thickness. Various meshing schemes are evaluated for modelling the crack front profile, with particular emphasis on the region near the inside surface and at the base metal/cladding interface. The shape of the crack front profile through the cladding layer and the number of finite elements used to discretize the cladding thickness are found to have a significant influence on typical fracture mechanic measures of the crack tip stress fields. Results suggest that the stress intensity factor at the inner surface of a cladded vessel may be affected as much by the finite element mesh near the surface as by the material discontinuity between the two parts of the structure.« less

  14. A study of the pressure vessel steel of the WWER-440 unit 1 of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova, E.; Velinov, N.; Avdjieva, T.; Mitov, I.; Rusanov, V.

    2017-11-01

    A comparison between highly neutron irradiated samples from the region of weld № 4 and low irradiated samples from weld № 1 taken from the pressure vessel of the WWER-440 Unit № 1 of the Kozloduy NPP has been performed. Measurements of the residual activity of samples from the outer surface of the reactor pressure vessel bottom corpus reveal very low activity of 60Co. Insofar as there the base and weld metal appear to be exposed to a very low neutron fluence, the samples from these locations can be considered as practically not affected and may serve as a reference basis for comparison with highly irradiated pressure vessel regions. The Mössbauer parameters isomer shift (IS) and quadrupole splitting (QS) were found to be absolutely irradiation insensitive. A stepwise reduction of the internal hyperfine magnetic field Bhf, each by about 2.6 T, was observed. This can be attributed to the replacement of one or two surrounding iron atoms as first nearest neighbors by non-iron alloying atoms. The Mössbauer experimental line widths for irradiated and non-irradiated samples are practically the same, which is a quite unexpected result. The area fraction ratio for the three main Zeeman sextet subspectra S1:S2:S3 shows very high irradiation sensitivity. For the bottom low irradiated region of the reactor vessel the values are S1:S2:S3 = 50.1:40.0:9.4. After seven years of operation between the pressure vessel annealing in 1989 and the autumn of 1996 when the samples from weld № 4 were taken the ratio changes strongly to S1:S2:S3 = 56.4:34.7:8.5. A possible explanation of this result is that neutron irradiation gives rise to a precipitation process involving predominantly alloying atoms as Ni, Mn, Cr, Mo and V which become mobile and precipitate in the form of carbides and/or P-rich phases and alloying atom aggregates. This "refinement" process lowers the partial area of subspectra S2 and S3 where alloying atoms are involved and leads to a higher area fraction of

  15. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels: Database Extension Task 3.0 and Impact Damage Effects Control Task 8.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Ross, William L., Sr.; Tapphorn, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    This document represents efforts accomplished at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in support of the Enhanced Technology for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Program, a joint research and technology effort among the U.S. Air Force, NASA, and the Aerospace Corporation. WSTF performed testing for several facets of the program. Testing that contributed to the Task 3.0 COPV database extension objective included baseline structural strength, failure mode and safe-life, impact damage tolerance, sustained load/impact effect, and materials compatibility. WSTF was also responsible for establishing impact protection and control requirements under Task 8.0 of the program. This included developing a methodology for establishing an impact control plan. Seven test reports detail the work done at WSTF. As such, this document contributes to the database of information regarding COPV behavior that will ensure performance benefits and safety are maintained throughout vessel service life.

  16. Proof test criteria for thin-walled 2219 aluminum pressure vessels. Volume 1: Program summary and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to investigate the crack growth behavior of deep surface flaws in 2219 aluminum. The program included tests of uniaxially loaded surface flaw and center crack panels at temperatures ranging from 20K (-423 F) to ambient. The tests were conducted on both the base metal and as-welded weld metal material. The program was designed to provide data on the mechanisms of failure by ligament penetration, and the residual cyclic life, after proof-testing, of a vessel which has been subjected to incipient penetration by the proof test. The results were compared and analyzed with previously developed data to develop guidelines for the proof testing of thin walled 2219 pressure vessels.

  17. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 54.01-2 Section 54.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-2 Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and...

  18. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 54.01-2 Section 54.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-2 Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and...

  19. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 54.01-2 Section 54.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-2 Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and...

  20. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 54.01-2 Section 54.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-2 Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and...

  1. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 54.01-2 Section 54.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-2 Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and...

  2. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize themore » mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.« less

  3. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  4. Finite element analysis of the design and manufacture of thin-walled pressure vessels used as aerosol cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Ragba Mohamed

    Thin-walled cylinders are used extensively in the food packaging and cosmetics industries. The cost of material is a major contributor to the overall cost and so improvements in design and manufacturing processes are always being sought. Shape optimisation provides one method for such improvements. Aluminium aerosol cans are a particular form of thin-walled cylinder with a complex shape consisting of truncated cone top, parallel cylindrical section and inverted dome base. They are manufactured in one piece by a reverse-extrusion process, which produces a vessel with a variable thickness from 0.31 mm in the cylinder up to 1.31 mm in the base for a 53 mm diameter can. During manufacture, packaging and charging, they are subjected to pressure, axial and radial loads and design calculations are generally outside the British and American pressure vessel codes. 'Design-by-test' appears to be the favoured approach. However, a more rigorous approach is needed in order to optimise the designs. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a powerful tool for predicting stress, strain and displacement behaviour of components and structures. FEA is also used extensively to model manufacturing processes. In this study, elastic and elastic-plastic FEA has been used to develop a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of yielding, 'dome reversal' (an inherent safety feature, where the base suffers elastic-plastic buckling at a pressure below the burst pressure) and collapse due to internal pressure loading and how these are affected by geometry. It has also been used to study the buckling behaviour under compressive axial loading. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the extrusion process (in order to investigate the effects of tool geometry, friction coefficient and boundary conditions) have been undertaken. Experimental verification of the buckling and collapse behaviours has also been carried out and there is reasonable agreement between the experimental data and the numerical

  5. Comparison of irradiation-induced shifts of K{sub Jc} and Charpy impact toughness for reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1999-10-01

    The current provisions for determination of the upward temperature shift of the lower-bound static fracture toughness curve due to irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels are based on the assumption that they are the same as the Charpy 41-J shifts as a consequence of irradiation. The objective of this paper is to evaluate this assumption relative to data reported in open publications. Depending on the specific source, different sizes of fracture toughness specimens, procedures of the K{sub Jc} determination, and fitting functions were used. It was anticipated that the scatter might be reduced by using a consistent approach to analyzemore » the published data. A method employing Weibull statistics is applied to analyze original fracture toughness data of unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. Application of the master curve concept is used to determine shifts of fracture toughness transition curves. A hyperbolic tangent function is used to fit charpy absorbed energy data. The fracture toughness shifts are compared to Charpy impact shifts evaluated with various criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that for weld metals, on average, the fracture toughness shift is the same as the Charpy 41-J temperature shift, while for base metals, on average, the fracture toughness shift at 41 J is 16% greater than the shift of the Charpy 41-J transition temperature, with both correlations having relatively large 95% confidence intervals.« less

  6. Disclosure of the oscillations in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessel steel damage at fast neutron intensity decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Fast neutron intensity influence on reactor materials radiation damage is a critically important question in the problem of the correct use of the accelerated irradiation tests data for substantiation of the materials workability in real irradiation conditions that is low neutron intensity. Investigations of the fast neutron intensity (flux) influence on radiation damage and experimental data scattering reveal the existence of non-monotonous sections in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steel damage. Discovery of the oscillations as indicator of the self-organization processes presence give reasons for new ways searching on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel radiation stability increasing and attempt of the self-restoring metal elaboration. Revealing of the wavelike process in the form of non monotonous parts of the kinetics of radiation embrittlement testifies that periodic transformation of the structure take place. This fact actualizes the problem of more precise definition of the RPV materials radiation embrittlement mechanisms and gives reasons for search of the ways to manage the radiation stability (nanostructuring and so on to stimulate the radiation defects annihilation), development of the means for creating of more stableness self recovering smart materials.

  7. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin

    In this paper, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress-strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. In conclusion, the stress-strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress-strainmore » state estimated assuming simplified transients.« less

  8. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; ...

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress-strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. In conclusion, the stress-strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress-strainmore » state estimated assuming simplified transients.« less

  9. Fracture resistance of welded thick-walled high-pressure vessels in power plants. Report No. 2. Approach to evaluating static strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gorynin, I.V.; Filatov, V.M.; Ignatov, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    The authors examine data on the effect of defects on the fracture resistance of high-pressure vessels and their models obtained within the framework of the HSST program. Results of internal-pressure tests of two types of vessels with a wall thickness of 152 mm made from forgings of steels SA508 and SA533, as well as small vessels with a wall thickness of 11.5 and 23mm made of steel SA533 are shown. The authors state that testing thick-walled welded high-pressure vessels and thin-walled vessels with surface defects of different sizes has demonstrated that there are substantial static-strength reserves in structures designed bymore » existing domestic and foreign standards on the strength of power-plant equipment. A correction was proposed for the presently used method of calculating the resistance of highpressure vessels to brittle fracture that allows for the dimensions of the defects in relation to the type of vessel, the manufacturing technology, and the method of inspection.« less

  10. Progressive Damage and Fracture of Unstiffened and Stiffened Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability and damage tolerance characteristics of pressurized graphite/epoxy laminated thin composite cylinders are investigated via computational simulation. Both unstiffened and integral hoop stiffened cylinders are considered. A computer code is utilized for the simulation of composite structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. The increase of burst pressure due to hoop stiffening is quantified. Results demonstrate the significance of the type and size of local defects on the structural durability of pressurized composite cylindrical shells.

  11. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Yi, W. S.; Lan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system.

  12. Analysis of Impact Induced Damage and its Effect on Structural Integrity of Space Flight Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this research work has been to provide analytical background and support to the ongoing experimental program at NASA, White Sands Test Facility, involving testing composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) for impact damage and cyclic pressurization. Preliminary theoretical basis, including the governing equations for a shallow shell subjected to internal pressure, has been established. Effects of the Griffith type cracks on the structural integrity of the cylindrical vessel were evaluated by methods of Fracture Mechanics. The results indicate that the effective mass of the pressure vessel is an important factor influencing the response to impact events. We also have found that the material properties of the target, contained in the constitutive equations of the composite attached to the Aluminum liner, dominate the impact event in the low velocity range, the material properties become less important, while the target mass distribution and the impactor mass become more significant as the velocity of the impactor increases. Therefore, at high-velocity impact it is not only the kinetic energy of the impactor but also its mass which has a significant effect on the dynamics of the event, and consequently on the induced damage. This work also suggests a methodology for an assessment of the rate of loading effects on the degradation of the material toughness associated with a high-velocity impact where the rate effects become significant. To model the rate dependence of the material response a viscoelastic-plastic constitutive equations were assumed, and on this basis predictions are made regarding the rate dependent material resistance curve. Other dynamic phenomena associated with the impact event have been treated in the framework of the Computational Mechanics using the courtesy of Prof. P. Guebelle and his graduate student at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who have an access to a super-fast computer located on their campus. Finally

  13. Identifying the Inertial Cavitation Pressure Threshold and Skull Effects in a Vessel Phantom Using Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James J.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-03-01

    Using Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been shown promising for brain drug delivery. However, the exact mechanism behind the opening remains unknown. Here, the effects of the murine skull on the threshold of inertial cavitation were investigated. In order to investigate the pressure threshold for inertial cavitation of preformed microbubbles during sonication, passive cavitation detection in conjunction with B-mode imaging was used. A cylindrical vessel with a 610-μm diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel was generated within a polyacrylamide gel to simulate large blood vessels. Definity® (Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA) microbubbles with a 1.1-3.3 μm in diameter at 2.5×107 bubbles/mL were injected into the channel before sonication (frequency: 1.525 MHz; pulse length: 100 cycles; PRF: 10 Hz; sonication duration: 2 s) through an excised mouse skull. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, acted as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold. A 7.5 MHz linear array with the field-of-view perpendicular to the axial length of the FUS beam was also used to image the occurrence of bubble fragmentation. The broadband spectral response acquired at the passive cavitation detector (PCD) and the B-mode images identified the occurrence and location of the inertial cavitation, respectively. Findings indicated that the peak-rarefactional pressure threshold was approximately equal to 0.45 MPa at the presence or the absence of the skull. However, the skull induced 10-50% lower inertial cavitation dose. Mouse skulls did not affect the pressure threshold of inertial cavitation but resulted in a lower inertial cavitation dose. The broadband response could be captured through the murine skull, so the same PCD setup can be used in future in vivo applications.

  14. Twist seal for high-pressure vessels such as space shuttle rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    von Pragenau, George L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Seals for sealing clevis and flange joints (14) of a solid rocket booster motor, and more particularly to a seal (30) which is twisted upon application of expansion forces to an edge seal (36). This twisting motion initially causes a leading edge seal (44) to be urged into sealing engagement with a surface (48) of an adjacent member (20) and thereafter, increasing fluid pressure on a pressurized side (64) of a seal (30) drives a broad sealing region (46) into sealing engagement with a surface (48).

  15. Effect of component compression on the initial performance of an IPV nickel-hydrogen cell. [Individual Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, Randall F.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method was developed for evaluating the effect of component compression on the charge and discharge voltage characteristics of a 3 1/2 in. diameter boiler plate cell. A standard boiler plate pressure vessel was modified by the addition of a mechanical feedthrough on the bottom of the vessel which permitted different compressions to be applied to the components without disturbing the integrity of the stack. Compression loadings from 0.94 to 27.4 psi were applied by suspending weights from the feedthrough rod. Cell voltages were measured for 0.96-C, 55-min charge and for 1.37-C, 35-min and 2-C, 24-min discharges. An initial change in voltage performance on both charge and discharge as the loading increased was attributed to seating of the components. Subsequent variation of the compression from 2.97 to 27.4 psi caused only minor changes in either the charge or the discharge voltages. Several one month open-circuit voltage stands and 1100 cycles under LEO conditions at the maximum loading have produced no change in performance.

  16. Safety Evaluation Report: Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage, Lincoln Composites, Lincoln, NE, May 25, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, III, William C.; Kallman, Richard A.; Maes, Miguel

    2010-12-22

    Lincoln Composites operates a facility for designing, testing, and manufacturing composite pressure vessels. Lincoln Composites also has a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to develop composite tanks for high-pressure hydrogen storage. The initial stage of this project involves testing the permeation of high-pressure hydrogen through polymer liners. The company recently moved and is constructing a dedicated research/testing laboratory at their new location. In the meantime, permeation tests are being performed in a corner of a large manufacturing facility. The safety review team visited the Lincoln Composites site on May 25, 2010. The project team presented an overview of themore » company and project and took the safety review team on a tour of the facility. The safety review team saw the entire process of winding a carbon fiber/resin tank on a liner, installing the boss and valves, and curing and painting the tank. The review team also saw the new laboratory that is being built for the DOE project and the temporary arrangement for the hydrogen permeation tests.« less

  17. Influence of structural parameters on the tendency of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steel to temper embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Zabusov, O.; Fedotova, S.; Frolov, A.; Saltykov, M.; Maltsev, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the influence of structural parameters on the tendency of steels to reversible temper embrittlement was studied for assessment of performance properties of reactor pressure vessel steels with extended service life. It is shown that the growth of prior austenite grain size leads to an increase of the critical embrittlement temperature in the initial state. An embrittlement heat treatment at the temperature of maximum manifestation of temper embrittlement (480 °C) shifts critical embrittlement temperature to higher values due to the increase of the phosphorus concentration on grain boundaries. There is a correlation between phosphorus concentration on boundaries of primary austenite grains and the share of brittle intergranular fracture (that, in turn, depends on impact test temperature) in the fracture surfaces of the tested Charpy specimens.

  18. Effect of Mechanical Heterogeneity on the Crack Driving Force of a Reactor Pressure Vessel Outlet Nozzle DMW Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingyan, Zhao; Yinghao, Cui; He, Xue

    2017-12-01

    The welding mechanical heterogeneity, load complexity, material and geometrical structure makes it very difficult to assess the structural integrity of dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints. Based on a numerical simulated approach of the continuous change of material mechanical property in the buttering layer, a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) outlet nozzle DMW joint with service loads is studied, effect of mechanical heterogeneity on the stress-strain field and stress triaxiality at the semi-elliptical surface crack front are discussed. The analyses show that once the crack extends into the high hardness zone of Alloy 182 buttering, the strain decreases sharply, the strain gradient increases and the crack propagation slows down. The influence of strength mismatch on the stress triaxiality at the shallow crack front is greater than that at the deep crack front. The interaction between strength mismatch and crack depth directly affects the crack growth direction.

  19. Effect of temperature on the fracture toughness in the nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (SA508-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.W.; Lim, M.B.; Yoon, H.K.

    1994-12-31

    The elastic-plastic fracture toughness J{sub IC} of the Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (SA508-3) which has high toughness was obtained at three temperatures (room temperature, {minus}20 C, 200 C) using a 1/2 CT specimen. Especially the two methods recommended in ASTM and JSME were compared. It was found that difficulty exists in obtaining J{sub IC} by ASTM R-curve method, while JSME R-curve method yielded good results. The stretched zone width method gave slightly larger J{sub IC} values than those by the R-curve method for SA508-3 steel and the blunting line was not affected by the test temperatures. The relation betweenmore » SZW and J, SZW and J/E and SZW and J/{sigma}{sub ys} before initiation of a stable crack growth in the fracture toughness test at three temperatures is described.« less

  20. Preparation of reconstituted Charpy V-notch impact specimens for generating pressure vessel steel fracture toughness data

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, J.S.; Fromm, E.O.; Server, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The arc stud welding process has been adapted for use in producing reconstituted Charpy V-notch impact specimens. In this process, each half of a tested and fractured Charpy specimen is used as the central region of a reconstituted specimen. End tabs are joined to one half of a fractured specimen by a specially designed stud welding apparatus. SA533B-1 and SA508-2 unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steel specimens have been produced. Both conventional and precracked reconstituted specimen data have been produced. Both types of data have been shown to be in excellent agreement with original specimen data. The arc stud weldingmore » process can therefore be used to increase the amount of data obtainable from a limited number of specimens or to obtain Charpy data when full size specimens cannot otherwise be obtained.« less

  1. Simulation of hydrostatic water level measuring system for pressure vessels with the ATHLET-code

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, R.; Vandreier, B.; Kaestner, W.

    1996-11-01

    The static and dynamic behavior of measuring systems determine the value indicated by the measuring systems in relation to the true operating conditions. This paper demonstrates the necessity to involve the behavior of measuring systems in accident analysis with the thermohydraulic code ATHLET (developed by GRS Germany) by the example of hydrostatic water level measurement for horizontal steam generators on NPP (VVER). The modelling of a comparison vessel for the level measuring system with high sensitivity and a limited range of measurement (narrow-range level measuring system) by using ATHLET components and the checking of the function of the module weremore » realized. A good correspondence (maximal deviation 3%) between the measured and calculated narrow-range water level by the module was obtained for a realized post calculation of a measured operational transient in a NPP (VVER). The research carried out was sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology within the projects {open_quotes}Basic research of process and system behaviour of NPP, control technique for accident management{close_quotes} (Project number 150 0855/7) and the project RS 978. The research work appertains to the theoretic and experimental work of institute {open_quotes}Institut fuer ProzeBtechnik, ProzeBautomatisierung und MeBtechnik (IPM){close_quotes} for accident analysis and accident management.« less

  2. Experimental results of direct containment heating by high-pressure melt ejection into the Surtsey vessel: The DCH-3 and DCH-4 tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.

    Two experiments, DCH-3 and DCH-4, were performed at the Surtsey test facility to investigate phenomena associated with a high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) reactor accident sequence resulting in direct containment heating (DCH). These experiments were performed using the same experimental apparatus with identical initial conditions, except that the Surtsey test vessel contained air in DCH-3 and argon in DCH-4. Inerting the vessel with argon eliminated chemical reactions between metallic debris and oxygen. Thus, a comparison of the pressure response in DCH-3 and DCH-4 gave an indication of the DCH contribution due to metal/oxygen reactions. 44 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. Retinal vessel diameter and estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in arterial hypertension: the Beijing Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Ya Xing; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Hypertensive retinal microvascular abnormalities include an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio. Because central retinal vein pressure depends on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we examined whether the retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio and other retinal hypertensive signs are associated with CSFP. Participants of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (n = 1,574 subjects) underwent measurement of the temporal inferior and superior retinal artery and vein diameter. CSFP was calculated as 0.44 × body mass index (kg/m(2)) + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mm Hg) - 0.18 × age (years) - 1.91. Larger retinal vein diameters and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratios were significantly associated with higher estimated CSFP (P = 0.001) in multivariable analysis. In contrast, temporal inferior retinal arterial diameter was marginally associated (P = 0.03) with estimated CSFP, and temporal superior artery diameter was not significantly associated (P = 0.10) with estimated CSFP; other microvascular abnormalities, such as arteriovenous crossing signs, were also not significantly associated with estimated CSFP. In a reverse manner, higher estimated CSFP as a dependent variable in the multivariable analysis was associated with wider retinal veins and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratio. In the same model, estimated CSFP was not significantly correlated with retinal artery diameters or other retinal microvascular abnormalities. Correspondingly, arterial hypertension was associated with retinal microvascular abnormalities such as arteriovenous crossing signs (P = 0.003), thinner temporal retinal arteries (P < 0.001), higher CSFP (P < 0.001), and wider retinal veins (P = 0.001) or, as a corollary, with a higher vein-to-artery diameter ratio in multivariable analysis. Wider retinal vein diameters are associated with higher estimated CSFP and vice versa. In arterial hypertension, an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio depends on elevated CSFP

  4. NESC Review of the 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) Oxygen Storage Pressure Vessel Inspection Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael; Raju, Ivatury; Piascik, Robert; Cameron, Kenneth; Kirsch, Michael; Hoffman, Eric; Murthy, Pappu; Hopson, George; Greulich, Owen; Frazier, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The 8-Foot HTT (refer to Figure 4.0-1) is used to conduct tests of air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems at Mach numbers 4, 5, and 7. Methane, Air, and LOX are mixed and burned in a combustor to produce test gas stream containing 21 percent by volume oxygen. The NESC was requested by the NASA LaRC Executive Safety Council to review the rationale for a proposed change to the recertification requirements, specifically the internal inspection requirements, of the 8-Foot HTT LOX Run Tank and LOX Storage Tank. The Run Tank is an 8,000 gallon cryogenic tank used to provide LOX to the tunnel during operations, and is pressured during the tunnel run to 2,250 pounds per square inch gage (psig). The Storage Tank is a 25,000 gallon cryogenic tank used to store LOX at slightly above atmospheric pressure as a external shell, with space between the shells maintained under vacuum conditions.

  5. Endothelial mineralocorticoid receptor ablation does not alter blood pressure, kidney function or renal vessel contractility

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Sidsel B.; Finsen, Stine; Marcussen, Niels; Quaggin, Susan E.

    2018-01-01

    Aldosterone blockade confers substantial cardiovascular and renal protection. The effects of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) expressed in endothelial cells (EC) within the renal vasculature have not been delineated. We hypothesized that lack of MR in EC may be protective in renal vasculature and examined this by ablating the Nr3c2 gene in endothelial cells (EC-MR) in mice. Blood pressure, heart rate and PAH clearance were measured using indwelling catheters in conscious mice. The role of the MR in EC on contraction and relaxation was investigated in the renal artery and in perfused afferent arterioles. Urinary sodium excretion was determined by use of metabolic cages. EC-MR transgenics had markedly decreased MR expression in isolated aortic endothelial cells as compared to littermates (WT). Blood pressure and effective renal plasma flow at baseline and following AngII infusion was similar between groups. No differences in contraction and relaxation were observed between WT and EC-MR KO in isolated renal arteries during baseline or following 2 or 4 weeks of AngII infusion. The constriction or dilatations of afferent arterioles between genotypes were not different. No changes were found between the groups with respect to urinary excretion of sodium after 4 weeks of AngII infusion, or in urinary albumin excretion and kidney morphology. In conclusion, deletion of the EC-MR does not confer protection towards the development of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction of renal arteries or renal function following prolonged AngII-infusion. PMID:29466427

  6. Studies on the Tempo of Bubble Formation in Recently Cavitated Vessels: A Model to Predict the Pressure of Air Bubbles1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  7. Design and deployment of autoclave pressure vessels for the portable deep-sea drill rig MeBo (Meeresboden-Bohrgerät)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Thomas; Hohnberg, Hans-Jürgen; Wunsch, David; Anders, Erik; Freudenthal, Tim; Huhn, Katrin; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Pressure barrels for sampling and preservation of submarine sediments under in situ pressure with the robotic sea-floor drill rig MeBo (Meeresboden-Bohrgerät) housed at the MARUM (Bremen, Germany) were developed. Deployments of the so-called MDP (MeBo pressure vessel) during two offshore expeditions off New Zealand and off Spitsbergen, Norway, resulted in the recovery of sediment cores with pressure stages equaling in situ hydrostatic pressure. While initially designed for the quantification of gas and gas-hydrate contents in submarine sediments, the MDP also allows for analysis of the sediments under in situ pressure with methods typically applied by researchers from other scientific fields (geotechnics, sedimentology, microbiology, etc.). Here we report on the design and operational procedure of the MDP and demonstrate full functionality by presenting the first results from pressure-core degassing and molecular gas analysis.

  8. A high-throughput platform for low-volume high-temperature/pressure sealed vessel solvent extractions.

    PubMed

    Damm, Markus; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-11-30

    A high-throughput platform for performing parallel solvent extractions in sealed HPLC/GC vials inside a microwave reactor is described. The system consist of a strongly microwave-absorbing silicon carbide plate with 20 cylindrical wells of appropriate dimensions to be fitted with standard HPLC/GC autosampler vials serving as extraction vessels. Due to the possibility of heating up to four heating platforms simultaneously (80 vials), efficient parallel analytical-scale solvent extractions can be performed using volumes of 0.5-1.5 mL at a maximum temperature/pressure limit of 200°C/20 bar. Since the extraction and subsequent analysis by either gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass detection (GC-MS or LC-MS) is performed directly from the autosampler vial, errors caused by sample transfer can be minimized. The platform was evaluated for the extraction and quantification of caffeine from commercial coffee powders assessing different solvent types, extraction temperatures and times. For example, 141±11 μg caffeine (5 mg coffee powder) were extracted during a single extraction cycle using methanol as extraction solvent, whereas only 90±11 were obtained performing the extraction in methylene chloride, applying the same reaction conditions (90°C, 10 min). In multiple extraction experiments a total of ~150 μg caffeine was extracted from 5 mg commercial coffee powder. In addition to the quantitative caffeine determination, a comparative qualitative analysis of the liquid phase coffee extracts and the headspace volatiles was performed, placing special emphasis on headspace analysis using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) techniques. The miniaturized parallel extraction technique introduced herein allows solvent extractions to be performed at significantly expanded temperature/pressure limits and shortened extraction times, using standard HPLC autosampler vials as reaction vessels. Remarkable differences regarding peak pattern and main peaks were

  9. Structural Properties of EB-Welded AlSi10Mg Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Produced by AM-SLM Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmany, Moshe; Stern, Adin; Aghion, Eli; Frage, Nachum

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing of metals by selective laser melting (AM-SLM) is hampered by significant limitations in product size due to the limited dimensions of printing trays. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a well-established process that results in relatively minor metallurgical modifications in workpieces due to the ability of EBW to pass high-density energy to the related substance. The present study aims to evaluate structural properties of EB-welded AlSi10Mg thin-walled pressure vessels produced from components prepared by SLM technology. Following the EB welding process, leak and burst tests were conducted, as was fractography analysis. The welded vessels showed an acceptable holding pressure of 30 MPa, with a reasonable residual deformation up to 2.3% and a leak rate better than 1 × 10-8 std-cc s-1 helium. The failures that occurred under longitudinal stresses reflected the presence of two weak locations in the vessels, i.e., the welded joint region and the transition zone between the vessel base and wall. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces of broken vessels displayed the ductile mode of the rupture, with dimples of various sizes, depending on the failure location.

  10. Damage evaluation and analysis of composite pressure vessels using fiber Bragg gratings to determine structural health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortyl, Nicholas E.

    2005-11-01

    . Multiaxis fiber optic sensors are able to measure pressure, temperature, axial and transverse strain, chemical properties, corrosion, as well as transverse strain gradients. This technology is easily embedded in between the various layers of the composite structure, during manufacture, without compromising the structural integrity, in order to verify manufacturing parameters during the cure cycle and well as monitor the on-going condition of the composite structure throughout its life time. This paper reviews some of the technical work that has been accomplished during the past two years; specifically the embedding of fiber optic sensors into various composite structures in order to be able to conduct in situ non-destructive evaluation of the curing process and the service life of the component. The fiber optic technology has been developed to the point that it is at a TRL of 6.

  11. Large-scale testing of in-vessel debris cooling through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel in the CYBL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Bergeron, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    The possibility of achieving in-vessel core retention by flooding the reactor cavity, or the ``flooded cavity``, is an accident management concept currently under consideration for advanced light water reactors (ALWR), as well as for existing light water reactors (LWR). The CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility is a facility specifically designed to perform large-scale confirmatory testing of the flooded cavity concept. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner 3.7 m diameter tank simulates the reactor vessel, and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. The energy deposition on the bottom head is simulated with an array of radiant heaters. The array canmore » deliver a tailored heat flux distribution corresponding to that resulting from core melt convection. The present paper provides a detailed description of the capabilities of the facility, as well as results of recent experiments with heat flux in the range of interest to those required for in-vessel retention in typical ALWRs. The paper concludes with a discussion of other experiments for the flooded cavity applications.« less

  12. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impuritymore » precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.« less

  13. Transdermal delivery of AT1 receptor antagonists reduce blood pressure and reveals a vasodilatory effect in kidney blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Michalatou, Michaila; Androutsou, Maria Eleni; Antonopoulos, Markos; Vlahakos, Demetrios V; Agelis, George; Zulli, Anthony; Qaradakhi, Tawar; Mikkelsen, Kathleen; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Matsoukas, John

    2018-04-19

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is pharmacologically targeted to reduce blood pressure, and patient compliance to oral medications is a clinical issue. The mechanisms of action of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in reducing blood pressure are not well understood, and is purported to be via a reduction of angiotensin II signaling. We aimed to develop a transdermal delivery method for ARBs (losartan potassium and valsartan) and to determine if ARBs reveal a vasodilatory effect of the novel RAS peptide, alamandine. In addition we determined the anti-hypertensive effects of the transdermal delivery patch. In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to develop an appropriate therapeutic system, promising an alternative and more effective therapy in the treatment of hypertension. A variety of penetration enhancers were selected such as isopropyl myristate, propylene glycol, transcutol and dimenthyl sulfoxide to obtain a constant release of drugs through human skin. Small resistance vessels (kidney interlobar arteries) were mounted in organ baths and incubated with an ARB. Vasodilatory curves to alamandine were constructed Results: The in vivo studies demonstrates that systemic absorption of valsartan and losartan potassium using the appropriate formulations provides a steady state release and anti-hypertensive effect even after 24 hours of transdermal administration. No apparent skin irritations (erythema, edema) were observed with the tested formulations. We also show that blocking the AT1 receptor of rabbit interlobar arteries in vitro reveals a vasodilatory effect of alamandine. This study reveals potential mechanism of AT1 receptor blockade via alamandine, and is an important contribution in developing a favorable, convenient and painless antihypertensive therapy of prolonged duration through transdermal delivery of AT1 blockers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Strength, Fatigue, and Fracture Toughness of Ti-6Al-4V Liner from a Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Lerch, Brad; Thesken, John C.; Sutter, Jim; Russell, Richard

    2008-01-01

    It was demonstrated by way of experiment that Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Ti-6Al-4V liner material can sustain the expected service loads and cycles. The experiments were performed as part of investigations on the residual life of COPV tanks being used in Space Shuttle Orbiters. Measured properties included tensile strength, compressive strength, reversed loading cycles to simulate liner proof strains, and cyclic fatigue loading to demonstrate the ability to sustain 1000 cycles after liner buckling. The liner material came from a salvaged 40 in. Columbia (orbiter 102) tank (SN029), and tensile strength measurements were made on both boss-transition (thick) and membrane regions (thin). The average measured yield strength was 131 ksi in the boss-transition and membrane regions, in good agreement with measurements made on 1970 s vintage forged plate stock. However, Young s modulus was 17.4+/-0.3 Msi, somewhat higher than typical handbook values (approx.16 Msi). The fracture toughness, as estimated from a failed fatigue specimen, was 74 ksi/sq in, in reasonable agreement with standardized measurements made on 1970 s vintage forged plate stock. Low cycle fatigue of a buckled test specimen implied that as-imprinted liners can sustain over 4000 load cycles.

  15. Nanoindentation of ion-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels - model-based interpretation and comparison with neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, F.; Heintze, C.; Pecko, S.; Akhmadaliev, S.; Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.

    2018-04-01

    Ion-irradiation-induced hardening is investigated on six selected reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The steels were irradiated with 5 MeV Fe2+ ions at fluences ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 displacements per atom (dpa) and the induced hardening of the surface layer was probed with nanoindentation. To separate the indentation size effect and the substrate effect from the irradiation-induced hardness profile, we developed an analytic model with the plastic zone of the indentation approximated as a half sphere. This model allows the actual hardness profile to be retrieved and the measured hardness increase to be assigned to the respective fluence. The obtained values of hardness increase vs. fluence are compared for selected pairs of samples in order to extract effects of the RPV steel composition. We identify hardening effects due to increased levels of copper, manganese-nickel and phosphorous. Further comparison with available neutron-irradiated conditions of the same heats of RPV steels indicates pronounced differences of the considered effects of composition for irradiation with neutrons vs. ions.

  16. Results from the decontamination of and the shielding arrangements in the reactor pressure vessel in Oskarshamn 1-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lowendahl, B.

    1995-03-01

    In September 1992 Oskarshamn 1 was shut down in order to carry out measures to correct discovered deficiencies in the emergency cooling systems. Due to the results of a comprehensive non destructive test programme it was decided to perform a major replacement of pipes in the primary systems including a full system decontamination using the Siemens CORD process. The paper briefly presents the satisfying result of the decontamination performed in May-June 1993. When in late June 1993 cracks also were detected in the feed-water pipes situated inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) the plans were reconsidered and a large projectmore » was formed with the aim, in a first phase, to verify the integrity of the RPV. In order to make it possible to perform work manually inside the RPV special radiation protection measures had to be carried out. In January 1994 the lower region of the RPV was decontaminated, again using the CORD-process, followed by the installation of a special shielding construction in the RPV. The surprisingly good results of these efforts are also briefly described in the paper.« less

  17. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  18. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cyrus M; Nanstad, Randy K; Clayton, Dwight A

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin nextmore » year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.« less

  19. Fatigue crack growth rates in a pressure vessel steel under various conditions of loading and the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, P. D.; Robinson, F. P. A.

    1986-10-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF) tests have been carried out on SA508 Cl 3 pressure vessel steel, in simulated P.W.R. environments. The test variables investigated included air and P.W.R. water environments, frequency variation over the range 1 Hz to 10 Hz, transverse and longitudinal crack growth directions, temperatures of 20 °C and 50 °C, and R-ratios of 0.2 and 0.7. It was found that decreasing the test frequency increased fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) in P.W.R. environments, P.W.R. environment testing gave enhanced crack growth (vs air tests), FCGRs were greater for cracks growing in the longitudinal direction, slight increases in temperature gave noticeable accelerations in FCGR, and several air tests gave FCGR greater than those predicted by the existing ASME codes. Fractographic evidence indicates that FCGRs were accelerated by a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The presence of elongated MnS inclusions aided both mechanical fatigue and hydrogen embrittlement processes, thus producing synergistically fast FCGRs. Both anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms have been proposed for the environmental enhancement of crack growth rates. Electrochemical potential measurements and potentiostatic tests have shown that sample isolation of the test specimens from the clevises in the apparatus is not essential during low temperature corrosion fatigue testing.

  20. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  1. Assessment of segregation kinetics in water-moderated reactors pressure vessel steels under long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Saltykov, M. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Khodan, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    In reactor pressure vessel (RPV) bcc-lattice steels temper embrittlement is developed under the influence of both operating temperature of ∼300 °C and neutron irradiation. Segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) begin to play a special role in the assessment of the safe operation of the RPV in case of its lifetime extension up to 60 years or more. The most reliable information on the RPV material condition can be obtained by investigating the surveillance specimens (SS) that are exposed to operational factors simultaneously with the RPV itself. In this paper the GB composition in the specimens with different thermal exposure time at the RPV operating temperature as well as irradiated by fast neutrons (E ≥ 0.5 MeV) to different fluences (20-71)·1022 m-2 was studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) including both impurity and main alloying elements content. The data obtained allowed to trace the trend of the operating temperature and radiation-stimulated diffusion influence on the overall segregants level in GB. The revealed differences in the concentration levels of GB segregants in different steels, are due to the different chemical composition of the steels and also due to different grain boundary segregation levels in initial (unexposed) state. The data were used to estimate the RPV steels working capacity for 60 years. The estimation was carried out using both the well-known Langmuir-McLean model and the one specially developed for RPV steels, which takes into account the structure and phase composition of VVER-1000 RPV steels, as well as the long-term influence of operational factors.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of Mn-Ni-Si precipitates in low-Cu reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Huibin; Wells, Peter; Edmondson, Philip D.

    Formation of large volume fractions of Mn-Ni-Si precipitates (MNSPs) causes excess irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high, extended-life fluences. Thus, a new and unique, semi-empirical cluster dynamics model was developed to study the evolution of MNSPs in low-Cu RPV steels. The model is based on CALPHAD thermodynamics and radiation enhanced diffusion kinetics. The thermodynamics dictates the compositional and temperature dependence of the free energy reductions that drive precipitation. The model treats both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, where the latter occurs on cascade damage, like dislocation loops. The model has only four adjustable parameters that were fitmore » to an atom probe tomography (APT) database. The model predictions are in semi-quantitative agreement with systematic Mn, Ni and Si composition variations in alloys characterized by APT, including a sensitivity to local tip-to-tip variations even in the same steel. The model predicts that heterogeneous nucleation plays a critical role in MNSP formation in lower alloy Ni contents. Single variable assessments of compositional effects show that Ni plays a dominant role, while even small variations in irradiation temperature can have a large effect on the MNSP evolution. Within typical RPV steel ranges, Mn and Si have smaller effects. Furthermore, the delayed but then rapid growth of MNSPs to large volume fractions at high fluence is well predicted by the model. For purposes of illustration, the effect of MNSPs on transition temperature shifts are presented based on well-established microstructure-property and property-property models.« less

  3. Using complimentary microscopy methods to examine Ni-Mn-Si-precipitates in highly-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2017-05-29

    Nano-scale Ni-Mn-Si-rich precipitates formed in a reactor pressure vessel steel under high neutron fluence have been characterized using highly complimentary atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) combined with STEM-EDS modeling. Using these techniques in a synergistic manner to overcome the well-known trajectory aberrations in APT data, the average upper limit Fe concentration within the precipitates was found to be ~6 at.%. Using this knowledge, accurate compositions of the precipitates was determined and it was found that the spread of precipitate compositions was large, but mostly centered around the Γ2-and G-phases. The usemore » of STEM-EDS also allowed for larger areas to be examined, and segregation of minor solutes was observed to occur on grain boundaries, along with Ni-Mn-Si-rich precipitates that were smaller in size than those in the matrix. Solute segregation at the grain boundaries is proposed to occur through a radiation induced segregation or radiation enhanced diffusion mechanism due to the presence of a denuded zone about the grain boundary. It is also proposed that the reduced precipitate size at the grain boundaries is due to the structure of the grain boundary. The lack of Ni-Mn-Si precipitates observed in larger Mo-rich precipitates is also discussed, and the absence of the minor solutes required to form the Ni-Mn-Si precipitates results in the lack of nucleation. This is in contrast to cementite phases in which Ni-Mn-Si precipitates have been seen to be formed. It was also determined through this work that the exclusion of all the Fe ions during atom probe analysis is a reasonable approximation.« less

  4. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of Mn-Ni-Si precipitates in low-Cu reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Ke, Huibin; Wells, Peter; Edmondson, Philip D.; ...

    2017-07-12

    Formation of large volume fractions of Mn-Ni-Si precipitates (MNSPs) causes excess irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high, extended-life fluences. Thus, a new and unique, semi-empirical cluster dynamics model was developed to study the evolution of MNSPs in low-Cu RPV steels. The model is based on CALPHAD thermodynamics and radiation enhanced diffusion kinetics. The thermodynamics dictates the compositional and temperature dependence of the free energy reductions that drive precipitation. The model treats both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, where the latter occurs on cascade damage, like dislocation loops. The model has only four adjustable parameters that were fitmore » to an atom probe tomography (APT) database. The model predictions are in semi-quantitative agreement with systematic Mn, Ni and Si composition variations in alloys characterized by APT, including a sensitivity to local tip-to-tip variations even in the same steel. The model predicts that heterogeneous nucleation plays a critical role in MNSP formation in lower alloy Ni contents. Single variable assessments of compositional effects show that Ni plays a dominant role, while even small variations in irradiation temperature can have a large effect on the MNSP evolution. Within typical RPV steel ranges, Mn and Si have smaller effects. Furthermore, the delayed but then rapid growth of MNSPs to large volume fractions at high fluence is well predicted by the model. For purposes of illustration, the effect of MNSPs on transition temperature shifts are presented based on well-established microstructure-property and property-property models.« less

  5. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  6. The Investigation on Strain Strengthening Induced Martensitic Phase Transformation of Austenitic Stainless Steel: A Fundamental Research for the Quality Evaluation of Strain Strengthened Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cai Ren, Fa; Tang, Xiao Ying

    2018-03-01

    The manufacture of pressure vessels with austenitic stainless steel strain strengthening technology has become an important technical means for the light weight of cryogenic pressure vessels. In the process of increasing the strength of austenitic stainless steel, strain can induce the martensitic phase transformation in austenite phase. There is a quantitative relationship between the transformation quantity of martensitic phase and the basic mechanical properties. Then, the martensitic phase variables can be obtained by means of detection, and the mechanical properties and safety performance are evaluated and calculated. Based on this, the quantitative relationship between strain hardening and deformation induced martensite phase content is studied in this paper, and the mechanism of deformation induced martensitic transformation of austenitic stainless steel is detailed.

  7. Containment vessel drain system

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  8. Movement of retinal vessels toward the optic nerve head after increasing intraocular pressure in monkey eyes with experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Atsumi; Enomoto, Nobuko; Ishida, Kyoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Horai, Naoto; Onoe, Hirotaka; Hara, Hideaki; Tomita, Goji

    2017-09-01

    A shift or displacement of the retinal blood vessels (RBVs) with neuroretinal rim thinning indicates the progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In chronic open angle glaucoma, individuals with RBV positional shifts exhibit more rapid visual field loss than those without RBV shifts. The retinal vessels reportedly move onto the optic nerve head (ONH) in response to glaucoma damage, suggesting that RBVs are pulled toward the ONH in response to increased cupping. Whether this phenomenon only applies to RVBs located in the vicinity or inside the ONH or, more generally, to RBVs also located far from the ONH, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the movement of RBVs located relatively far from the ONH edge after increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) in an experimental monkey model of glaucoma. Fundus photographs were obtained in 17 monkeys. High IOP was induced in the monkeys by laser photocoagulation burns applied uniformly with 360° irradiation around the trabecular meshwork of the left eye. The right eye was left intact and used as a non-treated control. Considering the circadian rhythm of IOP, it was measured in both eyes of each animal at around the same time-points. Then, fundus photographs were obtained. Using Image J image analysis software, an examiner (N.E.) measured the fundus photographs at two time-points, i.e. before laser treatment (time 1) and the last fundus photography after IOP elevation (time 2). The following parameters were measured (in pixels): 1) vertical diameter of the ONH (DD), 2) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the superior branch of the central retinal vein (UV), 3) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the inferior branch of the central retinal vein (LV), 4) ONH area, and 5) surface area of the cup of the ONH. We calculated the ratios of UV to DD (UV/DD), LV to DD (LV/DD), and the cup area to disc area ratio (C/D). The mean UV/DD at time 1 (0.656 ± 0.233) was

  9. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  10. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; ...

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 10 23 n.m –2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluencemore » of 1.7 × 10 23 n.m –3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 10 22 m –3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 10 23 n.m –3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 10 23 n.m –3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface

  11. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 10 23 n.m –2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluencemore » of 1.7 × 10 23 n.m –3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 10 22 m –3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 10 23 n.m –3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 10 23 n.m –3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface

  12. Development of Mini-Compact Tension Test Method for Determining Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of smallmore » specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Validation of the mini compact tension specimen (mini-CT) geometry has been performed on previously well characterized Midland beltline Linde 80 (WF-70) weld in the unirradiated condition. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature, To, measured by these Mini-CT specimens is almost the same as To value that was derived from various larger fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, an International collaborative program has been established to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated Linde 80 weld metal. The program is underway and involves the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Central Research Institute for Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The irradiated Mini-CT specimens from broken halves of previously tested

  13. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry’s law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  14. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry's law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Analysis of dosimetry from the H.B. Robinson unit 2 pressure vessel benchmark using RAPTOR-M3G and ALPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.A.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The dosimetry from the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 Pressure Vessel Benchmark is analyzed with a suite of Westinghouse-developed codes and data libraries. The radiation transport from the reactor core to the surveillance capsule and ex-vessel locations is performed by RAPTOR-M3G, a parallel deterministic radiation transport code that calculates high-resolution neutron flux information in three dimensions. The cross-section library used in this analysis is the ALPAN library, an Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF)/B-VII.0-based library designed for reactor dosimetry and fluence analysis applications. Dosimetry is evaluated with the industry-standard SNLRMLmore » reactor dosimetry cross-section data library. (authors)« less

  16. 60th Anniversary of electricity production from light water reactors: Historical review of the contribution of materials science to the safety of the pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duysen, J. C.; Meric de Bellefon, G.

    2017-02-01

    The first light water nuclear reactor dedicated to electricity production was commissioned in Shippingport, Pennsylvania in the United States in 1957. Sixty years after the event, it is clear that this type of reactor will be a major source of electricity and one of the key solutions to limit climate change in the 21st century. This article pays homage to the teams that contributed to this achievement by their involvement in research and development and their determination to push back the frontiers of knowledge. Via a few examples of scientific or technological milestones, it describes the evolution of ideas, models, and techniques during the last 60 years, and gives the current state-of-the-art in areas related to the safety of the reactor pressure vessel. Among other topics, it focuses on vessel manufacturing, steel fracture mechanics analysis, and understanding of irradiation-induced damage.

  17. Effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Makan, Abdelhadi; Assobhei, Omar; Mountadar, Mohammed

    2013-01-03

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco in terms of internal temperature, produced gases quantity, organic matter conversion rate, and the quality of the final composts.For this purpose, in-vessel bioreactor was designed and used to evaluate both appropriate initial air pressure and appropriate initial moisture content for the composting process. Moreover, 5 experiments were carried out within initial moisture content of 55%, 65%, 70%, 75% and 85%. The initial air pressure and the initial moisture content of the mixture showed a significant effect on the aerobic composting. The experimental results demonstrated that for composting organic waste, relatively high moisture contents are better at achieving higher temperatures and retaining them for longer times.This study suggested that an initial moisture content of around 75%, under 0.6 bar, can be considered as being suitable for efficient composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste. These last conditions, allowed maximum value of temperature and final composting product with good physicochemical properties as well as higher organic matter degradation and higher gas production. Moreover, final compost obtained showed good maturity levels and can be used for agricultural applications.

  18. Effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco in terms of internal temperature, produced gases quantity, organic matter conversion rate, and the quality of the final composts. For this purpose, in-vessel bioreactor was designed and used to evaluate both appropriate initial air pressure and appropriate initial moisture content for the composting process. Moreover, 5 experiments were carried out within initial moisture content of 55%, 65%, 70%, 75% and 85%. The initial air pressure and the initial moisture content of the mixture showed a significant effect on the aerobic composting. The experimental results demonstrated that for composting organic waste, relatively high moisture contents are better at achieving higher temperatures and retaining them for longer times. This study suggested that an initial moisture content of around 75%, under 0.6 bar, can be considered as being suitable for efficient composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste. These last conditions, allowed maximum value of temperature and final composting product with good physicochemical properties as well as higher organic matter degradation and higher gas production. Moreover, final compost obtained showed good maturity levels and can be used for agricultural applications. PMID:23369502

  19. Structures of Bordered Pits Potentially Contributing to Isolation of a Refilled Vessel from Negative Xylem Pressure in Stems of Morus australis Poir.: Testing of the Pit Membrane Osmosis and Pit Valve Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Ooeda, Hiroki; Terashima, Ichiro; Taneda, Haruhiko

    2017-02-01

    Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanism preventing the refilling vessel water from being drained to the neighboring functional vessels under negative pressure. The pit membrane osmosis hypothesis proposes that the xylem parenchyma cells release polysaccharides that are impermeable to the intervessel pit membranes into the refilling vessel; this osmotically counteracts the negative pressure, thereby allowing the vessel to refill. The pit valve hypothesis proposes that gas trapped within intervessel bordered pits isolates the refilling vessel water from the surrounding functional vessels. Here, using the single-vessel method, we assessed these hypotheses in shoots of mulberry (Morus australis Poir.). First, we confirmed the occurrence of xylem refilling under negative pressure in the potted mulberry saplings. To examine the pit membrane osmosis hypothesis, we estimated the semi-permeability of pit membranes for molecules of various sizes and found that the pit membranes were not semi-permeable to polyethylene glycol of molecular mass <20,000. For the pit valve hypothesis, we formed pit valves in the intervessel pits in the short stem segments and measured the maximum liquid pressure up to which gases in bordered pits were retained. The threshold pressure ranged from 0.025 to 0.10 MPa. These values matched the theoretical value calculated from the geometry of the pit chamber (0.0692-0.101 MPa). Our results suggest that gas in the pits is retained by surface tension, even under substantial positive pressure to resolve gases in the refilling vessel, whereas the molecule size required for the pit membrane osmosis mechanism in mulberry would be unrealistically large. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Providing Pressurized Gasses to the International Space Station (ISS): Developing a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) for the Safe Transport of Oxygen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael; Cook, Anthony; Dick, Brandon; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2012-01-01

    To supply oxygen and nitrogen to the International Space Station, a COPV tank is being developed to meet requirements beyond that which have been flown. In order to "Ship Full' and support compatibility with a range of launch site operations, the vessel was designed for certification to International Standards (ISO) that have a different approach than current NASA certification approaches. These requirements were in addition to existing NASA certification standards had to be met. Initial risk-reduction development tests have been successful. Qualification is in progress.

  1. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  2. 46 CFR 38.05-3 - Design and construction of pressure vessel type cargo tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... will, by themselves, constitute the cargo containment system and usually will not require a secondary... tanks by their support due to static and dynamic forces under operating conditions or during testing... percent of the vapor pressure corresponding to the temperature of the liquid at which the system is...

  3. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Gillemot, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M.; Török, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  4. LWR pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry improvement program: LWR power reactor surveillance physics-dosimetry data base compendium

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.

    1985-08-01

    This NRC physics-dosimetry compendium is a collation of information and data developed from available research and commercial light water reactor vessel surveillance program (RVSP) documents and related surveillance capsule reports. The data represents the results of the HEDL least-squares FERRET-SAND II Code re-evaluation of exposure units and values for 47 PWR and BWR surveillance capsules for W, B and W, CE, and GE power plants. Using a consistent set of auxiliary data and dosimetry-adjusted reactor physics results, the revised fluence values for E > 1 MeV averaged 25% higher than the originally reported values. The range of fluence values (new/old)more » was from a low of 0.80 to a high of 2.38. These HEDL-derived FERRET-SAND II exposure parameter values are being used for NRC-supported HEDL and other PWR and BWR trend curve data development and testing studies. These studies are providing results to support Revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.99. As stated by Randall (Ra84), the Guide is being updated to reflect recent studies of the physical basis for neutron radiation damage and efforts to correlate damage to chemical composition and fluence.« less

  5. Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Using Meandering Winding Magnetometer ((MWM(Registered Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick; Grundy, David; Jablonski, David; Martin, Christopher; Washabaugh, Andrew; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    There are 3 mechanisms that affect the life of a COPV are: a) The age life of the overwrap; b) Cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner; c) Stress Rupture life. The first two mechanisms are understood through test and analysis. A COPV Stress Rupture is a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. Currently there is no simple, deterministic method of determining the stress rupture life of a COPV, nor a screening technique to determine if a particular COPV is close to the time of a stress rupture failure. Conclusions: Demonstrated a correlation between MWM response and pressure or strain. Demonstrated the ability to monitor stress in COPV at different orientations and depths. FA41 provides best correlation with bottle pressure or stress.

  6. Smart Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel - Integrated Structural Health Monitoring System to Meet Space Exploration and International Space Station Mission Assurance Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Nichols, Charles; Waller, Jess

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no integrated NDE methods for baselining and monitoring defect levels in fleet for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) or related fracture critical composites, or for performing life-cycle maintenance inspections either in a traditional remove-and-inspect mode or in a more modern in situ inspection structural health monitoring (SHM) mode. Implicit in SHM and autonomous inspection is the existence of quantitative accept-reject criteria. To be effective, these criteria must correlate with levels of damage known to cause composite failure. Furthermore, implicit in SHM is the existence of effective remote sensing hardware and automated techniques and algorithms for interpretation of SHM data. SHM of facture critical composite structures, especially high pressure COPVs, is critical to the success of nearly every future NASA space exploration program as well as life extension of the International Space Station. It has been clearly stated that future NASA missions may not be successful without SHM [1]. Otherwise, crews will be busy addressing subsystem health issues and not focusing on the real NASA mission

  7. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, themore » NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.« less

  8. Continued Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell; Jablonski, David; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used in essentially all NASA spacecraft, launch. vehicles and payloads to contain high-pressure fluids for propulsion, life support systems and science experiments. Failure of any COPV either in flight or during ground processing would result in catastrophic damage to the spacecraft or payload, and could lead to loss of life. Therefore, NASA continues to investigate new methods to non-destructively inspect (NDE) COPVs for structural anomalies and to provide a means for in-situ structural health monitoring (SHM) during operational service. Partnering with JENTEK Sensors, engineers at NASA, Kennedy Space Center have successfully conducted a proof-of-concept study to develop Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM) eddy current sensors designed to make direct measurements of the stresses of the internal layers of a carbon fiber composite wrapped COPV. During this study three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed good correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. MWM-Array technology for scanning COPVs can reliably be used to image and detect mechanical damage. To validate this conclusion, several COPVs were scanned to obtain a baseline, and then each COPV was impacted at varying energy levels and then rescanned. The baseline subtracted images were used to demonstrate damage detection. These scans were performed with two different MWM-Arrays. with different geometries for near-surface and deeper penetration imaging at multiple frequencies and in multiple orientations of the linear MWM drive. This presentation will include a review of micromechanical models that relate measured sensor responses to composite material constituent properties, validated by the proof of concept study, as the basis for SHM and NDE data analysis as well as potential improvements including

  9. Effects of microstructural variation on Charpy impact properties in heavy-section Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel for reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Song, Jaemin; Kim, Min-Chul; Choi, Kwon-Jae; Lee, Bong-Sang

    2016-03-01

    The effects of microstructural changes in heavy-section Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel on Charpy impact properties were investigated using a 210 mm thick reactor pressure vessel. Specimens were sampled from 5 different positions at intervals of 1/4 thickness from the inner surface to the outer surface. A detailed microstructural analysis of impact-fractured specimens showed that coarse carbides along the lath boundaries acted as fracture initiation sites, and cleavage cracks deviated at prior-austenite grain boundaries and bainite lath boundaries. Upper shelf energy was higher and energy transition temperature was lower at the surface positon, where fine bainitic microstructure with homogeneously distributed fine carbides were present. Toward the center, coarse upper bainite and precipitation of coarse inter-lath carbides were observed, which deteriorated impact properties. At the 1/4T position, the Charpy impact properties were worse than those at other positions owing to the combination of elongated-coarse inter-lath carbides and large effective grain size.

  10. High Fluency Low Flux Embrittlement Models of LWR Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement and a Supporting Database from the UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert

    Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement may limit the lifetime of light water reactors (LWR). Embrittlement is primarily caused by formation of nano-scale precipitates, which cause hardening and a subsequent increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the steel. While the effect of Cu has historically been the largest research focus of RPV embrittlement, there is increasing evidence that Mn, Ni and Si are likely to have a large effect at higher fluence, where Mn-Ni-Si precipitates can form, even in the absence of Cu. Therefore, extending RPV lifetimes will require a thorough understanding of both precipitation and embrittlement at higher fluences thanmore » have ever been observed in a power reactor. To address this issue, test reactors that irradiate materials at higher neutron fluxes than power reactors are used. These experiments at high neutron flux can reach extended life neutron fluences in only months or several years. The drawback of these test irradiations is that they add additional complexity to interpreting the data, as the irradiation flux also plays a role into both precipitate formation and irradiation hardening and embrittlement. This report focuses on developing a database of both microstructure and mechanical property data to better understand the effect of flux. In addition, a previously developed model that enables the comparison of data taken over a range of neutron flux is discussed.« less

  11. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Postweld Heat Treatment Process in a Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A516 Grade 70.

    PubMed

    Peasura, Prachya

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the application of the response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) experiment in mathematical model and optimizes postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The material of study is a pressure vessel steel ASTM A516 grade 70 that is used for gas metal arc welding. PWHT parameters examined in this study included PWHT temperatures and time. The resulting materials were examined using CCD experiment and the RSM to determine the resulting material tensile strength test, observed with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that using a full quadratic model with the proposed mathematical model is YTS = -285.521 + 15.706X1 + 2.514X2 - 0.004X1(2) - 0.001X2(2) - 0.029X1X2. Tensile strength parameters of PWHT were optimized PWHT time of 5.00 hr and PWHT temperature of 645.75°C. The results show that the PWHT time is the dominant mechanism used to modify the tensile strength compared to the PWHT temperatures. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that pearlite can contribute to higher tensile strength. Pearlite has an intensity, which results in increased material tensile strength. The research described here can be used as material data on PWHT parameters for an ASTM A516 grade 70 weld.

  12. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Postweld Heat Treatment Process in a Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A516 Grade 70

    PubMed Central

    Peasura, Prachya

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the application of the response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) experiment in mathematical model and optimizes postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The material of study is a pressure vessel steel ASTM A516 grade 70 that is used for gas metal arc welding. PWHT parameters examined in this study included PWHT temperatures and time. The resulting materials were examined using CCD experiment and the RSM to determine the resulting material tensile strength test, observed with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that using a full quadratic model with the proposed mathematical model is Y TS = −285.521 + 15.706X 1 + 2.514X 2 − 0.004X 1 2 − 0.001X 2 2 − 0.029X 1 X 2. Tensile strength parameters of PWHT were optimized PWHT time of 5.00 hr and PWHT temperature of 645.75°C. The results show that the PWHT time is the dominant mechanism used to modify the tensile strength compared to the PWHT temperatures. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that pearlite can contribute to higher tensile strength. Pearlite has an intensity, which results in increased material tensile strength. The research described here can be used as material data on PWHT parameters for an ASTM A516 grade 70 weld. PMID:26550602

  13. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentrationmore » in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.« less

  14. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2-5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen.

  15. A novel high-pressure vessel for simultaneous observations of seismic velocity and in situ CO2 distribution in a porous rock using a medical X-ray CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Nishizawa, Osamu; Zhang, Yi; Park, Hyuck; Xue, Ziqiu

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismic wave velocity or attenuation and CO2 saturation is essential for CO2 storage in deep saline formations. In the present study, we describe a novel upright high-pressure vessel that is designed to keep a rock sample under reservoir conditions and simultaneously image the entire sample using a medical X-ray CT scanner. The pressure vessel is composed of low X-ray absorption materials: a carbon-fibre-enhanced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cylinder and PEEK vessel closures supported by carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) joists. The temperature was controlled by a carbon-coated film heater and an aramid fibre thermal insulator. The assembled sample cell allows us to obtain high-resolution images of rock samples during CO2 drainage and brine imbibition under reservoir conditions. The rock sample was oriented vertical to the rotation axis of the CT scanner, and seismic wave paths were aligned parallel to the rotation axis to avoid shadows from the acoustic transducers. The reconstructed CO2 distribution images allow us to calculate the CO2 saturation in the first Fresnel zone along the ray path between transducers. A robust relationship between the seismic wave velocity or attenuation and the CO2 saturation in porous rock was obtained from experiments using this pressure vessel.

  16. Voluntary Consensus Organization Standards for Nondestructive Evaluation of Thin-Walled Metallic Liners and Composite Overwraps in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA fracture control requirements outlined in NASA-STD-5009 and NASA-STD-5014 are predicated on the availability and use of sensitive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can detect and monitor defects, thereby providing data that can be used to predict failure or reduce the risk of failure in fracture critical components. However, in the case of composite materials and components, including composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), the effect of defects is poorly understood, the NDE methods used to evaluate locate and size defects are typically at lower technical readiness level than analogous NDE methods used for metals, and demonstration studies to verify the probability of detection (POD) are generally lacking or unavailable. These factors together make failure prediction of fracture critical composite materials and components based on size, quantity, or orientation of defects nearly impossible. Also, when inspecting metal liners in as-manufactured COPVs, sensitivity is lost and only the inner surface of the liner is accessible. Also, NDE of COPVs as applied during manufacturing varies significantly from manufacturer to manufacturer and has not yet been standardized. Although requirements exist to perform NDE immediately after manufacturing to establish initial integrity of the parts, procedural detail for NDE of composites is still nonexistent or under development. For example, in practice, only a visual inspection of COPVs is performed during manufacturing and service, leaving in question whether defects of concern, for example, bridging, overwrap winding anomalies, impact damage below visible threshold, out-of-family strain growth, and liner buckling have been adequately detected and monitored. To address these shortcomings, in 2005 the NASA Nondestructive Evaluation Working Group (NNWG) began funding work to develop and adopt standards for nondestructive evaluation of aerospace composites in collaboration with the American Society for Testing

  17. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  18. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent tomore » the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are

  19. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  20. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry analysis for westinghouse 4-loop XL pressurized water reactor plant using the RadTrack{sup TM} Code System with the 3D parallel discrete ordinates code RAPTOR-M3G

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Alpan, F. A.; Fischer, G.A.

    2011-07-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D)/one-dimensional (1D) SYNTHESIS methodology has been widely used to calculate fast neutron (>1.0 MeV) fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessel in the belt-line region. However, it is expected that this methodology cannot provide accurate fast neutron fluence calculation at elevations far above or below the active core region. A three-dimensional (3D) parallel discrete ordinates calculation for ex-vessel neutron dosimetry on a Westinghouse 4-Loop XL Pressurized Water Reactor has been done. It shows good agreement between the calculated results and measured results. Furthermore, the results show very different fast neutron flux values at some of the former plate locationsmore » and elevations above and below an active core than those calculated by a 2D/1D SYNTHESIS method. This indicates that for certain irregular reactor internal structures, where the fast neutron flux has a very strong local effect, it is required to use a 3D transport method to calculate accurate fast neutron exposure. (authors)« less

  1. Study on prestressed concrete reactor vessel structures. II-5: Crack analysis by three dimensional finite elements method of 1/20 multicavity type PCRV subjected to internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite elements analysis is reported of the nonlinear behavior of PCRV subjected to internal pressure by comparing calculated results with test results. As the first stage, an analysis considering the nonlinearity of cracking in concrete was attempted. As a result, it is found possible to make an analysis up to three times the design pressure (50 kg/sqcm), and calculated results agree well with test results.

  2. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  3. Statistical Analyses for Probabilistic Assessments of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Structural Integrity: Building a Master Curve on an Extract of the 'Euro' Fracture Toughness Dataset, Controlling Statistical Uncertainty for Both Mono-Temperature and multi-temperature tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josse, Florent; Lefebvre, Yannick; Todeschini, Patrick

    2006-07-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of a nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients is extremely important to safety. In addition to conventional deterministic calculations to confirm RPV integrity, Electricite de France (EDF) carries out probabilistic analyses. Probabilistic analyses are interesting because some key variables, albeit conventionally taken at conservative values, can be modeled more accurately through statistical variability. One variable which significantly affects RPV structural integrity assessment is cleavage fracture initiation toughness. The reference fracture toughness method currently in use at EDF is the RCCM and ASME Code lower-bound K{sub IC} based on the indexing parameter RT{submore » NDT}. However, in order to quantify the toughness scatter for probabilistic analyses, the master curve method is being analyzed at present. Furthermore, the master curve method is a direct means of evaluating fracture toughness based on K{sub JC} data. In the framework of the master curve investigation undertaken by EDF, this article deals with the following two statistical items: building a master curve from an extract of a fracture toughness dataset (from the European project 'Unified Reference Fracture Toughness Design curves for RPV Steels') and controlling statistical uncertainty for both mono-temperature and multi-temperature tests. Concerning the first point, master curve temperature dependence is empirical in nature. To determine the 'original' master curve, Wallin postulated that a unified description of fracture toughness temperature dependence for ferritic steels is possible, and used a large number of data corresponding to nuclear-grade pressure vessel steels and welds. Our working hypothesis is that some ferritic steels may behave in slightly different ways. Therefore we focused exclusively on the basic french reactor vessel metal of types A508 Class 3 and A 533 grade B Class 1, taking the

  4. Search for optimized conditions for sealing and storage of bypass vessels: influence of preservation solution and filling pressure on the degree of endothelialization

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Dominik Roger; Juchem, Gerd; Eblenkamp, Markus; Kemkes, Bernhard Michael; Gansera, Brigitte; Geier, Michael; Nees, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop methods for the rapid assessment of intimal quality of coronary bypass segments of venous origin, and to prevent endothelial damage by improved intraoperative handling of graft segments. Particular attention was paid to the influence of the composition of the preservation solution and the intravasal filling pressure on the degree of endothelialization. Intrava-sal exposure to Alcian blue at pH<3 resulted in highly specific staining of intimal regions with functionally or structurally damaged endothelium. Standardization of preparation, staining and image acquisition of the intimal surface of graft remnants and subsequent computer-aided planimetry of these images made it possible for the first time to perform rapid serial investigations for quality control of bypass grafts. Using saline as the rinsing and intraoperative storage medium resulted in the loss of more than 50% of the endothelium at intravasal pressures of 0-100 mmHg. Increasing the pressure resulted eventually in complete de-endothelialization. In contrast, grafts incubated in a customized plasma derivative tolerated pressures of up to 200 mmHg with no significant endothelial loss; and even after exposure to 1,000 mmHg (10 times the average mean arterial pressure!) more than 70% of the endothelium were intact and vital. These findings imply strongly that the quality of aortocoronary bypass grafts of venous origin can be improved substantially by the use of a plasma derivative solution for intraoperative preservation and by monitoring and controlling the intravasal pressures reached during sealing and storage. PMID:20369036

  5. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  6. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  7. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  8. In 6- to 8-year-old children, hair cortisol is associated with body mass index and somatic complaints, but not with stress, health-related quality of life, blood pressure, retinal vessel diameters, and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Endes, Katharina; Brand, Serge; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Pühse, Uwe; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2017-02-01

    Hair cortisol measurement has become an increasingly accepted approach in endocrinology and biopsychology. However, while in adult research hair cortisol has been proposed as a relevant biomarker for chronic stress (and its adverse consequences), studies with children are scarce. Therefore, the goal of the present exploratory study was to examine the associations between hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), stress, and a series of health-related outcomes in a sample of Swiss first grade schoolchildren. The sample consisted of 318 children (53% girls, M age =7.26, SD=0.35). Hair strands were taken near the scalp from a posterior vertex position, and HCCs were tested for the first 3-cm hair segment. Parents provided information about their children's age, gender, parental education, children's stress (recent critical life events, daily hassles), health-related quality of life, and psychosomatic complaints. Body composition, blood pressure, retinal vessel diameters, and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured with established methods. In multiple regression analyses, higher HCCs were weakly associated with increased BMI in girls (β=0.22, p<0.001), whereas higher HCCs were associated with increased somatic complaints in boys (β=0.20, p<0.05). No significant relationships were found between HCCs and parental reports of stress, health-related quality of life, blood pressure, retinal vessel diameters, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Although small significant relationships were found between HCCs, BMI and somatic complaints, the findings of this exploratory study challenge the view that HCCs can be used as a reliable biomarker of recent critical life events, daily hassles, health-related quality of life, and cardiovascular health indicators in non-clinical young children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing sodium in your diet, you may need medicines. Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to lower blood pressure. ... and widen blood vessels. Often, two or more medicines work better than one. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  10. Coal gasification vessel

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.

    1982-01-01

    A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

  11. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inmore » this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.« less

  12. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) generated from Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels subjected to sustained load-to-failure tests were studied. Data from two different transducer locations on the vessels were compared. It was found that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers showed a wide variance from those for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. Emissions from boss-mounted transducers did, however, yield values that were relatively consistent. It appears that the signals from the boss-mounted transducers represent an integrated average of the emissions generated by fibers fracturing during the vessel tests. The AE from boss-mounted transducers were also independent of time for vessel failure. This suggests that a similar number of fiber fractures must occur prior to initiation of vessel failure. These studies indicate a potential for developing an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels.

  13. Effect of Tempering Temperature on the Microstructure and Properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C Pressure Vessel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-wen; Li, Chang-sheng; Peng, Huan; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    To obtain the high-temperature strength and toughness of the medium-high-temperature-pressure steel, the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel subjected to three different tempering temperatures after being normalized were investigated. The results show that the microstructure of the sample, tempered in the range 675-725 °C for 50 min, did not change dramatically, yet the martensite/austenite constituents decomposed, and the bainite lath merged together and transformed into polygonal ferrite. At the same time, the precipitate size increased with an increase in tempering temperature. With the increase in the tempering temperature from 675 to 725 °C, the impact absorbed energy of the Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel at -40 °C increased from 257 to 325 J, and the high-temperature yield strength decreased; however, the high-temperature ultimate tensile strength tempered at 700 °C was outstanding (422-571 MPa) at different tested temperatures. The variations of the properties were attributed to the decomposition of M/A constituents and the coarsening of the precipitates. Fe-2Cr-Mo-0.12C steel normalized at 930 °C and tempered at 700 °C was found to have the best combination of ductility and strength.

  14. Cardiovascular risk factors and small vessel disease of the brain: Blood pressure, white matter lesions, and functional decline in older persons

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Hazel Mae A; Wolfson, Leslie; Moscufo, Nicola; Guttmann, Charles R G; Kaplan, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Several potential vascular risk factors exist for the development and accumulation of subcortical white matter disease in older people. We have reported that in older people followed for up to 4 years white matter hyperintensity (WMH) lesions on magnetic resonance imaging nearly doubled in volume and were associated with alterations in mobility and cognitive function. Herein we review the genetic, metabolic, and vascular risk factors that have been evaluated in association with the development and pathogenesis of WMH in older persons. Our research efforts have focused on systemic hypertension, particularly in the out-of-office setting as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) has proven to be a stronger indicator of the progression of WMH in older people and the associated functional decline than doctor’s office BP. Based on relations between 24-hour systolic BP levels, the accrual of WMH, and functional decline, we have designed the INFINITY trial, the first interventional study to use ambulatory BP to guide antihypertensive therapy to address this problem in the geriatric population. PMID:26036933

  15. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests thatmore » were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.« less

  16. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis safety vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    An 8 ft diameter safety vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, is evaluated to determine its ability to contain the quasi-static residual pressure from a high explosive (HE) blast. The safety vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A smaller confinement vessel fits inside the safety vessel and contains the actual explosion, and the safety vessel functions as a second layer of containment in the unlikely case of a confinement vessel leak. The safety vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC107. Combined stresses that result from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared to the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzle components are adequately designed for a static pressure of 830 psi, plus the maximum expected external loads. Shell stresses at the 'shell to nozzle' interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 700 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 17,384 psi, which is significantly less than the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  17. Vessel Loading Observations

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-01-01

    Vessel Loading Observations Procedures for P.L. 480, Titles II & III, : Section 416(b) and Food for Progress programs. Notice advises steamship lines and other interested parties that the vessel loading observation (VLO) procedure will continue to be...

  18. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  19. Thermal-Mechanical Stress Analysis of PWR Pressure Vessel and Nozzles under Grid Load-Following Mode: Interim Report on the Effect of Cyclic Hardening Material Properties and Pre-existing Cracks on Stress Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue as part of DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. In a previous report (September 2015), we presented tensile and fatigue test data and related hardening material properties for 508 low-alloys steel base metal and other reactor metals. In this report, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of the reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles based on estimated material properties. We also present results frommore » thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting cracks in the reactor nozzles (axial or circumferential crack). In addition, results from validation stress analysis based on tensile and fatigue experiments are reported.« less

  20. BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) - Generation Methodology and Preliminary Testing of two ENEA-Bologna Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Sinitsa, Valentin; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Two broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format, dedicated to LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry applications, were generated following the methodology recommended by the US ANSI/ANS-6.1.2-1999 (R2009) standard. These libraries, named BUGJEFF311.BOLIB and BUGENDF70.BOLIB, are respectively based on JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data and adopt the same broad-group energy structure (47 n + 20 γ) of the ORNL BUGLE-96 similar library. They were respectively obtained from the ENEA-Bologna VITJEFF311.BOLIB and VITENDF70.BOLIB libraries in AMPX format for nuclear fission applications through problem-dependent cross section collapsing with the ENEA-Bologna 2007 revision of the ORNL SCAMPI nuclear data processing system. Both previous libraries are based on the Bondarenko self-shielding factor method and have the same AMPX format and fine-group energy structure (199 n + 42 γ) as the ORNL VITAMIN-B6 similar library from which BUGLE-96 was obtained at ORNL. A synthesis of a preliminary validation of the cited BUGLE-type libraries, performed through 3D fixed source transport calculations with the ORNL TORT-3.2 SN code, is included. The calculations were dedicated to the PCA-Replica 12/13 and VENUS-3 engineering neutron shielding benchmark experiments, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes in LWR shielding and radiation damage analyses.

  1. Chemical Fracturing of Refractory-Metal Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Localized reactions cause refractory-metal vessels to break up at predetermined temperatures. Device following concept designed to break up along predetermined lines into smaller pieces at temperature significantly below melting point of metal from which made. Possible applications include fire extinguishers that breakup to release extinguishing gas in enclosed areas, pressure vessels that could otherwise burst dangerously in fire, and self-destroying devices. Technique particularly suitable modification to already existing structures.

  2. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) tests have been conducted on small-diameter Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels subjected to long-term sustained load-to-failure tests. Single-cycle burst tests were used as a basis for determining the test pressure in the sustained-loading tests. AE data from two vessel locations were compared. The data suggest that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers is quite different for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. AE from boss-mounted transducers yielded relatively consistent values. These values were not a function of time for vessel failure. The development of an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels is discussed.

  3. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  4. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis confinement vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    This study evaluates the static-pressure containment capability of a 6-ft-diameter, spherical vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, to be used for high-explosive (HE) containment. The confinement vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DARHT) being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two sets of openings in the vessel are covered with x-ray transparent covers to allow radiographic imaging of an explosion as it occurs inside the vessel. The confinement vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC-107. Combined stresses resulting from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared with the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzles of the confinement vessel are adequately designed to safely contain the maximum residual pressure of 1675 psi that would result from an HE charge of 24.2 kg detonated in a vacuum. Shell stresses at the shell-to-nozzle interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 400 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 16,070 psi, which is less than half the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  5. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  6. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  7. Refilling of a Hydraulically Isolated Embolized Xylem Vessel: Model Calculations

    PubMed Central

    VESALA, TIMO; HÖLTTÄ, TEEMU; PERÄMÄKI, MARTTI; NIKINMAA, EERO

    2003-01-01

    When they are hydraulically isolated, embolized xylem vessels can be refilled, while adjacent vessels remain under tension. This implies that the pressure of water in the refilling vessel must be equal to the bubble gas pressure, which sets physical constraints for recovery. A model of water exudation into the cylindrical vessel and of bubble dissolution based on the assumption of hydraulic isolation is developed. Refilling is made possible by the turgor of the living cells adjacent to the refilling vessel, and by a reflection coefficient below 1 for the exchange of solutes across the interface between the vessel and the adjacent cells. No active transport of solutes is assumed. Living cells are also capable of importing water from the water‐conducting vessels. The most limiting factors were found to be the osmotic potential of living cells and the ratio of the volume of the adjacent living cells to that of the embolized vessel. With values for these of 1·5 MPa and 1, respectively, refilling times were in the order of hours for a broad range of possible values of water conductivity coefficients and effective diffusion distances for dissolved air, when the xylem water tension was below 0·6 MPa and constant. Inclusion of the daily pattern for xylem tension improved the simulations. The simulated gas pressure within the refilling vessel was in accordance with recent experimental results. The study shows that the refilling process is physically possible under hydraulic isolation, while water in surrounding vessels is under negative pressure. However, the osmotic potentials in the refilling vessel tend to be large (in the order of 1 MPa). Only if the xylem water tension is, at most, twice atmospheric pressure, the reflection coefficient remains close to 1 (0·95) and the ratio of the volume of the adjacent living cells to that of the embolized vessel is about 2, does the osmotic potential stay below 0·4 MPa. PMID:12588721

  8. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  9. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  10. Making Large Composite Vessels Without Autoclaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    Method for making fiber-reinforced composite structure relies on heating and differential thermal expansion to provide temperature and pressure necessary to develop full strength, without having to place structure in large, expensive autoclave. Layers of differentially expanding material squeeze fiber-reinforce composite between them when heated. Method suitable for such cylindrical structures as pressure vessels and tanks. Used for both resin-matrix and metal-matrix composites.

  11. Procedure for preparation for shipment of natural gas storage vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amawd, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A method for preparing a natural gas storage vessel for shipment is presented. The gas is stored at 3,000 pounds per square inch. The safety precautions to be observed are emphasized. The equipment and process for purging the tank and sampling the exit gas flow are described. A diagram of the pressure vessel and the equipment is provided.

  12. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of... of all joints, connections and high stress areas. [CGD 95-028, 62 FR 51220, Sept. 30, 1997] records ...

  13. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  14. Disposal of Vessels at Sea

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vessel disposal general permits are issued by the EPA under the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act. Information is provided for vessel disposal permit applicants and where to dispose a vessel.

  15. Using SA508/533 for the HTGR Vessel Material

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) module power rating and normal operating temperatures on the use of SA508/533 material for the HTGR vessel system with emphasis on the calculated times at elevated temperatures approaching or exceeding ASME Code Service Limits (Levels B&C) to which the reactor pressure vessel could be exposed during postulated pressurized and depressurized conduction cooldown events over its design lifetime.

  16. Vessels, Marinas and Ports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An overview of EPA’s vessels (recreational/commercial/military), marinas, and ports programs and the regulatory (permits/rules) and non-regulatory approaches for addressing their associated environmental impacts, such as air and water pollution.

  17. Vessel Sewage Discharges

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vessel sewage discharges are regulated under Section 312 of the Clean Water Act, which is jointly implemented by the EPA and Coast Guard. This homepage links to information on marine sanitation devices and no discharge zones.

  18. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  19. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Nels W.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.Themore » project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.« less

  20. 46 CFR 32.20-1 - Equipment installations on vessels during World War II-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equipment installations on vessels during World War II-TB/ALL. 32.20-1 Section 32.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS... installations on vessels during World War II—TB/ALL. Boilers, pressure vessels, machinery, piping, electrical...