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Sample records for a53t mutant form

  1. Controlling aggregation propensity in A53T mutant of alpha-synuclein causing Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sonu; Sarkar, Anita; Sundar, Durai, E-mail: sundar@dbeb.iitd.ac.in

    2009-09-18

    Understanding {alpha}-synuclein in terms of fibrillization, aggregation, solubility and stability is fundamental in Parkinson's disease (PD). The three familial mutations, namely, A30P, E46K and A53T cause PD because the hydrophobic regions in {alpha}-synuclein acquire {beta}-sheet configuration, and have a propensity to fibrillize and form amyloids that cause cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration. On simulating the native form and mutants (A30P, E46K and A53T) of {alpha}-synuclein in water solvent, clear deviations are observed in comparison to the all-helical 1XQ8 PDB structure. We have identified two crucial residues, {sup 40}Val and {sup 74}Val, which play key roles in {beta}-sheet aggregation in the hydrophobic regionsmore » 36-41 and 68-78, respectively, leading to fibrillization and amyloidosis in familial (A53T) PD. We have also identified V40D{sub V}74D, a double mutant of A53T (the most amyloidogenic mutant). The simultaneous introduction of these two mutations in A53T nearly ends its aggregation propensity, increases its solubility and positively enhances its thermodynamic stability.« less

  2. Structures and free energy landscapes of the A53T mutant-type α-synuclein protein and impact of A53T mutation on the structures of the wild-type α-synuclein protein with dynamics.

    PubMed

    Coskuner, Orkid; Wise-Scira, Olivia

    2013-07-17

    utilizing our new theoretical strategy show that the residual secondary structure conversion stabilities resulting in α-helix formation are not significantly affected by the mutation. Interestingly, the residual secondary structure conversion stabilities show that secondary structure conversions resulting in β-sheet formation are influenced by the A53T mutation and the most stable residual transition yielding β-sheet occurs directly from the coil structure. Long-range interactions detected between the NAC region and the N- or C-terminal regions of the wild-type αS disappear upon A53T mutation. The A53T mutant-type αS structures are thermodynamically more stable than those of the wild-type αS protein structures in aqueous solution. Overall, the higher propensity of the A53T mutant-type αS protein to aggregate in comparison to the wild-type αS protein is related to the increased β-sheet formation and lack of strong intramolecular long-range interactions in the N-terminal region in comparison to its wild-type form. The specific residual secondary structure component stabilities reported herein provide information helpful for designing and synthesizing small organic molecules that can block the β-sheet forming residues, which are reactive toward aggregation.

  3. Structures and Free Energy Landscapes of the A53T Mutant-Type α-Synuclein Protein and Impact of A53T Mutation on the Structures of the Wild-Type α-Synuclein Protein with Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    results utilizing our new theoretical strategy show that the residual secondary structure conversion stabilities resulting in α-helix formation are not significantly affected by the mutation. Interestingly, the residual secondary structure conversion stabilities show that secondary structure conversions resulting in β-sheet formation are influenced by the A53T mutation and the most stable residual transition yielding β-sheet occurs directly from the coil structure. Long-range interactions detected between the NAC region and the N- or C-terminal regions of the wild-type αS disappear upon A53T mutation. The A53T mutant-type αS structures are thermodynamically more stable than those of the wild-type αS protein structures in aqueous solution. Overall, the higher propensity of the A53T mutant-type αS protein to aggregate in comparison to the wild-type αS protein is related to the increased β-sheet formation and lack of strong intramolecular long-range interactions in the N-terminal region in comparison to its wild-type form. The specific residual secondary structure component stabilities reported herein provide information helpful for designing and synthesizing small organic molecules that can block the β-sheet forming residues, which are reactive toward aggregation. PMID:23607785

  4. A Novel Hsp90 Inhibitor Activates Compensatory Heat Shock Protein Responses and Autophagy and Alleviates Mutant A53T α-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Rui; Zhou, Wenbo; Siegel, David; Kitson, Russell R. A.; Freed, Curt R.; Moody, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    A potential cause of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), is protein misfolding and aggregation that in turn leads to neurotoxicity. Targeting Hsp90 is an attractive strategy to halt neurodegenerative diseases, and benzoquinone ansamycin (BQA) Hsp90 inhibitors such as geldanamycin (GA) and 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin have been shown to be beneficial in mutant A53T α-synuclein PD models. However, current BQA inhibitors result in off-target toxicities via redox cycling and/or arylation of nucleophiles at the C19 position. We developed novel 19-substituted BQA (19BQA) as a means to prevent arylation. In this study, our data demonstrated that 19-phenyl-GA, a lead 19BQA in the GA series, was redox stable and exhibited little toxicity relative to its parent quinone GA in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells as examined by oxygen consumption, trypan blue, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and apoptosis assays. Meanwhile, 19-phenyl-GA retained the ability to induce autophagy and potentially protective heat shock proteins (HSPs) such as Hsp70 and Hsp27. We found that transduction of A53T, but not wild type (WT) α-synuclein, induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. 19-Phenyl-GA decreased oligomer formation and toxicity of A53T α-synuclein in transduced cells. Mechanistic studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase signaling was activated by A53T but not WT α-synuclein, and 19-phenyl-GA decreased mTOR activation that may be associated with A53T α-synuclein toxicity. In summary, our results indicate that 19BQAs such as 19-phenyl-GA may provide a means to modulate protein-handling systems including HSPs and autophagy, thereby reducing the aggregation and toxicity of proteins such as mutant A53T α-synuclein. PMID:26405178

  5. Oral Exposure to Paraquat Triggers Earlier Expression of Phosphorylated α-Synuclein in the Enteric Nervous System of A53T Mutant Human α-Synuclein Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naudet, Nicolas; Antier, Emilie; Gaillard, Damien; Morignat, Eric; Lakhdar, Latifa; Baron, Thierry; Bencsik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The misfolded α-synuclein protein, phosphorylated at serine 129 (pSer129 α-syn), is the hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Detected also in the enteric nervous system (ENS), it supports the recent theory that PD could start in the gut, rather than the brain. In a previous study, using a transgenic mouse model of human synucleinopathies expressing the A53T mutant α-synuclein (TgM83), in which a neurodegenerative process associated with α-synuclein occurs spontaneously in the brain, we have shown earlier onset of pSer129 α-syn in the ENS. Here, we used this model to study the impact of paraquat (PQ) a neurotoxic herbicide incriminated in PD in agricultural workers) on the enteric pSer129 α-syn expression in young mice. Orally delivered in the drinking water at 10 mg/kg/day for 6–8 weeks, the impact of PQ was measured in a time-dependent manner on weight, locomotor abilities, pSer129 α-syn, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression levels in the ENS. Remarkably, pSer129 α-syn was detected in ENS earlier under PQ oral exposure and enteric GFAP expression was also increased. These findings bring additional support to the theory that neurotoxic agents such as PQ initiate idiopathic PD after oral delivery. PMID:29040593

  6. Oral Exposure to Paraquat Triggers Earlier Expression of Phosphorylated α-Synuclein in the Enteric Nervous System of A53T Mutant Human α-Synuclein Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Naudet, Nicolas; Antier, Emilie; Gaillard, Damien; Morignat, Eric; Lakhdar, Latifa; Baron, Thierry; Bencsik, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The misfolded α-synuclein protein, phosphorylated at serine 129 (pSer129 α-syn), is the hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Detected also in the enteric nervous system (ENS), it supports the recent theory that PD could start in the gut, rather than the brain. In a previous study, using a transgenic mouse model of human synucleinopathies expressing the A53T mutant α-synuclein (TgM83), in which a neurodegenerative process associated with α-synuclein occurs spontaneously in the brain, we have shown earlier onset of pSer129 α-syn in the ENS. Here, we used this model to study the impact of paraquat (PQ) a neurotoxic herbicide incriminated in PD in agricultural workers) on the enteric pSer129 α-syn expression in young mice. Orally delivered in the drinking water at 10 mg/kg/day for 6-8 weeks, the impact of PQ was measured in a time-dependent manner on weight, locomotor abilities, pSer129 α-syn, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression levels in the ENS. Remarkably, pSer129 α-syn was detected in ENS earlier under PQ oral exposure and enteric GFAP expression was also increased. These findings bring additional support to the theory that neurotoxic agents such as PQ initiate idiopathic PD after oral delivery. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc.

  7. Generation of gene-corrected iPSC line from Parkinson's disease patient iPSC line with alpha-SNCA A53T mutation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Young; Jeong, SangKyun; Kim, Janghwan; Chung, Sun-Ku

    2018-06-09

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. PD can result from a mutation of alpha-synuclein (α-SNCA), such as α-SNCA A53T. Using episomal vectors, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts with the α-SNCA A53T mutation. A huge bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) harboring the normal α-SNCA gene successfully corrected the α-SNCA A53T-mutant iPSCs. Melting curve analysis for allelic composition indicated that the BAC DNA was precisely targeted to the α-SNCA A53T mutation allele, without random integration. The corrected PD-iPSCs displayed the normal karyotype and pluripotency, with the capability to differentiate to any cell type. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA damage preceding dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-synuclein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Degui; Yu, Tianyu; Liu, Yongqiang; Yan, Jun; Guo, Yingli; Jing, Yuhong; Yang, Xuguang; Song, Yanfeng; Tian, Yingxia

    2016-12-02

    Defective DNA repair has been linked with age-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors. Whether damages to nuclear DNA contribute to neurodegeneration of PD still remain obscure. in this study we aim to explore whether nuclear DNA damage induce dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-Synuclein over expressed mouse model. We investigated the effects of X-ray irradiation on A53T-α-Syn MEFs and A53T-α-Syn transgene mice. Our results indicate that A53T-α-Syn MEFs show a prolonged DNA damage repair process and senescense phenotype. DNA damage preceded onset of motor phenotype in A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice and decrease the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Neurons of A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice are more fragile to DNA damages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. FTY720/Fingolimod Reduces Synucleinopathy and Improves Gut Motility in A53T Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Martínez, Guadalupe; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Gil-Tommee, Carolina; Medina, David; Garza, Nathan T.; Yang, Barbara; Segura-Ulate, Ismael; Dominguez, Samantha J.; Perez, Ruth G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have aggregated α-synuclein (aSyn) in enteric nervous system (ENS) neurons, which may be associated with the development of constipation. This occurs well before the onset of classic PD motor symptoms. We previously found that aging A53T transgenic (Tg) mice closely model PD-like ENS aSyn pathology, making them appropriate for testing potential PD therapies. Here we show that Tg mice overexpressing mutant human aSyn develop ENS pathology by 4 months. We then evaluated the responses of Tg mice and their WT littermates to the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug FTY720 (fingolimod, Gilenya) or vehicle control solution from 5 months of age. Long term oral FTY720 in Tg mice reduced ENS aSyn aggregation and constipation, enhanced gut motility, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but produced no significant change in WT littermates. A role for BDNF was directly assessed in a cohort of young A53T mice given vehicle, FTY720, the Trk-B receptor inhibitor ANA-12, or FTY720 + ANA-12 from 1 to 4 months of age. ANA-12-treated Tg mice developed more gut aSyn aggregation as well as constipation, whereas FTY720-treated Tg mice had reduced aSyn aggregation and less constipation, occurring in part by increasing both pro-BDNF and mature BDNF levels. The data from young and old Tg mice revealed FTY720-associated neuroprotection and reduced aSyn pathology, suggesting that FTY720 may also benefit PD patients and others with synucleinopathy. Another finding was a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in gut neurons with aggregated aSyn, comparable with our prior findings in the CNS. PMID:27528608

  10. DNA damage preceding dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-synuclein transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Degui; Yu, Tianyu; Liu, Yongqiang

    Defective DNA repair has been linked with age-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors. Whether damages to nuclear DNA contribute to neurodegeneration of PD still remain obscure. in this study we aim to explore whether nuclear DNA damage induce dopamine neuron degeneration in A53T human α-Synuclein over expressed mouse model. We investigated the effects of X-ray irradiation on A53T-α-Syn MEFs and A53T-α-Syn transgene mice. Our results indicate that A53T-α-Syn MEFs show a prolonged DNA damage repair process and senescense phenotype. DNA damage preceded onset of motor phenotype in A53T-α-Syn transgenicmore » mice and decrease the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Neurons of A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice are more fragile to DNA damages. - Highlights: • This study explore contribution of DNA damage to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease mice. • A53T-α-Syn MEF cells show a prolonged DNA damage repair process and senescense phenotype. • DNA damage preceded onset of motor phenotype in A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice. • DNA damage decrease the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. • Neurons of A53T-α-Syn transgenic mice are more fragile to DNA damages.« less

  11. Pesticide exposure exacerbates alpha-synucleinopathy in an A53T transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Norris, Erin H; Uryu, Kunihiro; Leight, Susan; Giasson, Benoit I; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2007-02-01

    The factors initiating or contributing to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and related neurodegenerative synucleinopathies are still largely unclear, but environmental factors such as pesticides have been implicated. In this study, A53T mutant human alpha-synuclein transgenic mice (M83), which develop alpha-synuclein neuropathology, were treated with the pesticides paraquat and maneb (either singly or together), and their effects were analyzed. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses showed that chronic treatment of M83 transgenic mice with both pesticides (but not with either pesticide alone) drastically increased neuronal alpha-synuclein pathology throughout the central nervous system including the hippocampus, cerebellum, and sensory and auditory cortices. alpha-Synuclein-associated mitochondrial degeneration was observed in M83 but not in wild-type alpha-synuclein transgenic mice. Because alpha-synuclein inclusions accumulated in pesticide-exposed M83 transgenic mice without a motor phenotype, we conclude that alpha-synuclein aggregate formation precedes disease onset. These studies support the notion that environmental factors causing nitrative damage are closely linked to mechanisms underlying the formation of alpha-synuclein pathologies and the onset of Parkinson's-like neurodegeneration.

  12. Pesticide Exposure Exacerbates α-Synucleinopathy in an A53T Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Erin H.; Uryu, Kunihiro; Leight, Susan; Giasson, Benoit I.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    The factors initiating or contributing to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative synucleinopathies are still largely unclear, but environmental factors such as pesticides have been implicated. In this study, A53T mutant human α-synuclein transgenic mice (M83), which develop α-synuclein neuropathology, were treated with the pesticides paraquat and maneb (either singly or together), and their effects were analyzed. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses showed that chronic treatment of M83 transgenic mice with both pesticides (but not with either pesticide alone) drastically increased neuronal α-synuclein pathology throughout the central nervous system including the hippocampus, cerebellum, and sensory and auditory cortices. α-Synuclein-associated mitochondrial degeneration was observed in M83 but not in wild-type α-synuclein transgenic mice. Because α-synuclein inclusions accumulated in pesticide-exposed M83 transgenic mice without a motor phenotype, we conclude that α-synuclein aggregate formation precedes disease onset. These studies support the notion that environmental factors causing nitrative damage are closely linked to mechanisms underlying the formation of α-synuclein pathologies and the onset of Parkinson’s-like neurodegeneration. PMID:17255333

  13. Non-motor parkinsonian pathology in aging A53T α-synuclein mice is associated with progressive synucleinopathy and altered enzymatic function.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kaitlin F; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Villanueva, Ernesto; Lou, Haiyan; Alerte, Tshianda N M; Peet, Eloise; Drolet, Robert E; Perez, Ruth G

    2014-02-01

    Aging, the main risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), is associated with increased α-synuclein levels in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Excess α-synuclein spurs Lewy-like pathology and dysregulates the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A dephosphorylates many neuroproteins, including the catecholamine rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons induces PD movement problems, but before those abnormalities occur, behaviors such as olfactory loss, anxiety, and constipation often manifest. Identifying mouse models with early PD behavioral changes could provide a model in which to test emerging therapeutic compounds. To this end, we evaluated mice expressing A53T mutant human (A53T) α-synuclein for behavior and α-synuclein pathology in olfactory bulb, adrenal gland, and gut. Aging A53T mice exhibited olfactory loss and anxiety that paralleled olfactory and adrenal α-synuclein aggregation. PP2A activity was also diminished in olfactory and adrenal tissues harboring insoluble α-synuclein. Low adrenal PP2A activity co-occurred with TH hyperactivity, making this the first study to link adrenal synucleinopathy to anxiety and catecholamine dysregulation. Aggregated A53T α-synuclein recombinant protein also had impaired stimulatory effects on soluble recombinant PP2A. Collectively, the data identify an excellent model in which to screen compounds for their ability to block the spread of α-synuclein pathology associated with pre-motor stages of PD. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. A53T-α-synuclein overexpression in murine locus coeruleus induces Parkinson's disease-like pathology in neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Martin Timo; Geibl, Fanni Fruzsina; Lee, Bolam; Chiu, Wei-Hua; Koprich, James Benjamin; Brotchie, Jonathan Michael; Timmermann, Lars; Decher, Niels; Matschke, Lina Anita; Oertel, Wolfgang Hermann

    2018-05-10

    Degeneration of noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurons occurs during the prodromal phase of Parkinson's disease and contributes to a variety of non-motor symptoms, e.g. depression, anxiety and REM sleep behavior disorder. This study was designed to establish the first locus coeruleus α-synucleinopathy mouse model, which should provide sufficient information about the time-course of noradrenergic neurodegeneration, replicate cardinal histopathological features of the human Parkinson's disease neuropathology and finally lead to robust histological markers, which are sufficient to assess the pathological changes in a quantitative and qualitative way. We show that targeted viral vector-mediated overexpression of human mutant A53T-α-synuclein in vivo in locus coeruleus neurons of wild-type mice resulted in progressive noradrenergic neurodegeneration over a time frame of 9 weeks. Observed neuronal cell loss was accompanied by progressive α-synuclein phosphorylation, formation of proteinase K-resistant α-synuclein-aggregates, accumulation of Ubi-1- and p62-positive inclusions in microglia and induction of progressive micro- and astrogliosis. Apart from this local pathology, abundant α-synuclein-positive axons were found in locus coeruleus output regions, indicating rapid anterograde axonal transport of A53T-α-synuclein. Taken together, we present the first model of α-synucleinopathy in the murine locus coeruleus, replicating essential morphological features of human Parkinson's disease pathology. This new model may contribute to the research on prodromal Parkinson's disease, in respect to pathophysiology and the development of disease-modifying therapy.

  15. Behavioral Characterization of A53T Mice Reveals Early and Late Stage Deficits Related to Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paumier, Katrina L.; Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J.; Berger, Zdenek; Chen, Yi; Gonzales, Cathleen; Kaftan, Edward; Li, Li; Lotarski, Susan; Monaghan, Michael; Shen, Wei; Stolyar, Polina; Vasilyev, Dmytro; Zaleska, Margaret; D. Hirst, Warren; Dunlop, John

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology is characterized by the formation of intra-neuronal inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are comprised of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). Duplication, triplication or genetic mutations in α-syn (A53T, A30P and E46K) are linked to autosomal dominant PD; thus implicating its role in the pathogenesis of PD. In both PD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of protein aggregates (i.e., α-syn) and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of symptomatic dysfunction is important for understanding the impact of α-syn on disease progression. Furthermore, this knowledge is essential for identifying pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. To this end, we examined various functional and morphological endpoints in the transgenic mouse model expressing the human A53T α-syn variant directed by the mouse prion promoter at specific ages relating to disease progression (2, 6 and 12 months of age). Our findings indicate A53T mice develop fine, sensorimotor, and synaptic deficits before the onset of age-related gross motor and cognitive dysfunction. Results from open field and rotarod tests show A53T mice develop age-dependent changes in locomotor activity and reduced anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, digigait analysis shows these mice develop an abnormal gait by 12 months of age. A53T mice also exhibit spatial memory deficits at 6 and 12 months, as demonstrated by Y-maze performance. In contrast to gross motor and cognitive changes, A53T mice display significant impairments in fine- and sensorimotor tasks such as grooming, nest building and acoustic startle as early as 1–2 months of age. These mice also show significant abnormalities in basal synaptic transmission, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term depression (LTD). Combined, these data indicate the A53T model exhibits early- and late-onset behavioral and synaptic impairments

  16. FTY720/Fingolimod Reduces Synucleinopathy and Improves Gut Motility in A53T Mice: CONTRIBUTIONS OF PRO-BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (PRO-BDNF) AND MATURE BDNF.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Martínez, Guadalupe; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Gil-Tommee, Carolina; Medina, David; Garza, Nathan T; Yang, Barbara; Segura-Ulate, Ismael; Dominguez, Samantha J; Perez, Ruth G

    2016-09-23

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have aggregated α-synuclein (aSyn) in enteric nervous system (ENS) neurons, which may be associated with the development of constipation. This occurs well before the onset of classic PD motor symptoms. We previously found that aging A53T transgenic (Tg) mice closely model PD-like ENS aSyn pathology, making them appropriate for testing potential PD therapies. Here we show that Tg mice overexpressing mutant human aSyn develop ENS pathology by 4 months. We then evaluated the responses of Tg mice and their WT littermates to the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug FTY720 (fingolimod, Gilenya) or vehicle control solution from 5 months of age. Long term oral FTY720 in Tg mice reduced ENS aSyn aggregation and constipation, enhanced gut motility, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but produced no significant change in WT littermates. A role for BDNF was directly assessed in a cohort of young A53T mice given vehicle, FTY720, the Trk-B receptor inhibitor ANA-12, or FTY720 + ANA-12 from 1 to 4 months of age. ANA-12-treated Tg mice developed more gut aSyn aggregation as well as constipation, whereas FTY720-treated Tg mice had reduced aSyn aggregation and less constipation, occurring in part by increasing both pro-BDNF and mature BDNF levels. The data from young and old Tg mice revealed FTY720-associated neuroprotection and reduced aSyn pathology, suggesting that FTY720 may also benefit PD patients and others with synucleinopathy. Another finding was a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in gut neurons with aggregated aSyn, comparable with our prior findings in the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The different faces of the p. A53T alpha-synuclein mutation: A screening of Greek patients with parkinsonism and/or dementia.

    PubMed

    Breza, Marianthi; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Potagas, Constantin; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Paraskevas, George P; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Stefanis, Leonidas; Panas, Marios

    2018-04-13

    The p. A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene is a rare cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Although generally rare, it is particularly common in the Greek population due to a founder effect. A53T-positive PD patients often develop dementia during disease course and may very rarely present with dementia. We screened for the p. A53T SNCA mutation a total of 347 cases of Greek origin with parkinsonism and/or dementia, collected over 15 years at the Neurogenetics Unit, Eginition Hospital, University of Athens. Cases were classified into: "pure parkinsonism", "pure dementia" and "parkinsonism plus dementia". In total, 4 p. A53T SNCA mutation carriers were identified. All had autosomal dominant family history and early onset. Screening of the "pure parkinsonism" category revealed 2 cases with typical PD. The other two mutation carriers were identified in the "parkinsonism plus dementia" category. One had a diagnosis of PD dementia and the other of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Screening of patients with "pure dementia" failed to identify any further A53T-positive cases. Our results confirm that the p. A53T SNCA mutation is relatively common in Greek patients with PD or PD plus dementia, particularly in cases with early onset and/or autosomal dominant family history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. D409H GBA1 mutation accelerates the progression of pathology in A53T α-synuclein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghoon; Hwang, Heehong; Choi, Seulah; Kwon, Sang Ho; Lee, Suhyun; Park, Jae Hong; Kim, SangMin; Ko, Han Seok

    2018-04-27

    Heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase 1 (GBA1) are a major genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. Mutations in GBA1 leads to GBA1 enzyme deficiency, and GBA1-associated parkinsonism has an earlier age of onset and more progressive parkinsonism. To investigate a potential influence of GBA1 deficiency caused by mutations in GBA1 on the disease progression of PD, GBA1 mice carrying D409H knock-in mutation were crossbred with the human A53T (hA53T) α-synuclein transgenic mice. Here, we show that GBA1 enzyme activity plays a significant role in the hA53T α-synuclein induced α-synucleinopathy. The expression of D409H GBA1 markedly shortens the lifespan of hA53T α-synuclein transgenic mice. Moreover, D409H GBA1 expression exacerbates the formation of insoluble aggregates of α-synuclein, glial activation, neuronal degeneration, and motor abnormalities in the hA53T α-synuclein transgenic mice. Interestingly, the expression of D409H GBA1 results in the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of hA53T transgenic mice. Taken together, these results indicate that GBA1 deficiency due to D409H mutation affects the disease onset and course in hA53T α-synuclein transgenic mice. Therefore, strategies aimed to maintain GBA1 enzyme activity could be employed to develop an effective novel therapy for GBA1 linked-PD and related α-synucleinopathies.

  19. Monomer structure of a hyperthermophilic β-glucosidase mutant forming a dodecameric structure in the crystal form

    PubMed Central

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Kataoka, Misumi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    One of the β-glucosidases from Pyrococcus furiosus (BGLPf) is found to be a hyperthermophilic tetrameric enzyme that can degrade cellooligosaccharides. Recently, the crystal structures of the tetrameric and dimeric forms were solved. Here, a new monomeric form of BGLPf was constructed by removing the C-terminal region of the enzyme and its crystal structure was solved at a resolution of 2.8 Å in space group P1. It was discovered that the mutant enzyme forms a unique dodecameric structure consisting of two hexameric rings in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. Under biological conditions, the mutant enzyme forms a monomer. This result helps explain how BGLPf has attained its oligomeric structure and thermostability. PMID:25005077

  20. Intracellular transport and sorting of mutant human proinsulins that fail to form hexamers

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Human proinsulin and insulin oligomerize to form dimers and hexamers. It has been suggested that the ability of prohormones to self associate and form aggregates may be responsible for the sorting process at the trans-Golgi. To examine whether insulin oligomerization is required for proper sorting into regulated storage granules, we have constructed point mutations in human insulin B chain that have been previously shown to prevent formation of insulin hexamers (Brange, J., U. Ribel, J. F. Hansen, G. Dodson, M. T. Hansen, S. Havelund, S. G. Melberg, F. Norris, K. Norris, L. Snel, A. R. Sorensen, and H. O. Voight. 1988. Nature [Lond.]. 333:679-682). One mutant (B10His----Asp) allows formation of dimers but not hexamers and the other (B9Ser----Asp) prevents formation of both dimers and hexamers. The mutants were transfected into the mouse pituitary AtT-20 cells, and their ability to be sorted into regulated secretory granules was compared to wild-type insulin. We found that while B10His----Asp is sorted somewhat less efficiently than wild-type insulin as reported previously (Carroll, R. J., R. E. Hammer, S. J. Chan, H. H. Swift, A. H. Rubenstein, and D. F. Steiner. 1988. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 85:8943-8947; Gross, D. J., P. A. Halban, C. R. Kahn, G. C. Weir, and L. Villa-Kumaroff. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:4107-4111). B9Ser----Asp is targeted to granules as efficiently as wild-type insulin. These results indicate that self association of proinsulin into hexamers is not required for its targeting to the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:2040652

  1. Intracellular transport and sorting of mutant human proinsulins that fail to form hexamers.

    PubMed

    Quinn, D; Orci, L; Ravazzola, M; Moore, H P

    1991-06-01

    Human proinsulin and insulin oligomerize to form dimers and hexamers. It has been suggested that the ability of prohormones to self associate and form aggregates may be responsible for the sorting process at the trans-Golgi. To examine whether insulin oligomerization is required for proper sorting into regulated storage granules, we have constructed point mutations in human insulin B chain that have been previously shown to prevent formation of insulin hexamers (Brange, J., U. Ribel, J. F. Hansen, G. Dodson, M. T. Hansen, S. Havelund, S. G. Melberg, F. Norris, K. Norris, L. Snel, A. R. Sorensen, and H. O. Voight. 1988. Nature [Lond.]. 333:679-682). One mutant (B10His----Asp) allows formation of dimers but not hexamers and the other (B9Ser----Asp) prevents formation of both dimers and hexamers. The mutants were transfected into the mouse pituitary AtT-20 cells, and their ability to be sorted into regulated secretory granules was compared to wild-type insulin. We found that while B10His----Asp is sorted somewhat less efficiently than wild-type insulin as reported previously (Carroll, R. J., R. E. Hammer, S. J. Chan, H. H. Swift, A. H. Rubenstein, and D. F. Steiner. 1988. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 85:8943-8947; Gross, D. J., P. A. Halban, C. R. Kahn, G. C. Weir, and L. Villa-Kumaroff. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:4107-4111). B9Ser----Asp is targeted to granules as efficiently as wild-type insulin. These results indicate that self association of proinsulin into hexamers is not required for its targeting to the regulated secretory pathway.

  2. The heterozygous A53T mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene in a Chinese Han patient with Parkinson disease: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei-Xi; Sun, Yi-Min; Guan, Rong-Yuan; Luo, Su-Shan; Chen, Chen; An, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wu, Jian-Jun

    2016-10-01

    The missense mutation A53T of alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) was reported to be a rare but definite cause of sporadic and familial Parkinson disease (PD). It seemed to be restricted geographically in Greece and Italy. We aimed to identify the SNCA mutations in a Chinese PD cohort. Ninety-one early onset PD patients or familial PD probands were collected consecutively for the screening of PD-related genes. The genetic analysis was carried out by target sequencing of the exons and the corresponding flanking regions of the PD-related genes using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer and further confirmed by Sanger sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Dosage mutations of exons in these genes were carried out by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Among the 91 patients, we found only one heterozygous mutation of SNCA A53T, in a 23-year-old male patient with negative family history. The [(11)C]-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropan (CFT) PET and PD-related spatial covariance pattern (PDRP) via [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucos (FDG) PET confirmed a typical pattern of PD. After examining his parents, we found his mother was an asymptomatic carrier, with declined hand dexterity detected by quantitative motor tests. Reduced dopamine transporter uptake of his mother was identified by CFT PET, and abnormal PDRP pattern was found by FDG PET. Our investigation expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of Chinese PD patients, and we suggested SNCA mutations to be screened in familial and early onset Chinese PD patients.

  3. Quantitative proteomics in A30P*A53T α-synuclein transgenic mice reveals upregulation of Sel1l.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianguo; Zhang, Pei; Jiao, Fengjuan; Wang, Qingzhi; He, Feng; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zheng; Lv, Zexi; Peng, Xiang; Cai, Hongwei; Tian, Bo

    2017-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an abundantly expressed neuronal protein that is at the center of focus in understanding a group of neurodegenerative disorders called synucleinopathies, which are characterized by the intracellular presence of aggregated α-synuclein. However, the mechanism of α-synuclein biology in synucleinopathies pathogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, mice overexpressing human A30P*A53T α-synuclein were evaluated by a motor behavior test and count of TH-positive neurons, and then two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with tandem mass tags (TMTs) labeling was employed to quantitatively identify the differentially expressed proteins of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) tissue samples that were obtained from the α-synuclein transgenic mice and wild type controls. The number of SNpc dopaminergic neurons and the motor behavior were unchanged in A30P*A53T transgenic mice at the age of 6 months. Of the 4,715 proteins identified by proteomic techniques, 271 were differentially expressed, including 249 upregulated and 22 downregulated proteins. These alterations were primarily associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, ubiquitin-proteasome system impairment, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Some obviously changed proteins, which were validated by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, including Sel1l and Sdhc, may be involved in the α-synuclein pathologies of synucleinopathies. A biological pathway analysis of common related proteins showed that the proteins were linked to a total of 31 KEGG pathways. Our findings suggest that these identified proteins may serve as novel therapeutic targets for synucleinopathies.

  4. The First Mutant of the Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein That Forms a Red Chromophore†

    PubMed Central

    Mishin, Alexander S.; Subach, Fedor V.; Yampolsky, Ilia V.; King, William; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, and its mutants are widely used in biomedical studies as fluorescent markers. In spite of the enormous efforts of academia and industry toward generating its red fluorescent mutants, no GFP variants with emission maximum at more than 529 nm have been developed during the 15 years since its cloning. Here, we used a new strategy of molecular evolution aimed at generating a red-emitting mutant of GFP. As a result, we have succeeded in producing the first GFP mutant that substantially matures to the red-emitting state with excitation and emission maxima at 555 and 585 nm, respectively. A novel, nonoxidative mechanism for formation of the red chromophore in this mutant that includes a dehydration of the Ser65 side chain has been proposed. Model experiments showed that the novel dual-color GFP mutant with green and red emission is suitable for multicolor flow cytometry as an additional color since it is clearly separable from both green and red fluorescent tags. PMID:18366185

  5. Initial characterization of 17 viruses harboring mutant forms of the immediate-early gene of equine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Buczynski, Kimberly A; Kim, Seong K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2005-10-01

    The sole immediate-early (IE) gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) encodes a major regulatory protein of 1487 amino acids (aa) capable of modulating gene expression from both early and late promoters and also of trans-repressing its own promoter. Using a specially designed recombination system and a library of IE linker-insertion, deletion, point, and nonsense mutant constructs that encode forms of the IE protein (IEP) harboring mutations within all five regions, 17 mutant viruses were generated and characterized. Ribonuclease protection analyses revealed that all 17 mutants synthesize the IE mRNA in RK-13 cells, whereas those that failed to replicate on non-complementing RK-13 cells displayed a defect in the transcription of either an important early gene (EICP0) and/or an essential late gene (glycoprotein D). Western blot analyses showed that the IEP was synthesized and detectable in cells infected with each mutant virus, including those mutants that failed to replicate on non-complementing RK-13 cells. Eleven of the 17 mutants were capable of growth on non-complementing RK-13 cells, whereas mutant viruses with deletions within the serine-rich tract (SRT), nucleus localization signal (NLS), or DNA-binding domain (DBD) were capable of growth only on the IEP-producing cell line (IE13.1). Lastly, temperature shift experiments revealed that mutant viruses containing deletions within the C-terminus (KyAn1029 and KyAn1411) or within the SRT (KyADeltaSRT2) of the IEP exhibited a temperature-sensitive phenotype in that these viruses, in contrast to the parent KyA, failed to replicate at 39 degrees C. Overall, these results indicate that the C-terminus of the IEP is not essential for IEP function in cell culture, but this region contains elements that enhance the function(s) of the IEP. The initial characterization of these 17 EHV-1 mutants has shown that sequences totaling at least 43% of the IEP are not essential for virus replication in cell culture.

  6. Studies of protein aggregation in A53T α-synuclein transgenic, Tg2576 transgenic, and P246L presenilin-1 knock-in cross bred mice.

    PubMed

    Emmer, Kristel L; Covy, Jason P; Giasson, Benoit I

    2012-01-24

    Synucleinopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease, associated with neuronal amyloid inclusions comprised of the presynaptic protein α-synuclein (α-syn); however the biological events that initiate and lead to the formation of these inclusions are still poorly understood. There is mounting evidence that intracellular α-syn aggregation may proceed via a seeding mechanism and could spread between neurons through a prion-like mechanism that may involve other amyloidogenic proteins. Several lines of evidence suggest that Aβ peptides and/or extracellular Aβ deposits may directly or indirectly promote intracellular α-syn aggregation. To assess the effects of Aβ peptides and extracellular Aβ deposits on α-syn aggregate formation, transgenic mice (line M83) expressing A53T human α-syn that are sensitive to developing α-syn pathological inclusions were cross bred to Tg2576 transgenic mice that generated elevated levels of Aβ peptides and develop abundant Aβ plaques. In addition these mice were bred to mice with the P264L presenilin-1 knock-in mutation that further promotes Aβ plaque formation. These mice demonstrated the expected formation of Aβ plaques; however despite the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated α-syn dystrophic neurites within or surrounding Aβ plaques, no additional α-syn pathologies were observed. These studies show that Aβ amyloid deposits can cause the local aggregation of α-syn, but these did not lead to more extensive α-syn pathology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AAV1/2-induced overexpression of A53T-α-synuclein in the substantia nigra results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal system with Lewy-like pathology and motor impairment: a new mouse model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ip, Chi Wang; Klaus, Laura-Christin; Karikari, Akua A; Visanji, Naomi P; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Lang, Anthony E; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B

    2017-02-01

    α-Synuclein is a protein implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). AAV1/2-driven overexpression of human mutated A53T-α-synuclein in rat and monkey substantia nigra (SN) induces degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons and decreases striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Given certain advantages of the mouse, especially it being amendable to genetic manipulation, translating the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein model to mice would be of significant value. AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein or AAV1/2 empty vector (EV) at a concentration of 5.16 x 10 12 gp/ml were unilaterally injected into the right SN of male adult C57BL/6 mice. Post-mortem examinations included immunohistochemistry to analyze nigral α-synuclein, Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein and TH expression, striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) levels by autoradiography and dopamine levels by high performance liquid chromatography. At 10 weeks, in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice there was a 33% reduction in TH+ dopaminergic nigral neurons (P < 0.001), 29% deficit in striatal DAT binding (P < 0.05), 38% and 33% reductions in dopamine (P < 0.001) and DOPAC (P < 0.01) levels and a 60% increase in dopamine turnover (homovanilic acid/dopamine ratio; P < 0.001). Immunofluorescence showed that the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein injected mice had widespread nigral and striatal expression of vector-delivered A53T-α-synuclein. Concurrent staining with human PD SN samples using gold standard histological methodology for Lewy pathology detection by proteinase K digestion and application of specific antibody raised against human Lewy body α-synuclein (LB509) and Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein (81A) revealed insoluble α-synuclein aggregates in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice resembling Lewy-like neurites and bodies. In the cylinder test, we observed significant paw use asymmetry in the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein group when compared to EV controls at 5 and 9 weeks post injection (P

  8. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-11-01

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. ALS-causing profilin-1-mutant forms a non-native helical structure in membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Lim, Liangzhong; Kang, Jian; Song, Jianxing

    2017-11-01

    Despite having physiological functions completely different from superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), profilin 1 (PFN1) also carries mutations causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with a striking similarity to that triggered by SOD1 mutants. Very recently, the C71G-PFN1 has been demonstrated to cause ALS by a gain of toxicity and the acceleration of motor neuron degeneration preceded the accumulation of its aggregates. Here by atomic-resolution NMR determination of conformations and dynamics of WT-PFN1 and C71G-PFN1 in aqueous buffers and in membrane mimetics DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, we deciphered that: 1) the thermodynamic destabilization by C71G transforms PFN1 into coexistence with the unfolded state, which is lacking of any stable tertiary/secondary structures as well as restricted ps-ns backbone motions, thus fundamentally indistinguishable from ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. 2) Most strikingly, while WT-PFN1 only weakly interacts with DMPC/DHPC bicelle without altering the native structure, C71G-PFN1 acquires abnormal capacity in strongly interacting with DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, energetically driven by transforming the highly disordered unfolded state into a non-native helical structure, similar to what has been previously observed on ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. Our results imply that one potential mechanism for C71G-PFN1 to initiate ALS might be the abnormal interaction with membranes as recently established for SOD1 mutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Pharmacogenetic Approach to Identify Mutant Forms of α-Galactosidase A that Respond to a Pharmacological Chaperone for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyang; Katz, Evan; Valle, Maria Cecilia Della; Mascioli, Kirsten; Flanagan, John J; Castelli, Jeffrey P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Boudes, Pol; Lockhart, David J; Valenzano, Kenneth J; Benjamin, Elfrida R

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the gene (GLA) that encodes α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). The iminosugar AT1001 (GR181413A, migalastat hydrochloride, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) is a pharmacological chaperone that selectively binds and stabilizes α-Gal A, increasing total cellular levels and activity for some mutant forms (defined as “responsive”). In this study, we developed a cell-based assay in cultured HEK-293 cells to identify mutant forms of α-Gal A that are responsive to AT1001. Concentration-dependent increases in α-Gal A activity in response to AT1001 were shown for 49 (60%) of 81 mutant forms. The responses of α-Gal A mutant forms were generally consistent with the responses observed in male Fabry patient-derived lymphoblasts. Importantly, the HEK-293 cell responses of 19 α-Gal A mutant forms to a clinically achievable concentration of AT1001 (10 µM) were generally consistent with observed increases in α-Gal A activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from male Fabry patients orally administered AT1001 during Phase 2 clinical studies. This indicates that the cell-based responses can identify mutant forms of α-Gal A that are likely to respond to AT1001 in vivo. Thus, the HEK-293 cell-based assay may be a useful aid in the identification of Fabry patients with AT1001-responsive mutant forms. Hum Mutat 32:1–13, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21598360

  11. A Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Mutant Causes Chronic Pancreatitis by Forming Intracellular Aggregates That Activate Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xunjun; Jones, Gabrielle; Sevilla, Wednesday A; Stolz, Donna B; Magee, Kelsey E; Haughney, Margaret; Mukherjee, Amitava; Wang, Yan; Lowe, Mark E

    2016-10-28

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) frequently have genetic risk factors for disease. Many of the identified genes have been connected to trypsinogen activation or trypsin inactivation. The description of CP in patients with mutations in the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) domain of carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) presents an opportunity to study the pathogenesis of CP independently of trypsin pathways. We tested the hypothesis that a deletion and frameshift mutation (C563fsX673) in the CEL VNTR causes CP through proteotoxic gain-of-function activation of maladaptive cell signaling pathways including cell death pathways. HEK293 or AR42J cells were transfected with constructs expressing CEL with 14 repeats in the VNTR (CEL14R) or C563fsX673 CEL (CEL maturity onset diabetes of youth with a deletion mutation in the VNTR (MODY)). In both cell types, CEL MODY formed intracellular aggregates. Secretion of CEL MODY was decreased compared with that of CEL14R. Expression of CEL MODY increased endoplasmic reticulum stress, activated the unfolded protein response, and caused cell death by apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that disorders of protein homeostasis can lead to CP and suggest that novel therapies to decrease the intracellular accumulation of misfolded protein may be successful in some patients with CP. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Dynamics of translocation and substrate binding in individual complexes formed with active site mutants of {phi}29 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Joseph M; Wang, Hongyun; Lázaro, José M; Salas, Margarita; Lieberman, Kate R

    2014-03-07

    The Φ29 DNA polymerase (DNAP) is a processive B-family replicative DNAP. Fluctuations between the pre-translocation and post-translocation states can be quantified from ionic current traces, when individual Φ29 DNAP-DNA complexes are held atop a nanopore in an electric field. Based upon crystal structures of the Φ29 DNAP-DNA binary complex and the Φ29 DNAP-DNA-dNTP ternary complex, residues Tyr-226 and Tyr-390 in the polymerase active site were implicated in the structural basis of translocation. Here, we have examined the dynamics of translocation and substrate binding in complexes formed with the Y226F and Y390F mutants. The Y226F mutation diminished the forward and reverse rates of translocation, increased the affinity for dNTP in the post-translocation state by decreasing the dNTP dissociation rate, and increased the affinity for pyrophosphate in the pre-translocation state. The Y390F mutation significantly decreased the affinity for dNTP in the post-translocation state by decreasing the association rate ∼2-fold and increasing the dissociation rate ∼10-fold, implicating this as a mechanism by which this mutation impedes DNA synthesis. The Y390F dissociation rate increase is suppressed when complexes are examined in the presence of Mn(2+) rather than Mg(2+). The same effects of the Y226F or Y390F mutations were observed in the background of the D12A/D66A mutations, located in the exonuclease active site, ∼30 Å from the polymerase active site. Although translocation rates were unaffected in the D12A/D66A mutant, these exonuclease site mutations caused a decrease in the dNTP dissociation rate, suggesting that they perturb Φ29 DNAP interdomain architecture.

  13. Selective Action of the Iminosugar Isofagomine, a Pharmacological Chaperone For Mutant Forms of Acid-β-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Steet, Richard; Chung, Stephen; Lee, Wang-Sik; Pine, Corey W.; Do, Hung; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal glycolipid storage disorder characterized by defects in acid-β-glucosidase (GlcCerase), the enzyme responsible for the catabolism of glucosylceramide. We recently demonstrated that isofagomine (IFG), an iminosugar that binds to the active site of GlcCerase, enhances the folding, transport and activity of the N370S mutant form of GlcCerase. In this study we compared the effects of IFG on a number of other glucosidases and glucosyltransferases. We report that IFG has little or no inhibitory activity towards intestinal disaccharidase enzymes, ER α-glucosidase II or glucosylceramide synthase at concentrations previously shown to enhance N370S GlcCerase folding and trafficking in Gaucher fibroblasts. Furthermore, treatment of wild type fibroblasts with high doses of IFG did not alter the processing of newly synthesized N-linked oligosaccharides. These findings support further evaluation of IFG as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of some forms of Gaucher disease. PMID:17217920

  14. ASXL gain-of-function truncation mutants: defective and dysregulated forms of a natural ribosomal frameshifting product?

    PubMed

    Dinan, Adam M; Atkins, John F; Firth, Andrew E

    2017-10-16

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is a gene expression mechanism which enables the translation of two N-terminally coincident, C-terminally distinct protein products from a single mRNA. Many viruses utilize PRF to control or regulate gene expression, but very few phylogenetically conserved examples are known in vertebrate genes. Additional sex combs-like (ASXL) genes 1 and 2 encode important epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins that control the expression of homeotic genes during key developmental stages. Here we describe an ~150-codon overlapping ORF (termed TF) in ASXL1 and ASXL2 that, with few exceptions, is conserved throughout vertebrates. Conservation of the TF ORF, strong suppression of synonymous site variation in the overlap region, and the completely conserved presence of an EH[N/S]Y motif (a known binding site for Host Cell Factor-1, HCF-1, an epigenetic regulatory factor), all indicate that TF is a protein-coding sequence. A highly conserved UCC_UUU_CGU sequence (identical to the known site of +1 ribosomal frameshifting for influenza virus PA-X expression) occurs at the 5' end of the region of enhanced synonymous site conservation in ASXL1. Similarly, a highly conserved RG_GUC_UCU sequence (identical to a known site of -2 ribosomal frameshifting for arterivirus nsp2TF expression) occurs at the 5' end of the region of enhanced synonymous site conservation in ASXL2. Due to a lack of appropriate splice forms, or initiation sites, the most plausible mechanism for translation of the ASXL1 and 2 TF regions is ribosomal frameshifting, resulting in a transframe fusion of the N-terminal half of ASXL1 or 2 to the TF product, termed ASXL-TF. Truncation or frameshift mutants of ASXL are linked to myeloid malignancies and genetic diseases, such as Bohring-Opitz syndrome, likely at least in part as a result of gain-of-function or dominant-negative effects. Our hypothesis now indicates that these disease-associated mutant forms represent

  15. Single-molecule FRET studies on alpha-synuclein oligomerization of Parkinson’s disease genetically related mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatto, Laura; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Dear, Alexander J.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M.; Klenerman, David

    2015-11-01

    Oligomers of alpha-synuclein are toxic to cells and have been proposed to play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. As certain missense mutations in the gene encoding for alpha-synuclein induce early-onset forms of the disease, it has been suggested that these variants might have an inherent tendency to produce high concentrations of oligomers during aggregation, although a direct experimental evidence for this is still missing. We used single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to visualize directly the protein self-assembly process by wild-type alpha-synuclein and A53T, A30P and E46K mutants and to compare the structural properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated. We found that the kinetics of oligomer formation correlates with the natural tendency of each variant to acquire beta-sheet structure. Moreover, A53T and A30P showed significant differences in the averaged FRET efficiency of one of the two types of oligomers formed compared to the wild-type oligomers, indicating possible structural variety among the ensemble of species generated. Importantly, we found similar concentrations of oligomers during the lag-phase of the aggregation of wild-type and mutated alpha-synuclein, suggesting that the properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated during self-assembly might be more relevant than their absolute concentration for triggering neurodegeneration.

  16. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy and Parenchymal Amyloid Deposition in Transgenic Mice Expressing the Danish Mutant Form of Human BRI2

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Ruben; Barbeito, Ana G; Miravalle, Leticia; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2009-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cataracts, hearing impairment, cerebellar ataxia and dementia. Neuropathologically, FDD is characterized by the presence of widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), parenchymal amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles. FDD is caused by a 10-nucleotide duplication-insertion in the BRI2 gene that generates a larger-than-normal precursor protein, of which the Danish amyloid subunit (ADan) comprises the last 34 amino acids. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model for FDD (Tg-FDD) in which the mouse Prnp (prion protein) promoter drives the expression of the Danish mutant form of human BRI2. The main neuropathological findings in Tg-FDD mice are the presence of widespread CAA and parenchymal deposition of ADan. In addition, we observe the presence of amyloid-associated gliosis, an inflammatory response and deposition of oligomeric ADan. As the animals aged, they showed abnormal grooming behavior, an arched back, and walked with a wide-based gait and shorter steps. This mouse model may give insights on the pathogenesis of FDD and will prove useful for the development of therapeutics. Moreover, the study of Tg-FDD mice may offer new insights into the role of amyloid in neurodegeneration in other disorders, including Alzheimer disease. PMID:18410407

  17. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and parenchymal amyloid deposition in transgenic mice expressing the Danish mutant form of human BRI2.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Ruben; Barbeito, Ana G; Miravalle, Leticia; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2009-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cataracts, hearing impairment, cerebellar ataxia and dementia. Neuropathologically, FDD is characterized by the presence of widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), parenchymal amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles. FDD is caused by a 10-nucleotide duplication-insertion in the BRI(2) gene that generates a larger-than-normal precursor protein, of which the Danish amyloid subunit (ADan) comprises the last 34 amino acids. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model for FDD (Tg-FDD) in which the mouse Prnp (prion protein) promoter drives the expression of the Danish mutant form of human BRI(2). The main neuropathological findings in Tg-FDD mice are the presence of widespread CAA and parenchymal deposition of ADan. In addition, we observe the presence of amyloid-associated gliosis, an inflammatory response and deposition of oligomeric ADan. As the animals aged, they showed abnormal grooming behavior, an arched back, and walked with a wide-based gait and shorter steps. This mouse model may give insights on the pathogenesis of FDD and will prove useful for the development of therapeutics. Moreover, the study of Tg-FDD mice may offer new insights into the role of amyloid in neurodegeneration in other disorders, including Alzheimer disease.

  18. De Novo Emergence of Genetically Resistant Mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Persistence Phase Cells Formed against Antituberculosis Drugs In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Jees; Swaminath, Sharmada; Nair, Rashmi Ravindran; Jakkala, Kishor; Pradhan, Atul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial persisters are a subpopulation of cells that can tolerate lethal concentrations of antibiotics. However, the possibility of the emergence of genetically resistant mutants from antibiotic persister cell populations, upon continued exposure to lethal concentrations of antibiotics, remained unexplored. In the present study, we found that Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells exposed continuously to lethal concentrations of rifampin (RIF) or moxifloxacin (MXF) for prolonged durations showed killing, RIF/MXF persistence, and regrowth phases. RIF-resistant or MXF-resistant mutants carrying clinically relevant mutations in the rpoB or gyrA gene, respectively, were found to emerge at high frequency from the RIF persistence phase population. A Luria-Delbruck fluctuation experiment using RIF-exposed M. tuberculosis cells showed that the rpoB mutants were not preexistent in the population but were formed de novo from the RIF persistence phase population. The RIF persistence phase M. tuberculosis cells carried elevated levels of hydroxyl radical that inflicted extensive genome-wide mutations, generating RIF-resistant mutants. Consistent with the elevated levels of hydroxyl radical-mediated genome-wide random mutagenesis, MXF-resistant M. tuberculosis gyrA de novo mutants could be selected from the RIF persistence phase cells. Thus, unlike previous studies, which showed emergence of genetically resistant mutants upon exposure of bacteria for short durations to sublethal concentrations of antibiotics, our study demonstrates that continuous prolonged exposure of M. tuberculosis cells to lethal concentrations of an antibiotic generates antibiotic persistence phase cells that form a reservoir for the generation of genetically resistant mutants to the same antibiotic or another antibiotic. These findings may have clinical significance in the emergence of drug-resistant tubercle bacilli. PMID:27895008

  19. nip, a Symbiotic Medicago truncatula Mutant That Forms Root Nodules with Aberrant Infection Threads and Plant Defense-Like Response1

    PubMed Central

    Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, we isolated and studied a novel symbiotic mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula, designated nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). When grown on nitrogen-free media in the presence of the compatible bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nip mutant showed nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The mutant failed to form pink nitrogen-fixing nodules that occur in the wild-type symbiosis, but instead developed small bump-like nodules on its roots that were blocked at an early stage of development. Examination of the nip nodules by light microscopy after staining with X-Gal for S. meliloti expressing a constitutive GUS gene, by confocal microscopy following staining with SYTO-13, and by electron microscopy revealed that nip initiated symbiotic interactions and formed nodule primordia and infection threads. The infection threads in nip proliferated abnormally and very rarely deposited rhizobia into plant host cells; rhizobia failed to differentiate further in these cases. nip nodules contained autofluorescent cells and accumulated a brown pigment. Histochemical staining of nip nodules revealed this pigment to be polyphenolic accumulation. RNA blot analyses demonstrated that nip nodules expressed only a subset of genes associated with nodule organogenesis, as well as elevated expression of a host defense-associated phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene. nip plants were observed to have abnormal lateral roots. nip plant root growth and nodulation responded normally to ethylene inhibitors and precursors. Allelism tests showed that nip complements 14 other M. truncatula nodulation mutants but not latd, a mutant with a more severe nodulation phenotype as well as primary and lateral root defects. Thus, the nip mutant defines a new locus, NIP, required for appropriate infection thread development during invasion of the nascent nodule by rhizobia, normal lateral root elongation, and normal regulation of host defense-like responses

  20. The Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom) Natural Genetic Variation Rg1 and the DELLA Mutant Procera Control the Competence Necessary to Form Adventitious Roots and Shoots

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Despite the wide use of plant regeneration for biotechnological purposes, the signals that allow cells to become competent to assume different fates remain largely unknown. Here, it is demonstrated that the Regeneration1 (Rg1) allele, a natural genetic variation from the tomato wild relative Solanum peruvianum, increases the capacity to form both roots and shoots in vitro; and that the gibberellin constitutive mutant procera (pro) presented the opposite phenotype, reducing organogenesis on either root-inducing medium (RIM) or shoot-inducing medium (SIM). Mutants showing alterations in the formation of specific organs in vitro were the auxin low-sensitivity diageotropica (dgt), the lateral suppresser (ls), and the KNOX-overexpressing Mouse ears (Me). dgt failed to form roots on RIM, Me increased shoot formation on SIM, and the high capacity for in vitro shoot formation of ls contrasted with its recalcitrance to form axillary meristems. Interestingly, Rg1 rescued the in vitro organ formation capacity in proRg1 and dgtRg1 double mutants and the ex vitro low lateral shoot formation in pro and ls. Such epistatic interactions were also confirmed in gene expression and histological analyses conducted in the single and double mutants. Although Me phenocopied the high shoot formation of Rg1 on SIM, it failed to increase rooting on RIM and to rescue the non-branching phenotype of ls. Taken together, these results suggest REGENERATION1 and the DELLA mutant PROCERA as controlling a common competence to assume distinct cell fates, rather than the specific induction of adventitious roots or shoots, which is controlled by DIAGEOTROPICA and MOUSE EARS, respectively. PMID:22915742

  1. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom) natural genetic variation Rg1 and the DELLA mutant procera control the competence necessary to form adventitious roots and shoots.

    PubMed

    Lombardi-Crestana, Simone; da Silva Azevedo, Mariana; e Silva, Geraldo Felipe Ferreira; Pino, Lílian Ellen; Appezzato-da-Glória, Beatriz; Figueira, Antonio; Nogueira, Fabio Tebaldi Silveira; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira

    2012-09-01

    Despite the wide use of plant regeneration for biotechnological purposes, the signals that allow cells to become competent to assume different fates remain largely unknown. Here, it is demonstrated that the Regeneration1 (Rg1) allele, a natural genetic variation from the tomato wild relative Solanum peruvianum, increases the capacity to form both roots and shoots in vitro; and that the gibberellin constitutive mutant procera (pro) presented the opposite phenotype, reducing organogenesis on either root-inducing medium (RIM) or shoot-inducing medium (SIM). Mutants showing alterations in the formation of specific organs in vitro were the auxin low-sensitivity diageotropica (dgt), the lateral suppresser (ls), and the KNOX-overexpressing Mouse ears (Me). dgt failed to form roots on RIM, Me increased shoot formation on SIM, and the high capacity for in vitro shoot formation of ls contrasted with its recalcitrance to form axillary meristems. Interestingly, Rg1 rescued the in vitro organ formation capacity in proRg1 and dgtRg1 double mutants and the ex vitro low lateral shoot formation in pro and ls. Such epistatic interactions were also confirmed in gene expression and histological analyses conducted in the single and double mutants. Although Me phenocopied the high shoot formation of Rg1 on SIM, it failed to increase rooting on RIM and to rescue the non-branching phenotype of ls. Taken together, these results suggest REGENERATION1 and the DELLA mutant PROCERA as controlling a common competence to assume distinct cell fates, rather than the specific induction of adventitious roots or shoots, which is controlled by DIAGEOTROPICA and MOUSE EARS, respectively.

  2. An active site mutant of Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase forms new non-natural fatty acids providing insights on the mechanism of the enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    E, Guangqi; Drujon, Thierry; Correia, Isabelle; Ploux, Olivier; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    We have produced and purified an active site mutant of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFAS) by replacing the strictly conserved G236 within cyclopropane synthases, by a glutamate residue, which corresponds to E146 of the homologous mycolic acid methyltransferase, Hma, producing hydroxymethyl mycolic acids. The G236E CFAS mutant had less than 1% of the in vitro activity of the wild type enzyme. We expressed the G236E CFAS mutant in an E. coli (DE3) strain in which the chromosomal cfa gene had been deleted. After extraction of phospholipids and conversion into the corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), we observed the formation of cyclopropanated FAMEs suggesting that the mutant retained some of the normal activity in vivo. However, we also observed the formation of new C17 methyl-branched unsaturated FAMEs whose structures were determined using GC/MS and NMR analyses. The double bond was located at different positions 8, 9 or 10, and the methyl group at position 10 or 9. Thus, this new FAMEs are likely arising from a 16:1 acyl chain of a phospholipid that had been transformed by the G236E CFAS mutant in vivo. The reaction catalyzed by this G236E CFAS mutant thus starts by the methylation of the unsaturated acyl chain at position 10 or 9 yielding a carbocation at position 9 or 10 respectively. It follows then two competing steps, a normal cyclopropanation or hydride shift/elimination events giving different combinations of alkenes. This study not only provides further evidence that cyclopropane synthases (CSs) form a carbocationic intermediate but also opens the way to CSs engineering for the synthesis of non-natural fatty acids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Probing Structural Changes among Analogous Inhibitor-Bound Forms of HIV-1 Protease and a Drug-Resistant Mutant in Solution by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid N; Persons, John D; Paulsen, Janet L; Guerrero, Michel; Schiffer, Celia A; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Ishima, Rieko

    2018-03-13

    In the era of state-of-the-art inhibitor design and high-resolution structural studies, detection of significant but small protein structural differences in the inhibitor-bound forms is critical to further developing the inhibitor. Here, we probed differences in HIV-1 protease (PR) conformation among darunavir and four analogous inhibitor-bound forms and compared them with a drug-resistant mutant using nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts. Changes in amide chemical shifts of wild-type (WT) PR among these inhibitor-bound forms, ΔCSP, were subtle but detectable and extended >10 Å from the inhibitor-binding site, asymmetrically between the two subunits of PR. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed differential local hydrogen bonding as the molecular basis of this remote asymmetric change. Inhibitor-bound forms of the drug-resistant mutant also showed a similar long-range ΔCSP pattern. Differences in ΔCSP values of the WT and the mutant (ΔΔCSPs) were observed at the inhibitor-binding site and in the surrounding region. Comparing chemical shift changes among highly analogous inhibitors and ΔΔCSPs effectively eliminated local environmental effects stemming from different chemical groups and enabled exploitation of these sensitive parameters to detect subtle protein conformational changes and to elucidate asymmetric and remote conformational effects upon inhibitor interaction.

  4. Structure- and reactivity-based development of covalent inhibitors of the activating and gatekeeper mutant forms of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard A; Anderton, Mark J; Ashton, Susan; Bethel, Paul A; Box, Matthew; Butterworth, Sam; Colclough, Nicola; Chorley, Christopher G; Chuaqui, Claudio; Cross, Darren A E; Dakin, Les A; Debreczeni, Judit É; Eberlein, Cath; Finlay, M Raymond V; Hill, George B; Grist, Matthew; Klinowska, Teresa C M; Lane, Clare; Martin, Scott; Orme, Jonathon P; Smith, Peter; Wang, Fengjiang; Waring, Michael J

    2013-09-12

    A novel series of small-molecule inhibitors has been developed to target the double mutant form of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase, which is resistant to treatment with gefitinib and erlotinib. Our reported compounds also show selectivity over wild-type EGFR. Guided by molecular modeling, this series was evolved to target a cysteine residue in the ATP binding site via covalent bond formation and demonstrates high levels of activity in cellular models of the double mutant form of EGFR. In addition, these compounds show significant activity against the activating mutations, which gefitinib and erlotinib target and inhibition of which gives rise to their observed clinical efficacy. A glutathione (GSH)-based assay was used to measure thiol reactivity toward the electrophilic functionality of the inhibitor series, enabling both the identification of a suitable reactivity window for their potency and the development of a reactivity quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) to support design.

  5. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew D; Wilder, Julie A; Mega, William M; Hutt, Julie A; Kuehl, Philip J; Valderas, Michelle W; Chew, Lawrence L; Liang, Bertrand C; Squires, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg.

  6. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Effects of endoplasmic reticulum stressors on maturation and signaling of hemizygous and heterozygous wild-type and mutant forms of KIT.

    PubMed

    Brahimi-Adouane, Sabrina; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Tabone-Eglinger, Séverine; Subra, Frédéric; Capron, Claude; Blay, Jean-Yves; Emile, Jean-François

    2013-06-01

    Gain of function mutations of KIT are frequent in some human tumors, and are sensible to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In most tumors, oncogenic mutations are heterozygous, however most in vitro data of KIT activation have been obtained with hemizygous mutation. This study aimed to investigate the maturation and activation of wild-type (WT) and mutant (M) forms of KIT in hemizygous and heterozygous conditions. WT and two types of exon 11 deletions M forms of human KIT were expressed in NIH3T3 cell lines. Membrane expression of KIT was quantified by flow cytometry. Quantification of glycosylated forms of KIT and phosphorylated forms of AKT and ERK were performed by western blot. Simultaneous activation of WT KIT and treatment with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inhibitors, tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a complete inhibition of membrane expression of the 145 kDa form of KIT. By contrast activation or ER inhibitors alone, only partly inhibited this form. ER inhibitors also inhibited KIT activation-dependent phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. Brefeldin A induced a complete down regulation of the 145 kDa form in hemizygous M, and induced an intra-cellular accumulation of the 125 kDa form in WT but not in hemizygous M. Heterozygous cells had glycosylation and response to ER inhibitors patterns more similar to WT than to hemizygous M. Phosphorylated AKT was reduced in hemizygous cells in comparison to WT KIT cells and heterozygous cells, and in the presence of brefeldin A in all cell lines. Effects of ER inhibitors are significantly different in hemizygous and heterozygous mutants. Differences in intra-cellular trafficking of KIT forms result in differences in downstream signaling pathways, and activation of PI3K/AKT pathway appears to be tied to the presence of the mature 145 kDa form of KIT at the membrane surface. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Conversion of commensal Escherichia coli K-12 to an invasive form via expression of a mutant histone-like protein.

    PubMed

    Koli, Preeti; Sudan, Sudhanshu; Fitzgerald, David; Adhya, Sankar; Kar, Sudeshna

    2011-01-01

    The HUα(E38K, V42L) mutant of the bacterial histone-like protein HU causes a major change in the transcription profile of the commensal organism Escherichia coli K-12 (Kar S, Edgar R, Adhya S, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102:16397-16402, 2005). Among the upregulated genes are several related to pathogenic interactions with mammalian cells, as evidenced by the expression of curli fibers, Ivy, and hemolysin E. When E. coli K-12/ HUα(E38K, V42L) was added to Int-407 cells, there was host cell invasion, phagosomal disruption, and intracellular replication. The invasive trait was also retained in a murine ileal loop model and intestinal explant assays. In addition to invasion, the internalized bacteria caused a novel subversion of host cell apoptosis through modification and regulation of the BH3-only proteins Bim(EL) and Puma. Changes in the transcription profile were attributed to positive supercoiling of DNA leading to the altered availability of relevant promoters. Using the E. coli K-12/HUα(E38K, V42L) variant as a model, we propose that traditional commensal E. coli can adopt an invasive lifestyle through reprogramming its cellular transcription, without gross genetic changes. Escherichia coli K-12 is well established as a benign laboratory strain and a human intestinal commensal. Recent evidences, however, indicate that the typical noninvasive nature of resident E. coli can be reversed under specific circumstances even in the absence of any major genomic flux. We previously engineered an E. coli strain with a mutant histone-like protein, HU, which exhibited significant changes in nucleoid organization and global transcription. Here we showed that the changes induced by the mutant HU have critical functional consequences: from a strict extracellular existence, the mutant E. coli adopts an almost obligate intracellular lifestyle. The internalized E. coli exhibits many of the prototypical characteristics of traditional intracellular bacteria, like phagosomal

  9. FTIR spectroscopic study of biofilms formed by the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and its mutant Azospirillum brasilense Sp245.1610

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugarova, Anna V.; Scheludko, Andrei V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Filip'echeva, Yulia A.; Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms are spatially and metabolically structured communities of microorganisms, representing a mode of their existence which is ubiquitous in nature, with cells localised within an extracellular biopolymeric matrix, attached to each other, at an interface. For plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), the formation of biofilms is of special importance due to their primary localisation at the surface of plant root systems. In this work, FTIR spectroscopy was used, for the first time for bacteria of the genus Azospirillum, to comparatively study 6-day-mature biofilms formed on the surface of ZnSe discs by the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and its mutant A. brasilense Sp245.1610. The mutant strain, having an Omegon Km insertion in the gene of lipid metabolism fabG1 on the plasmid AZOBR_p1, as compared to the wild-type strain Sp245 (see http://dx.doi.org/10.1134/S1022795413110112)

  10. Centromere replication timing determines different forms of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint mutants during replication stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenyi; Bachant, Jeff; Collingwood, David; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2009-12-01

    Yeast replication checkpoint mutants lose viability following transient exposure to hydroxyurea, a replication-impeding drug. In an effort to understand the basis for this lethality, we discovered that different events are responsible for inviability in checkpoint-deficient cells harboring mutations in the mec1 and rad53 genes. By monitoring genomewide replication dynamics of cells exposed to hydroxyurea, we show that cells with a checkpoint deficient allele of RAD53, rad53K227A, fail to duplicate centromeres. Following removal of the drug, however, rad53K227A cells recover substantial DNA replication, including replication through centromeres. Despite this recovery, the rad53K227A mutant fails to achieve biorientation of sister centromeres during recovery from hydroxyurea, leading to secondary activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), aneuploidy, and lethal chromosome segregation errors. We demonstrate that cell lethality from this segregation defect could be partially remedied by reinforcing bipolar attachment. In contrast, cells with the mec1-1 sml1-1 mutations suffer from severely impaired replication resumption upon removal of hydroxyurea. mec1-1 sml1-1 cells can, however, duplicate at least some of their centromeres and achieve bipolar attachment, leading to abortive segregation and fragmentation of incompletely replicated chromosomes. Our results highlight the importance of replicating yeast centromeres early and reveal different mechanisms of cell death due to differences in replication fork progression.

  11. Dynamic Changes in Striatal mGluR1 But Not mGluR5 during Pathological Progression of Parkinson's Disease in Human Alpha-Synuclein A53T Transgenic Rats: A Multi-PET Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Furutsuka, Kenji; Nengaki, Nobuki; Shimoda, Yoko; Shiomi, Satoshi; Takei, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Yui, Joji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-01-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent degenerative disorder affecting the CNS that is primarily characterized by resting tremor and movement deficits. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes 1 and 5 (mGluR1 and mGluR5, respectively) are important targets for investigation in several CNS disorders. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo roles of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in chronic PD pathology by performing longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in A53T transgenic (A53T-Tg) rats expressing an abnormal human α-synuclein (ASN) gene. A53T-Tg rats showed a dramatic decline in general motor activities with age, along with abnormal ASN aggregation and striatal neuron degeneration. In longitudinal PET imaging, striatal nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) values for [(11)C]ITDM (N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methyl-4-[(11)C]methylbenzamide), a selective PET ligand for mGluR1, temporarily increased before PD symptom onset and dramatically decreased afterward with age. However, striatal BPND values for (E)-[(11)C]ABP688 [3-(6-methylpyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-(E)-O-[(11)C]methyloxime], a specific PET ligand for mGluR5, remained constant during experimental terms. The dynamic changes in striatal mGluR1 BPND values also showed a high correlation in pathological decreases in general motor activities. Furthermore, declines in mGluR1 BPND values were correlated with decreases in BPND values for [(18)F]FE-PE2I [(E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbo-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl) nortropane], a specific PET ligand for the dopamine transporter, a biomarker for dopaminergic neurons. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated for the first time that dynamic changes occur in mGluR1, but not mGluR5, that accompany pathological progression in a PD animal model. Synaptic signaling by glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate

  12. Mutant Alpha-Synuclein Causes Age-Dependent Neuropathology in Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2–3, 7–8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. PMID:26019347

  13. Mutant alpha-synuclein causes age-dependent neuropathology in monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2-3, 7-8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358345-14$15.00/0.

  14. Abnormal iron metabolism and oxidative stress in mice expressing a mutant form of the ferritin light polypeptide gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, Ana G.; Garringer, Holly J.; Baraibar, Martin A.; Gao, Xiaoying; Arredondo, Miguel; Núñez, Marco T.; Smith, Mark A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutations in exon 4 of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene are associated with hereditary ferritinopathy (HF) or neuroferritinopathy, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive impairment of motor and cognitive functions. To determine the pathogenic mechanisms by which mutations in FTL lead to neurodegeneration, we investigated iron metabolism and markers of oxidative stress in the brain of transgenic (Tg) mice that express the mutant human FTL498-499InsTC cDNA. Compared with wild-type mice, brain extracts from Tg (FTL-Tg) mice showed an increase in the cytoplasmic levels of both FTL and ferritin heavy chain polypeptides, a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of transferrin receptor-1, and a significant increase in iron levels. Transgenic mice also showed the presence of markers for lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, and nitrone–protein adducts in the brain. However, gene expression analysis of iron management proteins in the liver of Tg mice indicates that the FTL-Tg mouse liver is iron deficient. Our data suggest that disruption of iron metabolism in the brain has a primary role in the process of neurodegeneration in HF and that the pathogenesis of HF is likely to result from a combination of reduction in iron storage function and enhanced toxicity associated with iron-induced ferritin aggregates in the brain. PMID:19519778

  15. Single chain variable fragment antibodies block aggregation and toxicity induced by familial ALS-linked mutant forms of SOD1.

    PubMed

    Ghadge, Ghanashyam D; Pavlovic, John D; Koduvayur, Sujatha P; Kay, Brian K; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 10% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are familial (known as FALS) with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, and ~25% of FALS cases are caused by mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). There is convincing evidence that mutant SOD1 (mtSOD1) kills motor neurons (MNs) because of a gain-of-function toxicity, most likely related to aggregation of mtSOD1. A number of recent reports have suggested that antibodies can be used to treat mtSOD1-induced FALS. To follow up on the use of antibodies as potential therapeutics, we generated single chain fragments of variable region antibodies (scFvs) against SOD1, and then expressed them as 'intrabodies' within a motor neuron cell line. In the present study, we describe isolation of human scFvs that interfere with mtSOD1 in vitro aggregation and toxicity. These scFvs may have therapeutic potential in sporadic ALS, as well as FALS, given that sporadic ALS may also involve abnormalities in the SOD1 protein or activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectral characteristics of the mutant form GGBP/H152C of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein labeled with fluorescent dye BADAN: influence of external factors.

    PubMed

    Fonin, Alexander V; Stepanenko, Olga V; Povarova, Olga I; Volova, Catherine A; Philippova, Elizaveta M; Bublikov, Grigory S; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Demchenko, Alexander P; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    The mutant form GGBP/H152C of the D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein with the solvatochromic dye BADAN linked to cysteine residue Cys 152 can be used as a potential base for a sensitive element of glucose biosensor system. We investigated the influence of various external factors on the physical-chemical properties of GGBP/H152C-BADAN and its complex with glucose. The high affinity (Kd = 8.5 µM) and high binding rate of glucose make GGBP/H152C-BADAN a good candidate to determine the sugar content in biological fluids extracted using transdermal techniques. It was shown that changes in the ionic strength and pH of solution within the physiological range did not have a significant influence on the fluorescent characteristics of GGBP/H152C-BADAN. The mutant form GGBP/H152C has relatively low resistance to denaturation action of GdnHCl and urea. This result emphasizes the need to find more stable proteins for the creation of a sensitive element for a glucose biosensor system.

  17. Use of resistant ACCase mutants to screen for novel inhibitors against resistant and susceptible forms of ACCase from grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Amit; Nycholat, Corwin; Subramanian, Mani V; Anderson, Richard J; Devine, Malcolm D

    2004-08-11

    The aryloxyphenoxypropionic acid (AOPP) and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides inhibit the first committed enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase). The frequent use of AOPP and CHD herbicides has resulted in the development of resistance to these herbicides in many grass weed species. New herbicides that inhibit both the susceptible and resistant forms of ACCase in grass weeds would have obvious commercial appeal. In the present study, an attempt was made to identify molecules that target both the herbicide-sensitive and -resistant forms of ACCase. Seven experimental compounds, either CHD-like or AOPP-CHD hybrids, were synthesized and assayed against previously characterized susceptible and resistant forms of ACCase. All seven compounds inhibited ACCase from sensitive biotypes of Setaria viridis and Eleusine indica (I50 values from 6.4 to >100 microM) but were not particularly potent compared to some commercialized herbicides (I50 values of 0.08-5.6 microM). In almost all cases, the I50 values for each compound assayed against the resistant ACCases were higher than those against the corresponding sensitive ACCase, indicating reduced binding to the resistant ACCases. One compound, a CHD analogue, was almost equally effective against the resistant and susceptible ACCases, although it was not a very potent ACCase inhibitor per se (I50 of 51 and 76 microM against susceptible ACCase from S. viridis and E. indica, respectively). The AOPP-CHD hybrid molecules also inhibited some of the resistant ACCases, with I50 values ranging from 6.4 to 50 microM. These compounds may be good leads for developing ACCase inhibitors that target a wider range of ACCase isoforms, including those found in AOPP- and CHD-resistant weed biotypes.

  18. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  19. X-ray structures of the Pseudomonas cichorii D-tagatose 3-epimerase mutant form C66S recognizing deoxy sugars as substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Yoshihara, Akihide; Ishii, Tomohiko; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas cichorii D-tagatose 3-epimerase (PcDTE), which has a broad substrate specificity, efficiently catalyzes the epimerization of not only D-tagatose to D-sorbose but also D-fructose to D-psicose (D-allulose) and also recognizes the deoxy sugars as substrates. In an attempt to elucidate the substrate recognition and catalytic reaction mechanisms of PcDTE for deoxy sugars, the X-ray structures of the PcDTE mutant form with the replacement of Cys66 by Ser (PcDTE_C66S) in complexes with deoxy sugars were determined. These X-ray structures showed that substrate recognition by the enzyme at the 1-, 2-, and 3-positions is responsible for enzymatic activity and that substrate-enzyme interactions at the 4-, 5-, and 6-positions are not essential for the catalytic reaction of the enzyme leading to the broad substrate specificity of PcDTE. They also showed that the epimerization site of 1-deoxy 3-keto D-galactitol is shifted from C3 to C4 and that 1-deoxy sugars may bind to the catalytic site in the inhibitor-binding mode. The hydrophobic groove that acts as an accessible surface for substrate binding is formed through the dimerization of PcDTE. In PcDTE_C66S/deoxy sugar complex structures, bound ligand molecules in both the linear and ring forms were detected in the hydrophobic groove, while bound ligand molecules in the catalytic site were in the linear form. This result suggests that the sugar-ring opening of a substrate may occur in the hydrophobic groove and also that the narrow channel of the passageway to the catalytic site allows a substrate in the linear form to pass through.

  20. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  1. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  2. Early nodule senescence is activated in symbiotic mutants of pea (Pisum sativum L.) forming ineffective nodules blocked at different nodule developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Serova, Tatiana A; Tsyganova, Anna V; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2018-04-03

    Plant symbiotic mutants are useful tool to uncover the molecular-genetic mechanisms of nodule senescence. The pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants SGEFix - -1 (sym40), SGEFix - -3 (sym26), and SGEFix - -7 (sym27) display an early nodule senescence phenotype, whereas the mutant SGEFix - -2 (sym33) does not show premature degradation of symbiotic structures, but its nodules show an enhanced immune response. The nodules of these mutants were compared with each other and with those of the wild-type SGE line using seven marker genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. In wild-type SGE nodules, transcript levels of all of the senescence-associated genes were highest at 6 weeks after inoculation (WAI). The senescence-associated genes showed higher transcript abundance in mutant nodules than in wild-type nodules at 2 WAI and attained maximum levels in the mutant nodules at 4 WAI. Immunolocalization analyses showed that the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate accumulated earlier in the mutant nodules than in wild-type nodules. Together, these results showed that nodule senescence was activated in ineffective nodules blocked at different developmental stages in pea lines that harbor mutations in four symbiotic genes.

  3. Phage-Encoded Colanic Acid-Degrading Enzyme Permits Lytic Phage Infection of a Capsule-Forming Resistant Mutant Escherichia coli Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Sik; Park, Kwangseo; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated a bacteriophage T7-resistant mutant strain of Escherichia coli (named S3) and then proceeded to characterize it. The mutant bacterial colonies appeared to be mucoid. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to colanic acid production were upregulated in the mutant. Increases in colanic acid production by the mutant bacteria were observed when l-fucose was measured biochemically, and protective capsule formation was observed under an electron microscope. We found a point mutation in the lon gene promoter in S3, the mutant bacterium. Overproduction of colanic acid was observed in some phage-resistant mutant bacteria after infection with other bacteriophages, T4 and lambda. Colanic acid overproduction was also observed in clinical isolates of E. coli upon phage infection. The overproduction of colanic acid resulted in the inhibition of bacteriophage adsorption to the host. Biofilm formation initially decreased shortly after infection but eventually increased after 48 h of incubation due to the emergence of the mutant bacteria. Bacteriophage PBECO4 was shown to infect the colanic acid-overproducing mutant strains of E. coli. We confirmed that the gene product of open reading frame 547 (ORF547) of PBECO4 harbored colanic acid-degrading enzymatic (CAE) activity. Treatment of the T7-resistant bacteria with both T7 and PBECO4 or its purified enzyme (CAE) led to successful T7 infection. Biofilm formation decreased with the mixed infection, too. This procedure, using a phage cocktail different from those exploiting solely receptor differences, represents a novel strategy for overcoming phage resistance in mutant bacteria. PMID:25416767

  4. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. 'W' mutant forms of the Fms receptor tyrosine kinase act in a dominant manner to suppress CSF-1 dependent cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Reith, A D; Ellis, C; Maroc, N; Pawson, T; Bernstein, A; Dubreuil, P

    1993-01-01

    Point mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues in the catalytic domain of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) are responsible for the coat color, fertility and hematopoietic defects of mice bearing mutant alleles at the dominant white-spotting (W) locus. The dominant nature of structural Kit mutations suggests that expression of other kinase-defective RTKs might also specifically interfere with signal transduction by normal receptors. To test this possibility, we have investigated the functional consequences of introducing analogous mutations into the RTK encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. Both Fms37 (glu582-->lys) and Fms42 (asp776-->asn) mutant proteins, corresponding to the strongly dominant-negative W37 and W42 mutant c-kit alleles, had undetectable in vitro kinase activity and were unable to transform Rat-2 fibroblasts in the presence of exogenous CSF-1. Moreover, expression of Fms37 or Fms42 proteins in Rat-2 cells specifically inhibited anchorage-independent growth mediated by the normal Fms receptor in the presence of exogenous CSF-1 and conferred a dominant loss of Fms-associated PI3-kinase activity on CSF-1 stimulation. Mutant RTKs, bearing point substitutions identical to those present in mild or severe W mutants, may provide a generally applicable strategy for inducing dominant loss of function defects in RTK-mediated signalling pathways.

  6. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  7. Chimeras of the native form or achondroplasia mutant (G375C) of human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 induce ligand-dependent differentiation of PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, L M; Raffioni, S; Wasmuth, J J; Bradshaw, R A

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (hFGFR3) cause a variety of skeletal dysplasias, including the most common genetic form of dwarfism, achondroplasia (ACH). Evidence indicates that these phenotypes are not due to simple haploinsufficiency of FGFR3 but are more likely related to a role in negatively regulating skeletal growth. The effects of one of these mutations on FGFR3 signaling were examined by constructing chimeric receptors composed of the extracellular domain of human platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (hPDGFR beta) and the transmembrane and intracellular domains of hFGFR3 or of an ACH (G375C) mutant. Following stable transfection in PC12 cells, which lack platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors, all clonal cell lines, with either type of chimera, showed strong neurite outgrowth in the presence of PDGF but not in its absence. Antiphosphotyrosine immunoblots showed ligand-dependent autophosphorylation, and both receptor types stimulated strong phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an event associated with the differentiative response of these cells. In addition, ligand-dependent phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma and Shc was also observed. All of these responses were comparable to those observed from ligand activation, such as by nerve growth factor, of the native PC12 cells used to prepare the stable transfectants. The cells with the chimera bearing the ACH mutation were more rapidly responsive to ligand with less sustained MAPK activation, indicative of a preactivated or primed condition and consistent with the view that these mutations weaken ligand control of FGFR3 function. However, the full effect of the mutation likely depends in part on structural features of the extracellular domain. Although FGFR3 has been suggested to act as a negative regulator of long-bone growth in chrondrocytes, it produces differentiative signals similar to

  8. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  9. Electroacupuncture remediates glial dysfunction and ameliorates neurodegeneration in the astrocytic α-synuclein mutant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiahui; Lv, E; Yang, Jian; Gong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wenzhong; Liang, Xibin; Wang, Jiazeng; Jia, Jun; Wang, Xiaomin

    2015-05-28

    The acupuncture or electroacupuncture (EA) shows the therapeutic effect on various neurodegenerative diseases. This effect was thought to be partially achieved by its ability to alleviate existing neuroinflammation and glial dysfunction. In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of EA on abnormal neurochemical changes and motor symptoms in a mouse neurodegenerative disease model. The transgenic mouse which expresses a mutant α-synuclein (α-syn) protein, A53T α-syn, in brain astrocytic cells was used. These mice exhibit extensive neuroinflammatory and motor phenotypes of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, the effects of EA on these phenotypic changes were examined in these mice. EA improved the movement detected in multiple motor tests in A53T mutant mice. At the cellular level, EA significantly reduced the activation of microglia and prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain and motor neurons in the spinal cord. At the molecular level, EA suppressed the abnormal elevation of proinflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in the striatum and midbrain of A53T mice. In contrast, EA increased striatal and midbrain expression of a transcription factor, nuclear factor E2-related factor 2, and its downstream antioxidants (heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunits). These results suggest that EA possesses the ability to ameliorate mutant α-syn-induced motor abnormalities. This ability may be due to that EA enhances both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and suppresses aberrant glial activation in the diseased sites of brains.

  10. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and Crystal Structure of Potent Nonnucleoside Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase That Retain Activity against Mutant Forms of the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Marshall L.; Roth, Thomas; Farnsworth, David W.; Smith, Marilyn Kroeger; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W.; Das, Kalyan; Zhang, Wanyi; Arnold, Eddy; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Michejda, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to develop novel and potent nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that are effective against the wild type (WT) virus and clinically observed mutants, 1,2-bis-substituted benzimidazoles were synthesized and tested. Optimization of the N1 and C2 positions of benzimidazole led to the development of 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-4-methylbenzimidazole (1) (IC50 = 0.2 μM, EC50 = 0.44 μM, and TC50 ≥ 100 against WT). This paper describes how substitution on the benzimidazole ring profoundly affects activity. Substituents at the benzimidazole C4 dramatically enhanced potency, while at C5 or C6 substituents were generally detrimental or neutral to activity, respectively. A 7-methyl analogue did not inhibit HIV-1 RT. Determination of the crystal structure of 1 bound to RT provided the basis for accurate modeling of additional analogues, which were synthesized and tested. Several derivatives were nanomolar inhibitors of wild-type virus and were effective against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants. PMID:17663538

  11. Novel, Starch-Like Polysaccharides Are Synthesized by an Unbound Form of Granule-Bound Starch Synthase in Glycogen-Accumulating Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Shaw, Eudean; Mouille, Gregory; D'Hulst, Christophe; Morell, Matthew; Samuel, Michael S.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Gallant, Daniel J.; Sinskey, Anthony; Ball, Steven

    1999-01-01

    In vascular plants, mutations leading to a defect in debranching enzyme lead to the simultaneous synthesis of glycogen-like material and normal starch. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii comparable defects lead to the replacement of starch by phytoglycogen. Therefore, debranching was proposed to define a mandatory step for starch biosynthesis. We now report the characterization of small amounts of an insoluble, amylose-like material found in the mutant algae. This novel, starch-like material was shown to be entirely dependent on the presence of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSSI), the enzyme responsible for amylose synthesis in plants. However, enzyme activity assays, solubilization of proteins from the granule, and western blots all failed to detect GBSSI within the insoluble polysaccharide matrix. The glycogen-like polysaccharides produced in the absence of GBSSI were proved to be qualitatively and quantitatively identical to those produced in its presence. Therefore, we propose that GBSSI requires the presence of crystalline amylopectin for granule binding and that the synthesis of amylose-like material can proceed at low levels without the binding of GBSSI to the polysaccharide matrix. Our results confirm that amylopectin synthesis is completely blocked in debranching-enzyme-defective mutants of C. reinhardtii. PMID:9880375

  12. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    PubMed

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heavy ion action on yeast cells: Inhibition of ribosomal-RNA synthesis, loss of colony forming ability and induction of mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J.; Rase, S.; Schöpfer, F.; Schneider, E.; Weber, K.; Kraft, G.

    The action of heavy ions (Ar to U) accelerated to specific energies up to about 10 MeV/u (u=atomic mass unit) on different functions of yeast cells was studied. Ribosomal-RNA synthesis is inhibited according to a single-hit mechanism. Inactivation cross-sections were linearly related to the ratio of the squares of the effective charge Z* and the velocity of the ions. It is concluded from the analysis that the range of the most energetic δ-electrons is larger than previously assumed. There is no such dependence for survival and induction of mutants. In both cases cross-sections increase with the ion's specific-energy indicating an important contribution of long-range δ-electrons. The analysis shows that diploid yeast is not killed by a single-hit mechanism even by very heavy ions if the track width is too small. The relative importance of the penumbral region is even more pronounced with the more sensitive strains.

  14. Curcumin Pyrazole and its derivative (N-(3-Nitrophenylpyrazole) Curcumin inhibit aggregation, disrupt fibrils and modulate toxicity of Wild type and Mutant α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Nuzhat; Mishra, Satyendra; Jain, Manish Kumar; Surolia, Avadhesha; Gupta, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that deposition of neurotoxic α-synuclein aggregates in the brain during the development of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be curbed by anti-aggregation strategies that either disrupt or eliminate toxic aggregates. Curcumin, a dietary polyphenol exhibits anti-amyloid activity but the use of this polyphenol is limited owing to its instability. As chemical modifications in curcumin confiscate this limitation, such efforts are intensively performed to discover molecules with similar but enhanced stability and superior properties. This study focuses on the inhibitory effect of two stable analogs of curcumin viz. curcumin pyrazole and curcumin isoxazole and their derivatives against α-synuclein aggregation, fibrillization and toxicity. Employing biochemical, biophysical and cell based assays we discovered that curcumin pyrazole (3) and its derivative N-(3-Nitrophenylpyrazole) curcumin (15) exhibit remarkable potency in not only arresting fibrillization and disrupting preformed fibrils but also preventing formation of A11 conformation in the protein that imparts toxic effects. Compounds 3 and 15 also decreased neurotoxicity associated with fast aggregating A53T mutant form of α-synuclein. These two analogues of curcumin described here may therefore be useful therapeutic inhibitors for the treatment of α-synuclein amyloidosis and toxicity in Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies. PMID:25985292

  15. Epithelial IgG and its relationship to the loss of F508 in the common mutant form of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Treharne, Kate J; Cassidy, Diane; Goddard, Catharine; Colledge, William H; Cassidy, Andrew; Mehta, Anil

    2009-08-06

    The most debilitating feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) disease is uncontrolled inflammation of respiratory epithelium. The relationship between the commonest mutated form of CFTR (F508del or DeltaF508) and inflammation has not yet been elucidated. Here, we present a new paradigm suggesting that CFTR can interact with intra-epithelial IgG, establishing a direct link between normal CFTR and the immune system. Further, our data show that the amino-acid sequence local to F508 can bind IgG with high affinity, dependent on F508, such that loss of F508 abolishes this link both in vitro and in the intact cell.

  16. Expression of a Catalytically Inactive Mutant Form of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) Confers a Dominant-negative Effect in Male Fertility*

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Irina; Aichler, Michaela; Yefremova, Elena; Roveri, Antonella; Buday, Katalin; Doll, Sebastian; Tasdemir, Adrianne; Hoffard, Nils; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walch, Axel; Ursini, Fulvio; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro; Conrad, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The selenoenzyme Gpx4 is essential for early embryogenesis and cell viability for its unique function to prevent phospholipid oxidation. Recently, the cytosolic form of Gpx4 was identified as an upstream regulator of a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death, called ferroptosis, whereas the mitochondrial isoform of Gpx4 was previously shown to be crucial for male fertility. Here, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted mutation of the active site selenocysteine of Gpx4 (Gpx4_U46S). Mice homozygous for Gpx4_U46S died at the same embryonic stage (E7.5) as Gpx4−/− embryos as expected. Surprisingly, male mice heterozygous for Gpx4_U46S presented subfertility. Subfertility was manifested in a reduced number of litters from heterozygous breeding and an impairment of spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Morphologically, sperm isolated from heterozygous Gpx4_U46S mice revealed many structural abnormalities particularly in the spermatozoa midpiece due to improper oxidation and polymerization of sperm capsular proteins and malformation of the mitochondrial capsule surrounding and stabilizing sperm mitochondria. These findings are reminiscent of sperm isolated from selenium-deprived rodents or from mice specifically lacking mitochondrial Gpx4. Due to a strongly facilitated incorporation of Ser in the polypeptide chain as compared with selenocysteine at the UGA codon, expression of the catalytically inactive Gpx4_U46S was found to be strongly increased. Because the stability of the mitochondrial capsule of mature spermatozoa depends on the moonlighting function of Gpx4 both as an enzyme oxidizing capsular protein thiols and as a structural protein, tightly controlled expression of functional Gpx4 emerges as a key for full male fertility. PMID:25922076

  17. Using the MCF10A/MCF10CA1a Breast Cancer Progression Cell Line Model to Investigate the Effect of Active, Mutant Forms of EGFR in Breast Cancer Development and Treatment Using Gefitinib

    PubMed Central

    Bessette, Darrell C.; Tilch, Erik; Seidens, Tatjana; Quinn, Michael C. J.; Wiegmans, Adrian P.; Shi, Wei; Cocciardi, Sibylle; McCart-Reed, Amy; Saunus, Jodi M.; Simpson, Peter T.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Khanna, Kum Kum; Waddell, Nic; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Background Basal-like and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) share common molecular features, poor prognosis and a propensity for metastasis to the brain. Amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) occurs in ~50% of basal-like breast cancer, and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been reported in up to ~ 10% of Asian TNBC patients. In non-small cell lung cancer several different mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain confer sensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but the tumourigenic potential of EGFR mutations in breast cells and their potential for targeted therapy is unknown. Materials and Methods Constructs containing wild type, G719S or E746-A750 deletion mutant forms of EGFR were transfected into the MCF10A breast cells and their tumorigenic derivative, MCF10CA1a. The effects of EGFR over-expression and mutation on proliferation, migration, invasion, response to gefitinib, and tumour formation in vivo was investigated. Copy number analysis and whole exome sequencing of the MCF10A and MCF10CA1a cell lines were also performed. Results Mutant EGFR increased MCF10A and MCF10CA1a proliferation and MCF10A gefitinib sensitivity. The EGFR-E746-A750 deletion increased MCF10CA1a cell migration and invasion, and greatly increased MCF10CA1a xenograft tumour formation and growth. Compared to MCF10A cells, MCF10CA1a cells exhibited large regions of gain on chromosomes 3 and 9, deletion on chromosome 7, and mutations in many genes implicated in cancer. Conclusions Mutant EGFR enhances the oncogenic properties of MCF10A cell line, and increases sensitivity to gefitinib. Although the addition of EGFR E746-A750 renders the MCF10CA1a cells more tumourigenic in vivo it is not accompanied by increased gefitinib sensitivity, perhaps due to additional mutations, including the PIK3CA H1047R mutation, that the MCF10CA1a cell line has acquired. Screening TNBC/basal-like breast cancer for EGFR mutations may prove useful for

  18. Misfolded rhodopsin mutants display variable aggregation properties.

    PubMed

    Gragg, Megan; Park, Paul S-H

    2018-06-08

    The largest class of rhodopsin mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is mutations that lead to misfolding and aggregation of the receptor. The misfolding mutants have been characterized biochemically, and categorized as either partial or complete misfolding mutants. This classification is incomplete and does not provide sufficient information to fully understand the disease pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic strategies. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) method was utilized to directly assess the aggregation properties of misfolding rhodopsin mutants within the cell. Partial (P23H and P267L) and complete (G188R, H211P, and P267R) misfolding mutants were characterized to reveal variability in aggregation properties. The complete misfolding mutants all behaved similarly, forming aggregates when expressed alone, minimally interacting with the wild-type receptor when coexpressed, and were unresponsive to treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis retinal. In contrast, variability was observed between the partial misfolding mutants. In the opsin form, the P23H mutant behaved similarly as the complete misfolding mutants. In contrast, the opsin form of the P267L mutant existed as both aggregates and oligomers when expressed alone and formed mostly oligomers with the wild-type receptor when coexpressed. The partial misfolding mutants both reacted similarly to the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis retinal, displaying improved folding and oligomerization when expressed alone but aggregating with wild-type receptor when coexpressed. The observed differences in aggregation properties and effect of 9-cis retinal predict different outcomes in disease pathophysiology and suggest that retinoid-based chaperones will be ineffective or even detrimental. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  20. Studies on the defect underlying the lysosomal storage of sialic acid in Salla disease. Lysosomal accumulation of sialic acid formed from N-acetyl-mannosamine or derived from low density lipoprotein in cultured mutant fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Renlund, M; Kovanen, P T; Raivio, K O; Aula, P; Gahmberg, C G; Ehnholm, C

    1986-01-01

    Salla disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by mental retardation and disturbed sialic acid metabolism. To study endogenous synthesis and breakdown of sialic acid, fibroblasts were incubated for 5 d in the presence and then in the absence of N-[3H]acetylmannosamine. Labeling of free sialic acid was 5-10 times higher in mutant than in normal cells. Radioactivity decreased in 4 d by 75% in normal but only by 30% in mutant fibroblasts. The labeling pattern was not normalized upon coculture of mutant and normal cells. To study the metabolism of extracellular sialic acid, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was labeled in the sialic acid moiety (periodate-NaB3H4) or in the protein moiety (125I). Binding, internalization, lysosomal degradation, and exit of products of protein catabolism were similar in normal and mutant fibroblasts. Upon incubation with LDL labeled in the sialic acid moiety, mutant cells accumulated 2-3 times more free sialic acid radioactivity than normal fibroblasts, mostly in the lysosomal fraction. After a 24-h chase incubation, radioactivity in free sialic acid decreased by 70-80% in normal but only by 10-30% in mutant cells. In mutant fibroblasts, 40% of the radioactivity remained in lysosomes, whereas no labeled free sialic acid was detected in lysosomes from normal fibroblasts. We conclude that in Salla disease, fibroblast endogenous synthesis of sialic acid and lysosomal cleavage of exogenous glycoconjugates is normal, but free sialic acid cannot leave the lysosome. These findings suggest that the basic defect in Salla disease is deficient transport of free sialic acid through the lysosomal membrane. PMID:3944269

  1. Abnormal lignin in a loblolly pine mutant.

    PubMed

    Ralph, J; MacKay, J J; Hatfield, R D; O'Malley, D M; Whetten, R W; Sederoff, R R

    1997-07-11

    Novel lignin is formed in a mutant loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) severely depleted in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.195), which converts coniferaldehyde to coniferyl alcohol, the primary lignin precursor in pines. Dihydroconiferyl alcohol, a monomer not normally associated with the lignin biosynthetic pathway, is the major component of the mutant's lignin, accounting for approximately 30 percent (versus approximately 3 percent in normal pine) of the units. The level of aldehydes, including new 2-methoxybenzaldehydes, is also increased. The mutant pines grew normally indicating that, even within a species, extensive variations in lignin composition need not disrupt the essential functions of lignin.

  2. Kasugamycin-dependent mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, E R

    1978-01-01

    Kasugamycin-dependent mutants have been isolated from Escherichia coli B. They were obtained through mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate or nitrosoguanidine in conjunction with an antibiotic underlay technique. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, dependent mutants were obtained at a frequency of about 3% of survivors growing up in the selection. In the case of ethyl methane sulfonate, the corresponding value was 1%. Nineteen mutants showing a kasugamycin-dependent phenotype were studied. In terms of response to various temperatures and antibiotic concentrations, they were very heterogeneous, although most fell into two general classes. Genetic analysis indicated that in at least some cases, the kasugamycin-dependent phenotype was the product of two mutations. Two-dimensional gel electropherograms revealed alterations in the ribosomal proteins of seven mutants. One mutant had an alteration in protein S13, and one had an alteration in protein L14. Three showed changes in protein S9. Each of two mutants had changes in two proteins, S18 and L11. Three of these mutants additionally had protein S18 occurring in a partly altered, partly unaltered form. Images PMID:363701

  3. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  4. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  5. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; ...

    2015-09-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  6. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  7. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  8. Characterization of a Weak Allele of Zebrafish cloche Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Huang, Zhibin; Chen, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Linfeng; Xu, Xiangmin; Liao, Wangjun; Ruan, Hua; Luo, Shenqiu; Zhang, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complicated and dynamic process about which the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is an excellent vertebrate system for studying hematopoiesis and developmental mechanisms. In the previous study, we isolated and identified a cloche 172 (clo 172) mutant, a novel allele compared to the original cloche (clo) mutant, through using complementation test and initial mapping. Here, according to whole mount in-situ hybridization, we report that the endothelial cells in clo 172 mutant embryos, although initially developed, failed to form the functional vascular system eventually. In addition, further characterization indicates that the clo 172 mutant exhibited weaker defects instead of completely lost in primitive erythroid cells and definitive hematopoietic cells compared with the clo s5 mutant. In contrast, primitive myeloid cells were totally lost in clo 172 mutant. Furthermore, these reappeared definitive myeloid cells were demonstrated to initiate from the remaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clo 172 mutant, confirmed by the dramatic decrease of lyc in clo 172 runx1w84x double mutant. Collectively, the clo 172 mutant is a weak allele compared to the clo s5 mutant, therefore providing a model for studying the early development of hematopoietic and vascular system, as well as an opportunity to further understand the function of the cloche gene. PMID:22132109

  9. Autolytic defective mutant of Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, J B; Redman, B E; Shockman, G D

    1978-01-01

    Properties of a variant of Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790 with defective cellular autolysis are described. The mutant strain was selected as a survivor from a mutagenized cell population simultaneously challenged with two antibiotics which inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, penicillin G and cycloserine. Compared to the parental strain, the mutant strain exhibited: (i) a thermosensitive pattern of cellular autolysis; (ii) an autolytic enzyme activity that had only a slightly increased thermolability when tested in solution in the absence of wall substrate; and (iii) an isolated autolysin that had hydrolytic activity on isolated S. faecalis wall substrate indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but that was inactive when tested on walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus as a substrate. These data indicate an alteration in the substrate specificity of the autolytic enzyme of the mutant which appears to result from the synthesis of an altered form of autolytic enzyme. PMID:415045

  10. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  11. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  12. Onjisaponin B derived from Radix Polygalae enhances autophagy and accelerates the degradation of mutant α-synuclein and huntingtin in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, An-Guo; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; Xu, Su-Wei; Chan, Wai-Kit; Ng, Choi-In; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2013-11-15

    Emerging evidence indicates important protective roles being played by autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders through clearance of aggregate-prone or mutant proteins. In the current study, we aimed to identify autophagy inducers from Chinese medicinal herbs as a potential neuroprotective agent that enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin and α-synuclein in PC-12 cells. Through intensive screening using the green fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) autophagy detection platform, we found that the ethanol extracts of Radix Polygalae (Yuan Zhi) were capable of inducing autophagy. Further investigation showed that among three single components derived from Radix Polygalae--i.e., polygalacic acid, senegenin and onjisaponin B--onjisaponin B was able to induce autophagy and accelerate both the removal of mutant huntingtin and A53T α-synuclein, which are highly associated with Huntington disease and Parkinson disease, respectively. Our study further demonstrated that onjisaponin B induces autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, findings in the current study provide detailed insights into the protective mechanism of a novel autophagy inducer, which is valuable for further investigation as a new candidate agent for modulating neurodegenerative disorders through the reduction of toxicity and clearance of mutant proteins in the cellular level.

  13. Onjisaponin B Derived from Radix Polygalae Enhances Autophagy and Accelerates the Degradation of Mutant α-Synuclein and Huntingtin in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An-Guo; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; Xu, Su-Wei; Chan, Wai-Kit; Ng, Choi-In; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates important protective roles being played by autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders through clearance of aggregate-prone or mutant proteins. In the current study, we aimed to identify autophagy inducers from Chinese medicinal herbs as a potential neuroprotective agent that enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin and α-synuclein in PC-12 cells. Through intensive screening using the green fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) autophagy detection platform, we found that the ethanol extracts of Radix Polygalae (Yuan Zhi) were capable of inducing autophagy. Further investigation showed that among three single components derived from Radix Polygalae—i.e., polygalacic acid, senegenin and onjisaponin B—onjisaponin B was able to induce autophagy and accelerate both the removal of mutant huntingtin and A53T α-synuclein, which are highly associated with Huntington disease and Parkinson disease, respectively. Our study further demonstrated that onjisaponin B induces autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, findings in the current study provide detailed insights into the protective mechanism of a novel autophagy inducer, which is valuable for further investigation as a new candidate agent for modulating neurodegenerative disorders through the reduction of toxicity and clearance of mutant proteins in the cellular level. PMID:24248062

  14. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  15. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  16. Silibinin meglumine, a water-soluble form of milk thistle silymarin, is an orally active anti-cancer agent that impedes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Sílvia; Bonavia, Rosa; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Visa, Joana; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-10-01

    Silibinin is the primary active constituent of a crude extract (silymarin) from milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) seeds. We explored the ability of an oral milk thistle extract formulation that was enriched with a water-soluble form of silibinin complexed with the amino-sugar meglumine to inhibit the growth of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) mouse xenografts. As a single agent, oral silibinin meglumine notably decreased the overall volumes of NSCLC tumors as efficiently as did the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) gefitinib. Concurrent treatment with silibinin meglumine impeded the regrowth of gefitinib-unresponsive tumors, resulting in drastic tumor growth prevention. Because the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required by a multiplicity of mechanisms of resistance to EGFR TKIs, we evaluated the ability of silibinin meglumine to impede the EMT in vitro and in vivo. Silibinin-meglumine efficiently prevented the loss of markers associated with a polarized epithelial phenotype as well as the de novo synthesis of proteins associated with the mesenchymal morphology of transitioning cells. Our current findings with this non-toxic, orally active, and water-soluble silibinin formulation might facilitate the design of clinical trials to test the administration of silibinin meglumine-containing injections, granules, or beverages in combination with EGFR TKIs in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A., E-mail: jab@ysbl.york.ac.uk; Prabhune, Asmita

    The production, crystallization and characterization of three inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase from B. sphaericus in their respective precursor and processed forms are reported. The space groups are different for the native enzyme and the mutants. The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants willmore » provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme.« less

  18. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A.; Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, G. Guy; Suresh, C. G.

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants will provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme. PMID:16508111

  19. Genetics of Ustilago violacea. I. Carotenoid mutants and carotenogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, E.D.; Baird, M.L.; Chapman, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Wild-type strains of Ustilago violacea produce pink colonies on laboratory medium and yield white, orange, pumpkin, and yellow colonies after uv mutagenesis. The wild-type strains contain neurosporene and lycopene; one orange mutant, $gamma$-carotene; and one yellow mutant, $beta$-carotene. One white mutant had no detectable carotenoids. Diploid colonies heterozygous for wild type and orange, pumpkin, yellow, or white are phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for yellow and orange are also phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for white and orange; white and yellow; and white, yellow, and orange are phenotypically light orange, light yellow, and orange- yellow, respectively. The whitemore » mutants give a circular complementation map; the color mutants fit a linear complementation map. We propose a multienzyme of four identical dehydrogenases and one or two identical cyclases for carotenogenesis in this species. The white and color mutants represent structural mutations altering the conformation of the dehydrogenase or cyclase, respectively. Furthermore, cyclases may or may not aggregate in association with the dehydrogenase aggregate to form the multienzyme aggregate responsible for the color mutants. (auth)« less

  20. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF)more » are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.« less

  1. Evaluating evaluation forms form.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roger P

    2004-02-01

    To provide a tool for evaluating evaluation forms. A new form has been developed and tested on itself and a sample of evaluation forms obtained from the graduate medical education offices of several local universities. Additional forms from hospital administration were also subjected to analysis. The new form performed well when applied to itself. The form performed equally well when applied to the other (subject) forms, although their scores were embarrassingly poor. A new form for evaluating evaluation forms is needed, useful, and now available.

  2. Exploring the regulatory role of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant protein on glioma stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-C; Ma, J; Zhuang, Z; Qiu, F; Cheng, H-L; Shi, J-X

    2016-08-01

    Glioma is the most lethal form of cancer that originates mostly from the brain and less frequently from the spine. Glioma is characterized by abnormal regulation of glial cell differentiation. The severity of the glioma was found to be relaxed in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutant. The present study focused on histological discrimination and regulation of cancer stem cell between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. Histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting techniques are used to analyze the glioma nature and variation in glioma stem cells that differ between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. The aggressive form of non-IDH1 mutant glioma shows abnormal cellular histological variation with prominent larger nucleus along with abnormal clustering of cells. The longer survival form of IDH1 mutant glioma has a control over glioma stem cell proliferation. Immunohistochemistry with stem cell markers, CD133 and EGFRvIII are used to demonstrate that the IDH1 mutant glioma shows limited dependence on cancer stem cells and it shows marked apoptotic signals in TUNEL assay to regulate abnormal cells. The non-IDH1 mutant glioma failed to regulate misbehaving cells and it promotes cancer stem cell proliferation. Our finding supports that the IDH1 mutant glioma has a regulatory role in glioma stem cells and their survival.

  3. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  4. φX-174 Bacteriophage Structural Mutants Which Affect Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jeff E. D.; Hayashi, Masaki

    1969-01-01

    Seven cistrons in φX-174 were identified and one in particular was studied intensively: cistron A, which is assigned a protein in the mature phage. Amber mutants in this cistron synthesize a new deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) form in addition to circular phage DNA upon infection of the restrictive host. This DNA is linear, non-infectious, and single-stranded; it is formed from the phage strand of replicative form φX-174 DNA. These mutants produce two different defective particles in the restrictive host. One particle contains circular phage DNA but is not infectious; the other contains the new DNA form and is similar to the 70S particles found in wild-type phage lysates. The mutant A gene product acts independently of normal A protein upon mixed infection of the restrictive host with an A mutant and a mutant from any other cistron or wild type. PMID:5823229

  5. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials. PMID:26249693

  6. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  8. Mutants of Yeast Defective in Sucrose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Marian; Osmond, Barbara C.; Botstein, David

    1981-01-01

    Utilization of sucrose as a source of carbon and energy in yeast (Saccharomyces) is controlled by the classical SUC genes, which confer the ability to produce the sucrose-degrading enzyme invertase (Mortimer and Hawthorne 1969). Mutants of S. cerevisiae strain S288C (SUC2+) unable to grow anaerobically on sucrose, but still able to use glucose, were isolated. Two major complementation groups were identified: twenty-four recessive mutations at the SUC2 locus (suc2-); and five recessive mutations defining a new locus, SNF1 (for sucrose nonfermenting), essential for sucrose utilization. Two minor complementation groups, each comprising a single member with a leaky sucrose-nonfermenting phenotype, were also identified. The suc2 mutations isolated include four suppressible amber mutations and five mutations apparently exhibiting intragenic complementation; complementation analysis and mitotic mapping studies indicated that all of the suc2 mutations are alleles of a single gene. These results suggest that SUC2 encodes a protein, probably a dimer or multimer. No invertase activity was detected in suc2 mutants.—The SNF1 locus is not tightly linked to SUC2. The snf1 mutations were found to be pleiotropic, preventing sucrose utilization by SUC2+ and SUC7+ strains, and also preventing utilization of galactose, maltose and several nonfermentable carbon sources. Although snf1 mutants thus display a petite phenotype, classic petite mutations do not interfere with utilization of sucrose, galactose or maltose. A common feature of all the carbon utilization systems affected by SNF1 is that all are regulated by glucose repression. The snf1 mutants were found to produce the constitutive nonglycosylated form of invertase, but failed to produce the glucose-repressible, glycosylated, secreted invertase. This failure cannot be attributed to a general defect in production of glycosylated and secreted proteins because synthesis of acid phosphatase, a glycosylated secreted protein not

  9. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  10. Cadmium-sensitive, cad1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana are phytochelatin deficient.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Goldsbrough, P B; Andersen, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-01-01

    An allelic series of cad1, cadmium-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, was isolated. These mutants were sensitive to cadmium to different extents and were deficient in their ability to form cadmium-peptide complexes as detected by gel-filtration chromatography. Each mutant was deficient in its ability to accumulate phytochelatins (PCs) as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of PCs accumulated by each mutant correlated with its degree of sensitivity to cadmium. The mutants had wild-type levels of glutathione, the substrate for PC biosynthesis, and in vitro assays demonstrated that each of the mutants was deficient in PC synthase activity. These results demonstrate conclusively the importance of PCs for cadmium tolerance in plants. PMID:7770517

  11. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  12. The chaperonin CCT inhibits assembly of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils by a specific, conformation-dependent interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sot, Begoña; Rubio-Muñoz, Alejandra; Leal-Quintero, Ahudrey; Martínez-Sabando, Javier; Marcilla, Miguel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Valpuesta, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing TCP-1) uses cavities built into its double-ring structure to encapsulate and to assist folding of a large subset of proteins. CCT can inhibit amyloid fibre assembly and toxicity of the polyQ extended mutant of huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington’s disease. This raises the possibility that CCT modulates other amyloidopathies, a still-unaddressed question. We show here that CCT inhibits amyloid fibre assembly of α-synuclein A53T, one of the mutants responsible for Parkinson’s disease. We evaluated fibrillation blockade in α-synuclein A53T deletion mutants and CCT interactions of full-length A53T in distinct oligomeric states to define an inhibition mechanism specific for α-synuclein. CCT interferes with fibre assembly by interaction of its CCTζ and CCTγ subunits with the A53T central hydrophobic region (NAC). This interaction is specific to NAC conformation, as it is produced once soluble α-synuclein A53T oligomers form and blocks the reaction before fibres begin to grow. Finally, we show that this association inhibits α-synuclein A53T oligomer toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our results and those for huntingtin suggest that CCT is a general modulator of amyloidogenesis via a specific mechanism. PMID:28102321

  13. Isolation of peroxisome-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, R; Veenhuis, M; Mertens, D; Kunau, W H

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affected in peroxisomal assembly (pas mutants) have been isolated and characterized. Each strain contains a single mutation that results in (i) the inability to grow on oleic acid, (ii) accumulation of peroxisomal matrix enzymes in the cytosol, and (iii) absence of detectable peroxisomes at the ultrastructural level. These lesions (pas1-1 and pas2) are shown to be nonallelic and recessive. Crossing of pas1-1 and pas2 strains resulted in diploid cells that had regained the ability to grow on oleic acid as sole carbon source and to form peroxisomes. These pas mutants may provide useful tools for future studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in peroxisomal assembly. Images PMID:2568633

  14. Interaction of metronidazole with DNA repair mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yeung, T C; Beaulieu, B B; McLafferty, M A; Goldman, P

    1984-01-01

    It has been proposed that one of metronidazole's partially reduced intermediates interacts either with DNA to exert a bactericidal effect or with water to form acetamide. To test this hypothesis we have examined the effect of metronidazole on several mutants of Escherichia coli that are defective in DNA repair. UV-susceptible RecA- and UvrB- point mutants have an increased susceptibility to metronidazole as manifested by both a decreased minimal inhibitory concentration and a greater bactericidal response to metronidazole in resting cultures. By these criteria, however, we find that UvrB- deletion mutants, which lack the ability to reduce nitrate and chlorate, are no more susceptible to metronidazole than is the wild type. We find, however, that these deletion mutants also lack the ability to reduce metronidazole and thus possibly to form its reactive species. When metronidazole's bactericidal effect is expressed in terms of the concurrent accumulation of acetamide derived from metronidazole, then all RecA- and UvrB- mutants are killed more efficiently than their wild types. The data are consistent, therefore, with metronidazole's lethal effect being mediated by a partially reduced intermediate on the metabolic pathway between metronidazole and acetamide. Defects in other aspects of the DNA repair system do not confer this increased susceptibility to the proposed intermediate. A Tag- mutant, for example, which is defective in 3-methyl-adenine-DNA glycosylase, does not have this increased susceptibility to the presumed precursor of acetamide. Thus, these results provide further support for the hypothesis that the bactericidal effect of metronidazole is mediated by a partially reduced intermediate in the metabolic conversion of metronidazole to acetamide and suggest that this intermediate interacts with DNA to produce a lesion similar to that caused by UV light.

  15. Interaction of metronidazole with DNA repair mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, T C; Beaulieu, B B; McLafferty, M A; Goldman, P

    1984-01-01

    It has been proposed that one of metronidazole's partially reduced intermediates interacts either with DNA to exert a bactericidal effect or with water to form acetamide. To test this hypothesis we have examined the effect of metronidazole on several mutants of Escherichia coli that are defective in DNA repair. UV-susceptible RecA- and UvrB- point mutants have an increased susceptibility to metronidazole as manifested by both a decreased minimal inhibitory concentration and a greater bactericidal response to metronidazole in resting cultures. By these criteria, however, we find that UvrB- deletion mutants, which lack the ability to reduce nitrate and chlorate, are no more susceptible to metronidazole than is the wild type. We find, however, that these deletion mutants also lack the ability to reduce metronidazole and thus possibly to form its reactive species. When metronidazole's bactericidal effect is expressed in terms of the concurrent accumulation of acetamide derived from metronidazole, then all RecA- and UvrB- mutants are killed more efficiently than their wild types. The data are consistent, therefore, with metronidazole's lethal effect being mediated by a partially reduced intermediate on the metabolic pathway between metronidazole and acetamide. Defects in other aspects of the DNA repair system do not confer this increased susceptibility to the proposed intermediate. A Tag- mutant, for example, which is defective in 3-methyl-adenine-DNA glycosylase, does not have this increased susceptibility to the presumed precursor of acetamide. Thus, these results provide further support for the hypothesis that the bactericidal effect of metronidazole is mediated by a partially reduced intermediate in the metabolic conversion of metronidazole to acetamide and suggest that this intermediate interacts with DNA to produce a lesion similar to that caused by UV light. PMID:6367636

  16. Conversion between parallel and antiparallel β -sheets in wild-type and Iowa mutant Aβ40 fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Wenhui; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using a variant of Hamilton-replica-exchange, we study for wild type and Iowa mutant Aβ40 the conversion between fibrils with antiparallel β-sheets and such with parallel β-sheets. We show that wild type and mutant form distinct salt bridges that in turn stabilize different fibril organizations. The conversion between the two fibril forms leads to the release of small aggregates that in the Iowa mutant may shift the equilibrium from fibrils to more toxic oligomers.

  17. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  18. The Kinase Activity of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated Interferes with Adenovirus E4 Mutant DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Dipendra

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) mutants that lack early region 4 (E4) are unable to produce the early regulatory proteins that normally inactivate the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) sensor complex, which is a critical component for the ability of cells to respond to DNA damage. E4 mutant infection therefore activates a DNA damage response, which in turn interferes with a productive viral infection. MRN complex proteins localize to viral DNA replication centers in E4 mutant-infected cells, and this complex is critical for activating the kinases ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), which phosphorylate numerous substrates important for DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint activation, and apoptosis. E4 mutant growth defects are substantially rescued in cells lacking an intact MRN complex. We have assessed the role of the downstream ATM and ATR kinases in several MRN-dependent E4 mutant phenotypes. We did not identify a role for either ATM or ATR in “repair” of E4 mutant genomes to form concatemers. ATR was also not observed to contribute to E4 mutant defects in late protein production. In contrast, the kinase activity of ATM was important for preventing efficient E4 mutant DNA replication and late gene expression. Our results suggest that the MRN complex interferes with E4 mutant DNA replication at least in part through its ability to activate ATM. PMID:23740981

  19. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-06-01

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [The isolation and characteristics of mutants of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea strain resistant to thiostrepton].

    PubMed

    Nastasiak, I N; Fedorenko, V A; Danilenko, V N

    1997-01-01

    The formation of thiostreptone resistant spontaneous and nitrosoguanidine-induced mutants in the erythromycin-producing organism Saccharopolyspora erythraea was investigated. The investigated collection of the mutants was heterogeneous by the level of the thiostreptone resistance (2.5 to 20 micrograms/ml). The thiostreptone resistance mutations had a pleiotropic effect: 17 per cent of the mutants was characterized by the growth thermosensitivity and 26 and 5.8 per cent of the mutants were characterized by loss of the ability to form melanine and aerial mycelium respectively. Such phenotypes were most frequent in the mutants resistant to low concentrations of thiostreptone (2 to 5 micrograms/ml). The absolute majority of the isolated thiostreptone resistant mutants was unstable and formed both the antibiotic resistant and the antibiotic sensitive clones. The greatest portion of the strains with high antibiotic activity (20 per cent) was detected among the S. erythraea spontaneous mutants on the medium with 2.5 micrograms/ ml of thiostreptone. It was shown that the instability of the high antibiotic activity in the mutants was associated with loss of the thiostreptone resistance property.

  1. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Susan I.

    Despite the fact that soluble sugar levels have been postulated to play an important role in the control of a wide variety of plant metabolic and developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which plants respond to soluble sugar levels remain poorly understood. Plant responses to soluble sugar levels are also important in bioenergy production, as plant sugar responses are believed to help regulate both carbon fixation and carbon partitioning. For example, accumulation of soluble sugars, such as sucrose and glucose, in source tissues leads to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing rates of carbon fixation. Soluble sugar levels can also affectmore » sink strengths, affecting the rates of accumulation of carbon-based compounds into both particular molecular forms (e.g. carbohydrates versus lipids versus proteins) and particular plant organs and tissues. Mutants of Arabidopsis that are defective in the ability to respond to soluble sugar levels were isolated and used as tools to identify some of the factors involved in plant sugar response. These sugar insensitive (sis) mutants were isolated by screening mutagenized seeds for those that were able to germinate and develop relatively normal shoot systems on media containing 0.3 M glucose or 0.3 M sucrose. At these sugar concentrations, wild-type Arabidopsis germinate and produce substantial root systems, but show little to no shoot development. Twenty-eight sis mutants were isolated during the course of four independent mutant screens. Based on a preliminary characterization of all of these mutants, sis3 and sis6 were chosen for further study. Both of these mutations appear to lie in previously uncharacterized loci. Unlike many other sugar-response mutants, sis3 mutants exhibit a wild-type or near wild-type response in all phytohormone-response assays conducted to date. The sis6-1 mutation is unusual in that it appears to be due to overexpression of a gene, rather than representing a loss of function

  2. [Pigment-protein complexes nd the number of the reaction photosystem centers in pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2004-01-01

    We studied fluorescent and absorption properties of the chloroplasts and pigment-protein complexes isolated by gel electrophoresis from the leaves of pea, the initial cultivar Torsdag and mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014. Specific maxima of fluorescence and chlorophyll forms in individual complexes have been determined from the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the chloroplast chlorophyll and their secondary derivatives at 23 and -196 degrees C. Chlorotica 2004 mutant proved to have an increased intensity of a long-wave band at both 23 degrees C (745 nm) and -196 degrees C (728 nm) of the light-harvesting complex I. At the same time, this mutant featured a decreased accumulation of chlorophyll forms at 690, 697, and 708 nm forming the nearest-neighbor antenna of PSI reaction center. No spectral differences have been revealed between chlorotica 2014 mutant and the initial cultivar. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated synthesis of all chlorophyll-protein complexes in both mutants. At the same time, analysis of photochemical activity of PSI and PSII reaction centers and evaluation of the light-harvesting antenna as well as the number of reaction centers of the photosystems suggest that chlorotica 2004 mutant has 1.7 times less PSI reaction centers due to a mutation-disturbed chlorophyll a-protein complex of PSI. The primary effect of chlorotica 2014 mutation remains unclear. The proportional changes in the photosystem complexes in this mutant suggest that they are secondary and result from a 50% decrease in chlorophyll content.

  3. Disturbed secretion of mutant adiponectin associated with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Nagaretani, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hidehiko; Kobayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiyo; Maeda, Norikazu; Nagasawa, Azumi; Hibuse, Toshiyuki; Ohashi, Koji; Kumada, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Yoshihisa; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2003-06-20

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein, consists of collagen-like fibrous and complement C1q-like globular domains, and circulates in human plasma in a multimeric form. The protein exhibits anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic activities. However, adiponectin plasma concentrations are low in obese subjects, and hypoadiponectinemia is associated with the metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. We have recently reported a missense mutation in the adiponectin gene, in which isoleucine at position 164 in the globular domain is substituted with threonine (I164T). Subjects with this mutation showed markedly low level of plasma adiponectin and clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we examined the molecular characteristics of the mutant protein associated with a genetic cause of hypoadiponectinemia. The current study revealed (1) the mutant protein showed an oligomerization state similar to the wild-type as determined by gel filtration chromatography and, (2) the mutant protein exhibited normal insulin-sensitizing activity, but (3) pulse-chase study showed abnormal secretion of the mutant protein from adipose tissues. Our results suggest that I164T mutation is associated with hypoadiponectinemia through disturbed secretion into plasma, which may contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Functional verification of a porcine myostatin propeptide mutant.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dezun; Jiang, Shengwang; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Xiao, Gaojun; Yang, Jinzeng; Cui, Wentao

    2015-10-01

    Myostatin is a member of TGF-β superfamily that acts as a key negative regulator in development and growth of embryonic and postnatal muscles. In this study, the inhibitory activities of recombinant porcine myostatin propeptide and its mutated form (at the cleavage site of metalloproteinases of BMP-1/TLD family) against murine myostatin was evaluated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection into mice. Results showed that both wild type and mutated form of porcine propeptide significantly inhibited myostatin activity in vivo. The average body weight of mice receiving wild type propeptide or its mutated form increased by 12.5 % and 24.14%, respectively, compared to mice injected with PBS, implying that the in vivo efficacy of porcine propeptide mutant is greater than its wild type propeptide. Transgenic mice expressing porcine myostatin propeptide mutant were generated to further verify the results obtained from mice injected with recombinant porcine propeptide mutant. Compared with wild type (non-transgenic) mice, relative weight of gastrocnemius, rectusfemoris, and tibialis anterior increased by 22.14 %, 34.13 %, 25.37%, respectively, in transgenic male mice, and by 19.90 %, 42.47 %, 45.61%, respectively, in transgenic female mice. Our data also demonstrated that the mechanism by which muscle growth enhancement is achieved by these propeptides is due to an increase in fiber sizes, not by an increase in number of fiber cells.

  5. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDB

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been no central location for storing generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or for data associated with these mutants. Instead researchers relied on several independent, non-integrated databases. FgMutantDB was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web th...

  6. Escherichia coli mutants impaired in maltodextrin transport.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M; Ferenci, T

    1979-10-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 was found to grow equally well on maltose and on maltodextrins containing up to seven glucose residues. Three classes of mutants unable to grow on maltodextrins, but still able to grow on maltose, were investigated in detail. The first class, already known, was composed of phage lambda-resistant mutants, which lack the outer membrane protein coded by gene lamB. These mutants grow on maltose and maltotriose but not at all on maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins which cannot cross the outer membrane. A second class of mutants were affected in malE, the structural gene of the periplasmic maltose binding protein. The maltose binding proteins isolated from the new mutants were altered in their substrate binding properties, but not in a way that could account for the mutant phenotypes. Rather, the results of growth experiments and transport studies suggest that these malE mutants are impaired in their ability to transport maltodextrins across the outer membrane. This implies that the maltose binding protein (in wild-type strains) cooperates with the lambda receptor in permeation through the outer membrane. The last class of mutants described in this paper were affected in malG, or perhaps in an as yet undetected gene close to malG. They were defective in the transfer of maltodextrins from the periplasmic space to the cytoplasm but only slightly affected in the transport of maltose.

  7. Phenotypic characterization of adenovirus type 12 temperature-sensitive mutants in productive infection and transformation.

    PubMed

    Hama, S; Kimura, G

    1980-01-01

    Eleven temperature-sensitive mutants of adenovirus type 12, capable of forming plaques in human cells at 33 C but not at 39.5 C, were isolated from a stock of a wild-type strain after treatment with either nitrous acid or hydroxylamine. Complementation tests in doubly infected human cells permitted a tentative assignment of eight of these mutants to six complementation groups. Temperature-shift experiments revealed that one mutant is affected early and most of the other mutants are affected late. Only the early mutant, H12ts505, was temperature sensitive in viral DNA replication. Infectious virions of all the mutants except H12ts505 and two of the late mutants produced at 33 C, appeared to be more heat labile than those of the wild type. Only H12ts505 was temperature sensitive for the establishment of transformation of rat 3Y1 cells. One of the late mutants (H12ts504) had an increased transforming ability at the permissive temperature. Results of temperature-shift transformation experiments suggest that a viral function affected in H12ts505 is required for "initiation" of transformation. Some of the growth properties of H12ts505-transformed cells were also temperature dependent, suggesting that a functional expression of a gene mutation in H12ts505 is required to maintain at least some aspects of the transformed state.

  8. Gamma ray-induced small plaque mutants of western equine encephalitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Simizu, B.; Yamazaki, S.; Suzuki, K.

    1973-12-01

    Small plaque mutants of Western equine encephalitis virus were obtained from the surviving fractions of wild-type virus which was irradiated with gamma rays. The frequency with which small plaque mutants appeared in the surviving fraction increased with the radiation dose. These mutants were not more resistant to radiation than wild-type virus. The growth rate of a mutant, S127, was lower than that of wild-type. Clonally purified mutant virions presented two peaks in a velocity sedimentation profile; peak 1 corresponded to the peak of wild type and peak 2 moved faster than peak 1. Virions of both peaks were infectious andmore » consistently formed small plaques in chicken embryo cells. Virions reisolated from either peak and grown in chicken embryo cells also revealed two peaks in sedimentation analysis. In the electron microscope examination peak 2 proved to consist of giant form particles, each of which contained more than one nucleoid surrounded with a common envelope. Despite this remarkable morphological difference, densities of the wild-type and S127 mutant virions were similar in cesium chloride gradients. The RNAs and proteins of mutant virions could not be distinguished from those of wild types on the basis of size or change. (auth)« less

  9. HIV‑1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    On the cover: Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry

  10. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The hypothesis of this proposal is that LBD mutations in ESR1 promote resistance to

  11. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0360 TITLE: Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey L. Greene, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE September 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1 -Mutant...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The hypothesis of this proposal is that LBD mutations in ESR1 promote resistance to current FDA

  12. Polarity-defective mutants of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Osherov, N; Mathew, J; May, G S

    2000-12-01

    We have identified two polarity-defective (pod) mutants in Aspergillus nidulans from a collection of heat-sensitive lethal mutants. At restrictive temperature, these mutants are capable of nuclear division but are unable to establish polar hyphal growth. We cloned the two pod genes by complementation of their heat-sensitive lethal phenotypes. The libraries used to clone the pod genes are under the control of the bidirectional niaD and niiA promoters. Complementation of the pod mutants is dependent on growth on inducing medium. We show that rescue of the heat-sensitive phenotype on inducing media is independent of the orientation of the gene relative to the niaD or niiA promoters, demonstrating that the intergenic region between the niaD and the niiA genes functions as an orientation-independent enhancer and repressor that is capable of functioning over long distances. The products of the podG and the podH genes were identified as homologues of the alpha subunit of yeast mitochondrial phenylalanyl--tRNA synthetase and transcription factor IIF interacting component of the CTD phosphatase. Neither of these gene products would have been predicted to produce a pod mutant phenotype based on studies of cellular polarity mutants in other organisms. The implications of these results are discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Drosophila melanogaster White Mutant w1118 Undergo Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreiro, María José; Pérez, Coralia; Marchesano, Mariana; Ruiz, Santiago; Caputi, Angel; Aguilera, Pedro; Barrio, Rosa; Cantera, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Key scientific discoveries have resulted from genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster, using a multitude of transgenic fly strains, the majority of which are constructed in a genetic background containing mutations in the white gene. Here we report that white mutant flies from w1118 strain undergo retinal degeneration. We observed also that w1118 mutants have progressive loss of climbing ability, shortened life span, as well as impaired resistance to various forms of stress. Retinal degeneration was abolished by transgenic expression of mini-white+ in the white null background w1118. We conclude that beyond the classical eye-color phenotype, mutations in Drosophila white gene could impair several biological functions affecting parameters like mobility, life span and stress tolerance. Consequently, we suggest caution and attentiveness during the interpretation of old experiments employing white mutant flies and when planning new ones, especially within the research field of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. We also encourage that the use of w1118 strain as a wild-type control should be avoided. PMID:29354028

  14. Molecular Genetic Analysis of an Endotoxin Nonresponder Mutant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schromm, Andra B.; Lien, Egil; Henneke, Philipp; Chow, Jesse C.; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Heine, Holger; Latz, Eicke; Monks, Brian G.; Schwartz, David A.; Miyake, Kensuke; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    Somatic cell mutagenesis is a powerful tool for characterizing receptor systems. We reported previously two complementation groups of mutant cell lines derived from CD14-transfected Chinese hamster ovary–K1 fibroblasts defective in responses to bacterial endotoxin. Both classes of mutants expressed a normal gene product for Toll-like receptor (TLR)4, and fully responded to stimulation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or interleukin (IL)-1β. We identified the lesion in one of the complementation groups in the gene for MD-2, a putative TLR4 coreceptor. The nonresponder phenotype of this mutant was reversed by transfection with MD-2. Cloning of MD-2 from the nonresponder cell line revealed a point mutation in a highly conserved region resulting in a C95Y amino acid exchange. Both forms of MD-2 colocalized with TLR4 on the cell surface after transfection, but only the wild-type cDNA reverted the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) nonresponder phenotype. Furthermore, soluble MD-2, but not soluble MD-2C95Y, functioned to enable LPS responses in cells that expressed TLR4. Thus, MD-2 is a required component of the LPS signaling complex and can function as a soluble receptor for cells that do not otherwise express it. We hypothesize that MD-2 conformationally affects the extracellular domain of TLR4, perhaps resulting in a change in affinity for LPS or functioning as a portion of the true ligand for TLR4. PMID:11435474

  15. Drosophila melanogaster White Mutant w 1118 Undergo Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, María José; Pérez, Coralia; Marchesano, Mariana; Ruiz, Santiago; Caputi, Angel; Aguilera, Pedro; Barrio, Rosa; Cantera, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Key scientific discoveries have resulted from genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster , using a multitude of transgenic fly strains, the majority of which are constructed in a genetic background containing mutations in the white gene. Here we report that white mutant flies from w 1118 strain undergo retinal degeneration. We observed also that w 1118 mutants have progressive loss of climbing ability, shortened life span, as well as impaired resistance to various forms of stress. Retinal degeneration was abolished by transgenic expression of mini-white + in the white null background w 1118 . We conclude that beyond the classical eye-color phenotype, mutations in Drosophila white gene could impair several biological functions affecting parameters like mobility, life span and stress tolerance. Consequently, we suggest caution and attentiveness during the interpretation of old experiments employing white mutant flies and when planning new ones, especially within the research field of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. We also encourage that the use of w 1118 strain as a wild-type control should be avoided.

  16. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection.

  17. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K.; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z.; Shneider, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations. PMID:26842965

  18. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z; Shneider, Neil A

    2016-02-04

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations.

  19. Characterization of a Lignified Secondary Phloem Fibre‐deficient Mutant of Jute (Corchorus capsularis)

    PubMed Central

    SENGUPTA, GARGI; PALIT, P.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims High lignin content of lignocellulose jute fibre does not favour its utilization in making finer fabrics and other value‐added products. To aid the development of low‐lignin jute fibre, this study aimed to identify a phloem fibre mutant with reduced lignin. • Methods An x‐ray‐induced mutant line (CMU) of jute (Corchorus capsularis) was morphologically evaluated and the accession (CMU 013) with the most undulated phenotype was compared with its normal parent (JRC 212) for its growth, secondary fibre development and lignification of the fibre cell wall. • Key Results The normal and mutant plants showed similar leaf photosynthetic rates. The mutant grew more slowly, had shorter internodes and yielded much less fibre after retting. The fibre of the mutant contained 50 % less lignin but comparatively more cellulose than that of the normal type. Differentiation of primary and secondary vascular tissues throughout the CMU 013 stem was regular but it did not have secondary phloem fibre bundles as in JRC 212. Instead, a few thin‐walled, less lignified fibre cells formed uni‐ or biseriate radial rows within the phloem wedges of the middle stem. The lower and earliest developed part of the mutant stem had no lignified fibre cells. This developmental deficiency in lignification of fibre cells was correlated to a similar deficiency in phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, but not peroxidase activity, in the bark tissue along the stem axis. In spite of severe reduction in lignin synthesis in the phloem cells this mutant functioned normally and bred true. • Conclusions In view of the observations made, the mutant is designated as deficient lignified phloem fibre (dlpf). This mutant may be utilized to engineer low‐lignin jute fibre strains and may also serve as a model to study the positional information that coordinates secondary wall thickening of fibre cells. PMID:14707004

  20. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Accelerated bang recovery in Drosophila genderblind mutants.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, David E; Yanoga, Fatoumata; Grosjean, Yael

    2008-07-01

    Cystine-glutamate transporters import cystine into cells for glutathione synthesis and protection from oxidative stress, but also export significant amounts of glutamate. Increasing evidence suggests that 'ambient extracellular glutamate' secreted by cystine-glutamate transporters in the nervous system modulates glutamatergic synapse strength and behavior. To date, the only cystine-glutamate transporter mutants examined behaviorally are Drosophila genderblind mutants. These animals contain loss-of-function mutations in the 'genderblind' gene, which encodes an xCT subunit essential for cystine-glutamate transporter function. Genderblind was named based on a mutant courtship phenotype: male genderblind mutants are attracted to normally aversive male pheromones and thus court and attempt to copulate with both male and female partners equally. However, genderblind protein is expressed in many parts of the fly brain and thus might be expected to also regulate other behaviors, including behaviors not related to male courtship or chemosensation. Here, we show that genderblind mutants display faster recovery and increased negative geotaxis after strong mechanical stimuli (e.g., they climb faster and farther after vial banging). This phenotype is displayed by both males and females, consistent with strong genderblind expression in both sexes.

  2. Computing border bases using mutant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, E.; Abbas Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Border bases, a generalization of Gröbner bases, have actively been addressed during recent years due to their applicability to industrial problems. In cryptography and coding theory a useful application of border based is to solve zero-dimensional systems of polynomial equations over finite fields, which motivates us for developing optimizations of the algorithms that compute border bases. In 2006, Kehrein and Kreuzer formulated the Border Basis Algorithm (BBA), an algorithm which allows the computation of border bases that relate to a degree compatible term ordering. In 2007, J. Ding et al. introduced mutant strategies bases on finding special lower degree polynomials in the ideal. The mutant strategies aim to distinguish special lower degree polynomials (mutants) from the other polynomials and give them priority in the process of generating new polynomials in the ideal. In this paper we develop hybrid algorithms that use the ideas of J. Ding et al. involving the concept of mutants to optimize the Border Basis Algorithm for solving systems of polynomial equations over finite fields. In particular, we recall a version of the Border Basis Algorithm which is actually called the Improved Border Basis Algorithm and propose two hybrid algorithms, called MBBA and IMBBA. The new mutants variants provide us space efficiency as well as time efficiency. The efficiency of these newly developed hybrid algorithms is discussed using standard cryptographic examples.

  3. Mechanism of the Anticoagulant Activity of Thrombin Mutant W215A/E217A

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Prafull S.; Page, Michael J.; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-09-15

    The thrombin mutant W215A/E217A (WE) is a potent anticoagulant both in vitro and in vivo. Previous x-ray structural studies have shown that WE assumes a partially collapsed conformation that is similar to the inactive E* form, which explains its drastically reduced activity toward substrate. Whether this collapsed conformation is genuine, rather than the result of crystal packing or the mutation introduced in the critical 215-217 {beta}-strand, and whether binding of thrombomodulin to exosite I can allosterically shift the E* form to the active E form to restore activity toward protein C are issues of considerable mechanistic importance to improve themore » design of an anticoagulant thrombin mutant for therapeutic applications. Here we present four crystal structures of WE in the human and murine forms that confirm the collapsed conformation reported previously under different experimental conditions and crystal packing. We also present structures of human and murine WE bound to exosite I with a fragment of the platelet receptor PAR1, which is unable to shift WE to the E form. These structural findings, along with kinetic and calorimetry data, indicate that WE is strongly stabilized in the E* form and explain why binding of ligands to exosite I has only a modest effect on the E*-E equilibrium for this mutant. The E* {yields} E transition requires the combined binding of thrombomodulin and protein C and restores activity of the mutant WE in the anticoagulant pathway.« less

  4. Mutants with Enhanced Nitrogenase Activity in Hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-Wheat Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pereg Gerk, Lily; Gilchrist, Kate; Kennedy, Ivan R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism. PMID:10788397

  5. Understanding protein lids: kinetic analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    1999-08-31

    In previous work we tested what three amino acid sequences could serve as a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase [Sun, J., and Sampson, N. S. (1998) Protein Sci. 7, 1495-1505]. We generated a genetic library encoding all 8000 possible 3 amino acid combinations at the C-terminal hinge and selected for those combinations of amino acids that formed active mutants. These mutants were classified into six phylogenetic families. Two families resembled wild-type hinges, and four families represented new types of hinges. In this work, the kinetic characteristics and thermal stabilities of mutants representing each of these families were determined in order to understand what properties make an efficient protein hinge, and why all of the families are not observed in nature. From a steady-state kinetic analysis of our mutants, it is clear that the partitioning between protonation of intermediate to form product and intermediate release from the enzyme surface to form methylglyoxal (a decomposition product) is not affected. The two most impaired mutants undergo a change in rate-limiting step from enediol formation to dihydroxyacetone phosphate binding. Thus, it appears that k(cat)/K(m)'s are reduced relative to wild type as a result of slower Michaelis complex formation and dissociation, rather than increased loop opening speed.

  6. Biochemical Characterization and Cellular Effects of CADASIL Mutants of NOTCH3

    PubMed Central

    Meng, He; Zhang, Xiaojie; Yu, Genggeng; Lee, Soo Jung; Chen, Y. Eugene; Prudovsky, Igor; Wang, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the best understood cause of dominantly inherited stroke and results from NOTCH3 mutations that lead to NOTCH3 protein accumulation and selective arterial smooth muscle degeneration. Previous studies show that NOTCH3 protein forms multimers. Here, we investigate protein interactions between NOTCH3 and other vascular Notch isoforms and characterize the effects of elevated NOTCH3 on smooth muscle gene regulation. We demonstrate that NOTCH3 forms heterodimers with NOTCH1, NOTCH3, and NOTCH4. R90C and C49Y mutant NOTCH3 form complexes which are more resistant to detergents than wild type NOTCH3 complexes. Using quantitative NOTCH3-luciferase clearance assays, we found significant inhibition of mutant NOTCH3 clearance. In coculture assays of NOTCH function, overexpressed wild type and mutant NOTCH3 significantly repressed NOTCH-regulated smooth muscle transcripts and potently impaired the activity of three independent smooth muscle promoters. Wildtype and R90C recombinant NOTCH3 proteins applied to cell cultures also blocked canonical Notch fuction. We conclude that CADASIL mutants of NOTCH3 complex with NOTCH1, 3, and 4, slow NOTCH3 clearance, and that overexpressed wild type and mutant NOTCH3 protein interfere with key NOTCH-mediated functions in smooth muscle cells. PMID:23028706

  7. Bacterio-opsin mutants of Halobacterium halobium

    PubMed Central

    Betlach, Mary; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Friedman, James; Boyer, Herbert W.

    1983-01-01

    The bacterio-opsin (bop) gene of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been cloned with about 40 kilobases of flanking genomic sequence. The 40-kilobase segment is derived from the (G+C)-rich fraction of the chromosome and is not homologous to the major (pHH1) or minor endogenous covalently closed circular DNA species of H. halobium. A 5.1-kilobase Pst I fragment containing the bop gene was subcloned in pBR322 and a partial restriction map was determined. Defined restriction fragments of this clone were used as probes to analyze the defects associated with the bop gene in 12 bacterio-opsin mutants. Eleven out of 12 of the mutants examined had inserts ranging from 350 to 3,000 base pairs either in the bop gene or up to 1,400 base pairs upstream. The positions of the inserts were localized to four regions in the 5.1-kilobase genomic fragment: within the gene (one mutant), in a region that overlaps the 5′ end of the gene (seven mutants), and in two different upstream regions (three mutants). Two revertants of the mutant with the most distal insert had an additional insert in the same region. The polar effects of these inserts are discussed in terms of inactivation of a regulatory gene or disruption of part of a coordinately expressed operon. Given the defined nature of the bop mRNA—i.e., it has a 5′ leader sequence of three ribonucleotides—these observations indicate that the bop mRNA might be processed from a large mRNA transcript. Images PMID:16593291

  8. [Mutant prevention concentrations of antibacterial agents to ocular pathogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qun; Li, Ran; Luo, Shi-Yun; Deng, Shi-Jing; Sun, Xu-Guang

    2009-01-01

    To establish a method to measure mutant prevention concentration (MPC) in vitro, and to measure MPC of antibacterial agents for ocular bacteria caused keratitis. It was an experimental study. Forty strains of ocular bacteria were separated from cornea in Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, which included 8 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the levofloxacin (LVF), ofloxacin (OFL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NFL), tobramycin (TOB) and chloromycetin (CHL) were determined by agar dilution method from National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). The MPC were measured by accumulate-bacterial methods with bacterial population inoculated more than 1.2 x 10(10) colony forming units per milliliter with Mueller-Hinton broth and tryptic soy agar plate. With the software of SPSS 11.0, the datum such as the range of MIC, MPC, MIC90 and MPC90 were calculated, and the selection index (MPC90/ MI90) and mutant selection window (MSW) were obtained. The MI90 of LVF and TOB (4 mg/L) to Staphylococcus aureus strains were the lowest. CIP showed the lowest MIC90 (0.25 mg/L) to Pseudomonas aeruginosa among six kinds of antibacterial agents. The MIC90 of LVF to Staphylococcus epidermidis (256 mg/L), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 mg/L) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (0.25 mg/L) were lower than other antibacterial agents. The MPC90, MSW and the MPC90/MIC90 of levofloxacin showed lower values compared with other antibacterial medicines. From all the datum, the MIC90 of CHL was the highest and the activity was the weakest. Although the activity of LVF was higher to every kind of bacteria, CIP had the highest activity antibacterial to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The capacity of CHL and TOB was weaker than Quinolones for restricting resistant mutants on ocular bacteria. LVF had the strongest capacity for restricting resistant

  9. Craniofacial skeletal defects of adult zebrafish glypican 4 (knypek) mutants

    PubMed Central

    LeClair, Elizabeth E.; Mui, Stephanie R.; Huang, Angela; Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Topczewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan Glypican 4 (Gpc4) is part of the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, which is required for convergence and extension during zebrafish gastrulation. To observe Glypican 4-deficient phenotypes at later stages, we rescued gpc4−/− (knypek) homozygotes and raised them for more than one year. Adult mutants showed diverse cranial malformations of both dermal and endochondral bones, ranging from shortening of the rostral-most skull to loss of the symplectic. Additionally, the adult palatoquadrate cartilage was disorganized, with abnormal chondrocyte orientation. To understand how the palatoquadrate cartilage normally develops, we examined a juvenile series of wild type and mutant specimens. This identified two novel domains of elongated chondrocytes in the larval palatoquadrate, which normally form prior to endochondral ossification. In contrast, gpc4−/− larvae never form these domains, suggesting a failure of chondrocyte orientation, though not differentiation. Our findings implicate Gpc4 in the regulation of zebrafish cartilage and bone morphogenesis. PMID:19777561

  10. Rapid degeneration of rod photoreceptors expressing self-association-deficient arrestin-1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiufeng; Seo, Jungwon; Baameur, Faiza; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Chen, Qiuyan; Kook, Seunghyi; Kim, Miyeon; Brooks, Evan K.; Altenbach, Christian; Hong, Yuan; Hanson, Susan M.; Palazzo, Maria C.; Chen, Jeannie; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    Arrestin-1 binds light-activated phosphorhodopsin and ensures timely signal shutoff. We show that high transgenic expression of an arrestin-1 mutant with enhanced rhodopsin binding and impaired oligomerization causes apoptotic rod death in mice. Dark rearing does not prevent mutant-induced cell death, ruling out the role of arrestin complexes with light-activated rhodopsin. Similar expression of WT arrestin-1 that robustly oligomerizes, which leads to only modest increase in the monomer concentration, does not affect rod survival. Moreover, WT arrestin-1 co-expressed with the mutant delays retinal degeneration. Thus, arrestin-1 mutant directly affects cell survival via binding partner(s) other than light-activated rhodopsin. Due to impaired self-association of the mutant its high expression dramatically increases the concentration of the monomer. The data suggest that monomeric arrestin-1 is cytotoxic and WT arrestin-1 protects rods by forming mixed oligomers with the mutant and/or competing with it for the binding to non-receptor partners. Thus, arrestin-1 self-association likely serves to keep low concentration of the toxic monomer. The reduction of the concentration of harmful monomer is an earlier unappreciated biological function of protein oligomerization. PMID:24012956

  11. Rapid degeneration of rod photoreceptors expressing self-association-deficient arrestin-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiufeng; Seo, Jungwon; Baameur, Faiza; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Chen, Qiuyan; Kook, Seunghyi; Kim, Miyeon; Brooks, Evan K; Altenbach, Christian; Hong, Yuan; Hanson, Susan M; Palazzo, Maria C; Chen, Jeannie; Hubbell, Wayne L; Gurevich, Eugenia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2013-12-01

    Arrestin-1 binds light-activated phosphorhodopsin and ensures timely signal shutoff. We show that high transgenic expression of an arrestin-1 mutant with enhanced rhodopsin binding and impaired oligomerization causes apoptotic rod death in mice. Dark rearing does not prevent mutant-induced cell death, ruling out the role of arrestin complexes with light-activated rhodopsin. Similar expression of WT arrestin-1 that robustly oligomerizes, which leads to only modest increase in the monomer concentration, does not affect rod survival. Moreover, WT arrestin-1 co-expressed with the mutant delays retinal degeneration. Thus, arrestin-1 mutant directly affects cell survival via binding partner(s) other than light-activated rhodopsin. Due to impaired self-association of the mutant its high expression dramatically increases the concentration of the monomer. The data suggest that monomeric arrestin-1 is cytotoxic and WT arrestin-1 protects rods by forming mixed oligomers with the mutant and/or competing with it for the binding to non-receptor partners. Thus, arrestin-1 self-association likely serves to keep low concentration of the toxic monomer. The reduction of the concentration of harmful monomer is an earlier unappreciated biological function of protein oligomerization. © 2013.

  12. Characterization of a novel gravitropic mutant of morning glory, weeping2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Fujii, Nobuharu; Nitasaka, Eiji; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2008-09-01

    In higher plants, gravity is a major environmental cue that governs growth orientation, a phenomenon termed gravitropism. It has been suggested that gravity also affects other aspects of morphogenesis, such as circumnutation and winding movements. Previously, we showed that these aspects of plant growth morphology require amyloplast sedimentation inside gravisensing endodermal cells. However, the molecular mechanism of the graviresponse and its relationship to circumnutation and winding remains obscure. Here, we have characterized a novel shoot gravitropic mutant of morning glory, weeping2 ( we2). In the we2 mutant, the gravitropic response of the stem was absent, and hypocotyls exhibited a severely reduced gravitropic response, whereas roots showed normal gravitropism. In agreement with our previous studies, we found that we2 mutant has defects in shoot circumnutation and winding. Histological analysis showed that we2 mutant forms abnormal endodermal cells. We identified a mutation in the morning glory homolog of SHORT-ROOT ( PnSHR1) that was genetically linked to the agravitropic phenotype of we2 mutant, and which may underlie the abnormal differentiation of endodermal cells in this plant. These results suggest that the phenotype of we2 mutant is due to a mutation of PnSHR1, and that PnSHR1 regulates gravimorphogenesis, including circumnutation and winding movements, in morning glory.

  13. Improved Medium for Selecting Nitrate-Nonutilizing (nit) Mutants of Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Korolev, N; Katan, T

    1997-10-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate-nonutilizing (nit) mutants are commonly used to determine vegetative compatibility between isolates of Verticillium dahliae by complementation (heterokaryon) testing. These mutants emerge spontaneously as chlorate-resistant sectors growing out of partially restricted, wild-type colonies on chlorate-amended media. The commonly used chlorate media are based on minimal medium (MMC) or cornmeal agar (CMC), amended with potassium chlorate. nit mutants recovered on these media constituted 10 to 36%(on MMC) and 25 to 45%(on CMC) of the apparently resistant sectors. An improved water agar chlorate medium (WAC) is described that is more effective for selecting chlorate-resistant nit mutants. WAC medium consists of agar (2%), glucose (0.02%), and potassium chlorate (2 to 5%). On WAC, growth of most V. dahliae isolates was strongly inhibited, and 66 to 100%(average >80%) of the chlorate-resistant sectors formed were nit mutants. Most mutants were characterized as nit1, and about 6% as NitM.

  14. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  15. Generation of a Mutant Mucor hiemalis Endoglycosidase That Acts on Core-fucosylated N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Toshihiko; Katayama, Takane; Tomabechi, Yusuke; Nishikawa, Yoshihide; Kumada, Jyunichi; Matsuzaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2016-10-28

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase M (Endo-M), an endoglycosidase from the fungus Mucor hiemalis, is a useful tool for chemoenzymatic synthesis of glycoconjugates, including glycoprotein-based therapeutics having a precisely defined glycoform, by virtue of its transglycosylation activity. Although Endo-M has been known to act on various N-glycans, it does not act on core-fucosylated N-glycans, which exist widely in mammalian glycoproteins, thus limiting its application. Therefore, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on Endo-M to isolate mutant enzymes that are able to act on mammalian-type core-α1,6-fucosylated glycans. Among the Endo-M mutant enzymes generated, those in which the tryptophan at position 251 was substituted with alanine or asparagine showed altered substrate specificities. Such mutant enzymes exhibited increased hydrolysis of a synthetic α1,6-fucosylated trimannosyl core structure, whereas their activity on the afucosylated form decreased. In addition, among the Trp-251 mutants, the W251N mutant was most efficient in hydrolyzing the core-fucosylated substrate. W251N mutants could act on the immunoglobulin G-derived core-fucosylated glycopeptides and human lactoferrin glycoproteins. This mutant was also capable of transferring the sialyl glycan from an activated substrate intermediate (sialyl glyco-oxazoline) onto an α1,6-fucosyl-N-acetylglucosaminyl biotin. Furthermore, the W251N mutant gained a glycosynthase-like activity when a N175Q substitution was introduced and it caused accumulation of the transglycosylation products. These findings not only give insights into the substrate recognition mechanism of glycoside hydrolase family 85 enzymes but also widen their scope of application in preparing homogeneous glycoforms of core-fucosylated glycoproteins for the production of potent glycoprotein-based therapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Akt mediated ROS-dependent selective targeting of mutant KRAS tumors.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to cell death. Previously, we reported the ability of a small molecule compound, C1, to induce ROS dependent autophagy associated apoptosis in human cancer cell lines and primary tumor cells (Wong C. et al. 2010). Our ongoing investigations have unraveled a hitherto undefined novel signaling network involving hyper-phosphorylation of Akt and Akt-mediated ROS production in cancer cell lines. Interestingly, drug-induced Akt activation is selectively seen in cell lines that carry mutant KRAS; HCT116 cells that carry the V13D KRAS mutation respond favorably to C1 while HT29 cells expressing wild type KRAS are relatively resistant. Of note, not only does the compound target mutant KRAS expressing cells but also induces RAS activation as evidenced by the PAK pull down assay. Corroborating this, pharmacological inhibition as well as siRNA mediated silencing of KRAS or Akt, blocked C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony forming ability in HCT116 cells. To further confirm the involvement of KRAS, we made use of mutant KRAS transformed RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. Notably, drug-induced ROS generation and death sensitivity was significantly higher in RWPE-1-KRAS cells than the RWPE-1-vector cells, thus confirming the results obtained with mutant KRAS colorectal carcinoma cell line. Lastly, we made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout cells (KO) where the mutant KRAS allele had been deleted, thus expressing a single wild-type KRAS allele. Exposure of the KO cells to C1 failed to induce Akt activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Taken together, results show the involvement of activated Akt in ROS-mediated selective targeting of mutant KRAS expressing tumors, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of chemotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting KRAS mutant cancers. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  17. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  18. Genotyping-by-sequencing of glossy mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glossy mutants are a common occurrence in Brassica oleracea L. and they have been documented in most crop varieties of the species including cabbage, kale, broccoli, and collard. Glossy phenotypes have been of particular interest to researchers due to observations that they influence insect behavior...

  19. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  20. Nicotinamide Ribosyl Uptake Mutants in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiβ, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease. PMID:12933892

  1. Phenotypic mutant library: potential for gene discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rapid development of high throughput and affordable Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques has renewed interest in gene discovery using forward genetics. The conventional forward genetic approach starts with isolation of mutants with a phenotype of interest, mapping the mutation within a s...

  2. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  3. Quantitative genetics and utilization of mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relatively low level of genetic variability currently available in cotton makes mutagenesis attractive to overcome this problem. Mutations can occur either spontaneously or be induced. The majority of the genes we use today are spontaneous mutants that developed over a long period of time. Induc...

  4. Pattern-formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Starruß, Jörn; Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of the rod-shaped cells of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus depends on two motility machineries, type IV pili (giving rise to S-motility) and the gliding motility apparatus (giving rise to A-motility). Cell motility is regulated by occasional reversals. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies, depending on their nutritional status. To ultimately understand these two pattern-formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as the cell reversal machinery, we analyse spatial self-organization in three M. xanthus strains: (i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, (ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and (iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, occasionally reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by means of the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria owing to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemical signal regulation. The two-engine strain mutant reveals that the same phenomenon emerges when both motility systems are present, and as long as cells exhibit unidirectional motion only. From the study of these two strains, we conclude that unidirectional cell motion induces the formation of large moving clusters at low and intermediate densities, while it results in vortex formation at very high densities. These findings are consistent with what is known from self-propelled rod models, which strongly suggests that the combined effect of self-propulsion and volume exclusion interactions is the pattern-formation mechanism leading to the observed phenomena. On the other hand, we learn that when cells occasionally reverse

  5. Functional Rescue of Trafficking-Impaired ABCB4 Mutants by Chemical Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Gordo-Gilart, Raquel; Andueza, Sara; Hierro, Loreto; Jara, Paloma; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3, ABCB4) is a hepatocellular membrane protein that mediates biliary secretion of phosphatidylcholine. Null mutations in ABCB4 gene give rise to severe early-onset cholestatic liver disease. We have previously shown that the disease-associated mutations p.G68R, p.G228R, p.D459H, and p.A934T resulted in retention of ABCB4 in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus failing to target the plasma membrane. In the present study, we tested the ability of two compounds with chaperone-like activity, 4-phenylbutyrate and curcumin, to rescue these ABCB4 mutants by assessing their effects on subcellular localization, protein maturation, and phospholipid efflux capability. Incubation of transfected cells at a reduced temperature (30°C) or exposure to pharmacological doses of either 4-PBA or curcumin restored cell surface expression of mutants G228R and A934T. The delivery of these mutants to the plasma membrane was accompanied by a switch in the ratio of mature to inmature protein forms, leading to a predominant expression of the mature protein. This effect was due to an improvement in the maturation rate and not to the stabilization of the mature forms. Both mutants were also functionally rescued, displaying bile salt-dependent phospholipid efflux activity after addition of 4-PBA or curcumin. Drug-induced rescue was mutant specific, given neither 4-PBA nor curcumin had an effect on the ABCB4 mutants G68R and A934T. Collectively, these data indicate that the functionality of selected trafficking-defective ABCB4 mutants can be recovered by chemical chaperones through restoration of membrane localization, suggesting a potential treatment for patients carrying such mutations. PMID:26900700

  6. Characterization of antimicrobial activity against Listeria and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its mutant variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Singh, Atul K; Wu, Xiaoyu; Lyu, Yuan; Bhunia, Arun K; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are relatively short peptides that have the ability to penetrate the cell membrane, form pores leading to cell death. This study compares both antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its two mutants, namely, melittin I17K (GIGAVLKVLTTGLPALKSWIKRKRQQ) with a higher charge and lower hydrophobicity and mutant G1I (IIGAVLKVLTTGLPALISWIKRKRQQ) of higher hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity against different strains of Listeria was investigated by bioassay, viability studies, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay on mammalian Caco-2 cells. The minimum inhibitory concentration of native, mutant I17K, mutant G1I against Listeria monocytogenes F4244 was 0.315±0.008, 0.814±0.006 and 0.494±0.037μg/ml respectively, whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration values were 3.263±0.0034, 7.412±0.017 and 5.366±0.019μg/ml respectively. Lag time for inactivation of L. monocytogenes F4244 was observed at concentrations below 0.20 and 0.78μg/ml for native and mutant melittin I17K respectively. The antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes F4244 was in the order native>G1I>I17K. Native melittin was cytotoxic to mammalian Caco-2 cells above concentration of 2μg/ml, whereas the two mutants exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 8μg/ml. Pore formation in cell wall/membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of native and its mutants indicated that (i) surface native melittin and G1I exhibited higher tendency to penetrate a mimic of bacterial cell membrane and (ii) transmembrane native and I17K formed water channel in mimics of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  8. Small-molecule RETRA suppresses mutant p53-bearing cancer cells through a p73-dependent salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, J. E.; Ilyinskaya, G. V.; Komarov, P. G.; Agapova, L. S.; Kochetkov, D. V.; Strom, E.; Frolova, E. I.; Kovriga, I.; Gudkov, A. V.; Feinstein, E.; Chumakov, P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of unique features of cancer cells is important for defining specific and efficient therapeutic targets. Mutant p53 is present in nearly half of all cancer cases, forming a promising target for pharmacological reactivation. In addition to being defective for the tumor-suppressor function, mutant p53 contributes to malignancy by blocking a p53 family member p73. Here, we describe a small-molecule RETRA that activates a set of p53-regulated genes and specifically suppresses mutant p53-bearing tumor cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Although the effect is strictly limited to the cells expressing mutant p53, it is abrogated by inhibition with RNAi to p73. Treatment of mutant p53-expressing cancer cells with RETRA results in a substantial increase in the expression level of p73, and a release of p73 from the blocking complex with mutant p53, which produces tumor-suppressor effects similar to the functional reactivation of p53. RETRA is active against tumor cells expressing a variety of p53 mutants and does not affect normal cells. The results validate the mutant p53–p73 complex as a promising and highly specific potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:18424558

  9. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  10. Temperature-sensitive Mutants of Sindbis Virus: Biochemical Correlates of Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Boyce W.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1967-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of Sindbis virus fail to grow at a temperature that permits growth of the wild type, but when certain pairs of these mutants, mixed together, infect cells at that temperature, viral growth (i.e., complementation) occurs. The yield from this complementation, however, is of the same order of magnitude as the infectivity in the inoculum. Since in animal virus infections the protein components of the virion probably enter the cell with the viral nucleic acid, it was necessary to demonstrate that the observed complementation required synthesis of new viral protein and nucleic acid rather than some sort of rearrangement of the structural components of the inoculum. To demonstrate that complementation does require new biosynthesis, three biochemical events of normal virus growth have been observed during complementation and correlated with the efficiency of viral growth seen in complementation. These events include: (i) entrance of parental viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) into a double-stranded form; (ii) subsequent synthesis of viral RNA; and (iii) synthesis and subsequent incorporation of viral protein(s) into cell membranes where they were detected by hemadsorption. Although the infecting single-stranded RNA genome of the wild type was converted to a ribonuclease-resistant form, the genome of a mutant (ts-11) incapable of RNA synthesis at a nonpermissive temperature was not so converted. However, during complementation with another mutant also defective in viral RNA synthesis, some of the RNA of mutant ts-11 was converted to a ribonuclease-resistant form, and total synthesis of virus-specific RNA was markedly enhanced. The virus-specific alteration of the cell surface, detected by hemadsorption, was also extensively increased during complementation. These observations support the view that complementation between temperature-sensitive mutants and replication of wild-type virus are similar processes. PMID:5630228

  11. Mutant KRAS promotes malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Αgalioti, Theodora; Giannou, Anastasios D.; Krontira, Anthi C.; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Kati, Danai; Vreka, Malamati; Pepe, Mario; Spella, Μagda; Lilis, Ioannis; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Nikolouli, Eirini; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Papadakis, Andreas; Papadia, Konstantina; Voulgaridis, Apostolos; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Stamou, Panagiota; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Snyder, Linda A.; Antimisiaris, Sophia G.; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Psallidas, Ioannis; Μarazioti, Antonia; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is the lethal consequence of various human cancers metastatic to the pleural cavity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the development of MPE are still obscure. Here we show that mutant KRAS is important for MPE induction in mice. Pleural disseminated, mutant KRAS bearing tumour cells upregulate and systemically release chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) into the bloodstream to mobilize myeloid cells from the host bone marrow to the pleural space via the spleen. These cells promote MPE formation, as indicated by splenectomy and splenocyte restoration experiments. In addition, KRAS mutations are frequently detected in human MPE and cell lines isolated thereof, but are often lost during automated analyses, as indicated by manual versus automated examination of Sanger sequencing traces. Finally, the novel KRAS inhibitor deltarasin and a monoclonal antibody directed against CCL2 are equally effective against an experimental mouse model of MPE, a result that holds promise for future efficient therapies against the human condition. PMID:28508873

  12. Intact interval timing in circadian CLOCK mutants.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C R

    2008-08-28

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval-timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/- and -/- mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing.

  13. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  14. Mutant Profilin Suppresses Mutant Actin-dependent Mitochondrial Phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-profilin interface, Ala167 of the actin barbed end W-loop and His372 near the C terminus form a clamp around a profilin segment containing residue Arg81 and Tyr79. Modeling suggests that altering steric packing in this interface regulates actin activity. An actin A167E mutation could increase interface crowding and alter actin regulation, and A167E does cause growth defects and mitochondrial dysfunction. We assessed whether a profilin Y79S mutation with its decreased mass could compensate for actin A167E crowding and rescue the mutant phenotype. Y79S profilin alone caused no growth defect in WT actin cells under standard conditions in rich medium and rescued the mitochondrial phenotype resulting from both the A167E and H372R actin mutations in vivo consistent with our model. Rescue did not result from effects of profilin on actin nucleotide exchange or direct effects of profilin on actin polymerization. Polymerization of A167E actin was less stimulated by formin Bni1 FH1-FH2 fragment than was WT actin. Addition of WT profilin to mixtures of A167E actin and formin fragment significantly altered polymerization kinetics from hyperbolic to a decidedly more sigmoidal behavior. Substitution of Y79S profilin in this system produced A167E behavior nearly identical to that of WT actin. A167E actin caused more dynamic actin cable behavior in vivo than observed with WT actin. Introduction of Y79S restored cable movement to a more normal phenotype. Our studies implicate the importance of the actin-profilin interface for formin-dependent actin and point to the involvement of formin and profilin in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:21956104

  15. Computational and Experimental Study of Neuroglobin and Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Lauren; Cho, Samuel; Kim-Shaprio, Daniel

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a hexacoordinated heme protein that is closely related to hemoglobin and myoglobin and normally found in the brain and nervous systems. It is involved in cellular oxygen homeostasis and reversibly binds to oxygen with a higher binding affinity than hemoglobin. To protect the brain tissue from hypoxic or ischemic conditions, Ngb increases oxygen availability. We have previously shown that a mutant form of Ngb reduces nitrite to nitric oxide 50x faster than myoglobin and 500x faster than hemoglobin. It also tightly binds to carbon monoxide (CO) with an association rate that is 500x faster than hemoglobin. To analyze the structure of neuroglobin and the characteristics causing these phenomena, we performed 3 sets of 1 microsecond molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of wild-type oxidized and reduced human Ngb and their C46A, C55A, H64L, and H64Q mutants. We also directly compare our MD simulations with time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. These studies will help identify treatments for diseases involving low nitric oxide availability and carbon monoxide poisoning. This research was supported by an NIH NSRA predoctoral fellowship in the Structural and Computational Biophysics Program training Grant (T32GM095440-05).

  16. The emergence of cooperation from a single cooperative mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Population structure is one central condition which promotes the stability of cooperation: If cooperators more likely interact with other cooperators (positive assortment), they keep most of their benefit for themselves and are less exploited by non-cooperators. However, positive assortment can only act successfully if cooperation is already well established in the population such that cooperative individuals can successfully assort. But how can cooperation emerge when starting with a single cooperative mutant? Here we study this issue for a generic situation of microbial systems where microbes regularly form new colonies and show strong population growth. We show how and when the dynamical interplay between colony formation, population growth and evolution within colonies can provoke the emergence of cooperation. In particular, the probability for a single cooperative mutant to succeed is robustly large when colony-formation is fast or comparable to the time-scale of growth within colonies; growth supports cooperation.[4pt] [1] A. Melbinger, J. Cremer, and E. Frey, Evolutionary game theory in growing populations, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 178101 (2010)[0pt] [2] J. Cremer, A. Melbinger, and E. Frey, Evolutionary and population dynamics: a coupled approach, arXiv:1108.2604

  17. Defeat mutant KRAS with synthetic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ras proteins are considered as the founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that control fundamental cellular functions. Mutationally activated RAS genes were discovered in human cancer cells more than 3 decades ago, but intensive efforts on Ras structure, biochemistry, function and signaling continue even now. Because mutant Ras proteins are inherently difficult to inhibit and have yet been therapeutically conquered, it was designated as “the Everest of oncogenes” in the cancer genome landscape, further promoting a “renaissance” in RAS research. Different paths to directly or indirectly targeting mutant Ras signaling are currently under investigation in the hope of finding an efficacious regimen. Inhibitors directly binding to KRASG12C to block its downstream signaling have been revealed, supporting the notion of Ras' druggability. An alternative indirect approach by targeting synthetic lethal interactors of mutant RAS is underway. We recently employed a synthetic lethal drug screen plus a combinatorial strategy using a panel of clinical agents and discovered that KRAS-mutant cancers were fragile to the combined inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK). The combined regimen of BI-2536 (a Plk1 inhibitor) and fasudil (a ROCK inhibitor) promoted a significant inhibition of patient-derived lung cancer xenografts and prolonged the survival of LSL-KRASG12D mice. In this commentary, we will summarize the state-of-the art for the direction of synthetic lethality, and also speculate on the future development of this approach. PMID:27463838

  18. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Cambridge, MA). pLPC-12S coexpresses an E1A 12S cDNA with puromycin phosphotransferase (puro) and pWZL-12S coexpresses E1A with hygromycin phospho...retinoblastoma; CR1, -2, -3, conserved regions 1, 2, and 3; MEF, mouse embryonic fibroblast; puro, puromycin; hygro, hygromycin . To whom reprint requests...ml hygromycin B (Boehringer Mannheim) to elim- inate uninfected cells. When two separate E1A mutants were coexpressed, they were introduced

  19. Reversion of autocrine transformation by a dominant negative platelet-derived growth factor mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Vassbotn, F S; Andersson, M; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H; Ostman, A

    1993-01-01

    A non-receptor-binding mutant of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A chain, PDGF-0, was generated by exchanging 7 amino acids in the sequence. The mutant chains formed dimers that were similar to wild-type PDGF-AA with regard to stability and rate of processing to the mature 30-kDa secreted forms. Moreover, the mutant chains formed disulfide-bonded heterodimers with the PDGF B chain in NIH 3T3 cells heterodimer underwent the same processing and secretion as PDGF-AB. Transfection of c-sis-expressing 3T3 cells with PDGF-0 significantly inhibited the transformed phenotype of these cells, as determined by the following criteria. (i) Compared with PDGF-0-negative clones, PDGF-0-producing clones showed a reverted morphology. (ii) Clones producing PDGF-0 grew more slowly than PDGF-0-negative clones, with a fivefold difference in cell number after 14 days in culture. (iii) The expression of PDGF-0 completely inhibited the ability of the c-sis-expressing 3T3 cells to form colonies in soft agar; this inhibition was overcome by the addition of recombinant PDGF-BB to the culture medium, showing that the lack of colony formation of these cells was not due to a general unresponsiveness to PDGF. The specific expression of a PDGF-0/PDGF wild-type heterodimer in COS cells revealed that the affinity of the mutant heterodimer for the PDGF alpha receptor was decreased by approximately 50-fold compared with that of PDGF-AA. Thus, we show that a non-receptor-binding PDGF A-chain mutant neutralizes in a trans-dominant manner the autocrine transforming potential of the c-sis/PDGF B chain by forming low-affinity heterodimers with wild-type PDGF chains. This method of specifically antagonizing the effect of PDGF may be useful in investigations of the role of PDGF in normal and pathological conditions. Images PMID:8321214

  20. Reversion of autocrine transformation by a dominant negative platelet-derived growth factor mutant.

    PubMed

    Vassbotn, F S; Andersson, M; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H; Ostman, A

    1993-07-01

    A non-receptor-binding mutant of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A chain, PDGF-0, was generated by exchanging 7 amino acids in the sequence. The mutant chains formed dimers that were similar to wild-type PDGF-AA with regard to stability and rate of processing to the mature 30-kDa secreted forms. Moreover, the mutant chains formed disulfide-bonded heterodimers with the PDGF B chain in NIH 3T3 cells heterodimer underwent the same processing and secretion as PDGF-AB. Transfection of c-sis-expressing 3T3 cells with PDGF-0 significantly inhibited the transformed phenotype of these cells, as determined by the following criteria. (i) Compared with PDGF-0-negative clones, PDGF-0-producing clones showed a reverted morphology. (ii) Clones producing PDGF-0 grew more slowly than PDGF-0-negative clones, with a fivefold difference in cell number after 14 days in culture. (iii) The expression of PDGF-0 completely inhibited the ability of the c-sis-expressing 3T3 cells to form colonies in soft agar; this inhibition was overcome by the addition of recombinant PDGF-BB to the culture medium, showing that the lack of colony formation of these cells was not due to a general unresponsiveness to PDGF. The specific expression of a PDGF-0/PDGF wild-type heterodimer in COS cells revealed that the affinity of the mutant heterodimer for the PDGF alpha receptor was decreased by approximately 50-fold compared with that of PDGF-AA. Thus, we show that a non-receptor-binding PDGF A-chain mutant neutralizes in a trans-dominant manner the autocrine transforming potential of the c-sis/PDGF B chain by forming low-affinity heterodimers with wild-type PDGF chains. This method of specifically antagonizing the effect of PDGF may be useful in investigations of the role of PDGF in normal and pathological conditions.

  1. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants

    PubMed Central

    Dissel, Stephane; Angadi, Veena; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Suzuki, Yasuko; Donlea, Jeff; Klose, Markus; Koch, Zachary; English, Denis; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; van Swinderen, Bruno; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Given the role that sleep plays in modulating plasticity, we hypothesized that increasing sleep would restore memory to canonical memory mutants without specifically rescuing the causal molecular-lesion. Sleep was increased using three independent strategies: activating the dorsal Fan Shaped Body (FB), increasing the expression of Fatty acid binding protein (dFabp) or by administering the GABA-A agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). Short-term memory (STM) or Long-term memory (LTM) was evaluated in rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc) mutants using Aversive Phototaxic Suppression (APS) and courtship conditioning. Each of the three independent strategies increased sleep and restored memory to rut and dnc mutants. Importantly, inducing sleep also reverses memory defects in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer’s disease. Together these data demonstrate that sleep plays a more fundamental role in modulating behavioral plasticity than previously appreciated and suggests that increasing sleep may benefit patients with certain neurological disorders. PMID:25913403

  2. Phenotypic characterization of a photomorphogenic mutant.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J

    2004-09-01

    Light is arguably the most important abiotic factor controlling plant growth and development throughout their life cycle. Plants have evolved sophisticated light-sensing mechanisms to monitor fluctuations in light quality, intensity, direction and periodicity (day length). In Arabidopsis, three families of photoreceptors have been identified by molecular genetic studies. The UV-A/blue light receptors cryptochromes and the red/far-red receptors phytochromes control an overlapping set of responses including photoperiodic flowering induction and de-etiolation. Phototropins are the primary photoreceptors for a set of specific responses to UV-A/blue light such as phototropism, chloroplast movement and stomatal opening. Mutants affecting a photoreceptor have a characteristic phenotype. It is therefore possible to determine the specific developmental responses and the photoreceptor pathway(s) affected in a mutant by performing an appropriate set of photobiological and genetic experiments. In this paper, we outline the principal and easiest experiments that can be performed to obtain a first indication about the nature of the photobiological defect in a given mutant.

  3. Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I Catalytic Mutants Reveal an Alternative Nucleophile That Can Catalyze Substrate Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Comeaux, Evan Q.; Cuya, Selma M.; Kojima, Kyoko; Jafari, Nauzanene; Wanzeck, Keith C.; Mobley, James A.; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; van Waardenburg, Robert C. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) catalyzes the repair of 3′-DNA adducts, such as the 3′-phosphotyrosyl linkage of DNA topoisomerase I to DNA. Tdp1 contains two conserved catalytic histidines: a nucleophilic His (Hisnuc) that attacks DNA adducts to form a covalent 3′-phosphohistidyl intermediate and a general acid/base His (Hisgab), which resolves the Tdp1-DNA linkage. A Hisnuc to Ala mutant protein is reportedly inactive, whereas the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1 has been attributed to the enhanced stability of the Tdp1-DNA intermediate induced by mutation of Hisgab to Arg. However, here we report that expression of the yeast HisnucAla (H182A) mutant actually induced topoisomerase I-dependent cytotoxicity and further enhanced the cytotoxicity of Tdp1 Hisgab mutants, including H432N and the SCAN1-related H432R. Moreover, the HisnucAla mutant was catalytically active in vitro, albeit at levels 85-fold less than that observed with wild type Tdp1. In contrast, the HisnucPhe mutant was catalytically inactive and suppressed Hisgab mutant-induced toxicity. These data suggest that the activity of another nucleophile when Hisnuc is replaced with residues containing a small side chain (Ala, Asn, and Gln), but not with a bulky side chain. Indeed, genetic, biochemical, and mass spectrometry analyses show that a highly conserved His, immediately N-terminal to Hisnuc, can act as a nucleophile to catalyze the formation of a covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate. These findings suggest that the flexibility of Tdp1 active site residues may impair the resolution of mutant Tdp1 covalent phosphohistidyl intermediates and provide the rationale for developing chemotherapeutics that stabilize the covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate. PMID:25609251

  4. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism ( fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypesmore » of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  5. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  6. A potential functional association between mutant BMPR2 and primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Liliana Catherine; Silgado, Daniel; Laissue, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) affects ~1% of women in the general population. Despite numerous attempts at identifying POI genetic aetiology, coding mutations in only a few genes have been functionally related to POI pathogenesis. It has been suggested that mutant BMPR2 might contribute towards the phenotype. Several BMP15 (a BMPR2 ligand) coding mutations in human species have been related to POI pathogenesis. The BMPR2 p.Ser987Phe mutation, previously identified in a woman with POI, might therefore lead to cellular dysfunction contributing to the phenotype. To explore such an assumption, the present study assessed potential pathogenic subcellular localization/aggregation patterns associated with the p.Ser987Phe mutant form of BMPR2 in a relevant model for studying ovarian function. A significant increase in protein-like aggregation patterns was identified at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which permitted us to establish, for the first time, a potential functional association between mutant BMPR2 and POI aetiology. Since BMPR2 mutant forms were previously related to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, BMPR2 mutations may be related to an as-yet-to-be described syndromic form of POI involving pulmonary dysfunction. Additional assays are necessary to confirm that BMPR2 abnormal subcellular patterns are composed by aggregates. POI: primary ovarian insufficiency; ER: endoplasmic reticulum; NGS: next generation sequencing.

  7. Structural and functional impairment of endocytic pathways by retinitis pigmentosa mutant rhodopsin-arrestin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Jen-Zen; Vega, Carrie; Jun, Wenjin; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous degenerative eye disease. Mutations at Arg135 of rhodopsin are associated with a severe form of autosomal dominant RP. This report presents evidence that Arg135 mutant rhodopsins (e.g., R135L, R135G, and R135W) are hyperphosphorylated and bind with high affinity to visual arrestin. Mutant rhodopsin recruits the cytosolic arrestin to the plasma membrane, and the rhodopsin-arrestin complex is internalized into the endocytic pathway. Furthermore, the rhodopsin-arrestin complexes alter the morphology of endosomal compartments and severely damage receptor-mediated endocytic functions. The biochemical and cellular defects of Arg135 mutant rhodopsins are distinct from those previously described for class I and class II RP mutations, and, hence, we propose that they be named class III. Impaired endocytic activity may underlie the pathogenesis of RP caused by class III rhodopsin mutations. PMID:15232620

  8. [Biofilm Formation by the Nonflagellated flhB1 Mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    PubMed

    Shelud'ko, A V; Filip'echeva, Yu A; Shumiliva, E M; Khlebtsov, B N; Burov, A M; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with mixed flagellation are able to form biofilms on various surfaces. A nonflagellated mutant of this strain with inactivated chromosomal copy of the flhB gene (flhB1) was shown to exhibit specific traits at the later stages of biofilm formation on a hydrophilic (glass) surface. Mature biofilms of the flhB1::Omegon-Km mutant Sp245.1063 were considerably thinner than those of the parent strain Sp245. The biofilms of the mutant were more susceptible to the forces of hydrodynamic shear. A. brasilense Sp245 cells in biofilms were not found to possess lateral flagella. Cells with polar flagella were, however, revealed by atomic force microscopy of mature native biofilms of strain Sp245. Preservation of a polar flagellum (probably nonmotile) on the cells of A. brasilense Sp245 may enhance the biofilm stability.

  9. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    PubMed

    Cornils, Astrid; Maurya, Ashish K; Tereshko, Lauren; Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-12-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  10. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G.; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E.; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies. PMID:27906968

  11. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21794145

  12. A cadmium-sensitive, glutathione-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Andersen, C R; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1995-01-01

    The roots of the cadmium-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, cad1-1, become brown in the presence of cadmium. A new cadmium-sensitive mutant affected at a second locus, cad2, has been identified using this phenotype. Genetic analysis has grown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Assays of cadmium accumulation by intact plants indicated that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester cadmium. Undifferentiated callus tissue was also cadmium sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. The level of cadmium-binding complexes formed in vivo was decreased compared with the wild type and accumulation of phytochelatins was about 10% of that in the wild type. The level of glutathione, the substrate for phytochelatin biosynthesis, in tissues of the mutant was decreased to about 15 to 30% of that in the wild type. Thus, the deficiency in phytochelatin biosynthesis can be explained by a deficiency in glutathione. PMID:7770518

  13. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Javier; Folgueira, Cristina; Soto, Manuel; Fresno, Manuel; Requena, Jose M

    2011-07-27

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  14. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  15. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fadD26 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Infante, E; Aguilar, L D; Gicquel, B; Pando, R Hernandez

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis fadD26 mutant has impaired synthesis of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM) and is attenuated in BALB/c mice. Survival analysis following direct intratracheal infection confirmed the attenuation: 60% survival at 4 months post-infection versus 100% mortality at 9 weeks post-infection with the wild-type strain. The fadD26 mutant induced less pneumonia and larger DTH reactions. It induced lower but progressive production of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Used as a subcutaneous vaccine 60 days before intratracheal challenge with a hypervirulent strain of M. tuberculosis (Beijing code 9501000), the mutant induced a higher level of protection than did Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG). Seventy per cent of the mice vaccinated with the fadD26 mutant survived at 16 weeks after challenge compared to 30% of those vaccinated with BCG. Similarly, there was less tissue damage (pneumonia) and lower colony-forming units (CFU) in the mice vaccinated with the fadD26 mutant compared to the findings in mice vaccinated with BCG. These data suggest that DIM synthesis is important for the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis, and that inactivation of DIM synthesis can increase the immunogenicity of live vaccines, and increase their ability to protect against tuberculosis. PMID:15958066

  16. Chir99021 and Valproic acid reduce the proliferative advantage of Apc mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Langlands, Alistair J; Carroll, Thomas D; Chen, Yu; Näthke, Inke

    2018-02-15

    More than 90% of colorectal cancers carry mutations in Apc that drive tumourigenesis. A 'just-right' signalling model proposes that Apc mutations stimulate optimal, but not excessive Wnt signalling, resulting in a growth advantage of Apc mutant over wild-type cells. Reversal of this growth advantage constitutes a potential therapeutic approach. We utilised intestinal organoids to compare the growth of Apc mutant and wild-type cells. Organoids derived from Apc Min/+ mice recapitulate stages of intestinal polyposis in culture. They eventually form spherical cysts that reflect the competitive growth advantage of cells that have undergone loss of heterozygosity (LOH). We discovered that this emergence of cysts was inhibited by Chiron99021 and Valproic acid, which potentiates Wnt signalling. Chiron99021 and Valproic acid restrict the growth advantage of Apc mutant cells while stimulating that of wild-type cells, suggesting that excessive Wnt signalling reduces the relative fitness of Apc mutant cells. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that Chiron99021-treated Apc mutant organoids were rendered susceptible to TSA-induced apoptosis, while wild-type cells were protected.

  17. Characterization of the mutant spectra of a fish RNA virus within individual hosts during natural infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Kurath, Gael

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an RNA virus that causes significant mortalities of salmonids in the Pacific Northwest of North America. RNA virus populations typically contain genetic variants that form a heterogeneous virus pool, referred to as a quasispecies or mutant spectrum. This study characterized the mutant spectra of IHNV populations within individual fish reared in different environmental settings by RT–PCR of genomic viral RNA and determination of partial glycoprotein gene sequences of molecular clones. The diversity of the mutant spectra from ten in vivo populations was low and the average mutation frequencies of duplicate populations did not significantly exceed the background mutation level expected from the methodology. In contrast, two in vitro populations contained variants with an identical mutational hot spot. These results indicated that the mutant spectra of natural IHNV populations is very homogeneous, and does not explain the different magnitudes of genetic diversity observed between the different IHNV genogroups. Overall the mutant frequency of IHNV within its host is one of the lowest reported for RNA viruses.

  18. Metaphase to Anaphase (mat) Transition–Defective Mutants inCaenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Andy; Sadler, Penny L.; Wallenfang, Matthew R.; Schumacher, Jill M.; Hamill, Danielle R.; Bates, Gayle; Bowerman, Bruce; Seydoux, Geraldine; Shakes, Diane C.

    2000-01-01

    The metaphase to anaphase transition is a critical stage of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and, thus, it is highly regulated. Errors during this transition can lead to chromosome segregation defects and death of the organism. In genetic screens for temperature-sensitive maternal effect embryonic lethal (Mel) mutants, we have identified 32 mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in which fertilized embryos arrest as one-cell embryos. In these mutant embryos, the oocyte chromosomes arrest in metaphase of meiosis I without transitioning to anaphase or producing polar bodies. An additional block in M phase exit is evidenced by the failure to form pronuclei and the persistence of phosphohistone H3 and MPM-2 antibody staining. Spermatocyte meiosis is also perturbed; primary spermatocytes arrest in metaphase of meiosis I and fail to produce secondary spermatocytes. Analogous mitotic defects cause M phase delays in mitotic germline proliferation. We have named this class of mutants “mat” for metaphase to anaphase transition defective. These mutants, representing six different complementation groups, all map near genes that encode subunits of the anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome, and, here, we show that one of the genes, emb-27, encodes the C. elegans CDC16 ortholog. PMID:11134076

  19. Mutant p53-associated myosin-X upregulation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arjonen, Antti; Kaukonen, Riina; Mattila, Elina; Rouhi, Pegah; Högnäs, Gunilla; Sihto, Harri; Miller, Bryan W; Morton, Jennifer P; Bucher, Elmar; Taimen, Pekka; Virtakoivu, Reetta; Cao, Yihai; Sansom, Owen J; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2014-03-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor TP53 are present in many forms of human cancer and are associated with increased tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Several mechanisms have been identified for promoting dissemination of cancer cells with TP53 mutations, including increased targeting of integrins to the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate a role for the filopodia-inducing motor protein Myosin-X (Myo10) in mutant p53-driven cancer invasion. Analysis of gene expression profiles from 2 breast cancer data sets revealed that MYO10 was highly expressed in aggressive cancer subtypes. Myo10 was required for breast cancer cell invasion and dissemination in multiple cancer cell lines and murine models of cancer metastasis. Evaluation of a Myo10 mutant without the integrin-binding domain revealed that the ability of Myo10 to transport β₁ integrins to the filopodia tip is required for invasion. Introduction of mutant p53 promoted Myo10 expression in cancer cells and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice, whereas suppression of endogenous mutant p53 attenuated Myo10 levels and cell invasion. In clinical breast carcinomas, Myo10 was predominantly expressed at the invasive edges and correlated with the presence of TP53 mutations and poor prognosis. These data indicate that Myo10 upregulation in mutant p53-driven cancers is necessary for invasion and that plasma-membrane protrusions, such as filopodia, may serve as specialized metastatic engines.

  20. Computational design of a thermostable mutant of cocaine esterase via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2011-06-07

    Cocaine esterase (CocE) has been known as the most efficient native enzyme for metabolizing naturally occurring cocaine. A major obstacle to the clinical application of CocE is the thermoinstability of native CocE with a half-life of only ∼11 min at physiological temperature (37 °C). It is highly desirable to develop a thermostable mutant of CocE for therapeutic treatment of cocaine overdose and addiction. To establish a structure-thermostability relationship, we carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K on wild-type CocE and previously known thermostable mutants, demonstrating that the thermostability of the active form of the enzyme correlates with the fluctuation (characterized as the root-mean square deviation and root-mean square fluctuation of atomic positions) of the catalytic residues (Y44, S117, Y118, H287, and D259) in the simulated enzyme. In light of the structure-thermostability correlation, further computational modelling including MD simulations at 400 K predicted that the active site structure of the L169K mutant should be more thermostable. The prediction has been confirmed by wet experimental tests showing that the active form of the L169K mutant had a half-life of 570 min at 37 °C, which is significantly longer than those of the wild-type and previously known thermostable mutants. The encouraging outcome suggests that the high-temperature MD simulations and the structure-thermostability relationship may be considered as a valuable tool for the computational design of thermostable mutants of an enzyme.

  1. Computational Design of a Thermostable Mutant of Cocaine Esterase via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine esterase (CocE) has been known as the most efficient native enzyme for metabolizing the naturally occurring cocaine. A major obstacle to the clinical application of CocE is the thermoinstability of native CocE with a half-life of only ~11 min at physiological temperature (37°C). It is highly desirable to develop a thermostable mutant of CocE for therapeutic treatment of cocaine overdose and addiction. To establish a structure-thermostability relationship, we carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K on wild-type CocE and previously known thermostable mutants, demonstrating that the thermostability of the active form of the enzyme correlates with the fluctuation (characterized as the RMSD and RMSF of atomic positions) of the catalytic residues (Y44, S117, Y118, H287, and D259) in the simulated enzyme. In light of the structure-thermostability correlation, further computational modeling including MD simulations at 400 K predicted that the active site structure of the L169K mutant should be more thermostable. The prediction has been confirmed by wet experimental tests showing that the active form of the L169K mutant had a half-life of 570 min at 37°C, which is significantly longer than those of the wild-type and previously known thermostable mutants. The encouraging outcome suggests that the high-temperature MD simulations and the structure-thermostability may be considered as a valuable tool for computational design of thermostable mutants of an enzyme. PMID:21373712

  2. Perturbed glial scaffold formation precedes axon tract malformation in Drosophila mutants.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J R

    1993-05-01

    The longitudinal glia (LG), progeny of a single glioblast, form a scaffold that presages the formation of longitudinal tracts in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of the Drosophila embryo. The LG are used as a substrate during the extension of the first axons of the longitudinal tract. I have examined the differentiation of the LG in six mutations in which the longitudinal tracts were absent, displaced, or interrupted to determine whether the axon tract malformations may be attributable to disruptions in the LG scaffold. Embryos mutant for the gene prospero had no longitudinal tracts, and glial differentiation remained arrested at a preaxonogenic state. Two mutants of the Polycomb group also lacked longitudinal tracts; here the glia failed to form an oriented scaffold, but cytological differentiation of the LG was unperturbed. The longitudinal tracts in embryos mutant for slit fused at the VNC midline and scaffold formation was normal, except that it was medially displaced. Longitudinal tracts had intersegmental interruptions in embryos mutant for hindsight and midline. In hindsight, there were intersegmental gaps in the glial scaffold. In midline, the glial scaffold retracted after initial extension. LG morphogenesis during axonogenesis was abnormal in midline. Commitment to glial identity and glial differentiation also occurred before scaffold formation. In all mutants examined, the early distribution of the glycoprotein neuroglian was perturbed. This was indicative of early alterations in VNC pattern present before LG scaffold formation began. Therefore, some changes in scaffold formation may have reflected changes in the placement and differentiation of other cells of the VNC. In all mutants, alterations in scaffold formation preceded longitudinal axon tract formation.

  3. Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain of Chlamydomonas reinhardi VI. Electron Transport in Mutant Strains Lacking Either Cytochrome 553 or Plastocyanin 1

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Donald S.; Levine, R. P.

    1966-01-01

    A mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardi, ac-206, lacks cytochrome 553, at least in an active and detectable form. Chloroplast fragments of this mutant strain are inactive in the photoreduction of NADP when the source of electrons is water, but they are active when the electron source is 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and ascorbate. The addition of either cytochrome 553 or plastocyanin, obtained from the wild-type strain, has no effect upon the photosynthetic activities of the mutant strain. Cells of the mutant strain lack both the soluble and insoluble forms of cytochrome 553, but they possess the mitochondrial type cytochrome c. Thus, the loss of cytochrome 553 appears to be specific. Another mutant strain, ac-208, lacks plastocyanin, or possesses it in an inactive and undetectable form. Chloroplast fragments of ac-208 are inactive in the photoreduction of NADP with either water or 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and ascorbate as electron donors. However, these reactions are restored upon the addition of plastocyanin. The addition of cytochrome 553 has no effect. The measurement of light-induced absorbance changes with ac-208 reveal that, in the absence of plastocyanin, light fails to sensitize the oxidation of cytochrome 553, but it will sensitize its reduction. However, the addition of plastocyanin restores the light-induced cytochrome oxidation. A third mutant strain, ac-208 (sup.) carries a suppressor mutation that partially restores the wild phenotype. This mutant strain appears to possess a plastocyanin that is less stable than that of the wild-type strain. The observations with the mutant strains are discussed in terms of the sequence of electron transport System II → cytochrome 553 → plastocyanin → System I. PMID:16656453

  4. Some properties of three αB-crystallin mutants carrying point substitutions in the C-terminal domain and associated with congenital diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerasimovich, Evgeniia S; Strelkov, Sergei V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2017-11-01

    Physico-chemical properties of G154S, R157H and A171T mutants of αB-crystallin (HspB5) associated with congenital human diseases including certain myopathies and cataract were investigated. Oligomers formed by G154S and A171T mutants have the size and apparent molecular weight indistinguishable from those of the wild-type HspB5, whereas the size of oligomers formed by R157H mutant is slightly smaller. All mutants are less thermostable and start to aggregate at a lower temperature than the wild-type protein. All mutants effectively interact with a triple phosphomimicking mutant of HspB1 and form large heterooligomeric complexes of similar composition. All mutants interact with HspB6 forming heterooligomeric complexes with size and composition dependent on the molar ratio of two proteins. The wild-type HspB5 and its G154S and A171T mutants form only high molecular weight (300-450 kDa) heterooligomeric complexes with HspB6, whereas the R157H mutant forms both high and low (∼120 kDa) molecular weight complexes. The wild-type HspB5 and its G154S and A171T mutants form two types of heterooligomers with HspB4, whereas R157H mutant effectively forms only one type of heterooligomers with HspB4. G154S and A171T mutants have lower chaperone-like activity than the wild-type protein when subfragment S1 of myosin or β L -crystallin are used as a model substrates. With these substrates, the R157H mutant shows equal or higher chaperone activity than the wild-type HspB5. We hypothesize that the mutations in the C-terminal region modulate the binding of the IP(I/V) motif to the core α-crystallin domain. The R157H mutation is located in the immediate proximity of this motif. Such modulation could cause altered interaction of HspB5 with partners and substrates and eventually lead to pathological processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. RNA polymerase III mutants in TFIIFα-like C37 that cause terminator readthrough with no decrease in transcription output.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2013-01-07

    How eukaryotic RNA polymerases switch from elongation to termination is unknown. Pol III subunits Rpc53 and Rpc37 (C53/37) form a heterodimer homologous to TFIIFβ/α. C53/37 promotes efficient termination and together with C11 also mediates pol III recycling in vitro. We previously developed Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains that report on two pol III termination activities: RNA oligo(U) 3'-end cleavage, and terminator readthrough. We randomly mutagenized C53 and C37 and isolated many C37 mutants with terminator readthrough but no comparable C53 mutants. The majority of C37 mutants have strong phenotypes with up to 40% readthrough and map to a C-terminal tract previously localized near Rpc2p in the pol III active center while a minority represent a distinct class with weaker phenotype, less readthrough and 3'-oligo(U) lengthening. Nascent pre-tRNAs released from a terminator by C37 mutants have shorter 3'-oligo(U) tracts than in cleavage-deficient C11 double mutants indicating RNA 3'-end cleavage during termination. We asked whether termination deficiency affects transcription output in the mutants in vivo both by monitoring intron-containing nascent transcript levels and (14)C-uridine incorporation. Surprisingly, multiple termination mutants have no decrease in transcript output relative to controls. These data are discussed in context of current models of pol III transcription.

  6. RNA polymerase III mutants in TFIIFα-like C37 that cause terminator readthrough with no decrease in transcription output

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    How eukaryotic RNA polymerases switch from elongation to termination is unknown. Pol III subunits Rpc53 and Rpc37 (C53/37) form a heterodimer homologous to TFIIFβ/α. C53/37 promotes efficient termination and together with C11 also mediates pol III recycling in vitro. We previously developed Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains that report on two pol III termination activities: RNA oligo(U) 3′-end cleavage, and terminator readthrough. We randomly mutagenized C53 and C37 and isolated many C37 mutants with terminator readthrough but no comparable C53 mutants. The majority of C37 mutants have strong phenotypes with up to 40% readthrough and map to a C-terminal tract previously localized near Rpc2p in the pol III active center while a minority represent a distinct class with weaker phenotype, less readthrough and 3′-oligo(U) lengthening. Nascent pre-tRNAs released from a terminator by C37 mutants have shorter 3′-oligo(U) tracts than in cleavage-deficient C11 double mutants indicating RNA 3′-end cleavage during termination. We asked whether termination deficiency affects transcription output in the mutants in vivo both by monitoring intron-containing nascent transcript levels and 14C-uridine incorporation. Surprisingly, multiple termination mutants have no decrease in transcript output relative to controls. These data are discussed in context of current models of pol III transcription. PMID:23093604

  7. Imaginal Disc Abnormalities in Lethal Mutants of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Allen; Rice, Thomas; Garen, Alan; Gehring, Walter

    1971-01-01

    Late lethal mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, dying after the larval stage of development, were isolated. The homozygous mutant larvae were examined for abnormal imaginal disc morphology, and the discs were injected into normal larval hosts to test their capacities to differentiate into adult structures. In about half of the mutants analyzed, disc abnormalities were found. Included among the abnormalities were missing discs, small discs incapable of differentiating, morphologically normal discs with limited capacities for differentiation, and discs with homeotic transformations. In some mutants all discs were affected, and in others only certain discs. The most extreme abnormal phenotype is a class of “discless” mutants. The viability of these mutant larvae indicates that the discs are essential only for the development of an adult and not of a larva. The late lethals are therefore a major source of mutants for studying the genetic control of disc formation. Images PMID:5002822

  8. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    MA). pLPC-12S coexpresses an E1A 12S cDNA with puromycin phosphotransferase (puro) and pWZL-12S coexpresses E1A with hygromycin phospho...expressing puromycin phosphotransferase (puro); LPC-12S, a 12S El A cDNA in LPC (McCurrach et al. 1997); LPC-12S.AN and LPC-12S.ACR2, El A mutants that...2, -3, conserved regions 1, 2, and 3; MEF, mouse embryonic fibroblast; puro, puromycin; hygro, hygromycin . To whom reprint requests should be

  9. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsyama@restaff.chiba-u.jp

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusionmore » of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.« less

  10. Characterization of Russell bodies accumulating mutant antithrombin derived from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koji; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Ueda, Yumiko; Arai, Seisuke; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Wada, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) adjusts its size and architecture to adapt to change in the surrounding environment. Russell bodies (RBs) were originally described as dilated structures of the ER cisternae containing large amounts of mutant immunoglobulin. Similar structures are observed in a wide variety of mutant proteins accumulated in the ER. We previously prepared Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in which the expression of mutant antithrombin (AT) (C95R) was controlled with a Tet-On system and showed that RBs can be conditionally formed. However the precise architecture and intracellular behavior of RBs have been as yet only poorly characterized. To characterize the properties of RB, we prepared the same system using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused mutant and measured the dynamics and architecture of RBs. We observed the mobile nature of the molecule in the RB lumen and RBs were separated from the rest of the ER network by narrow tubes. Furthermore, we found that the RBs were not simply expanded ER membranes. The RB lumen is filled with misfolded proteins that are surrounded by ER membranes. In addition, RBs mostly maintain their structure during cell division, possess ribosomes on their membranes and synthesize AT(C95R)-GFP. Based on the characterization of the hydrodynamic radius of AT(C95R)-GFP and the effect of DP1, an ER-shaping protein, we propose that RBs are spontaneously formed as a result of the partitioning of the misfolded AT with the shaping protein.

  11. Conformational and hydration properties modulate ice recognition by type I antifreeze protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Jana, Biman

    2017-05-10

    The mechanism of ice recognition by antifreeze protein (AFP) is a topic of recent interest. Here, using equilibrium simulations and free energy calculations, we provide structural rationale to the observed experimental anomalies on type I AFP (wfAFP isoform HPLC6) and its mutants as well as probe the molecular origin of ice recognition by them. Our results clearly demonstrate that the interplay between the conformational and hydration properties dictates the ice binding ability of type I AFP and its mutants. We find that HPLC6 exists as a highly stable long helix which adsorbs on the ice surface through the ordered water cages around the CH 3 group of threonine (THR) residues, rather than directly binding to the ice surface via threonine (THR) through hydrogen bonding. Upon mutating THR with serine (SER), the straight helix conformation of HPLC6 disappears and the most stable conformation is a kinked helix devoid of ice binding ability. Free energy calculations reveal that there is a dynamic equilibrium between straight and bent helical conformations in the case of a valine (VAL) mutant. The straight long helical form of the VAL mutant also has the ability to form an ordered water cage structure around the CH 3 groups of the VAL residues and thereby efficiently adsorbs on an ice plane similar to the wild type AFP.

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  13. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  14. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  15. Molecular characterization of baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus polyhedron mutants.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, S; Noguchi, Y; Shimada, T; Nagata, M; Kobayashi, M; Maeda, S

    1999-01-01

    Four newly isolated and two previously isolated polyhedron mutants of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) were studied. Two polyhedron deficient mutants, #126 and #136, produced small uncrystallized particles of polyhedrin in the nuclei and cytoplasm of infected cells. Mutant #211 produced a large number of variably sized polyhedra in the nucleus and #220 produced a few large cuboidal polyhedra in the nucleus. Mutant #24 and #128 were previously isolated BmNPV mutants. Mutant #24 could not produce polyhedrin mRNA and polyhedra produced by mutant #128 lacked oral infectivity. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that five mutants (#126, #136, #211, #220 and #128) had amino acid substitutions in polyhedrin and mutant #24 had a point mutation only in the promoter region of the polyhedrin gene. Cotransfection experiments showed that the altered phenotypes were due to the mutations found in the polyhedrin gene regions. In mutants #126 and #136, amino acid sequences of the nuclear localization signal of polyhedrin were identical to those of wild-type BmNPV, suggesting that this sequence was necessary but not sufficient for nuclear localization of polyhedrin. Electron microscopic observation revealed that fewer occluded virions were contained in polyhedra of #128 and #220.

  16. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsivenessmore » to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.« less

  17. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  18. Shallow boomerang-shaped influenza hemagglutinin G13A mutant structure promotes leaky membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Alex L; Tamm, Lukas K

    2010-11-26

    Our previous studies showed that an angled boomerang-shaped structure of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) fusion domain is critical for virus entry into host cells by membrane fusion. Because the acute angle of ∼105° of the wild-type fusion domain promotes efficient non-leaky membrane fusion, we asked whether different angles would still support fusion and thus facilitate virus entry. Here, we show that the G13A fusion domain mutant produces a new leaky fusion phenotype. The mutant fusion domain structure was solved by NMR spectroscopy in a lipid environment at fusion pH. The mutant adopted a boomerang structure similar to that of wild type but with a shallower kink angle of ∼150°. G13A perturbed the structure of model membranes to a lesser degree than wild type but to a greater degree than non-fusogenic fusion domain mutants. The strength of G13A binding to lipid bilayers was also intermediate between that of wild type and non-fusogenic mutants. These membrane interactions provide a clear link between structure and function of influenza fusion domains: an acute angle is required to promote clean non-leaky fusion suitable for virus entry presumably by interaction of the fusion domain with the transmembrane domain deep in the lipid bilayer. A shallower angle perturbs the bilayer of the target membrane so that it becomes leaky and unable to form a clean fusion pore. Mutants with no fixed boomerang angle interacted with bilayers weakly and did not promote any fusion or membrane perturbation.

  19. Shallow Boomerang-shaped Influenza Hemagglutinin G13A Mutant Structure Promotes Leaky Membrane Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an angled boomerang-shaped structure of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) fusion domain is critical for virus entry into host cells by membrane fusion. Because the acute angle of ∼105° of the wild-type fusion domain promotes efficient non-leaky membrane fusion, we asked whether different angles would still support fusion and thus facilitate virus entry. Here, we show that the G13A fusion domain mutant produces a new leaky fusion phenotype. The mutant fusion domain structure was solved by NMR spectroscopy in a lipid environment at fusion pH. The mutant adopted a boomerang structure similar to that of wild type but with a shallower kink angle of ∼150°. G13A perturbed the structure of model membranes to a lesser degree than wild type but to a greater degree than non-fusogenic fusion domain mutants. The strength of G13A binding to lipid bilayers was also intermediate between that of wild type and non-fusogenic mutants. These membrane interactions provide a clear link between structure and function of influenza fusion domains: an acute angle is required to promote clean non-leaky fusion suitable for virus entry presumably by interaction of the fusion domain with the transmembrane domain deep in the lipid bilayer. A shallower angle perturbs the bilayer of the target membrane so that it becomes leaky and unable to form a clean fusion pore. Mutants with no fixed boomerang angle interacted with bilayers weakly and did not promote any fusion or membrane perturbation. PMID:20826788

  20. ALS mutant SOD1 interacts with G3BP1 and affects stress granule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jozsef; Kuang, Lisha; Barnett, Kelly R; Zhu, Brian Z; Shissler, Susannah C; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Hayward, Lawrence J; Kasarskis, Edward J; Zhu, Haining

    2016-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are responsible for approximately 20 % of the familial ALS cases. ALS-causing SOD1 mutants display a gain-of-toxicity phenotype, but the nature of this toxicity is still not fully understood. The Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein G3BP1 plays a critical role in stress granule dynamics. Alterations in the dynamics of stress granules have been reported in several other forms of ALS unrelated to SOD1. To our surprise, the mutant G93A SOD1 transgenic mice exhibited pathological cytoplasmic inclusions that co-localized with G3BP1-positive granules in spinal cord motor neurons. The co-localization was also observed in fibroblast cells derived from familial ALS patient carrying SOD1 mutation L144F. Mutant SOD1, unlike wild-type SOD1, interacted with G3BP1 in an RNA-independent manner. Moreover, the interaction is specific for G3BP1 since mutant SOD1 showed little interaction with four other RNA-binding proteins implicated in ALS. The RNA-binding RRM domain of G3BP1 and two particular phenylalanine residues (F380 and F382) are critical for this interaction. Mutant SOD1 delayed the formation of G3BP1- and TIA1-positive stress granules in response to hyperosmolar shock and arsenite treatment in N2A cells. In summary, the aberrant mutant SOD1-G3BP1 interaction affects stress granule dynamics, suggesting a potential link between pathogenic SOD1 mutations and RNA metabolism alterations in ALS.

  1. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    PubMed

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J; Kijek, Todd K; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  2. A Yersinia pestis tat Mutant Is Attenuated in Bubonic and Small-Aerosol Pneumonic Challenge Models of Infection but Not As Attenuated by Intranasal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K.; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J.; Kijek, Todd K.; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G.; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge. PMID:25101850

  3. Genetic requirements for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlašić, Ignacija; Šimatović, Ana; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2011-09-01

    The RecA protein in its functional state is in complex with single-stranded DNA, i.e., in the form of a RecA filament. In SOS induction, the RecA filament functions as a coprotease, enabling the autodigestion of the LexA repressor. The RecA filament can be formed by different mechanisms, but all of them require three enzymatic activities essential for the processing of DNA double-stranded ends. These are helicase, 5'-3' exonuclease, and RecA loading onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). In some mutants, the SOS response can be expressed constitutively during the process of normal DNA metabolism. The RecA730 mutant protein is able to form the RecA filament without the help of RecBCD and RecFOR mediators since it better competes with the single-strand binding (SSB) protein for ssDNA. As a consequence, the recA730 mutants show high constitutive SOS expression. In the study described in this paper, we studied the genetic requirements for constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants. Using a β-galactosidase assay, we showed that the constitutive SOS response in recA730 mutants exhibits different requirements in different backgrounds. In a wild-type background, the constitutive SOS response is partially dependent on RecBCD function. In a recB1080 background (the recB1080 mutation retains only helicase), constitutive SOS expression is partially dependent on RecBCD helicase function and is strongly dependent on RecJ nuclease. Finally, in a recB-null background, the constitutive SOS expression of the recA730 mutant is dependent on the RecJ nuclease. Our results emphasize the importance of the 5'-3' exonuclease for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants and show that RecBCD function can further enhance the excellent intrinsic abilities of the RecA730 protein in vivo. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. An Analysis of Interactions between Fluorescently-Tagged Mutant and Wild-Type SOD1 in Intracellular Inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Qualls, David A.; Crosby, Keith; Brown, Hilda; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background By mechanisms yet to be discerned, the co-expression of high levels of wild-type human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) with variants of hSOD1 encoding mutations linked familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) hastens the onset of motor neuron degeneration in transgenic mice. Although it is known that spinal cords of paralyzed mice accumulate detergent insoluble forms of WT hSOD1 along with mutant hSOD1, it has been difficult to determine whether there is co-deposition of the proteins in inclusion structures. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we use cell culture models of mutant SOD1 aggregation, focusing on the A4V, G37R, and G85R variants, to examine interactions between WT-hSOD1 and misfolded mutant SOD1. In these studies, we fuse WT and mutant proteins to either yellow or red fluorescent protein so that the two proteins can be distinguished within inclusions structures. Conclusions/Significance Although the interpretation of the data is not entirely straightforward because we have strong evidence that the nature of the fused fluorophores affects the organization of the inclusions that form, our data are most consistent with the idea that normal dimeric WT-hSOD1 does not readily interact with misfolded forms of mutant hSOD1. We also demonstrate the monomerization of WT-hSOD1 by experimental mutation does induce the protein to aggregate, although such monomerization may enable interactions with misfolded mutant SOD1. Our data suggest that WT-hSOD1 is not prone to become intimately associated with misfolded mutant hSOD1 within intracellular inclusions that can be generated in cultured cells. PMID:24391857

  5. Effect of CCS on the Accumulation of FALS SOD1 Mutant-containing Aggregates and on Mitochondrial Translocation of SOD1 Mutants: Implication of a Free Radical Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Kun; Chung, Youn Wook; Chock, P. Boon; Yim, Moon B.

    2011-01-01

    Missense mutations of SOD1 are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) through a yet-to-be identified toxic-gain-of-function. One of the proposed mechanisms involves enhanced aggregate formation. However, a recent study showed that dual transgenic mice overexpressing both G93A and CCS copper chaperone (G93A/CCS) exhibit no SOD1-positive aggregates yet show accelerated FALS symptoms with enhanced mitochondrial pathology compared to G93A mice. Using a dicistronic mRNA to simultaneously generate hSOD1 mutants, G93A, A4V and G85R, and hCCS in AAV293 cells, we revealed: (i) CCS is degraded primarily via a macroautophagy pathway. It forms a stable heterodimer with inactive G85R, and via its novel copper chaperone-independent molecular chaperone activity facilitates G85R degradation via a macroautophagy-mediated pathway. For active G93A and A4V, CCS catalyzes their maturation to form active and soluble homodimers. (ii) CCS reduces, under non-oxidative conditions, yet facilitates in the presence of H2O2, mitochondrial translocation of inactive SOD1 mutants. These results, together with previous reports showing FALS SOD1 mutants enhanced free radical-generating activity, provide a mechanistic explanation for the observations with G93A/CCS dual transgenic mice and suggest that free radical generation by FALS SOD1, enhanced by CCS, may, in part, be responsible for the FALS SOD1 mutant-linked aggregation, mitochondrial translocation, and degradation. PMID:21354101

  6. Effect of CCS on the accumulation of FALS SOD1 mutant-containing aggregates and on mitochondrial translocation of SOD1 mutants: implication of a free radical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Kun; Chung, Youn Wook; Chock, P Boon; Yim, Moon B

    2011-05-15

    Missense mutations of SOD1 are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) through a yet-to-be identified toxic-gain-of-function. One of the proposed mechanisms involves enhanced aggregate formation. However, a recent study showed that dual transgenic mice overexpressing both G93A and CCS copper chaperone (G93A/CCS) exhibit no SOD1-positive aggregates yet show accelerated FALS symptoms with enhanced mitochondrial pathology compared to G93A mice. Using a dicistronic mRNA to simultaneously generate hSOD1 mutants, G93A, A4V and G85R, and hCCS in AAV293 cells, we revealed: (i) CCS is degraded primarily via a macroautophagy pathway. It forms a stable heterodimer with inactive G85R, and via its novel copper chaperone-independent molecular chaperone activity facilitates G85R degradation via a macroautophagy-mediated pathway. For active G93A and A4V, CCS catalyzes their maturation to form active and soluble homodimers. (ii) CCS reduces, under non-oxidative conditions, yet facilitates in the presence of H(2)O(2), mitochondrial translocation of inactive SOD1 mutants. These results, together with previous reports showing FALS SOD1 mutants enhanced free radical-generating activity, provide a mechanistic explanation for the observations with G93A/CCS dual transgenic mice and suggest that free radical generation by FALS SOD1, enhanced by CCS, may, in part, be responsible for the FALS SOD1 mutant-linked aggregation, mitochondrial translocation, and degradation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina Politi...CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Phenotypic changes have been observed in EGFR mutant lung cancers that become resistant to targeted

  8. Chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dusenbery, D B; Sheridan, R E; Russell, R L

    1975-06-01

    The technique of countercurrent separation has been used to isolate 17 independent chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants, selected to be relatively insensitive to the normally attractive salt NaCl, show varying degrees of residual sensitivity; some are actually weakly repelled by NaCl. The mutants are due to single gene defects, are autosomal and recessive, and identify at least five complementation groups.

  9. Plasmodium yoelii: induction of attenuated mutants by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Waki, S.; Yonome, I.; Suzuki, M.

    When erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis, which is invariably fatal in mice, were exposed to X rays, the dose to reduce surviving parasites to one millionth was 100 gray (10 Krad). A suspension of 5 X 10(6) per ml of parasitized erythrocyte was irradiated at 100 gray, and 0.2 ml aliquots were inoculated into 22 mice. Eleven mice showed patent parasitemia, and in these the growth curves were less steep than that found in nonirradiated parasites. The infections of 8 mice of the 11 were self-resolving, and the attenuated feature of the parasites maintained following a limited number ofmore » blood passages. The parasites were slowly growing even in nude mice and cause self-resolving infections in intact mice. BALB/c mice immunized with the attenuated parasites were protected against subsequent challenge infections with the original virulent erythrocytic and sporogonic forms. These findings indicate that attenuated mutants of malaria parasites can be readily induced by this method.« less

  10. [Construction and stress tolerance of trehalase mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Lv, Ye; Xiao, Dongguang; He, Dongqin; Guo, Xuewu

    2008-10-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is critical in improving the stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two enzymes are capable of hydrolyzing trehalose: a neutral trehalase (NTH1) and an acidic trehalase (ATH1). We constructed trehalase disruption mutants to provide a basis for future commercial application. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cell, we constructed diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Deltanth1), acid trehalase mutants (Deltaath1) and double mutants (Deltaath1Deltanth1) by using gene disruption. We tested mutants'trehalose content and their tolerance to freezing, heat, high-sugar and ethanol concentrations. These trehalase disruption mutants were further confirmed by PCR amplification and southern blot. All mutant strains accumulated higher levels of cellular trehalose and grew to a higher cell density than the isogenic parent strain. In addition, the levels of trehalose in these mutants correlated with increased tolerance to freezing, heat, high-sugar and ethanol concentration. The improved tolerance of trehalase mutants may make them useful in commercial applications, including baking and brewing protein.

  11. Characterization and classification of zebrafish brain morphology mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Laura Anne; De Rienzo, Gianluca; Gutzman, Jennifer H.; Sive, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the vertebrate brain achieves its three-dimensional structure are clearly complex, requiring the functions of many genes. Using the zebrafish as a model, we have begun to define genes required for brain morphogenesis, including brain ventricle formation, by studying 16 mutants previously identified as having embryonic brain morphology defects. We report the phenotypic characterization of these mutants at several time-points, using brain ventricle dye injection, imaging, and immunohistochemistry with neuronal markers. Most of these mutants display early phenotypes, affecting initial brain shaping, while others show later phenotypes, affecting brain ventricle expansion. In the early phenotype group, we further define four phenotypic classes and corresponding functions required for brain morphogenesis. Although we did not use known genotypes for this classification, basing it solely on phenotypes, many mutants with defects in functionally related genes clustered in a single class. In particular, class 1 mutants show midline separation defects, corresponding to epithelial junction defects; class 2 mutants show reduced brain ventricle size; class 3 mutants show midbrain-hindbrain abnormalities, corresponding to basement membrane defects; and class 4 mutants show absence of ventricle lumen inflation, corresponding to defective ion pumping. Later brain ventricle expansion requires the extracellular matrix, cardiovascular circulation, and transcription/splicing-dependent events. We suggest that these mutants define processes likely to be used during brain morphogenesis throughout the vertebrates. PMID:19051268

  12. Isolation of ntrA-like mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Santero, E; Luque, F; Medina, J R; Tortolero, M

    1986-01-01

    A number of chlorate-resistant mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii affected in a general control of nitrogen metabolism were isolated. These mutants could not utilize dinitrogen, nitrate, or nitrite as a nitrogen source. The reason for this inability is that they were simultaneously deficient in nitrogenase and nitrate and nitrite reductase activities. They were complemented by a cosmid carrying a DNA fragment of A. vinelandii able to complement ntrA mutants of Escherichia coli, so they seemed to be ntrA-like mutants. PMID:3009406

  13. Diaminopurine-Resistant Mutants of Cultured, Diploid Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Harriet; DeMars, Robert

    1973-01-01

    Clones of cells resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine were detected in skin fibroblast cultures derived from 13 of 21 normal humans of both sexes from 17 unrelated families. Almost all of the cultures that yielded mutants were chosen for further study from among a total of 83 surveyed because they displayed a slight resistance to low concentrations of diaminopurine. The incidences of mutant colonies ranged between about 10-5 and 10-4 per cell surviving prior mutagenic treatment with MNNG. The incidences of spontaneous mutants were about 10-7 to 10-5 in three unrelated cultures. Most independent mutants had distinctly reduced activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase but some had apparently normal amounts of activity. Two mutants from unrelated boys had little or no detectable enzyme activity and were unable to effectively use exogenous adenine for growth when purine biosynthesis was blocked with azaserine. Most mutants could utilize exogenous adenine, just as most azaguanine-resistant fibroblast mutants can utilize exogenous hypoxanthine, even when their hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity is reduced. Diverse genetic changes conferred diaminopurine resistance but their specific natures are still undefined. Gross numerical or structural chromosome abnormalities were not observed in the mutants examined so far. Since at least one gene responsible for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity is on autosome No. 16 our results suggest that at least some of the cultures yielding mutants were heterozygous and that alleles conferring diaminopurine resistance may be frequent enough to comprise a polymorphism. PMID:4358687

  14. Correlation between in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo lethal activity in mice of epsilon toxin mutants from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Pauillac, Serge; Díaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Popoff, Michel R; Blasi, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) from Clostridium perfringens is a pore-forming protein with a lethal effect on livestock, producing severe enterotoxemia characterized by general edema and neurological alterations. Site-specific mutations of the toxin are valuable tools to study the cellular and molecular mechanism of the toxin activity. In particular, mutants with paired cysteine substitutions that affect the membrane insertion domain behaved as dominant-negative inhibitors of toxin activity in MDCK cells. We produced similar mutants, together with a well-known non-toxic mutant (Etx-H106P), as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to perform in vivo studies in an acutely intoxicated mouse model. The mutant (GFP-Etx-I51C/A114C) had a lethal effect with generalized edema, and accumulated in the brain parenchyma due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the renal system, this mutant had a cytotoxic effect on distal tubule epithelial cells. The other mutants studied (GFP-Etx-V56C/F118C and GFP-Etx-H106P) did not have a lethal effect or cross the BBB, and failed to induce a cytotoxic effect on renal epithelial cells. These data suggest a direct correlation between the lethal effect of the toxin, with its cytotoxic effect on the kidney distal tubule cells, and the ability to cross the BBB.

  15. Correlation between In Vitro Cytotoxicity and In Vivo Lethal Activity in Mice of Epsilon Toxin Mutants from Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Pauillac, Serge; Díaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Popoff, Michel R.; Blasi, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) from Clostridium perfringens is a pore-forming protein with a lethal effect on livestock, producing severe enterotoxemia characterized by general edema and neurological alterations. Site-specific mutations of the toxin are valuable tools to study the cellular and molecular mechanism of the toxin activity. In particular, mutants with paired cysteine substitutions that affect the membrane insertion domain behaved as dominant-negative inhibitors of toxin activity in MDCK cells. We produced similar mutants, together with a well-known non-toxic mutant (Etx-H106P), as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to perform in vivo studies in an acutely intoxicated mouse model. The mutant (GFP-Etx-I51C/A114C) had a lethal effect with generalized edema, and accumulated in the brain parenchyma due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the renal system, this mutant had a cytotoxic effect on distal tubule epithelial cells. The other mutants studied (GFP-Etx-V56C/F118C and GFP-Etx-H106P) did not have a lethal effect or cross the BBB, and failed to induce a cytotoxic effect on renal epithelial cells. These data suggest a direct correlation between the lethal effect of the toxin, with its cytotoxic effect on the kidney distal tubule cells, and the ability to cross the BBB. PMID:25013927

  16. Isolation and characterization of mutants with lesions affecting pellicle formation and erythrocyte agglutination by type 1 piliated Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, S L; Elliott, D A; Blake, M C; Must, L M; Messenger, M; Orndorff, P E

    1990-01-01

    The product of the pilE (also called fimH) gene is a minor component of type 1 pili in Escherichia coli. Mutants that have insertions in the pilE gene are fully piliated but unable to bind to and agglutinate guinea pig erythrocytes, a characteristic of wild-type type 1 piliated E. coli. In this paper we describe the isolation of 48 mutants with point lesions that map to the pilE gene. Such mutants were isolated by using mutT mutagenesis and an enrichment procedure devised to favor the growth of individuals that could form a pellicle in static broth containing alpha-methylmannoside, an inhibitor of erythrocyte binding and pellicle formation. Results indicated that the enrichment favored mutants expressing pilE gene products that were defective in mediating erythrocyte binding. Characterization of 12 of the mutants in greater detail revealed that certain lesions affected pilus number and length. In addition, a mutant that was temperature sensitive for erythrocyte binding was isolated and used to provide evidence that pellicle formation relies on the intercellular interaction of pilE gene products. Our results suggest a molecular explanation for the old and paradoxical observations connecting pellicle formation and erythrocyte agglutination by type 1 piliated E. coli. Images PMID:1977736

  17. Limits of transforming competence of SV40 nuclear and cytoplasmic large T mutants with altered Rb binding sequences.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, D; Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1993-03-01

    Multiple amino acid substitutions were introduced into the SV40 large T region that harbors the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) binding site and the nuclear transport signal, changing either one or both of these determinants. Mutant activities were examined in a set of assays allowing different levels of transforming potential to be distinguished; phenotypic changes in established and pre-crisis rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) were detected under isogenic cell conditions, and comparisons made with other established rodent cells. The limit of the transforming ability of mutants with important substitutions in the Rb binding site fell between two transformation levels of the same established rat cells. Such cells could be induced to form dense foci but not agar colonies (their parental pre-crises REFs, as expected, were untransformed either way). Nonetheless, agar colony induction was possible in other cell lines, such as mouse NIH3T3 and (for one of the mutants) rat F2408. All these mutants efficiently immortalized pre-crisis REFs. The transforming ability of cytoplasmic mutants appeared to depend on the integrity of the Rb-binding sequence to approximately the same extent as that of the wild-type large T, although evidence of in vivo Rb-cytoplasmic large T complexes was not found. The presence or absence of small t was critical when the transforming task of mutants was near the limit of their abilities.

  18. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Identification of Vitis vinifera L. grape berry skin color mutants and polyphenolic profile.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vanessa; Fernandes, Fátima; Pinto-Carnide, Olinda; Valentão, Patrícia; Falco, Virgílio; Martín, Juan Pedro; Ortiz, Jesús María; Arroyo-García, Rosa; Andrade, Paula B; Castro, Isaura

    2016-03-01

    A germplasm set of twenty-five grapevine accessions, forming eleven groups of possible berry skin color mutants, were genotyped with twelve microsatellite loci, being eleven of them identified as true color mutants. The polyphenolic profiling of the confirmed mutant cultivars revealed a total of twenty-four polyphenols, comprising non-colored compounds (phenolic acids, flavan-3-ols, flavonols and a stilbene) and anthocyanins. Results showed differences in the contribution of malvidin-3-O-glucoside to the characteristic Pinot Noir anthocyanins profile. Regarding the two Pique-Poul colored variants, the lighter variant was richer than the darker one in all classes of compounds, excepting anthocyanins. In Moscatel Galego Roxo the F3'H pathway seems to be more active than F3'5'H, resulting in higher amounts of cyanidin, precursor of the cyanidin derivatives. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that a relationship between the content of polyphenolic compounds is established in groups of grape berry skin color mutant cultivars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons promotes the onset and progression of ALS in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cao; Tong, Jianbin; Bi, Fangfang; Zhou, Hongxia; Xia, Xu-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration, which ultimately leads to paralysis and death. Mutation of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been linked to the development of an inherited form of ALS. Existing TDP-43 transgenic animals develop a limited loss of motor neurons and therefore do not faithfully reproduce the core phenotype of ALS. Here, we report the creation of multiple lines of transgenic rats in which expression of ALS-associated mutant human TDP-43 is restricted to either motor neurons or other types of neurons and skeletal muscle and can be switched on and off. All of these rats developed progressive paralysis reminiscent of ALS when the transgene was switched on. Rats expressing mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons alone lost more spinal motor neurons than rats expressing the disease gene in varying neurons and muscle cells, although these rats all developed remarkable denervation atrophy of skeletal muscles. Intriguingly, progression of the disease was halted after transgene expression was switched off; in rats with limited loss of motor neurons, we observed a dramatic recovery of motor function, but in rats with profound loss of motor neurons, we only observed a moderate recovery of motor function. Our finding suggests that mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons is sufficient to promote the onset and progression of ALS and that motor neuron degeneration is partially reversible, at least in mutant TDP-43 transgenic rats. PMID:22156203

  1. A mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis defective in the biosynthesis of mycolic acids accumulates meromycolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Mycolic acids are a major constituent of the mycobacterial cell wall, and they form an effective permeability barrier to protect mycobacteria from antimicrobial agents. Although the chemical structures of mycolic acids are well established, little is known on their biosynthesis. We have isolated a mycolate-deficient mutant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155 by chemical mutagenesis followed by screening for increased sensitivity to novobiocin. This mutant also was hypersensitive to other hydrophobic compounds such as crystal violet, rifampicin, and erythromycin. Entry of hydrophobic probes into mutant cells occurred much more rapidly than that into the wild-type cells. HPLC and TLC analysis of fatty acid composition after saponification showed that the mutant failed to synthesize full-length mycolic acids. Instead, it accumulated a series of long-chain fatty acids, which were not detected in the wild-type strain. Analysis by 1H NMR, electrospray and electron impact mass spectroscopy, and permanganate cleavage of double bonds showed that these compounds corresponded to the incomplete meromycolate chain of mycolic acids, except for the presence of a β-hydroxyl group. This direct identification of meromycolates as precursors of mycolic acids provides a strong support for the previously proposed pathway for mycolic acid biosynthesis involving the separate synthesis of meromycolate chain and the α-branch of mycolic acids, followed by the joining of these two branches. PMID:10097154

  2. Prevalence of precore-defective mutant of hepatitis B virus in HBV carriers.

    PubMed

    Niitsuma, H; Ishii, M; Saito, Y; Miura, M; Kobayashi, K; Ohori, H; Toyota, T

    1995-08-01

    Two hundred and seventy-three serum specimens from hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers were examined for the presence of a characteristic one point mutation at nucleotide (nt) 1896 from the EcoRI site of the HBV genome in the precore region (the preC mutant) using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. This assay approach could detect preC mutants or wild-type sequences when either form constituted more than 10% of the total sample. Overall, 65.5% (76/116) of HBeAg-positive carriers had only the preC wild-type. All HBeAg-positive asymptomatic carriers (n = 14) had only the preC wild-type. In patients with chronic hepatitis B and in anti-HBe-positive asymptomatic carriers, increased prevalence of the preC mutant was associated with the development of anti-HBe antibodies and normalization of the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration. Furthermore, 27 (29.0%) of 93 HBeAg-negative carriers had unexpectedly preC wild-type sequences only. Direct sequencing of the HBV precore region of HBV specimens from 24 patients revealed no mutation at nt 1896, supporting the specificity of the RFLP analysis. These results suggest that RFLP analysis was accurate for the detection of the preC mutation and that the absence of serum HBeAg cannot be explained solely by the dominance of the preC mutant.

  3. Molecular mechanism of action of pharmacoperone rescue of misrouted GPCR mutants: the GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Patny, Akshay; Mosley, Ralph; Goulet, Mark T; Altman, Michael D; Rush, Thomas S; Cornea, Anda; Conn, P Michael

    2009-02-01

    The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR), a G protein-coupled receptor, is a useful model for studying pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones), drugs that rescue misfolded and misrouted protein mutants and restore them to function. This technique forms the basis of a therapeutic approach of rescuing mutants associated with human disease and restoring them to function. The present study relies on computational modeling, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, assessment of ligand binding, effector activation, and confocal microscopy. Our results show that two different chemical classes of pharmacoperones act to stabilize hGnRHR mutants by bridging residues D(98) and K(121). This ligand-mediated bridge serves as a surrogate for a naturally occurring and highly conserved salt bridge (E(90)-K(121)) that stabilizes the relation between transmembranes 2 and 3, which is required for passage of the receptor through the cellular quality control system and to the plasma membrane. Our model was used to reveal important pharmacophoric features, and then identify a novel chemical ligand, which was able to rescue a D(98) mutant of the hGnRHR that could not be rescued as effectively by previously known pharmacoperones.

  4. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K.; Quinn, William G.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  5. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII andmore » of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.« less

  6. Functional determinants of ras interference 1 mutants required for their inhbitory activity on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, Adriana; Giambini, Hugo; Villasana, Zoilmar

    In this study, we initiated experiments to address the structure-function relationship of Rin1. A total of ten substitute mutations were created, and their effects on Rin1 function were examined. Of the ten mutants, four of them (P541A, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were defective in Rab5 binding, while two other Rin1 mutants (D537A, Y561F) partially interacted with Rab5. Mutations in several other residues (Y506F, Y523F, T572A, Y578F) resulted in partial loss of Rab5 function. Biochemical studies showed that six of them (D537A, P541A, Y561F, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were unable to activate Rab5 in an in vitro assay. In addition, Rin1: D537A andmore » Rin1: Y561F mutants showed dominant inhibition of Rab5 function. Consistent with the biochemical studies, we observed that these two Rin1 mutants have lost their ability to stimulate the endocytosis of EGF, form enlarged Rab5-positive endosomes, or support in vitro endosome fusion. Based on these data, our results showed that mutations in the Vps9 domain of Rin1 lead to a loss-of-function phenotype, indicating a specific structure-function relationship between Rab5 and Rin1.« less

  7. Isolation, characterization, and complementation of a motility mutant of Spiroplasma citri.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, C; Nouzières, F; Duret, S; Bové, J M; Renaudin, J

    1997-01-01

    The helical mollicute Spiroplasma citri, when growing on low-agar medium, forms fuzzy colonies with occasional surrounding satellite colonies due to the ability of the spiroplasmal cells to move through the agar matrix. In liquid medium, these helical organisms flex, twist, and rotate rapidly. By using Tn4001 insertion mutagenesis, a motility mutant was isolated on the basis of its nondiffuse, sharp-edged colonies. Dark-field microscopy observations revealed that the organism flexed at a low frequency and had lost the ability to rotate about the helix axis. In this mutant, the transposon was shown to be inserted into an open reading frame encoding a putative polypeptide of 409 amino acids for which no significant homology with known proteins was found. The corresponding gene, named scm1, was recovered from the wild-type strain and introduced into the motility mutant by using the S. citri oriC plasmid pBOT1 as the vector. The appearance of fuzzy colonies and the observation that spiroplasma cells displayed rotatory and flexional movements showed the motile phenotype to be restored in the spiroplasmal transformants. The functional complementation of the motility mutant proves the scm1 gene product to be involved in the motility mechanism of S. citri. PMID:9244268

  8. Use of an otolith-deficient mutant in studies of fish behavior in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, K.; Mizuno, R.; Eguchi, H.

    2003-10-01

    The mutant strain ( ha) of medaka ( Oryzias latipes) lack utricular otoliths as fry, and some never form otoliths for life. The cross (Fl generation) between the strain having good eyesight and another strain having ordinary eyesight augmented visual acuity of the Fl generation. Crossing the good eyesight strain and ha mutant produced fish having good eyesight and less sensitivity to gravity in the F2 population. Their tolerance to microgravity was tested by parabolic flight using an airplane. The fish exhibited less looping and no differences in degree of looping between light and dark conditions, suggesting that loss of eyesight (in darkness) is not a direct cause for looping behavior in microgravity. The ha embryos could not form utricular otoliths. They did form saccular otoliths, but with a delay. Fry of the mutant fish lacking the utricular otoliths are highly dependent on light upon hatching and exhibit a perfect dorsal-light response (DLR). As they grow, they eventually shift from being light-dependent to being gravity-dependent. Continuous treatment of the fry with altered light direction suppressed this shift to gravity dependence. Being less dependent on gravity, these fish can serve as models in studying the differences expected for the vestibular system of fish reared in microgravity. When these fish were exposed to microgravity (parabolic flights) of an airplane, they spent far less time looping than fish reared in an ordinary light regimen.

  9. Synthesis of bacteriophage phiC DNA in dna mutants of Esherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, K I; Taketo, A

    1978-06-01

    Host dna functions involved in the replication of microvirid phage phiC DNA were investigated in vivo. Although growth of this phage was markedly inhibited even at 35-37 degrees C even in dna+ host, conversion of the infecting single-stranded DNA into the double-stranded parental replicative form (stage I synthesis) occurred normally at 43 degrees C in dna+, dnaA, dnaB, dnaC(D), and dnaE cells. In dnaG mutant, the stage I synthesis was severely inhibited at 43 degrees C but not at 30 degrees C. The stage I replication of phiC DNA was clearly thermosensitive in dnaZ cells incubated in nutrient broth. In Tris-casamino acids-glucose medium, however, the dnaZ mutant sufficiently supported synthesis of the parental replicative form. At 43 degrees C, synthesis of the progeny replicative form DNA (stage II replication) was significantly inhibited even in dna+ cells and was nearly completely blocked in dnaB or dnaC(D) mutant. At 37 degrees C, the stage II replication proceeded normally in dna+ bacteria.

  10. Elevated expression of ribosomal protein genes L37, RPP-1, and S2 in the presence of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Loging, W T; Reisman, D

    1999-11-01

    The wild-type p53 protein is a DNA-binding transcription factor that activates genes such as p21, MDM2, GADD45, and Bax that are required for the regulation of cell cycle progression or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Mutant forms of p53, which are transforming oncogenes and are expressed at high levels in tumor cells, generally have a reduced binding affinity for the consensus DNA sequence. Interestingly, some p53 mutants that are no longer effective at binding to the consensus DNA sequence and transactivating promoters containing this target site have acquired the ability to transform cells in culture, in part through their ability to transactivate promoters of a number of genes that are not targets of the wild-type protein. Certain p53 mutants are therefore considered to be gain-of-function mutants and appear to be promoting proliferation or transforming cells through their ability to alter the expression of novel sets of genes. Our goal is to identify genes that have altered expression in the presence of a specific mutant p53 (Arg to Trp mutation at codon 248) protein. Through examining differential gene expression in cells devoid of p53 expression and in cells that express high levels of mutant p53 protein, we have identified three ribosomal protein genes that have elevated expression in response to mutant p53. Consistent with these findings, the overexpression of a number of ribosomal protein genes in human tumors and evidence for their contribution to oncogenic transformation have been reported previously, although the mechanism leading to this overexpression has remained elusive. We show results that indicate that expression of these specific ribosomal protein genes is increased in the presence of the R248W p53 mutant, which provides a mechanism for their overexpression in human tumors.

  11. A Dictyostelium mutant deficient in severin, an F-actin fragmenting protein, shows normal motility and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A severin deficient mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum has been isolated by the use of colony immunoblotting after chemical mutagenesis. In homogenates of wild-type cells, severin is easily detected as a very active F-actin fragmenting protein. Tests for severin in the mutant, HG1132, included viscometry for the assay of F- actin fragmentation in fractions from DEAE-cellulose columns, labeling of blots with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and immunofluorescent-labeling of cryosections. Severin could not be detected in the mutant using these methods. The mutation in HG1132 is recessive and has been mapped to linkage group VII. The mutant failed to produce the normal severin mRNA, but small amounts of a transcript that was approximately 100 bases larger than the wild-type mRNA were detected in the mutant throughout all stages of development. On the DNA level a new Mbo II restriction site was found in the mutant within the coding region of the severin gene. The severin deficient mutant cells grew at an approximately normal rate, aggregated and formed fruiting bodies with viable spores. By the use of an image processing system, speed of cell movement, turning rates, and precision of chemotactic orientation in a stable gradient of cyclic AMP were quantitated, and no significant differences between wild-type and mutant cells were found. Thus, under the culture conditions used, severin proved to be neither essential for growth of D. discoideum nor for any cell function that is important for aggregation or later development. PMID:2537840

  12. Dictyostelium myosin I double mutants exhibit conditional defects in pinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Novak, K D; Peterson, M D; Reedy, M C; Titus, M A

    1995-12-01

    The functional relationship between three Dictyostelium myosin Is, myoA, myoB, and myoC, has been examined through the creation of double mutants. Two double mutants, myoA-/B- and myoB-/C-, exhibit similar conditional defects in fluid-phase pinocytosis. Double mutants grown in suspension culture are significantly impaired in their ability to take in nutrients from the medium, whereas they are almost indistinguishable from wild-type and single mutant strains when grown on a surface. The double mutants are also found to internalize gp126, a 116-kD membrane protein, at a slower rate than either the wild-type or single mutant cells. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that both double mutants possess numerous small vesicles, in contrast to the wild-type or myosin I single mutants that exhibit several large, clear vacuoles. The alterations in fluid and membrane internalization in the suspension-grown double mutants, coupled with the altered vesicular profile, suggest that these cells may be compromised during the early stages of pinocytosis, a process that has been proposed to occur via actin-based cytoskeletal rearrangements. Scanning electron microscopy and rhodamine-phalloidin staining indicates that the myosin I double mutants appear to extend a larger number of actin-filled structures, such as filopodia and crowns, than wild-type cells. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining of the F-actin cytoskeleton of these suspension-grown cells also reveals that the double mutant cells are delayed in the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich structures upon adhesion to a substrate. We propose that myoA, myoB, and myoC play roles in controlling F-actin filled membrane projections that are required for pinosome internalization in suspension.

  13. Amino- and carboxy-terminal deletion mutants of Gs alpha are localized to the particulate fraction of transfected COS cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the structural basis for membrane attachment of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gs alpha), mutant Gs alpha cDNAs with deletions of amino acid residues in the amino and/or carboxy termini were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The particulate and soluble fractions prepared from these cells were analyzed by immunoblot using peptide specific antibodies to monitor distribution of the expressed proteins. Transfection of mutant forms of Gs alpha with either 26 amino terminal residues deleted (delta 3-28) or with 59 amino terminal residues deleted (delta 1-59) resulted in immunoreactive proteins which localized primarily to the particulate fraction. Similarly, mutants with 10 (delta 385-394), 32 (delta 353-384), or 42 (delta 353-394) amino acid residues deleted from the carboxy terminus also localized to the particulate fraction, as did a mutant form of Gs alpha lacking amino acid residues at both the amino and carboxy termini (delta 3-28)/(delta 353-384). Mutant and wild type forms of Gs alpha demonstrated a similar degree of tightness in their binding to membranes as demonstrated by treatment with 2.5 M NaCl or 6 M urea, but some mutant forms were relatively resistant compared with wild type Gs alpha to solubilization by 15 mM NaOH or 1% sodium cholate. We conclude that: (a) deletion of significant portions of the amino and/or carboxyl terminus of Gs alpha is still compatible with protein expression; (b) deletion of these regions is insufficient to cause cytosolic localization of the expressed protein. The basis of Gs alpha membrane targeting remains to be elucidated. PMID:1400589

  14. Augmented Expression of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin in a Defined Staphylococcus epidermidis Mutant with the Small-Colony-Variant Phenotype▿

    PubMed Central

    Al Laham, Nahed; Rohde, Holger; Sander, Gunnar; Fischer, Andreas; Hussain, Muzaffar; Heilmann, Christine; Mack, Dietrich; Proctor, Richard; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten; von Eiff, Christof

    2007-01-01

    While coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), with their ability to form a thick, multilayered biofilm on foreign bodies, have been identified as the major cause of implant-associated infections, no data are available about biofilm formation by staphylococcal small-colony variants (SCVs). In the past years, a number of device-associated infections due to staphylococcal SCVs were described, among them, several pacemaker infections due to SCVs of CoNS auxotrophic to hemin. To test the characteristics of SCVs of CoNS, in particular, to study the ability of SCVs to form a biofilm on foreign bodies, we generated a stable mutant in electron transport by interrupting one of the hemin biosynthetic genes, hemB, in Staphylococcus epidermidis. In fact, this mutant displayed a stable SCV phenotype with tiny colonies showing strong adhesion to the agar surface. When the incubation time was extended to 48 h or a higher inoculum concentration was used, the mutant produced biofilm amounts on polystyrene similar to those produced by the parent strain. When grown under planktonic conditions, the mutant formed markedly larger cell clusters than the parental strain which were completely disintegrated by the specific β-1,6-hexosaminidase dispersin B but were resistant to trypsin treatment. In a dot blot assay, the mutant expressed larger amounts of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) than the parent strain. In conclusion, interrupting a hemin biosynthetic gene in S. epidermidis resulted in an SCV phenotype. Markedly larger cell clusters and the ability of the hemB mutant to form a biofilm are related to the augmented expression of PIA. PMID:17449620

  15. Characterization of Escherichia coli men Mutants Defective in Conversion of o-Succinylbenzoate to 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-Naphthoate

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Duncan J.; Guest, John R.; Meganathan, Rangaswamy; Bentley, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Four independent menaquinone (vitamin K2)-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli, blocked in the conversion of o-succinylbenzoate (OSB) to 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA), were found to represent two distinct classes. Enzymatic complementation was observed when a cell-free extract of one mutant was mixed with extracts of any of the remaining three mutants. The missing enzymes in the two classes were identified by in vitro complementation with preparations of OSB-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase or DHNA synthase isolated from Mycobacterium phlei. Mutants lacking DHNA synthase (and therefore complementing with M. phlei DHNA synthase) were designated menB, and the mutant lacking OSB-CoA synthetase (and therefore complementing with M. phlei OSB-CoA synthetase) was designated menE. The menB mutants produced only the spirodilactone form of OSB when extracts were incubated with [2,3-14C2]OSB, ATP, and CoA; the OSB was unchanged on incubation with an extract from the menE mutant under these conditions. Experiments with strains lysogenized by a λ men transducing phage (λG68) and transduction studies with phage P1 indicated that the menB and menE genes form part of a cluster of four genes, controlling the early steps in menaquinone biosynthesis, located at 48.5 min in the E. coli linkage map. Evidence was obtained for the clockwise gene order gyrA....menC- 0000100000 0000110000 0011111000 0000111000 0011111000 0001110000 0000110101 0001111111 0001100000 0000100000 0001101100 0011111000 0011000000 0011000000 0111000111 0111101110 -B-D, where the asterisk denotes the uncertain position of menE relative to menC and menB. The transducing phage (λG68) contained functional menB, menC, and menE genes, but only part of the menD gene, and it was designated λ menCB(D). PMID:6754698

  16. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  17. Dictyostelium discoideum mutants with conditional defects in phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized Dictyostelium discoideum mutants with conditional defects in phagocytosis. Under suspension conditions, the mutants exhibited dramatic reductions in the uptake of bacteria and polystyrene latex beads. The initial binding of these ligands was unaffected, however, indicating that the defect was not in a plasma membrane receptor: Because of the phagocytosis defect, the mutants were unable to grow when cultured in suspensions of heat-killed bacteria. The mutants exhibited normal capacities for fluid phase endocytosis and grew as rapidly as parental (AX4) cells in axenic medium. Both the defects in phagocytosis and growth on bacteria were corrected when the mutant Dictyostelium cells were cultured on solid substrates. Reversion and genetic complementation analysis suggested that the mutant phenotypes were caused by single gene defects. While the precise site of action of the mutations was not established, the mutations are likely to affect an early signaling event because the binding of bacteria to mutant cells in suspension was unable to trigger the localized polymerization of actin filaments required for ingestion; other aspects of actin function appeared normal. This class of conditional phagocytosis mutant should prove to be useful for the expression cloning of the affected gene(s). PMID:7519624

  18. A Mutant Hunt Using the C-Fern (Ceratopteris Richardii)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calie, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    A modification of the popular C-Fern system, the tropical fern Ceratopteris richardii is developed in which students plate out a genetically mixed set of fern spores and then select for specific mutants. This exercise can provide students with an experience in plant mutant selection and can be used as a platform to expose students to a diverse…

  19. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  20. Chaperone-mediated autophagy degrades mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Kim, Minsu; Xia, Hong-guang; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Pan, Lifeng; Ince, Tan A.; Kroemer, Guido; Brugge, Joan S.; Yuan, Junying

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations in the gene TP53, which encodes p53, one of the most important tumor suppressors, are common in human cancers. Accumulated mutant p53 proteins are known to actively contribute to tumor development and metastasis. Thus, promoting the removal of mutant p53 proteins in cancer cells may have therapeutic significance. Here we investigated the mechanisms that govern the turnover of mutant p53 in nonproliferating tumor cells using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches. We show that suppression of macroautophagy by multiple means promotes the degradation of mutant p53 through chaperone-mediated autophagy in a lysosome-dependent fashion. In addition, depletion of mutant p53 expression due to macroautophagy inhibition sensitizes the death of dormant cancer cells under nonproliferating conditions. Taken together, our results delineate a novel strategy for killing tumor cells that depend on mutant p53 expression by the activation of chaperone-mediated autophagy and potential pharmacological means to reduce the levels of accumulated mutant p53 without the restriction of mutant p53 conformation in quiescent tumor cells. PMID:23913924

  1. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  2. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  3. Cardiac-Targeted Transgenic Mutant Mitochondrial Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J.; Hosseini, Seyed H.; Green, Elgin; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Cucoranu, Ioan; Haase, Chad P.; Russ, Rodney; Srivastava, Jaya; Ivey, Kristopher; Ludaway, Tomika; Kapoor, Victor; Abuin, Allison; Shapoval, Alexsey; Santoianni, Robert; Saada, Ann; Elpeleg, Orly; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA biogenesis is critical to cardiac contractility. DNA polymerase gamma (pol γ) replicates mtDNA, whereas thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) monophosphorylates pyrimidines intramitochondrially. Point mutations in POLG and TK2 result in clinical diseases associated with mtDNA depletion and organ dysfunction. Pyrimidine analogs (NRTIs) inhibit Pol γ and mtDNA replication. Cardiac “dominant negative” murine transgenes (TGs; Pol γ Y955G, and TK2 H121N or I212N) defined the role of each in the heart. mtDNA abundance, histopathological features, histochemistry, mitochondrial protein abundance, morphometry, and echocardiography were determined for TGs in “2 × 2” studies with or without pyrimidine analogs. Cardiac mtDNA abundance decreased in Y955C TGs (∼50%) but increased in H121N and I212N TGs (20-70%). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) increased in hearts of all mutants. Ultrastructural changes occurred in Y955C and H121N TGs. Histopathology demonstrated hypertrophy in H121N, LV dilation in I212N, and both hypertrophy and dilation in Y955C TGs. Antiretrovirals increased LV mass (≈50%) for all three TGs which combined with dilation indicates cardiomyopathy. Taken together, these studies demonstrate three manifestations of cardiac dysfunction that depend on the nature of the specific mutation and antiretroviral treatment. Mutations in genes for mtDNA biogenesis increase risk for defective mtDNA replication, leading to LV hypertrophy. PMID:18446447

  4. Membrane cytochromes of Escherichia coli chl mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, N R; Bragg, P D

    1983-01-01

    The cytochromes present in the membranes of Escherichia coli cells having defects in the formate dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase system have been analyzed by spectroscopic, redox titration, and enzyme fractionation techniques. Four phenotypic classes differing in cytochrome composition were recognized. Class I is represented by strains with defects in the synthesis or insertion of molybdenum cofactor. Cytochromes of the formate dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase pathway are present. Class II strains map in the chlC-chlI region. The cytochrome associated with nitrate reductase (cytochrome bnr) is absent in these strains, whereas that associated with formate dehydrogenase (cytochrome bfdh) is the major cytochrome in the membranes. Class III strains lack both cytochromes bfdh and bnr but overproduce cytochrome d of the aerobic pathway even under anaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. Class III strains have defects in the regulation of cytochrome synthesis. An fdhA mutant produced cytochrome bnr but lacked cytochrome bfdh. These results support the view that chlI (narI) is the structural gene for cytochrome bnr and that chlC (narG) and chlI(narI) are in the same operon, and they provide evidence of the complexity of the regulation of cytochrome synthesis. PMID:6302081

  5. Mutants of Cre recombinase with improved accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Church, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in genome engineering technologies, inserting genes into precise locations in the human genome remains an outstanding problem. It has been suggested that site-specific recombinases can be adapted towards use as transgene delivery vectors. The specificity of recombinases can be altered either with directed evolution or via fusions to modular DNA-binding domains. Unfortunately, both wildtype and altered variants often have detectable activities at off-target sites. Here we use bacterial selections to identify mutations in the dimerization surface of Cre recombinase (R32V, R32M, and 303GVSdup) that improve the accuracy of recombination. The mutants are functional in bacteria, in human cells, and in vitro (except for 303GVSdup, which we did not purify), and have improved selectivity against both model off-target sites and the entire E. coli genome. We propose that destabilizing binding cooperativity may be a general strategy for improving the accuracy of dimeric DNA-binding proteins. PMID:24056590

  6. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa gshA Mutant Is Defective in Biofilm Formation, Swarming, and Pyocyanin Production

    PubMed Central

    Van Laar, Tricia A.; Esani, Saika; Birges, Tyler J.; Hazen, Bethany; Thomas, Jason M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium that can cause severe opportunistic infections. The principal redox buffer employed by this organism is glutathione (GSH). To assess the role of GSH in the virulence of P. aeruginosa, a number of analyses were performed using a mutant strain deficient in gshA, which does not produce GSH. The mutant strain exhibited a growth delay in minimal medium compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, the gshA mutant was defective in biofilm and persister cell formation and in swimming and swarming motility and produced reduced levels of pyocyanin, a key virulence factor. Finally, the gshA mutant strain demonstrated increased sensitivity to methyl viologen (a redox cycling agent) as well as the thiol-reactive antibiotics fosfomycin and rifampin. Taken together, these data suggest a key role for GSH in the virulence of P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium that can cause severe opportunistic infections, including many hospital-acquired infections. It is also a major cause of infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a number of drugs and is capable of forming biofilms that are difficult to eradicate with antibiotics. The number of drug-resistant strains is also increasing, making treatment of P. aeruginosa infections very difficult. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand how P. aeruginosa causes disease in order to find novel ways to treat infections. We show that the principal redox buffer, glutathione (GSH), is involved in intrinsic resistance to the fosfomycin and rifampin antibiotics. We further demonstrate that GSH plays a role in P. aeruginosa disease and infection, since a mutant lacking GSH has less biofilm formation, is less able to swarm, and produces less pyocyanin, a pigment associated with infection. PMID:29669887

  9. Mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens with elevated vir gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pazour, G.J.; Ta, C.N.; Das, A.

    1991-08-15

    Expression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence (vir) genes requires virA, virG, and a plant-derived inducing compound such as acetosyringone. To identify the critical functional domains of virA and virG, a mutational approach was used. Agrobacterium A136 harboring plasmid pGP159, which contains virA, virG, and a reporter virB:lacZ gene fusion, was mutagenized with UV light or nitrosoguanidine. Survivors that formed blue colonies on a plate containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl beta-D-galactoside were isolated and analyzed. Quantification of beta-galactosidase activity in liquid assays identified nine mutant strains. By plasmid reconstruction and other procedures, all mutations mapped to the virA locus. These mutations caused an 11- tomore » 560-fold increase in the vegetative level of virB:lacZ reporter gene expression. DNA sequence analysis showed that the mutations are located in four regions of VirA: transmembrane domain one, the active site, a glycine-rich region with homology to ATP-binding sites, and a region at the C terminus that has homology to the N terminus of VirG.« less

  10. The Succinated Proteome of FH-Mutant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Ternette, Nicola; Su, Huizhong; Dabiri, Raliat; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Adam, Julie; Teh, Bin Tean; Pollard, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH) predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Loss of FH activity in HLRCC tumours causes accumulation of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate to high levels, which may act as an oncometabolite through various, but not necessarily mutually exclusive, mechanisms. One such mechanism, succination, is an irreversible non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues by fumarate, to form S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Previous studies have demonstrated that succination of proteins including glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) can have profound effects on cellular metabolism. Furthermore, immunostaining for 2SC is a sensitive and specific biomarker for HLRCC tumours. Here, we performed a proteomic screen on an FH-mutant tumour and two HLRCC-derived cancer cell lines and identified 60 proteins where one or more cysteine residues were succinated; 10 of which were succinated at cysteine residues either predicted, or experimentally proven, to be functionally significant. Bioinformatic enrichment analyses identified most succinated targets to be involved in redox signaling. To our knowledge, this is the first proteomic-based succination screen performed in human tumours and cancer-derived cells and has identified novel 2SC targets that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of HLRCC. PMID:25105836

  11. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Analysis on the Pathologic Mutant Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Darrell E; Suzuki, Shigeru; Mayama, Takafumi; Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene mutations may cause familial or sporadic generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. Most of the missense forms distribute in the ligand-binding domain and impair its ligand-binding activity and formation of the activation function (AF)-2 that binds LXXLL motif-containing coactivators. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to ligand-binding domain of pathologic GR mutants to reveal their structural defects. Several calculated parameters including interaction energy for dexamethasone or the LXXLL peptide indicate that destruction of ligand-binding pocket (LBP) is a primary character. Their LBP defects are driven primarily by loss/reduction of the electrostatic interaction formed by R611 and T739 of the receptor to dexamethasone and a subsequent conformational mismatch, which deacylcortivazol resolves with its large phenylpyrazole moiety and efficiently stimulates transcriptional activity of the mutant receptors with LBP defect. Reduced affinity of the LXXLL peptide to AF-2 is caused mainly by disruption of the electrostatic bonds to the noncore leucine residues of this peptide that determine the peptide's specificity to GR, as well as by reduced noncovalent interaction against core leucines and subsequent exposure of the AF-2 surface to solvent. The results reveal molecular defects of pathologic mutant receptors and provide important insights to the actions of wild-type GR.

  13. NRAS-mutant melanoma: current challenges and future prospect

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Adelantado, Ester Zamora; Ortiz, Carolina; García, Jesús Soberino; Perez-Garcia, José

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most common cutaneous cancers worldwide. Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes are found in a third of all human cancers and NRAS mutations are found in 15%–20% of melanomas. The NRAS-mutant subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes, compared to non-NRAS-mutant melanoma. Although immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapies for BRAF-mutant melanoma are transforming the treatment of metastatic melanoma, the ideal treatment for NRAS-mutant melanoma remains unknown. Despite promising preclinical data, current therapies for NRAS-mutant melanoma remain limited, showing a modest increase in progression-free survival but without any benefit in overall survival. Combining MEK inhibitors with agents inhibiting cell cycling and the PI3K–AKT pathway appears to provide additional benefit; in particular, a strategy of MEK inhibition and CDK4/6 inhibition is likely to be a viable treatment option in the future. Patients whose tumors had NRAS mutations had better response to immunotherapy and better outcomes than patients whose tumors had other genetic subtypes, suggesting that immune therapies – especially immune checkpoint inhibitors – may be particularly effective as treatment options for NRAS-mutant melanoma. Improved understanding of NRAS-mutant melanoma will be essential to develop new treatment strategies for this subset of patients with melanoma. PMID:28860801

  14. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  15. ptk7 mutant zebrafish models of congenital and idiopathic scoliosis implicate dysregulated Wnt signalling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Madeline; Gao, Xiaochong; Yu, Lisa X; Paria, Nandina; Henkelman, R. Mark; Wise, Carol A.; Ciruna, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis is a complex genetic disorder of the musculoskeletal system, characterized by three-dimensional rotation of the spine. Curvatures caused by malformed vertebrae (congenital scoliosis (CS)) are apparent at birth. Spinal curvatures with no underlying vertebral abnormality (idiopathic scoliosis (IS)) most commonly manifest during adolescence. The genetic and biological mechanisms responsible for IS remain poorly understood due largely to limited experimental models. Here we describe zygotic ptk7 (Zptk7) mutant zebrafish, deficient in a critical regulator of Wnt signalling, as the first genetically defined developmental model of IS. We identify a novel sequence variant within a single IS patient that disrupts PTK7 function, consistent with a role for dysregulated Wnt activity in disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that embryonic loss-of-gene function in maternal-zygotic ptk7 mutants (MZptk7) leads to vertebral anomalies associated with CS. Our data suggest novel molecular origins of, and genetic links between, congenital and idiopathic forms of disease. PMID:25182715

  16. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  17. Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers suppress mutant huntingtin expression and attenuate neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Marque, Leonard O.; Cordner, Zachary; Pruitt, Jennifer L.; Bhat, Manik; Li, Pan P.; Kannan, Geetha; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Moran, Timothy H.; Margolis, Russell L.; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Disease pathogenesis derives, at least in part, from the long polyglutamine tract encoded by mutant HTT. Therefore, considerable effort has been dedicated to the development of therapeutic strategies that significantly reduce the expression of the mutant HTT protein. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the CAG repeat region of HTT transcripts have been of particular interest due to their potential capacity to discriminate between normal and mutant HTT transcripts. Here, we focus on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs), ASOs that are especially stable, highly soluble and non-toxic. We designed three PMOs to selectively target expanded CAG repeat tracts (CTG22, CTG25 and CTG28), and two PMOs to selectively target sequences flanking the HTT CAG repeat (HTTex1a and HTTex1b). In HD patient–derived fibroblasts with expanded alleles containing 44, 77 or 109 CAG repeats, HTTex1a and HTTex1b were effective in suppressing the expression of mutant and non-mutant transcripts. CTGn PMOs also suppressed HTT expression, with the extent of suppression and the specificity for mutant transcripts dependent on the length of the targeted CAG repeat and on the CTG repeat length and concentration of the PMO. PMO CTG25 reduced HTT-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and suppressed mutant HTT expression in vivo in the N171-82Q transgenic mouse model. Finally, CTG28 reduced mutant HTT expression and improved the phenotype of HdhQ7/Q150 knock-in HD mice. These data demonstrate the potential of PMOs as an approach to suppressing the expression of mutant HTT. PMID:25035419

  18. The kinetics of root gravitropism in PIN mutants suggest redundancy in the signal transduction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Chris

    As nonmotile organisms, plants rely on differential growth responses to maximize exposure to the resources necessary for growth and reproduction. One of the primary environmental cues causing differential growth in roots is gravity, which is thought to be sensed predominately in the root cap. This gravity perception event is thought to be transduced into information in the form of an auxin gradient across the cap and propagating basipetally toward the elongation zone. The discovery of several families of auxin efflux and influx carriers has provided significant insight into the mechanisms of directional auxin transport, and the identification of mutants in the genes encoding these carriers provides the opportunity to test the roles of these transporters in plant gravitropism. In this study, we report the results of a systematic, high-resolution study of the kinetics of root gravitropism of mutants in the PIN family of auxin efflux carriers. Based on reported expression and localization patterns, we predicted mutations in PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 to cause the greatest reduction in root gravitropism. While pin2 mutants showed severe gravitropic deficiencies in roots as reported previously, several alleles of pin3, pin4 and pin7 remained strongly gravitropic. PIN3 has been localized to the central columella cells, the purported gravisensing cells in the root, and shown to rapidly relocate to the lower flank of the columella cells upon gravistimulation, suggesting an early role in auxin gradient formation. Mutant alleles of PIN3 showed an early delay in response, with just 7 deg of curvature in the first hour compared to approximately 15 deg h-1 in wild-type, but their rate of curvature recovered to near wild-type levels over the ensuing 3 h. Pin3 mutants also showed a slower overall growth rate (124 µm h-1 ), elongating at approximately half the rate of wild-type roots (240 µm h-1 ). PIN4 has been localized to the quiescent center in the root, where it presumably

  19. Steroid catechol degradation: disecoandrostane intermediates accumulated by Pseudomonas transposon mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A

    1989-07-01

    Eleven transposon mutant strains affected in bile acid catabolism were each found to form yellow, muconic-like intermediates from bile acids. To characterize these unstable intermediates, media from the growth of one of these mutants with deoxycholic acid was treated with ammonia, then the crude product was methylated with diazomethane. Four compounds were subsequently isolated; spectral evidence suggested that they were methyl 12 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-23,24-dinorchola-1,4-dien-22-oate, methyl 4-aza-12 beta-hydroxy-9(10)-secoandrosta-1,3,5-triene-9,17-dione-3-carboxyl ate, 4-aza-9 alpha, 12 beta-dihydroxy-9(10)-secoandrosta-1,3,5-trien-17-one-3- methyl carboxylate and 4 alpha-[3'-propionic acid]-5-amino-7 beta-hydroxy-7 alpha beta-methyl- 3a alpha, 4,7,7a-tetrahydro-1-indanone-delta-lactam. It is proposed that the mutants are blocked in the utilization of such muconic-like compounds as the 3,12 beta-dihydroxy-5,9,17-trioxo-4(5),9(10)- disecoandrostal (10),2-dien-4-oic acid formed from deoxycholic acid. A further mutant was examined, which converted deoxycholic acid to 12 alpha-hydroxyandrosta-1,4-dien-3,17-dione, but accumulated yellow products from steroids which lacked a 12 alpha-hydroxy function, such as chenodeoxycholic acid. The products from the latter acid were treated as above; spectral evidence suggested that the two compounds isolated were methyl 4-aza-7-hydroxy-9(10)-secoandrosta-1,3,5- triene-9,17-dione-3-carboxylate and 4 alpha-[1'alpha-hydroxy-3'-propionic acid]-5-amino-7a beta-methyl-3a alpha,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-1-indanone-delta-lactam.

  20. A dinoflagellate mutant with higher frequency of multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Lam, C M; Chong, C; Wong, J T

    2001-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler propagates by both binary and multiple fission. By a newly developed mutagenesis protocol based on using ethyl methanesulfonate and a cell size screening method, a cell cycle mutant, mf2, was isolated with giant cells which predominantly divide by multiple fission. The average cell size of the mutant mf2 is larger than the control C. cohnii. Cell cycle synchronization experiments suggest that mutant mf2, when compared with the control strain, has a prolonged G1 phase with a corresponding delay of the G2 + M phase.

  1. Synthetic Lethality of a Novel Small Molecule Against Mutant KRAS-Expressing Cancer Cells Involves AKT-Dependent ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Yadav, Sanjiv Kumar; Foo, Chuan Han Jonathan; Sethi, Gautam; Qiang, Yu; Bellot, Gregory L; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2016-05-10

    We recently reported the death-inducing activity of a small-molecule compound, C1, which triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy-associated apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cell lines. In this study, we examine the ability of the compound to specifically target cancer cells harboring mutant KRAS with minimal activity against wild-type (WT) RAS-expressing cells. HCT116 cells expressing mutated KRAS are susceptible, while the WT-expressing HT29 cells are resistant. Interestingly, C1 triggers activation of mutant RAS, which results in the downstream phosphorylation and activation of AKT/PKB. Gene knockdown of KRAS or AKT or their pharmacological inhibition resulted in the abrogation of C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony-forming ability. We also made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout (KO) cells, which express only a single WT KRAS allele. Exposure of KO cells to C1 failed to increase mitochondrial ROS and cell death, unlike the parental cells harboring mutant KRAS. Similarly, mutant KRAS-transformed prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1-RAS) were more sensitive to the ROS-producing and death-inducing effects of C1 than the vector only expressing RWPE-1 cells. An in vivo model of xenograft tumors generated with HCT116 KRAS(WT/MUT) or KRAS(WT/-) cells showed the efficacy of C1 treatment and its ability to affect the relative mitotic index in tumors harboring KRAS mutant. These data indicate a synthetic lethal effect against cells carrying mutant KRAS, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of KRAS-specific chemotherapeutic strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 781-794.

  2. Neurogenin 1 Null Mutant Ears Develop Fewer, Morphologically Normal Hair Cells in Smaller Sensory Epithelia Devoid of Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiufu; Anderson, David J.

    2000-01-01

    The proneuronal gene neurogenin 1 (ngn1) is essential for development of the inner-ear sensory neurons that are completely absent in ngn1 null mutants. Neither afferent, efferent, nor autonomic nerve fibers were detected in the ears of ngn1 null mutants. We suggest that efferent and autonomic fibers are lost secondarily to the absence of afferents. In this article we show that ngn1 null mutants develop smaller sensory epithelia with morphologically normal hair cells. In particular, the saccule is reduced dramatically and forms only a small recess with few hair cells along a duct connecting the utricle with the cochlea. Hair cells of newborn ngn1 null mutants show no structural abnormalities, suggesting that embryonic development of hair cells is independent of innervation. However, the less regular pattern of dispersal within sensory epithelia may be caused by some effects of afferents or to the stunted growth of the sensory epithelia. Tracing of facial and stato-acoustic nerves in control and ngn1 null mutants showed that only the distal, epibranchial, placode-derived sensory neurons of the geniculate ganglion exist in mutants. Tracing further showed that these geniculate ganglion neurons project exclusively to the solitary tract. In addition to the normal complement of facial branchial and visceral motoneurons, ngn1 null mutants have some trigeminal motoneurons and contralateral inner-ear efferents projecting, at least temporarily, through the facial nerve. These data suggest that some neurons in the brainstem (e.g., inner-ear efferents, trigeminal motoneurons) require afferents to grow along and redirect to ectopic cranial nerve roots in the absence of their corresponding sensory roots. PMID:11545141

  3. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of stabilized A state mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP): Snipping the proton wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Jaye, Andrew A.; Ronayne, Kate L.; Nappa, Jérôme; Tonge, Peter J.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    Two blue absorbing and emitting mutants (S65G/T203V/E222Q and S65T at pH 5.5) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been investigated through ultrafast time resolved infra-red (TRIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. In these mutants, in which the excited state proton transfer reaction observed in wild-type GFP has been blocked, the photophysics are dominated by the neutral A state. It was found that the A∗ excited state lifetime is short, indicating that it is relatively less stabilised in the protein matrix than the anionic form. However, the lifetime of the A state can be increased through modifications to the protein structure. The TRIR spectra show that a large shifts in protein vibrational modes on excitation of the A state occurs in both these GFP mutants. This is ascribed to a change in H-bonding interactions between the protein matrix and the excited state.

  4. Densified waste form and method for forming

    DOEpatents

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  5. Mutant PFN1 causes ALS phenotypes and progressive motor neuron degeneration in mice by a gain of toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunxing; Danielson, Eric W.; Qiao, Tao; Metterville, Jake; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.; Xu, Zuoshang

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the profilin 1 (PFN1) gene cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of motor neurons leading to paralysis and eventually death. PFN1 is a small actin-binding protein that promotes formin-based actin polymerization and regulates numerous cellular functions, but how the mutations in PFN1 cause ALS is unclear. To investigate this problem, we have generated transgenic mice expressing either the ALS-associated mutant (C71G) or wild-type protein. Here, we report that mice expressing the mutant, but not the wild-type, protein had relentless progression of motor neuron loss with concomitant progressive muscle weakness ending in paralysis and death. Furthermore, mutant, but not wild-type, PFN1 forms insoluble aggregates, disrupts cytoskeletal structure, and elevates ubiquitin and p62/SQSTM levels in motor neurons. Unexpectedly, the acceleration of motor neuron degeneration precedes the accumulation of mutant PFN1 aggregates. These results suggest that although mutant PFN1 aggregation may contribute to neurodegeneration, it does not trigger its onset. Importantly, these experiments establish a progressive disease model that can contribute toward identifying the mechanisms of ALS pathogenesis and the development of therapeutic treatments. PMID:27681617

  6. Efflux of a range of antimalarial drugs and 'chloroquine resistance reversers' from the digestive vacuole in malaria parasites with mutant PfCRT.

    PubMed

    Lehane, Adele M; Kirk, Kiaran

    2010-08-01

    Chloroquine-resistant malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) show an increased leak of H(+) ions from their internal digestive vacuole in the presence of chloroquine. This phenomenon has been attributed to the transport of chloroquine, together with H(+), out of the digestive vacuole (and hence away from its site of action) via a mutant form of the parasite's chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT). Here, using transfectant parasite lines, we show that a range of other antimalarial drugs, as well as various 'chloroquine resistance reversers' induce an increased leak of H(+) from the digestive vacuole of parasites expressing mutant PfCRT, consistent with these compounds being substrates for mutant forms, but not the wild-type form, of PfCRT. For some compounds there were significant differences observed between parasites having the African/Asian Dd2 form of PfCRT and those with the South American 7G8 form of PfCRT, consistent with there being differences in the transport properties of the two mutant proteins. The finding that chloroquine resistance reversers are substrates for mutant PfCRT has implications for the mechanism of action of this class of compound. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Triptolide Promotes the Clearance of α-Synuclein by Enhancing Autophagy in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guanzheng; Gong, Xiaoli; Wang, Le; Liu, Mengru; Liu, Yang; Fu, Xia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an aging-associated neurodegenerative disease with a characteristic feature of α-synuclein accumulation. Point mutations (A53T, A30P) that increase the aggregation propensity of α-synuclein result in familial early onset PD. The abnormal metabolism of α-synuclein results in aberrant level changes of α-synuclein in PD. In pathological conditions, α-synuclein is degraded mainly by the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Triptolide (T10) is a monomeric compound isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. Our group demonstrated for the first time that T10 possesses potent neuroprotective properties both in vitro and in vivo PD models. In the present study, we reported T10 as a potent autophagy inducer in neuronal cells, which helped to promote the clearance of various forms of α-synuclein in neuronal cells. We transfected neuronal cells with A53T mutant (A53T) or wild-type (WT) α-synuclein plasmids and found T10 attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by pathogenic A53T α-synuclein overexpression. We observed that T10 significantly reduced both A53T and WT α-synuclein level in neuronal cell line, as well as in primary cultured cortical neurons. Excluding the changes of syntheses, secretion, and aggregation of α-synuclein, we further added autophagy inhibitor or proteasome inhibitor with T10, and we noticed that T10 promoted the clearance of α-synuclein mainly by the autophagic pathway. Lastly, we observed increased autophagy marker LC3-II expression and autophagosomes by GFP-LC3-II accumulation and ultrastructural characterization. However, the lysosome activity and cell viability were not modulated by T10. Our study revealed that T10 could induce autophagy and promote the clearance of both WT and A53T α-synuclein in neurons. These results provide evidence of T10 as a promising mean to treat PD and other neurodegenerative diseases by reducing pathogenic proteins in neurons.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide and Aldoheptose Biosynthesis in Transketolase Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Eidels, L.; Osborn, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence that sedoheptulose-7-phosphate is an obligatory precursor of the L-glycero-D-mannoheptose residues of the lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella was obtained by isolation and characterization of transketolase-negative mutants of Salmonella typhimurium. These mutants, which are defective in synthesis of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, were found to produce an incomplete heptose-deficient lipopolysaccharide, and were also sensitive to bile salts, a characteristic property of heptose-deficient mutants. Phenotypic repair of the defect in lipopolysaccharide synthesis was obtained by addition of exogenous sedoheptulose-7-phosphate to growing cultures of the mutant strains. Characterization of revertants isolated either as transketolase-positive or heptose-positive provided further evidence that the heptose deficiency resulted from mutation at the transketolase locus. On the basis of these findings a possible pathway for conversion of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate to L-glycero-D-mannoheptose is proposed. PMID:4942911

  9. [Biosorption ability of mutants of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776].

    PubMed

    Mamieieva, O H; Kasatkina, T P; Lavrinchuk, V Ia

    2007-01-01

    Twenty stable mutants with various coloration intensity have been allocated in carotene-synthesizing natural strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776 (wild type) after nitrosoguanidine action. Two brightly orange mutants 4L and 11 and one non-pigmented mutant 2 were chosen for the further researches. The ultraviolet was inefficient as a mutagen. Resistance to high concentration of copper ions (up to 200 mg/g), high sorption ability (Qmax = 9.1 mmol/g) was characteristic of R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776. Concentration of copper ions 50 mg/l was toxic for mutants 4L, 11 and 2, which sorption ability was lower in comparison with carotene pigmented R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776. It was shown, for the first time that there was a direct dependence between the presence of carotenoid pigments, resistance to high concentration of copper ions and sorption ability for yeast R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776.

  10. Altered sexual and social behaviors in trp2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Leypold, Bradley G.; Yu, C. Ron; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Kim, Michelle M.; Zufall, Frank; Axel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We have used gene targeting to generate mice with a homozygous deficiency in trp2, a cation channel expressed in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Trp2 mutant animals reveal a striking reduction in the electrophysiological response to pheromones in the VNO, suggesting that trp2 plays a central role in mediating the pheromone response. These mutants therefore afford the opportunity to examine the role of the VNO in the generation of innate sexual and social behaviors in mice. Trp2 mutant males and nursing females are docile and fail to initiate aggressive attacks on intruder males. Male–female sexual behavior appears normal, but trp2 mutant males also vigorously mount other males. These results suggest that the cation channel trp2 is required in the VNO to detect male-specific pheromones that elicit aggressive behaviors and dictate the choice of sexual partners. PMID:11972034

  11. Cortex content of asporogenous mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Imae, Y; Strominger, J L

    1976-01-01

    A method for the measurement of muramic lactam, which is specifically located in the cortical peptidoglycan of bacterial spores, was developed as a quantitative assay method for spore cortex content. During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168, muramic lactam (i.e., spore cortex) began to appear at state IV of sporulation and continued to increase over most of the late stages of sporulation. Spore cortex contents of various spo mutants of B. subitils were surveyed. Cortex was not detected in mutants in which sporulation was blocked earlier than stage II sporulation. Spores of spo IV mutant had about 40% of the cortex content of the wild-type spores. One spo III mutant had a low amount of cortex, but four others had none. PMID:1262319

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Mutant p53 Stabilization: The Role of HSP70 and MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Wiech, Milena; Olszewski, Maciej B.; Tracz-Gaszewska, Zuzanna; Wawrzynow, Bartosz; Zylicz, Maciej; Zylicz, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    Numerous p53 missense mutations possess gain-of-function activities. Studies in mouse models have demonstrated that the stabilization of p53 R172H (R175H in human) mutant protein, by currently unknown factors, is a prerequisite for its oncogenic gain-of-function phenotype such as tumour progression and metastasis. Here we show that MDM2-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of p53 R175H mutant protein in mouse embryonic fibroblasts is partially inhibited by increasing concentration of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70/HSPA1-A). These phenomena correlate well with the appearance of HSP70-dependent folding intermediates in the form of dynamic cytoplasmic spots containing aggregate-prone p53 R175H and several molecular chaperones. We propose that a transient but recurrent interaction with HSP70 may lead to an increase in mutant p53 protein half-life. In the presence of MDM2 these pseudoaggregates can form stable amyloid-like structures, which occasionally merge into an aggresome. Interestingly, formation of folding intermediates is not observed in the presence of HSC70/HSPA8, the dominant-negative K71S variant of HSP70 or HSP70 inhibitor. In cancer cells, where endogenous HSP70 levels are already elevated, mutant p53 protein forms nuclear aggregates without the addition of exogenous HSP70. Aggregates containing p53 are also visible under conditions where p53 is partially unfolded: 37°C for temperature-sensitive variant p53 V143A and 42°C for wild-type p53. Refolding kinetics of p53 indicate that HSP70 causes transient exposure of p53 aggregate-prone domain(s). We propose that formation of HSP70- and MDM2-dependent protein coaggregates in tumours with high levels of these two proteins could be one of the mechanisms by which mutant p53 is stabilized. Moreover, sequestration of p73 tumour suppressor protein by these nuclear aggregates may lead to gain-of-function phenotypes. PMID:23251530

  13. Mutant Kras copy number defines metabolic reprogramming and therapeutic susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Emma; Gaude, Edoardo; Turrell, Frances; Frezza, Christian; Martins, Carla P

    2016-01-01

    Summary The RAS/MAPK-signalling pathway is frequently deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), often through KRAS activating mutations1-3. A single endogenous mutant Kras allele is sufficient to promote lung tumour formation in mice but malignant progression requires additional genetic alterations4-7. We recently showed that advanced lung tumours from KrasG12D/+;p53-null mice frequently exhibit KrasG12D allelic enrichment (KrasG12D/Kraswild-type>1)7, implying that mutant Kras copy gains are positively selected during progression. Through a comprehensive analysis of mutant Kras homozygous and heterozygous MEFs and lung cancer cells we now show that these genotypes are phenotypically distinct. In particular, KrasG12D/G12D cells exhibit a glycolytic switch coupled to increased channelling of glucose-derived metabolites into the TCA cycle and glutathione biosynthesis, resulting in enhanced glutathione-mediated detoxification. This metabolic rewiring is recapitulated in mutant KRAS homozygous NSCLC cells and in vivo, in spontaneous advanced murine lung tumours (which display a high frequency of KrasG12D copy gain), but not in the corresponding early tumours (KrasG12D heterozygous). Finally, we demonstrate that mutant Kras copy gain creates unique metabolic dependences that can be exploited to selectively target these aggressive mutant Kras tumours. Our data demonstrate that mutant Kras lung tumours are not a single disease but rather a heterogeneous group comprised of two classes of tumours with distinct metabolic profiles, prognosis and therapeutic susceptibility, which can be discriminated based on their relative mutant allelic content. We also provide the first in vivo evidence of metabolic rewiring during lung cancer malignant progression. PMID:26909577

  14. Mapping Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation in BRCA1 Mutant Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Transformation in BRCA1 Mutant Mice PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerburg M. Wulf CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical...REPORT NUMBER Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston, MA 02215 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...and whether it allowed us to analyze the early steps of tumor formation. For this purpose transgenic and conditional knock-out mice (mutant p53 or

  15. Mutant Enrichment in the Colonial Alga, EUDORINA ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Toby, A. L.; Kemp, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    An enrichment procedure has been developed that results in at least a 200x increase in mutation frequency in the colonial alga, Eudorina elegans. A period of nitrogen starvation followed by treatment with 8-azaguanine results in the death of wild-type cells and the maintenance of mutants. N'-nitro-N-nitro-soguanidine-induced acetate, p-aminobenzoic acid and reduced nitrogen requiring mutants have been isolated by this procedure. PMID:1205128

  16. Circulation of Pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase mutants in France.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Damiani, Céline; Perrot, Maëla; Rouillé, Amélie; Virmaux, Michèle; Quinio, Dorothée; Moalic, Elodie; Saliou, Philippe; Berthou, Christian; Le Meur, Yann; Totet, Anne; Nevez, Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Data on the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutants in France are still limited. In this study, mutant prevalence in the Brest region (western France) was determined. Archival pulmonary specimens from 85 patients infected with P. jirovecii and admitted to our institution (University Hospital, Brest) from October 2007 to February 2010 were retrospectively typed at the DHPS locus using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Type identification was successful in 66 of 85 patients. Sixty-four patients were infected with a wild type, whereas mutants were found in 2 patients (2/66, 3%). Medical chart analysis revealed that these 2 patients usually lived in Paris. Another patient usually lived on the French Riviera, whereas 63 patients were from the city of Brest. Thus, the corrected prevalence of mutants in patients who effectively lived in our geographic area was 0% (0/63). Taking into account that i) Paris is characterized by a high prevalence of mutants from 18.5% to 40%, ii) infection diagnoses were performed in the 2 Parisians during their vacation <30 days, iii) infection incubation is assumed to last about 2 months, the results provide evidence of mutant circulation from Paris to Brest through infected vacationers. The study shows that the usual city of patient residence, rather than the city of infection diagnosis, is a predictor of mutants and that P. jirovecii infections involving mutants do not represent a public health issue in western France. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prediction of protein mutant stability using classification and regression tool.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Saraboji, K; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hwang, Shiow-Fen; Ponnuswamy, M N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2007-02-01

    Prediction of protein stability upon amino acid substitutions is an important problem in molecular biology and the solving of which would help for designing stable mutants. In this work, we have analyzed the stability of protein mutants using two different datasets of 1396 and 2204 mutants obtained from ProTherm database, respectively for free energy change due to thermal (DeltaDeltaG) and denaturant denaturations (DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O)). We have used a set of 48 physical, chemical energetic and conformational properties of amino acid residues and computed the difference of amino acid properties for each mutant in both sets of data. These differences in amino acid properties have been related to protein stability (DeltaDeltaG and DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O)) and are used to train with classification and regression tool for predicting the stability of protein mutants. Further, we have tested the method with 4 fold, 5 fold and 10 fold cross validation procedures. We found that the physical properties, shape and flexibility are important determinants of protein stability. The classification of mutants based on secondary structure (helix, strand, turn and coil) and solvent accessibility (buried, partially buried, partially exposed and exposed) distinguished the stabilizing/destabilizing mutants at an average accuracy of 81% and 80%, respectively for DeltaDeltaG and DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O). The correlation between the experimental and predicted stability change is 0.61 for DeltaDeltaG and 0.44 for DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O). Further, the free energy change due to the replacement of amino acid residue has been predicted within an average error of 1.08 kcal/mol and 1.37 kcal/mol for thermal and chemical denaturation, respectively. The relative importance of secondary structure and solvent accessibility, and the influence of the dataset on prediction of protein mutant stability have been discussed.

  18. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    mutant NSCLC , a challenge we must meet to make progress in this clinically challenging NSCLC subset. Mutant KRAS, like ALK or EGFR, is a bone fide NSCLC ...required for KRAS G12D-driven NSCLC . Specific Aim 1. To identify gene products specifically essential for KRAS-driven NSCLC , we will perform a shRNA...screen of thousands of mouse genes, looking for essentiality in multiple independent cell lines derived from two NSCLC GEMMs: one RAF- dependent and

  19. Photocycle dynamics of the E149A mutant of cryptochrome 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Moldt, J; Pokorny, R; Batschauer, A; Essen, L-O

    2009-11-09

    The E149A mutant of the cryDASH member cryptochrome 3 (cry3) from Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized in vitro by optical absorption and emission spectroscopic studies. The mutant protein non-covalently binds the chromophore flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In contrast to the wild-type protein it does not bind N5,N10-methenyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (MTHF). Thus, the photo-dynamics caused by FAD is accessible without the intervening coupling with MTHF. In dark adapted cry3-E149A, FAD is present in the oxidized form (FAD(ox)), semiquinone form (FADH(.)), and anionic hydroquinone form (FAD(red)H(-)). Blue-light photo-excitation of previously unexposed cry3-E149A transfers FAD(ox) to the anionic semiquinone form (FAD()(-)) with a quantum efficiency of about 2% and a back recovery time of about 10s (photocycle I). Prolonged photo-excitation leads to an irreversible protein re-conformation with structure modification of the U-shaped FAD and enabling proton transfer. Thus, a change in the photocycle dynamics occurs with photo-conversion of FAD(ox) to FADH(.), FADH(.) to FAD(red)H(-), and thermal back equilibration in the dark (photocycle II). The photocycle dynamics of cry3-E149A is compared with the photocycle behaviour of wild-type cry3 and other photo-sensory cryptochromes.

  20. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 ( eal1 ) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene ( enhancer of eal1 ) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis .

  1. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis. PMID:27746791

  2. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ozone-Sensitive Arabidopsis Mutants with Deficiencies in Photorespiratory Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Saji, Shoko; Bathula, Srinivas; Kubo, Akihiro; Tamaoki, Masanori; Aono, Mitsuko; Sano, Tomoharu; Tobe, Kazuo; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Saji, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    An ozone-sensitive mutant was isolated from T-DNA-tagged lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. The T-DNA was inserted at a locus on chromosome 3, where two genes encoding glycolate oxidases, GOX1 and GOX2, peroxisomal enzymes involved in photorespiration, reside contiguously. The amounts of the mutant's foliar transcripts for these genes were reduced, and glycolate oxidase activity was approximately 60% of that of the wild-type plants. No difference in growth and appearance was observed between the mutant and the wild-type plants under normal conditions with ambient air under a light intensity of 100 µmol photons m-2 s-1. However, signs of severe damage, such as chlorosis and ion leakage from the tissue, rapidly appeared in mutant leaves in response to ozone treatment at a concentration of 0.2 µl l-1 under a higher light intensity of 350 µmol photons m-2 s-1 that caused no such symptoms in the wild-type plant. The mutant also exhibited sensitivity to sulfur dioxide and long-term high-intensity light. Arabidopsis mutants with deficiencies in other photorespiratory enzymes such as glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase also exhibited ozone sensitivities. Therefore, photorespiration appears to be involved in protection against photooxidative stress caused by ozone and other abiotic factors under high-intensity light. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Leptin gene promoter DNA methylation in WNIN obese mutant rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity has become an epidemic in worldwide population. Leptin gene defect could be one of the causes for obesity. Two mutant obese rats WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb, isolated at National Centre for Laboratory Animal Sciences (NCLAS), Hyderabad, India, were found to be leptin resistant. The present study aims to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying the resistance by promoter DNA methylation of leptin gene in these mutant obese rats. Methods Male obese mutant homozygous, carrier and heterozygous rats of WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb strain of 6 months old were studied to check the leptin gene expression (RT-PCR) and promoter DNA methylation (MassARRAY Compact system, SEQUENOM) of leptin gene by invivo and insilico approach. Results Homozygous WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb showed significantly higher leptin gene expression compared to carrier and lean counterparts. Leptin gene promoter DNA sequence region was analyzed ranging from transcription start site (TSS) to-550 bp length and found four CpGs in this sequence among them only three CpG loci (-309, -481, -502) were methylated in these WNIN mutant rat phenotypes. Conclusion The increased percentage of methylation in WNIN mutant lean and carrier phenotypes is positively correlated with transcription levels. Thus genetic variation may have effect on methylation percentages and subsequently on the regulation of leptin gene expression which may lead to obesity in these obese mutant rat strains. PMID:24495350

  5. CHO-cell mutant with a defect in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Lindl, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    In a selection procedure designed to enrich for temperature-sensitive mutant cells blocked in mitosis a CHO-cell mutant was isolated which has a defect in cytokinesis as the basis of its temperature-sensitive phenotype. Cultures of the mutant had an abnormally high percentage (ie, 34 percent) of polyploid cells at the permissive temperature of 34/sup 0/C and showed further increased frequencies of polyploidy as well as many multinucleated cells at 38.5/sup 0/ and 39.5/sup 0/. When the mutant cells were synchronized in metaphase by Colcemid arrest and then placed into fresh medium at nonpermissive temperature, they did not divide although the completionmore » of mitosis appeared cytologically normal. Ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy of such synchronized cells at telophase revealed no specific defects in cellular components other than failure of development of a normal midbody. The sensitivity of the mutant to cytochalasin B and to Colcemid was the same as for wild-type cells. This mutation behaved as recessive in tetraploid cell hybrids constructed by fusing the mutant with a CHO strain which was wild-type with respect to temperature sensitivity.« less

  6. Relationships between starch synthase I and branching enzyme isozymes determined using double mutant rice lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the most important carbohydrate in plant storage tissues. Multiple isozymes in at least four enzyme classes are involved in starch biosynthesis. Some of these isozymes are thought to interact and form complexes for efficient starch biosynthesis. Of these enzyme classes, starch synthases (SSs) and branching enzymes (BEs) play particularly central roles. Results We generated double mutant lines (ss1/be1 and ss1 L /be2b) between SSI (the largest component of total soluble SS activity) and BEI or BEIIb (major BEs in developing rice endosperm) to explore the relationships among these isozymes. The seed weight of ss1/be1 was comparable to that of wild type, although most ss1/be2b seeds were sterile and no double recessive plants were obtained. The seed weight of the double recessive mutant line ss1 L /be2b, derived from the leaky ss1 mutant (ss1 L ) and be2b, was higher than that of the single be2b mutant. Analyses of the chain-length distribution of amylopectin in ss1/be1 endosperm revealed additive effects of SSI and BEI on amylopectin structure. Chain-length analysis indicated that the BEIIb deficiency significantly reduced the ratio of short chains in amylopectin of ss1 L /be2b. The amylose content of endosperm starch of ss1/be1 and ss1 L /be2b was almost the same as that of wild type, whereas the endosperm starch of be2b contained more amylose than did that of wild type. SSI, BEI, and BEIIb deficiency also affected the extent of binding of other isozymes to starch granules. Conclusions Analysis of the chain-length distribution in amylopectin of the double mutant lines showed that SSI and BEI or BEIIb primarily function independently, and branching by BEIIb is followed by SSI chain elongation. The increased amylose content in be2b was because of reduced amylopectin biosynthesis; however, the lower SSI activity in this background may have enhanced amylopectin biosynthesis as a result of a correction of imbalance between the branching and

  7. Relationships between starch synthase I and branching enzyme isozymes determined using double mutant rice lines.

    PubMed

    Abe, Natsuko; Asai, Hiroki; Yago, Hikari; Oitome, Naoko F; Itoh, Rumiko; Crofts, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-03-26

    Starch is the most important carbohydrate in plant storage tissues. Multiple isozymes in at least four enzyme classes are involved in starch biosynthesis. Some of these isozymes are thought to interact and form complexes for efficient starch biosynthesis. Of these enzyme classes, starch synthases (SSs) and branching enzymes (BEs) play particularly central roles. We generated double mutant lines (ss1/be1 and ss1L/be2b) between SSI (the largest component of total soluble SS activity) and BEI or BEIIb (major BEs in developing rice endosperm) to explore the relationships among these isozymes. The seed weight of ss1/be1 was comparable to that of wild type, although most ss1/be2b seeds were sterile and no double recessive plants were obtained. The seed weight of the double recessive mutant line ss1L/be2b, derived from the leaky ss1 mutant (ss1L) and be2b, was higher than that of the single be2b mutant. Analyses of the chain-length distribution of amylopectin in ss1/be1 endosperm revealed additive effects of SSI and BEI on amylopectin structure. Chain-length analysis indicated that the BEIIb deficiency significantly reduced the ratio of short chains in amylopectin of ss1L/be2b. The amylose content of endosperm starch of ss1/be1 and ss1L/be2b was almost the same as that of wild type, whereas the endosperm starch of be2b contained more amylose than did that of wild type. SSI, BEI, and BEIIb deficiency also affected the extent of binding of other isozymes to starch granules. Analysis of the chain-length distribution in amylopectin of the double mutant lines showed that SSI and BEI or BEIIb primarily function independently, and branching by BEIIb is followed by SSI chain elongation. The increased amylose content in be2b was because of reduced amylopectin biosynthesis; however, the lower SSI activity in this background may have enhanced amylopectin biosynthesis as a result of a correction of imbalance between the branching and elongation found in the single mutant. The fact

  8. Revisiting PC1/3 Mutants: Dominant-Negative Effect of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Retained Mutants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elias H; Ramos-Molina, Bruno; Lindberg, Iris

    2015-10-01

    Prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), encoded by the gene PCSK1, is critical for peptide hormone synthesis. An increasing number of studies have shown that inactivating mutations in PCSK1 are correlated with endocrine pathologies ranging from intestinal dysfunction to morbid obesity, whereas the common nonsynonymous polymorphisms rs6232 (N221D) and rs6234-rs6235 (Q665E-S690T) are highly associated with obesity risk. In this report, we revisited the biochemical and cellular properties of PC1/3 variants in the context of a wild-type PC1/3 background instead of the S357G hypermorph background used for all previous studies. In the wild-type background the PC1/3 N221D variant exhibited 30% lower enzymatic activity in a fluorogenic assay than wild-type PC1/3; this inhibition was greater than that detected in an equivalent experiment using the PC1/3 S357G background. A PC1/3 variant with the linked carboxyl-terminal polymorphisms Q665E-S690T did not show this difference. We also analyzed the biochemical properties of 2 PC1/3 mutants, G209R and G593R, which are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and studied their effects on wild-type PC1/3. The expression of ER-retained mutants induced ER stress markers and also resulted in dominant-negative blockade of wild-type PC1/3 prodomain cleavage and decreased expression of wild-type PC1/3, suggesting facilitation of the entry of wild-type protein to a degradative proteasomal pathway. Dominant-negative effects of PC1/3 mutations on the expression and maturation of wild-type protein, with consequential effects on PC1/3 availability, add a new element which must be considered in population and clinical studies of this gene.

  9. Abnormal photoreceptor outer segment development and early retinal degeneration in kif3a mutant zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Rakesh K; Zhang, Xun; Alhasani, Reem H; Zhou, Xinzhi; Mullin, Margaret; Reilly, James; Li, Wenchang; Liu, Mugen; Shu, Xinhua

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors are highly specialized sensory neurons that possess a modified primary cilium called the outer segment. Photoreceptor outer segment formation and maintenance require highly active protein transport via a process known as intraflagellar transport. Anterograde transport in outer segments is powered by the heterotrimeric kinesin II and coordinated by intraflagellar transport proteins. Here, we describe a new zebrafish model carrying a nonsense mutation in the kinesin II family member 3A (kif3a) gene. Kif3a mutant zebrafish exhibited curved body axes and kidney cysts. Outer segments were not formed in most parts of the mutant retina, and rhodopsin was mislocalized, suggesting KIF3A has a role in rhodopsin trafficking. Both rod and cone photoreceptors degenerated rapidly between 4 and 9 days post fertilization, and electroretinography response was not detected in 7 days post fertilization mutant larvae. Loss of KIF3A in zebrafish also resulted in an intracellular transport defect affecting anterograde but not retrograde transport of organelles. Our results indicate KIF3A plays a conserved role in photoreceptor outer segment formation and intracellular transport. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Reversed polarized delivery of an aquaporin-2 mutant causes dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Bichet, Daniel G.; Konings, Irene B.M.; Nivet, Hubert; Lonergan, Michelle; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; van Os, Carel H.; Deen, Peter M.T.

    2003-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates body water conservation by redistributing aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels from intracellular vesicles to the apical surface of renal collecting ducts, resulting in water reabsorption from urine. Mutations in AQP2 cause autosomal nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disease characterized by the inability to concentrate urine. Here, we report a frame-shift mutation in AQP2 causing dominant NDI. This AQP2 mutant is a functional water channel when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, expressed in polarized renal cells, it is misrouted to the basolateral instead of apical plasma membrane. Additionally, this mutant forms heterotetramers with wild-type AQP2 and redirects this complex to the basolateral surface. The frame shift induces a change in the COOH terminus of AQP2, creating both a leucine- and a tyrosine-based motif, which cause the reversed sorting of AQP2. Our data reveal a novel cellular phenotype in dominant NDI and show that dominance of basolateral sorting motifs in a mutant subunit can be the molecular basis for disease. PMID:14662748

  11. Battling Btk Mutants With Noncovalent Inhibitors That Overcome Cys481 and Thr474 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam R; Kohli, Pawan Bir; Katewa, Arna; Gogol, Emily; Belmont, Lisa D; Choy, Regina; Penuel, Elicia; Burton, Luciana; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Ortwine, Daniel F; Bowman, Krista; Franke, Yvonne; Tam, Christine; Estevez, Alberto; Mortara, Kyle; Wu, Jiansheng; Li, Hong; Lin, May; Bergeron, Philippe; Crawford, James J; Young, Wendy B

    2016-10-21

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib has shown impressive clinical efficacy in a range of B-cell malignancies. However, acquired resistance has emerged, and second generation therapies are now being sought. Ibrutinib is a covalent, irreversible inhibitor that modifies Cys481 in the ATP binding site of Btk and renders the enzyme inactive, thereby blocking B-cell receptor signal transduction. Not surprisingly, Cys481 is the most commonly mutated Btk residue in cases of acquired resistance to ibrutinib. Mutations at other sites, including Thr474, a gatekeeper residue, have also been detected. Herein, we describe noncovalent Btk inhibitors that differ from covalent inhibitors like ibrutinib in that they do not interact with Cys481, they potently inhibit the ibrutinib-resistant Btk C481S mutant in vitro and in cells, and they are exquisitely selective for Btk. Noncovalent inhibitors such as GNE-431 also show excellent potency against the C481R, T474I, and T474M mutants. X-ray crystallographic analysis of Btk provides insight into the unique mode of binding of these inhibitors that explains their high selectivity for Btk and their retained activity against mutant forms of Btk. This class of noncovalent Btk inhibitors may provide a treatment option to patients, especially those who have acquired resistance to ibrutinib by mutation of Cys481 or Thr474.

  12. Rubisco small subunits from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas complement Rubisco-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky; Leitão, Nuno; Orr, Douglas J; Meyer, Moritz T; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-04-01

    Introducing components of algal carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into higher plant chloroplasts could increase photosynthetic productivity. A key component is the Rubisco-containing pyrenoid that is needed to minimise CO 2 retro-diffusion for CCM operating efficiency. Rubisco in Arabidopsis was re-engineered to incorporate sequence elements that are thought to be essential for recruitment of Rubisco to the pyrenoid, namely the algal Rubisco small subunit (SSU, encoded by rbcS) or only the surface-exposed algal SSU α-helices. Leaves of Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing 'pyrenoid-competent' chimeric Arabidopsis SSUs containing the SSU α-helices from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can form hybrid Rubisco complexes with catalytic properties similar to those of native Rubisco, suggesting that the α-helices are catalytically neutral. The growth and photosynthetic performance of complemented Arabidopsis rbcs mutants producing near wild-type levels of the hybrid Rubisco were similar to those of wild-type controls. Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing a Chlamydomonas SSU differed from wild-type plants with respect to Rubisco catalysis, photosynthesis and growth. This confirms a role for the SSU in influencing Rubisco catalytic properties. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The conformational requirements for the mechanical precipitation of hemoglobin S and other mutants.

    PubMed

    Roth, E F; Elbaum, D; Bookchin, R M; Nagel, R L

    1976-08-01

    The mechanical stability of human hemoglobin mutants was studied for the specific effects of single and double amino acid substitutions, the ligand state of each chain, and the effect of hybrids between oxy and cyanmet partners on precipitability. It was found that the beta6Glu leads to Val and the beta73 Asp leads to Asn mutations increased the degree of mechanical precipitation in the liganded but not in the deoxy form. When these mutations occurred on the same chain, the effects were approximately additive. Heat labile mutants such as Hb Gun Hill and Hb Leiden exhibited mechanical instability, but probably through a different mechanism, as very little dependence on ligand state was apparent. Studies with valency hybrids of HbS(alpha2 betas2-and-alpha2 betas2 where = cyanmet) revealed that instability was primarily determined by the state of the betas chain, which must be liganded to confer instability on the tetramer. A good agreement between surface activity and mechanical precipitability of these mutants has been found.

  15. Phenotypic Restoration by Molybdate of Nitrate Reductase Activity in chlD Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, J. H.; DeMoss, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    ChlD mutants of Escherichia coli are pleiotropic, lacking formate-nitrate reductase activity as well as formate-hydrogenlyase activity. Whole-chain formate-nitrate reductase activity, assayed with formate as the electron donor and measuring the amount of nitrite produced, was restored to wild-type levels in the mutants by addition of 10−4m molybdate to the growth medium. Under these conditions, the activity of each of the components of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase chain increased after molybdate supplementation. In the absence of nitrate, the activities of the formate-hydrogenlyase system were also restored by molybdate. Strains deleted for the chlD gene responded in a similar way to molybdate supplementation. The concentration of molybdenum in the chlD mutant cells did not differ significantly from that in the wild-type cells at either low or high concentrations of molybdate in the medium. However, the distribution of molybdenum between the soluble protein and membrane fractions differed significantly from wild type. We conclude that the chlD gene product cannot be a structural component of the formate-hydrogenlyase pathway or the formate-nitrate reductase pathway, but that it must have an indirect role in processing molybdate to a form necessary for both electron transport systems. PMID:4942767

  16. In Vivo Effects of Sporulation Kinases on Mutant Spo0A Proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Quisel, John D.; Burkholder, William F.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2001-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of the response regulator Spo0A (Spo0A∼P) is required for the initiation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Phosphate is transferred to Spo0A from at least four histidine kinases (KinA, KinB, KinC, and KinD) by a phosphotransfer pathway composed of Spo0F and Spo0B. Several mutations in spo0A allow initiation of sporulation in the absence of spo0F and spo0B, but the mechanisms by which these mutations allow bypass of spo0F and spo0B are not fully understood. We measured the ability of KinA, KinB, and KinC to activate sporulation of five spo0A mutants in the absence of Spo0F and Spo0B. We also determined the effect of Spo0E, a Spo0A∼P-specific phosphatase, on sporulation of strains containing the spo0A mutations. Our results indicate that several of the mutations relax the specificity of Spo0A, allowing Spo0A to obtain phosphate from a broader group of phosphodonors. In the course of these experiments, we observed medium-dependent effects on the sporulation of different mutants. This led us to identify a small molecule, acetoin, that can stimulate sporulation of some spo0A mutants. PMID:11673427

  17. An 'instant gene bank' method for gene cloning by mutant complementation.

    PubMed

    Gems, D; Aleksenko, A; Belenky, L; Robertson, S; Ramsden, M; Vinetski, Y; Clutterbuck, A J

    1994-02-01

    We describe a new method of gene cloning by complementation of mutant alleles which obviates the need for construction of a gene library in a plasmid vector in vitro and its amplification in Escherichia coli. The method involves simultaneous transformation of mutant strains of the fungus Aspergillus nidulans with (i) fragmented chromosomal DNA from a donor species and (ii) DNA of a plasmid without a selectable marker gene, but with a fungal origin of DNA replication ('helper plasmid'). Transformant colonies appear as the result of the joining of chromosomal DNA fragments carrying the wild-type copies of the mutant allele with the helper plasmid. Joining may occur either by ligation (if the helper plasmid is in linear form) or recombination (if it is cccDNA). This event occurs with high efficiency in vivo, and generates an autonomously replicating plasmid cointegrate. Transformants containing Penicillium chrysogenum genomic DNA complementing A. nidulans niaD, nirA and argB mutations have been obtained. While some of these cointegrates were evidently rearranged or consisted only of unaltered replicating plasmid, in other cases plasmids could be recovered into E. coli and were subsequently shown to contain the selected gene. The utility of this "instant gene bank" technique is demonstrated here by the molecular cloning of the P. canescens trpC gene.

  18. Gluco-oligosaccharides synthesized by glucosyltransferases from constitutive mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28.

    PubMed

    Iliev, I; Vassileva, T; Ignatova, C; Ivanova, I; Haertlé, T; Monsan, P; Chobert, J-M

    2008-01-01

    To find different types of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28 and its mutant forms, and to check the effectiveness of gluco-oligosaccharide synthesis using maltose as the acceptor. Constitutive mutants were obtained after chemical mutagenesis by ethyl methane sulfonate. Lm M281 produced more active GTFs than that obtained by the parental strain cultivated on sucrose. GTF from Lm M286 produced a resistant glucan, based on endo-dextranase and amyloglucosidase hydrolysis. The extracellular enzymes from Lm M286 catalyse acceptor reactions and transfer the glucose unit from sucrose to maltose to produce gluco-oligosaccharides (GOS). By increasing the sucrose/maltose ratio, it was possible to catalyse the synthesis of oligosaccharides of increasing degree of polymerization (DP). Different types of GTFs (dextransucrase, alternansucrase and levansucrase) were produced from new constitutive mutants of Leuc. mesenteroides. GTFs from Lm M286 can catalyse the acceptor reaction in the presence of maltose, leading to the synthesis of branched oligosaccharides. Conditions were optimized to synthesize GOS by using GTFs from Lm M286, with the aim of producing maximum quantities of branched-chain oligosaccharides with DP 3-5. This would allow the use of the latter as prebiotics.

  19. Convergent mechanisms favor fast amyloid formation in two lambda 6a Ig light chain mutants.

    PubMed

    Valdés-García, Gilberto; Millán-Pacheco, César; Pastor, Nina

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular deposition as amyloids of immunoglobulin light chains causes light chain amyloidosis. Among the light chain families, lambda 6a is one of the most frequent in light chain amyloidosis patients. Its germline protein, 6aJL2, and point mutants, R24G and P7S, are good models to study fibrillogenesis, because their stability and fibril formation characteristics have been described. Both mutations make the germline protein unstable and speed up its ability to aggregate. To date, there is no molecular mechanism that explains how these differences in amyloidogenesis can arise from a single mutation. To look into the structural and dynamical differences in the native state of these proteins, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Despite the structural similarity of the germline protein and the mutants, we found differences in their dynamical signatures that explain the mutants' increased tendency to form amyloids. The contact network alterations caused by the mutations, though different, converge in affecting two anti-aggregation motifs present in light chain variable domains, suggesting a different starting point for aggregation in lambda chains compared to kappa chains. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Forms, Forms and More Forms. Book Seven. Project Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Doris; And Others

    This Project Drive booklet titled Forms, Forms, and More Forms is one of eight booklets designed for intermediate-level English-as-a-second-language students and low-level adult basic education/basic reading students. The goal of the booklet is to aid the student in developing the oral and sight vocabulary necessary for a basic driver training…

  1. Prion Propagation in Cells Expressing PrP Glycosylation Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Salamat, Muhammad K.; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrPC) to a disease-related isoform (PrPSc). PrPC carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrPC glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrPSc and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrPSc, while PrPC with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrPC, were able to form infectious PrPSc. Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection. PMID:21248032

  2. HPV-18 E6 mutants reveal p53 modulation of viral DNA amplification in organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Eun-Young; Wang, Hsu-Kun; Banerjee, N. Sanjib; Broker, Thomas R.; Chow, Louise T.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) amplify in differentiated strata of a squamous epithelium. The HPV E7 protein destabilizes the p130/retinoblastoma susceptibility protein family of tumor suppressors and reactivates S-phase reentry, thereby facilitating viral DNA amplification. The high-risk HPV E6 protein destabilizes the p53 tumor suppressor and many other host proteins. However, the critical E6 targets relevant to viral DNA amplification have not been identified, because functionally significant E6 mutants are not stably maintained in transfected cells. Using Cre-loxP recombination, which efficiently generates HPV genomic plasmids in transfected primary human keratinocytes, we have recapitulated a highly productive infection of HPV-18 in organotypic epithelial cultures. By using this system, we now report the characterization of four HPV-18 E6 mutations. An E6 null mutant accumulated high levels of p53 and amplified very poorly. p53 siRNA or ectopic WT E6 partially restored amplification, whereas three missense E6 mutations that did not effectively destabilize p53 complemented the null mutant poorly. Unexpectedly, in cis, two of the missense mutants amplified, albeit to a lower extent than the WT and only in cells with undetectable p53. These observations and others implicate p53 and additional host proteins in regulating viral DNA amplification and also suggest an inhibitory effect of E6 overexpression. We show that high levels of viral DNA amplification are critical for late protein expression and report several previously undescribed viral RNAs, including bicistronic transcripts predicted to encode E5 and L2 or an alternative form of E1^E4 and L1. PMID:23572574

  3. Impaired Heme Binding and Aggregation of Mutant Cystathionine β-Synthase Subunits in Homocystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Janošík, Miroslav; Oliveriusová, Jana; Janošíková, Bohumila; Sokolová, Jitka; Kraus, Eva; Kraus, Jan P.; Kožich, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    During the past 20 years, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency has been detected in the former Czechoslovakia with a calculated frequency of 1:349,000. The clinical manifestation was typical of homocystinuria, and about half of the 21 patients were not responsive to pyridoxine. Twelve distinct mutations were detected in 30 independent homocystinuric alleles. One half of the alleles carried either the c.833 T→C or the IVS11−2A→C mutation; the remaining alleles contained private mutations. The abundance of five mutant mRNAs with premature stop codons was analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Two mRNAs, c.828_931ins104 (IVS7+1G→A) and c.1226 G→A, were severely reduced in the cytoplasm as a result of nonsense-mediated decay. In contrast, the other three mRNAs—c.19_20insC, c.28_29delG, and c.210_235del26 (IVS1−1G→C)—were stable. Native western blot analysis of 14 mutant fibroblast lines showed a paucity of CBS antigen, which was detectable only in aggregates. Five mutations—A114V (c.341C→T), A155T (c.463G→A), E176K (c.526G→A), I278T (c.833T→C), and W409_G453del (IVS11−2A→C)—were expressed in Escherichia coli. All five mutant proteins formed substantially more aggregates than did the wild-type CBS, and no aggregates contained heme. These data suggest that abnormal folding, impaired heme binding, and aggregation of mutant CBS polypeptides may be common pathogenic mechanisms in CBS deficiency. PMID:11359213

  4. Altered striatal function in a mutant mouse lacking D1A dopamine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Drago, J; Gerfen, C R; Lachowicz, J E; Steiner, H; Hollon, T R; Love, P E; Ooi, G T; Grinberg, A; Lee, E J; Huang, S P

    1994-01-01

    Of the five known dopamine receptors, D1A and D2 represent the major subtypes expressed in the striatum of the adult brain. Within the striatum, these two subtypes are differentially distributed in the two main neuronal populations that provide direct and indirect pathways between the striatum and the output nuclei of the basal ganglia. Movement disorders, including Parkinson disease and various dystonias, are thought to result from imbalanced activity in these pathways. Dopamine regulates movement through its differential effects on D1A receptors expressed by direct output neurons and D2 receptors expressed by indirect output neurons. To further examine the interaction of D1A and D2 neuronal pathways in the striatum, we used homologous recombination to generate mutant mice lacking functional D1A receptors (D1A-/-). D1A-/- mutants are growth retarded and die shortly after weaning age unless their diet is supplemented with hydrated food. With such treatment the mice gain weight and survive to adulthood. Neurologically, D1A-/- mice exhibit normal coordination and locomotion, although they display a significant decrease in rearing behavior. Examination of the striatum revealed changes associated with the altered phenotype of these mutants. D1A receptor binding was absent in striatal sections from D1A-/- mice. Striatal neurons normally expressing functional D1A receptors are formed and persist in adult homozygous mutants. Moreover, substance P mRNA, which is colocalized specifically in striatal neurons with D1A receptors, is expressed at a reduced level. In contrast, levels of enkephalin mRNA, which is expressed in striatal neurons with D2 receptors, are unaffected. These findings show that D1A-/- mice exhibit selective functional alterations in the striatal neurons giving rise to the direct striatal output pathway. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809078

  5. Rescue of volume-regulated anion current by bestrophin mutants with altered charge selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Ting; Hartzell, H Criss

    2008-11-01

    Mutations in human bestrophin-1 are linked to various kinds of retinal degeneration. Although it has been proposed that bestrophins are Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, definitive proof is lacking partly because mice with the bestrophin-1 gene deleted have normal Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents. Here, we provide compelling evidence to support the idea that bestrophin-1 is the pore-forming subunit of a cell volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) in Drosophila S2 cells. VRAC was abolished by treatment with RNAi to Drosophila bestrophin-1. VRAC was rescued by overexpressing bestrophin-1 mutants with altered biophysical properties and responsiveness to sulfhydryl reagents. In particular, the ionic selectivity of the F81C mutant changed from anionic to cationic when the channel was treated with the sulfhydryl reagent, sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSES(-)) (P(Cs)/P(Cl) = 0.25 for native and 2.38 for F81C). The F81E mutant was 1.3 times more permeable to Cs(+) than Cl(-). The finding that VRAC was rescued by F81C and F81E mutants with different biophysical properties shows that bestrophin-1 is a VRAC in S2 cells and not simply a regulator or an auxiliary subunit. F81C overexpressed in HEK293 cells also exhibits a shift of ionic selectivity after MTSES(-) treatment, although the effect is quantitatively smaller than in S2 cells. To test whether bestrophins are VRACs in mammalian cells, we compared VRACs in peritoneal macrophages from wild-type mice and mice with both bestrophin-1 and bestrophin-2 disrupted (best1(-/-)/best2(-/-)). VRACs were identical in wild-type and best1(-/-)/best2(-/-) mice, showing that bestrophins are unlikely to be the classical VRAC in mammalian cells.

  6. Increased Levels of Rictor Prevent Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Neuronal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Creus-Muncunill, Jordi; Rué, Laura; Alcalá-Vida, Rafael; Badillos-Rodríguez, Raquel; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Marco, Sonia; Alberch, Jordi; Perez-Otaño, Isabel; Malagelada, Cristina; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2018-02-19

    Rictor associates with mTOR to form the mTORC2 complex, which activity regulates neuronal function and survival. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of neuronal dysfunction and cell death in specific brain regions such as for example Huntington's disease (HD), which is characterized by the loss of striatal projection neurons leading to motor dysfunction. Although HD is caused by the expression of mutant huntingtin, cell death occurs gradually suggesting that neurons have the capability to activate compensatory mechanisms to deal with neuronal dysfunction and later cell death. Here, we analyzed whether mTORC2 activity could be altered by the presence of mutant huntingtin. We observed that Rictor levels are specifically increased in the striatum of HD mouse models and in the putamen of HD patients. Rictor-mTOR interaction and the phosphorylation levels of Akt, one of the targets of the mTORC2 complex, were increased in the striatum of the R6/1 mouse model of HD suggesting increased mTORC2 signaling. Interestingly, acute downregulation of Rictor in striatal cells in vitro reduced mTORC2 activity, as shown by reduced levels of phospho-Akt, and increased mutant huntingtin-induced cell death. Accordingly, overexpression of Rictor increased mTORC2 activity counteracting cell death. Furthermore, normalization of endogenous Rictor levels in the striatum of R6/1 mouse worsened motor symptoms suggesting an induction of neuronal dysfunction. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased Rictor striatal levels could counteract neuronal dysfunction induced by mutant huntingtin.

  7. orco mutant mosquitoes lose strong preference for humans and are not repelled by volatile DEET.

    PubMed

    DeGennaro, Matthew; McBride, Carolyn S; Seeholzer, Laura; Nakagawa, Takao; Dennis, Emily J; Goldman, Chloe; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2013-06-27

    Female mosquitoes of some species are generalists and will blood-feed on a variety of vertebrate hosts, whereas others display marked host preference. Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti have evolved a strong preference for humans, making them dangerously efficient vectors of malaria and Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Specific host odours probably drive this strong preference because other attractive cues, including body heat and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2), are common to all warm-blooded hosts. Insects sense odours via several chemosensory receptor families, including the odorant receptors (ORs), membrane proteins that form heteromeric odour-gated ion channels comprising a variable ligand-selective subunit and an obligate co-receptor called Orco (ref. 6). Here we use zinc-finger nucleases to generate targeted mutations in the orco gene of A. aegypti to examine the contribution of Orco and the odorant receptor pathway to mosquito host selection and sensitivity to the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). orco mutant olfactory sensory neurons have greatly reduced spontaneous activity and lack odour-evoked responses. Behaviourally, orco mutant mosquitoes have severely reduced attraction to honey, an odour cue related to floral nectar, and do not respond to human scent in the absence of CO2. However, in the presence of CO2, female orco mutant mosquitoes retain strong attraction to both human and animal hosts, but no longer strongly prefer humans. orco mutant females are attracted to human hosts even in the presence of DEET, but are repelled upon contact, indicating that olfactory- and contact-mediated effects of DEET are mechanistically distinct. We conclude that the odorant receptor pathway is crucial for an anthropophilic vector mosquito to discriminate human from non-human hosts and to be effectively repelled by volatile DEET.

  8. Role of disulfide cross-linking of mutant SOD1 in the formation of inclusion-body-like structures.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brittany L T; Patel, Kinaree; Brown, Hilda H; Borchelt, David R

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic aggregates of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) harboring mutations linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) have been shown to contain aberrant intermolecular disulfide cross-links. In prior studies, we observed that intermolecular bonding was not necessary in the formation of detergent- insoluble SOD1 complexes by mutant SOD1, but we were unable to assess whether this type of bonding may be important for pathologic inclusion formation. In the present study, we visually assess the formation of large inclusions by fusing mutant SOD1 to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Experimental constructs possessing mutations at all cysteine residues in SOD1 (sites 6, 57, 111, and 146 to F,S,Y,R or G,S,Y,R, respectively) were shown to maintain a high propensity of inclusion formation despite the inability to form disulfide cross-links. Interestingly, although aggregates form when all cysteines were mutated, double mutants of the ALS mutation C6G with an experimental mutation C111S exhibited low aggregation propensity. Overall, this study is an extension of previous work demonstrating that cysteine residues in mutant SOD1 play a role in modulating aggregation and that intermolecular disulfide bonds are not required to produce large intracellular inclusion-like structures.

  9. Analysis of Photosynthetic Antenna Function in a Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Lacking trans-Hexadecenoic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Peter; Browse, John; Watson, Jan; Arntzen, Charles J.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1985-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the proposal that the unusual chloroplast-specific lipid acyl group Δ3,trans-hexadecenoic acid (trans-C16:1) stimulates the formation or maintenance of the oligomeric form of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCP). To assess the functional significance of this apparent association we have analyzed LHCP structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) which lacks trans-C16:1 by electrophoretic analysis of the protein-chlorophyll complexes and by measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence under a variety of conditions. By these criteria the putative oligomeric form of LHCP appears to be slightly more labile to detergent-mediated dissociation in the mutant. The oligomeric PSI chlorophyll-protein complex, associated with PSI, was also more labile to detergent-mediated dissociation in the mutant, suggesting a previously unsuspected association of trans-C16:1 with the PSI complex. However, no significant effect of the mutation on the efficiency of energy transfer from LHCP to the photochemical reaction centers was observed under any of the various conditions imposed. Also, the stability of the chlorophyll-protein complexes to temperature-induced dissociation was unaffected in the mutant. The role of trans-C16:1 is very subtle or is only conditionally expressed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664340

  10. Linking a compound-heterozygous Parkin mutant (Q311R and A371T) to Parkinson's disease by using proteomic and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Ozgul, Sinem; Kasap, Murat; Akpinar, Gurler; Kanli, Aylin; Güzel, Nil; Karaosmanoglu, Kübra; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Iseri, Pervin

    2015-01-01

    Parkin is an E3-protein ubiquitin ligase, which plays an important role as a scavenger in cell metabolism. Since the discovery of the link between Parkin and Parkinson's disease, Parkin was placed in the center of Parkinson's disease research. Previously, we isolated a mutant form of the Parkin protein (Q311R and A371T) from a Parkinson's disease patient. In this study, we aimed at characterizing this mutant Parkin protein by using biochemical and proteomic approaches. We used neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) as our model and created two inducible cell lines that expressed the wild type and the mutant Parkin proteins. We first investigated the effect of expressing both the wild type and the mutant Parkin proteins on the overall proteome by using 2D-DIGE approach. The experiments yielded the identification of 22 differentially regulated proteins, of which 13 were regulated in the mutant Parkin expressing cells. Classification of the identified proteins based on biological process and molecular function revealed that the majority of the regulated proteins belonged to protein folding and energy metabolism. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted the presence of a link between the regulated proteins of the mutant Parkin expressing cells and Parkinson's disease. We also performed biochemical characterization studies on the wild type and the mutant Parkin proteins to make sense out of the differences observed at the proteome level. Both proteins displayed biological activity, had similar stabilities and localized similarly to the cytoplasm and the nucleus in SH-SY5Y cells. The mutant protein, however, was cut by a protease and subjected to a post-translational modification. The observed differences at the proteome level might be due to the differences in processing of the mutant Parkin protein. Overall, we were able to create a possible link between a pair of Parkin mutations to its pertinent disease by using 2D-DIGE in combination with biochemical and molecular approaches

  11. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  12. Dominant negative mutant of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluR3: implications for the role of a cysteine residue for its channel activity and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Watase, K; Sekiguchi, M; Matsui, T A; Tagawa, Y; Wada, K

    1997-01-01

    We reported that a 33-amino-acid deletion (from tyrosine-715 to glycine-747) in a putative extracellular loop of GluR3 produced a mutant that exhibited dominant negative effects upon the functional expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors [Sekiguchi et al. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 14559-14565]. In this study, we searched for a key residue in the dominant negative effects to explore the mechanism and examined the role of the residue in the function of the AMPA receptor. We prepared 20 GluR3 mutants with amino acid substitutions within the 33-amino-acid-region, and dominant negative effects were tested electrophysiologically in Xenopus oocytes co-expressing the mutant and normal subunits. Among the mutants, only a GluR3 mutant in which an original cysteine (Cys)-722 was replaced by alanine exhibited a dominant negative effect comparable with that of the original mutant in which the entire 33-amino-acid segment is deleted. The co-expression of the Cys-722 mutant did not inhibit the translation of normal subunits in oocytes. The Cys-722 mutant formed a functional homomeric receptor with significantly higher affinity for glutamate or kainate than a homomeric GluR3 receptor. The Cys-722 mutation greatly enhanced the sensitivity of GluR3 for aniracetam, which alters kinetic properties of AMPA receptors. The kainate-induced currents in oocytes expressing the Cys-722 mutant alone showed strong inward rectification. These results suggest that the Cys-722 in GluR3 is important for dominant negative effects and plays a crucial role in the determination of pharmacological properties in AMPA receptor function. PMID:9065754

  13. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62–65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments. PMID:27667026

  14. Indirect intergenic suppression of a radiosensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora defective in sister-chromatid cohesiveness.

    PubMed

    Huynh, A D; Leblon, G; Zickler, D

    1986-01-01

    Six ultra violet (UV) mutageneses were performed on the spo76 UV-sensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora. Spo76 shows an early centromere cleavage associated with an arrest at the first meiotic division and therefore does not form ascospores. Moreover, it exhibits altered pairing structure (synaptonemal complex), revealing a defect in the sister-chromatid cohesiveness. From 37 revertants which partially restored sporulation, 34 extragenic suppressors of spo76 were isolated. All suppressors are altered in chromosomal pairing but, unlike spo76, show a wild type centromere cleavage. The 34 suppressors were assigned to six different genes and mapped. Only one of the suppressor genes is involved in repair functions.

  15. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  16. Recombinant levels of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in various replication, recombination, or repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zieg, J; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains containing mutations in lexA, rep, uvrA, uvrD, uvrE, lig, polA, dam, or xthA were constructed and tested for conjugation and transduction proficiencies and ability to form Lac+ recombinants in an assay system utilizing a nontandem duplication of two partially deleted lactose operons (lacMS286phi80dIIlacBK1). lexA and rep mutants were as deficient (20% of wild type) as recB and recC strains in their ability to produce Lac+ progeny. All the other strains exhibited increased frequencies of Lac+ recombinant formation, compared with wild type, ranging from 2- to 13-fold. Some strains showed markedly increased conjugation proficiency (dam uvrD) compared to wild type, while others appeared deficient (polA107). Some differences in transduction proficiency were also observed. Analysis of the Lac+ recombinants formed by the various mutants indicated that they were identical to the recombinants formed by a wild-type strain. The results indicate that genetic recombination in E. coli is a highly regulated process involving multiple gene products. PMID:350859

  17. Densified waste form and method for forming

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate themore » temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.« less

  18. Defective transport of the obesity mutant PC1/3 N222D contributes to loss of function.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Yogikala; Blanco, Elias H; Liu, Ming; Peinado, Juan R; Wheeler, Matthew C; Gekakis, Nicholas; Arvan, Peter; Lindberg, Iris

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in the PCSK1 gene encoding prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) are strongly associated with obesity in humans. The PC1/3(N222D) mutant mouse thus far represents the only mouse model that mimics the PC1/3 obesity phenotype in humans. The present investigation addresses the cell biology of the N222D mutation. Metabolic labeling experiments reveal a clear defect in the kinetics of insulin biosynthesis in islets from PC1/3(N222D) mutant mice, resulting in an increase in both proinsulin and its processing intermediates, predominantly lacking cleavage at the Arg-Arg site. Although the mutant PC1/3 zymogen is correctly processed to the 87-kDa form, pulse-chase immunoprecipitation experiments, labeling, and immunohistochemical experiments using uncleavable variants all demonstrate that the PC1/3-N222D protein is largely mislocalized compared with similar wild-type (WT) constructs, being predominantly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The PC1/3-N222D mutant also undergoes more efficient degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system than the WT enzyme. Lastly, the mutant PC1/3-N222D protein coimmunoprecipitates with WT PC1/3 and exerts a modest effect on intracellular retention of the WT enzyme. These profound alterations in the cell biology of PC1/3-N222D are likely to contribute to the defective insulin biosynthetic events observed in the mutant mice and may be relevant to the dramatic contributions of polymorphisms in this gene to human obesity.

  19. Defective Transport of the Obesity Mutant PC1/3 N222D Contributes to Loss of Function

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Yogikala; Blanco, Elias H.; Liu, Ming; Peinado, Juan R.; Wheeler, Matthew C.; Gekakis, Nicholas; Arvan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PCSK1 gene encoding prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) are strongly associated with obesity in humans. The PC1/3N222D mutant mouse thus far represents the only mouse model that mimics the PC1/3 obesity phenotype in humans. The present investigation addresses the cell biology of the N222D mutation. Metabolic labeling experiments reveal a clear defect in the kinetics of insulin biosynthesis in islets from PC1/3N222D mutant mice, resulting in an increase in both proinsulin and its processing intermediates, predominantly lacking cleavage at the Arg-Arg site. Although the mutant PC1/3 zymogen is correctly processed to the 87-kDa form, pulse-chase immunoprecipitation experiments, labeling, and immunohistochemical experiments using uncleavable variants all demonstrate that the PC1/3-N222D protein is largely mislocalized compared with similar wild-type (WT) constructs, being predominantly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The PC1/3-N222D mutant also undergoes more efficient degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system than the WT enzyme. Lastly, the mutant PC1/3-N222D protein coimmunoprecipitates with WT PC1/3 and exerts a modest effect on intracellular retention of the WT enzyme. These profound alterations in the cell biology of PC1/3-N222D are likely to contribute to the defective insulin biosynthetic events observed in the mutant mice and may be relevant to the dramatic contributions of polymorphisms in this gene to human obesity. PMID:24828610

  20. ChR2 mutants at L132 and T159 with improved operational light sensitivity for vision restoration.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhuo-Hua; Ganjawala, Tushar H; Lu, Qi; Ivanova, Elena; Zhang, Zhifei

    2014-01-01

    The ectopic expression of microbial opsin-based optogenetic sensors, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in surviving inner retinal neurons, is a promising approach to restoring vision after retinal degeneration. However, a major limitation in using native ChR2 as a light sensor for vision restoration is the low light sensitivity of its expressing cells. Recently, two ChR2 mutations, T159C and L132C, were reported to produce higher photocurrents or have ultra light sensitivity. In this study, we created additional ChR2 mutants at these two sites to search for more light responsive ChR2 forms and evaluate their suitability for vision restoration by examining their light responsive properties in HEK cells and mouse retinal ganglion cells. We found additional ChR2 mutants at these two sites that showed a further increase in current amplitude at low light levels in the cells expressing these mutants, or operational light sensitivity. However, the increase in the operational light sensitivity was correlated with a decrease in temporal kinetics. Therefore, there is a trade-off between operational light sensitivity and temporal resolution for these more light responsive ChR2 mutants. Our results showed that for the two most light responsive mutants, L132C/T159C and L132C/T159S, the required light intensities for generating the threshold spiking activity in retinal ganglion cells were 1.5 and nearly 2 log units lower than wild-type ChR2 (wt-ChR2), respectively. Additionally, their ChR2-mediated spiking activities could follow flicker frequencies up to 20 and 10 Hz, respectively, at light intensities up to 1.5 log units above their threshold levels. Thus, the use of these more light responsive ChR2 mutants could make the optogenetic approach to restoring vision more feasible.

  1. Enhanced breast cancer progression by mutant p53 is inhibited by the circular RNA circ-Ccnb1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ling; Du, William W; Lyu, Juanjuan; Dong, Jun; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Weining; He, Alina; Kwok, Yat Sze Sheila; Ma, Jian; Wu, Nan; Li, Feiya; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; He, Chengyan; Yang, Bing L; Peng, Chun; MacKay, Helen J; Yee, Albert J; Yang, Burton B

    2018-05-23

    TP53 mutations occur in many different types of cancers that produce mutant p53 proteins. The mutant p53 proteins have lost wild-type p53 activity and gained new functions that contribute to malignant tumor progression. Different p53 mutations create distinct profiles in loss of wild-type p53 activity and gain of functions. Targeting the consequences generated by the great number of p53 mutations would be extremely complex. Therefore, in this study we used a workaround and took advantage of the fact that mutant p53 cannot bind H2AX. Using this, we developed a new approach to repress the acquisition of mutant p53 functions. We show here that the delivery of a circular RNA circ-Ccnb1 inhibited the function of three p53 mutations. By microarray analysis and real-time PCR, we detected decreased circ-Ccnb1 expression levels in patients bearing breast carcinoma. Ectopic delivery of circ-Ccnb1 inhibited tumor growth and extended mouse viability. Using proteomics, we found that circ-Ccnb1 precipitated p53 in p53 wild-type cells, but instead precipitated Bclaf1 in p53 mutant cells. Further experiments showed that H2AX serves as a bridge, linking the interaction of circ-Ccnb1 and wild-type p53, thus allowing Bclaf1 to bind Bcl2 resulting in cell survival. In the p53 mutant cells, circ-Ccnb1 formed a complex with H2AX and Bclaf1, resulting in the induction of cell death. We found that this occurred in three p53 mutations. These results shed light on the possible development of new approaches to inhibit the malignancy of p53 mutations.

  2. Brassinosteroid-Insensitive Dwarf Mutants of Arabidopsis Accumulate Brassinosteroids1

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Shozo; Choe, Sunghwa; Takatsuto, Suguru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yuan, Heng; Feldmann, Kenneth A.; Tax, Frans E.

    1999-01-01

    Seven dwarf mutants resembling brassinosteroid (BR)-biosynthetic dwarfs were isolated that did not respond significantly to the application of exogenous BRs. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that these were novel alleles of BRI1 (Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1), which encodes a receptor kinase that may act as a receptor for BRs or be involved in downstream signaling. The results of morphological and molecular analyses indicated that these represent a range of alleles from weak to null. The endogenous BRs were examined from 5-week-old plants of a null allele (bri1-4) and two weak alleles (bri1-5 and bri1-6). Previous analysis of endogenous BRs in several BR-biosynthetic dwarf mutants revealed that active BRs are deficient in these mutants. However, bri1-4 plants accumulated very high levels of brassinolide, castasterone, and typhasterol (57-, 128-, and 33-fold higher, respectively, than those of wild-type plants). Weaker alleles (bri1-5 and bri1-6) also accumulated considerable levels of brassinolide, castasterone, and typhasterol, but less than the null allele (bri1-4). The levels of 6-deoxoBRs in bri1 mutants were comparable to that of wild type. The accumulation of biologically active BRs may result from the inability to utilize these active BRs, the inability to regulate BR biosynthesis in bri1 mutants, or both. Therefore, BRI1 is required for the homeostasis of endogenous BR levels. PMID:10557222

  3. Corticostriatal circuit defects in Hoxb8 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Naveen; Jones, Bryan W.; West, Peter J.; Marc, Robert; Capecchi, Mario R.

    2018-01-01

    Hoxb8 mutant mice exhibit compulsive grooming and hair removal dysfunction similar to humans with the OCD-spectrum disorder, trichotillomania. Since, in the mouse brain, the only detectable cells that label with Hoxb8 cell lineage appear to be microglia, we suggested that defective microglia cause the neuropsychiatric disorder. Does the Hoxb8 mutation in microglia lead to neural circuit dysfunctions? We demonstrate that Hoxb8 mutants contain corticostriatal circuit defects. Golgi staining, ultra-structural, and electrophysiological studies of mutants reveal excess dendritic spines, pre- and post-synaptic structural defects, long-term potentiation and miniature postsynaptic current defects. Hoxb8 mutants also exhibit hyperanxiety and social behavioral deficits similar to mice with neuronal mutations in Sapap3, Slitrk5 and Shank3, reported models of OCD and autism spectrum disorders (ASD’s). Long-term treatment of Hoxb8 mutants with fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), reduces excessive grooming, hyperanxiety and social behavioral impairments. These studies provide linkage between the neuronal defects induced by defective Hoxb8-microglia, and neuronal dysfunctions directly generated by mutations in synaptic components that result in mice that display similar pathological grooming, hyperanxiety and social impairment deficits. Our results shed light on Hoxb8 microglia driven circuit-specific defects and therapeutic approaches that will become essential to developing novel therapies for neuropsychiatric diseases such as OCD and ASD’s with Hoxb8-microglia being the central target. PMID:28948967

  4. Regulatory Mutants at the his1 Locus of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Carol; Fogel, Seymour; Cramer, Carole

    1979-01-01

    The his1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for phosphoribosyl transferase, an allosteric enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in histidine biosynthesis. Mutants that specifically alter the feedback regulatory function were isolated by selecting his1 prototrophic revertants that overproduce and excrete histidine. The prototrophs were obtained from diploids homoallelic for his1–7 and heterozygous for the flanking markers thr3 and arg6. Among six independently derived mutant isolates, three distinct levels of histidine excretion were detected. The mutants were shown to be second-site alterations mapping at the his1 locus by recovery of the original auoxtrophic parental alleles. The double mutants, HIS1–7e, are dominant with respect to catalytic function but recessive in regulatory function. When removed from this his1–7 background, the mutant regulatory site (HIS1–e) still confers prototrophy but not histidine excretion. To yield the excretion phenotype, the primary and altered secondary sites are required in cis array. Differences in histidine excretion levels correlate with resistance to the histidine analogue, triazoalanine. PMID:385447

  5. Analysis of AtCry1 and Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Derek; Purvis, Adam; Ahmad, Margaret; Link, Justin J.; Engle, Dorothy

    Cryptochrome is an incredibly versatile protein that influences numerous biological processes such as plant growth, bird migration, and sleep cycles. Due to the versatility of this protein, understanding the mechanism would allow for advances in numerous fields such as crop growth, animal behavior, and sleep disorders. It is known that cryptochrome requires blue light to function, but the exact processes in the regulation of biological activity are still not fully understood. It is believed that the c-terminal domain of the protein undergoes a conformational change when exposed to blue light which allows for biological function. Three different non-functioning mutants were tested during this study to gain insight on the mechanism of cryptochrome. Absorbance spectra showed a difference between two of the mutants and the wild type with one mutant showing little difference. Immunoprecipitation experiments were also conducted to identify the different c-terminal responses of the mutants. By studying non functioning mutants of this protein, the mechanism of the protein can be further characterized. This two-month research experience in Paris allowed us to experience international and interdisciplinary collaborations in science and immerse in a different culture. The Borcer Fund for Student Research, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, and John Hauck Foundation.

  6. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P.; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T.; Gainor, Justin F.; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Rudin, Charles M.; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proven difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, an FDA-approved MEK inhibitor that acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signaling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumor cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities – it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patient tumors treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  7. EMMA—mouse mutant resources for the international scientific community

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Phil; Sengerova, Jitka; Matteoni, Raffaele; Chen, Chao-Kung; Soulat, Gaetan; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Fessele, Sabine; Hagn, Michael; Massimi, Marzia; Pickford, Karen; Butler, Richard H.; Marschall, Susan; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Pickard, Amanda; Raspa, Marcello; Scavizzi, Ferdinando; Fray, Martin; Larrigaldie, Vanessa; Leyritz, Johan; Birney, Ewan; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Brown, Steve; Herault, Yann; Montoliu, Lluis; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Smedley, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human disease and thousands of mutants have been identified or produced, most recently through gene-specific mutagenesis approaches. High throughput strategies by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) are producing mutants for all protein coding genes. Generating a knock-out line involves huge monetary and time costs so capture of both the data describing each mutant alongside archiving of the line for distribution to future researchers is critical. The European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA) is a leading international network infrastructure for archiving and worldwide provision of mouse mutant strains. It operates in collaboration with the other members of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe), EMMA being the European component. Additionally EMMA is one of four repositories involved in the IKMC, and therefore the current figure of 1700 archived lines will rise markedly. The EMMA database gathers and curates extensive data on each line and presents it through a user-friendly website. A BioMart interface allows advanced searching including integrated querying with other resources e.g. Ensembl. Other resources are able to display EMMA data by accessing our Distributed Annotation System server. EMMA database access is publicly available at http://www.emmanet.org. PMID:19783817

  8. Mutant number distribution in an exponentially growing population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Peter; Antal, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    We present an explicit solution to a classic model of cell-population growth introduced by Luria and Delbrück (1943 Genetics 28 491-511) 70 years ago to study the emergence of mutations in bacterial populations. In this model a wild-type population is assumed to grow exponentially in a deterministic fashion. Proportional to the wild-type population size, mutants arrive randomly and initiate new sub-populations of mutants that grow stochastically according to a supercritical birth and death process. We give an exact expression for the generating function of the total number of mutants at a given wild-type population size. We present a simple expression for the probability of finding no mutants, and a recursion formula for the probability of finding a given number of mutants. In the ‘large population-small mutation’ limit we recover recent results of Kessler and Levine (2014 J. Stat. Phys. doi:10.1007/s10955-014-1143-3) for a fully stochastic version of the process.

  9. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases andmore » disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.« less

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration in mahogunin (Mgrn1) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaihua; Johnson, Brian S.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress, ubiquitination defects and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly associated with neurodegeneration. Mice lacking mahogunin ring finger-1 (MGRN1) or attractin (ATRN) develop age-dependent spongiform neurodegeneration through an unknown mechanism. It has been suggested that they act in a common pathway. As MGRN1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, proteomic analysis of Mgrn1 mutant and control brains was performed to explore the hypothesis that loss of MGRN1 causes neurodegeneration via accumulation of its substrates. Many mitochondrial proteins were reduced in Mgrn1 mutants. Subsequent assays confirmed significantly reduced mitochondrial complex IV expression and activity as well as increased oxidative stress in mutant brains. Mitochondrial dysfunction was obvious many months before onset of vacuolation, implicating this as a causative factor. Compatible with the hypothesis that ATRN and MGRN1 act in the same pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress were also observed in the brains of Atrn mutants. Our results suggest that the study of Mgrn1 and Atrn mutant mice will provide insight into a causative molecular mechanism common to many neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17720281

  11. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  12. Molybdenum cofactor in chlorate-resistant and nitrate reductase-deficient insertion mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J B; Amy, N K

    1983-01-01

    We examined molybdenum cofactor activity in chlorate-resistant (chl) and nitrate reductase-deficient (nar) insertion mutants and wild-type strains of Escherichia coli K-12. The bacterial molybdenum cofactor was assayed by its ability to restore activity to the cofactor-deficient nitrate reductase found in the nit-1 strain of Neurospora crassa. In the wild-type E. coli strains, molybdenum cofactor was synthesized constitutively and found in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. Cofactor was found in two forms: the demolybdo form required additional molybdate in the assay mix for detection, whereas the molybdenum-containing form was active without additional molybdate. The chlA and chlE mutants had no detectable cofactor. The chlB and the narG, narI, narK, and narL (previously designated chlC) strains had cofactor levels similar to those of the wild-type strains, except the chlB strains had two to threefold more membrane-bound cofactor. Cofactor levels in the chlD and chlG strains were sensitive to molybdate. When grown in 1 microM molybdate, the chlD strains had only 15 to 20% of the wild-type levels of the demolybdo and molybdenum-containing forms of the cofactor. In contrast, the chlG strains had near wild-type levels of demolybdo cofactor when grown in 1 microM molybdate, but none of the molybdenum-containing form of the cofactor. Near wild-type levels of both forms of the cofactor were restored to the chlD and chlG strains by growth in 1 mM molybdate. PMID:6307982

  13. Production and characterization of streptomycin dependent mutants of Pasteurella multocida from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    de Alwis, M C; Carter, G R; Chengappa, M M

    1980-01-01

    A large number of streptomycin dependent mutants were produced from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia strains of Pasteurella multocida. The mutants required a minimum concentration of 25-50 microgram/mL streptomycin for growth and tolerated a concentration of 200 mg/mL. These mutants were avirulent to mice, when inoculated alone, but some mutants killed mice when inoculated with streptomycin. Biochemically all mutants were uniform and similar to the wild type. Most mutants were stable, but a few produced streptomycin independent revertants. The rate of reversion varied with each mutant. Most revertants were highly virulent for mice, some totally avirulant and a few relatively avirulent. PMID:6778598

  14. Comparison of effect of gamma ray irradiation on wild-type and N-terminal mutants of αA-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Srinivasagan; Fujii, Noriko; Fujii, Norihiko; Thankappan, Bency; Sakaue, Hiroaki; Ingu, Kim; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy; Anbarasu, Kumarasamy

    2014-01-01

    To study the comparative structural and functional changes between wild-type (wt) and N-terminal congenital cataract causing αA-crystallin mutants (R12C, R21L, R49C, and R54C) upon exposure to different dosages of gamma rays. Alpha A crystallin N-terminal mutants were created with the site-directed mutagenesis method. The recombinantly overexpressed and purified wt and mutant proteins were used for further studies. A (60)Co source was used to generate gamma rays to irradiate wild and mutant proteins at dosages of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 kGy. The biophysical property of the gamma irradiated (GI) and non-gamma irradiated (NGI) αA-crystallin wt and N-terminal mutants were determined. Oligomeric size was determined by size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the secondary structure with circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry, conformation of proteins with surface hydrophobicity, and the functional characterization were determined regarding chaperone activity using the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) aggregation assay. αA-crystallin N-terminal mutants formed high molecular weight (HMW) cross-linked products as well as aggregates when exposed to GI compared to the NGI wt counterparts. Furthermore, all mutants exhibited changed β-sheet and random coil structure. The GI mutants demonstrated decreased surface hydrophobicity when compared to αA-crystallin wt at 0, 1.0, and 1.5 kGy; however, at 2.0 kGy a drastic increase in hydrophobicity was observed only in the mutant R54C, not the wt. In contrast, chaperone activity toward ADH was gradually elevated at the minimum level in all GI mutants, and significant elevation was observed in the R12C mutant. Our findings suggest that the N-terminal mutants of αA-crystallin are structurally and functionally more sensitive to GI when compared to their NGI counterparts and wt. Protein oxidation as a result of gamma irradiation drives the protein to cross-link and aggregate culminating in cataract formation.

  15. Spatial constraints govern competition of mutant clones in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M D; Lynch, C N S; Craythorne, E; Liakath-Ali, K; Mallipeddi, R; Barker, J N; Watt, F M

    2017-10-24

    Deep sequencing can detect somatic DNA mutations in tissues permitting inference of clonal relationships. This has been applied to human epidermis, where sun exposure leads to the accumulation of mutations and an increased risk of skin cancer. However, previous studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the relative importance of positive selection and neutral drift in clonal evolution. Here, we sequenced larger areas of skin than previously, focusing on cancer-prone skin spanning five decades of life. The mutant clones identified were too large to be accounted for solely by neutral drift. Rather, using mathematical modelling and computational lattice-based simulations, we show that observed clone size distributions can be explained by a combination of neutral drift and stochastic nucleation of mutations at the boundary of expanding mutant clones that have a competitive advantage. These findings demonstrate that spatial context and cell competition cooperate to determine the fate of a mutant stem cell.

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John [Shoreham, NY; Whittle, Edward J [Greenport, NY

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  17. How Life History Can Sway the Fixation Probability of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Kurokawa, Shun; Giaimo, Stefano; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of demographic structure on evolutionary dynamics when selection acts on reproduction, survival, or both. In contrast to the previously discovered pattern that the fixation probability of a neutral mutant decreases while the population becomes younger, we show that a mutant with a constant selective advantage may have a maximum or a minimum of the fixation probability in populations with an intermediate fraction of young individuals. This highlights the importance of life history and demographic structure in studying evolutionary dynamics. We also illustrate the fundamental differences between selection on reproduction and selection on survival when age structure is present. In addition, we evaluate the relative importance of size and structure of the population in determining the fixation probability of the mutant. Our work lays the foundation for also studying density- and frequency-dependent effects in populations when demographic structures cannot be neglected. PMID:27129737

  18. Phenotypic analysis of a novel chordin mutant in medaka.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Shimada, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yokoi, Hayato; Narita, Takanori; Jindo, Tomoko; Kage, Takahiro; Kitagawa, Tadao; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Sekimizu, Koshin; Miyake, Akimitsu; Setiamarga, Davin H E; Murakami, Ryohei; Tsuda, Sachiko; Ooki, Shinya; Kakihara, Ken; Hojo, Motoki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Yuji; Araki, Kazuo; Saga, Yumiko; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2007-08-01

    We have isolated and characterized a ventralized mutant in medaka (the Japanese killifish; Oryzias latipes), which turned out to have a mutation in the chordin gene. The mutant exhibits ventralization of the body axis, malformation of axial bones, over-bifurcation of yolk sac blood vessels, and laterality defects in internal organs. The mutant exhibits variability of phenotypes, depending on the culture temperature, from embryos with a slightly ventralized phenotype to those without any head and trunk structures. Taking advantages of these variable and severe phenotypes, we analyzed the role of Chordin-dependent tissues such as the notochord and Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in the establishment of left-right axis in fish. The results demonstrate that, in the absence of the notochord and KV, the medaka lateral plate mesoderm autonomously and bilaterally expresses spaw gene in a default state. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders.

  20. Elevated Cell Wall Serine in Pleiotropic Staphylococcal Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Ruth Z.

    1966-01-01

    Korman, Ruth Z. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.). Elevated cell wall serine in pleiotropic staphylococcal mutants. J. Bacteriol. 92:762–768. 1966.—Physically purified cell walls were prepared from two staphylococcal strains and from pleiotropic variants derived from them. The quantitative amino acid and amino sugar content of these walls is reported. The pleiotypes, which are identified culturally by their failure to elaborate coagulase, their resistance to bacteriophage, and their sensitivity to mannitol, have altered molar ratios of amino acids and amino sugars in their cell walls. In comparison with lysine content, the serine content of the mutant wall is elevated and the glycine content is reduced. The glucosamine content is reduced also. It is postulated that the pleiotropic mutants possess an altered cell wall biosynthetic pathway. Images PMID:5922547

  1. Bending patterns of chlamydomonas flagella: III. A radial spoke head deficient mutant and a central pair deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, C J; Luck, D J

    1985-01-01

    Flash photomicrography at frequencies up to 300 Hz and computer-assisted image analysis have been used to obtain parameters describing the flagellar bending patterns of mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. All strains contained the uni1 mutation, to facilitate photography. The radial spoke head deficient mutant pf17, and the central pair deficient mutant, pf15, in combination with suppressor mutations that restore motility without restoring the ultrastructural or biochemical deficiencies, both generate forward mode bending patterns with increased shear amplitude and decreased asymmetry relative to the "wild-type" uni1 flagella described previously. In the reverse beating mode, the suppressed pf17 mutants generate reverse bending patterns with large shear amplitudes. Reverse beating of the suppressed pf15 mutants is rare. There is a reciprocal relationship between increased shear amplitude and decreased beat frequency, so that the velocity of sliding between flagellar microtubules is not increased by an increase in shear amplitude. The suppressor mutations alone cause decreased frequency and sliding velocity in both forward and reverse mode beating, with little change in shear amplitude or symmetry.

  2. Biochemical Analysis of Two Single Mutants that Give Rise to a Polymorphic G6PD A-Double Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Nava, Edson Jiovany; González-Valdez, Abigail; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Hernández-Pineda, Jessica; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Marcial-Quino, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular energy and redox balance. Mutations in the gene encoding G6PD cause the most common enzymopathy that drives hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. To gain insights into the effects of mutations in G6PD enzyme efficiency, we have investigated the biochemical, kinetic, and structural changes of three clinical G6PD variants, the single mutations G6PD A+ (Asn126AspD) and G6PD Nefza (Leu323Pro), and the double mutant G6PD A− (Asn126Asp + Leu323Pro). The mutants showed lower residual activity (≤50% of WT G6PD) and displayed important kinetic changes. Although all Class III mutants were located in different regions of the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and were not close to the active site, these mutants had a deleterious effect over catalytic activity and structural stability. The results indicated that the G6PD Nefza mutation was mainly responsible for the functional and structural alterations observed in the double mutant G6PD A−. Moreover, our study suggests that the G6PD Nefza and G6PD A− mutations affect enzyme functions in a similar fashion to those reported for Class I mutations. PMID:29072585

  3. Quinolone-resistant gyrase mutants demonstrate decreased susceptibility to triclosan.

    PubMed

    Webber, Mark A; Buckner, Michelle M C; Redgrave, Liam S; Ifill, Gyles; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Webb, Carly; Iddles, Robyn; Maxwell, Anthony; Piddock, Laura J V

    2017-10-01

    Cross-resistance between antibiotics and biocides is a potentially important driver of MDR. A relationship between susceptibility of Salmonella to quinolones and triclosan has been observed. This study aimed to: (i) investigate the mechanism underpinning this; (ii) determine whether the phenotype is conserved in Escherichia coli; and (iii) evaluate the potential for triclosan to select for quinolone resistance. WT E. coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and gyrA mutants were used. These were characterized by determining antimicrobial susceptibility, DNA gyrase activity and sensitivity to inhibition. Expression of stress response pathways (SOS, RpoS, RpoN and RpoH) was measured, as was the fitness of mutants. The potential for triclosan to select for quinolone resistance was determined. All gyrase mutants showed increased triclosan MICs and altered supercoiling activity. There was no evidence for direct interaction between triclosan and gyrase. Identical substitutions in GyrA had different impacts on supercoiling in the two species. For both, there was a correlation between altered supercoiling and expression of stress responses. This was more marked in E. coli, where an Asp87Gly GyrA mutant demonstrated greatly increased fitness in the presence of triclosan. Exposure of parental strains to low concentrations of triclosan did not select for quinolone resistance. Our data suggest gyrA mutants are less susceptible to triclosan due to up-regulation of stress responses. The impact of gyrA mutation differs between E. coli and Salmonella. The impacts of gyrA mutation beyond quinolone resistance have implications for the fitness and selection of gyrA mutants in the presence of non-quinolone antimicrobials. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants affected in attachment to plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, C J; Halperin, W; Nester, E W

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed that the chromosome of A. tumefaciens codes for a specific ability of this bacterium to attach to plant cells. This ability is associated with tumorigenesis by A. tumefaciens, the ability of avirulent A. tumefaciens to inhibit tumorigenesis, and the ability to adsorb certain phages. A second class of chromosomal mutations affects tumorigenesis without altering the ability to attach to plant cells. The attachment of A. tumefaciens to plant cells was assayed by mixing radiolabeled bacteria with suspensions of tobacco tissue culture cells or freshly isolated Zinnia leaf mesophyll cells. Under the conditions of this assay, an avirulent Ti plasmid-cured strain attached to the same extent as the same strain containing pTiB6806. Six of eight avirulent mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed defective attachment, whereas two retained wild-type attachment ability. In contrast to the strains showing wild-type attachment, the attachment-defective mutants failed to inhibit tumorigenesis when inoculated onto Jerusalem artichoke slices before inoculation of a virulent strain and also showed a loss of sensitivity to two Agrobacterium phages. The loss of phage sensitivity appeared to be due to a loss of ability to adsorb the phages. Staining with Calcofluor indicated that the mutants retained the ability to synthesize cellulose fibrils, which have been implicated in the attachment process. Southern filter hybridizations demonstrated that each mutant contained a single Tn5 insertion, and genetic linkage between the Tn5 insertion in one mutant and the attachment phenotype has also been demonstrated. Images PMID:6292165

  5. A Mutant Connexin50 with Enhanced Hemichannel Function Leads to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Peter J.; Tong, Jun-Jie; Arora, Anita; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Hunt, David M.; Moore, Anthony T.; Ebihara, Lisa; Beyer, Eric C.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the consequences of expression of a novel connexin50 (CX50) mutant identified in a child with congenital total cataracts. METHODS The GJA8 gene was directly sequenced. Formation of functional channels was assessed by two-microelectrode voltage-clamp. Connexin protein levels and distribution were assessed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The proportion of apoptotic cells was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Direct sequencing of the GJA8 gene identified a 137 G>T transition that resulted in the replacement of glycine by valine at position 46 of the coding region of CX50 (CX50G46V). Both CX50 and CX50G46V induced gap junctional currents in pairs of Xenopus oocytes. In single Xenopus oocytes, CX50G46V induced connexin hemichannel currents that were activated by removal of external calcium; their magnitudes were much higher than those in oocytes injected with similar amounts of CX50 cRNA. When expressed in HeLa cells under the control of an inducible promoter, both CX50 and CX50G46V formed gap junctional plaques. Induction of CX50G46V expression led to a decrease in cell number and an increase in the proportion of apoptotic cells. CX50G46V-induced cell death was prevented by high concentrations of extracellular calcium ions. CONCLUSIONS Unlike previously characterized CX50 mutants that exhibit impaired trafficking and/or lack of function, CX50G46V traffics properly to the plasma membrane and forms functional hemichannels and gap junction channels; however, it causes cell death even when expressed at minute levels. The biochemical results indirectly suggest a potential novel mechanism by which connexin mutants could lead to cataracts: cytotoxicity due to enhanced hemichannel function. PMID:19684000

  6. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. Methods A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca) were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Results Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara), Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java), Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung), Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung), Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra), whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. Conclusion The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme) or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes. PMID:22364613

  7. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asih, Puji Bs; Syahrani, Lepa; Rozi, Ismail Ep; Pratama, Nandha R; Marantina, Sylvia S; Arsyad, Dian S; Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo; Hawley, William; Laihad, Ferdinand; Shinta; Sukowati, Supratman; Lobo, Neil F; Syafruddin, Din

    2012-02-25

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca) were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara), Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java), Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung), Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung), Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra), whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme) or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes.

  8. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  9. Tryptophan 32 potentiates aggregation and cytotoxicity of a copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mutant associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David M; Gibbs, Bernard F; Kabashi, Edor; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D; Agar, Jeffrey N

    2007-06-01

    One familial form of the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1). This study provides in vivo evidence that normally occurring oxidative modification to SOD-1 promotes aggregation and toxicity of mutant proteins. The oxidation of Trp-32 was identified as a normal modification being present in both wild-type enzyme and SOD-1 with the disease-causing mutation, G93A, isolated from erythrocytes. Mutating Trp-32 to a residue with a slower rate of oxidative modification, phenylalanine, decreased both the cytotoxicity of mutant SOD-1 and its propensity to form cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons of dissociated mouse spinal cord cultures.

  10. User Guide for the LORE1 Insertion Mutant Resource.

    PubMed

    Mun, Terry; Małolepszy, Anna; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2017-01-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model legume used in the study of plant-microbe interactions, especially in the field of biological nitrogen fixation due to its ability to enter into a symbiotic relationship with a soil bacterium, Mesorhizobium loti. The LORE1 mutant population is a valuable resource for reverse genetics in L. japonicus due to its non-transgenic nature, high tagging efficiency, and low copy count. Here, we outline a workflow for identifying, ordering, and establishing homozygous LORE1 mutant lines for a gene of interest, LjFls2, including protocols for growth and genotyping of a segregating LORE1 population.

  11. Analysis of isoniazid-resistant transposon mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Sloan, J; Coppel, R L

    1996-10-15

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has renewed interest in the study of drug resistance in mycobacteria with the objective of improved chemotherapy. The genetic basis of isoniazid resistance in a model mycobacterium was studied. Eleven isoniazid-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis were created using transposon mutagenesis. Genetic and enzymatic characterisation of the mutants showed that katG, encoding T-catalase, was inactivated. The nucleotide sequence of M. smegmatis katG was determined and the mutation sites mapped demonstrating that both the amino and carboxyl halves of T-catalase are important for enzymatic activity.

  12. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  13. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  14. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  15. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  16. Stabilization of the E* Form Turns Thrombin into an Anticoagulant

    SciTech Connect

    Bah, Alaji; Carrell, Christopher J.; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-07-31

    Previous studies have shown that deletion of nine residues in the autolysis loop of thrombin produces a mutant with an anticoagulant propensity of potential clinical relevance, but the molecular origin of the effect has remained unresolved. The x-ray crystal structure of this mutant solved in the free form at 1.55 {angstrom} resolution reveals an inactive conformation that is practically identical (root mean square deviation of 0.154 {angstrom}) to the recently identified E* form. The side chain of Trp215 collapses into the active site by shifting >10 {angstrom} from its position in the active E form, and the oxyanion hole ismore » disrupted by a flip of the Glu192-Gly193 peptide bond. This finding confirms the existence of the inactive form E* in essentially the same incarnation as first identified in the structure of the thrombin mutant D102N. In addition, it demonstrates that the anticoagulant profile often caused by a mutation of the thrombin scaffold finds its likely molecular origin in the stabilization of the inactive E* form that is selectively shifted to the active E form upon thrombomodulin and protein C binding.« less

  17. Complementation analysis of mutants of nitric oxide synthase reveals that the active site requires two hemes.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Q W; Leung, M; Fuortes, M; Sassa, S; Nathan, C

    1996-01-01

    For catalytic activity, nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) must be dimeric. Previous work revealed that the requirements for stable dimerization included binding of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), arginine, and heme. Here we asked what function is served by dimerization. We assessed the ability of individually inactive mutants of mouse inducible NOS (iNOS; NOS2), each deficient in binding a particular cofactor or cosubstrate, to complement each other by generating NO upon cotransfection into human epithelial cells. The ability of the mutants to homodimerize was gauged by gel filtration and/or PAGE under partially denaturing conditions, both followed by immunoblot. Their ability to heterodimerize was assessed by coimmunoprecipitation. Heterodimers that contained only one COOH-terminal hemimer and only one BH4-binding site could both form and function, even though the NADPH-, FAD-, and FMN-binding domains (in the COOH-terminal hemimer) and the BH4-binding sites (in the NH2-terminal hemimer) were contributed by opposite chains. Heterodimers that contained only one heme-binding site (Cys-194) could also form, either in cis or in trans to the nucleotide-binding domains. However, for NO production, both chains had to bind heme. Thus, NO production by iNOS requires dimerization because the active site requires two hemes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:8643499

  18. Neuronal defects in the hindbrain of Hoxa1, Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutants reflect regulatory interactions among these Hox genes.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, Anthony; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Livet, Jean; Henderson, Christopher E; Krumlauf, Robb

    2003-12-01

    Hox genes are instrumental in assigning segmental identity in the developing hindbrain. Auto-, cross- and para-regulatory interactions help establish and maintain their expression. To understand to what extent such regulatory interactions shape neuronal patterning in the hindbrain, we analysed neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and motoneuron migration in Hoxa1, Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice. This comparison revealed that neurogenesis and differentiation of specific neuronal subpopulations in r4 was impaired in a similar fashion in all three mutants, but with different degrees of severity. In the Hoxb1 mutants, neurons derived from the presumptive r4 territory were re-specified towards an r2-like identity. Motoneurons derived from that territory resembled trigeminal motoneurons in both their migration patterns and the expression of molecular markers. Both migrating motoneurons and the resident territory underwent changes consistent with a switch from an r4 to r2 identity. Abnormally migrating motoneurons initially formed ectopic nuclei that were subsequently cleared. Their survival could be prolonged through the introduction of a block in the apoptotic pathway. The Hoxa1 mutant phenotype is consistent with a partial misspecification of the presumptive r4 territory that results from partial Hoxb1 activation. The Hoxb2 mutant phenotype is a hypomorph of the Hoxb1 mutant phenotype, consistent with the overlapping roles of these genes in facial motoneuron specification. Therefore, we have delineated the functional requirements in hindbrain neuronal patterning that follow the establishment of the genetic regulatory hierarchy between Hoxa1, Hoxb1 and Hoxb2.

  19. Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Dibyendu; Talukdar, Tulika

    2013-01-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) mutants, sodPv 1 and sodPv 2, exhibiting foliar superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of only 25% and 40% of their mother control (MC) cv. VL 63 were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 8 h) M2 progeny. Native-PAGE analysis revealed occurrence of Mn SOD, Fe SOD, Cu/Zn SOD I and Cu/Zn SOD II isozymes in MC, while Fe SOD, and Mn SOD were not formed in sodPv 1 and sodPv 2 leaves, respectively. In-gel activity of individual isozymes differed significantly among the parents. SOD deficiency is inherited as recessive mutations, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. Gene expressions using qRT PCR confirmed higher expressions of Cu/Zn SOD transcripts in both mutants and the absence of Fe SOD in sodPv 1 and Mn SOD in sodPv 2. In 50 μM arsenic, Cu/Zn SODs genes were further upregulated but other isoforms downregulated in the two mutants, maintaining SOD activity in its control level. In an F2 double mutants of sodPv 1 × sodPv 2, no Fe SOD, and Mn SOD expressions were detectable, while both Cu/Zn SODs are down-regulated and arsenic-induced leaf necrosis appeared. In contrast to both mutants, ROS-imaging study revealed overaccumulation of both superoxides and H2O2 in leaves of double mutant. PMID:24078924

  20. Mice mutant for both Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 show extensive remodeling of the hindbrain and defects in craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Rossel, M; Capecchi, M R

    1999-11-01

    The analysis of mice mutant for both Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 suggests that these two genes function together to pattern the hindbrain. Separately, mutations in Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 have profoundly different effects on hindbrain development. Hoxa1 mutations disrupt the rhombomeric organization of the hindbrain, whereas Hoxb1 mutations do not alter the rhombomeric pattern, but instead influence the fate of cells originating in rhombomere 4. We suggest that these differences are not the consequences of different functional roles for these gene products, but rather reflect differences in the kinetics of Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 gene expression. In strong support of the idea that Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 have overlapping functions, Hoxa1/Hoxb1 double mutant homozygotes exhibit a plethora of defects either not seen, or seen only in a very mild form, in mice mutant for only Hoxa1 or Hoxb1. Examples include: the loss of both rhombomeres 4 and 5, the selective loss of the 2(nd) branchial arch, and the loss of most, but not all, 2(nd) branchial arch-derived tissues. We suggest that the early role for both of these genes in hindbrain development is specification of rhombomere identities and that the aberrant development of the hindbrain in Hoxa1/Hoxb1 double mutants proceeds through two phases, the misspecification of rhombomeres within the hindbrain, followed subsequently by size regulation of the misspecified hindbrain through induction of apoptosis.

  1. Lipidomic Profiling of Lung Pleural Effusion Identifies Unique Metabotype for EGFR Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ying Swan; Yip, Lian Yee; Basri, Nurhidayah; Chong, Vivian Su Hui; Teo, Chin Chye; Tan, Eddy; Lim, Kah Ling; Tan, Gek San; Yang, Xulei; Yeo, Si Yong; Koh, Mariko Si Yue; Devanand, Anantham; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng Huat; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon

    2016-10-14

    Cytology and histology forms the cornerstone for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but obtaining sufficient tumour cells or tissue biopsies for these tests remains a challenge. We investigate the lipidome of lung pleural effusion (PE) for unique metabolic signatures to discriminate benign versus malignant PE and EGFR versus non-EGFR malignant subgroups to identify novel diagnostic markers that is independent of tumour cell availability. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we profiled the lipidomes of the PE of 30 benign and 41 malignant cases with or without EGFR mutation. Unsupervised principal component analysis revealed distinctive differences between the lipidomes of benign and malignant PE as well as between EGFR mutants and non-EGFR mutants. Docosapentaenoic acid and Docosahexaenoic acid gave superior sensitivity and specificity for detecting NSCLC when used singly. Additionally, several 20- and 22- carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids and phospholipid species were significantly elevated in the EGFR mutants compared to non-EGFR mutants. A 7-lipid panel showed great promise in the stratification of EGFR from non-EGFR malignant PE. Our data revealed novel lipid candidate markers in the non-cellular fraction of PE that holds potential to aid the diagnosis of benign, EGFR mutation positive and negative NSCLC.

  2. Phenotypic Characterization of a copA Mutant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Identifies a Link between Copper and Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Djoko, Karrera Y.; Franiek, Jessica A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Falsetta, Megan L.; Kidd, Stephen P.; Potter, Adam J.; Chen, Nathan H.; Apicella, Michael A.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    NGO0579 is annotated copA in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae chromosome, suggesting that it encodes a cation-transporting ATPase specific for copper ions. Compared to wild-type cells, a copA mutant was more sensitive to killing by copper ions but not to other transition metals. The mutant also accumulated a greater amount of copper, consistent with the predicted role of CopA as a copper efflux pump. The copA mutant showed a reduced ability to invade and survive within human cervical epithelial cells, although its ability to form a biofilm on the surface of these cells was not significantly different from that of the wild type. In the presence of copper, the copA mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to killing by nitrite or nitric oxide. Therefore, we concluded that copper ion efflux catalyzed by CopA is linked to the nitrosative stress defense system of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These observations suggest that copper may exert its effects as an antibacterial agent in the innate immune system via an interaction with reactive nitrogen species. PMID:22184419

  3. Identification of Bacillus subtilis men mutants which lack O-succinylbenzoyl-coenzyme A synthetase and dihydroxynaphthoate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Meganathan, R; Bentley, R; Taber, H

    1981-01-01

    Menaquinone (vitamin K2)-deficient mutants of Bacillus subtilis, whose growth requirement is satisfied by 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid but not by o-succinylbenzoic acid (OSB), have been analyzed for enzymatic defects. Complementation analysis of cell-free extracts of the mutants revealed that there are two groups, as already indicated by genetic analysis. The missing enzyme in each group was identified by complementation of the cell-free extracts with o-succinylbenzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase and dihydroxynaphthoate synthase extracted from Mycobacterium phlei. Mutants found to lack dihydroxynaphthoate synthase, and which therefore complement with dihydroxynaphthoate synthase of M. phlei, were designated as menB; those lacking o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase, and therefore complementing with o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase, were designated as menE. The menB mutants RB413 (men-325) and RB415 (men-329), when incubated with [2,3-14C2]OSB, produced only the spirodilactone form of OSB in a reaction that was CoA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate dependent. PMID:6780515

  4. In vitro bactericidal activity of enrofloxacin against gyrA mutant and qnr-containing Escherichia coli isolates from animals.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, M; Sahinturk, P; Sonal, S; Buyukcangaz, E; Sen, A; Arslan, E

    2013-05-04

    The objective of this work was to investigate the bactericidal activity of enrofloxacin against gyrA mutant and qnr-containing Escherichia coli isolates from animals. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of gyrA mutant and qnr-containing E coli isolates ranged from 1 µg/ml to 32 µg/ml for enrofloxacin. Time-kill experiments were performed using selected E coli isolates. For the time-kill experiments, the colony counts were determined by plating each diluted sample onto plate count agar and an integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics area measure (log ratio area) was applied to the colony-forming units (cfu) data. In general, enrofloxacin exhibited bactericidal activity against all the gyrA mutant E coli isolates at all concentrations greater than four times the MIC. However, the bactericidal activity of enrofloxacin for all the qnr-containing E coli isolates was less dependent on concentration. The results of the present study indicated that the genetic mechanism of resistance might account for the different bactericidal activities of enrofloxacin observed for the gyrA mutant and the qnr-containing E coli isolates. Therefore, in addition to MIC assays, genetic mechanism-based pharmacodynamic models should be used to provide accurate predictions of the effects of drugs on resistant bacteria.

  5. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  6. The parkin Mutant Phenotype in the Fly Is Largely Rescued by Metal-Responsive Transcription Factor (MTF-1) ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Nidhi; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The gene for Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mutated in some familial forms of Parkinson's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. A homozygous mutant of the Drosophila ortholog of human parkin is viable but results in severe motoric impairment including an inability to fly, female and male sterility, and a decreased life span. We show here that a double mutant of the genes for Parkin and the metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) is not viable. MTF-1, which is conserved from insects to mammals, is a key regulator of heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification and plays additional roles in other stress conditions, notably oxidative stress. In contrast to the synthetic lethality of the double mutant, elevated expression of MTF-1 dramatically ameliorates the parkin mutant phenotype, as evidenced by a prolonged life span, motoric improvement including short flight episodes, and female fertility. At the cellular level, muscle and mitochondrial structures are substantially improved. A beneficial effect is also seen with a transgene encoding human MTF-1. We propose that Parkin and MTF-1 provide complementary functions in metal homeostasis, oxidative stress and other cellular stress responses. Our findings also raise the possibility that MTF-1 gene polymorphisms in humans could affect the severity of Parkinson's disease. PMID:21383066

  7. Constitutively active rhodopsin mutants causing night blindness are effectively phosphorylated by GRKs but differ in arrestin-1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey. A.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Singhal, Ankita; Panneels, Valerie; Homan, Kristoff T.; Glukhova, Alisa; Sligar, Stephen G.; Tesmer, John J. G.; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Standfuss, Joerg; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of activating mutations associated with night blindness on the stoichiometry of rhodopsin interactions with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and arrestin-1 have not been reported. Here we show that the monomeric form of WT rhodopsin and its constitutively active mutants M257Y, G90D, and T94I, reconstituted into HDL particles are effectively phosphorylated by GRK1, as well as two more ubiquitously expressed subtypes, GRK2 and GRK5. All versions of arrestin-1 tested (WT, pre-activated, and constitutively monomeric mutants) bind to monomeric rhodopsin and show the same selectivity for different functional forms of rhodopsin as in native disc membranes. Rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and GRK2 promotes arrestin-1 binding to a comparable extent, whereas similar phosphorylation by GRK5 is less effective, suggesting that not all phosphorylation sites on rhodopsin are equivalent in promoting arrestin-1 binding. The binding of WT arrestin-1 to phospho-opsin is comparable to the binding to its preferred target, P-Rh*, suggesting that in photoreceptors arrestin-1 only dissociates after opsin regeneration with 11-cis-retinal, which converts phospho-opsin into inactive phospho-rhodopsin that has lower affinity for arrestin-1. Reduced binding of arrestin-1 to the phospho-opsin form of G90D mutant likely contributes to night blindness caused by this mutation in humans. PMID:23872075

  8. Constitutively active rhodopsin mutants causing night blindness are effectively phosphorylated by GRKs but differ in arrestin-1 binding.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Ostermaier, Martin K; Singhal, Ankita; Panneels, Valerie; Homan, Kristoff T; Glukhova, Alisa; Sligar, Stephen G; Tesmer, John J G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Standfuss, Joerg; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2013-11-01

    The effects of activating mutations associated with night blindness on the stoichiometry of rhodopsin interactions with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and arrestin-1 have not been reported. Here we show that the monomeric form of WT rhodopsin and its constitutively active mutants M257Y, G90D, and T94I, reconstituted into HDL particles are effectively phosphorylated by GRK1, as well as two more ubiquitously expressed subtypes, GRK2 and GRK5. All versions of arrestin-1 tested (WT, pre-activated, and constitutively monomeric mutants) bind to monomeric rhodopsin and show the same selectivity for different functional forms of rhodopsin as in native disc membranes. Rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and GRK2 promotes arrestin-1 binding to a comparable extent, whereas similar phosphorylation by GRK5 is less effective, suggesting that not all phosphorylation sites on rhodopsin are equivalent in promoting arrestin-1 binding. The binding of WT arrestin-1 to phospho-opsin is comparable to the binding to its preferred target, P-Rh*, suggesting that in photoreceptors arrestin-1 only dissociates after opsin regeneration with 11-cis-retinal, which converts phospho-opsin into inactive phospho-rhodopsin that has lower affinity for arrestin-1. Reduced binding of arrestin-1 to the phospho-opsin form of G90D mutant likely contributes to night blindness caused by this mutation in humans. © 2013.

  9. Proteostasis and ageing: insights from long-lived mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; Page, Melissa M; Selman, Colin

    2017-10-15

    The global increase in life expectancy is creating significant medical, social and economic challenges to current and future generations. Consequently, there is a need to identify the fundamental mechanisms underlying the ageing process. This knowledge should help develop realistic interventions capable of combatting age-related disease, and thus improving late-life health and vitality. While several mechanisms have been proposed as conserved lifespan determinants, the loss of proteostasis - where proteostasis is defined here as the maintenance of the proteome - appears highly relevant to both ageing and disease. Several studies have shown that multiple proteostatic mechanisms, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, appear indispensable for longevity in many long-lived invertebrate mutants. Similarly, interspecific comparisons suggest that proteostasis may be an important lifespan determinant in vertebrates. Over the last 20 years a number of long-lived mouse mutants have been described, many of which carry single-gene mutations within the growth-hormone, insulin/IGF-1 or mTOR signalling pathways. However, we still do not know how these mutations act mechanistically to increase lifespan and healthspan, and accordingly whether mechanistic commonality occurs between different mutants. Recent evidence supports the premise that the successful maintenance of the proteome during ageing may be linked to the increased lifespan and healthspan of long-lived mouse mutants. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  10. Mutations and Misconceptions: The Isolation and Study of Mutant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes simple, inexpensive activities for teaching students about mutants and mutations in bacteria. Explains how to isolate bacteria from soil and leaves and how to grow bacteria on agar or in broth. Describes how to construct a gradient plate for finding the minimum inhibitory concentration of a substance and how to use this set up to find…

  11. Modeling dynamics of mutants in heterogeneous stem cell niche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, L.; Mahdipour-Shirayeh, A.

    2017-02-01

    Studying the stem cell (SC) niche architecture is a crucial step for investigating the process of oncogenesis and obtaining an effective stem cell therapy for various cancers. Recently, it has been observed that there are two groups of SCs in the SC niche collaborating with each other to maintain tissue homeostasis: border stem cells (BSCs), which are responsible in controlling the number of non-stem cells as well as stem cells, and central stem cells (CeSCs), which regulate the SC niche. Here, we develop a bi-compartmental stochastic model for the SC niche to study the spread of mutants within the niche. The analytic calculations and numeric simulations, which are in perfect agreement, reveal that in order to delay the spread of mutants in the SC niche, a small but non-zero number of SC proliferations must occur in the CeSC compartment. Moreover, the migration of BSCs to CeSCs delays the spread of mutants. Furthermore, the fixation probability of mutants in the SC niche is independent of types of SC division as long as all SCs do not divide fully asymmetrically. Additionally, the progeny of CeSCs have a much higher chance than the progeny of BSCs to take over the entire niche.

  12. Genetic characterization of glossy-leafed mutant broccoli lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glossy mutants of Brassica oleracea L. have reduced or altered epicuticular wax on the surface of their leaves as compared to wild-type plants, conveying a shiny green appearance. Mutations conferring glossiness are common and have been found in most B. oleracea crop varieties, including cauliflower...

  13. Modelling the Evolution and Spread of HIV Immune Escape Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Helen R.; Frater, John; Duda, Anna; Roberts, Mick G.; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.

    2010-01-01

    During infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immune pressure from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) selects for viral mutants that confer escape from CTL recognition. These escape variants can be transmitted between individuals where, depending upon their cost to viral fitness and the CTL responses made by the recipient, they may revert. The rates of within-host evolution and their concordant impact upon the rate of spread of escape mutants at the population level are uncertain. Here we present a mathematical model of within-host evolution of escape mutants, transmission of these variants between hosts and subsequent reversion in new hosts. The model is an extension of the well-known SI model of disease transmission and includes three further parameters that describe host immunogenetic heterogeneity and rates of within host viral evolution. We use the model to explain why some escape mutants appear to have stable prevalence whilst others are spreading through the population. Further, we use it to compare diverse datasets on CTL escape, highlighting where different sources agree or disagree on within-host evolutionary rates. The several dozen CTL epitopes we survey from HIV-1 gag, RT and nef reveal a relatively sedate rate of evolution with average rates of escape measured in years and reversion in decades. For many epitopes in HIV, occasional rapid within-host evolution is not reflected in fast evolution at the population level. PMID:21124991

  14. Let-7 Sensitizes KRAS Mutant Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tan, Chalet

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance. Let-7 is a family of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are frequently suppressed in solid tumors, where KRAS mutations are highly prevalent. In this study, we investigated the potential use of let-7 as a chemosensitizer. We found that let-7b repletion selectively sensitized KRAS mutant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Transfection of let-7b mimic downregulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of let-7b mimic with paclitaxel or gemcitabine diminished MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling concurrently, triggered the onset of apoptosis, and reverted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in KRAS mutant tumor cells. In addition, let-7b repletion downregulated the expression of β-tubulin III and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2, two proteins known to mediate tumor resistance to paclitaxel and gemcitabine, respectively. Let-7 may represent a new class of chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25946136

  15. Searching and Mining Visually Observed Phenotypes of Maize Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are thousands of maize mutants, which are invaluable resources for plant research. Geneticists use them to study underlying mechanisms of biochemistry, cell biology, cell development, and cell physiology. To streamline the understanding of such complex processes, researchers need the most curr...

  16. Some Experiments with Respiratory Deficient Mutants of Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are described for the induction and identification of respiratory deficient mutants in yeast. Practical schemes are given to enable students to obtain dose-response information for physical and chemical mutagens such as heat, ultraviolet light, or acriflavine. A simple test for environmental mutagens is described. (Author/MA)

  17. Active site-directed double mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ercikan-Abali, E A; Mineishi, S; Tong, Y; Nakahara, S; Waltham, M C; Banerjee, D; Chen, W; Sadelain, M; Bertino, J R

    1996-09-15

    Variants of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), which confer resistance to antifolates, are used as dominant selectable markers in vitro and in vivo and may be useful in the context of gene therapy. To identify improved mutant human DHFRs with increased catalytic efficiency and decreased binding to methotrexate, we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis four variants with substitutions at both Leu22 and Phe31 (i.e., Phe22-Ser31, Tyr22-Ser31, Phe22-Gly31, and Tyr22-Gly31). Antifolate resistance has been observed previously when individual changes are made at these active-site residues. Substrate and antifolate binding properties of these "double" mutants revealed that each have greatly diminished affinity for antifolates (> 10,000-fold) yet only slightly reduced substrate affinity. Comparison of in vitro measured properties with those of single-residue variants indicates that double mutants are indeed significantly superior. This was verified for one of the double mutants that provided high-level methotrexate resistance following retrovirus-mediated gene transfer in NIH3T3 cells.

  18. Study the Expression of ompf Gene in Esherichia coli Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jaktaji, R Pourahmad; Heidari, F

    2013-09-01

    The outer membrane porin proteins are the major factors in controlling the permeability of cell membrane. OmpF is an example of porin proteins in Esherichia coli. In normal growth condition a large amount of this protein is synthesised, but under stress condition, such as the presence of antibiotics in environment its expression is decreased inhibiting the entrance of antibiotics into cell. The expression of ompF is inhibited by antisense RNA transcribed from micF. In normal condition the expression of micF is low, but in the presence of antibiotics its expression is increased and causes multiple resistances to irrelevant antibiotics. The aims of this research were to study first, the intactness of micF and then quantify the expression of ompF in ciprofloxacin and tetracycline resistant mutants of E. coli. For this purpose the 5' end of micF was amplified and then sequenced. None of these mutants except one and its clone has a mutation in this gene. Then the relative expression of ompF in these mutants was quantified by real time PCR. There was no significant difference between ompF transcription of mutants and wild type strain. Based on this study and previous study it is concluded that low to intermediate levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline does not decrease ompF transcription.

  19. Study the Expression of ompf Gene in Esherichia coli Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Jaktaji, R. Pourahmad; Heidari, F.

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane porin proteins are the major factors in controlling the permeability of cell membrane. OmpF is an example of porin proteins in Esherichia coli. In normal growth condition a large amount of this protein is synthesised, but under stress condition, such as the presence of antibiotics in environment its expression is decreased inhibiting the entrance of antibiotics into cell. The expression of ompF is inhibited by antisense RNA transcribed from micF. In normal condition the expression of micF is low, but in the presence of antibiotics its expression is increased and causes multiple resistances to irrelevant antibiotics. The aims of this research were to study first, the intactness of micF and then quantify the expression of ompF in ciprofloxacin and tetracycline resistant mutants of E. coli. For this purpose the 5’ end of micF was amplified and then sequenced. None of these mutants except one and its clone has a mutation in this gene. Then the relative expression of ompF in these mutants was quantified by real time PCR. There was no significant difference between ompF transcription of mutants and wild type strain. Based on this study and previous study it is concluded that low to intermediate levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline does not decrease ompF transcription. PMID:24403654

  20. Potential of multiseeded mutant (msd) to boost sorghum grain yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed number per plant is an important determinant of the grain yield in cereal and other crops. We have isolated a class of multiseeded (msd) sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) mutants that are capable of producing three times the seed number and twice the seed weight per panicle as compared with t...

  1. Wheat ABA-insensitive mutants result in reduced grain dormancy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper describes the isolation of wheat mutants in the hard red spring Scarlet resulting in reduced sensitivity to the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination. ABA induces seed dormancy during embryo maturation and inhibits the germination of mature seeds. Wheat sensitivity t...

  2. Enhanced cellulase producing mutants developed from heterokaryotic Aspergillus strain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljit; Oberoi, H S; Chadha, B S

    2014-03-01

    A heterokaryon 28, derived through protoplast fusion between Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus tubingensis (Dal8), was subjected cyclic mutagenesis followed by selection on increasing levels of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) as selection marker. The derived deregulated cellulase hyper producing mutant '64', when compared to fusant 28, produced 9.83, 7.8, 3.2, 4.2 and 19.74 folds higher endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, FPase and xylanase, respectively, under shake cultures. The sequence analysis of PCR amplified β-glucosidase gene from wild and mutant showed nucleotide deletion/substitution. The mutants showed highly catalytic efficient β-glucosidase as evident from low Km and high Vmax values. The expression profiling through zymogram analysis also indicated towards over-expression of cellulases. The up/down regulated expressed proteins observed through SDS-PAGE were identified by Peptide mass fingerprinting The cellulase produced by mutants in conjunction with cellulase free xylanase derived from Thermomyces lanuginosus was used for efficient utilization of alkali treated rice straw for obtaining xylo-oligosaccharides and ethanol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Paradigms for pharmacological characterization of C. elegans synaptic transmission mutants.

    PubMed

    Locke, Cody; Berry, Kalen; Kautu, Bwarenaba; Lee, Kyle; Caldwell, Kim; Caldwell, Guy

    2008-08-18

    The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has become an expedient model for studying neurotransmission. C. elegans is unique among animal models, as the anatomy and connectivity of its nervous system has been determined from electron micrographs and refined by pharmacological assays. In this video, we describe how two complementary neural stimulants, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, called aldicarb, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonist, called pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), may be employed to specifically characterize signaling at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and facilitate our understanding of antagonistic neural circuits. Of 302 C. elegans neurons, nineteen GABAergic D-type motor neurons innervate body wall muscles (BWMs), while four GABAergic neurons, called RMEs, innervate head muscles. Conversely, thirty-nine motor neurons express the excitatory neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), and antagonize GABA transmission at BWMs to coordinate locomotion. The antagonistic nature of GABAergic and cholinergic motor neurons at body wall NMJs was initially determined by laser ablation and later buttressed by aldicarb exposure. Acute aldicarb exposure results in a time-course or dose-responsive paralysis in wild-type worms. Yet, loss of excitatory ACh transmission confers resistance to aldicarb, as less ACh accumulates at worm NMJs, leading to less stimulation of BWMs. Resistance to aldicarb may be observed with ACh-specific or general synaptic function mutants. Consistent with antagonistic GABA and ACh transmission, loss of GABA transmission, or a failure to negatively regulate ACh release, confers hypersensitivity to aldicarb. Although aldicarb exposure has led to the isolation of numerous worm homologs of neurotransmission genes, aldicarb exposure alone cannot efficiently determine prevailing roles for genes and pathways in specific C. elegans motor neurons. For this purpose, we have introduced a complementary experimental approach, which

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Mms-Sensitive Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    1977-01-01

    We have isolated mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Alleles of rad1, rad4, rad6, rad52, rad55 and rad57 were found among these mms mutants. Twenty-nine of the mms mutants which complement the existing radiation-sensitive (rad and rev ) mutants belong to 22 new complementation groups. Mutants from five complementation groups are sensitive only to MMS. Mutants of 11 complementation groups are sensitive to UV or X rays in addition to MMS, mutants of six complementation groups are sensitive to all three agents. The cross-sensitivities of these mms mutants to UV and X rays are discussed in terms of their possible involvement in DNA repair. Sporulation is reduced or absent in homozygous diploids of mms mutants from nine complementation groups. PMID:195865

  5. Mutant matrix metalloproteinase-9 reduces postoperative peritoneal adhesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Atta, Hussein; El-Rehany, Mahmoud; Roeb, Elke; Abdel-Ghany, Hend; Ramzy, Maggie; Gaber, Shereen

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative peritoneal adhesions continue to be a major source of morbidity and occasional mortality. Studies have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels are decreased postoperatively which may limits matrix degradation and participate in the development of peritoneal adhesions. In this proof-of-principle study, we evaluated the effect of gene therapy with catalytically inactive mutant MMP-9 on postoperative peritoneal adhesions in rats. Adenovirus encoding mutant MMP-9 (Ad-mMMP-9) or saline was instilled in the peritoneal cavity after cecal and parietal peritoneal injury in rats. Expression of mutant MMP-9 transcript was verified by sequencing. Adenovirus E4 gene expression, adhesion scores, MMP-9, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression were evaluated at sacrifice one week after treatment. Both mutant MMP-9 transcripts and adenovirus E4 gene were expressed in Ad-mMMP-9 treated adhesions. Adhesions severity decreased significantly (p = 0.036) in the Ad-mMMP-9-treated compared with saline-treated adhesions. Expression of MMP-9 mRNA and protein were elevated (p = 0.001 and p = 0.029, respectively) in the Ad-mMMP-9-treated adhesions compared with saline-treated adhesions. While tPA levels were increased (p = 0.02) in Ad-mMMP-9 treated adhesions compared with saline-treated adhesions, TGF-β1 and PAI-1 levels were decreased (p = 0.017 and p = 0.042, respectively). No difference in mortality were found between groups (p = 0.64). Mutant MMP-9 gene therapy effectively transduced peritoneal adhesions resulting in reduction of severity of primary peritoneal adhesions. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Two-Pore Channels: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in two-pore channels (TPCs) has resulted in a variety of studies dealing with the functional role and mechanism of action of these endo-lysosomal proteins in diverse physiological processes. With the availability of mouse lines harbouring mutant alleles for Tpcnl and/or Tpcn2 genes, several studies have made use of them to validate, consolidate and discover new roles for these channels not only at the cellular level but, importantly, also at the level of the whole organism. The different mutant mouse lines that have been used were derived from distinct genetic manipulation strategies, with the aim of knocking out expression of TPC proteins. However, the expression of different residual TPC sequences predicted to occur in these mutant mouse lines, together with the varied degree to which the effects on Tpcn expression have been studied, makes it important to assess the true knockout status of some of the lines. In this review we summarize these Tpcn mutant mouse lines with regard to their predicted effect on Tpcn expression and the extent to which they have been characterized. Additionally, we discuss how results derived from studies using these Tpcn mutant mouse lines have consolidated previously proposed roles for TPCs, such as mediators of NAADP signalling, endo-lysosomal functions, and pancreatic β cell physiology. We will also review how they have been instrumental in the assignment of new physiological roles for these cation channels in processes such as membrane electrical excitability, neoangiogenesis, viral infection and brown adipose tissue and heart function, revealing, in some cases, a specific contribution of a particular TPC isoform. PMID:27330869

  7. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGES

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore » Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  8. Targeting Autophagy Sensitizes BRAF-Mutant Thyroid Cancer to Vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Kang, Helen; Zhao, Yinu; Min, Irene; Wyrwas, Brian; Moore, Maureen; Teng, Lisong; Zarnegar, Rasa; Jiang, Xuejun

    2017-01-01

    Context: The RAF inhibitor vemurafenib has provided a major advance for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. However, BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer is relatively resistant to vemurafenib, and the reason for this disparity remains unclear. Anticancer therapy–induced autophagy can trigger adaptive drug resistance in a variety of cancer types and treatments. To date, role of autophagy during BRAF inhibition in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Objective: In this study, we investigate if autophagy is activated in vemurafenib-treated BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells, and whether autophagy inhibition improves or impairs the treatment efficacy of vemurafenib. Design: Autophagy level was determined by western blot assay and transmission electron microscopy. The combined effects of autophagy inhibitor and vemurafenib were assessed in terms of cell viability in vitro and tumor growth rate in vivo. Whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was in response to vemurafenib-induced autophagy was also analyzed. Results: Vemurafenib induced a high level of autophagy in BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either a pharmacological inhibitor or interfering RNA knockdown of essential autophagy genes augmented vemurafenib-induced cell death. Vemurafenib-induced autophagy was independent of MAPK signaling pathway and was mediated through the ER stress response. Finally, administration of vemurafenib with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine promoted more pronounced tumor suppression in vivo. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that vemurafenib induces ER stress response–mediated autophagy in thyroid cancer and autophagy inhibition may be a beneficial strategy to sensitize BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer to vemurafenib. PMID:27754804

  9. Targeting Autophagy Sensitizes BRAF-Mutant Thyroid Cancer to Vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Kang, Helen; Zhao, Yinu; Min, Irene; Wyrwas, Brian; Moore, Maureen; Teng, Lisong; Zarnegar, Rasa; Jiang, Xuejun; Fahey, Thomas J

    2017-02-01

    The RAF inhibitor vemurafenib has provided a major advance for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. However, BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer is relatively resistant to vemurafenib, and the reason for this disparity remains unclear. Anticancer therapy-induced autophagy can trigger adaptive drug resistance in a variety of cancer types and treatments. To date, role of autophagy during BRAF inhibition in thyroid cancer remains unknown. In this study, we investigate if autophagy is activated in vemurafenib-treated BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells, and whether autophagy inhibition improves or impairs the treatment efficacy of vemurafenib. Autophagy level was determined by western blot assay and transmission electron microscopy. The combined effects of autophagy inhibitor and vemurafenib were assessed in terms of cell viability in vitro and tumor growth rate in vivo. Whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was in response to vemurafenib-induced autophagy was also analyzed. Vemurafenib induced a high level of autophagy in BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either a pharmacological inhibitor or interfering RNA knockdown of essential autophagy genes augmented vemurafenib-induced cell death. Vemurafenib-induced autophagy was independent of MAPK signaling pathway and was mediated through the ER stress response. Finally, administration of vemurafenib with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine promoted more pronounced tumor suppression in vivo. Our data demonstrate that vemurafenib induces ER stress response-mediated autophagy in thyroid cancer and autophagy inhibition may be a beneficial strategy to sensitize BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer to vemurafenib. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  10. Properties of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigens encoded by SV40 mutants with deletions in gene A.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, C N; Tornow, J; Clark, R; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    The biochemical properties of the large T antigens encoded by simian virus 40 (SV40) mutants with deletions at DdeI sites in the SV40 A gene were determined. Mutant large T antigens containing only the first 138 to 140 amino acids were unable to bind to the SV40 origin of DNA replication as were large T antigens containing at their COOH termini 96 or 97 amino acids encoded by the long open reading frame located between 0.22 and 0.165 map units (m.u.). All other mutant large T antigens were able to bind to the SV40 origin of replication. Mutants with in-phase deletions at 0.288 and 0.243 m.u. lacked ATPase activity, but ATPase activity was normal in mutants lacking origin-binding activity. The 627-amino acid large T antigen encoded by dlA2465, with a deletion at 0.219 m.u., was the smallest large T antigen displaying ATPase activity. Mutant large T antigens with the alternate 96- or 97-amino acid COOH terminus also lacked ATPase activity. All mutant large T antigens were found in the nuclei of infected cells; a small amount of large T with the alternate COOH terminus was also located in the cytoplasm. Mutant dlA2465 belonged to the same class of mutants as dlA2459. It was unable to form plaques on CV-1p cells at 37 or 32 degrees C but could form plaques on BSC-1 monolayers at 37 degrees C but not at 32 degrees C. It was positive for viral DNA replication and showed intracistronic complementation with any group A mutant whose large T antigen contained a normal carboxyl terminus. These findings and those of others suggest that both DNA binding and ATPase activity are required for the viral DNA replication function of large T antigen, that these two activities must be located on the same T antigen monomer, and that these two activities are performed by distinct domains of the polypeptide. These domains are distinct and separable from the domain affected by the mutation of dlA2465 and indicate that SV40 large T antigen is made up of at least three separate functional

  11. Lecithin retinol acyltransferase and its S175R mutant have a similar secondary structure content and maximum insertion pressure but different enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Salesse, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Recent work on Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) allowed to gather a large amount of information on its secondary structure, enzymatic properties and membrane binding. A truncated form of LRAT (tLRAT) as well as its S175R mutant leading to retinis pigmentosa, a severe form of retinal dystrophy, were studied to understand the role of this mutation on the dysfunction of this protein. Consistently with previous reports, the S175R-tLRAT mutant was shown to lack enzyme activity. However, very similar secondary structures probed by circular dichroism have been obtained with the S175R-tLRAT mutant and tLRAT. Moreover, similar values of maximum insertion pressure of the S175R-tLRAT mutant and tLRAT have been obtained using Langmuir monolayers, thus suggesting that the S175R mutation has no effect on the membrane binding properties of tLRAT. These findings leave open the possibility that the loss of enzymatic activity associated with the S175R mutant is related to loss of an essential nucleophile near the active site, or alternatively, to steric obstruction of the active site that impedes substrate binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Sex-Linked Female-Sterile Mutants in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER with Special Attention to Eggshell Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Komitopoulou, Katia; Gans, Madeleine; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Masson, Michele

    1983-01-01

    To study genes that function mainly or exclusively during oogenesis, we have isolated and analyzed female-sterile mutations, with special emphasis on those that affect eggshell formation. Following treatment that induced 61 to 66% lethals, 8.1% of the 1071 X chromosomes tested carried recessive female sterility mutations (87 isolates), and 8.0% carried partial female-sterile mutations (86 isolates), respectively. In addition, three dominant female steriles were recovered. Some of the mutants had very low fecundity, and others laid morphologically normal eggs that failed to develop. A third category included 29 mutants that laid eggs with morphological abnormalities: 26 were female steriles, two were partial female steriles and one was fertile. Mutants of this third category were characterized in some detail and compared with 40 previously isolated mutants that laid similarly abnormal eggs. Approximately 28–31 complementation groups with morphological abnormalities were detected, some of which were large allelic series (11, 9, 7, 6 and 5 alleles). Twenty-four groups were mapped genetically or cytogenetically, and 21 were partially characterized by ultrastructural and biochemical procedures. Of the latter, one group showed clear deficiency of yolk proteins, and nine showed prominent ultrastructural defects in the chorion (at least eight accompanied by deficiencies in characterized chorion proteins). At least six groups with clear-cut effects were found at loci not previously identified with known chorion structural genes. PMID:17246182

  13. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  14. Chemical chaperones reduce endoplasmic reticulum stress and prevent mutant HFE aggregate formation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sérgio F; Picarote, Gonçalo; Fleming, John V; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Azevedo, Jorge E; de Sousa, Maria

    2007-09-21

    HFE C282Y, the mutant protein associated with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), fails to acquire the correct conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is targeted for degradation. We have recently shown that an active unfolded protein response (UPR) is present in the cells of patients with HH. Now, by using HEK 293T cells, we demonstrate that the stability of HFE C282Y is influenced by the UPR signaling pathway that promotes its degradation. Treatment of HFE C282Y-expressing cells with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a bile acid derivative with chaperone properties, or with the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) impeded the UPR activation. However, although TUDCA led to an increased stability of the mutant protein, 4PBA contributed to a more efficient disposal of HFE C282Y to the degradation route. Fluorescence microscopy and biochemical analysis of the subcellular localization of HFE revealed that a major portion of the C282Y mutant protein forms intracellular aggregates. Although neither TUDCA nor 4PBA restored the correct folding and intracellular trafficking of HFE C282Y, 4PBA prevented its aggregation. These data suggest that TUDCA hampers the UPR activation by acting directly on its signal transduction pathway, whereas 4PBA suppresses ER stress by chemically enhancing the ER capacity to cope with the expression of misfolded HFE, facilitating its degradation. Together, these data shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in HFE C282Y-related HH and open new perspectives on the use of orally active chemical chaperones as a therapeutic approach for HH.

  15. Dopamine D2 receptor signaling modulates mutant ataxin-1 S776 phosphorylation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hearst, Scoty M; Lopez, Mariper E; Shao, Qingmei; Liu, Yong; Vig, Parminder J S

    2010-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive ataxia resulting from the loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and neurons in the brainstem. In PCs of SCA1 transgenic mice, the disease causing ataxin-1 protein mediates the formation of S100B containing cytoplasmic vacuoles and further self-aggregates to form intranuclear inclusions. The exact function of the ataxin-1 protein is not fully understood. However, the aggregation and neurotoxicity of the mutant ataxin-1 protein is dependent on the phosphorylation at serine 776 (S776). Although protein kinase A (PKA) has been implicated as the S776 kinase, the mechanism of PKA/ataxin-1 regulation in SCA1 is still not clear. We propose that a dopamine D(2) receptor (D2R)/S100B pathway may be involved in modulating PKA activity in PCs. Using a D2R/S100B HEK stable cell line transiently transfected with GFP-ataxin-1[82Q], we demonstrate that stimulation of the D2R/S100B pathway caused a reduction in mutant ataxin-1 S776 phosphorylation and ataxin-1 aggregation. Activation of PKA by forskolin resulted in an enhanced S776 phosphorylation and increased ataxin-1 nuclear aggregation, which was suppressed by treatment with D2R agonist bromocriptine and PKA inhibitor H89. Furthermore, treating SCA1 transgenic PC slice cultures with forskolin induced neurodegenerative morphological abnormalities in PC dendrites consistent with those observed in vivo. Taken together our data support a mechanism where PKA dependent mutant ataxin-1 phosphorylation and aggregation can be regulated by D2R/S100B signaling.

  16. Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling Modulates Mutant Ataxin-1 S776 Phosphorylation and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Hearst, SM; Lopez, ME; Shao, Q; Liu, Y; Vig, PJS

    2010-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive ataxia resulting from the loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and neurons in the brainstem. In PCs of SCA1 transgenic (Tg) mice, the disease causing ataxin-1 protein mediates the formation of S100B containing cytoplasmic vacuoles and further self-aggregates to form intranuclear inclusions. The exact function of the ataxin-1 protein is not fully understood. However, the aggregation and neurotoxicity of the mutant ataxin-1 protein is dependent on the phosphorylation at serine 776 (S776). Although protein kinase A (PKA) has been implicated as the S776 kinase, the mechanism of PKA/ataxin-1 regulation in SCA1 is still not clear. We propose that a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)/S100B pathway may be involved in modulating PKA activity in PCs. Using a D2R/S100B HEK stable cell line transiently transfected with GFP-ataxin-1[82Q], we demonstrate that stimulation of the D2R/S100B pathway caused a reduction in mutant ataxin-1 S776 phosphorylation and ataxin-1 aggregation. Activation of PKA by forskolin resulted in an enhanced S776 phosphorylation and increased ataxin-1 nuclear aggregation, which was suppressed by treatment with D2R agonist bromocriptine and PKA inhibitor H89. Furthermore, treating SCA1 Tg PC slice cultures with forskolin induced neurodegenerative morphological abnormalities in PC dendrites consistent with those observed in vivo. Taken together our data support a mechanism where PKA dependent mutant ataxin-1 phosphorylation and aggregation can be regulated by D2R/S100B signaling. PMID:20477910

  17. Cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of F877L mutant androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Van Hook, Kathryn; King, Carly J.; Schwartzman, Jacob; Lisac, Robert; Urrutia, Joshua; Sehrawat, Archana; Woodward, Josha; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gulati, Roman; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Gleave, Martin; Korkola, James E.; Gao, Lina; Heiser, Laura M.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second-most lethal cancer among men in the United States. The vast majority of prostate cancer deaths are due to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) – the lethal form of the disease that has progressed despite therapies that interfere with activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. One emergent resistance mechanism to medical castration is synthesis of intratumoral androgens that activate the AR. This insight led to the development of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. However, resistance to enzalutamide invariably develops, and disease progression is nearly universal. One mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide is an F877L mutation in the AR ligand-binding domain that can convert enzalutamide to an agonist of AR activity. However, mechanisms that contribute to the agonist switch had not been fully clarified, and there were no therapies to block AR F877L. Using cell line models of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we determined that cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of mutant F877L AR. Further, enzalutamide treatment of AR F877L-expressing cell lines recapitulated the effects of androgen activation of F877L AR or wild-type AR. Because the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ-1 was previously shown to block androgen activation of wild-type AR, we tested JQ-1 in AR F877L-expressing CRPC models. We determined that JQ-1 suppressed androgen or enzalutamide activation of mutant F877L AR and suppressed growth of mutant F877L AR CRPC tumors in vivo, demonstrating a new strategy to treat tumors harboring this mutation. PMID:27276681

  18. The Origin of Mutants Under Selection: How Natural Selection Mimics Mutagenesis (Adaptive Mutation)

    PubMed Central

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection detects mutants but does not cause mutations. Contrary to this dictum, Cairns and Foster plated a leaky lac mutant of Escherichia coli on lactose medium and saw revertant (Lac+) colonies accumulate with time above a nongrowing lawn. This result suggested that bacteria might mutagenize their own genome when growth is blocked. However, this conclusion is suspect in the light of recent evidence that revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies the conjugative F′lac plasmid, which carries the lac mutation. Some plated cells have multiple copies of the simple F′lac plasmid. This provides sufficient LacZ activity to support plasmid replication but not cell division. In nongrowing cells, repeated plasmid replication increases the likelihood of a reversion event. Reversion to lac+ triggers exponential cell growth leading to a stable Lac+ revertant colony. In 10% of these plated cells, the high-copy plasmid includes an internal tandem lac duplication, which provides even more LacZ activity—sufficient to support slow growth and formation of an unstable Lac+ colony. Cells with multiple copies of the F′lac plasmid have an increased mutation rate, because the plasmid encodes the error-prone (mutagenic) DNA polymerase, DinB. Without DinB, unstable and stable Lac+ revertant types form in equal numbers and both types arise with no mutagenesis. Amplification and selection are central to behavior of the Cairns–Foster system, whereas mutagenesis is a system-specific side effect or artifact caused by coamplification of dinB with lac. Study of this system has revealed several broadly applicable principles. In all populations, gene duplications are frequent stable genetic polymorphisms, common near-neutral mutant alleles can gain a positive phenotype when amplified under selection, and natural selection can operate without cell division when variability is generated by overreplication of local genome subregions. PMID:26134316

  19. Mechanism of citrate metabolism by an oxaloacetate decarboxylase-deficient mutant of Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Pudlik, Agata M; Lolkema, Juke S

    2011-08-01

    Citrate metabolism in resting cells of Lactococcus lactis IL1403(pFL3) results in the formation of two end products from the intermediate pyruvate, acetoin and acetate (A. M. Pudlik and J. S. Lolkema, J. Bacteriol. 193:706-714, 2011). Pyruvate is formed from citrate following uptake by the transporter CitP through the subsequent actions of citrate lyase and oxaloacetate decarboxylase. The present study describes the metabolic response of L. lactis when oxaloacetate accumulates in the cytoplasm. The oxaloacetate decarboxylase-deficient mutant ILCitM(pFL3) showed nearly identical rates of citrate consumption, but the end product profile in the presence of glucose shifted from mainly acetoin to only acetate. In addition, in contrast to the parental strain, the mutant strain did not generate proton motive force. Citrate consumption by the mutant strain was coupled to the excretion of oxaloacetate, with a yield of 80 to 85%. Following citrate consumption, oxaloacetate was slowly taken up by the cells and converted to pyruvate by a cryptic decarboxylase and, subsequently, to acetate. The transport of oxaloacetate is catalyzed by CitP. The parental strain IL1403(pFL3) containing CitP consumed oxaloacetate, while the original strain, IL1403, not containing CitP, did not. Moreover, oxaloacetate consumption was enhanced in the presence of L-lactate, indicating exchange between oxaloacetate and L-lactate catalyzed by CitP. Hence, when oxaloacetate inadvertently accumulates in the cytoplasm, the physiological response of L. lactis is to excrete oxaloacetate in exchange with citrate by an electroneutral mechanism catalyzed by CitP. Subsequently, in a second step, oxaloacetate is taken up by CitP and metabolized to pyruvate and acetate.

  20. Accumulation of 10 Fluoroquinolones by Wild-Type or Efflux Mutant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Piddock, Laura J. V.; Johnson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring fluoroquinolone accumulation by Streptococcus pneumoniae was rigorously examined. The accumulation of ciprofloxacin, clinafloxacin, gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, sitafloxacin, and trovafloxacin in the presence and absence of either carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP) or reserpine was determined for two wild-type fluoroquinolone-susceptible capsulated S. pneumoniae strains (M3 and M4) and the noncapsulated strain R6. Two efflux mutants, R6N (which overexpresses PmrA) and a mutant of M4, M22 (no expression of PmrA), were also examined. Essentially, the fluoroquinolones fell into two groups. (i) One group consisting of ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin, and norfloxacin accumulated to 72 to 92 ng/mg (dry weight) of cells in all strains. (ii) The remainder of the agents accumulated to 3 to 30 ng/mg (dry weight) of cells. With a decrease in hydrophobicity, there was a decrease in the concentration accumulated. With an increase in the molecular weight of the free form of each agent, there was also a decrease in the concentration accumulated. The strains differed in their responses to reserpine and CCCP. For the three fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains, only reserpine had a significant effect upon accumulation of moxifloxacin and clinafloxacin by M3 and showed no effect for the other agents and strains. For M3 and M4, CCCP enhanced the concentration of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin accumulated, whereas for R6, the effect was only statistically significant for ofloxacin. Efflux mutant M22 accumulated less ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and ofloxacin than M4 did. M22 accumulated more norfloxacin than M4 did. Reserpine and CCCP had variable effects as for the other strains. Differences in the accumulation of fluoroquinolones by R6 and R6N were highly dependent upon growth phase, and only for norfloxacin was there a significant difference between two strains. PMID:11850266

  1. Structure of the Dominant Negative S17N Mutant of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, N.; Singh, K; Garcia-Diaz, M

    2010-01-01

    The use of the dominant negative mutant of Ras has been crucial in elucidating the cellular signaling of Ras in response to the activation of various membrane-bound receptors. Although several point mutants of Ras exhibit a dominant negative effect, the asparagine to serine mutation at position 17 (S17N) remains the most popular and the most effective at inhibiting the activation of endogenous Ras. It is now widely accepted that the dominant negative effect is due to the ability of the mutant to sequester upstream activators and its inability to activate downstream effectors. Here, we present the crystal structure of RasS17Nmore » in the GDP-bound form. In the three molecules that populate the asymmetric unit, the Mg{sup 2+} ion that normally coordinates the {beta}-phosphate is absent because of steric hindrance from the Asn17 side chain. Instead, a Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinating the {alpha}-phosphate. Also absent from one molecule is electron density for Phe28, a conserved residue that normally stabilizes the nucleotide's guanine base. Except for Phe28, the nucleotide makes conserved interactions with Ras. Combined, the inability of Phe28 to stabilize the guanine base and the absence of a Mg{sup 2+} ion to neutralize the negative charges on the phosphates explain the weaker affinity of GDP for Ras. Our data suggest that the absence of the Mg{sup 2+} should also dramatically affect GTP binding to Ras and the proper positioning of Thr35 necessary for the activation of switch 1 and the binding to downstream effectors, a prerequisite for the triggering of signaling pathways.« less

  2. Comparative Analysis of Light-Harvesting Antennae and State Transition in chlorina and cpSRP Mutants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    State transitions in photosynthesis provide for the dynamic allocation of a mobile fraction of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to photosystem II (PSII) in state I and to photosystem I (PSI) in state II. In the state I-to-state II transition, LHCII is phosphorylated by STN7 and associates with PSI to favor absorption cross-section of PSI. Here, we used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with defects in chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis or in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) machinery to study the flexible formation of PS-LHC supercomplexes. Intriguingly, we found that impaired Chl b biosynthesis in chlorina1-2 (ch1-2) led to preferentially stabilized LHCI rather than LHCII, while the contents of both LHCI and LHCII were equally depressed in the cpSRP43-deficient mutant (chaos). In view of recent findings on the modified state transitions in LHCI-deficient mutants (Benson et al., 2015), the ch1-2 and chaos mutants were used to assess the influence of varying LHCI/LHCII antenna size on state transitions. Under state II conditions, LHCII-PSI supercomplexes were not formed in both ch1-2 and chaos plants. LHCII phosphorylation was drastically reduced in ch1-2, and the inactivation of STN7 correlates with the lack of state transitions. In contrast, phosphorylated LHCII in chaos was observed to be exclusively associated with PSII complexes, indicating a lack of mobile LHCII in chaos. Thus, the comparative analysis of ch1-2 and chaos mutants provides new evidence for the flexible organization of LHCs and enhances our understanding of the reversible allocation of LHCII to the two photosystems. PMID:27663408

  3. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; ...

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore » this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan

  4. A Sordaria macrospora mutant lacking the leu1 gene shows a developmental arrest during fruiting body formation.

    PubMed

    Kück, Ulrich

    2005-10-01

    Developmental mutants with defects in fruiting body formation are excellent resources for the identification of genetic components that control cellular differentiation processes in filamentous fungi. The mutant pro4 of the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora is characterized by a developmental arrest during the sexual life cycle. This mutant generates only pre-fruiting bodies (protoperithecia), and is unable to form ascospores. Besides being sterile, pro4 is auxotrophic for leucine. Ascospore analysis revealed that the two phenotypes are genetically linked. After isolation of the wild-type leu1 gene from S. macrospora, complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene was able to restore both prototrophy and fertility in pro4. To investigate the control of leu1 expression, other genes involved in leucine biosynthesis specifically and in the general control of amino acid biosynthesis ("cross-pathway control") have been analysed using Northern hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR. These analyses demonstrated that genes of leucine biosynthesis are transcribed at higher levels under conditions of amino acid starvation. In addition, the expression data for the cpc1 and cpc2 genes indicate that cross-pathway control is superimposed on leucine-specific regulation of fruiting body development in the leu1 mutant. This was further substantiated by growth experiments in which the wild-type strain was found to show a sterile phenotype when grown on a medium containing the amino acid analogue 5-methyl-tryptophan. Taken together, these data show that pro4 represents a novel mutant type in S. macrospora, in which amino acid starvation acts as a signal that interrupts the development of the fruiting body.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Light-Harvesting Antennae and State Transition in chlorina and cpSRP Mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    State transitions in photosynthesis provide for the dynamic allocation of a mobile fraction of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to photosystem II (PSII) in state I and to photosystem I (PSI) in state II. In the state I-to-state II transition, LHCII is phosphorylated by STN7 and associates with PSI to favor absorption cross-section of PSI. Here, we used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with defects in chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis or in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) machinery to study the flexible formation of PS-LHC supercomplexes. Intriguingly, we found that impaired Chl b biosynthesis in chlorina1-2 (ch1-2) led to preferentially stabilized LHCI rather than LHCII, while the contents of both LHCI and LHCII were equally depressed in the cpSRP43-deficient mutant (chaos). In view of recent findings on the modified state transitions in LHCI-deficient mutants (Benson et al., 2015), the ch1-2 and chaos mutants were used to assess the influence of varying LHCI/LHCII antenna size on state transitions. Under state II conditions, LHCII-PSI supercomplexes were not formed in both ch1-2 and chaos plants. LHCII phosphorylation was drastically reduced in ch1-2, and the inactivation of STN7 correlates with the lack of state transitions. In contrast, phosphorylated LHCII in chaos was observed to be exclusively associated with PSII complexes, indicating a lack of mobile LHCII in chaos Thus, the comparative analysis of ch1-2 and chaos mutants provides new evidence for the flexible organization of LHCs and enhances our understanding of the reversible allocation of LHCII to the two photosystems. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Protein expression profiling of the drosophila fragile X mutant brain reveals up-regulation of monoamine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong Q; Friedman, David B; Wang, Zhe; Woodruff, Elvin; Pan, Luyuan; O'donnell, Janis; Broadie, Kendal

    2005-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation, associated with both cognitive and behavioral anomalies. The disease is caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene, which encodes the mRNA-binding, translational regulator FMRP. Previously we established a disease model through mutation of Drosophila fmr1 (dfmr1) and showed that loss of dFMRP causes defects in neuronal structure, function, and behavioral output similar to the human disease state. To uncover molecular targets of dFMRP in the brain, we use here a proteomic approach involving two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analyses followed by mass spectrometry identification of proteins with significantly altered expression in dfmr1 null mutants. We then focus on two misregulated enzymes, phenylalanine hydroxylase (Henna) and GTP cyclohydrolase (Punch), both of which mediate in concert the synthetic pathways of two key monoamine neuromodulators, dopamine and serotonin. Brain enzymatic assays show a nearly 2-fold elevation of Punch activity in dfmr1 null mutants. Consistently brain neurochemical assays show that both dopamine and serotonin are significantly increased in dfmr1 null mutants. At a cellular level, dfmr1 null mutant neurons display a highly significant elevation of the dense core vesicles that package these monoamine neuromodulators for secretion. Taken together, these data indicate that dFMRP normally down-regulates the monoamine pathway, which is consequently up-regulated in the mutant condition. Elevated brain levels of dopamine and serotonin provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for aspects of cognitive and behavioral deficits in human patients.

  7. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J.

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{supmore » 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.« less

  8. Comparative production of 6-aminopenicillanic acid by different E. coli strains and their acridine orange (AO) induced mutants.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Rubina; Farooq, Shafqat; Ali, Syed Shahid

    2007-11-01

    The present study was conducted to see the difference in production of 6-APA I) between wild strains of E. coli collected from local environment and their acridine orange (AO) induced mutants and ii) between mutants and E. coli strains (ATCC 11105 and ATCC 9637) of American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) used commercially for enzymatic production of 6-APA. The optimum conditions for bioconversion were standardized and 6-APA was obtained in crystalline form. Relative PGA activity of local and foreign E. coli strains varied significantly with the highest being 12.7 in mutant strain (BDCS-N-M36) and the lowest 4.3 mg 6-APA h(-1) mg(-1) wet cells in foreign strain (ATCC 11105). The enzyme activity exhibited by mutant strain (BDCS-N-M36) was also two folds higher compared to that in wild parent BDCS-N-W50 (6.3 mg 6-APA h(-1) mg(-1) wet cells). The overall production of 6-APA and conversion ratios ranged between 0.25-0.41 g of 6-APA per 0.5 g of penicillin G and 51-83%, respectively. Maximum conversion ratio (83%) was achieved by using crude cells of mutant strain (BDCS-N-M36) which is the highest value ever reported by crude cells on a shake-flask scale whereas reported 6-APA production by immobilized cells is 60-90% in batch and continuous systems. Results are being discussed with reference to importance of local bacterial strains and their significance for industrially important enzymes.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  11. Analyzing the 3D Structure of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II and Its Mutants Using Deep View and the Protein Data Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ship, Noam J.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2005-01-01

    The self directed study of a 3D image of a biomolecule stresses the complex nature of the intra- and intermolecular interactions that come together to define its structure. This is made up of a series of in vitro experiments with a wild-type and mutants forms of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) that examine the structure function relationship…

  12. α-Synuclein Mutation Inhibits Endocytosis at Mammalian Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianhua; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Sheng, Jiansong; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Sun, Lixin; Sgobio, Carmelo; Lin, Xian; Peng, Shiyong; Jin, Yinghui; Gan, Lin; Cai, Huaibin; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-04-20

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense and multiplication mutations have been suggested to cause neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. Before causing the progressive neuronal loss, α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. To understand how α-syn mutations impair exocytosis, we developed a mouse model that selectively expressed PD-related human α-syn A53T (h-α-synA53T) mutation at the calyx of Held terminals, where release mechanisms can be dissected with a patch-clamping technique. With capacitance measurement of endocytosis, we reported that h-α-synA53T, either expressed transgenically or dialyzed in the short term in calyces, inhibited two of the most common forms of endocytosis, the slow and rapid vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses. The expression of h-α-synA53Tin calyces also inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These findings may help to understand how α-syn mutations impair neurotransmission before neurodegeneration. α-Synuclein (α-syn) missense or multiplication mutations may cause neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The initial impact of α-syn mutations before neuronal loss is impairment of exocytosis, which may contribute to eventual neurodegeneration. The mechanism underlying impairment of exocytosis is poorly understood. Here we report that an α-syn mutant, the human α-syn A53T, inhibited two of the most commonly observed forms of endocytosis, slow and rapid endocytosis, at a mammalian central synapse. We also found that α-syn A53T inhibited vesicle replenishment to the readily releasable pool. These results may contribute to accounting for the widely observed early synaptic impairment caused by α-syn mutations in the progression toward neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364408-07$15.00/0.

  13. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Govinda; Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  14. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kamila B.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings. PMID:28275610

  15. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E.; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium’s efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  16. Bacteria form tellurium nanocrystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers have found two bacterial species that produce tellurium oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors for growth, leaving elemental tellurium in the form of nanoparticles. The crystals from the two organisms exhibit distinctively different structures. Bacillus selenitireducens initially forms nanorods that cluster together to form rosettes. Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms irregularly-shaped nanospheres that coalesce into larger composite aggregates.

  17. Handbook of Poetic Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Ron, Ed.

    Intended for secondary teachers and student writers but useful for anyone interested in poetic forms, this book defines 74 basic poetic forms, summarizes their histories, quotes examples from noted poets, and offers professional tricks of the trade on how to use each form. The book covers the following poetic forms: abstract poem, acrostic,…

  18. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basismore » of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.« less

  19. Selection of Streptococcus lactis Mutants Defective in Malolactic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Pierre P.; Heslot, Henri

    1987-01-01

    An enrichment medium and a new sensitive medium were developed to detect malolactic variants in different strains of lactic bacteria. Factors such as the concentration of glucose and l-malate, pH level, and the type of indicator dye used are discussed with regard to the kinetics of malic acid conversion to lactic acid. Use of these media allowed a rapid and easier screening of mutagenized streptococcal cells unable to ferment l-malate. A collection of malolactic-negative mutants of Streptococcus lactis induced by UV, nitrosoguanidine, or transposonal mutagenesis were characterized. The results showed that several mutants were apparently defective in the structural gene of malolactic enzyme, whereas others contained mutations which may either inactivate a putative permease or affect a regulatory sequence. PMID:16347282

  20. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yuuichi; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2014-09-01

    A diverse range of organisms shows physiological and behavioural rhythms with various periods. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms with an approximately 24 h period in both Drosophila and mammals, while less attention has been paid to ultradian rhythms with shorter periods. We used a video-tracking method to monitor the movement of single flies, and clear ultradian rhythms were detected in the locomotor behaviour of wild type and clock mutant flies kept under constant dark conditions. In particular, the Pigment-dispersing factor mutant (Pdf 01) demonstrated a precise and robust ultradian rhythmicity, which was not temperature compensated. Our results suggest that Drosophila has an endogenous ultradian oscillator that is masked by circadian rhythmic behaviours.

  1. Implications of long tails in the distribution of mutant effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, D.; Feng, J.

    2005-07-01

    Long-tailed distributions possess an infinite variance, yet a finite sample that is drawn from such a distribution has a finite variance. In this work we consider a model of a population subject to mutation, selection and drift. We investigate the implications of a long-tailed distribution of mutant allelic effects on the distribution of genotypic effects in a model with a continuum of allelic effects. While the analysis is confined to asexual populations, it does also have implications for sexual populations. We obtain analytical results for a selectively neutral population as well as one subject to selection. We supplement these analytical results with numerical simulations, to take into account genetic drift. We find that a long-tailed distribution of mutant effects may affect both the equilibrium and the evolutionary adaptive behaviour of a population.

  2. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Confer Cross-Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heithoff, Douglas M.; Enioutina, Elena Y.; Daynes, Raymond A.; Sinsheimer, Robert L.; Low, David A.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella isolates that lack or overproduce DNA adenine methylase (Dam) elicited a cross-protective immune response to different Salmonella serovars. The protection afforded by the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam vaccine was greater than that elicited in mice that survived a virulent infection. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam mutant strains exhibited enhanced sensitivity to mediators of innate immunity such as antimicrobial peptides, bile salts, and hydrogen peroxide. Also, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccines were not immunosuppressive; unlike wild-type vaccines, they failed to induce increased nitric oxide levels and permitted a subsequent robust humoral response to diptheria toxoid antigen in infected mice. Dam mutant strains exhibited a low-grade persistence which, coupled with the nonimmunosuppression and the ectopic protein expression caused by altered levels of Dam, may provide an expanded source of potential antigens in vaccinated hosts. PMID:11598044

  3. Studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Indicate Pyoverdine as the Central Factor in Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Sass, Gabriele; Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John; Shah, Hemi; Ansari, Shajia Rahman; Clemons, Karl V; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Dietl, Anna-Maria; Visca, Paolo; Haas, Hubertus; Déziel, Eric; Stevens, David A

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus are common opportunistic bacterial and fungal pathogens, respectively. They often coexist in airways of immunocompromised patients and individuals with cystic fibrosis, where they form biofilms and cause acute and chronic illnesses. Hence, the interactions between them have long been of interest and it is known that P. aeruginosa can inhibit A. fumigatus in vitro We have approached the definition of the inhibitory P. aeruginosa molecules by studying 24 P. aeruginosa mutants with various virulence genes deleted for the ability to inhibit A. fumigatus biofilms. The ability of P. aeruginosa cells or their extracellular products produced during planktonic or biofilm growth to affect A. fumigatus biofilm metabolism or planktonic A. fumigatus growth was studied in agar and liquid assays using conidia or hyphae. Four mutants, the pvdD pchE , pvdD , lasR rhlR , and lasR mutants, were shown to be defective in various assays. This suggested the P. aeruginosa siderophore pyoverdine as the key inhibitory molecule, although additional quorum sensing-regulated factors likely contribute to the deficiency of the latter two mutants. Studies of pure pyoverdine substantiated these conclusions and included the restoration of inhibition by the pyoverdine deletion mutants. A correlation between the concentration of pyoverdine produced and antifungal activity was also observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates derived from lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. The key inhibitory mechanism of pyoverdine was chelation of iron and denial of iron to A. fumigatus IMPORTANCE Interactions between human pathogens found in the same body locale are of vast interest. These interactions could result in exacerbation or amelioration of diseases. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa affects the growth of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Both pathogens form biofilms that are resistant to therapeutic drugs and host immunity. P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus

  4. Pattern of retinal morphological and functional decay in a light-inducible, rhodopsin mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Gargini, Claudia; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Biagioni, Martina; Strettoi, Enrica

    2017-07-18

    Hallmarks of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a family of genetic diseases, are a typical rod-cone-degeneration with initial night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, followed by decreased daylight sight and progressive visual acuity loss up to legal blindness. Great heterogeneity in nature and function of mutated genes, variety of mutations for each of them, variability in phenotypic appearance and transmission modality contribute to make RP a still incurable disease. Translational research relies on appropriate animal models mimicking the genetic and phenotypic diversity of the human pathology. Here, we provide a systematic, morphological and functional analysis of Rho Tvrm4 /Rho + rhodopsin mutant mice, originally described in 2010 and portraying several features of common forms of autosomal dominant RP caused by gain-of-function mutations. These mice undergo photoreceptor degeneration only when exposed briefly to strong, white light and allow controlled timing of induction of rod and cone death, which therefore can be elicited in adult animals, as observed in human RP. The option to control severity and retinal extent of the phenotype by regulating intensity and duration of the inducing light opens possibilities to exploit this model for multiple experimental purposes. Altogether, the unique features of this mutant make it an excellent resource for retinal degeneration research.

  5. Deficient Gene Expression in Protein Kinase Inhibitor α Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gangolli, Esha A.; Belyamani, Mouna; Muchinsky, Sara; Narula, Anita; Burton, Kimberly A.; McKnight, G. Stanley; Uhler, Michael D.; Idzerda, Rejean L.

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) is a potent endogenous inhibitor of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). It functions by binding the free catalytic (C) subunit with a high affinity and is also known to export nuclear C subunit to the cytoplasm. The significance of these actions with respect to PKI's physiological role is not well understood. To address this, we have generated by homologous recombination mutant mice that are deficient in PKIα, one of the three isoforms of PKI. The mice completely lack PKI activity in skeletal muscle and, surprisingly, show decreased basal and isoproterenol-induced gene expression in muscle. Further examination revealed reduced levels of the phosphorylated (active) form of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) in the knockouts. This phenomenon stems, at least in part, from lower basal PKA activity levels in the mutants, arising from a compensatory increase in the level of the RIα subunit of PKA. The deficit in gene induction, however, is not easily explained by current models of PKI function and suggests that PKI may play an as yet undescribed role in PKA signaling. PMID:10779334

  6. Use of an otolith-deficient mutant in studies of fish behavior under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, K.; Mizuno, R.; Eguchi, H.

    In Medaka (Oryzias latipes ), fish of a mutant strain (ha strain) had a malfunction in otolith-vestibular system. The phenotype is expressed when the fish have this recessive gene h a) in a homozygous fashion, and the gene is autosomal. Their( difference from the normal fish was first recognizable in their embryonic stages, with abnormally larger ear vesicles and absence of otoliths called Lapillus inside the vesicles. The time-course study was carried out for the subsequent development of their otoliths. X ray phot ographs of the fish revealed that some adult fish of ha- strain still lack a pair of Lapillus, which mainly serve in sensing the direction of gravity, while others have formed the otoliths partially or completely. Changing the light direction within each day, the ha mutant fish were reared from hatching to young fish. The fish treated showed less dependence on gravity even at the age of 50 days or more. Parabolic flight experiments were carried out to observe the fish behavior under microgravity for ha strain.

  7. Ectopic expression of pMADS3 in transgenic petunia phenocopies the petunia blind mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchimoto, S; van der Krol, A R; Chua, N H

    1993-01-01

    We cloned a MADS-box gene, pMADS3, from Petunia hybrida, which shows high sequence homology to the Arabidopsis AGAMOUS and Antirrhinum PLENA. pMADS3 is expressed exclusively in stamens and carpels of wild-type petunia plants. In the petunia mutant blind, which shows homeotic conversions of corolla limbs into antheroid structures with pollen grains and small parts of sepals into carpelloid tissue, pMADS3 is expressed in all floral organs as well as in leaves. Ectopic expression of pMADS3 in transgenic petunia leads to phenocopies of the blind mutant, i.e., the formation of antheroid structures on limbs and carpelloid tissue on sepals. Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress pMADS3 exhibit an even more severe phenotype, with the sepals forming a carpel-like structure encasing the interior floral organs. Our results identify BLIND as a negative regulator of pMADS3, which specifies stamens and carpels during petunia flower development. PMID:8104573

  8. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  9. A molecular chaperone activity of CCS restores the maturation of SOD1 fALS mutants.

    PubMed

    Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Banci, Lucia

    2017-12-12

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is an important metalloprotein for cellular oxidative stress defence, that is mutated in familiar variants of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (fALS). Some mutations destabilize the apo protein, leading to the formation of misfolded, toxic species. The Copper Chaperone for SOD1 (CCS) transiently interacts with SOD1 and promotes its correct maturation by transferring copper and catalyzing disulfide bond formation. By in vitro and in-cell NMR, we investigated the role of the SOD-like domain of CCS (CCS-D2). We showed that CCS-D2 forms a stable complex with zinc-bound SOD1 in human cells, that has a twofold stabilizing effect: it both prevents the accumulation of unstructured mutant SOD1 and promotes zinc binding. We further showed that CCS-D2 interacts with apo-SOD1 in vitro, suggesting that in cells CCS stabilizes mutant apo-SOD1 prior to zinc binding. Such molecular chaperone function of CCS-D2 is novel and its implications in SOD-linked fALS deserve further investigation.

  10. Altered native stability is the dominant basis for susceptibility of α1-antitrypsin mutants to polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Irving, James A.; Haq, Imran; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Faull, Sarah V.; Lomas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are protease inhibitors whose most stable state is achieved upon transition of a central 5-stranded β-sheet to a 6-stranded form. Mutations, low pH, denaturants and elevated temperatures promote this transition, which can result in a growing polymer chain of inactive molecules. Different types of polymer are possible, but, experimentally only heat has been shown to generate polymers in vitro consistent with ex vivo pathological specimens. Many mutations that alter the rate of heat-induced polymerization have been described, but interpretation is problematic because discrimination is lacking between the effect of global changes in native stability and specific effects on structural mechanism. We show that the temperature midpoint (Tm) of thermal denaturation reflects the transition of α1-antitrypsin to the polymerization intermediate, and determine the relationship with fixed-temperature polymerization half-times (t0.5) in the presence of stabilizing additives [TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), sucrose and sodium sulfate], point mutations and disulfide bonds. Combined with a retrospective analysis of 31 mutants characterized in the literature, the results of the present study show that global changes to native state stability are the predominant basis for the effects of mutations and osmolytes on heat-induced polymerization, summarized by the equation: ln(t0.5,mutant/t0.5,wild-type)=0.34×ΔTm. It is deviations from this relationship that hold key information about the polymerization process. PMID:24552432

  11. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xingsheng; McMillan, Mary; Coumans, Joëlle V F; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot). The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase), nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase), stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit) and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein). The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  12. Cellular Responses during Morphological Transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA Knockout Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Coumans, Joëlle V. F.; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J.; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot). The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase), nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase), stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit) and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein). The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA − strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome. PMID:25502569

  13. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; ...

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  14. Use of virion DNA as a cloning vector for the construction of mutant and recombinant herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Duboise, S M; Guo, J; Desrosiers, R C; Jung, J U

    1996-10-15

    We have developed improved procedures for the isolation of deletion mutant, point mutant, and recombinant herpesvirus saimiri. These procedures take advantage of the absence of NotI and AscI restriction enzyme sites within the viral genome and use reporter genes for the identification of recombinant viruses. Genes for secreted engineered alkaline phosphatase and green fluorescent protein were placed under simian virus 40 early promoter control and flanked by NotI and AscI restriction sites. When permissive cells were cotransfected with herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA and one of the engineered reporter genes cloned within herpesvirus saimiri sequences, recombinant viruses were readily identified and purified on the basis of expression of the reporter gene. Digestion of recombinant virion DNA with NotI or AscI was used to delete the reporter gene from the recombinant herpesvirus saimiri. Replacement of the reporter gene can be achieved by NotI or AscI digestion of virion DNA and ligation with a terminally matched fragment or, alternatively, by homologous recombination in cotransfected cells. Any gene can, in theory, be cloned directly into the virion DNA when flanked by the appropriate NotI or AscI sites. These procedures should be widely applicable in their general form to most or all herpesviruses that replicate permissively in cultured cells.

  15. RelA Mutant Enterococcus faecium with Multiantibiotic Tolerance Arising in an Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Honsa, Erin S.; Mhaissen, Mohammed N.; Frank, Matthew; Shaker, Jessica; Iverson, Amy; Rubnitz, Jeffrey; Hayden, Randall T.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serious bacterial infections in immunocompromised patients require highly effective antibacterial therapy for cure, and thus, this setting may reveal novel mechanisms by which bacteria circumvent antibiotics in the absence of immune pressure. Here, an infant with leukemia developed vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) bacteremia that persisted for 26 days despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 22 consecutive VRE isolates identified the emergence of a single missense mutation (L152F) in relA, which constitutively activated the stringent response, resulting in elevated baseline levels of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp). Although the mutant remained susceptible to both linezolid and daptomycin in clinical MIC testing and during planktonic growth, it demonstrated tolerance to high doses of both antibiotics when growing in a biofilm. This biofilm-specific gain in resistance was reflected in the broad shift in transcript levels caused by the mutation. Only an experimental biofilm-targeting ClpP-activating antibiotic was able to kill the mutant strain in an established biofilm. The relA mutation was associated with a fitness trade-off, forming smaller and less-well-populated biofilms on biological surfaces. We conclude that clinically relevant relA mutations can emerge during prolonged VRE infection, causing baseline activation of the stringent response, subsequent antibiotic tolerance, and delayed eradication in an immunocompromised state. PMID:28049149

  16. Use of proline mutants to help solve the NMR solution structure of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Davies, P. L.; Sykes, B. D.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    To help understand the structure/function relationships in antifreeze proteins (AFP), and to define the motifs required for ice binding, a Type III AFP suitable for two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies was produced in Escherichia coli. A synthetic gene for one of the Type III AFP isoforms was assembled in a T7 polymerase-directed expression vector. The 67-amino acid-l