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Sample records for a549 xenograft model

  1. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  2. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  3. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  4. Preclinical PK/PD model for combined administration of erlotinib and sunitinib in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-yun; Ren, Yu-peng; Yuan, Yin; Ji, Shuang-min; Zhou, Shu-pei; Wang, Li-jie; Mou, Zhen-zhen; Li, Liang; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Combined therapy of EGFR TKI and VEGFR TKI may produce a greater therapeutic benefit and overcome EGFR TKI-induced resistance. However, a previous study shows that a combination of EGFR TKI erlotinib (ER) with VEGFR TKI sunitinib (SU) did not improve the overall survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study we examined the anticancer effect of ER, SU and their combination in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice, and conducted PK/PD modeling and simulations to optimize the dose regimen. Methods: ER (20, 50 mg·kg−1·d−1) or SU (5, 10, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1) alone, or their combination were administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing A549 tumors for 22 days. The tumor size and body weight were recorded daily. The experimental data were used to develop PK/PD models describing the quantitative relationship between the plasma concentrations and tumor suppression in different dose regimens. The models were further evaluated and validated, and used to predict the efficacy of different combination regimens and to select the optimal regimen. Results: The in vivo anticancer efficacy of the combination groups was much stronger than that of either drug administered alone. A PK/PD model was developed with a combination index (φ) of 4.4, revealing a strong synergistic effect between ER and SU. The model simulation predicted the tumor growth in different dosage regimens, and showed that the dose of SU played a decisive role in the combination treatment, and suggested that a lower dose of ER (≤5 mg·kg−1·d−1) and adjusting the dose of SU might yield a better dosage regimen for clinical research. Conclusion: The experimental data and modeling confirm synergistic anticancer effect of ER and SU in the treatment of A549 xenograft mice. The optimal dosage regimen determined by the PK/PD modeling and simulation can be used in future preclinical study and provide a reference for clinical application. PMID:27180983

  5. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting; Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Chune

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:27045080

  6. Vitamin D Analogs Potentiate the Antitumor Effect of Imatinib Mesylate in a Human A549 Lung Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Ewa; Filip-Psurska, Beata; Świtalska, Marta; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In previous papers, we presented data on studies on the anticancer activity of the vitamin D3 analogs, named PRI-2191 and PRI-2205, in different cancer models. In this study, we showed the improved antiproliferative activity of a combination of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, GV) and cytostatic agents in in vitro studies, when used with a third compound, namely PRI-2191, in an A549 human lung cancer model. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of both PRI-2191, as well as PRI-2205 on the anticancer activity of GV in mice bearing A549 tumors. The route of PRI-2191 analog administration showed a significant impact on the outcome of GV treatment: subcutaneous injection was more efficient and less toxic than oral gavage. Moreover, both vitamin D compounds increased the anticancer activity of GV; however, they might also potentiate some adverse effects. We also evaluated in tumor tissue the expression of VEGF, PDGF-BB, vitamin D receptor, CYP27B1, CYP24, p53 and Bcl-2, as well as PDGF receptors: α and β. We observed the upregulation of p53 expression and the downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as VEGF in A549 tumors as a result of the tested treatment. However, vitamin D analogs did not significantly influence the expression of these proteins. PMID:26580599

  7. Vitamin D Analogs Potentiate the Antitumor Effect of Imatinib Mesylate in a Human A549 Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Filip-Psurska, Beata; Świtalska, Marta; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In previous papers, we presented data on studies on the anticancer activity of the vitamin D₃ analogs, named PRI-2191 and PRI-2205, in different cancer models. In this study, we showed the improved antiproliferative activity of a combination of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, GV) and cytostatic agents in in vitro studies, when used with a third compound, namely PRI-2191, in an A549 human lung cancer model. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of both PRI-2191, as well as PRI-2205 on the anticancer activity of GV in mice bearing A549 tumors. The route of PRI-2191 analog administration showed a significant impact on the outcome of GV treatment: subcutaneous injection was more efficient and less toxic than oral gavage. Moreover, both vitamin D compounds increased the anticancer activity of GV; however, they might also potentiate some adverse effects. We also evaluated in tumor tissue the expression of VEGF, PDGF-BB, vitamin D receptor, CYP27B1, CYP24, p53 and Bcl-2, as well as PDGF receptors: α and β. We observed the upregulation of p53 expression and the downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as VEGF in A549 tumors as a result of the tested treatment. However, vitamin D analogs did not significantly influence the expression of these proteins. PMID:26580599

  8. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by a Lysophosphatidic Acid Antagonist in a Engineered Three-dimensional Lung Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND We developed an engineered three-dimensional (3-D) tumor xenograft model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in nude mice, and used this model to evaluate a dual-activity inhibitor of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) biosynthesis and receptor activation. METHODS First, BrP-LPA, a pan-antagonist for four LPA receptors and inhibitor of the lyosphospholipase D activity of autotaxin, was examined for inhibition of cell migration and cell invasion by human NSCLC A549 cells. Second, A549 cells were encapsulated in 3-D in three semi-synthetic ECMs based on chemically-modified glycosaminoglycans, and injected subcutaneously in nude mice. Tumor volume and vascularity were deteremined as a function of sECM composition. Third, engineered NSCLC xenografts were formed from A549 cells in either Extracel-HP or Matrigel, and mice were treated with four intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg of BrP-LPA. RESULTS First, BrP-LPA inhibited cell migration and invasiveness of A549 cells in vitro. Second, tumor growth and microvessel formation for 3-D encapsulated A549 cells in vivo in nude mice increased in the order: buffer only < Extracel < Extracel-HP < Extracel-HP containing growth factors plus laminin. Third, tumor volumes increased rapidly in both Matrigel and Extracel-HP encapsulated A549 cells, and tumor growth was markedly inhibited by BrP-LPA treatment. Finally, tumor vascularization was dramatically reduced in the A549 tumors treated with BrP-LPA. CONCLUSIONS Engineered A549 lung tumors can be created by 3-D encapsulation in an ECM substitute with user controlled composition. The engineered tumors regress and lose vascularity in response to a dual activity inhibitor of the LPA signaling pathway. PMID:20143443

  9. Predicting the clonogenic survival of A549 cells after modulated x-ray irradiation using the linear quadratic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Regina; Oliver, Lyn; Davey, Ross; Harvie, Rozelle; Baldock, Clive

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present two prediction methods, mean dose and summed dose, for predicting the number of A549 cells that will survive after modulated x-ray irradiation. The prediction methods incorporate the dose profile from the modulated x-ray fluence map applied across the cell sample and the linear quadratic (LQ) model. We investigated the clonogenic survival of A549 cells when irradiated using two different modulated x-ray fluence maps. Differences between the measured and predicted surviving fraction were observed for modulated x-ray irradiation. When the x-ray fluence map produced a steep dose gradient across the sample, fewer cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. When the x-ray fluence map produced a less steep dose gradient across the sample, more cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. Regardless of the steepness of the dose gradient, more cells survived in the irradiated region than expected for the reference dose range of 1-10 Gy. The change in the cell survival for the unirradiated regions of the two different dose gradients may be an important factor to consider when predicting the number of cells that will survive at the edge of modulated x-ray fields. This investigation provides an improved method of predicting cell survival for modulated x-ray radiation treatment. It highlights the limitations of the LQ model, particularly in its ability to describe the biological response of cells irradiated under these conditions.

  10. Peloruside A Inhibits Growth of Human Lung and Breast Tumor Xenografts in an Athymic nu/nu Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Colin J; Krauth, Melissa; Wick, Michael J; Shay, Jerry W; Gellert, Ginelle; De Brabander, Jef K; Northcote, Peter T; Miller, John H

    2015-08-01

    Peloruside A is a microtubule-stabilizing agent isolated from a New Zealand marine sponge. Peloruside prevents growth of a panel of cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations, including cell lines that are resistant to paclitaxel. Three xenograft studies in athymic nu/nu mice were performed to assess the efficacy of peloruside compared with standard anticancer agents such as paclitaxel, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. The first study examined the effect of 5 and 10 mg/kg peloruside (QD×5) on the growth of H460 non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Peloruside caused tumor growth inhibition (%TGI) of 84% and 95%, respectively, whereas standard treatments with paclitaxel (8 mg/kg, QD×5) and docetaxel (6.3 mg/kg, Q2D×3) were much less effective (%TGI of 50% and 18%, respectively). In a second xenograft study using A549 lung cancer cells and varied schedules of dosing, activity of peloruside was again superior compared with the taxanes with inhibitions ranging from 51% to 74%, compared with 44% and 50% for the two taxanes. A third xenograft study in a P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI/ADR-RES breast tumor model showed that peloruside was better tolerated than either doxorubicin or paclitaxel. We conclude that peloruside is highly effective in preventing the growth of lung and P-glycoprotein-overexpressing breast tumors in vivo and that further therapeutic development is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(8); 1816-23. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26056149

  11. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization.

    PubMed

    Saffarini, Camelia M; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7-, 30-, 90-, 200-, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (ie, CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) was performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200- and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  12. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hines, William C; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER(+) adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with "luminal B" intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44(High) subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44(Low) cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER(+) cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development. PMID:26661596

  13. Development and characterization of xenograft model systems for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Baras, Alexander S.; Mancuso, Stefani; Fan, Hao; Davidson, Robert; Dirks, Dawn; Golden, Wendy; Frierson, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) is one of the most common malignancies to arise in human salivary glands, and also arises in glandular tissue of other organ systems. To address the paucity of experimental model systems for this tumor type, we have undertaken a program of transplanting tissue samples of human ACC into immunodeficient nu/nu mice to create xenograft model systems. In 17 of 23 attempts (74%) xenograft tumors were successfully grown. In all cases, the histologic appearance of the donating tumor was recapitulated in the subsequent xenograft. Characterization of a subset of xenograft models by immunohistochemical biomarkers and by RNA transcript microarray analysis showed good fidelity in the recapitulation of gene expression patterns in the xenograft tumors compared to the human donor tumors. Since ACC is known to frequently contain a t(6;9) translocation that fuses the MYB and NFIB genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of twelve ACC xenograft models was performed that assayed MYB locus break-apart and MYB-NFIB locus fusion. 11/12 (92%) xenograft models revealed MYB locus rearrangement and 10/12 (83%) xenograft models showed evidence of fusion of the MYB and NFIB loci. The two related xenograft models (derived from primary and metastatic tumors, respectively, of the same human subject) were karyotyped, showing a t(1;6) translocation, suggesting MYB translocation to a novel fusion partner gene. Overall, our results indicate that ACC is amenable to xenografting and that ACC xenograft models recapitulate the molecular and morphologic characteristics of human tumors, suggesting utility as valid experimental and preclinical model systems for this disease. PMID:21709671

  14. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puchelle, E; Peault, B

    2000-01-01

    Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa. PMID:11667974

  15. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models in Gynecological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska, Paul

    2014-01-01

    OVERVIEW In the era of targeted therapies, patients with gynecological malignancies have not yet been major beneficiaries of this new class of agents. This may reflect the fact that the main tumor types, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers, are a highly heterogeneous group of cancers, with variable response to standard chemotherapies. This is also likely due to poor model development in which to study the diversity of these cancers. Cancer-derived cell lines fail to adequately recapitulate molecular hallmarks of specific cancer subsets and complex microenvironments, which may be critical for sensitivity to targeted therapies. Patient derived xenografts (PDX), using fresh human tumor without prior in vitro culture, combined with whole genome expression, gene copy number and sequencing analyses, could dramatically aid novel therapy development in gynecological malignancies. Gynecological tumors can be engrafted in immunodeficient mice with a high rate of success and within a reasonable time frame. The resulting PDX accurately recapitulate the patient’s tumour in histological, molecular and in vivo treatment response characteristics. Orthotopic PDX develop complications relevant for the clinic, such as ascites and bowel obstruction, providing opportunities for understanding the biology of these clinical problems. Thus, PDX have great promise for delivering improved understanding of gynecological malignancies, serve as better models for designing novel therapies and clinical trials and could underpin individualized, directed therapy for patients from whom PDX models have been established. PMID:24857111

  16. CpG ODN 1826 enhances radiosensitivity of the human lung cancer cell line A549 in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Sun, T-Y; Yang, C-M; Jia, M; Li, J; Tang, H-L; Zhou, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of CpG ODN1826 plus radiotherapy (RT) on tumor growth and angiogenesis of subcutaneous tumor in a rat model. Four treatment groups were tested in which rats were injected with 100 μL CpG ODN1826 (1 μg/μL) or 100 μL vehicle, with and without exposure to 8 Gy after 2 h. At 7 days after inoculation of lung cancer cells, drugs were injected in the tumor and radiation was administered over 5 days, after which the rate of tumor inhibition was calculated. Expression of VEGF-C in tumor tissue was seen in 10, 50, 80, and 100% of tumors in the CpG ODN1826 + RT, CpG ODN1826, vehicle + RT, and vehicle alone groups, respectively, while positive expression of NRP-1 was seen in 10, 40, 90, and 100% of tumors. The decreases in expression of VEGF-C mRNA in the CpG ODN1826 + RT and CpG ODN1826 groups compared with the NS + RT and NS groups were significant (P < 0.01), as were the decreases in NRP-1 mRNA in the CpG ODN1826 + RT group compared with the CpG ODN1826 group (P < 0.01). Thus, CpG ODN1826 can significantly inhibit tumor growth in a rat model, the mechanism of which may be related to inhibition of the expression of VEGF-C and NRP-1, which have an inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. PMID:26345913

  17. Evaluation of Synergetic Anticancer Activity of Berberine and Curcumin on Different Models of A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562 Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Acharya; Kumar, M Hemanth

    2015-01-01

    Ayurvedic system of medicine is using Berberis aristata and Curcuma longa herbs to treat different diseases including cancer. The study was performed to evaluate the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine and Curcumin by estimating the inhibition of the cell proliferation by cytotoxicity assay using MTT method on specified human cell lines (A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562). All the cells were harvested from the culture and seeded in the 96-well assay plates at seeding density of 2.0 × 10(4) cells/well and were incubated for 24 hours. Test items Berberine with Curcumin (1 : 1), Curcumin 95% pure, and Berberine 95% pure were exposed at the concentrations of 1.25, 0.001, and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively, and incubated for a period of 48 hours followed by dispensing MTT solution (5 mg/mL). The cells were incubated at 37 ± 1°C for 4 hours followed by addition of DMSO for dissolving the formazan crystals and absorbance was read at 570 nm. Separate wells were prepared for positive control, controls (only medium with cells), and blank (only medium). The results had proven the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine with Curcumin inducing cell death greater percentage of >77% when compared to pure curcumin with <54% and pure Berberine with <45% on average on all cell line models. PMID:26247019

  18. Evaluation of Synergetic Anticancer Activity of Berberine and Curcumin on Different Models of A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Acharya; Kumar, M. Hemanth

    2015-01-01

    Ayurvedic system of medicine is using Berberis aristata and Curcuma longa herbs to treat different diseases including cancer. The study was performed to evaluate the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine and Curcumin by estimating the inhibition of the cell proliferation by cytotoxicity assay using MTT method on specified human cell lines (A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat, and K562). All the cells were harvested from the culture and seeded in the 96-well assay plates at seeding density of 2.0 × 104 cells/well and were incubated for 24 hours. Test items Berberine with Curcumin (1 : 1), Curcumin 95% pure, and Berberine 95% pure were exposed at the concentrations of 1.25, 0.001, and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively, and incubated for a period of 48 hours followed by dispensing MTT solution (5 mg/mL). The cells were incubated at 37 ± 1°C for 4 hours followed by addition of DMSO for dissolving the formazan crystals and absorbance was read at 570 nm. Separate wells were prepared for positive control, controls (only medium with cells), and blank (only medium). The results had proven the synergetic anticancer activity of Berberine with Curcumin inducing cell death greater percentage of >77% when compared to pure curcumin with <54% and pure Berberine with <45% on average on all cell line models. PMID:26247019

  19. Paracrine control of differentiation in the alveolar carcinoma, A549, by human foetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Speirs, V.; Ray, K. P.; Freshney, R. I.

    1991-01-01

    Synthesis of pulmonary surfactant (PS) is necessary for normal functioning of the lungs and its production is indicative of normal differentiated lung. The human alveolar carcinoma, A549, has been found to synthesis and secrete PS in vitro. The purpose of this study was to optimise the culture conditions for PS synthesis by A549 as well as to determine the potential role of foetal lung fibroblasts in the induction of PS by glucocorticoids. A549 cells growing in filter wells produced higher levels of PS in response to steroid, a 5-fold increase on the filter well compared to only a 1.5-fold increase when the cells were cultured on a conventional plastic substrate. A549 cells grown in filter wells responded to coculture with fibroblasts whether in direct contact or separated co-culture. A 20-fold increase in PS over control values was observed in separated steroid-treated co-cultures, suggesting the presence of a diffusible factor. A partially purified factor was isolated from fibroblast conditioned medium which was capable of inducing differentiation and other phenotypic changes in A549, namely induction of PS, reduction of plasminogen activator activity and reduction in the in vivo growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. These results suggest that, under the correct conditions, A549 cells, although transformed, still retain the capacity to respond to differentiation-inducing signals from normal fibroblasts. Images Figure 5 PMID:1654985

  20. Dendrotoxin-κ suppresses tumor growth induced by human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Ryu, Pan Dong

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels have been considered to be a regulator of membrane potential and neuronal excitability. Recently, accumulated evidence has indicated that several Kv channel subtypes contribute to the control of cell proliferation in various types of cells and are worth noting as potential emerging molecular targets of cancer therapy. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the Kv1.1-specific blocker, dendrotoxin-κ (DTX-κ), on tumor formation induced by the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 in a xenograft model. Kv1.1 mRNA and protein was expressed in A549 cells and the blockade of Kv1.1 by DTX-κ, reduced tumor formation in nude mice. Furthermore, treatment with DTX-κ significantly increased protein expression of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, and p15INK4B and significantly decreased protein expression of cyclin D3 in tumor tissues compared to the control. These results suggest that DTX-κ has anti-tumor effects in A549 cells through the pathway governing G1-S transition. PMID:21368561

  1. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; Poulin, Kathy L; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C; Parks, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  2. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  3. Establishment and characterization of a canine xenograft model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; González Gil, A; Cáceres, S; Díez, L; Illera, J C

    2013-12-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) are the most aggressive form of mammary/breast cancer. Both species naturally develop it, sharing epidemiological, clinical and histological characteristics. Thus, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. We have developed the first IMC xenograft model in SCID mice. Xenografts reproduced the histological features from the primary tumor, were highly aggressive and showed dermal tumor emboli, distinctive hallmarks of IMC/IBC. This model was hormone receptors positive and HER2 negative. Our findings showed that estrogens and androgens are locally produced in tissues. Factors related to tumor vascularization showed positive expression and xenografts with the highest expression of all analyzed vascular factors had the highest rate of tumor proliferation. The role of steroid hormones and the angio/lymphangiogenic properties found in this model, provide additional knowledge for future interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease. PMID:23972378

  4. Establishment and characterization of novel xenograft models of human biliary tract carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Emura, Fabian; Kamma, Hiroshi; Ghosh, Mila; Koike, Naoto; Kawamoto, Toru; Saijo, Kaoru; Ohno, Tadao; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2003-11-01

    In order to develop new therapeutic regimens for biliary tract cancers, which carry dismal prognoses, the establishment of a human biliary tract cancer xenograft model is essential. Herein, we report the successful establishment and characterization of two xenograft models of human biliary tract cancers. An adenosquamous gallbladder cancer cell line (TGBC-44) and a bile duct adenocarcinoma cell line (TGBC-47) were obtained from fresh surgical specimens in our department and subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice. The overall tumor take rate was 100% and solid tumors grew measurable after 5 and 7 days for TGBC-44 and TGBC-47, respectively. Tumor doubling time was 3.9+/-1.1 and 4.1+/-0.5 days in the exponential growth phase in TGBC-44 and TGBC-47 xenografts, respectively. Isozyme test and karyotype analysis confirmed the human origin. Histopathology analysis revealed that the TGBC-44 xenograft retained both the squamous and the adenocarcinoma components, and the TGBC-47 xenograft exhibited poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma as in the corresponding original tumors. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting studies revealed positive and similar expression of platelet derived endothelial growth factor/thymidine phosphorylase (PDGF/TP), thymidylate synthase (TS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in both original tumors and xenograft models. No macroscopic metastases were found at the time of sacrifice. We have successfully established two models of human biliary tract cancer, gallbladder and bile duct cancer. Models retained the morphological and biochemical characteristics of the original tumor and demonstrated constant biological behavior in all transplanted mice. These models could be useful tools for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against biliary tract cancers. PMID:14532968

  5. Anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MICHISHITA, Masaki; OHTSUKA, Aya; NAKAHIRA, Rei; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; NAKAGAWA, Takayuki; SASAKI, Nobuo; ARAI, Toshiro; TAKAHASHI, Kimimasa

    2015-01-01

    Feline mammary carcinomas are characterized by rapid progression and metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single drug therapy of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma expressing VEGF protein. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis and enhancing apoptosis; however, it did not affect the tumor proliferation index. Thus, bevacizumab had anti-tumor effects on a xenograft model, and this may be useful for the treatment of feline mammary carcinoma. PMID:26616000

  6. Maturation of the developing human fetal prostate in a rodent xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Spade, Daniel J.; Huse, Susan M.; Kostadinov, Stefan; Hall, Susan J.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in men. The etiology of prostate cancer is unknown, although both animal and epidemiologic data suggest that early life exposures to various toxicants, may impact DNA methylation status during development, playing an important role. Methods We have developed a xenograft model to characterize the growth and differentiation of human fetal prostate implants (gestational age 12-24 weeks) that can provide new data on the potential role of early life stressors on prostate cancer. The expression of key immunohistochemical markers responsible for prostate maturation was evaluated, including p63, cytokeratin 18, α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, caldesmon, Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, estrogen receptor-α, and androgen receptor. Xenografts were separated into epithelial and stromal compartments using laser capture microdissection (LCM), and the DNA methylation status was assessed in >480,000 CpG sites throughout the genome. Results Xenografts demonstrated growth and maturation throughout the 200 days of post-implantation evaluation. DNA methylation profiles of laser capture micro-dissected tissue demonstrated tissue-specific markers clustered by their location in either the epithelium or stroma of human prostate tissue. Differential methylated promoter region CpG-associated gene analysis revealed significantly more stromal than epithelial DNA methylation in the 30 and 90-day xenografts. Functional classification analysis identified CpG-related gene clusters in methylated epithelial and stromal human xenografts. Conclusion This study of human fetal prostate tissue establishes a xenograft model that demonstrates dynamic growth and maturation, allowing for future mechanistic studies of the developmental origins of later life proliferative prostate disease. PMID:24038131

  7. Human xenograft models as useful tools to assess the potential of novel therapeutics in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Weerden, W M; Bangma, C; de Wit, R

    2008-01-01

    With docetaxel as effective chemotherapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), the number of new treatment combinations for HRPC is expanding demanding a fast-track screening system. This review elaborates on the use of xenograft models to select the most promising combination therapies for entering into phase II clinical trials. PMID:19088719

  8. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo. PMID:20406497

  9. Modeling of response to endocrine therapy in a panel of human luminal breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cottu, P; Marangoni, E; Assayag, F; de Cremoux, P; Vincent-Salomon, A; Guyader, Ch; de Plater, L; Elbaz, C; Karboul, N; Fontaine, J J; Chateau-Joubert, S; Boudou-Rouquette, P; Alran, S; Dangles-Marie, V; Gentien, D; Poupon, M-F; Decaudin, D

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major complication of luminal breast cancer and studies of the biological features of hormonal resistance are limited by the lack of adequate preclinical models. The aim of this study is to establish and characterize a panel of primary human luminal breast carcinoma xenografts, and to evaluate their response to endocrine therapies. Four hundred and twenty-three tumor fragments obtained directly from patients have been grafted in the interscapular fatpad of Swiss nude mice. After stable engraftment with estradiol supplementation, xenografted tumors have been validated by conventional pathology and immunohistochemistry examination, and additional molecular studies. In vivo tumor growth and response to different endocrine treatments were evaluated. We have engrafted 423 tumors including 314 ER+ tumors, and 8 new luminal breast cancer xenografts have been obtained (2.5%). Tumor take was much lower for luminal tumors than for non-luminal tumors (2.5 vs. 24.7%, P < 0.0001), and was associated with two independent criteria, i.e., ER status (P < 0.0001) and a high grade tumor (P = 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses performed on patient's tumors and xenografts showed striking similarities in the tumor morphology as well as in the expression level of ER, PR, and HER2. Response to hormone therapy, evaluated in 6 luminal models, showed different sensitivities, thus exhibiting heterogeneity similar to what is observed in the clinic. We have established a panel of primary human luminal breast cancer xenografts, recapitulating the biological and clinical behaviors of patient tumors, and therefore suitable for further preclinical experiments. PMID:22002565

  10. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I; Ward, Christopher W; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P; Kunkel, Louis M; Partridge, Terence A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2014-06-15

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1(null) IL2rγ(null) immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. PMID:24452336

  11. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  12. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  13. Establishment of an Orthotopic Xenograft Mice Model of Retinoblastoma Suitable for Preclinical Testing.

    PubMed

    Cassoux, Nathalie; Thuleau, Aurélie; Assayag, Franck; Aerts, Isabelle; Decaudin, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that occurs during childhood. The goal of current and future therapeutic strategies is to conserve the eye and visual function without using external beam radiotherapy, which is known to increase the risk of secondary cancers in genetically predisposed patients. Multimodality therapy (usually intravenous but also intra-arterial and intravitreal chemotherapy, transpupillary thermotherapy, cryotherapy, or brachytherapy) has recently improved the eye salvage rate in retinoblastoma and has led to a decreased need for external beam radiotherapy. However, the treatment of advanced intraocular retinoblastoma remains a real challenge, especially in cases of vitreous and subretinal seeding. There is a need for alternative and less toxic therapies as well as for better ways to administer the drugs. Animal models are an integral part of preclinical research in the field of oncology. This paper describes the different xenograft rodent models published in the literature so far. We will also describe a new orthotopic xenografted retinoblastoma model in immunodeficient mice, which is suitable for preclinical assays. The xenograft model was established from tumor tissue obtained directly from surgical samples and closely mimics human retinoblastoma. PMID:27171982

  14. Establishment of an Orthotopic Xenograft Mice Model of Retinoblastoma Suitable for Preclinical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Cassoux, Nathalie; Thuleau, Aurélie; Assayag, Franck; Aerts, Isabelle; Decaudin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that occurs during childhood. The goal of current and future therapeutic strategies is to conserve the eye and visual function without using external beam radiotherapy, which is known to increase the risk of secondary cancers in genetically predisposed patients. Multimodality therapy (usually intravenous but also intra-arterial and intravitreal chemotherapy, transpupillary thermotherapy, cryotherapy, or brachytherapy) has recently improved the eye salvage rate in retinoblastoma and has led to a decreased need for external beam radiotherapy. However, the treatment of advanced intraocular retinoblastoma remains a real challenge, especially in cases of vitreous and subretinal seeding. There is a need for alternative and less toxic therapies as well as for better ways to administer the drugs. Animal models are an integral part of preclinical research in the field of oncology. This paper describes the different xenograft rodent models published in the literature so far. We will also describe a new orthotopic xenografted retinoblastoma model in immunodeficient mice, which is suitable for preclinical assays. The xenograft model was established from tumor tissue obtained directly from surgical samples and closely mimics human retinoblastoma. PMID:27171982

  15. Ophiopogonin B induces apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe and autophagy in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meijuan; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Ruolin; Wang, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Miao; Fu, Haian; Zhang, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Ophiopogonin B (OP-B), a saponin compound isolated from Radix Ophiopogon japonicus, was verified to inhibit cell proliferation in numerous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in our previous study. However, the precise mechanisms of action have remained unclear. In the present study, we mainly investigated the effects of OP-B on adenocarcinoma A549 cells to further elaborate the underlying mechanisms of OP-B in different NSCLC cell lines. Detection by high content screening (HCS) and TUNEL assay verified that OP-B induced apoptosis in this cell line, while detection of Caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax showed that OP-B induced cell death was caspase and mitochondrial independent. Further experiments showed that OP-B induced cell cycle arrest in the S and G2/M phases by inhibiting the expression of Myt1 and phosphorylation of Histone H3 (Ser10), which resulted in mitotic catastrophe in the cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of cell micro-morphology combined with detection of Atgs by western blot analysis showed that OP-B induced autophagy in this cell line. Autophagy inhibition by the lysosome inhibitor CQ or Beclin1-siRNA knockdown both attenuated cell viability, demonstrated that autophagy also being the vital reason resulted in cell death. More importantly, the xenograft model using A549 cells provided further evidence of the inhibition of OP-B on tumor proliferation. Immunohistochemistry detection of LC3 and Tunel assay both verified that high dose of OP-B (75 mg/kg) induced autophagy and apoptosis in vivo, and western blot detection of p-Histone H3 (Ser10), Survivin and XIAP further indicated the molecular mechanism of OP-B in vivo. As our findings revealed, multiple types of cell death overlapped in OP-B treated A549 cells, it displayed multitarget characteristics of the compounds extracted from the Chinese herbal, which may be used as candidate anticancer medicine in clinic. PMID:27175570

  16. First In-Mouse Development and Application of a Surgically Relevant Xenograft Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Helland, Øystein; Popa, Mihaela; Vintermyr, Olav K.; Molven, Anders; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bjørge, Line; McCormack, Emmet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical models of epithelial ovarian cancer have not been exploited to evaluate the clinical standard combination therapy of surgical debulking with follow-up chemotherapy. As surgery is critical to patient survival, here we establish a combined surgical/chemotherapy xenograft model of epithelial ovarian cancer and demonstrate its translational relevance. Experimental Design SKOV-3luc+ ovary cancer cells were injected topically into the ovaries of immunodeficient mice. Disease development and effect of clinical standard treatment including hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and removal of metastasis with follow up chemotherapy (carboplatin 12 mg/kg + paclitaxel 15 mg/kg) was evaluated by clinical parameters. Tumor burden was quantified by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results The xenograft ovarian tumors developed were poorly differentiated and multicystic and the disease disseminated into the peritoneal cavity. When compared to the controls with a mean survival time of 4.9 weeks, mice treated with surgery and chemotherapy, surgery or chemotherapy demonstrated significantly improved mean survival of 16.1 weeks (p = 0.0008), 12.7 weeks (p = 0.0008), or 10.4 weeks (p = 0.008), respectively. Conclusion Combined surgical intervention and adjuvant chemotherapy was demonstrated for the first time in an orthotopic xenograft model of ovarian cancer. Similar to observation in human studies the combined approach resulted in the longest medial survival time, advocating application of this strategy in future preclinical therapeutic development for this disease. PMID:24594904

  17. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  18. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  19. Orthotopic human melanoma xenograft model systems for studies of tumour angiogenesis, pathophysiology, treatment sensitivity and metastatic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Rofstad, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate tumour models are a prerequisite in experimental cancer research. The purpose of the present work was to establish and assess the validity of four new orthotopic human melanoma xenograft model systems (A-07, D-12, R-18, U-25). Permanent cell lines were established in monolayer culture from subcutaneous metastases of four different melanoma patients by using an in vivo-in vitro procedure, and cells from these lines were inoculated intradermally in Balb/c nu/nu mice to form tumours. Individual xenografted tumours of the same line differed substantially in growth and pathophysiological parameters, probably as a consequence of differences between inoculation sites in host factors which influence tumour angiogenesis. Nevertheless, xenografted tumours of different lines showed distinctly different biological characteristics. Several biological characteristics of the donor patients' tumours were retained in the xenografted tumours, including angiogenic potential; growth, histopathological and pathophysiological parameters; and sensitivity to radiation, heat and dacarbazine treatment. Moreover, the organ-specific metastatic pattern of the xenografted tumours reflected the pattern of distant metastases in the donor patients. The organs of preference for distant metastases were lungs (A-07, D-12), lymph nodes (R-18) and brain (U-25). R-18 lymph node metastases and U-25 brain metastases developed in the absence of lung involvement. The four orthotopic human melanoma xenograft model systems show great promise for future studies of tumour angiogenesis, pathophysiology, treatment sensitivity and metastatic pattern. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:7947084

  20. Evaluation of the Retinoids with Cisplatin and Vincristine in Xenograft Models of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Robin E.; Nguyen, Vu T.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Retinoids have been studied for the treatment of children with neuroblastoma for more than 25 years. Post-transplant administration of isotretinoin is standard of care for children with high-risk neuroblastoma, while fenretinide remains investigational. Previous preclinical studies have evaluated the interaction of retinoids and cytotoxic agents with conflicting results. We evaluated the schedule dependent interaction of the cytotoxics, vincristine and cisplatin, with the retinoids, isotretinoin and fenretinide, in xenograft models of neuroblastoma. Concomitant administration of isotretinoin or fenretinide with the cytotoxics did not result in any clear potentiation of cytotoxicity. PMID:23669732

  1. Enhanced anti-angiogenic effect of E7820 in combination with erlotinib in epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ken; Semba, Taro; Uenaka, Toshimitsu; Wakabayashi, Toshiaki; Asada, Makoto; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Most non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harboring activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are initially responsive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs); however, they invariably develop resistance to these drugs. E7820 is an angiogenesis inhibitor that decreases integrin-α2 expression and is currently undergoing clinical trials. We investigated whether E7820 in combination with erlotinib, an EGFR-TKI, could overcome EGFR-TKI-resistance in the NSCLC cell lines A549 (KRAS; G12S), H1975 (EGFR; L858R/T790M), and H1650 (PTEN; loss, EGFR; exon 19 deletion), which are resistant to erlotinib. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out in xenografted tumors to investigate anti-angiogenesis activity and endothelial cell apoptosis levels by endothelial cell marker CD31 and TUNEL staining, respectively. Treatment with E7820 (50 mg/kg) with erlotinib (60 mg/kg) showed a synergistic antitumor effect in three xenograft models. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that combined treatment with E7820 and erlotinib significantly decreased microvessel density and increased apoptosis of tumor-associated endothelial cells compared with use of only one of the agents. This combination increased apoptosis in HUVECs through activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways in vitro. The combination of E7820 with erlotinib is an alternative strategy to overcome erlotinib resistance in NSCLC by enhancement of the anti-angiogenic activity of E7820. PMID:24841832

  2. The chick chorioallantoic membrane as an in vivo xenograft model for Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive malignancy that arises from B-cells and belongs to the group of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models NHL research is mainly performed in vitro. Here, we studied the use of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) for the generation of human BL xenograft tumors, which we compared with known characteristics of the human disease. Methods In order to generate experimental BL tumors, we inoculated human BL2B95 and BL2-GFP cells on the CAM. BL2B95 xenograft-tumors were grown for seven days and subsequently analyzed with transmission electron and immunofluorescence microscopy, as well as histological staining approaches. BL2-GFP cells were studied at regular intervals up to seven days, and their metastatic behavior was visualized with intravital immunofluorescence techniques. Results Xenografted BL2B95 cells formed solid tumors in the CAM model with a Ki67-index greater than 90%, preservation of typical tumor markers (CD10, CD19, CD20), a ‘starry sky’ morphology, production of agyrophilic fibers in the stroma, formation of blood and lymphatic vessels and lymphogenic dissemination of BL2B95 to distant sites. We identified macrophages, lymphocytes and heterophilic granulocytes (chick homolog of neutrophils) as the most abundant immune cells in the experimental tumors. BL2-GFP cells could be traced in real-time during their distribution in the CAM, and the first signs for their dissemination were visible after 2-3 days. Conclusions We show that xenografted BL2B95 cells generate tumors in the CAM with a high degree of cellular, molecular and proliferative concord with the human disease, supporting the application of the CAM model for NHL research with a focus on tumor-stroma interactions. Additionally we report that BL2-GFP cells, grafted on the CAM of ex ovo cultured chick embryos, provide a powerful tool to study lymphogenic dissemination in real-time. PMID:24884418

  3. In vivo-in vitro comparison of acute respiratory tract toxicity using human 3D airway epithelial models and human A549 and murine 3T3 monolayer cell systems.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula G; Vogel, Sandra; Hess, Annemarie; Kolle, Susanne N; Ma-Hock, Lan; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The usefulness of in vitro systems to predict acute inhalation toxicity was investigated. Nineteen substances were tested in three-dimensional human airway epithelial models, EpiAirway™ and MucilAir™, and in A549 and 3T3 monolayer cell cultures. IC(50) values were compared to rat four-hour LC(50) values classified according to EPA and GHS hazard categories. Best results were achieved with a prediction model distinguishing toxic from non-toxic substances, with satisfactory specificities and sensitivities. Using a self-made four-level prediction model to classify substances into four in vitro hazard categories, in vivo-in vitro concordance was mediocre, but could be improved by excluding substances causing pulmonary edema and emphysema in vivo. None of the test systems was outstanding, and there was no evidence that tissue or monolayer systems using respiratory tract cells provide an added value. However, the test systems only reflected bronchiole epithelia and alveolar cells and investigated cytotoxicity. Effects occurring in other cells by other mechanisms could not be recognised. Further work should optimise test protocols and expand the set of substances tested to define applicability domains. In vivo respiratory toxicity data for in vitro comparisons should distinguish different modes of action, and their relevance for human health effects should be ensured. PMID:23085368

  4. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  5. Developmental Exposure to Estrogen Alters Differentiation and Epigenetic Programming in a Human Fetal Prostate Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Huse, Susan M.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM) isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure. PMID:25799167

  6. A murine xenograft model for a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, A; Tovar, C; Obendorf, D L; Dun, K; Woods, G M

    2011-03-01

    The number of Tasmanian devils in the wild is rapidly declining owing to a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Although progress has been made to understand the spread of this disease, crucial research on the pathogenesis of DFTD has been limited because of the threatened status of the host species. Here, the authors describe the development of a NOD/SCID (nonobese diabetic / severe combined immunodeficiency) mouse model that reproduces DFTD and provides a much-needed model to undertake studies into this intriguing transmissible cancer. Histologically, the DFTD produced in NOD/SCID mice (xenografted DFTD) was indistinguishable from the DFTD identified in Tasmanian devils. At the protein level, all xenografted DFTD tumors expressed periaxin, a marker that confirmed the diagnosis of DFTD. The karyotype of DFTD in NOD/SCID mice reproduced similar chromosomal alterations as seen in diseased devils. Furthermore, each NOD/SCID mouse inoculated with cultured DFTD tumor cells developed tumors, whereas DFTD did not develop in any of the inoculated immune-competent BALB/c mice. PMID:20861503

  7. Small-sample inference for incomplete longitudinal data with truncation and censoring in tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    In cancer drug development, demonstrating activity in xenograft models, where mice are grafted with human cancer cells, is an important step in bringing a promising compound to humans. A key outcome variable is the tumor volume measured in a given period of time for groups of mice given different doses of a single or combination anticancer regimen. However, a mouse may die before the end of a study or may be sacrificed when its tumor volume quadruples, and its tumor may be suppressed for some time and then grow back. Thus, incomplete repeated measurements arise. The incompleteness or missingness is also caused by drastic tumor shrinkage (<0.01 cm3) or random truncation. Because of the small sample sizes in these models, asymptotic inferences are usually not appropriate. We propose two parametric test procedures based on the EM algorithm and the Bayesian method to compare treatment effects among different groups while accounting for informative censoring. A real xenograft study on a new antitumor agent, temozolomide, combined with irinotecan is analyzed using the proposed methods. PMID:12229996

  8. AML cells are differentially sensitive to chemotherapy treatment in a human xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Mark; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Sexton, Christina; Shrestha, Mahesh; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Mulloy, James C

    2013-03-21

    As acute myeloid leukemia (AML) xenograft models improve, the potential for using them to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies becomes more appealing. Currently, there is little information on using standard chemotherapy regimens in AML xenografts. Here we have characterized the immunodeficient mouse response to combined Ara-C (cytarabine) and doxorubicin treatment. We observed significant toxicity associated with doxorubicin that required optimization of the route of injection as well as the maximum-tolerated dose for immunodeficient strains. Mice treated with an optimized 5-day induction protocol showed transient weight loss, short-term reduction of peripheral blood cell and platelet counts, and slight anemia. Considerable cytotoxicity was observed in the bone marrow (BM), with primitive LSK cells having a significant survival advantage relative to more mature cells, consistent with the idea of chemotherapy targeting actively growing cells. Treated leukemic mice demonstrated reduced disease burden and increased survival, demonstrating efficacy. AML cells showed significantly increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-containing therapy compared with murine BM cells. Although early treatment could result in some cures, mice with significant leukemia grafts were not cured by using induction therapy alone. Overall, the data show that this model system is useful for the evaluation of novel chemotherapies in combination with standard induction therapy. PMID:23349390

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in A549 human lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, WEI; DENG, JIAGANG; TONG, RONGSHENG; YANG, YONG; HE, XIA; LV, JIANZHEN; WANG, HAILIAN; DENG, SHAOPING; QI, PING; ZHANG, DINGDING; WANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin, which is a C-glucosylxanthone (1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone-C2-β-D-glucoside) purified from plant sources, has recently gained attention due to its various biological activities. The present study aimed to determine the apoptotic effects of mangiferin on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that mangiferin exerted growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects against A549 cells. In addition, mangiferin exhibited anti-tumor properties in A549 xenograft mice in vivo. Mangiferin triggered G2/M phase cell cycle arrest via down-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase 1-cyclin B1 signaling pathway, and induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting the protein kinase C-nuclear factor-κB pathway. In addition, mangiferin was able to enhance the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin on A549 cells, thus indicating the potential for a combined therapy. Notably, mangiferin exerted anticancer effects in vivo, where it was able to markedly decrease the volume and weight of subcutaneous tumor mass, and expand the lifespan of xenograft mice. The present study clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced antitumor activities, and suggested that mangiferin may be considered a potential antineoplastic drug for the future treatment of cancer. PMID:26935347

  10. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Using Brain Tumor Stem Cell Systems to Study Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Chirayu; Dhillon, Manvir; McFarlane, Nicole; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models provide an excellent platform to understand cancer initiation and development in vivo. In the context of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), PDX models allow for characterization of tumor formation, growth, and recurrence, in a clinically relevant in vivo system. Here, we detail procedures to harvest, culture, characterize, and orthotopically inject human BTICs derived from patient samples. PMID:27581026

  11. Genomic characterization of a large panel of patient-derived hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft tumor models for preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingyang; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Hongye; Xu, Qiang; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Guan; Luo, Qin; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Shuqun; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Shengxian; Liang, Guibai; Ji, Qunsheng; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Zhou, Weiping; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Hongyang; Fang, Douglas D

    2015-08-21

    Lack of clinically relevant tumor models dramatically hampers development of effective therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Establishment of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models that faithfully recapitulate the genetic and phenotypic features of HCC becomes important. In this study, we first established a cohort of 65 stable PDX models of HCC from corresponding Chinese patients. Then we showed that the histology and gene expression patterns of PDX models were highly consistent between xenografts and case-matched original tumors. Genetic alterations, including mutations and DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), of the xenografts correlated well with the published data of HCC patient specimens. Furthermore, differential responses to sorafenib, the standard-of-care agent, in randomly chosen xenografts were unveiled. Finally, in the models expressing high levels of FGFR1 gene according to the genomic data, FGFR1 inhibitor lenvatinib showed greater efficacy than sorafenib. Taken together, our data indicate that PDX models resemble histopathological and genomic characteristics of clinical HCC tumors, as well as recapitulate the differential responses of HCC patients to the standard-of-care treatment. Overall, this large collection of PDX models becomes a clinically relevant platform for drug screening, biomarker discovery and translational research in preclinical setting. PMID:26062443

  12. Atrasentan (ABT-627) enhances perfusion and reduces hypoxia in a human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kwang Mo; Russell, James; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Cho, HyungJoon; Li, Xiao-Feng; Koutcher, Jason A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2010-01-01

    The endothelin-1 antagonist, Atrasentan (ABT-627) was used to modify perfusion in the human tumor xenograft model, HT29, growing in nude mice. Atrasentan produced a significant increase in perfusion, as measured in vivo by Gd-DTPA DCE-MRI. Changes in tumor hypoxia were assessed by comparing the binding of two hypoxia tracers, pimonidazole and EF5 given before and after Atrasentan administration. In vehicle-treated controls, the distribution of EF5 and pimonidazole was very similar. However, Atrasentan treatment was associated with decreased uptake of the second hypoxia tracer (EF5), relative to the first (pimonidazole). Although Atrasentan had no independent effect on the growth of HT29 tumors, Atrasentan combined with 20 Gy radiation led to a modest but significant increase in tumor growth delay compared to radiation alone. PMID:19717985

  13. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  14. CysLT1R Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Xenograft Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21WAF/Cip1 (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  15. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. PMID:24373153

  16. Patient-Derived Gastric Carcinoma Xenograft Mouse Models Faithfully Represent Human Tumor Molecular Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuqiong; Zhang, Meizhuo; Fu, Haihua; Liu, Yuanjie; Yin, Xiaolu; Chen, Hao; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Jingchuan; Gavine, Paul R.; Gu, Yi; Ni, Xingzhi; Su, Xinying

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDCX) generally represent more reliable models of human disease in which to evaluate a potential drugs preclinical efficacy. However to date, only a few patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft (PDGCX) models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish additional PDGCX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological and genetic diversities of the corresponding patient tumors. By engrafting fresh patient gastric cancer (GC) tissues into immune-compromised mice (SCID and/or nude mice), thirty two PDGCX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining. Genomic comparison was performed for several biomarkers including ERBB1, ERBB2, ERBB3, FGFR2, MET and PTEN. These biomarkers were profiled to assess gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). All 32 PDGCX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors. Furthermore, among the 32 models, 78% (25/32) highly expressed ERBB1 (EGFR), 22% (7/32) were ERBB2 (HER2) positive, 78% (25/32) showed ERBB3 (HER3) high expression, 66% (21/32) lost PTEN expression, 3% (1/32) harbored FGFR2 amplification, 41% (13/32) were positive for MET expression and 16% (5/32) were MET gene amplified. Between the PDGCX models and their parental tumors, a high degree of similarity was observed for FGFR2 and MET gene amplification, and also for ERBB2 status (agreement rate = 94~100%; kappa value = 0.81~1). Protein expression of PTEN and MET also showed moderate agreement (agreement rate = 78%; kappa value = 0.46~0.56), while ERBB1 and ERBB3 expression showed slight agreement (agreement rate = 59~75%; kappa value = 0.18~0.19). ERBB2 positivity, FGFR2 or MET gene amplification was all maintained until passage 12 in mice. The stability of the molecular profiles observed across subsequent passages within the

  17. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  18. Optimization of arterial spin labeling MRI for quantitative tumor perfusion in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Liang, Jieming; Tang, Mei Yee Annie; Henry, Brian; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2015-08-01

    Perfusion is an important biomarker of tissue function and has been associated with tumor pathophysiology such as angiogenesis and hypoxia. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI allows noninvasive and quantitative imaging of perfusion; however, the application in mouse xenograft tumor models has been challenging due to the low sensitivity and high perfusion heterogeneity. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL was optimized for a mouse xenograft tumor. To assess the sensitivity and reliability for measuring low perfusion, the lumbar muscle was used as a reference region. By optimizing the number of averages and inversion times, muscle perfusion as low as 32.4 ± 4.8 (mean ± standard deviation) ml/100 g/min could be measured in 20 min at 7 T with a quantification error of 14.4 ± 9.1%. Applying the optimized protocol, heterogeneous perfusion ranging from 49.5 to 211.2 ml/100 g/min in a renal carcinoma was observed. To understand the relationship with tumor pathology, global and regional tumor perfusion was compared with histological staining of blood vessels (CD34), hypoxia (CAIX) and apoptosis (TUNEL). No correlation was observed when the global tumor perfusion was compared with these pathological parameters. Regional analysis shows that areas of high perfusion had low microvessel density, which was due to larger vessel area compared with areas of low perfusion. Nonetheless, these were not correlated with hypoxia or apoptosis. The results suggest that tumor perfusion may reflect certain aspect of angiogenesis, but its relationship with other pathologies needs further investigation. PMID:26104980

  19. Assessment of the antitumor potential of Bithionol in vivo using a xenograft model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Johnston, Nancy A; Brard, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    In terms of the concept of 'drug repurposing', we focused on pharmaceutical-grade Bithionol (BT) as a therapeutic agent against ovarian cancer. Our recent in-vitro study provides preclinical data suggesting a potential therapeutic role for BT against recurrent ovarian cancer. BT was shown to cause cell death by caspases-mediated apoptosis. The present preliminary study further explores the antitumor potential of pharmaceutical-grade BT in an in-vivo xenograft model of human ovarian cancer. Nude Foxn1 mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian tumor xenografts were treated with titrated doses of BT and the therapeutic efficacy of pharmaceutical BT was determined using bioluminescence imaging. BT-induced changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by Ki-67 immunochemical staining and TUNEL assay. The effect of BT on autotaxin levels in serum, ascitic fluid, and tumor tissue was assessed by colorimetric and western blot techniques. BT treatment did not show antitumor potential or enhanced survival time at any of the doses tested. No apparent signs of toxicity were observed with any of the doses tested. Immunohistological analysis of tumor sections did not indicate a significant decrease in cellular proliferation (Ki-67 assay). An increase in apoptosis (by TUNEL assay) was observed in all BT-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. Although BT did not show significant antitumor activity in the present study, the ability of BT to induce apoptosis still makes it a promising therapeutic agent. Further confirmatory and optimization studies are essential to enhance the therapeutic effects of BT. PMID:27058706

  20. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  1. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  2. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. PMID:27241667

  3. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  4. Establishment and characterisation of patient-derived xenografts as paraclinical models for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Hyunki; Sim, Moon Hee; Kim, Ka-Kyung; Lee, Gunho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; An, Ji Yeong; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Choong-Bai; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model is emerging as a promising translational platform to duplicate the characteristics of tumours. However, few studies have reported detailed histological and genomic analyses for model fidelity and for factors affecting successful model establishment of gastric cancer. Here, we generated PDX tumours surgically-derived from 62 gastric cancer patients. Fifteen PDX models were successfully established (24.2%, 15/62) and passaged to maintain tumours in immune-compromised mice. Diffuse type and low tumour cell percentage were negatively correlated with success rates (p = 0.005 and p = 0.025, respectively), while reducing ex vivo and overall procedure times were positively correlated with success rates (p = 0.003 and p = 0.01, respectively). The histology and genetic characteristics of PDX tumour models were stable over subsequent passages. Lymphoma transformation occurred in five cases (33.3%, 5/15), and all were in the NOG mouse, with none in the nude mouse. Together, the present study identified Lauren classification, tumour cell percentages, and ex vivo times along with overall procedure times, as key determinants for successful PDX engraftment. Furthermore, genetic and histological characteristics were highly consistent between primary and PDX tumours, which provide realistic paraclinical models, enabling personalised development of treatment options for gastric cancer. PMID:26926953

  5. Anti-proliferative effect of Kv1.3 blockers in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Seon Young; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2011-01-25

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are widely expressed in the plasma membranes of numerous cells and contribute to a variety of cellular functions in both excitable neuronal cells and non-excitable epithelial cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Kv channels are associated with the proliferation of several types of cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of suppression of Kv1.3 expression on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in human lung adenocarcinoma, A549 cells. Treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a selective blocker of Kv1.3 or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against Kv1.3, significantly blocked A549 cells' proliferation. In addition, selective inhibition of Kv1.3 significantly increased expression level of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and significantly decreased the expression level of Cdk4 and cyclin D3. We also applied the MgTX into a xenograft model using nude mice, and MgTX caused a reduction of tumor volume when it was injected into the tumor tissues. These results suggest that Kv1.3 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. PMID:21087602

  6. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  7. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of an Induction Regimen for In Vivo Combined Testing of Novel Drugs against Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min H.; Liem, Natalia L. M.; Carol, Hernan; Boehm, Ingrid; Groepper, Daniel; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Stewart, Clinton F.; Lock, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR), a glucocorticoid, and l-asparaginase (ASP) with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX) and ASP (VXL) against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL. PMID:22479469

  8. Histone modifications patterns in tissues and tumours from acute promyelocytic leukemia xenograft model in response to combined epigenetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Valiulienė, Giedrė; Treigytė, Gražina; Savickienė, Jūratė; Matuzevičius, Dalius; Alksnė, Milda; Jarašienė-Burinskaja, Rasa; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Navakauskas, Dalius; Navakauskienė, Rūta

    2016-04-01

    Xenograft models are suitable for in vivo study of leukemia's pathogenesis and the preclinical development of anti-leukemia agents but understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms linking to adult cell functions in pathological conditions during different in vivo treatments is yet unknown. In this study, for the first time epigenetic chromatin modifications were characterized in tissues and tumours from murine xenograft model generated using the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells engrafted in immunodeficient NOG mice. Xenografts were subjected to combined epigenetic treatment by histone deacetylase inhibitor Belinostat, histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-DZNeaplanocin A and all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro model, where such combination inhibited NB4 cell growth and enhanced retinoic acid-induced differentiation to granulocytes. Xenotransplantation was assessed by peripheral blood cells counts, the analysis of cell surface markers (CD15, CD33, CD45) and the expression of certain genes (PML-RAR alpha, CSF3, G-CSFR, WT1). The combined treatment prolonged APL xenograft mice survival and prevented tumour formation. The analysis of the expression of histone marks such as acetylation of H4, trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 in APL xenograft mice tumours and tissues demonstrated tissue-specific changes in the level of histone modifications and the APL prognostic mark, WT1 protein. In summary, the effects of epigenetic agents used in this study were positive for leukemia prevention and linked to a modulation of the chromatin epigenetic environment in adult tissues of malignant organism. PMID:27044813

  9. Application of a Patient Derived Xenograft Model for Predicative Study of Uterine Fibroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Martin; Schmidt, Nicole; Gröticke, Ina; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Keator, Christopher S; Koch, Markus; Slayden, Ov D

    2015-01-01

    Human uterine fibroids, benign tumors derived from the smooth muscle layers of the uterus, impose a major health burden to up to 50% of premenopausal women in their daily life. To improve our understanding of this disease, we developed and characterized a patient-derived xenograft model by subcutaneous transplantation of pieces of human uterine fibroid tissue into three different strains of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Engrafted uterine fibroid tissue preserved the classical morphology with interwoven bundles of smooth muscle cells and an abundant deposition of collagenous matrix, similar to uterine fibroids in situ. The grafts expressed both estrogen receptor 1 and progesterone receptor. Additionally, both receptors were up-regulated by estrogen treatment. Growth of the fibroid grafts was dependent on 17β-estradiol and progesterone supplementation at levels similar to women with the disease and was studied for up to 60 days at maximum. Co-treatment with the antiprogestin mifepristone reduced graft growth (four independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test), as did treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (three independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test). This in vivo animal model preserves the main histological and functional characteristics of human uterine fibroids, is amenable to intervention by pharmacological treatment, and can thus serve as an adequate model for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26588841

  10. Application of a Patient Derived Xenograft Model for Predicative Study of Uterine Fibroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gröticke, Ina; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Keator, Christopher S.; Koch, Markus; Slayden, Ov D.

    2015-01-01

    Human uterine fibroids, benign tumors derived from the smooth muscle layers of the uterus, impose a major health burden to up to 50% of premenopausal women in their daily life. To improve our understanding of this disease, we developed and characterized a patient-derived xenograft model by subcutaneous transplantation of pieces of human uterine fibroid tissue into three different strains of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Engrafted uterine fibroid tissue preserved the classical morphology with interwoven bundles of smooth muscle cells and an abundant deposition of collagenous matrix, similar to uterine fibroids in situ. The grafts expressed both estrogen receptor 1 and progesterone receptor. Additionally, both receptors were up-regulated by estrogen treatment. Growth of the fibroid grafts was dependent on 17β-estradiol and progesterone supplementation at levels similar to women with the disease and was studied for up to 60 days at maximum. Co-treatment with the antiprogestin mifepristone reduced graft growth (four independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test), as did treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (three independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test). This in vivo animal model preserves the main histological and functional characteristics of human uterine fibroids, is amenable to intervention by pharmacological treatment, and can thus serve as an adequate model for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26588841

  11. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanalingam, Umayal; Balys, Marlene; Eberhardt, Allison; Wang, Nancy; Myers, Jason R.; Ashton, John M.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.; Mendler, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH). Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26177509

  12. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  13. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  14. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O’Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an “inversion” of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  15. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guastella, Anthony R.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Klinger, Neil V.; Kupsky, William J.; Polin, Lisa A.; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  16. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  17. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  18. Fine-tuning patient-derived xenograft models for precision medicine approaches in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Olivia L; Milford, Terry-Ann M; Beldiman, Cornelia; Payne, Kimberly J

    2016-03-01

    Many leukemias are characterized by well-known mutations that drive oncogenesis. Mice engineered with these mutations provide a foundation for understanding leukemogenesis and identifying therapies. However, data from whole genome studies provide evidence that malignancies are characterized by multiple genetic alterations that vary between patients, as well as inherited genetic variation that can also contribute to oncogenesis. Improved outcomes will require precision medicine approaches-targeted therapies tailored to malignancies in each patient. Preclinical models that reflect the range of mutations and the genetic background present in patient populations are required to develop and test the combinations of therapies that will be used to provide precision medicine therapeutic strategies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) produced by transplanting leukemia cells from patients into immune deficient mice provide preclinical models where disease mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy can be studied in vivo in context of the genetic variability present in patient tumors. PDX models are possible because many elements in the bone marrow microenvironment show cross-species activity between mice and humans. However, several cytokines likely to impact leukemia cells are species-specific with limited activity on transplanted human leukemia cells. In this review we discuss the importance of PDX models for developing precision medicine approaches to leukemia treatment. We illustrate how PDX models can be optimized to overcome a lack of cross-species cytokine activity by reviewing a recent strategy developed for use with a high-risk form of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that is characterized by overexpression of CRLF2, a receptor component for the cytokine, TSLP. PMID:26912005

  19. Application of a patient-derived xenograft model in cytolytic viral activation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Huang, Yenlin; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lui, Kar-Wai; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lin, Tung-Liang; Fan, Hsien-Chi; Lin, An-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Li-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-related malignancy in which the tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role in tumor progression. Here, we developed two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse lines from engrafted NPC metastatic tumors. Positive staining for EBV-encoded small RNAs confirmed that these tumors harbored EBV, and gene expression profile analyses further showed that the PDX was highly similar to the primary parent tumor. In vivo drug screening using the PDX system demonstrated that gemcitabine had the best antitumor effect among the tested drugs. The donor of this PDX also showed excellent responsiveness to gemcitabine treatment. The combination of gemcitabine and valproic acid exerted synergistic antitumor effects. Further addition of ganciclovir to this two-drug combination regimen enhanced cytolytic viral activation, yielding the best antitumor response among tested regimens. Treatment with this three-drug combination regimen decreased plasma EBV-DNA load, tumor viral concentration, and the number of viable tumor cells to a greater extent than the two-drug gemcitabine and valproic acid combination. These results highlight the value of PDX models in the development of EBV-targeted strategies to treat NPC. PMID:26416517

  20. Clearance of circulating radio-antibodies using streptavidin or second antibodies in a xenograft model.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D.; Pedley, R. B.; Boden, J. A.; Boden, R.; Begent, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The improved tumour to non-tumour ratios needed for effective tumour targeting with antibodies requires that blood background radioactivity is reduced. We investigated the effect of streptavidin as a clearing agent for 125I-labelled biotinylated anti-CEA antibodies in a human colon carcinoma xenograft model. By comparing the biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody A5B7 with four, nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule, we investigated how the degree of biotinylation of the primary radiolabelled antibody affects its clearance with streptavidin. Limiting the degree of biotinylation limited blood clearance, whereas nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule resulted in a 13- to 14-fold reduction in blood radioactivity, the streptavidin-biotinylated antibody complexes clearing rapidly via the liver and spleen. Although a reduction in tumour activity was also seen, a 6.6-fold improvement in the tumour to blood ratio was achieved. A comparative study of streptavidin versus second antibody clearance was carried out using the polyclonal antibody PK4S biotinylated with 12 biotins per antibody molecule. This study indicated that second antibody was superior for clearance of the polyclonal antibody, resulting in a larger and faster reduction in blood radioactivity and improved tumour to blood ratios. In this case the primary antibody was polyclonal, and therefore non-uniformity of biotinylation may affect complexation with streptavidin. Therefore, the degree of biotinylation and type of antibody must be carefully considered before the use of streptavidin clearance. PMID:8123481

  1. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  2. Reversing Cancer Multidrug Resistance in Xenograft Models via Orchestrating Multiple Actions of Functional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Debin; Wang, Tingfang; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2016-08-31

    A multistimuli responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on sulfhydryl and amino-cofunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SH/NH2-MSNs) has been developed, in which the multifunctional hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were grafted onto the SH/NH2-MSNs by disulfide bonds for targeting delivery, controlling drug release and reversing multidrug resistance (MDR). The doxorubicin (Dox) loaded multifunctional HA derivatives modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Dox/HHS-MSNs) were enzyme and redox sensitive, which could respond to the intracellular stimuli of hyaluronidase (HAase) and glutathione (GSH) successively and prevent drug leakage before reaching the tumor tissues. The cellular uptake experiments showed that Dox/HHS-MSNs were vulnerable to be endocytosed into the Dox-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells, efficiently realized the endolysosomal escape and remained in the cytoplasm. Because of orchestrating multiple actions above including active targeting, endolysosomal escape and efficient multilevel drug release, Dox/HHS-MSNs could induce the strongest apoptosis and cytotoxicity of MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, a series of in vivo studies on MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing xenograft mouse models demonstrated that Dox/HHS-MSNs possessed the enhanced tumor-targeting capacity and the best therapeutic efficacy to reverse cancer MDR. PMID:27420116

  3. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000 mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential.

  4. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000  mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential. PMID:26442962

  5. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26873136

  6. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  7. Entrectinib is a potent inhibitor of Trk-driven neuroblastomas in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Radhika; Wehrmann, Lea; Golden, Rebecca L; Naraparaju, Koumudi; Croucher, Jamie L; MacFarland, Suzanne P; Guan, Peng; Kolla, Venkatadri; Wei, Ge; Cam, Nicholas; Li, Gang; Hornby, Zachary; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2016-03-28

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is one of the most common and deadly childhood solid tumors. These tumors are characterized by clinical heterogeneity, from spontaneous regression to relentless progression, and the Trk family of neurotrophin receptors plays an important role in this heterogeneous behavior. We wanted to determine if entrectinib (RXDX-101, Ignyta, Inc.), an oral Pan-Trk, Alk and Ros1 inhibitor, was effective in our NB model. In vitro effects of entrectinib, either as a single agent or in combination with the chemotherapeutic agents Irinotecan (Irino) and Temozolomide (TMZ), were studied on an SH-SY5Y cell line stably transfected with TrkB. In vivo growth inhibition activity was studied in NB xenografts, again as a single agent or in combination with Irino-TMZ. Entrectinib significantly inhibited the growth of TrkB-expressing NB cells in vitro, and it significantly enhanced the growth inhibition of Irino-TMZ when used in combination. Single agent therapy resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition in animals treated with entrectinib compared to control animals [p < 0.0001 for event-free survival (EFS)]. Addition of entrectinib to Irino-TMZ also significantly improved the EFS of animals compared to vehicle or Irino-TMZ treated animals [p < 0.0001 for combination vs. control, p = 0.0012 for combination vs. Irino-TMZ]. We show that entrectinib inhibits growth of TrkB expressing NB cells in vitro and in vivo, and that it enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in in vivo models. Our data suggest that entrectinib is a potent Trk inhibitor and should be tested in clinical trials for NBs and other Trk-expressing tumors. PMID:26797418

  8. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  9. Radiolabeled liposome imaging determines an indication for liposomal anticancer agent in ovarian cancer mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ken; Hamamichi, Shusei; Asano, Makoto; Hori, Yusaku; Matsui, Junji; Iwata, Masao; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Umeda, Izumi O; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Liposomal anticancer agents can effectively deliver drugs to tumor lesions, but their therapeutic effects are enhanced in only limited number of patients. Appropriate biomarkers to identify responder patients to these liposomal agents will improve their treatment efficacies. We carried out pharmacological and histopathological analyses of mouse xenograft models bearing human ovarian cancers (Caov-3, SK-OV-3, KURAMOCHI, and TOV-112D) to correlate the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin-encapsulated liposome (Doxil(®) ) and histological characteristics linked to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We next generated (111) In-encapsulated liposomes to examine their capacities to determine indications for Doxil(®) treatment by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging. Antitumor activities of Doxil(®) were drastically enhanced in Caov-3, moderately in SK-OV-3, and minimally in KURAMOCHI and TOV-112D when compared to doxorubicin. Microvessel density and vascular perfusion were high in Caov-3 and SK-OV-3, indicating a close relation with the enhanced antitumor effects. Next, (111) In-encapsulated liposomes were given i.v. to the animals. Their tumor accumulation and area under the curve values over 72 h were high in Caov-3, relatively high in SK-OV-3, and low in two other tumors. Importantly, as both Doxil(®) effects and liposomal accumulation varied in the SK-OV-3 group, we individually obtained SPECT/CT images of SK-OV-3-bearing mouse (n = 11) before Doxil(®) treatment. Clear correlation between liposomal tumor accumulation and effects of Doxil(®) was confirmed (R(2) = 0.73). Taken together, our experiments definitely verified that enhanced therapeutic effects through liposomal formulations of anticancer agents depend on tumor accumulation of liposomes. Tumor accumulation of the radiolabeled liposomes evaluated by SPECT/CT imaging is applicable to appropriately determine indications for liposomal antitumor agents. PMID:26509883

  10. Effect of Curcumin on Pro-angiogenic Factors in the Xenograft Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Livia Carvalho; Arbab, Ali S; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a new blood vessel is stimulated by angiogenic factors. Curcumin, which is the active ingredient of the spice plant Curcuma longa L and is used as food and traditional medicine, has shown anticancer effects against different types of cancers. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on angiogenesis/pro-angiogenic factors in a mouse model of human breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay after curcumin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). For the in vivo study, human breast cancer was induced in athymic mice and treated with 300 mg/kg/day of curcumin administered intraperitoneally. Tumor size was measured weekly, and the animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning with Tc-99m tagged VEGF-c to detect the in vivo expression of VEGFR2/3. In addition, the expression of proangiogenic/ growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by a membrane antibody array. Histological analysis was performed to confirm the effect of curcumin on neovascularization. The MTT assay showed that curcumin significantly reduced the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells. In breast cancer xenografts, curcumin treatment led to a decrease in tumor volume and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared with the vehicle treated group. Tc-99m-HYNIC-VEGF-c-SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake to the tumor, which may indicate a lower expression of VEGFR2/3 in curcumin treated tumors; however, a statistically significant difference was not achieved (p>0.05). Additionally, curcumin treatment showed a significantly low level of expression of pro-angiogenic factors (p<0.05) and a decrease in micro-vessel density (vWF) in animals compared with that of vehicle treated tumors. In conclusion, curcumin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:25991545

  11. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  12. Molecular imaging of fibrin in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Medarova, Zdravka; Farrar, Christian T.; Dai, Guangping; Moore, Anna; Caravan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives Fibrin deposition has been indicated within the stroma of a majority of solid tumors. Here we assess the feasibility of using the established fibrin-specific probe EP-2104R for the noninvasive imaging of fibrin in the context of breast cancer. Methods EP-2104R, untargeted Gd-DTPA and a newly synthesized non-fibrin binding control linear peptide (CLP) were compared using steady-state and dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model at 9.4T. Results EP-2104R transiently enhanced both the tumor core and periphery, but only the enhancement in the tumor periphery persisted even 90 min after EP-2104R administration. However, untargeted Gd-DTPA and CLP are not retained in the tumor periphery. The half-life of EP-2104R in the tumor periphery (103±18 min) is significantly longer (p<0.05) than either Gd-DTPA (29.6±2.4 min) or CLP (42.4±1.5 min), but the rate of clearance is similar for all the three probes from the tumor core. The presence of high concentrations of fibrin in the tumor periphery was corroborated using immuno-histochemistry with a fibrin-specific antibody. Conclusions The persistent enhancement observed in the tumor periphery with EP-2104R is likely a result of its fibrin-specific binding rather than its size and demonstrates the feasibility of EP-2104R for molecular imaging of fibrin in tumor stroma. PMID:22960948

  13. Biodistribution of charged F(ab')2 photoimmunoconjugates in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Duska, L R; Hamblin, M R; Bamberg, M P; Hasan, T

    1997-01-01

    The effect of charge modification of photoimmunoconjugates (PICs) on their biodistribution in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer was investigated. Chlorin(e6)c(e6) was attached site specifically to the F(ab')2 fragment of the murine monoclonal antibody OC125, directed against human ovarian cancer cells, via poly-1-lysine linkers carrying cationic or anionic charges. Preservation of immunoreactivity was checked by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PICs were radiolabelled with 125I and compared with non-specific rabbit IgG PICs after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection into nude mice. Samples were taken from normal organs and tumour at 3 h and 24 h. Tumour to normal 125I ratios showed that the cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC had the highest tumour selectivity. Ratios for c(e6) were uniformly higher than for 125I, indicating that c(e6) became separated from 125I. OC125F(ab')2 gave highest tissue values of 125I, followed by cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC; other species were much lower. The amounts of c(e6) delivered per gram of tumour were much higher for cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC than for other species. The results indicate that cationic charge stimulates the endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the OC125F(ab')2-pl-c(e6) that has bound to the i.p. tumour. Positively charged PICs may have applications in the i.p. photoimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer. PMID:9062404

  14. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  15. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E. Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W.; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80–90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  16. Intratumoral injection of taxol in vivo suppresses A549 tumor showing cytoplasmic vacuolization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoyang; Chen, Tongsheng

    2012-04-01

    Based on our recent in vitro studies, this report was designed to explore the mechanism by which high concentration of taxol (70 µM) induced paraptosis-like cell death in human lung carcinoma (A549) cells, and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of taxol using A549 tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Exposure of cells to taxol induced time-dependent cytotoxicity and cytoplasmic vacuolization without the involvement of Bax, Bak, Mcl-1, Bcl-XL, and caspase-3. Although taxol treatment induced activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) cleavage indicative of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, silencing ATF6 by shATF6 did not prevent taxol-induced both cytotoxcity and cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death were not due to ER stress. Moreover, taxol-treated cells did not show DNA fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the typical characteristics of apoptosis. In addition, taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization did not show the cellular lysis, the characteristics of oncosis, and positive of β-galactosidase, the characteristic of senescence, indicating that taxol induced paraptosis-like cell death is neither oncosis nor senescence. Moreover, our in vivo data showed that intratumoral injection of taxol (50 mg/kg) in A549 tumor xenograft mice on day 1 and day 19 potently suppressed tumor growth showing significant ER vacuolization without toxicity. In conclusion, high concentration of taxol exhibits a significant anticancer activity by inducing paraptosis-like cell death in vitro and in vivo, without significant toxicity, suggesting a promising therapeutic strategy for apoptosis-resistance cancer by inducing ER vacuolization. PMID:22134971

  17. Xenograft models for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified are essential for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Tonak, Marcus; Radsak, Markus P.; Bopp, Tobias; Bals, Robert; Bohle, Rainer M.; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Proschek, Dirk; Wehler, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified belongs to the heterogeneous group of soft tissue tumors. It is preferentially located in the upper and lower extremities of the body, and surgical resection remains the only curative treatment. Preclinical animal models are crucial to improve the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. However, this approach has been hampered by the lack of reproducible animal models. The present study established two xenograft animal models generated from stable non-clonal cell cultures, and investigated the difference in chemotherapeutic effects on tumor growth between undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in vivo and in vitro. The cell cultures were generated from freshly isolated tumor tissues of two patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. For the in vivo analysis, these cells were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The mice were monitored for tumor appearance and treated with the most common or innovative chemotherapeutic agents available to date. Furthermore, the same drugs were administered to in vitro cell cultures. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in vitro was observed with doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), also known as vorinostat. In the in vivo xenograft mouse model, the combination of doxorubicin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib induced a significant tumor reduction. By contrast, treatment with vorinostat did not reduce the tumor growth. Taken together, the results obtained from drug testing in vitro differed significantly from the in vivo results. Therefore, the novel and reproducible xenograft animal model established in the present study demonstrated that in vivo models are required to test potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma prior to clinical use, since animal models are more similar

  18. Antitumor efficacy of the anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) antibody siltuximab in mouse xenograft models of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lanxi; Smith, Matthew A.; Doshi, Parul; Sasser, Kate; Fulp, William; Altiok, Soner; Haura, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-6 (IL-6) can activate downstream signaling pathways in lung cancer cells, such as the STAT3 pathway, and is reported to be produced by tumor cells with activating EGFR mutations. We examined IL-6/STAT3 in lung cancer tumor tissues and the effects of siltuximab, a neutralizing antibody to human IL-6, in mouse models of lung cancer. Methods IL-6 and STAT3 activation levels were compared to tumor histology and presence of KRAS mutations in snap-frozen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. The effects of siltuximab alone or in combination with erlotinib were examined in mouse xenograft models constructed using three cell line xenograft models and one primary explant mouse model. We examined the influence of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) on tumor growth and siltuximab effects. Results IL-6 levels were higher in tumors of squamous cell versus adenocarcinoma histology and were not associated with presence of KRAS mutations. Tyrosine phosphorylation status of STAT3 did not correlate with tumor IL-6 levels. Serine phosphorylation of STAT3 was correlated with KRAS mutation status. Both tumor and stromal cells contributed to total IL-6 within tumors. Siltuximab had minimal effect as a single agent in xenografts with tumor cells alone; however, in models co-administered with CAFs, siltuximab had more potent effects on tumor inhibition. We observed no effects of combined erlotinib and siltuximab. Conclusions IL-6 is elevated in subsets of human NSCLCs, especially with squamous cell histology. Tumors supported by stromal production of IL-6 appear to be the most vulnerable to tumor growth inhibition by siltuximab. PMID:24922005

  19. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.« less

  20. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    these human lymphoma xenograft models. PMID:25785845

  1. Establishment and characterization of intraperitoneal xenograft models by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel

    PubMed Central

    YAO, YUQIN; ZHOU, YONGJUN; SU, XIAOLAN; DAI, LEI; YU, LIN; DENG, HONGXIN; GOU, LANTU; YANG, JINLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a feasible intraperitoneal (i.p.) xenograft model in nude mice is a good strategy to evaluate the antitumor effect of drugs in vivo. However, the manipulation of human cancer cells in establishing a stable peritoneal carcinomatosis model in nude mice is problematic. In the present study, the ovarian and colorectal peritoneal tumor models were successfully established in nude mice by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel. In ovarian tumor models, the mean number tumor nodes was significantly higher in the experimental group (intraperitoneal tumor cell co-injection with ECM gel) compared with the PBS control group on the 30th day (21.0±3.0 vs. 3.6±2.5; P<0.05). The same results were observed in the colorectal peritoneal tumor models on the 28th day. The colorectal peritoneal tumor model was further used to evaluate the chemotherapy effect of irinotecan (CPT-11). The mean weight of peritoneal tumor nodes in CPT-11 treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group (0.81±0.16 vs. 2.18±0.21 g; P<0.05). The results confirmed the value of these i.p. xenograft models in nude mice as efficient and feasible tools for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26788149

  2. Antitumor effect of para-toluenesulfonamide against lung cancer xenograft in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Gao, Yonghua; Guan, Weijie; Huang, Liyan; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chenting; Chen, Xiuqing; Wu, Yizhuang; Zeng, Guangqiao

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are relatively insensitive and unsatisfactory. Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS), a unique antitumor drug for local intratumoral injection, shows an efficacy of severely suppressing solid tumor growth with mild side effects in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PTS on lung cancer H460 cells in vivo in nude mice and its underlying mechanisms in vitro. Methods A lung cancer model for in vivo experiment was established in BALB/c nude mice using H460 cells to examine the effect of local injection of PTS on tumor suppression. We also assessed the injury to the normal tissue by subcutaneous injection of PTS. In vitro, PTS was diluted into different doses for study on its antitumor mechanisms. We evaluated the necrotic effect of PTS on H460 cells by PI and Hoechst 33342 staining. Cell viability and membrane permeability were also determined by using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. All these tests were conducted in comparison with traditional local injection of anhydrous ethanol. Results PTS was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of H460 tumor xenografts in nude mice by inducing necrosis of the tumor histologically. Its effect on tumor growth was significantly stronger than that of anhydrous ethanol. By contrast, the injured normal tissue by PTS injection was less than that by ethanol. In vitro, PTS still demonstrated excellent necrotizing effect on H460 cells when diluted to a lower concentration. Detailed analysis of PTS on H460 cells indicated that PTS had a better effect on attenuating the cell viability and increasing the cell membrane permeability than ethanol at the same level. Conclusions PTS exhibits excellent inhibition effect on the growth of lung cancer by necrotizing tumor in vivo and in vitro, reducing tumor cell viability and augmenting the membrane permeability in vitro, with only mild injury to normal tissue. The

  3. E-Cadherin repression increases amount of cancer stem cells in human A549 lung adenocarcinoma and stimulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Farmakovskaya, M; Khromova, N; Rybko, V; Dugina, V; Kopnin, B; Kopnin, P

    2016-04-17

    Here we show that cancer stem cells amount in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 depends on E-cadherin expression. In fact, downregulation of E-cadherin expression enhanced expression of pluripotent genes (c-MYC, NESTIN, OCT3/4 and SOX2) and enriched cell population with the cells possessing the properties of so-called 'cancer stem cells' via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Repression of E-cadherin also stimulated cell proliferation and migration in vitro, decreased cell amount essential for xenografts formation in nude mice, increased tumors vascularization and growth. On the other hand, E-cadherin upregulation caused opposite effects i.e. diminished the number of cancer stem cells, decreased xenograft vascularization and decelerated tumor growth. Therefore, agents restoring E-cadherin expression may be useful in anticancer therapy. PMID:26940223

  4. Effect of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum on human renal cell carcinoma proliferation and metastasis in an orthotropic xenograft nude mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan-Zhuo; Xu, Yun-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to explore the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum on tumor proliferation and metastasis in an orthotropic xenograft nude mice model of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and evaluate the safety of CO2 pneumoperitoneum laparoscopy for treating RCC. Material and methods RCC 786-0 cells were injected to establish an orthotropic xenograft model. Fifty nude mice were given orthotropic inoculations and randomized to five groups: group A (control); group B (CO2 pneumoperitoneum for 2 h); group C (CO2 pneumoperitoneum for 4 h); group D (CO2 pneumoperitoneum for 4 h and 24 h after waking); group E (CO2 pneumoperitoneum for 4 h and 48 h after waking). The proliferation status was observed in RCC specimens by immunohistochemical staining for Ki67. The protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were examined by western blotting. Results All groups showed similar Ki67-positive staining in RCC samples (p > 0.05). The relative expression of HIF-1α and VEGF gradually increased in both group B and group C, as compared with group A, but only the difference between group C and group A reached statistical significance (p < 0.05). The protein levels of HIF-1α and VEGF decreased in both group D and group E, as compared with group B and group C; however, the differences between group D, group E, and group A did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusions In an orthotropic xenograft nude mice model of RCC, CO2 pneumoperitoneum has no effect on expression of the cellular proliferation marker Ki67. However, CO2 pneumoperitoneum rapidly induces transient expression of HIF-1α and VEGF. Thus, CO2 pneumoperitoneum laparoscopy may be a safe method for treating RCC. PMID:25395958

  5. A robust and rapid xenograft model to assess efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents for human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saland, E; Boutzen, H; Castellano, R; Pouyet, L; Griessinger, E; Larrue, C; de Toni, F; Scotland, S; David, M; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Vergez, F; Barreira, Y; Collette, Y; Récher, C; Sarry, J-E

    2015-01-01

    Relevant preclinical mouse models are crucial to screen new therapeutic agents for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current in vivo models based on the use of patient samples are not easy to establish and manipulate in the laboratory. Our objective was to develop robust xenograft models of human AML using well-characterized cell lines as a more accessible and faster alternative to those incorporating the use of patient-derived AML cells. Five widely used AML cell lines representing various AML subtypes were transplanted and expanded into highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/LtSz-severe combined immunodeficiency IL2Rγcnull mice (for example, cell line-derived xenografts). We show here that bone marrow sublethal conditioning with busulfan or irradiation has equal efficiency for the xenotransplantation of AML cell lines. Although higher number of injected AML cells did not change tumor engraftment in bone marrow and spleen, it significantly reduced the overall survival in mice for all tested AML cell lines. On the basis of AML cell characteristics, these models also exhibited a broad range of overall mouse survival, engraftment, tissue infiltration and aggressiveness. Thus, we have established a robust, rapid and straightforward in vivo model based on engraftment behavior of AML cell lines, all vital prerequisites for testing new therapeutic agents in preclinical studies. PMID:25794133

  6. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor α-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  7. Application of Coiled Coil Peptides in Liposomal Anticancer Drug Delivery Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shimada, Yasuhito; Olsthoorn, René C L; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Kros, Alexander

    2016-08-23

    The complementary coiled coil forming peptides E4 [(EIAALEK)4] and K4 [(KIAALKE)4] are known to trigger liposomal membrane fusion when tethered to lipid vesicles in the form of lipopeptides. In this study, we examined whether these coiled coil forming peptides can be used for drug delivery applications. First, we prepared E4 peptide modified liposomes containing the far-red fluorescent dye TO-PRO-3 iodide (E4-Lipo-TP3) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could deliver TP3 into HeLa cells expressing K4 peptide on the membrane (HeLa-K) under cell culture conditions in a selective manner. Next, we prepared doxorubicin-containing E4-liposomes (E4-Lipo-DOX) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could also deliver DOX into HeLa-K cells. Moreover, E4-Lipo-DOX showed enhanced cytotoxicity toward HeLa-K cells compared to free doxorubicin. To prove the suitability of E4/K4 coiled coil formation for in vivo drug delivery, we injected E4-Lipo-TP3 or E4-Lipo-DOX into zebrafish xenografts of HeLa-K. As a result, E4-liposomes delivered TP3 to the implanted HeLa-K cells, and E4-Lipo-DOX could suppress cancer proliferation in the xenograft when compared to nontargeted conditions (i.e., zebrafish xenograft with free DOX injection). These data demonstrate that coiled coil formation enables drug selectivity and efficacy in vivo. It is envisaged that these findings are a step forward toward biorthogonal targeting systems as a tool for clinical drug delivery. PMID:27504667

  8. Rubus idaeus L Inhibits Invasion Potential of Human A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Suppression Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Akt Pathway In Vitro and Reduces Tumor Growth In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Chen; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chiang, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2014-05-01

    The metastasis of lung cancer is the most prevalent cause of patient death. Various treatment strategies have targeted the prevention of the occurrence of metastasis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer cells is considered a prerequisite to acquire the invasive/migratory phenotype and to subsequently achieve metastasis. However, the effects ofRubus idaeuson cancer invasion and the EMT of the human lung carcinoma remain unclear. In this article, we test the hypothesis thatR idaeusethyl acetate (RIAE) possesses an antimetastatic effect and reverses the EMT potential of human lung A549 cells. We extract the raspberryR idaeuswith methanol (RIME), chloroform (RICE), ethyl acetate (RIAE),n-butanol (RIBE), and water (RIWE). The RIAE treatment obviously inhibits the invasive (P< .001), motility (P< .001), spreading, and migratory potential (P< .001) of highly metastatic human lung cancer A549 cells. The zymography and promoter luciferase analysis reveals that RIAE decreases the proteinase and transcription activities of MMP-2 and u-PA. Molecular analyses show that RIAE increases the E-cadherin level that is mainly localized at the cellular membrane. This result was also verified through confocal analyses. RIAE also induces the upregulation of an epithelial marker, such as α-catenin, and decreases mesenchymal markers, such as snail-1 and N-cadherin, that promote cell invasion and metastasis. RIAE inhibits MMP-2 and u-PA by attenuating the NF-κB and p-Akt expression. The inhibition of RIAE on the growth of A549 cells in vivo was also verified using a cancer cell xenograft nude mice model. Our results show the anti-invasive/antitumor effects of RIAE and associated mechanisms, which suggest that RIAE should be further tested in clinically relevant models to exploit its potential benefits against metastatic lung cancer cells. PMID:24335666

  9. Intrahepatic Xenograft of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines: A Useful Model for Rapid Biological and Therapeutic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Andrique, Laetitia; Poglio, Sandrine; Prochazkova-Carlotti, Martina; Kadin, Marshall Edward; Giese, Alban; Idrissi, Yamina; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Chevret, Edith

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases primarily involving the skin that could have an aggressive course with circulating blood cells, especially in Sézary syndrome and transformed mycosis fungoides. So far, few CTCL cell lines have been adapted for in vivo experiments and their tumorigenicity has not been adequately assessed, hampering the use of a reproducible model for CTCL biological evaluation. In fact, both patient-derived xenografts and cell line xenografts at subcutaneous sites failed to provide a robust tool, because engraftment was dependent on mice strain and cell line subtype. Herein, we describe an original method of intrahepatic injection into adult NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice liver of both aggressive (My-La, HUT78, HH, MAC2A, and MAC2B) and indolent (FE-PD and MAC1) CTCL cell lines. Six of the seven CTCL cell lines were grafted with a high rate of success (80%). Moreover, this model provided a quick (15 days) and robust assay for in vivo evaluation of CTCL cell lines tumorigenicity and therapeutic response in preclinical studies. Such a reproducible model can be therefore used for further functional studies and in vivo drug testing. PMID:27181405

  10. Development and analysis of patient-derived xenograft mouse models in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shimada, K; Shimada, S; Sugimoto, K; Nakatochi, M; Suguro, M; Hirakawa, A; Hocking, T D; Takeuchi, I; Tokunaga, T; Takagi, Y; Sakamoto, A; Aoki, T; Naoe, T; Nakamura, S; Hayakawa, F; Seto, M; Tomita, A; Kiyoi, H

    2016-07-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a distinct disease entity with the peculiar characteristic that tumor cells proliferate within vessels. Despite recent advances in understanding the disease from clinical aspects, the underlying pathogenesis remains unknown. Here we demonstrate analyses of IVLBCL biology using four xenograft mouse models established from primary IVLBCL samples. In all four models, the main characteristic of IVLBCL tumor cell proliferation within vessels was retained. Time-lapse engraftment analyses revealed that the tumor cells initially engrafted and proliferated in the sinusoids and vessels in the liver and then engrafted and proliferated in multiple organs. Intriguingly, serial passage of tumor cells from the adrenal gland of a transplanted mouse developed from primary patient bone marrow cells into a second mouse showed that the tumor cells mainly distributed into the adrenal gland in the second mouse, implying the existence of clonal selection and/or evolution at engraftment of a specific organ. Gene expression profiling analyses demonstrated that the gene set associated with cell migration was enriched for normal peripheral blood B cells, indicating that inhibition of cell migration might be involved in IVLBCL pathogenesis. In conclusion, the mouse xenograft models described here are essential tools for uncovering IVLBCL biology. PMID:27001523

  11. The use of thermographic imaging to evaluate therapeutic response in human tumour xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Nosheen; Connah, David; Ugail, Hassan; Cooper, Patricia A; Falconer, Robert A; Patterson, Laurence H; Shnyder, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods to monitor tumour growth are an important goal in cancer drug development. Thermographic imaging systems offer potential in this area, since a change in temperature is known to be induced due to changes within the tumour microenvironment. This study demonstrates that this imaging modality can be applied to a broad range of tumour xenografts and also, for the first time, the methodology's suitability to assess anti-cancer agent efficacy. Mice bearing subcutaneously implanted H460 lung cancer xenografts were treated with a novel vascular disrupting agent, ICT-2552, and the cytotoxin doxorubicin. The effects on tumour temperature were assessed using thermographic imaging over the first 6 hours post-administration and subsequently a further 7 days. For ICT-2552 a significant initial temperature drop was observed, whilst for both agents a significant temperature drop was seen compared to controls over the longer time period. Thus thermographic imaging can detect functional differences (manifesting as temperature reductions) in the tumour response to these anti-cancer agents compared to controls. Importantly, these effects can be detected in the first few hours following treatment and therefore the tumour is observable non-invasively. As discussed, this technique will have considerable 3Rs benefits in terms of reduction and refinement of animal use. PMID:27491535

  12. The use of thermographic imaging to evaluate therapeutic response in human tumour xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nosheen; Connah, David; Ugail, Hassan; Cooper, Patricia A.; Falconer, Robert A.; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods to monitor tumour growth are an important goal in cancer drug development. Thermographic imaging systems offer potential in this area, since a change in temperature is known to be induced due to changes within the tumour microenvironment. This study demonstrates that this imaging modality can be applied to a broad range of tumour xenografts and also, for the first time, the methodology’s suitability to assess anti-cancer agent efficacy. Mice bearing subcutaneously implanted H460 lung cancer xenografts were treated with a novel vascular disrupting agent, ICT-2552, and the cytotoxin doxorubicin. The effects on tumour temperature were assessed using thermographic imaging over the first 6 hours post-administration and subsequently a further 7 days. For ICT-2552 a significant initial temperature drop was observed, whilst for both agents a significant temperature drop was seen compared to controls over the longer time period. Thus thermographic imaging can detect functional differences (manifesting as temperature reductions) in the tumour response to these anti-cancer agents compared to controls. Importantly, these effects can be detected in the first few hours following treatment and therefore the tumour is observable non-invasively. As discussed, this technique will have considerable 3Rs benefits in terms of reduction and refinement of animal use. PMID:27491535

  13. Fibrin degradation by rtPA enhances the delivery of nanotherapeutics to A549 tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Wang, Sheng; Deng, Jun; Shi, Wei; Mei, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2016-07-01

    Effective drug delivery to a tumor depends on favorable blood perfusion within the tumor. As an important component of tumor extracellular matrix, fibrin is abundant near tumor vessels. Inspired by the distinct distribution pattern and vessel-dependent production of fibrin, we hypothesized that fibrin depletion in tumors decompresses tumor vessels to improve tumor blood perfusion and accordingly enhance drug delivery to tumors rich in vessels. In the present study, we attempted to employ a clinically used thrombolytic drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), to modulate fibrin deposition in tumors. We then combined this drug with a nanoparticle drug delivery system for tumor therapy. RtPA treatment (25 mg/kg/d i. p. administration for two weeks) successfully depleted fibrin deposition and enhanced blood perfusion within A549 tumor xenografts. Furthermore, rtPA treatment also improved the in vivo delivery of 115-nm nanoparticles to tumor tissues. Finally, rtPA combined with therapeutic agent-loaded nanoparticles resulted in the most effective shrinkage of A549 tumor xenografts compared with the control groups. Overall, the present study provides a new strategy to enhance the delivery of nanotherapeutics to tumors rich in vessels. PMID:27149664

  14. Comparison of the effects of vitamin D products in a psoriasis plaque test and a murine psoriasis xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Peter H; Svensson, Lars; Hagberg, Oskar; Hoffmann, Vibeke; Kemp, Kaare; Røpke, Mads A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of Daivobet and calcipotriol on clinical score and biomarker responses in a modified version of the Scholtz-Dumas psoriasis plaque assay. Furthermore, it was the aim to compare the effects of calcipotriol and betamethasone in the murine psoriasis xenograft model. Twenty four patients with psoriasis were treated topically once daily for three weeks, whereas the grafted mice were treated for four weeks. Clinical responses were scored twice weekly and biopsies were taken at the end of each study to analyse for skin biomarkers by histology and immunohistochemistry. The results clearly demonstrate effects on both clinical signs and biomarkers. In the patient study the total clinical score was reduced significantly with both Daivobet and calcipotriol. Both treatments reduced epidermal thickness, Ki-67 and cytokeratin 16 expression. T cell infiltration was significantly reduced by Daivobet but only marginally by calcipotriol. Both treatments showed strong effects on the epidermal psoriatic phenotype.Results from the xenograft model essentially showed the same results. However differences were observed when investigating subtypes of T cells.The study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining robust biomarker data in the psoriasis plaque test that correlate well with those obtained in other clinical studies. Furthermore, the biomarker data from the plaque test correlate with biopsy data from the grafted mice. PMID:20017943

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. Results The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. Conclusion High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. PMID:27587968

  16. Comparison of the effects of vitamin D products in a psoriasis plaque test and a murine psoriasis xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of Daivobet® and calcipotriol on clinical score and biomarker responses in a modified version of the Scholtz-Dumas psoriasis plaque assay. Furthermore, it was the aim to compare the effects of calcipotriol and betamethasone in the murine psoriasis xenograft model. Twenty four patients with psoriasis were treated topically once daily for three weeks, whereas the grafted mice were treated for four weeks. Clinical responses were scored twice weekly and biopsies were taken at the end of each study to analyse for skin biomarkers by histology and immunohistochemistry. The results clearly demonstrate effects on both clinical signs and biomarkers. In the patient study the total clinical score was reduced significantly with both Daivobet® and calcipotriol. Both treatments reduced epidermal thickness, Ki-67 and cytokeratin 16 expression. T cell infiltration was significantly reduced by Daivobet® but only marginally by calcipotriol. Both treatments showed strong effects on the epidermal psoriatic phenotype. Results from the xenograft model essentially showed the same results. However differences were observed when investigating subtypes of T cells. The study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining robust biomarker data in the psoriasis plaque test that correlate well with those obtained in other clinical studies. Furthermore, the biomarker data from the plaque test correlate with biopsy data from the grafted mice. PMID:20017943

  17. Evaluation of 9-cis retinoic acid and mitotane as antitumoral agents in an adrenocortical xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltán; Baghy, Kornélia; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Micsik, Tamás; Nyírő, Gábor; Rácz, Gergely; Butz, Henriett; Perge, Pál; Kovalszky, Ilona; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila; Igaz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The available drug treatment options for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) are limited. In our previous studies, the in vitro activity of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA) on adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells was shown along with its antitumoral effects in a small pilot xenograft study. Our aim was to dissect the antitumoral effects of 9-cisRA on ACC in a large-scale xenograft study involving mitotane, 9-cisRA and their combination. 43 male SCID mice inoculated with NCI-H295R cells were treated in four groups (i. control, ii. 9-cisRA, iii. mitotane, iv. 9-cisRA + mitotane) for 28 days. Tumor size follow-up, histological and immunohistochemical (Ki-67) analysis, tissue gene expression microarray, quantitative real-time-PCR for the validation of microarray results and to detect circulating microRNAs were performed. Protein expression was studied by proteomics and Western-blot validation. Only mitotane alone and the combination of 9-cisRA and mitotane resulted in significant tumor size reduction. The Ki-67 index was significantly reduced in both 9-cisRA and 9-cisRA+mitotane groups. Only modest changes at the mRNA level were found: the 9-cisRA-induced overexpression of apolipoprotein A4 and down-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4A was validated. The expression of circulating hsa-miR-483-5p was significantly reduced in the combined treatment group. The SET protein was validated as being significantly down-regulated in the combined mitotane+9-cisRA group. 9-cisRA might be a helpful additive agent in the treatment of ACC in combination with mitotane. Circulating hsa-miR-483-5p could be utilized for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ACC patients, and the treatment-induced reduction in protein SET expression might raise its relevance in ACC biology. PMID:26885453

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing of Rapid Autopsy Tumors and Xenograft Models Reveals Possible Driver Mutations Underlying Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tao; Musteanu, Monica; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P.; Shields, David J.; Olson, Peter; Rejto, Paul A.; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to its propensity to invade and rapidly metastasize and remains very difficult to manage clinically. One major hindrance towards a better understanding of PDAC is the lack of molecular data sets and models representative of end stage disease. Moreover, it remains unclear how molecularly similar patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are to the primary tumor from which they were derived. To identify potential molecular drivers in metastatic pancreatic cancer progression, we obtained matched primary tumor, metastases and normal (peripheral blood) samples under a rapid autopsy program and performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on tumor as well as normal samples. PDX models were also generated, sequenced and compared to tumors. Across the matched data sets generated for three patients, there were on average approximately 160 single-nucleotide mutations in each sample. The majority of mutations in each patient were shared among the primary and metastatic samples and, importantly, were largely retained in the xenograft models. Based on the mutation prevalence in the primary and metastatic sites, we proposed possible clonal evolution patterns marked by functional mutations affecting cancer genes such as KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4 that may play an important role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. These results add to our understanding of pancreatic tumor biology, and demonstrate that PDX models derived from advanced or end-stage likely closely approximate the genetics of the disease in the clinic and thus represent a biologically and clinically relevant pre-clinical platform that may enable the development of effective targeted therapies for PDAC. PMID:26555578

  19. Transferrin Receptor Targeted Lipopolyplexes for Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotide G3139 in a Murine K562 Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xulang; Koh, Chee Guan; Yu, Bo; Liu, Shujun; Piao, Longzhu; Marcucci, Guido; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, L. James

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transferrin (Tf) conjugated lipopolyplexes (LPs) carrying G3139, an antisense oligonucleotide for Bcl-2, were synthesized and evaluated in Tf receptor positive K562 erythroleukemia cells and then in a murine K562 xenograft model. Materials and Methods Particle size and Zeta potentials of transferrin conjugated lipopolyplexs containing G3139 (Tf-LP-G3139) were measured by Dynamic Light Scattering and ZetaPALS. In vitro and in vivo sample’s Bcl-2 downregulation was analyzed using Western blot and tumor tissue samples also exhibited by immunohistochemistry method. For athymic mice bearing with K562 xenograft tumors, tumor growth inhibition and survival rate were investigated. Nanoparticle distribution in 3-D cell cluster was observed by Laser scan confocal microscopy. IL-12 production in the plasma was measured by ELISA kit. Results In vitro, Tf-LP-G3139 was more effective in inducing down regulation of Bcl-2 in K562 cells than non-targeted LP-G3139, free G3139 and mismatched control ODN-G4126 in the same formulation. In vivo Tf-LP-G3139 was less effective than free G3139 in Bcl-2 down regulation. 3-D cell cluster model diffusion results indeed indicated limited penetration of the LPs into the cell cluster. Finally, the therapeutic efficacies of Tf-LP-G3139 and free G3139 were determined in the K562 xenograft model. Tf-LP-G3139 showed slower plasma clearance, higher AUC, and greater accumulation in the tumor compared to free G3139. In addition, Tf-LP-G3139 was found to be more effective in tumor growth inhibition and prolonging mouse survival than free G3139. This was associated with increased spleen weight and IL-12 production in the plasma. Conclusion The role of the immune system in the therapeutic response obtained with the Tf-LPs is necessary and in vitro 3-D cell cluster model can be a potential tool to evaluate the nanoparticle distribution. PMID:19291371

  20. In vitro and in vivo studies on the inhibitory effects of myocardial cell culture medium on growth of a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Zhou, J.; Fu, S.Z.; Fan, J.; Wu, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the heart is one of the body’s vital organs, with an abundant blood supply, metastasis to the heart is considered rare. In a previous study, we found that the myocardial microenvironment might contain a low molecular weight natural tumour suppressor. The present study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cardiac myocyte–conditioned medium (cmcm) on the growth of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods An mtt assay was used to detect the inhibition ratio with respect to A549 proliferation. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cell strain) were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice to produce tumours. The xenograft tumour growth in mice was observed after selected drug administration. Results After treatment with cmcm and cisplatin (Cis), A549 cell viability significantly declined (p < 0.001). The cell viability in the cmcm and Cis groups were 53.42% ± 3.45% and 58.45% ± 6.39% respectively. Growth of implanted tumour cells in vivo was significantly inhibited in the cmcm group, the group treated with recombinant human adenovirus–p53, and the Cis-treated group compared with a control group. The inhibition rates were 41.44% in the cmcm group, 41.34% in the p53 group, and 64.50% in the Cis group. Lung metastasis capacity was significantly reduced in the presence of cmcm (p < 0.05). Lung metastasis inhibition rates in mice were 56.52% in the cmcm group, 47.83% in the p53 group, and 82.61% in the Cis group. With cmcm, the lives of A549-tumour-bearing mice could be significantly prolonged without any effect on weight loss. Conclusions Use of cmcm has the effect of reducing A549 cell viability, tumour volume, and lung metastasis rate, while prolonging survival duration without severe toxicity. PMID:26966411

  1. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  2. Busulfan depletes neutrophils and delays accelerated acute rejection of discordant xenografts in the guinea pig-to-rat model.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Robert B; Beck, Tino; Stehle, Ingo; Kremer, Marcus; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Complement factor C6 plays a critical role in mediating hyperacute rejection of discordant xenografts. In order to explore the mechanism of discordant xenograft rejection, we investigated kinetics and phenotypes of the cellular infiltrate in xenografts in untreated and leukocyte-depleted recipients, in relation to graft survival. Guinea pig cardiac xenografts were heterotopically transplanted to totally C6-deficient PVG (C-) rats. Grafts were removed after 0, 6, 12, and 24 h ( n = 6). Histological evaluation was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) and immunoperoxidase staining. The agents fucoidin and busulfan were applied to delay xenograft rejection further. Within 6 h, minimal perivascular edema with isolated infiltrating CD11b/c- and ED1-positive cells were found. An intense infiltration of CD11b/c- and ED1-positive cells with interstitial hemorrhage was present after 24 h, though with little CD161 and CD3 cell infiltration. Inhibition of cell adhesion by fucoidin did not prolong xenograft survival (34 +/- 15 h, n = 4, P<0.47), but the depletion of granulocytes by injection of busulfan did prolong survival of the discordant xenografts, to 62 +/- 22 h ( n = 7, P < or = 0.0039). These results demonstrate a significant effect of specific depletion of granulocytes and macrophages by busulfan therapy on guinea pig cardiac xenograft survival in PVG (C-) rats, suggesting the participation of these infiltrating cells in the xenoreactive rejection process. PMID:12545340

  3. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  4. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  5. Anticancer Activity of Apaziquone in Oral Cancer Cells and Xenograft Model: Implications for Oral Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to investigate the anticancer potential of Apaziquone, [EOquin, USAN, E09, 3-hydroxy-5- aziridinyl-1-methyl-2(1H-indole-4,7-dione)–prop-β-en-α-ol], a pro-drug belonging to a class of anti-cancer agents called bioreductive alkylating agents, for OSCC. Apaziquone treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Apaziquone treated OSCC cells showed increased activation of Caspase 9 and Caspase 3, and Poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage suggesting induction of apoptosis by apaziquone in oral cancer cells. Importantly, apaziquone treatment significantly reduced oral tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo studies identified and demonstrated the pre-clinical efficacy of Apaziquone, as a potential novel anti-cancer therapeutic candidate for oral cancer management. PMID:26208303

  6. Antitumor Effects of Flavopiridol on Human Uterine Leiomyoma In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Baek, Jong-Woo; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Park, Won-Jin; Chung, Rosa; Choi, Eun-Som; Lee, Gun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Flavopiridol is a potent CDK inhibitor. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol and its mechanism in human uterine leiomyoma cells were investigated. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in primary cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells. Cell viability and cell proliferation assays were conducted. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the effect of flavopiridol on cell cycle. The expression of cell cycle regulatory-related proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. Cell viability and proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells were significantly reduced by flavopiridol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry results showed that flavopiridol induced G1 phase arrest. Flavopiridol-induced growth inhibition in uterine leiomyoma cells was associated with increased expression of p21cip/wafl and p27kip1 in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of CDK2/4 and Cyclin A with a concomitant increase in dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma was observed. This study demonstrates that flavopiridol inhibits cell proliferation by initiating G1 cell cycle arrest in human uterine leiomyoma. We also found that flavopiridol is effective in inhibiting xenografted human uterine leiomyoma growth. These results indicate that flavopiridol could prove to be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for human uterine leiomyoma. PMID:24572052

  7. Morphine modulates doxorubicin uptake and improves efficacy of chemotherapy in an intracranial xenograft model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    da Ros, Martina; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Consolante, Dario; Cardile, Francesco; Muratori, Monica; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Guidi, Milena; Pisano, Claudio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    Morphine may alter the permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), enhancing the access of molecules normally unable to cross it, as Doxorubicin (Dox). In addition, morphine seems to mediate the uptake of Dox into the brain by its reduced efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We evaluated the antitumor efficacy of Dox plus morphine treatment by an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model. Foxn1 mice were injected with U87MG-luc cells in the left lobe of the brain and treated with Dox (5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, weekly) with or without morphine pretreatment (10 mg/kg, weekly). Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was used to monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy. Additionally, we investigated the role of morphine on the uptake of Dox by MDCKII cells transfected with human MDR1 gene encoding for P-gp. The data demonstrate that only Dox 5 mg/kg determined a significant tumor regression while the lower dose (2.5 mg/kg) was not effective. However, if combined with morphine, the group treated with Dox 2.5 mg/kg showed a decreasing tumor growth. The average BLI for Dox 2.5 mg/kg plus morphine was 5 fold lower than Dox 2.5 mg/kg alone (P=0.0053) and 8 fold lower than vehicle (P=0.0004). Additionally, Dox increased in MDCKII-P-gp transfected cells only in the presence of morphine with a significantly higher level comparing control group (3.84) vs Dox plus morphine group (12.29, P<0.05). Our results indicate that Dox alone and in combination with morphine appear to be effective in controlling the growth of glioblastoma in a xenograft mouse model. PMID:27152241

  8. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  9. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  10. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Hernán Pérez de la Ossa, Dolores; Lorente, Mar; Gil-Alegre, Maria Esther; Torres, Sofía; García-Taboada, Elena; Aberturas, María Del Rosario; Molpeceres, Jesús; Velasco, Guillermo; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w) of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies. PMID:23349970

  11. Morphine modulates doxorubicin uptake and improves efficacy of chemotherapy in an intracranial xenograft model of human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    da Ros, Martina; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Consolante, Dario; Cardile, Francesco; Muratori, Monica; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Guidi, Milena; Pisano, Claudio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    Morphine may alter the permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), enhancing the access of molecules normally unable to cross it, as Doxorubicin (Dox). In addition, morphine seems to mediate the uptake of Dox into the brain by its reduced efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We evaluated the antitumor efficacy of Dox plus morphine treatment by an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model. Foxn1 mice were injected with U87MG-luc cells in the left lobe of the brain and treated with Dox (5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, weekly) with or without morphine pretreatment (10 mg/kg, weekly). Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was used to monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy. Additionally, we investigated the role of morphine on the uptake of Dox by MDCKII cells transfected with human MDR1 gene encoding for P-gp. The data demonstrate that only Dox 5 mg/kg determined a significant tumor regression while the lower dose (2.5 mg/kg) was not effective. However, if combined with morphine, the group treated with Dox 2.5 mg/kg showed a decreasing tumor growth. The average BLI for Dox 2.5 mg/kg plus morphine was 5 fold lower than Dox 2.5 mg/kg alone (P=0.0053) and 8 fold lower than vehicle (P=0.0004). Additionally, Dox increased in MDCKII-P-gp transfected cells only in the presence of morphine with a significantly higher level comparing control group (3.84) vs Dox plus morphine group (12.29, P<0.05). Our results indicate that Dox alone and in combination with morphine appear to be effective in controlling the growth of glioblastoma in a xenograft mouse model. PMID:27152241

  12. Chloroquine rescues A549 cells from paraquat-induced death.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingjie; Wang, Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a widely used herbicide associated with a high mortality rate, yet, there are no effective treatments for PQ poisoning. PQ may damage alveolar type II cells leading to moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present study was undertaken to show that PQ causes alveolar type II (A549) cell death and to evaluate whether chloroquine (CQ) can protect A549 cells against PQ-induced cell death. The results showed that high concentrations of PQ resulted in toxicity, as indicated by a decrease in cell viability. More importantly, for the first time, CQ was found to improve cell viability of PQ treated A549 cells. Moreover, our data demonstrated that CQ increased lysosome-associated membrane protein-1, lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 and light chain-3 expressions, suggesting that the mechanism by which CQ rescues PQ-induced cytotoxicity may be through protection of the lysosomal membrane or up-regulation of autophagy. In conclusion, our study indicates that CQ may be used as a potential drug to rescue PQ-induced ARDS. PMID:26154125

  13. Phloretin induces apoptosis of non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells via JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    MIN, JIE; LI, XU; HUANG, KENAN; TANG, HUA; DING, XINYU; QI, CHEN; QIN, XIONG; XU, ZHIFEI

    2015-01-01

    Phloretin (Ph) existing in apples, pears and various vegetables is known to have antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. However, little is known about its effect on human lung cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to see whether Ph could induce apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, and explore the possible underlying mechanism of action. We found that Ph markedly induced cell apoptosis of NSCLC cell line A549, and inhibited the migration of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The expression level of BAX, cleaved caspase-3 and -9, and degraded form of PARP was increased and Bcl-2 was decreased after Ph treatment. In addition, the phosphorylation of P38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 was increased in a dose-dependent manner in parallel with Ph treatment. Inhibition of P38 MAPK and JNK1/2 by specific inhibitors significantly abolished the Ph-induced activation of the caspase-3 and -9. In vivo tumor-suppression assay further indicated that Ph (20 mg/kg) displayed a more significant inhibitory effect on A549 xenografts in tumor growth. All these findings indicate that Ph is able to inhibit NSCLC A549 cell growth by inducing apoptosis through P38 MAPK and JNK1/2 pathways, and therefore may prove to be an adjuvant to the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26503828

  14. Abrogation of STAT3 signaling cascade by zerumbone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Li, Feng; Kim, Chulwon; Sikka, Sakshi; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-10-01

    Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is one of the characteristic features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and often linked to its deregulated proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In the present report, we investigated whether zerumbone, a sesquiterpene, exerts its anticancer effect through modulation of STAT3 activation pathway. The pharmacological effect of zerumbone on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases and phosphatase, and apoptosis was investigated using both RCC cell lines and xenograft mouse model. We observed that zerumbone suppressed STAT3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in RCC cells. The suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream kinases c-Src, Janus-activated kinase 1, and Janus-activated kinase 2. Pervanadate treatment reversed zerumbone-induced downregulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that zerumbone induced the expression of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 that correlated with its ability to inhibit STAT3 activation. Interestingly, deletion of SHP-1 gene by siRNA abolished the ability of zerumbone to inhibit STAT3 activation. The inhibition of STAT3 activation by zerumbone also caused the suppression of the gene products involved in proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Finally, when administered i.p., zerumbone inhibited STAT3 activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human RCC xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice without any side effects. Overall, our results suggest for the first time that zerumbone is a novel blocker of STAT3 signaling cascade and thus has an enormous potential for the treatment of RCC and other solid tumors. PMID:24797723

  15. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  16. FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, overcomes irinotecan and topotecan resistance in human tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhong, Kai; Smith, Nicholas; Prey, Joshua; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan and topotecan are the only camptothecin analogues approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. However, inherent and/or acquired irinotecan and topotecan resistance is a challenging issue in clinical practice. In this report, we showed that FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, effectively obliterated human xenograft tumors that acquire irinotecan and topotecan resistance. Consistent with this finding, Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that FL118 rapidly clears from circulation, while effectively accumulating in tumors with a long elimination half-life. Consistent with our previous studies on irinotecan, FL118 exhibited ≥25 fold more effectiveness than topotecan at inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation; we further showed that although topotecan can inhibit the expression of survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2, its effectiveness is about 10-100 fold weaker than FL118. Lastly, in contrast to both SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) and topotecan are substrates of the efflux pump proteins P-gp/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP, FL118 is not a substrate of P-gp and ABCG2. Consistently, sildenafil, a multiple efflux pump inhibitor, sensitized SN-38 much more than these of the ABCG2-selective inhibitor KO143 in growth inhibition of SW620 and HCT-8 cells. In contrast, both inhibitors showed no effect on FL118 efficacy. Given that both P-gp and ABCG2 express in SW620 and HCT-8 cells and FL118 is not a substrate for P-gp and ABCG2, this suggests that FL118 appears to bypass multiple efflux pump protein-induced resistance, which may contribute to FL118 overcoming irinotecan and topotecan resistance in vivo. These new findings provide renewed perspectives for further development of FL118 for clinical applications. PMID:26692923

  17. Effect of Melatonin on Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in Xenograft Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Arbab, Ali S.; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R. S.; Iskander, A. S. M.; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M.; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2014-01-01

    As neovascularization is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, controlling angiogenesis is a promising tactic in limiting cancer progression. Melatonin has been studied for their inhibitory properties on angiogenesis in cancer. We performed an in vivo study to evaluate the effects of melatonin treatment on angiogenesis in breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay after melatonin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). After, cells were implanted in athymic nude mice and treated with melatonin or vehicle daily, administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before turning the room light off. Volume of the tumors was measured weekly with a digital caliper and at the end of treatments animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Technetium-99m tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C to detect in vivo angiogenesis. In addition, expression of pro-angiogenic/growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by membrane antibody array and collected tumor tissues were analyzed with histochemical staining. Melatonin in vitro treatment (1 mM) decreased cell viability (p<0.05). The breast cancer xenografts nude mice treated with melatonin showed reduced tumor size and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared to control animals after 21 days of treatment (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF receptor 2 decreased significantly in the treated animals compared to that of control when determined by immunohistochemistry (p<0.05) but the changes were not significant on SPECT (p>0.05) images. In addition, there was a decrease of micro-vessel density (Von Willebrand Factor) in melatonin treated mice (p<0.05). However, semiquantitative densitometry analysis of membrane array indicated increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 in treated tumors compared to vehicle treated tumors (p<0.05). In conclusion, melatonin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell

  18. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Ingrid R.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Abreu, José G.; Carneiro, Katia; Rossi, Maria I. D.; Brito, José M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC) are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1) regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues. PMID:26319582

  19. Quercetin inhibits angiogenesis by targeting calcineurin in the xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Qiuting; Yang, Shijun; Chen, Chen; Li, Xiaoya; Liu, Jinyu; Zou, Zhongmei; Cai, Dayong

    2016-06-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) mediated calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) pathway is crucial in the angiogenesis of human breast cancer. Quercetin (Qu), a flavonoid known to possess anti-angiogenesis and antitumor properties, inhibited calcineurin activity in vitro. Herein, we performed a study in vivo to evaluate the effects of Qu on the angiogenesis in breast cancer. Female BALB/c nude mice were injected with MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat and were randomly divided into four groups. The animals were treated with vehicle solution, tamoxifen (TAM, 5.6mg/kg), tacrolimus (FK506, 3mg/kg), or Qu (34mg/kg) for 21 days, respectively. The results showed that, similar to TAM and FK506, Qu decreased tumor growth, limited oncocyte proliferation and promoted tumor necrosis. Anti-angiogenic actions of Qu were demonstrated as decreased serum VEGF (P<0.01), and sparse microvessel density (P<0.05). Qu significantly inhibited tumor calcineurin activities, and the inhibitory rate was 62.73% in Qu treated animals, compared to that was 72.90% in FK506 group (P>0.05). Effects of Qu on calcineurin/NFAT pathway were confirmed as decreased subcellular located levels of VEGF (P<0.05), VEGFR2 (P<0.05) and NFATc3 (P<0.01), downregulated gene expression of VEGF (P<0.05), VEGFR2 (P<0.05) and NFATc3 (P<0.01), reduced protein levels of VEGF (P<0.05), VEGFR2 (P<0.05), and NFATc3 (P<0.01) in tumor tissues. These findings indicate that Qu inhibit angiogenesis of human breast cancer xenograft in nude mice, which was associated with suppressing calcineurin activity and its regulated pathway activation. PMID:27041643

  20. Investigation of the origin of stromal and endothelial cells at the desmoplastic interface in xenograft tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsun; Ryu, Young-joon; Kang, Gu

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts found at the interface between a tumor and the normal stroma play several roles in the development of cancer, including cancer initiation, growth, and progression, thereby also affecting patient prognosis. Although recent studies have focused on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts as potential treatment targets, the origin of these fibroblasts remains unclear. One theory suggests that these cells arise from tumor cells undergoing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e., tumor cells transform into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the cellular origin of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in a mouse xenograft model. Mice were transplanted with human lung cancer cells (H226 and A549 cells). After sacrifice, tumor masses and surrounding tissues were excised. Interestingly, the excised xenograft tissues contained a significant proportion of desmoplastic fibroblasts that exhibited strong expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Immunohistochemical staining with pan-cytokeratin, vimentin, β-catenin, E-cadherin, and CD34 showed no evidence of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Additional evaluation using dual-color silver in situ hybridization with dinitrophenyl-labeled human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and digoxigenin-labeled chromosome 17 centromere probes also showed similar results. In conclusion, our results revealed that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition may not occur in tumor xenograft models, regardless of evidence supporting this phenomenon in humans. PMID:26564105

  1. Hydrogel-Based 3D Model of Patient-Derived Prostate Xenograft Tumors Suitable for Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lack of effective therapies for bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) underscores the need for accurate models of the disease to enable the discovery of new therapeutic targets and to test drug sensitivities of individual tumors. To this end, the patient-derived xenograft (PDX) PCa model using immunocompromised mice was established to model the disease with greater fidelity than is possible with currently employed cell lines grown on tissue culture plastic. However, poorly adherent PDX tumor cells exhibit low viability in standard culture, making it difficult to manipulate these cells for subsequent controlled mechanistic studies. To overcome this challenge, we encapsulated PDX tumor cells within a three-dimensional hyaluronan-based hydrogel and demonstrated that the hydrogel maintains PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression. Furthermore, a differential sensitivity to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug, was observed as compared to a traditional PCa cell line. These findings underscore the potential impact of this novel 3D PDX PCa model as a diagnostic platform for rapid drug evaluation and ultimately push personalized medicine toward clinical reality. PMID:24779589

  2. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  3. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient's medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  4. Anti-alphav integrin monoclonal antibody intetumumab enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy and reduces metastasis of human cancer xenografts in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shoucheng; Tian, Junqiang; Marshall, Deborah J; Knox, Susan J

    2010-10-01

    We previously reported that intetumumab (CNTO 95), a fully human anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibody, is a radiosensitizer in mice with xenograft tumors. Because intetumumab does not cross-react with mouse integrins, but has cross-reactivity with rat integrins, we next studied the potential combined use of radiation therapy and intetumumab in human cancer xenograft models in nude rats to assess effects on both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Nude rats bearing human head and neck cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts were treated with intetumumab and fractionated local tumor radiotherapy. Effects on tumor growth and metastasis, blood perfusion, oxygenation, and gastrointestinal toxicity were studied. Intetumumab alone had a moderate effect on tumor growth. When combined with fractionated radiation therapy, intetumumab significantly inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor response rate that was significantly better than with radiation therapy alone. Treatment with intetumumab also significantly reduced lung metastasis in the A549 NSCLC xenograft model. The oxygenation and blood perfusion in xenograft tumors measured by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging were substantially increased after treatment with intetumumab. The combined use of intetumumab and radiation therapy reduced the microvessel density and increased apoptosis in tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Toxicity studies showed that treatment with intetumumab did not cause the histopathologic changes in the lungs and did not sensitize the sensitive gastrointestinal epithelium to the effect of radiation therapy. Intetumumab can potentiate the efficacy of fractionated radiation therapy in human cancer xenograft tumors in nude rats without increased toxicity. PMID:20841470

  5. Cetuximab delivery and antitumor effects are enhanced by mild hyperthermia in a xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Yuki; Shimomura, Osamu; Ohara, Yusuke; Yamada, Keiichi; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Kishimoto, Mikio; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kita, Eiji; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Even with current promising antitumor antibodies, their antitumor effects on stroma-rich solid cancers have been insufficient. We used mild hyperthermia with the intent of improving drug delivery by breaking the stromal barrier. Here, we provide preclinical evidence of cetuximab + mild hyperthermia therapy. We used four in vivo pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse models with different stroma amounts (scarce, MIAPaCa-2; moderate, BxPC-3; and abundant, Capan-1 and Ope-xeno). Cetuximab (1 mg/kg) was given systemically, and the mouse leg tumors were concurrently heated using a water bath method for 30 min at three different temperatures, 25°C (control), 37°C (intra-abdominal organ level), or 41°C (mild hyperthermia) (n = 4, each group). The evaluated variables were the antitumor effects, represented by tumor volume, and in vivo cetuximab accumulation, indirectly quantified by the immunohistochemical fluorescence intensity value/cell using antibodies against human IgG Fc. At 25°C, the antitumor effects were sufficient, with a cetuximab accumulation value (florescence intensity/cell) of 1632, in the MIAPaCa-2 model, moderate (1063) in the BxPC-3 model, and negative in the Capan-1 and Ope-xeno models (760, 461). By applying 37°C or 41°C heat, antitumor effects were enhanced shown in decreased tumor volumes. These enhanced effects were accompanied by boosted cetuximab accumulation, which increased by 2.8-fold (2980, 3015) in the BxPC-3 model, 2.5- or 4.8-fold (1881, 3615) in the Capan-1 model, and 3.2- or 4.2-fold (1469, 1922) in the Ope-xeno model, respectively. Cetuximab was effective in treating even stroma-rich and k-ras mutant pancreatic cancer mouse models when the drug delivery was improved by combination with mild hyperthermia. PMID:26782353

  6. Metallofullerene-based Nanoplatform for Brain Tumor Brachytherapy and Longitudinal Imaging in a Murine Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Michael D.; Wilson, John D.; Fuller, Christine E.; Zhang, Jianyuan; Dorn, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate in an orthotopic xenograft brain tumor model that a functionalized metallofullerene (f-Gd3N@C80) can enable longitudinal tumor imaging and, when radiolabeled with lutetium 177 (177Lu) and tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (DOTA) (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80), provide an anchor to deliver effective brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: All experiments involving the use of mice were carried out in accordance with protocols approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Human glioblastoma U87MG cells were implanted by using stereotactic procedures into the brains of 37 female athymic nude-Foxn1nu mice and allowed to develop into a tumor for 8 days. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five mice. Biodistribution studies were performed in 12 mice at four time points over 7 days to evaluate gadolinium content. Survival studies involved 20 mice that received infusion of a nanoplatform by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) 8 days after tumor implantation. Mice in survival studies were divided into two groups: one comprised untreated mice that received f-Gd3N@C80 alone and the other comprised mice treated with brachytherapy that received 1.11 MBq of 177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80. Survival data were evaluated by using Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. Results: MR imaging showed extended tumor retention (25.6% ± 1.2 of the infused dose at 52 days, confirmed with biodistribution studies) of the f-Gd3N@C80 nanoplatform, which enabled longitudinal imaging. Successful coupling of 177Lu to the f-Gd3N@C80 surface was achieved by using a bifunctional macrocyclic chelator. The extended tumor retention allowed for effective brachytherapy, as indicated by extended survival time (>2.5 times that of the untreated group) and histologic signs of radiation-induced tumor damage. Conclusion: The authors have developed a multimodal nanoplatform and have demonstrated longitudinal tumor imaging, prolonged intratumoral probe

  7. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC.

    PubMed

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level. PMID:25256442

  8. Using heterogeneity of the patient-derived xenograft model to identify the chemoresistant population in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobbin, Zachary C.; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Erickson, Britt K.; Shah, Monjri M.; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Conner, Michael G.; Schneider, David; Chen, Dongquan; Landen, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of preclinical cancer research has been the use of clonal cell lines. However, this resource has underperformed in its ability to effectively identify novel therapeutics and evaluate the heterogeneity in a patient's tumor. The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model retains the heterogeneity of patient tumors, allowing a means to not only examine efficacy of a therapy, but also basic tenets of cancer biology in response to treatment. Herein we describe the development and characterization of an ovarian-PDX model in order to study the development of chemoresistance. We demonstrate that PDX tumors are not simply composed of tumor-initiating cells, but recapitulate the original tumor's heterogeneity, oncogene expression profiles, and clinical response to chemotherapy. Combined carboplatin/paclitaxel treatment of PDX tumors enriches the cancer stem cell populations, but persistent tumors are not entirely composed of these populations. RNA-Seq analysis of six pair of treated PDX tumors compared to untreated tumors demonstrates a consistently contrasting genetic profile after therapy, suggesting similar, but few, pathways are mediating chemoresistance. Pathways and genes identified by this methodology represent novel approaches to targeting the chemoresistant population in ovarian cancer PMID:25209969

  9. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level. PMID:25256442

  10. A Novel Bufalin Derivative Exhibited Stronger Apoptosis-Inducing Effect than Bufalin in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Lower Acute Toxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Feng, Li-Xing; Sun, Peng; Liu, Wang; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    BF211 is a synthetic molecule derived from bufalin (BF). The apoptosis-inducing effect of BF211 was stronger than that of BF while the acute toxicity of BF211 was much lower than that of BF. BF211 exhibited promising concentration-dependent anti-cancer effects in nude mice inoculated with A549 cells in vivo. The growth of A549 tumor xenografts was almost totally blocked by treatment with BF211 at 6 mg/kg. Notably, BF and BF211 exhibited differences in their binding affinity and kinetics to recombinant proteins of the α subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase. Furthermore, there was a difference in the effects of BF or BF211 on inhibiting the activity of porcine cortex Na+/K+-ATPase and in their time-dependent effects on intracellular Ca2+ levels in A549 cells. The time-dependent effects of BF or BF211 on the activation of Src, which was mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase signalosome, in A549 cells were also different. Both BF and BF211 could induce apoptosis-related cascades, such as activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) in A549 cells, in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the effects of BF211 on apoptosis-related cascades was stronger than that of BF. The results of the present study supported the importance of binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunits in the mechanism of cardiac steroids and also suggested the possibility of developing new cardiac steroids with a stronger anti-cancer activity and lower toxicity as new anti-cancer agents. PMID:27459387

  11. A Dual Tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET Imaging of an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Ong, Lai-Chun; Ranganath, Sudhir H; Zheng, Lin; Kee, Irene; Zhan, Wenbo; Yu, Sidney; Chow, Pierce K H; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of low grade glioma has been a challenge to clinicians. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using 18F-FDG as a radio-tracer has limited utility in this area because of the high background in normal brain tissue. Other radiotracers such as 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) could provide better contrast between tumor and normal brain tissue but with high incidence of false positives. In this study, the potential application of a dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET is investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of PET imaging for low grade glioma diagnosis based on a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice with and without orthotopic glioma xenografts from U87 MG-luc2 glioma cell line are used for the study. The animals are subjected to 18F-FCH and 18F-FDG PET imaging, and images acquired from two separate scans are superimposed for analysis. The 18F-FCH counts are subtracted from the merged images to identify the tumor. Micro-CT, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), histology and measurement of the tumor diameter are also conducted for comparison. Results show that there is a significant contrast in 18F-FCH uptake between tumor and normal brain tissue (2.65 ± 0.98), but with a high false positive rate of 28.6%. The difficulty of identifying the tumor by 18F-FDG only is also proved in this study. All the tumors can be detected based on the dual tracer technique of 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET imaging in this study, while the false-positive caused by 18F-FCH can be eliminated. Dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET imaging has the potential to improve the visualization of low grade glioma. 18F-FCH delineates tumor areas and the tumor can be identified by subtracting the 18F-FCH counts. The sensitivity was over 95%. Further studies are required to evaluate the possibility of applying this technique in clinical trials. PMID:26844770

  12. A Dual Tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET Imaging of an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Sudhir H.; Zheng, Lin; Kee, Irene; Zhan, Wenbo; Yu, Sidney; Chow, Pierce K. H.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of low grade glioma has been a challenge to clinicians. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using 18F-FDG as a radio-tracer has limited utility in this area because of the high background in normal brain tissue. Other radiotracers such as 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) could provide better contrast between tumor and normal brain tissue but with high incidence of false positives. In this study, the potential application of a dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG-PET is investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of PET imaging for low grade glioma diagnosis based on a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice with and without orthotopic glioma xenografts from U87 MG-luc2 glioma cell line are used for the study. The animals are subjected to 18F-FCH and 18F-FDG PET imaging, and images acquired from two separate scans are superimposed for analysis. The 18F-FCH counts are subtracted from the merged images to identify the tumor. Micro-CT, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), histology and measurement of the tumor diameter are also conducted for comparison. Results show that there is a significant contrast in 18F-FCH uptake between tumor and normal brain tissue (2.65 ± 0.98), but with a high false positive rate of 28.6%. The difficulty of identifying the tumor by 18F-FDG only is also proved in this study. All the tumors can be detected based on the dual tracer technique of 18F-FCH/ 18F-FDG-PET imaging in this study, while the false-positive caused by 18F-FCH can be eliminated. Dual tracer 18F-FCH/18F-FDG PET imaging has the potential to improve the visualization of low grade glioma. 18F-FCH delineates tumor areas and the tumor can be identified by subtracting the 18F-FCH counts. The sensitivity was over 95%. Further studies are required to evaluate the possibility of applying this technique in clinical trials. PMID:26844770

  13. Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker demonstrates angiogenic activity and inhibits A549 cell growth by targeting the KDR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bingling; Qi, Junpeng; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Yanmin

    2014-09-01

    Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker has been reported to have anticoagulation, antithrombotic, liver protective and antitumor effects. In the present study, the inhibitory effects on proliferation of A549 human non‑small cell lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Firstly, three solvents, 70% ethanol, distilled water and 95% ethanol, were used to extract Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker. The MTT assay results demonstrated that the 70% ethanol extract more potently reduced the growth of A549 cells and it was therefore adopted in the subsequent experiments. Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker 70% ethanol extract significantly inhibited A549 cell migration in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner and inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Furthermore, Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker 70% ethanol extract effectively inhibited blood vessel formation in the established tissue model for angiogenesis. In addition, Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker 70% ethanol extract was demonstrated to inhibit the autophosphorylation of KDR, and downregulate the subsequent activation of AKT and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in A549 cells. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that the antitumor mechanism of Eupolyphaga sinensis Walker 70% ethanol extract was through inhibiting angiogenesis. It functioned by interrupting the autophosphorylation of KDR and subsequently, AKT and ERK1/2. PMID:25059654

  14. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  15. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  16. Triptolide and its prodrug minnelide suppress Hsp70 and inhibit in vivo growth in a xenograft model of mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Blake A; Chen, Esther Z; Tang, Shaogeng; Belgum, Holly Sedgwick; McCauley, Joel A; Evenson, Kristen A; Etchison, Ryan G; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Patel, Manish R; Raza, Ahmad; Saluja, Ashok K; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Kratzke, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis for which there is a clear need for more successful therapeutic approaches. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide, is a highly effective agent against several cancer types in animal models. Owing to triptolide's poor solubility in water, a water-soluble analog, minnelide, was synthesized. Minnelide is a prodrug of triptolide and is activated by exposure to phosphatases that are found in all body tissues, including blood. Mesothelioma cells were treated in vitro with minnelide or its parent compound, triptolide. Minnelide and triptolide were both found to significantly reduce mesothelioma cell viability and induce apoptosis. The level of Hsp70, a protein that promotes cancer cell survival, was measured in mesothelioma cells before and after treatment with triptolide. Hsp70 levels were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, triptolide sensitized cells to gemcitabine and pemetrexed as measured by cell viability. Mice bearing mesothelioma flank tumors were treated with daily injections (28 d) of minnelide or saline solution and xenograft tumor growth recorded. Mice displayed significantly reduced tumor burden. These findings support the clinical evaluation of minnelide therapy for mesothelioma. PMID:26000097

  17. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  18. Systemically administered AAV9-sTRAIL combats invasive glioblastoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Kantar, Rami; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Badr, Christian E; Würdinger, Thomas; Maguire, Casey A; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing tumoricidal genes injected directly into brain tumors have shown some promise, however, invasive tumor cells are relatively unaffected. Systemic injection of AAV9 vectors provides widespread delivery to the brain and potentially the tumor/microenvironment. Here we assessed AAV9 for potential glioblastoma therapy using two different promoters driving the expression of the secreted anti-cancer agent sTRAIL as a transgene model; the ubiquitously active chicken β-actin (CBA) promoter and the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter to restrict expression in brain. Intravenous injection of AAV9 vectors encoding a bioluminescent reporter showed similar distribution patterns, although the NSE promoter yielded 100-fold lower expression in the abdomen (liver), with the brain-to-liver expression ratio remaining the same. The main cell types targeted by the CBA promoter were astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, while expression by NSE promoter mostly occurred in neurons. Intravenous administration of either AAV9-CBA-sTRAIL or AAV9-NSE-sTRAIL vectors to mice bearing intracranial patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts led to a slower tumor growth and significantly increased survival, with the CBA promoter having higher efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the potential of systemic injection of AAV9 vector encoding a therapeutic gene for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:27382645

  19. Triptolide and its prodrug minnelide suppress Hsp70 and inhibit in vivo growth in a xenograft model of mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Blake A.; Chen, Esther Z.; Tang, Shaogeng; Belgum, Holly Sedgwick; McCauley, Joel A.; Evenson, Kristen A.; Etchison, Ryan G.; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Patel, Manish R.; Raza, Ahmad; Saluja, Ashok K.; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Kratzke, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis for which there is a clear need for more successful therapeutic approaches. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide, is a highly effective agent against several cancer types in animal models. Owing to triptolide's poor solubility in water, a water-soluble analog, minnelide, was synthesized. Minnelide is a prodrug of triptolide and is activated by exposure to phosphatases that are found in all body tissues, including blood. Mesothelioma cells were treated in vitro with minnelide or its parent compound, triptolide. Minnelide and triptolide were both found to significantly reduce mesothelioma cell viability and induce apoptosis. The level of Hsp70, a protein that promotes cancer cell survival, was measured in mesothelioma cells before and after treatment with triptolide. Hsp70 levels were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, triptolide sensitized cells to gemcitabine and pemetrexed as measured by cell viability. Mice bearing mesothelioma flank tumors were treated with daily injections (28 d) of minnelide or saline solution and xenograft tumor growth recorded. Mice displayed significantly reduced tumor burden. These findings support the clinical evaluation of minnelide therapy for mesothelioma. PMID:26000097

  20. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  1. Antibodies targeting human IL1RAP (IL1R3) show therapeutic effects in xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ågerstam, Helena; Karlsson, Christine; Hansen, Nils; Sandén, Carl; Askmyr, Maria; von Palffy, Sofia; Högberg, Carl; Rissler, Marianne; Wunderlich, Mark; Juliusson, Gunnar; Richter, Johan; Sjöström, Kjell; Bhatia, Ravi; Mulloy, James C.; Järås, Marcus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a poor survival rate, and there is an urgent need for novel and more efficient therapies, ideally targeting AML stem cells that are essential for maintaining the disease. The interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP; IL1R3) is expressed on candidate leukemic stem cells in the majority of AML patients, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells. We show here that monoclonal antibodies targeting IL1RAP have strong antileukemic effects in xenograft models of human AML. We demonstrate that effector-cell–mediated killing is essential for the observed therapeutic effects and that natural killer cells constitute a critical human effector cell type. Because IL-1 signaling is important for the growth of AML cells, we generated an IL1RAP-targeting antibody capable of blocking IL-1 signaling and show that this antibody suppresses the proliferation of primary human AML cells. Hence, IL1RAP can be efficiently targeted with an anti-IL1RAP antibody capable of both achieving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and blocking of IL-1 signaling as modes of action. Collectively, these results provide important evidence in support of IL1RAP as a target for antibody-based treatment of AML. PMID:26261316

  2. The impact of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on breast cancer metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ampuja, M; Alarmo, E L; Owens, P; Havunen, R; Gorska, A E; Moses, H L; Kallioniemi, A

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is a key regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. In breast cancer cells, BMP4 has been shown to reduce proliferation in vitro and interestingly, in some cases, also to induce migration and invasion. Here we investigated whether BMP4 influences breast cancer metastasis formation by using a xenograft mouse model. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were injected intracardially into mice and metastasis formation was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Mice treated with BMP4 developed metastases slightly earlier as compared to control animals but the overall number of metastases was similar in both groups (13 in the BMP4 group vs. 12 in controls). In BMP4-treated mice, bone metastases were more common (10 vs. 7) but adrenal gland metastases were less frequent (1 vs. 5) than in controls. Immunostaining revealed no differences in signaling activation, proliferation rate, blood vessel formation, EMT markers or the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts between the treatment groups. In conclusion, BMP4 caused a trend towards accelerated metastasis formation, especially in bone. More work is needed to uncover the long-term effects of BMP4 and the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:26970275

  3. Direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc-acetate halts tumor growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Maulik R; Kriedt, Christopher L; Lents, Nathan H; Hoyer, Mary K; Jamaluddin, Nimah; Klein, Claudette; Baldassare, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular levels of zinc have shown a strong inverse correlation to growth and malignancy of prostate cancer. To date, studies of zinc supplementation in prostate cancer have been equivocal and have not accounted for bioavailability of zinc. Therefore, we hypothesized that direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc could impact prostate cancer growth. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic properties of the pH neutral salt zinc acetate on the prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145 and LNCaP. Zinc acetate killed prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, independent of androgen sensitivity, in a dose-dependent manner in a range between 200 and 600 microM. Cell death occurred rapidly with 50% cell death by six hours and maximal cell death by 18 hours. We next established a xenograft model of prostate cancer and tested an experimental treatment protocol of direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc acetate. We found that zinc treatments halted the growth of the prostate cancer tumors and substantially extended the survival of the animals, whilst causing no detectable cytoxicity to other tissues. Thus, our studies form a solid proof-of-concept that direct intra-tumoral injection of zinc acetate could be a safe and effective treatment strategy for prostate cancer. PMID:19534805

  4. The Addition of A Pregnenolone Pendant Group Enhances the Anticancer Properties of Titanocene Dichloride in a MCF-7 Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Gladiany; Loperena, Yaliz; Ortiz, Giovanni; Reyes, Fiorella; Szeto, Ada; Vera, Jose; Velez, Javier; Morales, Jessica; Morrero, Deborah; Castillo, Linnette; Dharmawardhane, Surangani; Melendez, Enrique; Washington, A. Valance

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Titanocene dichloride held great promise as a chemotherapeutic compound in preclinical studies. However, subsequent clinical trials revealed hepatoxicity and nephrotoxicity, which limited its use in clinical applications. Therefore, we used steroid pendant groups to improve the targeting of titanocene in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, and demonstrated a 10-fold lower effective dose compared to titanocene in in vitro assays. The aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of a titanocene functionalized with pregnenolone (Ti-Preg) in an in vivo breast cancer model. Materials and Methods Xenografts from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line were implanted into athymic nu/nu mice to evaluate the potential of Ti-Preg as an anti-breast cancer agent. Results Ti-Preg demonstrated a significant inhibition of MCF-7 tumor growth when compared to vehicle and to titanocene controls. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the potential of steroid pendent groups for targeting chemotherapeutics to steroid hormone-dependent cancer. PMID:24692689

  5. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Bendale; Vineeta, Bendale; Rammesh, Natu; Saili, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt)-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID) were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27386144

  6. Ovarian Tumor Attachment, Invasion, and Vascularization Reflect Unique Microenvironments in the Peritoneum: Insights from Xenograft and Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Steinkamp, Mara P.; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Davies, Suzy; Muller, Carolyn; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M.; Shirinifard, Abbas; Moses, Melanie; Jiang, Yi; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian cancer cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-red fluorescent protein (RFP) cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that cancer cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM) that examines ovarian cancer cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth, and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of cancer cell–cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum, or spleen readily invade the “open” architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer

  7. Expression and targeting of human fibroblast activation protein in a human skin/severe combined immunodeficient mouse breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tahtis, Kiki; Lee, Fook-Thean; Wheatley, Jennifer M; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Park, John E; Smyth, Fiona E; Obata, Yuichi; Stockert, Elisabeth; Hall, Cathrine M; Old, Lloyd J; Rettig, Wolfgang J; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    Antigens and receptors that are highly expressed on tumor stromal cells, such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), are attractive targets for antibody-based therapies because the supporting stroma and vessel network is essential for a solid neoplasm to grow beyond a size of 1-2 mm. The in vivo characterization of antibodies targeting human stromal or vessel antigens is hindered by the lack of an appropriate mouse model system because xenografts in standard mouse models express stromal and vessels elements of murine origin. This limitation may be overcome by the development of a human skin/mouse chimeric model, which is established by transplanting human foreskin on to the lateral flank of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The subsequent inoculation of breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells within the dermis of the transplanted human skin resulted in the production of xenografts expressing stromal and vessel elements of human origin. Widespread expression of human FAP-positive reactive stromal fibroblasts within xenografts was seen up to 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells. Human blood vessel antigen expression also persisted at 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells with murine vessels coexisting with the human vascular supply. The model was subsequently used to evaluate the biodistribution properties of an iodine-131-labeled humanized anti-FAP monoclonal antibody (BIBH-7). The results showed high specific targeting of the stromal compartment of the xenograft, indicating that the model provides a useful and novel approach for the in vivo assessment of the immunotherapeutic potential of molecules targeting human stroma and angiogenic systems. PMID:12939462

  8. Circulating Tumor Cells as a Biomarker of Response to Treatment in Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Torphy, Robert J.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Kamande, Joyce W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Herrera Loeza, Silvia G.; Soper, Steven A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from solid tumors into circulation and have been shown to be prognostic in the setting of metastatic disease. These cells are obtained through a routine blood draw and may serve as an easily accessible marker for monitoring treatment effectiveness. Because of the rapid progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), early insight into treatment effectiveness may allow for necessary and timely changes in treatment regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate CTC burden as a biomarker of response to treatment with a oral phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor, BKM120, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models of PDAC. PDX mice were randomized to receive vehicle or BKM120 treatment for 28 days and CTCs were enumerated from whole blood before and after treatment using a microfluidic chip that selected for EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) positive cells. This microfluidic device allowed for the release of captured CTCs and enumeration of these cells via their electrical impedance signatures. Median CTC counts significantly decreased in the BKM120 group from pre- to post-treatment (26.61 to 2.21 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.0207) while no significant change was observed in the vehicle group (23.26 to 11.89 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.8081). This reduction in CTC burden in the treatment group correlated with tumor growth inhibition indicating CTC burden is a promising biomarker of response to treatment in preclinical models. Mutant enriched sequencing of isolated CTCs confirmed that they harbored KRAS G12V mutations, identical to the matched tumors. In the long-term, PDX mice are a useful preclinical model for furthering our understanding of CTCs. Clinically, mutational analysis of CTCs and serial monitoring of CTC burden may be used as a minimally invasive approach to predict and monitor treatment response to guide therapeutic regimens. PMID:24586805

  9. The HDACi Panobinostat Shows Growth Inhibition Both In Vitro and in a Bioluminescent Orthotopic Surgical Xenograft Model of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helland, Øystein; Popa, Mihaela; Bischof, Katharina; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; McCormack, Emmet; Bjørge, Line

    2016-01-01

    Background In most epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC), epigenetic changes are evident, and overexpression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) represents an important manifestation. In this study, we wanted to evaluate the effects of the novel HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) panobinostat, both alone and in combination with carboplatin, on ovarian cancer cell lines and in a murine bioluminescent orthotopic surgical xenograft model for EOC. Methods The effects of panobinostat, both alone and in combination with carboplatin, on proliferation and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, were evaluated using colony and WST-1 assays, Hoechst staining and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, mechanisms were characterised by western blotting and phosphoflow analysis. Immuno-deficient mice were engrafted orthotopically with SKOV-3luc+ cells and serial bioluminescence imaging monitored the effects of treatment with panobinostat and/or carboplatin and/or surgery. Survival parameters were also measured. Results Panobinostat treatment reduced cell growth and diminished cell viability, as shown by the induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro. We observed increased levels of cleaved PARP and caspase-3, downregulation of cdc2 protein kinase, acetylation of H2B and higher pH2AX expression. The combined administration of carboplatin and panobinostat synergistically increased the anti-tumour effects compared to panobinostat or carboplatin treatment alone. In our novel ovarian cancer model, the mice showed significantly higher rates of survival when treated with panobinostat, carboplatin or a combination of both, compared to the controls. Panobinostat was as efficient as carboplatin regarding prolongation of survival. No significant additional effect on survival was observed when surgery was combined with carboplatin/panobinostat treatment. Conclusions Panobinostat demonstrates effective in vitro growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells. The efficacy of panobinostat and carboplatin was

  10. Orthotopic glioblastoma stem-like cell xenograft model in mice to evaluate intra-arterial delivery of bevacizumab: from bedside to bench.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Santillan, Alejandro; Shin, Benjamin J; Foley, Conor P; Ballon, Douglas J; Pierre Gobin, Y; Boockvar, John A

    2012-11-01

    Bevacizumab (BV), a humanized monocolonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is a standard intravenous (IV) treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), that has been introduced recently as an intra-arterial (IA) treatment modality in humans. Since preclinical models have not been reported, we sought to develop a tumor stem cell (TSC) xenograft model to investigate IA BV delivery in vivo. Firefly luciferase transduced patient TSC were injected into the cortex of 35 nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored weekly using bioluminescence imaging. Mice were treated with either intraperitoneal (IP) or IA BV, with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), or with IP saline injection (controls). Tumor tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and western blot techniques. Tumor formation occurred in 31 of 35 (89%) mice with a significant signal increase over time (p=0.018). Post mortem histology revealed an infiltrative growth of TSC xenografts in a similar pattern compared to the primary human GBM. Tumor tissue analyzed at 24 hours after treatment revealed that IA BV treatment with BBBD led to a significantly higher intratumoral BV concentration compared to IA BV alone, IP BV or controls (p<0.05). Thus, we have developed a TSC-based xenograft mouse model that allows us to study IA chemotherapy. However, further studies are needed to analyze the treatment effects after IA BV to assess tumor progression and overall animal survival. PMID:22985932

  11. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX.

    PubMed

    Rea, Domenica; Del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery. PMID:27294148

  12. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX

    PubMed Central

    del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery. PMID:27294148

  13. Targeted Hsp70 expression combined with CIK-activated immune reconstruction synergistically exerts antitumor efficacy in patient-derived hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao; Fang, Lin; Peng, Zhangxiao; Ji, Weidan; Xu, Yang; Shen, Shuwen; Yan, Yan; Huang, Xuandong; Zheng, Junnian; Su, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    The patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models can reproduce a similar natural genetic background and similar biological behaviors to tumor cells in patients, which is conducive to the assessment of personalized cancer treatment. In this study, to verify the targeting and effectiveness of the therapeutic strategy using a Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus expressing Hsp70, the PDTX models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were established in nude mice and the cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells were intravenously infused into mice to partially reconstruct the mouse immune function. The results demonstrated that, either the immune anti-tumor effect caused by CIK cell infusion or the oncolytic effect generated by oncolytic adenovirus replication was very limited. However, the synergistic tumor inhibitory effect was significantly enhanced after treatments with oncolytic adenovirus expressing Hsp70 combined with CIK cells. Oncolytic adenovirus mediated the specific expression of Hsp70 in cancer tissues allowed the CIK chemotaxis, and induce the infiltration of CD3+ T cells in tumor stroma, thereby exhibiting anti-tumor activity. The anti-tumor effect was more effective for the highly malignant tumor xenografts with highly Survivin expression. This strategy can synergistically activate multiple anti-tumor mechanisms and exert effective anti-tumor activities that have a significant inhibitory effect against the growth of HCC xenografts. PMID:25473902

  14. The In ovo CAM-assay as a Xenograft Model for Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sys, Gwen M.L.; Lapeire, Lore; Stevens, Nikita; Favoreel, Herman; Forsyth, Ramses; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoma is a very rare disease that is heterogeneous in nature, all hampering the development of new therapies. Sarcoma patients are ideal candidates for personalized medicine after stratification, explaining the current interest in developing a reproducible and low-cost xenotransplant model for this disease. The chick chorioallantoic membrane is a natural immunodeficient host capable of sustaining grafted tissues and cells without species-specific restrictions. In addition, it is easily accessed, manipulated and imaged using optical and fluorescence stereomicroscopy. Histology further allows detailed analysis of heterotypic cellular interactions. This protocol describes in detail the in ovo grafting of the chorioallantoic membrane with fresh sarcoma-derived tumor tissues, their single cell suspensions, and permanent and transient fluorescently labeled established sarcoma cell lines (Saos-2 and SW1353). The chick survival rates are up to 75%. The model is used to study graft- (viability, Ki67 proliferation index, necrosis, infiltration) and host (fibroblast infiltration, vascular ingrowth) behavior. For localized grafting of single cell suspensions, ECM gel provides significant advantages over inert containment materials. The Ki67 proliferation index is related to the distance of the cells from the surface of the CAM and the duration of application on the CAM, the latter determining a time frame for the addition of therapeutic products. PMID:23892612

  15. The in ovo CAM-assay as a xenograft model for sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sys, Gwen M L; Lapeire, Lore; Stevens, Nikita; Favoreel, Herman; Forsyth, Ramses; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoma is a very rare disease that is heterogeneous in nature, all hampering the development of new therapies. Sarcoma patients are ideal candidates for personalized medicine after stratification, explaining the current interest in developing a reproducible and low-cost xenotransplant model for this disease. The chick chorioallantoic membrane is a natural immunodeficient host capable of sustaining grafted tissues and cells without species-specific restrictions. In addition, it is easily accessed, manipulated and imaged using optical and fluorescence stereomicroscopy. Histology further allows detailed analysis of heterotypic cellular interactions. This protocol describes in detail the in ovo grafting of the chorioallantoic membrane with fresh sarcoma-derived tumor tissues, their single cell suspensions, and permanent and transient fluorescently labeled established sarcoma cell lines (Saos-2 and SW1353). The chick survival rates are up to 75%. The model is used to study graft- (viability, Ki67 proliferation index, necrosis, infiltration) and host (fibroblast infiltration, vascular ingrowth) behavior. For localized grafting of single cell suspensions, ECM gel provides significant advantages over inert containment materials. The Ki67 proliferation index is related to the distance of the cells from the surface of the CAM and the duration of application on the CAM, the latter determining a time frame for the addition of therapeutic products. PMID:23892612

  16. In-vivo xenograft murine human uveal melanoma model develops hepatic micrometastases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Fang, Guofu; Huang, Xinping; Yu, Jie; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a mouse ocular melanoma model with human uveal melanoma cells that forms hepatic micrometastases. Human uveal melanoma Mel290 cells were transfected with a lentiviral-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vector. Proliferation assays were performed by comparing Mel290-EGFP and Mel290 cells. After stable expression of EGFP and proliferation was ascertained, 1 × 106 Mel290-EGFP cells were introduced into NU/NU mice by posterior compartment (PC) inoculation or tail vein injection. Control groups were inoculated or injected with Mel290 cells. Ocular and hepatic frozen sections were examined by fluorescence microscopy, and the number of hepatic micrometastases was determined. EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection. At 72 h after transfection, more than 70% of Mel290 cells expressed EGFP. At 45 days (six passages), 90% of Mel290 cells stably expressed EGFP. Histologic examination showed that Mel290-EGFP cells formed hepatic micrometastases after either PC inoculation or tail vein injection. A significant difference in the number of hepatic micrometastases between PC inoculation and tail vein injection (P<0.01) was observed. Mel290-EGFP cells stably expressed green fluorescent protein in vitro at 45 days (six passages). These cells formed hepatic micrometastases in NU/NU mice after PC inoculation or tail vein injection, with significantly more micrometastases developing in the PC inoculation model than after tail vein injection. PMID:18337645

  17. pH-Responsive Artemisinin Dimer in Lipid Nanoparticles Are Effective Against Human Breast Cancer in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YITONG J.; ZHAN, XI; WANG, LIGUO; HO, RODNEY J.Y.; SASAKI, TOMIKAZU

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin (ART), a well-known antimalaria drug, also exhibits anticancer activities. We previously reported a group of novel dimeric artemisinin piperazine conjugates (ADPs) possessing pH-dependent aqueous solubility and a proof-of-concept lipid nanoparticle formulation based on natural egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC). EPC may induce allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to egg products. Therefore, the goal of this report is to develop ADP-synthetic lipid particles suitable for in vivo evaluation. We found that ADP binds to 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) with greater than 90% efficiency and forms drug–lipid particles (d ~ 80 nm). Cryo-electron microscopy of the ADP drug–lipid particles revealed unilamellar vesicle-like structures. Detailed characterization studies show insertion of the ADP lead compound, ADP109, into the DPPC membrane and the presence of an aqueous core. Over 50% of the ADP109 was released in 48 hours at pH4 compared with less than 20% at neutral. ADP109–lipid particles exhibited high potency against human breast cancer, but was tolerated well by nontumorigenic cells. In MDA-MB-231 mouse xenograft model, lipid-bound ADP109 particles were more effective than paclitaxel in controlling tumor growth. Cellular uptake studies showed endocytosis of the nanoparticles and release of core-trapped marker throughout the cytosol at 37°C. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the in vivo feasibility of lipid-bound ART dimer for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25753991

  18. Naltrindole inhibits human multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in a murine xenograft model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra; Howells, Richard D

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [(3)H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC(50) of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  19. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  20. Metformin displays anti-myeloma activity and synergistic effect with dexamethasone in in vitro and in vivo xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Zi, Fu-Ming; He, Jing-Song; Li, Yi; Wu, Cai; Yang, Li; Yang, Yang; Wang, Li-Juan; He, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Gao-Feng; Han, Xiao-Yan; Huang, He; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2015-01-28

    Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses have suggested that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a higher incidence of malignancies, including myeloma. Metformin is a widely prescribed antidiabetic drug. Recently, researchers have shown that metformin has direct anticancer activity against many tumor cell lines, mainly through activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or reducing the blood insulin level. In the present study, we investigated whether metformin exerts an anti-myeloma effect in in vitro and in vivo xenograft models and explored the underlying mechanism. We found that metformin can inhibit proliferation of MM cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. Western blot showed that metformin activated caspase 3, caspase 9, PARP-1, Bak, and p21 and inactivated Mcl-1, HIAP-1, cyclin D1, CDK4, and CDK6. Metformin inhibited the expression of insulin growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) and the downstream mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). IGF-I blocked metformin-induced MM cell apoptosis and reactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Metformin also demonstrated synergistic activity with dexamethasone but not bortezomib to eradicate MM cells in vitro and in vivo, especially in MM.1S cells. We conclude that metformin inhibits MM cell proliferation through the IGF-1R/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Metformin and dexamethasone combination therapy may be an option for MM treatment. PMID:25305450

  1. Naltrindole Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation In Vitro and in a Murine Xenograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [3H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  2. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  3. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer. PMID:24594241

  4. Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography of Response to Anti-cancer Therapy in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Chamming's, Foucauld; Le-Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Fitoussi, Victor; Redheuil, Alban; Assayag, Franck; Pidial, Laetitia; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Cuénod, Charles-André; Fournier, Laure S

    2016-04-01

    Our objective was to determine if supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) can detect changes in stiffness of a breast cancer model under therapy. A human invasive carcinoma was implanted in 22 mice. Eleven were treated with an anti-angiogenic therapy and 11 with glucose for 24 d. Tumor volume and stiffness were assessed during 2 wk before treatment and 0, 7, 12, 20 and 24 d after the start of therapy using SSWE. Pathology was assessed after 12 and 24 d of treatment. We found that response to therapy was associated with early softening of treated tumors only, resulting in a significant difference from non-treated tumors after 12 d of treatment (p = 0.03). On pathology, large areas of necrosis were observed at 12 d in treated tumors. Although treatment was still effective, treated tumors subsequently stiffened during a second phase of the treatment (days 12-24), with a small amount of necrosis observed on pathology on day 24. In conclusion, SSWE was able to measure changes in the stiffness of tumors in response to anti-cancer treatment. However, stiffness changes associated with good response to treatment may change over time, and increased stiffness may also reflect therapy efficacy. PMID:26746382

  5. Uptake of verteporfin by orthotopic xenograft pancreas models with different levels of aggression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Julia; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Hoopes, P. Jack; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis, usually treated with chemoradiation therapy. Interstitial photodynamic therapy is a potentially effective adjuvant treatment that is under development. In the current study, two orthotopic pancreatic cancer models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1), have been characterized with respect to growth rates, morphology and liposomal drug (Verteporfin) uptake and distribution in SCID mice. Fluorescence of Verteporfin was measured in liver and tumor in vivo using a PDT fluorescence dosimeter with measurements taken before and up to one hour after tail vein injection. Fluorescence reached a plateau by about 15 minutes and did not decrease over the first hour. At time points from 15 minutes to 24 hrs, the internal organs (kidney, spleen, pancreas, tumor, muscle, lung, liver, and skin were excised and scanned on a Typhoon imager. The ratio of fluorescence in tumor versus normal tissues was analyzed with image processing, calculated at each time point and compared to in vivo results. Tissue distribution of Verteporfin in relation to functional vasculature marked by DiOc7 was carried out on frozen sections. Final analysis will result in determination of the ideal time point to administer light to achieve maximum tumor destruction while preserving normal tissue.

  6. Combined magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and histology imaging strategy in a human breast tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Amstalden van Hove, Erika R.; Chughtai, Kamila; Raman, Venu; Winnard, Paul T.; Heeren, Ron; Artemov, Dmitri; Glunde, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Applications of molecular imaging in cancer and other diseases frequently require combining in vivo imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance and optical imaging, with ex vivo optical, fluorescence, histology, and immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging, to investigate and relate molecular and biological processes to imaging parameters within the same region of interest. We have developed a multimodal image reconstruction and fusion framework that accurately combines in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), ex vivo brightfield and fluorescence microscopic imaging, and ex vivo histology imaging. Ex vivo brightfield microscopic imaging was used as an intermediate modality to facilitate the ultimate link between ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI/MRSI. Tissue sectioning necessary for optical and histology imaging required generation of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction module for 2D ex vivo optical and histology imaging data. We developed an external fiducial marker based 3D reconstruction method, which was able to fuse optical brightfield and fluorescence with histology imaging data. Registration of 3D tumor shape was pursued to combine in vivo MRI/MRSI and ex vivo optical brightfield and fluorescence imaging data. This registration strategy was applied to in vivo MRI/MRSI, ex vivo optical brightfield/fluorescence, as well as histology imaging data sets obtained from human breast tumor models. 3D human breast tumor data sets were successfully reconstructed and fused with this platform. PMID:22945331

  7. Evaluation of the NOD/SCID xenograft model for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids such as prednisolone and dexamethasone are critical drugs used in multi-agent chemotherapy protocols used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and response to glucocorticoids is highly predictive of outcome. The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model of ALL is a clinically relevant model in which the mice develop a systemic leukemia which retains the fundamental biological characteristics of the original disease. Here we report a study evaluating the NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model to investigate glucocorticoid-induced gene expression. Cells from a glucocorticoid-sensitive xenograft derived from a child with B-cell precursor ALL were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice. When highly engrafted the mice were randomized into groups of 4 to receive dexamethasone 15 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection or vehicle control. Leukemia cells were harvested from mice spleens at 0, 8, 24 or 48 hours thereafter, and gene expression analyzed on Illumina WG-6_V3 chips, comparing all groups to time 0 hours. Results The 8 hour dexamethasone-treated timepoint had the highest number of significantly differentially expressed genes, with fewer observed at the 24 and 48 hour timepoints, and with minimal changes seen across the time-matched controls. When compared to publicly available datasets of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression from an in vitro cell line study and from an in vivo study of patients with ALL, at the level of pathways, expression changes in the 8 hour xenograft samples showed a similar response to patients treated with glucocorticoids. Replicate analysis revealed that at the 8 hour timepoint, a dataset with high signal and differential expression, using data from 3 replicates instead of 4 resulted in excellent recovery scores of > 0.9. However at other timepoints with less signal very poor recovery scores were obtained with 3 replicates. Conclusions The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model provides a reproducible experimental system in which to

  8. A novel xenograft model to study the role of TSLP-induced CRLF2 signals in normal and malignant human B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Francis, Olivia L; Milford, Terry-Ann M; Martinez, Shannalee R; Baez, Ineavely; Coats, Jacqueline S; Mayagoitia, Karina; Concepcion, Katherine R; Ginelli, Elizabeth; Beldiman, Cornelia; Benitez, Abigail; Weldon, Abby J; Arogyaswamy, Keshav; Shiraz, Parveen; Fisher, Ross; Morris, Christopher L; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Filippov, Valeri; Van Handel, Ben; Ge, Zheng; Song, Chunhua; Dovat, Sinisa; Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Payne, Kimberly J

    2016-04-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) stimulates in-vitro proliferation of human fetal B-cell precursors. However, its in-vivo role during normal human B lymphopoiesis is unknown. Genetic alterations that cause overexpression of its receptor component, cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2), lead to high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia implicating this signaling pathway in leukemogenesis. We show that mouse thymic stromal lymphopoietin does not stimulate the downstream pathways (JAK/STAT5 and PI3K/AKT/mTOR) activated by the human cytokine in primary high-risk leukemia with overexpression of the receptor component. Thus, the utility of classic patient-derived xenografts for in-vivo studies of this pathway is limited. We engineered xenograft mice to produce human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (+T mice) by injection with stromal cells transduced to express the cytokine. Control (-T) mice were produced using stroma transduced with control vector. Normal levels of human thymic stromal lymphopoietin were achieved in sera of +T mice, but were undetectable in -T mice. Patient-derived xenografts generated from +T as compared to -T mice showed a 3-6-fold increase in normal human B-cell precursors that was maintained through later stages of B-cell development. Gene expression profiles in high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia expanded in +T mice indicate increased mTOR pathway activation and are more similar to the original patient sample than those from -T mice. +T/-T xenografts provide a novel pre-clinical model for understanding this pathway in B lymphopoiesis and identifying treatments for high-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with overexpression of cytokine-like factor receptor 2. PMID:26611474

  9. Reversal of multidrug resistance by cisplatin-loaded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles in A549/DDP lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Chen, Baoan; Xu, Lin; Feng, Jifeng; Xia, Guohua; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Jun; Gao, Feng; Wang, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-MNP) loaded with cisplatin (Fe3O4-MNP-DDP) can reverse DDP resistance in lung cancer cells and to investigate mechanisms of multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay showed that DDP inhibited both A549 cells and DDP-resistant A549 cells in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition was enhanced by Fe3O4-MNP. An increased rate of apoptosis was detected in the Fe3O4-MNP-DDP group compared with a control group and the Fe3O4-MNP group by flow cytometry, and typical morphologic features of apoptosis were confirmed by confocal microscopy. Accumulation of intracellular DDP in the Fe3O4-MNP-DDP group was greater than that in the DDP group by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Further, lower levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein-1, lung resistance-related protein, Akt, and Bad, and higher levels of caspase-3 genes and proteins, were demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in the presence of Fe3O4-MNP-DDP. We also demonstrated that Fe3O4-MNP enhanced the effect of DDP on tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice bearing DDP-resistant human A549 xenografts by decreasing localization of lung resistance-related protein and Ki-67 immunoreactivity in cells. There were no apparent signs of toxicity in the animals. Overall, these findings suggest potential clinical application of Fe3O4-MNP-DDP to increase cytotoxicity in lung tumor xenografts. PMID:23690684

  10. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylani, Samer Z.; Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pressey, Joseph G.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  11. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    % cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.

  12. Targeted tumor theranostics using folate-conjugated and camptothecin-loaded acoustic nanodroplets in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Lin, Jian-Liang; Wang, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Ran-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to validate the feasibility of receptor-targeted tumor theranostics with folate-conjugated (FA) and camptothecin-loaded (CPT) acoustic nanodroplets (NDs) (collectively termed FA-CPT-NDs). The ND formulation was based on lipid-stabilized low-boiling perfluorocarbon that can undergo acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under ultrasound (US) exposure. Conjugation of folate enhanced the selective delivery to tumors expressing high levels of folate receptor (FR) under mediation by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed using FR-positive KB and FR-negative HT-1080 cell lines and mouse xenograft tumor models. Simultaneous therapy and imaging were conducted with a clinical US imaging system at mechanical indices of up to 1.4 at a center frequency of 10 MHz. The results demonstrated that FA-CPT-NDs selectively attached to KB cells, but not HT-1080 cells. The targeted ADV caused instant and delayed damage via mechanical disruption and chemical toxicity to decrease the viability of KB cells by up to 45%, a much higher decrease than that achieved by the NDs without folate conjugation. The in vivo experiments showed that FR-mediated targeting successfully enhanced the EPR of FA-CPT-NDs in KB tumors mainly on the tumor periphery as indicated by immunofluorescence microscopy and US B-mode imaging. Treatments with FA-CPT-NDs at a CPT dose of 50 μg/kg inhibited the growth of KB tumors for up to six weeks, whereas treatment with NDs lacking folate produced a 4.6-fold increase in tumor volume. For HT-1080 tumors, neither the treatments with FA-CPT-NDs nor those with the NDs lacking folate presented tumor growth inhibition. In summary, FR-targeted tumor theranostics has been successfully implemented with FA-CPT-NDs and a clinical US unit. The ligand-directed and EPR-mediated accumulation provides active and passive targeting capabilities, permitting the antitumor effects of FA-CPT-NDs to be exerted

  13. Efficacy of Tumor-Targeting Salmonella A1-R on a Melanoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mako; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Shurell, Elizabeth; Eilber, Fritz C.; Bouvet, Michael; Noda, Makoto; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-targeting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium A1-R (Salmonella A1-R) had strong efficacy on a melanoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model. GFP-expressing Salmonella A1-R highly and selectively colonized the PDOX melanoma and significantly suppressed tumor growth (p = 0.021). The combination of Salmonella A1-R and cisplatinum (CDDP), both at low-dose, also significantly suppressed the growth of the melanoma PDOX (P = 0.001). Salmonella A1-R has future clinical potential for combination chemotherapy with CDDP of melanoma, a highly-recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27500926

  14. Gene expression profiling upon (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment in the LS-174T i.p. xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon J; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that therapy with (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab resulted in (1) induction of apoptosis, (2) G2/M arrest, and (3) blockage of double-strand DNA damage repair in LS-174T i.p. (intraperitoneal) xenografts. To further understand the molecular basis of the cell killing efficacy of (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab, gene expression profiling was performed with LS-174T xenografts 24 h after exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. DNA damage response genes (84) were screened using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array (qRT-PCR array). Differentially regulated genes were identified following exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. These included genes involved in apoptosis (ABL, GADD45α, GADD45γ, PCBP4, and p73), cell cycle (ATM, DDIT3, GADD45α, GTSE1, MKK6, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding (DDB) and repair (ATM and BTG2). The stressful growth arrest conditions provoked by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab were found to induce genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The expression of genes involved in DDB and single-strand DNA breaks was also enhanced by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab while no modulation of genes involved in double-strand break repair was apparent. Furthermore, the p73/GADD45 signaling pathway mediated by p38 kinase signaling may be involved in the cellular response, as evidenced by the enhanced expression of genes and proteins of this pathway. These results further support the previously described cell killing mechanism by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in the same LS-174T i.p. xenograft. Insight into these mechanisms could lead to improved strategies for rational application of radioimmunotherapy using α-particle emitters. PMID:24403230

  15. Gene expression profiling upon 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment in the LS-174T i.p. xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon J; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that therapy with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab resulted in (1) induction of apoptosis, (2) G2/M arrest, and (3) blockage of double-strand DNA damage repair in LS-174T i.p. (intraperitoneal) xenografts. To further understand the molecular basis of the cell killing efficacy of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab, gene expression profiling was performed with LS-174T xenografts 24 h after exposure to 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. DNA damage response genes (84) were screened using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array (qRT-PCR array). Differentially regulated genes were identified following exposure to 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. These included genes involved in apoptosis (ABL, GADD45α, GADD45γ, PCBP4, and p73), cell cycle (ATM, DDIT3, GADD45α, GTSE1, MKK6, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding (DDB) and repair (ATM and BTG2). The stressful growth arrest conditions provoked by 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab were found to induce genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The expression of genes involved in DDB and single-strand DNA breaks was also enhanced by 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab while no modulation of genes involved in double-strand break repair was apparent. Furthermore, the p73/GADD45 signaling pathway mediated by p38 kinase signaling may be involved in the cellular response, as evidenced by the enhanced expression of genes and proteins of this pathway. These results further support the previously described cell killing mechanism by 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in the same LS-174T i.p. xenograft. Insight into these mechanisms could lead to improved strategies for rational application of radioimmunotherapy using α-particle emitters. The apoptotic response and associated gene modulations have not been clearly defined following exposure of cells to α-particle radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Gene expression profiling was performed with LS-174T i.p. (intraperitoneal) xenografts after exposure to 212Pb

  16. [Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibits the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yehan; Ye, Xiufeng; Shi, Yao; Wang, Ke; Wan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Objective To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Methods Trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to determine the cytotoxic effect of varying doses of GSPs on the BEAS-2B normal human pulmonary epithelial cells. After treated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL GSP, the proliferation of A549 cells was detected by MTT assay; the invasion and migration of A549 cells were determined by Transwell(TM) assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. The levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), E-cadherin, N-cadherin in A549 cells treated with GSPs were detected by Western blotting. Results (0-40) μg/mL GSPs had no significant toxic effect on BEAS-2B cells, while 80 μg/mL GSPs had significant cytotoxicity to BEAS-2B cells. The proliferation of A549 cells was significantly inhibited within limited dosage in a dose-dependent manner, and the abilities of invasion and migration of A549 cells were also inhibited. Western blotting showed that the expression of EGFR and N-cadherin decreased, while E-cadherin increased after GSPs treatment. Conclusion GSPs could inhibit the abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of A549 cells, which might be related to the dow-regulation of EGFR and N-cadherin and the up-regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:26927375

  17. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  18. Novel Effects of Simvastatin on Uterine Fibroids: In vitro and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Model Study

    PubMed Central

    BORAHAY, Mostafa A.; VINCENT, Kathleen; MOTAMEDI, Massoud; SBRANA, Elena; KILIC, Gokhan S.; AL-HENDY, Ayman; BOEHNING, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Objective Uterine leiomyomas represent a common gynecologic problem with no satisfactory long-term medical treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of simvastatin on uterine leiomyoma, both in vitro and in vivo. Study Design This is a laboratory-based experimental study. For in vitro studies, we used human and rat leiomyoma cells. For in vivo studies, we used immunodeficient mice supplemented with estrogen/progesterone pellets xenografted with human leiomyoma tissue explant. Results For in vitro studies, cells were treated with different concentrations of simvastatin for 48 hours. Simvastatin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in leiomyoma cells as measured by a fluorometric caspase-3 activity assay, and inhibited proliferation as demonstrated by an MTT assay (both were significant at 5 and 10 μM). In addition, simvastatin decreased Akt signaling pathway phosphorylation as examined using Western blot analysis. For in vivo studies, animals were treated for 28 days with simvastatin (20 μg/ gm body weight/ day) vs vehicle control. The treatment inhibited tumor growth as measured weekly using calipers and/ or ultrasound (P<.01). Finally, simvastatin decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 in xenograft tumor tissue as examined by immunohistochemistry (P=.02). Conclusion Simvastatin can be a promising treatment for uterine leiomyoma. Further studies, including pharmacokinetic and drug delivery studies, are required. PMID:25840272

  19. XH1--a new cervical carcinoma cell line and xenograft model of tumour invasion, 'metastasis' and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Han, X.; Lyle, R.; Eustace, D. L.; Jewers, R. J.; Parrington, J. M.; Das, A.; Chana, T.; Dagg, B.; Money, S.; Bates, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new cell line, XH1, has been derived from an invasive focally keratinising adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix in a 32 year old patient. It has been maintained in long term monolayer culture for 26 months, and passaged over 100 times (much greater than 300 population doublings). It is aneuploid with a mean chromosome number of 78. Examination using two minisatellite hypervariable DNA probes has shown it to be different from other cell lines maintained in this laboratory and from HeLa. Two sublines, XH1a and XH1b, show marked differences in monolayer culture, growth in soft agar, and xenograft formation. XH1 and XH1a cells readily form subcutaneous xenografts, and lung colonies can be established by their intravenous injection. Subcutaneous injection of XH1b cells results in rapid cell growth for a few days after which the tumour undergoes degeneration and then regresses completely. The XH1 karyotype has many rearranged chromosomes. Parental XH1 cells and both sublines show integration of HPV16 into the genome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:1911212

  20. 5α-reductase Inhibition Coupled with Short Off Cycles Increases Survival in the LNCaP Xenograft Prostate Tumor Model on Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Shevrin, Daniel; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Parikh, Rahul A.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) for patients with PSA progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer is an alternative to the standard continuous ADT. IADT allows for the recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor in order to lessen the side effects of continuous ADT and potentially prolong survival. Previously, IADT coupled with finasteride was shown to prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was not prolonged and fixed at 10–14 days. Regressed prostate tumor xenografts with testosterone replacement were initially responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition, but resumed growth after several days in the animal models. 5α-reductase inhibition in shorter off-cycles of testosterone recovery could maximize tumor growth inhibition during IADT and perhaps increase survival. Materials and Methods The LNCaP xenograft tumor model was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of short off-cycles of 4 days coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition on IADT on survival and tumor regrowth. Results Dutasteride inhibited initial testosterone-induced tumor regrowth during both the first and second off-cycle and significantly increased survival. Conclusions These results further support the potential for IADT combined with 5α-reductase inhibition to improve survival in prostate cancer patients when off cycle durations are short or very short. PMID:25444984

  1. Piperlongumine Suppresses Growth and Sensitizes Pancreatic Tumors to Gemcitabine in a Xenograft Mouse Model by Modulating the NF-kappa B Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongwei; Wu, Xiangsong; Zhou, Yinan; Jiang, Hongchi; Pan, Shangha; Sun, Bei

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, which generally respond poorly to chemotherapy. Hence, novel agents that are safe and effective are highly needed. The aim of this study was to investigate whether piperlongumine, a natural product isolated from the fruit of the pepper Piper longum, has any efficacy against human pancreatic cancer when used either alone or in combination with gemcitabine in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In vitro, piperlongumine inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines, potentiated the apoptotic effects of gemcitabine, inhibited the constitutive and inducible activation of NF-κB, and suppressed the NF-κB-regulated expression of c-Myc, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin, XIAP, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Furthermore, in an in vivo xenograft model, we found piperlongumine alone significantly suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the antitumor properties of gemcitabine. These results were consistent with the downregulation of NF-κB activity and its target genes, decreased proliferation (PCNA and Ki-67), decreased microvessel density (CD31), and increased apoptosis (TUNEL) in tumor remnants. Collectively, our results suggest that piperlongumine alone exhibits significant antitumor effects against human pancreatic cancer and it further enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine, possibly through the modulation of NF-κB- and NF-κB-regulated gene products. PMID:26667450

  2. A Novel Eg5 Inhibitor (LY2523355) Causes Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Shows Potent Antitumor Activity in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang S; Fan, Li; Van Horn, Robert D; Nakai, Ryuichiro; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Akinaga, Shiro; Murakata, Chikara; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yin, Tinggui; Credille, Kelly M; Donoho, Gregory P; Merzoug, Farhana F; Li, Heng; Aggarwal, Amit; Blanchard, Kerry; Westin, Eric H

    2015-11-01

    Intervention of cancer cell mitosis by antitubulin drugs is among the most effective cancer chemotherapies. However, antitubulin drugs have dose-limiting side effects due to important functions of microtubules in resting normal cells and are often rendered ineffective by rapid emergence of resistance. Antimitotic agents with different mechanisms of action and improved safety profiles are needed as new treatment options. Mitosis-specific kinesin Eg5 represents an attractive anticancer target for discovering such new antimitotic agents, because Eg5 is essential only in mitotic progression and has no roles in resting, nondividing cells. Here, we show that a novel selective Eg5 inhibitor, LY2523355, has broad target-mediated anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. LY2523355 arrests cancer cells at mitosis and causes rapid cell death that requires sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation with a required threshold concentration. In vivo efficacy of LY2523355 is highly dose/schedule-dependent, achieving complete remission in a number of xenograft tumor models, including patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models. We further establish that histone-H3 phosphorylation of tumor and proliferating skin cells is a promising pharmacodynamic biomarker for in vivo anticancer activity of LY2523355. PMID:26304237

  3. Efficacy of JAK/STAT pathway inhibition in murine xenograft models of early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Dolai, Sibasish; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Vincent, Tiffaney; Robbins, Alissa; Selvanathan, Arthavan; Ryan, Theresa; Hall, Junior; Wood, Andrew C.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Wood, Brent L.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently described subtype of T-ALL characterized by a unique immunophenotype and genomic profile, as well as a high rate of induction failure. Frequent mutations in cytokine receptor and Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathways led us to hypothesize that ETP-ALL is dependent on JAK/STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in ETP-ALL blasts relative to non-ETP T-ALL. Moreover, ETP-ALL showed hyperactivation of STAT5 in response to interleukin-7, an effect that was abrogated by the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. In vivo, ruxolitinib displayed activity in 6 of 6 patient-derived murine xenograft models of ETP-ALL, with profound single-agent efficacy in 5 models. Ruxolitinib treatment decreased peripheral blast counts relative to pretreatment levels and compared with control (P < .01) in 5 of 6 ETP-ALL xenografts, with marked reduction in mean splenic blast counts (P < .01) in 6 of 6 samples. Surprisingly, both JAK/STAT pathway activation and ruxolitinib efficacy were independent of the presence of JAK/STAT pathway mutations, raising the possibility that the therapeutic potential of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL extends beyond those cases with JAK mutations. These findings establish the preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL, a biologically distinct subtype for which novel therapies are needed. PMID:25645356

  4. A HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope induces anti-tumor effects against human lung cancer in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Lin, Su-I; Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Chiang, I-Ping; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is attractive for antigen-specific T cell-mediated anti-tumor therapy, especially in induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this report, we evaluated human CTL epitope-induced anti-tumor effects in human lung cancer xenograft models. The tumor associated antigen L6 (TAL6) is highly expressed in human lung cancer cell lines and tumor specimens as compared to normal lung tissues. TAL6 derived peptides strongly inhibited tumor growth, cancer metastasis and prolonged survival time in HLA-A2 transgenic mice immunized with a formulation of T-helper (Th) peptide, synthetic CpG ODN, and adjuvant Montanide ISA-51 (ISA-51). Adoptive transfer of peptide-induced CTL cells from HLA-A2 transgenic mice into human tumor xenograft SCID mice significantly inhibited tumor growth. Furthermore, combination of CTL-peptide immunotherapy and gemcitabine additively improved the therapeutic effects. This pre-clinical evaluation model provides a useful platform to develop efficient immunotherapeutic drugs to treat lung cancer and demonstrates a promising strategy with benefit of antitumor immune responses worthy of further development in clinical trials. PMID:26621839

  5. 2′-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel conjugate nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lei; Schorzman, Allison N; Ma, Ping; Madden, Andrew J; Zamboni, William C; Benhabbour, Soumya Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle (NP) formulation with 2′-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel (Br-16-PX) conjugate was developed in these studies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lipophilic paclitaxel conjugate Br-C16-PX was synthesized and incorporated into lipid NPs where the 16-carbon chain enhanced drug entrapment in the drug delivery system and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics. The electron-withdrawing bromine group was used to facilitate the conversion of Br-C16-PX to paclitaxel at the tumor site. The developed system was evaluated in luciferase-expressing A549 cells in vitro and in an orthotopic NSCLC mouse model. The results demonstrated that the Br-C16-PX NPs had a higher maximum tolerated dose (75 mg/kg) than Taxol® (19 mg/kg) and provided significantly longer median survival (88 days versus 70 days, P<0.05) in the orthotopic NSCLC model. An improved pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the Br-C16-PX NPs at 75 mg/kg compared to Taxol at 19 mg/kg. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)0–96 h of Br-C16-PX from the NPs was 91.7-fold and 49.6-fold greater than Taxol in plasma and tumor-bearing lungs, respectively, which provided sustained drug exposure and higher antitumor efficacy in the NP-treated group. PMID:25114529

  6. As2 O3 combined with leflunomide prolongs heart xenograft survival via suppressing the response of Th1, Th2, and B cells in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhi-Xing; Leng, Yun; Xia, Jun-Jie; Wu, Hai-Qiao; Jin, Ning; Fu, Jia-Zhao; Cheng, Lian-Na; Wang, Jin-Hua; Ni, Shao-Bin; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2016-05-01

    Xenotransplantation remits the severe shortage of human organs and tissues for transplantation, which is a problem that severely limits the application of transplantation to the treatment of human disease. However, severe immune rejection significantly limits the efficacy of xenotransplantation. In this study, we systematically investigated the immunosuppressive effect and mechanism of action of As2 O3 and leflunomide using a hamster-to-rat heart xenotransplantation model. We initially examined heart xenograft survival following As2 O3 and leflunomide treatment alone or combined treatment. We found that treatment with As2 O3 combined with leflunomide can significantly prolong the survival of heart xenograft by inhibiting Th1 and Th2 differentiation and reducing the production of IgG and IgM. Interestingly, As2 O3 and leflunomide showed low toxicity to the organs of the recipient. Taken together, these observations indicate that treatment with As2 O3 combined with leflunomide may be a promising immunosuppressive schedule for xenotransplantation. PMID:27188662

  7. Interferon alpha2b gene delivery using adenoviral vector causes inhibition of tumor growth in xenograft models from a variety of cancers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal Ahmed, C M; Johnson, D E; Demers, G W; Engler, H; Howe, J A; Wills, K N; Wen, S F; Shinoda, J; Beltran, J; Nodelman, M; Machemer, T; Maneval, D C; Nagabhushan, T L; Sugarman, B J

    2001-10-01

    A recombinant adenovirus expressing human interferon alpha2b driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter, IACB, was shown to produce and secrete biologically active protein in vitro and in vivo. Intravenous administration of IACB in Buffalo rats resulted in circulating levels of biologically active human interferon at 70,000 international units/mL for up to 15 days. Distribution of interferon protein after IACB administration was different from that seen with the subcutaneous delivery of interferon protein. Higher levels of interferon protein were observed in liver and spleen after IACB delivery compared to protein delivery. The antitumor efficacy of IACB, as measured by suppression of tumor growth, was tested in athymic nude mice bearing established human tumor xenografts from different types of human cancer. Subcutaneous tumors most responsive to the intratumoral administration of IACB ranked as U87MG (glioblastoma) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia), followed by Hep 3B (hepatocellular carcinoma) and LN229 cells (glioblastoma). Intravenous administration of IACB in animals bearing U87MG or Hep 3B xenografts was also effective in suppressing tumor growth, although to a lesser extent than the intratumoral administration. IACB was also tested in a metastatic model in beige/SCID mice generated with H69 (small cell lung carcinoma) cells and was found to prolong survival in tumor-bearing animals. This suggested that interferon gene delivery can be effective in suppressing tumor growth in a wide variety of cells. PMID:11687902

  8. Pre-transplant antibody screening and anti-CD154 costimulation blockade promote long-term xenograft survival in a pig-to-primate kidney transplant model

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Laura; Mathews, Dave; Breeden, Cynthia A.; Song, Mingqing; Farris, Alton Brad; Larsen, Christian P.; Ford, Mandy L.; Lutz, Andrew J.; Tector, Matthew; Newell, Kenneth A.; Tector, A. Joseph; Adams, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has the potential to alleviate the organ shortage that prevents many patients with end-stage renal disease from enjoying the benefits of kidney transplantation. Despite significant advances in other models, pig-to-primate kidney xenotransplantation has met limited success. Preformed anti-pig antibodies are an important component of the xenogeneic immune response. To address this, we screened a cohort of 34 rhesus macaques for anti-pig antibody levels. We then selected animals with both low and high titers of anti-pig antibodies to proceed with kidney transplant from galactose-α1,3-galactose knockout/CD55 transgenic pig donors. All animals received T-cell depletion followed by maintenance therapy with costimulation blockade (either anti-CD154 mAb or belatacept), mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid. The animal with the high titer of anti-pig antibody rejected the kidney xenograft within the first week. Low-titer animals treated with anti-CD154 antibody, but not belatacept exhibited prolonged kidney xenograft survival (>133 and >126 vs. 14 and 21 days, respectively). Long-term surviving animals treated with the anti-CD154-based regimen continue to have normal kidney function and preserved renal architecture without evidence of rejection on biopsies sampled at day 100. This description of the longest reported survival of pig-to-non-human primate kidney xenotransplantation, now >125 days, provides promise for further study and potential clinical translation. PMID:25847130

  9. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  10. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  11. Intratracheally Administered 5-Azacytidine Is Effective Against Orthotopic Human Lung Cancer Xenograft Models and Devoid of Important Systemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Sameer; Saxena, Ashish; Qiu, Xuan; Perez-Soler, Roman; Zou, Yiyu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypermethylation of key tumor suppressor genes plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study is to explore the therapeutic potential of regional administration (via the airways) of the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-Aza) for the treatment of early lung cancer. Patients and Methods We administered 5-Aza solution directly into the trachea in imprinting control region (ICR) mice (to study its toxicity) and in nude mice bearing orthotopic human lung cancer xenografts (to assess its antitumor activity). Results In vitro, 5-Aza inhibited the growth of human lung cancer cell lines H226, H358, and H460 in a dose-dependent manner. The concentrations to inhibit cell growth by 50% (IC50) were about 0.6-4.9 μg/mL. 5-Azacytidine reversed hypermethylation in the promoter of tumor suppressor gene RASSF1a in the H226 cells at a 6000-fold lower concentration than its IC50. In animal studies, intratracheal (I.T.) administration of 90 mg/kg 5-Aza (the maximum tolerated dose of 5-Aza intravenous injection [I.V.]) resulted in moderate pulmonary toxicity and 5-fold reduced myelosuppression compared with the same dose of I.V. 5-Aza. Using an optimized multiple dose schedule, I.T. 5-Aza was about 3-fold more effective than I.V. 5-Aza in prolonging the survival of mice bearing orthotopic H460 and H358 xenografts, and did not cause any detectable toxicity. Conclusion 5-Azacytidine can reverse the hypermethylation in the human lung cancer cell lines at a nontoxic dose. Regional administration to the airways enhances the therapeutic index of 5-Aza by 75-fold. The potential of regional administration of 5-Aza (including by aerosolization) for the treatment of advanced bronchial premalignancy deserves further investigation. PMID:21062731

  12. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p < 0.05). Cell count in G2/M stages was obviously increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05), with the highest count observed at 72 h, after which G2/M stage arrest was diminished. ICM can cause apparent A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h. PMID:25686868

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antitumor effect of TM208 and EGFR-TKI resistance in human breast cancer xenograft mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xi-wei; Ji, Shuang-min; Li, Run-tao; Wu, Ke-hua; Zhu, Xiao; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The novel anticancer compound TM208 is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Since the development of resistance to EGFR-TKIs is a major challenge in their clinical usage, we investigated the profiles of resistance following continuous treatment with TM208 in human breast cancer xenograft mice, and identified the relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition. Methods: Female BALB/c nude mice were implanted with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and the xenograft mice received TM208 (50 or 150 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 18 d. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of TM208 were evaluated. Results: The PK properties of TM208 were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption kinetics. Our study showed the inhibitory effects of TM208 on tumor pEGFR levels gradually reached a maximum effect, after which it became weaker over time, which was characterized by a combined tolerance/indirect response PD model with an estimated EC50 (55.9 μg/L), as well as three parameters ('a' of 27.2%, 'b' of 2730%, 'c' of 0.58 h−1) denoting the maximum, extent and rate of resistance, respectively. The relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition was characterized by a combined logistic tumor growth/transit compartment model with estimated parameters associated with tumor growth characteristics kng (0.282 day−1), drug potency kTM208 (0.0499 cm3/day) and the kinetics of tumor cell death k1 (0.141 day−1), which provided insight into drug mechanisms and behaviors. Conclusion: The proposed PK/PD model provides a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TM208 in the treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, simulation based on a tolerance model allows prediction of the occurrence of resistance. PMID:27133303

  14. Ocimum gratissimum Aqueous Extract Induces Apoptotic Signalling in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell A549

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Min; Lee, Mu-Jang; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Pei-Lin; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Ocimum gratissimum (OG) is widely used as a traditional herb for its antibacterial activity in Taiwan. Recently, antitumor effect of OG on breast cancer cell is also reported; however, the effects of OG on human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell A549 remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether aqueous OG extract (OGE) affects viability of A549 cells and the signals induced by OGE in A549 cells. Cell viability assays revealed that OGE significantly and dose-dependently decreased the viability of A549 cell but not that of BEAS-2B cell. Morphological examination and DAPI staining indicated that OGE induced cell shrinkage and DNA condensation for A549 cells. Further investigation showed that OGE enhanced activation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and caspase-8 and increased protein level of Apaf-1 and Bak, but diminished the level of Bcl-2. Additionally, OGE inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) yet enhanced the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase (p38). In conclusion, our findings indicate that OGE suppressed the cell viability of A549 cells, which may result from the activation of apoptotic signaling and the inhibition of anti-apoptotic signaling, suggesting that OGE might be beneficial to lung carcinoma treatment. PMID:20953389

  15. Stromal platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) provides a therapeutic target independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E.; Gupta, Puja; Dellinger, Michael T.; Toombs, Jason E.; Peyton, Michael; Duignan, Inga; Malaby, Jennifer; Bailey, Timothy; Burns, Colleen; Brekken, Rolf A.; Loizos, Nick

    2012-01-01

    In lung cancer, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is expressed frequently by tumor-associated stromal cells and by cancer cells in a subset of tumors. We sought to determine the effect of targeting stromal PDGFRα in preclinical lung tumor xenograft models (human tumor, mouse stroma). Effects of anti-human (IMC-3G3) and anti-mouse (1E10) PDGFRα mAbs on proliferation and PDGFRα signaling were evaluated in lung cancer cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Therapy studies were performed using established PDGFRα-positive H1703 cells and PDGFRα-negative Calu-6, H1993, and A549 subcutaneous tumors in immunocompromised mice treated with vehicle, anti-PDGFRα mAbs, chemotherapy, or combination therapy. Tumors were analyzed for growth and levels of growth factors. IMC-3G3 inhibited PDGFRα activation and the growth of H1703 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, but had no effect on PDGFRα-negative cell lines or mouse fibroblasts. 1E10 inhibited growth and PDGFRα activation of mouse fibroblasts, but had no effect on human cancer cell lines in vitro. In vivo, 1E10-targeted inhibition of murine PDGFRα reduced tumor growth as single-agent therapy in Calu-6 cells and enhanced the effect of chemotherapy in xenografts derived from A549 cells. We also identified that low expression cancer cell expression of VEGF-A and elevated expression of PDGF-AA were associated with response to stromal PDGFRα targeting. We conclude that stromal PDGFRα inhibition represents a means for enhancing control of lung cancer growth in some cases, independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression. PMID:22933705

  16. Biodistribution and Safety Assessment of Bladder Cancer Specific Recombinant Oncolytic Adenovirus in Subcutaneous Xenografts Tumor Model in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Zhiping; Tian, Hongwei; Qi, Meijiao; Zhai, Zhenxing; Li, Shuwen; Li, Renju; Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Wenyun; Fu, Shenjun; Lu, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Ronald; Guo, Yinglu; Zhou, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    Background The previous works about safety evaluation for constructed bladder tissue specific adenovirus are poorly documented. Thus, we investigated the biodistribution and body toxicity of bladder specific oncolytic adenovirus Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A (APU-E1A) and Ad-PSCAE-UPII-E1A-AR (APU-E1A-AR), providing meaningful information prior to embarking on human clinical trials. Materials and Method Conditionally replicate recombinant adenovirus (CRADs) APU-E1A, APU-EIA-AR were constructed with bladder tissue specific Uroplakin II (UP II) promoter to induce the expression of Ad5E1A gene and E1A-AR fusing gene, and PSCAE was inserted at upstream of promoter to enhance the function of promoter. Based on the cytopathic and anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer, these CRADs were intratumorally injected into subcutaneous xenografts tumor in nude mice. We then determined the toxicity through general health and behavioral assessment, hepatic and hematological toxicity evaluation, macroscopic and microscopic postmortem analyses. The spread of the transgene E1A of adenovirus was detected with RT-PCR and Western blot. Virus replication and distribution were examined with APU-LUC administration and Luciferase Assay. Results General assessment and body weight of the animals did not reveal any alteration in general behavior. The hematological alterations of groups which were injected with 5×108 pfu or higher dose (5×109 pfu) of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR showed no difference in comparison with PBS group, and only slight increased transaminases in contrast to PBS group at 5×109 pfu of APU-E1A and APU-E1A-AR were observed. E1A transgene did not disseminate to organs outside of xenograft tumor. Virus replication was not detected in other organs beside tumor according to Luciferase Assay. Conclusions Our study showed that recombinant adenovirus APU-E1A-AR and APU-E1A appear safe with 5×107 pfu and 5×108 pfu intratumorally injection in mice, without any discernable effects on general health

  17. Prostate cancer xenografts engineered from 3D precision-porous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels as models for tumorigenesis and dormancy escape

    PubMed Central

    Long, Thomas J.; Sprenger, Cynthia C.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biomaterial scaffolds show promise for in vitro and in vivo 3D cancer models. Tumors engineered in biomaterial scaffolds have shown evidence of being more physiologically relevant than some traditional preclinical model systems, and synthetic biomaterials provide the added benefit of defined and consistent microenvironmental control. Here, we examine sphere-templated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) scaffolds as the basis for engineering xenografts from multiple human prostate cancer cell lines. pHEMA scaffolds seeded and pre-cultured with tumorigenic M12 cells prior to implantation generated tumors in athymic nude mice, demonstrating the ability of the scaffolds to be used as a synthetic vehicle for xenograft generation. pHEMA scaffolds seeded with LNCaP C4-2 cells, which require Matrigel or stromal cell support for tumor formation, were poorly tumorigenic up to twelve weeks after implantation even when Matrigel was infused into the scaffold, demonstrating a lack of necessary pro-tumorigenic signaling within the scaffolds. Finally, M12mac25 cells, which are ordinarily rendered non-tumorigenic through the expression of the tumor suppressor insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), displayed a tumorigenic response when implanted within porous pHEMA scaffolds. These M12mac25 tumors showed a significantly higher macrophage infiltration within the scaffolds driven by the foreign body response to the materials. These findings show the potential for this biomaterials-based model system to be used in the study of prostate cancer tumorigenesis and dormancy escape. PMID:24942815

  18. Lentivirus-Mediated RNAi Silencing of VEGF Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth of Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiahua; Pang, Hailin; Guo, Xiaojian; Ding, Yunfei; Geng, Jiaxu; Zhang, Jingmeng; Min, Jie

    2015-12-01

    To construct and screen short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and investigate potential values of VEGF-shRNA on angiogenesis and growth in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a xenograft tumor model. VEGF-shRNA fragment was designed to connect plasmid vector, and RCC cells were transfected with shRNA. Real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTFQ-PCR) was used to detect interference efficiency of VEGF gene. The xenograft tumor model was established in nude mice, and mice were randomly divided into blank control (BC) group, negative control (NC) group, and experimental group. RNA interference (RNAi) effect was detected by immunohistochemistry, and tumor volume changes were observed. Tumor-bearing nude mice model was established and mice were randomly divided into BC group, NC group, and treatment group. The tumor volume changes and tumor inhibition rate were recorded, and angiogenesis status was observed. The apoptosis of tumor cells and genetic toxicity of VEGF-shRNA were detected. VEGF-shRNA can inhibit VEGF mRNA expression with an inhibition ratio of 72.3%. Compared with NC group and BC group, experimental group presents smaller tumor volume, weight, and poor growth (all p < 0.05). Positive VEGF rate in experimental group is significantly lower than that in NC group and BC group (all p < 0.05). Significantly lower tumor volume, less microvessel density (MVD) value, and higher apoptotic index (AI) are found in treatment group compared with BC group and NC group (all p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in AI between treatment group and BC group regarding adjacent normal tissues (p > 0.05). VEGF plays an important role in the occurrence and development of RCC, chemical synthesis of VEGF small interfering RNA (siRNA) can specifically inhibit VEGF expression, angiogenesis and growth in RCC, and can promote cell apoptosis without genetic toxicity to normal tissues. PMID:26465082

  19. Scopoletin, an active principle of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) inhibits human tumor vascularization in xenograft models and modulates ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2 in computer model.

    PubMed

    Tabana, Yasser M; Hassan, Loiy Elsir A; Ahamed, Mohamed B Khadeer; Dahham, Saad S; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Saeed, Mohammed A A; Khan, Md Shamsuddin S; Sandai, Doblin; Majid, Aman S Abdul; Oon, Chern Ein; Majid, Amin Malik S A

    2016-09-01

    We recently reported the antineovascularization effect of scopoletin on rat aorta and identified its potential anti-angiogenic activity. Scopoletin could be useful as a systemic chemotherapeutic agent against angiogenesis-dependent malignancies if its antitumorigenic activity is investigated and scientifically proven using a suitable human tumor xenograft model. In the present study, bioassay-guided (anti-angiogenesis) phytochemical investigation was conducted on Nicotiana glauca extract which led to the isolation of scopoletin. Further, anti-angiogenic activity of scopoletin was characterized using ex vivo, in vivo and in silico angiogenesis models. Finally, the antitumorigenic efficacy of scopoletin was studied in human colorectal tumor xenograft model using athymic nude mice. For the first time, an in vivo anticancer activity of scopoletin was reported and characterized using xenograft models. Scopoletin caused significant suppression of sprouting of microvessels in rat aortic explants with IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) 0.06μM. Scopoletin (100 and 200mg/kg) strongly inhibited (59.72 and 89.4%, respectively) vascularization in matrigel plugs implanted in nude mice. In the tumor xenograft model, scopoletin showed remarkable inhibition on tumor growth (34.2 and 94.7% at 100 and 200mg/kg, respectively). Tumor histology revealed drastic reduction of the extent of vascularization. Further, immunostaining of CD31 and NG2 receptors in the histological sections confirmed the antivascular effect of scopoletin in tumor vasculature. In computer modeling, scopoletin showed strong ligand affinity and binding energies toward the following angiogenic factors: protein kinase (ERK1), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These results suggest that the antitumor activity of scopoletin may be due to its strong anti-angiogenic effect, which may be mediated by its effective inhibition of ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2. PMID:27133199

  20. In vitro and in vivo antitumour activities of puerarin 6″-O-xyloside on human lung carcinoma A549 cell line via the induction of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ti; Chen, Hui; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Context Pueraria lobata (Leguminoseae) shows cytotoxic effects against cancer cells; however, its active components remain unclear. Objective This study investigated the antitumour activity of puerarin 6″-O-xyloside (POS) on the human lung carcinoma A549 cell line. Materials and methods The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of POS (at 10, 20 and 40 μM) in vitro, and xenograft nude mice were established to evaluate the antitumour effect of POS (at 40 mg/kg/d) in vivo by 15 days intraperitoneal injection (ip). To explore its mechanism of action, flow cytometry was performed to determine the pro-apoptotic effect of POS (at 10, 20 and 40 μM). Subsequently, the expression of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, Bcl-2 and Bax in A549 cells were determined. Results POS showed significant cytotoxicity toward A549 cells (p < 0.05) by inducing apoptosis. Treatment with POS significantly upregulated the levels of caspase-3 (p < 0.01), caspase-7 (p < 0.01), caspase-9 (p < 0.01) and Bax (p < 0.01) in A549 cells, and Bcl-2 was downregulated (p < 0.01). Additionally, the in vivo animal study showed that POS significantly inhibited tumour growth in A549 cells (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study demonstrated the POS has significant antitumour activities. The mechanisms are related to increased levels of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9 and Bax, and reduced levels Bcl-2. PMID:26730946

  1. An important role for peroxiredoxin II in survival of A549 lung cancer cells resistant to gefitinib

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taeho; Kyung Rho, Jin; Cheol Lee, Jae; Park, Young-Ho; Shin, Hye-Jun; Cho, Sunwha; Kang, Yong-Kook; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yoon, Do-Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Redox adaptation is an important concept that explains the mechanisms by which cancer cells survive under persistent endogenous oxidative stress and become resistant to certain anticancer agents. To investigate this concept, we determined the expression levels of peroxiredoxins (Prxs), antioxidant enzymes in drug-resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Prx II was remarkably increased only in A549/GR (gefitinib-resistant) cells compared with A549 cells, consistent with methylation/demethylation. Prx II was highly methylated in the A549 cells but was demethylated in the A549/GR cells. The elevated expression of Prx II resulted in the downregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death and upregulation of cell cycle progression in the A549/GR cells. When Prx II mRNA in the A549/GR cells was knocked down, the levels of ROS and apoptosis were significantly recovered to the levels of the controls. In addition, signaling molecules involved in apoptosis were increased in the A549/GR-shPrx II cells. There was no difference in the expression of MAPK/ERK between the A549/GR cells and A549/GR-shPrx II cells, but the phosphorylation of JNK was increased in the A549/GR cells and was markedly decreased in the A549/GR-shPrx II cells. Colony number and tumor growth were significantly decreased in the A549/GR-shPrx II cells compared with the A549/GR cells. Our findings suggest that Prx II has an important role in cancer cell survival via the modulation of signaling molecules involved in apoptosis and the phosphorylation of JNK by the downregulation of ROS levels in A549/GR cells. PMID:26021759

  2. An Orally Bioavailable, Indole-3-glyoxylamide Based Series of Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors Showing Tumor Growth Inhibition in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Colley, Helen E; Muthana, Munitta; Danson, Sarah J; Jackson, Lucinda V; Brett, Matthew L; Harrison, Joanne; Coole, Sean F; Mason, Daniel P; Jennings, Luke R; Wong, Melanie; Tulasi, Vamshi; Norman, Dennis; Lockey, Peter M; Williams, Lynne; Dossetter, Alexander G; Griffen, Edward J; Thompson, Mark J

    2015-12-10

    A number of indole-3-glyoxylamides have previously been reported as tubulin polymerization inhibitors, although none has yet been successfully developed clinically. We report here a new series of related compounds, modified according to a strategy of reducing aromatic ring count and introducing a greater degree of saturation, which retain potent tubulin polymerization activity but with a distinct SAR from previously documented libraries. A subset of active compounds from the reported series is shown to interact with tubulin at the colchicine binding site, disrupt the cellular microtubule network, and exert a cytotoxic effect against multiple cancer cell lines. Two compounds demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition in a mouse xenograft model of head and neck cancer, a type of the disease which often proves resistant to chemotherapy, supporting further development of the current series as potential new therapeutics. PMID:26580420

  3. Combination of angiogenesis inhibitors increases the anti-tumor efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a human bladder tumor xenograft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Gan, Yik Yuen; Thong, Patricia S. P.; Chin, William Wei L.; Soo, Khee Chee; Olivo, Malini

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a standard treatment for various malignant and non-malignant conditions. Though therapeutic responses are encouraging, recurrences have been noted, as one of the limitations of PDT is treatment-induced hypoxia that triggers angiogenesis. The present study evaluates the use of angiogenic inhibitors Avastin, that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Erbitux that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with PDT in an in vivo bladder carcinoma xenograft. Tumor bearing mice were assigned to 6 different categories: control, PDT only, Avastin + Erbitux, PDT + Avastin, PDT + Erbitux and PDT + Avastin and Erbitux. Treated and control tumors were monitored for recurrence for up to 90 days. VEGF and EGFR expression was detected in the tumor tissue. Migratory assay was performed to establish the inhibitory effect of the angiogenesis agents. Using confocal laser endomicroscopy, the tumor microvasculature was assessed. Tumors treated with the combination therapy of PDT + inhibitors showed significantly greater response compared to control and PDT only treated group. Combination therapy treated tumors also showed the most post-treatment damage with reduced tumor vasculature. These results demonstrate that the combination of PDT with inhibitors that target different angiogenesis pathways can improve tumor control.

  4. A Humanized Anti-VEGF Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Angiogenesis and Blocks Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongke; Yu, Qiu; Lee, Jonathan; Li, Mingzhen; Song, Jialiang; Chen, Jungang; Dai, Jihong; Couto, Fernando Jose Rebelo Do; An, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Weimin; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies have been widely used in research and diagnostics due to their high antigen specificity and affinity. Though these properties are also highly desirable for therapeutic applications, rabbit antibodies have remained untapped for human disease therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs), we generated a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs against human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). These neutralizing RabMAbs are specific to VEGF and do not cross-react to other members of the VEGF protein family. Guided by sequence and lineage analysis of a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs, we humanized the lead candidate by substituting non-critical residues with human residues within both the frameworks and the CDR regions. We showed that the humanized RabMAb retained its parental biological properties and showed potent inhibition of the growth of H460 lung carcinoma and A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts in mice. These studies provide proof of principle for the feasibility of developing humanized RabMAbs as therapeutics. PMID:20140208

  5. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy—A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma–derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. PMID:27267834

  6. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy-A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma-derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. PMID:27267834

  7. Low-dose mistletoe lectin-I reduces melanoma growth and spread in a scid mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Thies, A; Dautel, P; Meyer, A; Pfüller, U; Schumacher, U

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of mistletoe lectin-I (ML-I) on melanoma growth and spread in vivo. The human melanoma cell line MV3 was xenografted into severe combined immunodeficient mice and vehicle solution or purified ML-I was administered at 30, 150 and 500 ng per kg body weight (20 mice per group) daily. After 19 days, mice were killed, primary tumours (PTs) and lungs were dissected out, and tumour weights, number of lung metastases (LMs), number of tumour-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs), and apoptosis rates in the melanoma cells and in the DCs were assessed. A 35% reduction of PT weight (P=0.03) and a 55% decrease in number of LMs (P=0.016) were evident for low-dose ML-I (30 ng kg−1) treatment but not for higher doses. Mistletoe lectin-I increased apoptosis rates in the melanoma cells of PTs at all doses, while no induction of apoptosis was noted in the LMs. Low-dose ML-I significantly increased the number of DCs infiltrating the PTs (P<0.0001) and protected DCs against apoptosis, while higher doses induced apoptosis in the DCs (P<0.01). Our results demonstrate that low-dose ML-I reduced melanoma growth and number of metastases in vivo, primarily due to immunomodulatory effects. PMID:18026191

  8. Thymoquinone overcomes chemoresistance and enhances the anticancer effects of bortezomib through abrogation of NF-κB regulated gene products in multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Mustafa, Nurulhuda; Li, Feng; Kannaiyan, Radhamani; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kumar, Alan Prem; Chng, Wee-Joo; Sethi, Gautam

    2014-02-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell malignancy characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. With the advent of novel targeted agents, the median survival rate has increased to 5 -7 years. However, majority of patients with myeloma suffer relapse or develop chemoresistance to existing therapeutic agents. Thus, there is a need to develop novel alternative therapies for the treatment of MM. Thus in the present study, we investigated whether thymoquinone (TQ), a bioactive constituent of black seed oil, could suppress the proliferation and induce chemosensitization in human myeloma cells and xenograft mouse model. Our results show that TQ inhibited the proliferation of MM cells irrespective of their sensitivity to doxorubicin, melphalan or bortezomib. Interestingly, TQ treatment also resulted in a significant inhibition in the proliferation of CD138+ cells isolated from MM patient samples in a concentration dependent manner. TQ also potentiated the apoptotic effects of bortezomib in various MM cell lines through the activation of caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of PARP. TQ treatment also inhibited chemotaxis and invasion induced by CXCL12 in MM cells. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, TQ potentiated the antitumor effects of bortezomib (p<0.05, vehicle versus bortezomib + TQ; p<0.05, bortezomib versus bortezomib + TQ), and this correlated with modulation of various markers for survival and angiogenesis, such as Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Bcl-2 and p65 expression. Overall, our results demonstrate that TQ can enhance the anticancer activity of bortezomib in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM. PMID:24504138

  9. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Nicole E.; Rastelli, Antonella L.; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  10. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Park, Steven I; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K; Green, Damian J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Press, Oliver W

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. α-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to β-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. α imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a β-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 μCi of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an α-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  11. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  12. Thymoquinone overcomes chemoresistance and enhances the anticancer effects of bortezomib through abrogation of NF-κB regulated gene products in multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Mustafa, Nurulhuda; Li, Feng; Kannaiyan, Radhamani; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kumar, Alan Prem; Chng, Wee-Joo; Sethi1, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell malignancy characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. With the advent of novel targeted agents, the median survival rate has increased to 5−7 years. However, majority of patients with myeloma suffer relapse or develop chemoresistance to existing therapeutic agents. Thus, there is a need to develop novel alternative therapies for the treatment of MM. Thus in the present study, we investigated whether thymoquinone (TQ), a bioactive constituent of black seed oil, could suppress the proliferation and induce chemosensitization in human myeloma cells and xenograft mouse model. Our results show that TQ inhibited the proliferation of MM cells irrespective of their sensitivity to doxorubicin, melphalan or bortezomib. Interestingly, TQ treatment also resulted in a significant inhibition in the proliferation of CD138+ cells isolated from MM patient samples in a concentration dependent manner. TQ also potentiated the apoptotic effects of bortezomib in various MM cell lines through the activation of caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of PARP. TQ treatment also inhibited chemotaxis and invasion induced by CXCL12 in MM cells. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, TQ potentiated the antitumor effects of bortezomib (p < 0.05, vehicle versus bortezomib + TQ; p < 0.05, bortezomib versus bortezomib + TQ), and this correlated with modulation of various markers for survival and angiogenesis, such as Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Bcl-2 and p65 expression. Overall, our results demonstrate that TQ can enhance the anticancer activity of bortezomib in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM. PMID:24504138

  13. Antitumor activity of (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-12-01

    (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo. PMID:25505565

  14. Genomic characterization of patient-derived xenograft models established from fine needle aspirate biopsies of a primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and from patient-matched metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Francine B.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Barth, Richard J.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Wood, Matthew; Kacsoh, Balint Z.; Bouley, Stephanie J.; Cui, Jingxuan; Hamilton, Joanna; Choi, Jungbin A.; Lange, Joshua T.; Peterson, Jason D.; Padmanabhan, Vijayalakshmi; Tomlinson, Craig R.; Tsongalis, Gregory J.; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Smith, Kerrington D.

    2016-01-01

    N-of-1 trials target actionable mutations, yet such approaches do not test genomically-informed therapies in patient tumor models prior to patient treatment. To address this, we developed patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies (FNA-PDX) obtained from primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at the time of diagnosis. Here, we characterize PDX models established from one primary and two metastatic sites of one patient. We identified an activating KRAS G12R mutation among other mutations in these models. In explant cells derived from these PDX tumor models with a KRAS G12R mutation, treatment with inhibitors of CDKs (including CDK9) reduced phosphorylation of a marker of CDK9 activity (phospho-RNAPII CTD Ser2/5) and reduced viability/growth of explant cells derived from PDAC PDX models. Similarly, a CDK inhibitor reduced phospho-RNAPII CTD Ser2/5, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth in FNA-PDX and patient-matched metastatic-PDX models. In summary, PDX models can be constructed from FNA biopsies of PDAC which in turn can enable genomic characterization and identification of potential therapies. PMID:26934555

  15. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying,, Hong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20′ (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40′ (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20′ (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40′ (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20′ (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40′ (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  16. Methyl methanesulfonate induces necroptosis in human lung adenoma A549 cells through the PIG-3-reactive oxygen species pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Shan, Shigang; Chi, Linfeng; Zhang, Guanglin; Gao, Xiangjing; Li, Hongjuan; Zhu, Xinqiang; Yang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is an alkylating agent that can induce cell death through apoptosis and necroptosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying MMS-induced apoptosis have been studied extensively; however, little is known about the mechanism for MMS-induced necroptosis. Therefore, we first established MMS-induced necroptosis model using human lung carcinoma A549 cells. It was found that, within a 24-h period, although MMS at concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 μM can induce DNA damage, only at higher concentrations (400 and 800 μM) MMS treatment lead to necroptosis in A549 cells, as it could be inhibited by the specific necroptotic inhibitor necrostatin-1, but not the specific apoptotic inhibitor carbobenzoxy-valyl-alanyl-aspartyl-[O-methyl]-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-fmk). MMS-induced necroptosis was further confirmed by the induction of the necroptosis biomarkers including the depletion of cellular NADH and ATP and leakage of LDH. This necroptotic cell death was also concurrent with the increased expression of p53, p53-induced gene 3 (PIG-3), high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1), and receptor interaction protein kinase (RIP) but not the apoptosis-associated caspase-3 and caspase-9 proteins. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was also involved in this process as the specific ROS inhibitor (4-amino-2,4-pyrrolidine-dicarboxylic acid (APDC)) can inhibit the necroptotic cell death. Interestingly, knockdown of PIG-3 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment can inhibit the generation of ROS. Taken together, these results suggest that MMS can induce necroptosis in A549 cells, probably through the PIG-3-ROS pathway. PMID:26472723

  17. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying, Hong-Mei

    2013-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20' (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40' (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20' (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40' (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20' (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40' (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  18. (212)Pb-radioimmunotherapy induces G(2) cell-cycle arrest and delays DNA damage repair in tumor xenografts in a model for disseminated intraperitoneal disease.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2012-03-01

    In preclinical studies, targeted radioimmunotherapy using (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab as an in vivo generator of the high-energy α-particle emitting radionuclide (212)Bi is proving an efficacious modality for the treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. To elucidate mechanisms associated with this therapy, mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were treated with (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with the nonspecific control (212)Pb-TCMC-HuIgG, unlabeled trastuzumab, and HuIgG, as well as untreated controls. (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment induced significantly more apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at 24 hours. Rad51 protein expression was downregulated, indicating delayed DNA double-strand damage repair compared with (212)Pb-TCMC-HuIgG, the nonspecific control. (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment also caused G(2)-M arrest, depression of the S phase fraction, and depressed DNA synthesis that persisted beyond 120 hours. In contrast, the effects produced by (212)Pb-TCMC-HuIgG seemed to rebound by 120 hours. In addition, (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment delayed open chromatin structure and expression of p21 until 72 hours, suggesting a correlation between induction of p21 protein and modification in chromatin structure of p21 in response to (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment. Taken together, increased DNA DSBs, impaired DNA damage repair, persistent G(2)-M arrest, and chromatin remodeling were associated with (212)Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment and may explain its increased cell killing efficacy in the LS-174T intraperitoneal xenograft model for disseminated intraperitoneal disease. PMID:22238365

  19. Evaluation of 6-([18F] fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoic-anilide (18F-FAHA) as imaging probe in tumor xenograft mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fiona; Cho, Sung Ju; Yu, Lihai; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Pin, Christopher L.; Kovacs, Michael S.; Koropatnick, James; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-03-01

    Alteration in genetic expression is as important as gene mutation in cancer development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Histone deacetylase (HDAC), an enzyme facilitating histone remodelling, can lead to silencing of tumor suppressor genes making HDAC inhibitors viable anticancer drugs against tumors with increased activity of the enzyme. In this study we evaluated 18F-fluroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide (18F-FAHA), an artificial HDAC substrate, as imaging probe of HDAC activity of human tumor xenografts in immunocompromised host mice. Human breast and melanoma cell lines, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-435 respectively, known to overexpress HDAC activity were xenografted into immunocompromised mice and HDAC activity was imaged using 18F-FAHA. The melanoma group was treated with saline, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an approved anticancer HDAC inhibitor) in DMSO, or DMSO as positive control. Tracer kinetic modelling and SUV were used to estimate HDAC activity from dynamic PET data. Both breast tumor and melanoma group showed great variability in binding rate constant (BRC) of 18F-FAHA suggesting highly variable inter- and intra-tumoral HDAC activity. For the SAHA treated melanoma group, HDAC activity, as monitored by BRC of 18F-FAHA, decreased more than the two (positive and negative) control groups but not tumor growth. Our preliminary study showed that noninvasive PET imaging with 18F-FAHA has the potential to identify patients for whom treatment with HDAC inhibitors are appropriate, to assess the effectiveness of that treatment as an early marker of target reduction, and also eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsy to individualize treatment.

  20. 212Pb-Radioimmunotherapy induces G2 cell cycle arrest and delays DNA damage repair in tumor xenografts in a model for disseminated intraperitoneal disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, targeted radioimmunotherapy using 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab as an in vivo generator of the high energy α-particle emitting radionuclide 212Bi is proving an efficacious modality for the treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. To elucidate mechanisms associated with this therapy, mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T i.p. xenografts were treated with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared to the non-specific control 212Pb-TCMC-HuIgG, unlabeled trastuzumab, and HuIgG, as well as untreated controls. 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment induced significantly more apoptosis and DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) at 24 h. Rad51 protein expression was down-regulated, indicating delayed DNA double strand damage repair compared to 212Pb-TCMC-HuIgG, the non-specific control. 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment also caused G2/M arrest, depression of the S phase fraction and depressed DNA synthesis that persisted beyond 120 h. In contrast, the effects produced by 212Pb-TCMC-HuIgG appeared to rebound by 120 h. In addition, 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment delayed open chromatin structure and expression of p21 until 72 h, suggesting a correlation between induction of p21 protein and modification in chromatin structure of p21 in response to 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment. Taken together, increased DNA DSBs, impaired DNA damage repair, persistent G2/M arrest, and chromatin remodeling were associated with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment and may explain its increased cell killing efficacy in the LS-174T i.p. xenograft model for disseminated intraperitoneal disease. PMID:22238365

  1. Small interfering RNA targeting S100A4 sensitizes non-small-cell lung cancer cells (A549) to radiation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ruixue; Qiao, Tiankui; Zhuang, Xibing

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the impact of S100A4-small interfering RNA (S100A4-siRNA) on apoptosis and enhanced radiosensitivity in non-small-cell lung cancer (A549) cells. We also explored the mechanisms of radiosensitization and identified a new target to enhance radiosensitivity and gene therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods RNA interference is a powerful tool for gene silencing. In this study, we constructed an effective siRNA to knock down S100A4. A549 cells were randomly divided into three groups: blank, negative control, and S100A4-siRNA. To investigate the effect of S100A4-siRNA, the expression of S100A4, E-cadherin, and p53 proteins and their messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected by Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Transwell chambers were used to assess cell invasion. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Radiosensitivity was determined by colony formation ability. Results Our results demonstrate that S100A4-siRNA effectively silenced the S100A4 gene. When siRNA against S100A4 was used, S100A4 protein expression was downregulated, whereas the expressions of E-cadherin and p53 were upregulated. In addition, a clear reduction in S100A4 mRNA levels was noted compared with the blank and negative control groups, whereas E-cadherin and p53 mRNA levels increased. Transfection with S100A4-siRNA significantly reduced the invasiveness of A549 cells. S100A4 silencing induced immediate G2/M arrest in cell cycle studies and increased apoptosis rates in A549 cells. In clonogenic assays, we used a multitarget, single-hit model to detect radiosensitivity after S100A4 knockdown. All parameters (D0, Dq, α, β) indicated that the downregulation of S100A4 enhanced radiosensitivity in A549 cells. Furthermore, S100A4-siRNA upregulated p53 expression, suggesting that S100A4 may promote A549 cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis by regulating the expression of other proteins. Therefore, si

  2. Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of human lung carcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liangrui; Zheng, Junxian; Sun, Qianqian; Wei, Kemin; Hu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone (RTHF) is widely used as a traditional herb and has detoxification and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of RTHF on the growth and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and evaluated its mechanisms. A549 cells were treated with RTHF at various concentrations for different periods. In vitro Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and colony formation methods showed that RTHF had dose- and time-dependent antiproliferation effects on A549 cells. A cell adhesion assay showed that RTHF decreased A549 cell adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. Cell invasion and migration were investigated using the Transwell assay and observed using an inverted microscope; the results showed that cell metastasis was significantly lower in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01). Expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The results showed that the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 decreased, while that of TIMP-2 increased significantly in the RTHF group when compared with the results of the control group. These results show that RTHF exhibits antigrowth and antimetastasis activity in lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing the expression of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1 and increasing that of TIMP-2. PMID:26893573

  3. Role of Rad52 in fractionated irradiation induced signaling in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishna, Malini

    2012-01-01

    The effect of fractionated doses of γ-irradiation (2Gy per fraction over 5 days), as delivered in cancer radiotherapy, was compared with acute doses of 10 and 2Gy, in A549 cells. A549 cells were found to be relatively more radioresistant if the 10Gy dose was delivered as a fractionated regimen. Microarray analysis showed upregulation of DNA repair and cell cycle arrest genes in the cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. There was intense activation of DNA repair pathway-associated genes (DNA-PK, ATM, Rad52, MLH1 and BRCA1), efficient DNA repair and phospho-p53 was found to be translocated to the nucleus of A549 cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. MCF-7 cells responded differently in fractionated regimen. Silencing of the Rad52 gene in fractionated group of A549 cells made the cells radiosensitive. The above result indicated increased radioresistance in A549 cells due to the activation of Rad52 gene. PMID:22001234

  4. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Suppresses Testosterone-Induced Initial Regrowth of Regressed Xenograft Prostate Tumors in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E.; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M.; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Joel B.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  5. Meta-[{sup 211}At]astatobenzylguanidine (MABG): In vivo evaluation in an athymic mouse human neuroblastoma xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Friedman, H.S.; Keir, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Because of the short range and high linear energy transfer of {sup 211}At {alpha}-particles, the MIBG analogue MABG might be useful for the therapy of micrometastatic neuroblastoma and previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that under single-cell conditions, the cytotoxicity of MABG is > 1000 times higher than [{sup 131}I]MIBG. A paired label protocol was used to compare the tissue distribution of MABG and [{sup 131}I]MIBG in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma xenografts from 1-24 hr after injection. In tumor, significantly higher (p < 0.05) uptake was observed for MABG (3.8 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g vs 3.1 {plus_minus} 0.7%ID/g at 8 hr). Pretreatment with desipramine reduced tumor uptake of MABG by 43%, suggesting that accumulation was related to the uptake-1 mechanism. Significantly higher uptake of MABG also was observed in normal tissue targets. For example, at 8 hr, heart uptake of MABG was 6.0 {plus_minus} 0.9 % ID/g compared with 4.5 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g for [{sup 131}I]MIBG. Two strategies were investigated to increase the tumor-to-hear uptake ratio. Pretreatment of mice with unlabeled MIBG (4 mg/kg) increased MABG tumor uptake by 1.5-fold while reducing uptake in several normal tissues including heart. The vesicular uptake blocker tetrabenazine (TBZ; 20 mg/kg), reduced MABG hear uptake by 30% of control values with not significant decrease in tumor levels. We conclude that MABG deserves further evaluation as a potential agent for the treatment of neuroblastoma, particularly in combination with strategies to minimize radiation dose to normal target tissues.

  6. Anti-Tumoral Effects of Anti-Progestins in a Patient-Derived Breast Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Esber, Nathalie; Cherbonnier, Clément; Resche-Rigon, Michèle; Hamze, Abdallah; Alami, Mouad; Fagart, Jérôme; Loosfelt, Hugues; Lombès, Marc; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is a hormone-dependent disease in which estrogen signaling targeting drugs fail in about 10 % due to resistance. Strong evidences highlighted the mitogen role of progesterone, its ligands, and the corresponding progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms in mammary carcinoma. Several PR antagonists have been synthesized; however, some of them are non-selective and led to side or toxic effects. Herein, we evaluated the anti-tumor activity of a commercially available PR modulator, ulipristal acetate (UPA), and a new selective and passive PR antagonist "APR19" in a novel preclinical approach based on patient-derived breast tumor (HBCx-34) xenografted in nude mice. As opposed to P4 that slightly reduces tumor volume, UPA and APR19 treatment for 42 days led to a significant 30 % reduction in tumor weight, accompanied by a significant 40 % retardation in tumor growth upon UPA exposure while a 1.5-fold increase in necrotic areas was observed in APR19-treated tumors. Interestingly, PR expression was upregulated by a 2.5-fold factor in UPA-treated tumors while APR19 significantly reduced expression of both PR and estrogen receptor α, indicating a potential distinct molecular mechanism among PR antagonists. Cell proliferation was clearly reduced in UPA group compared to vehicle conditions, as revealed by the significant reduction in Ki-67, Cyclin D1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression. Likewise, an increase in activated, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) expression was also demonstrated upon UPA exposure. Collectively, our findings provide direct in vivo evidence for anti-progestin-mediated control of human breast cancer growth, given their anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities, supporting a potential role in breast cancer therapy. PMID:26941094

  7. Spatial and temporal mapping of heterogeneity in liposome uptake and microvascular distribution in an orthotopic tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ekdawi, Sandra N; Stewart, James M P; Dunne, Michael; Stapleton, Shawn; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Dou, Yannan N; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2015-06-10

    Existing paradigms in nano-based drug delivery are currently being challenged. Assessment of bulk tumor accumulation has been routinely considered an indicative measure of nanomedicine potency. However, it is now recognized that the intratumoral distribution of nanomedicines also impacts their therapeutic effect. At this time, our understanding of the relationship between the bulk (i.e., macro-) tumor accumulation of nanocarriers and their intratumoral (i.e., micro-) distribution remains limited. Liposome-based drug formulations, in particular, suffer from diminished efficacy in vivo as a result of transport-limiting properties, combined with the heterogeneous nature of the tumor microenvironment. In this report, we perform a quantitative image-based assessment of macro- and microdistribution of liposomes. Multi-scalar assessment of liposome distribution was enabled by a stable formulation which co-encapsulates an iodinated contrast agent and a near-infrared fluorescence probe, for computed tomography (CT) and optical microscopy, respectively. Spatio-temporal quantification of tumor uptake in orthotopic xenografts was performed using CT at the bulk tissue level, and within defined sub-volumes of the tumor (i.e., rim, periphery and core). Tumor penetration and relative distribution of liposomes were assessed by fluorescence microscopy of whole tumor sections. Microdistribution analysis of whole tumor images exposed a heterogeneous distribution of both liposomes and tumor vasculature. Highest levels of liposome uptake were achieved and maintained in the well-vascularized tumor rim over the study period, corresponding to a positive correlation between liposome and microvascular density. Tumor penetration of liposomes was found to be time-dependent in all regions of the tumor however independent of location in the tumor. Importantly, a multi-scalar comparison of liposome distribution reveals that macro-accumulation in tissues (e.g., blood, whole tumor) may not reflect

  8. Prevalence of Endogenous CD34+ Adipose Stem Cells Predicts Human Fat Graft Retention in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Brian J.; Grahovac, Tara L.; Valentin, Jolene E.; Chung, Christopher W.; Bliley, Jacqueline M.; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Roy, Sohini B.; Dreifuss, Stephanie; Kelmendi-Doko, Arta; Kling, Russell E.; Ravuri, Sudheer K.; Marra, Kacey G.; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Rubin, J. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat grafting is a promising technique for soft-tissue augmentation, although graft retention is highly unpredictable and factors that affect graft survival have not been well defined. Because of their capacity for differentiation and growth factor release, adipose-derived stem cells may have a key role in graft healing. The authors’ objective was to determine whether biological properties of adipose-derived stem cells present within human fat would correlate with in vivo outcomes of graft volume retention. Methods Lipoaspirate from eight human subjects was processed using a standardized centrifugation technique and then injected subcutaneously into the flanks of 6-week-old athymic nude mice. Graft masses and volumes were measured, and histologic evaluation, including CD31+ staining for vessels, was performed 8 weeks after transplantation. Stromal vascular fraction isolated at the time of harvest from each subject was analyzed for surface markers by multi-parameter flow cytometry, and also assessed for proliferation, differentiation capacity, and normoxic/hypoxic vascular endothelial growth factor secretion. Results Wide variation in percentage of CD34+ progenitors within the stromal vascular fraction was noted among subjects and averaged 21.3 ± 15 percent (mean ± SD). Proliferation rates and adipogenic potential among stromal vascular fraction cells demonstrated moderate interpatient variability. In mouse xenograft studies, retention volumes ranged from approximately 36 to 68 percent after 8 weeks, with an overall average of 52 ± 11 percent. A strong correlation (r = 0.78, slope = 0.76, p < 0.05) existed between stromal vascular fraction percentage of CD34+ progenitors and high graft retention. Conclusion Inherent biological differences in adipose tissue exist between patients. In particular, concentration of CD34+ progenitor cells within the stromal vascular fraction may be one of the factors used to predict human fat graft retention. (Plast

  9. 5α-reductase inhibition suppresses testosterone-induced initial regrowth of regressed xenograft prostate tumors in animal models.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Nelson, Joel B; Parikh, Rahul A; Wang, Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  10. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells. PMID:25650339

  11. Copper oxide nanoparticles induce autophagic cell death in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tingting; Yan, Yiwu; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Chengyu

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are among the most highly produced nanomaterials, and have many diverse functions in catalysis, environmental remediation, as sensors, and in the production of personal care products. In this study, the toxicity of several widely used metal oxide NPs such as copper oxide, silica, titanium oxide and ferric oxide NPs, were evaluated In vitro. We exposed A549, H1650 and CNE-2Z cell lines to metal oxide NPs, and found CuO NPs to be the most toxic, SiO2 mild toxic, while the other metal oxide NPs had little effect on cell viability. Furthermore, the autophagic biomarker LC3-II significantly increased in A549 cells treated with CuO NPs, and the use of the autophagy inhibitors wortmannin and 3-methyladenin significantly improved cell survival. These results indicate that the cytoxicity of CuO NPs may involve the autophagic pathway in A549 cells. PMID:22916263

  12. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  13. Rapamycin enhances docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in a androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft model by survivin downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Hidekazu; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapamycin (RPM) enhances the susceptibility of PC3 cells to docetaxel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dosage of docetaxel (DTX) did not reduce survivin expression levels in PC3 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination treatment of RPM with DTX suppressed the expression of surviving. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNA against survivin enhanced the susceptibility of PC3 cells to DTX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RPM and DTX cotreatment inhibited PC3 cell growth and decreased surviving in vivo. -- Abstract: Background: Docetaxel is a first-line treatment choice in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the management of CRPC remains an important challenge in oncology. There have been many reports on the effects of rapamycin, which is an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the treatment of carcinogenesis. We assessed the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment of docetaxel and rapamycin in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between these treatments and survivin, which is a member of the inhibitory apoptosis family. Methods: Prostate cancer cells were cultured and treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effects on proliferation were evaluated with the MTS assay. In addition, we evaluated the effect on proliferation of the combination treatment induced knockdown of survivin expression by small interfering RNA transfection and docetaxel. Protein expression levels were assayed using western blotting. PC3 cells and xenograft growth in nude mice were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of docetaxel and its combination with rapamycin. Results: In vitro and in vivo, the combination of rapamycin with docetaxel resulted in a greater inhibition of proliferation than treatment with rapamycin or docetaxel alone. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, rapamycin decreased basal surviving levels, and cotreatment with docetaxel further decreased these levels

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides

  15. Induction of p53-independent growth inhibition in lung carcinoma cell A549 by gypenosides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Sen; Chiang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Li-Ju; Chao, Wei-Chih; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate antiproliferative effect and mechanisms of bioactive compounds from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum) on lung carcinoma cell A549. Saponins, carotenoids and chlorophylls were extracted and fractionated by column chromatography, and were subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The saponin fraction, which consisted mainly of gypenoside (Gyp) XXII and XXIII, rather than the carotenoid and chlorophyll ones, was effective in inhibiting A549 cell growth in a concentration- and a time-dependent manner as evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The estimated half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of Gyp on A549 cells was 30.6 μg/ml. Gyp was further demonstrated to induce an apparent arrest of the A549 cell cycle at both the S phase and the G2/M phase, accompanied by a concentration- and a time-dependent increase in the proportions of both the early and late apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Gyp down-regulated cellular expression of cyclin A and B as well as BCL-2, while up-regulated the expression of BAX, DNA degradation factor 35 KD, poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1, p53, p21 and caspase-3. Nevertheless, both the treatment of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, and the small hairpin RNA-mediated p53 knockdown in the A549 cells did not alter the growth inhibition effect induced by Gyp. As a result, the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells induced by Gyp would most likely proceed through p53-independent pathway(s). PMID:25781909

  16. Induction of p53-independent growth inhibition in lung carcinoma cell A549 by gypenosides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Sen; Chiang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Li-Ju; Chao, Wei-Chih; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate antiproliferative effect and mechanisms of bioactive compounds from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum) on lung carcinoma cell A549. Saponins, carotenoids and chlorophylls were extracted and fractionated by column chromatography, and were subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The saponin fraction, which consisted mainly of gypenoside (Gyp) XXII and XXIII, rather than the carotenoid and chlorophyll ones, was effective in inhibiting A549 cell growth in a concentration- and a time-dependent manner as evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The estimated half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Gyp on A549 cells was 30.6 μg/ml. Gyp was further demonstrated to induce an apparent arrest of the A549 cell cycle at both the S phase and the G2/M phase, accompanied by a concentration- and a time-dependent increase in the proportions of both the early and late apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Gyp down-regulated cellular expression of cyclin A and B as well as BCL-2, while up-regulated the expression of BAX, DNA degradation factor 35 KD, poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1, p53, p21 and caspase-3. Nevertheless, both the treatment of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, and the small hairpin RNA-mediated p53 knockdown in the A549 cells did not alter the growth inhibition effect induced by Gyp. As a result, the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells induced by Gyp would most likely proceed through p53-independent pathway(s). PMID:25781909

  17. Ac-SDKP suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells via HSP27 signaling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haijing; Yang, Fang; Xu, Hong; Sun, Yue; Xue, Xinxin; Du, Shipu; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Shifeng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Ruimin

    2014-08-01

    The synthetic tetrapeptide N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) has been shown to be a modulator of molecular aspects of the fibrosis pathway. This study reveals that Ac-SDKP exerts an anti-fibrotic effect on human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549), which are a source of myofibroblasts once exposed to TGF-β1, by decreasing the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). We used A549 cells in vitro to detect morphological evidence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by phase-contrast microscopy. Immunocytochemical and western blot analysis determined the distributions of cytokeratin 8 (CK8), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and SNAI1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed a colocalization of HSP27 and SNAI1 on TGF-β1-induced A549 cells. These results also demonstrated that A549 cells became spindle-like when exposed to TGF-β1. Coincident with these morphological changes, expression levels of CK8 and E-cad decreased, while those of vimentin and α-SMA increased. This process was accompanied by increases in levels of HSP27, SNAI1, and type I and type III collagen. In vitro transfection experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of HSP27 in cultured A549 cells could decrease the expression of SNAI1 and α-SMA while increasing the expression of E-cad. A noticeable reduction in collagen types I and III was also evident. Our results found that Ac-SDKP inhibited the transition of cultured A549 cells to myofibroblasts and attenuated collagen synthesis through modulating the expression of HSP27. PMID:24998956

  18. Anti-tumor efficacy of paclitaxel against human lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yamori, T; Sato, S; Chikazawa, H; Kadota, T

    1997-12-01

    We examined paclitaxel for anti-tumor activity against human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice and compared its efficacy with that of cisplatin, currently a key drug for lung cancer chemotherapy. Five non-small cell lung cancers (A549, NCI-H23, NCI-H226, NCI-H460 and NCI-H522) and 2 small cell lung cancers (DMS114 and DMS273) were chosen for this study, since these cell lines have been well characterized as regards in vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity. These cells were exposed to graded concentrations of paclitaxel (0.1 to 1000 nM) for 48 h. The 50% growth-inhibitory concentrations (GI50) for the cell lines ranged from 4 to 24 nM, which are much lower than the achievable peak plasma concentration of paclitaxel. In the in vivo study, 4 cell lines (A549, NCI-H23, NCI-H460, DMS-273) were grown as subcutaneous tumors xenografts in nude mice. Paclitaxel was given intravenously as consecutive daily injections for 5 days at the doses of 24 and 12 mg/kg/day. Against every xenograft, paclitaxel produced a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition compared to the saline control. Paclitaxel at 24 mg/kg/day was more effective than cisplatin at 3 mg/kg/day with the same dosing schedule as above, although the toxicity of paclitaxel was similar to or rather lower than that of cisplatin, in terms of body weight loss. In addition, paclitaxel showed potent activity against 2 other lung cancer xenografts (NCI-H226 and DMS114). Therefore, paclitaxel showed more effective, wider-spectrum anti-tumor activity than cisplatin in this panel of 6 lung cancer xenografts. These findings support the potential utility of paclitaxel in the treatment of human lung cancer. PMID:9473739

  19. Utility of 3’-[18F]fluoro-3’-deoxythymidine as a PET tracer to monitor response to gene therapy in a xenograft model of head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Neale S; Lopresti, Brian J; Ruszkiewicz, James; Dong, Xinxin; Joyce, Sonali; Leef, George; Sen, Malabika; Wahed, Abdus S; Mathis, Chester A; Grandis, Jennifer R; Thomas, Sufi M

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging methodologies are needed to assess treatment responses to novel molecular targeting approaches for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging do not effectively distinguish tumors from fibrotic tissue commonly associated with SCCHN tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) offers functional non-invasive imaging of tumors. We determined the uptake of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3’-[18F]Fluoro-3’-deoxythymidine ([18F]FLT) in several SCCHN xenograft models. In addition, we evaluated the utility of [18F]FLT microPET imaging in monitoring treatment response to an EGFR antisense approach targeted therapy that has shown safety and efficacy in a phase I trial. Two of the 3 SCCHN xenograft models tested demonstrated no appreciable uptake or retention of [18F]FDG, but consistent accumulation of [18F]FLT. The third tumor xenograft SCCHN model (Cal33) demonstrated variable uptake of both tracers. SCCHN xenografts (1483) treated with EGFR antisense gene therapy decreased tumor volumes in 4/6 mice. Reduced uptake of [18F]FLT was observed in tumors that responded to epidermal growth factor antisense (EGFRAS) gene therapy compared to non-responding tumors or tumors treated with control sense plasmid DNA. These findings indicate that [18F]FLT PET imaging may be useful in monitoring SCCHN response to molecular targeted therapies, while [18F]FDG uptake in SCCHN xenografts may not be reflective of the level of metabolic activity characteristic of human SCCHN tumors. PMID:23342298

  20. The cytotoxicity of organophosphate flame retardants on HepG2, A549 and Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Hu, Jingwen; Shang, Yu; Zhong, Yufang; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Zhiqiang

    2016-09-18

    In order to elucidate the cytotoxicity of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs), three human in vitro models, namely the HepG2 hepatoma cells, the A549 lung cancer cells and the Caco-2 colon cancer cells, were chosen to investigate the toxicity of triphenyl phosphate (TPP), tributylphosphate (TBP), tris(2-butoxyexthyl) phosphate (TBEP) and tris (2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP). Cytotoxicity was assayed in terms of cell viability, DNA damage status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. The results showed that all these four OPFRs could inhibit cell viability, overproduce ROS level, induce DNA lesions and increase the LDH leakage. In addition, the toxic effects of OPFRs in Caco-2 cells were relatively severer than those in HepG2 and A549 cells, which might result from some possible mechanisms apart from oxidative stress pathway. In conclusion, TBP, TPP, TBEP and TCPP could induce cell toxicity in various cell lines at relatively high concentrations as evidenced by suppression of cell viability, overproduction of ROS, induction of DNA lesions and increase of LDH leakage. Different cell types seemed to have different sensitivities and responses to OPFRs exposure, as well as the underlying potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:27336727

  1. Inhibition of human tumor xenograft growth in nude mice by a conjugate of monoclonal antibody LA22 to epidermal growth factor receptor with anti-tumor antibiotics mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Wei; Zhao Shan; Liu Zhaofei; Zhang Jianzhong; Ma Shujun; Sato, J. Denry; Zhang Peng; Tong Mei; Han Jiping; Wang Yan; Bai Dongmei; Wang Fan . E-mail: wangfan@bjmu.edu.cn; Sun Le . E-mail: lsun@welsonpharma.com

    2006-10-20

    Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies LA22 and Erbitux bind to different epitopes of EGFR. The chemimmunoconjugates of MMC with LA22 or Erbitux were prepared, and in vitro cytotoxicity assays with A549 cells showed that LA22-MMC was much more potent than Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC. Viabilities of A549 cells treated with LA22-MMC, Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC were 35%, 94%, and 81%, respectively. Immunoscintigraphy of xenografts of human A431 and A549 cells in nude mice both showed that {sup 125}I-labeled-LA22-MMC enriched in tumor sites prominently. Most importantly, in vivo assays showed LA22-MMC was significantly more effective than free drug MMC in the treatment of subcutaneous xenografts of human A431 cells in nude mice (83% inhibition for LA22-MMC and 30% for MMC). We concluded that LA22-MMC could be a very potent drug for treatment of solid tumors.

  2. Antitumor effect of FGFR inhibitors on a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft mouse model endogenously expressing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Xiwei; Wang, Shaoqing; Moser, Catherine D; Shaleh, Hassan M; Mohamed, Essa A; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Allotey, Loretta K; Chen, Gang; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; McNulty, Melissa S; Ndzengue, Albert; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Knudson, Ryan A; Greipp, Patricia T; Clark, Karl J; Torbenson, Michael S; Kipp, Benjamin R; Zhou, Jie; Barrett, Michael T; Gustafson, Michael P; Alberts, Steven R; Borad, Mitesh J; Roberts, Lewis R

    2016-09-28

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly lethal cancer with limited therapeutic options. Recent genomic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma has revealed the presence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) fusion proteins in up to 13% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). FGFR fusions have been identified as a novel oncogenic and druggable target in a number of cancers. In this study, we established a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model bearing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein from a metastatic lung nodule of an iCCA patient. Using this PDX model, we confirmed the ability of the FGFR inhibitors, ponatinib, dovitinib and BGJ398, to modulate FGFR signaling, inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma tumors harboring FGFR2 fusions. In addition, BGJ398 appeared to be superior in potency to ponatinib and dovitinib in this model. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the investigation of FGFR inhibitors, particularly BGJ398, as a therapeutic option for cholangiocarcinoma patients harboring FGFR2 fusions. PMID:27216979

  3. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  4. Superior antitumor activity of trastuzumab combined with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    HARADA, SUGURU; YANAGISAWA, MIEKO; KANEKO, SAORI; YOROZU, KEIGO; YAMAMOTO, KANAME; MORIYA, YOICHIRO; HARADA, NAOKI

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer, it has been reported that the combination of trastuzumab with capecitabine plus cisplatin, or with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin, significantly increased overall survival compared with chemotherapy alone (ToGA trial). In addition, adjuvant therapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) improved the survival of patients who received curative D2 gastrectomy (CLASSIC trial). However, the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX for patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study, was to investigate the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX in a HER2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model. Combination treatment with these three agents (trastuzumab 20 mg/kg, capecitabine 359 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 10 mg/kg), was found to exhibit a significantly stronger antitumor activity in NCI-N87 xenografts compared with either trastuzumab or XELOX alone. In this model, treatment with trastuzumab alone or trastuzumab plus oxaliplatin enhanced the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme in the generation of 5-FU from capecitabine in tumor tissues. In in vitro experiments, trastuzumab induced TP mRNA expression in NCI-N87 cells. In addition, NCI-N87 cells co-cultured with the natural killer (NK) cell line CD16(158V)/NK-92 exhibited increased expression of TP mRNA. When NCI-N87 cells were cultured with CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells in the presence of trastuzumab, the mRNA expression of cytokines reported to have the ability to induce TP was upregulated in tumor cells. Furthermore, a medium conditioned by CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells also upregulated the expression of TP mRNA in NCI-N87 cells. These results suggest that trastuzumab promotes TP expression, either by acting directly on NCI-N87 cells, or indirectly via a mechanism that includes trastuzumab-mediated interactions

  5. 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene, the metabolite of resveratrol analogue DMU-212, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in a mice xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Kempisty, Hanna; Ruciński, Marcin; Borys, Sylwia; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Zawierucha, Piotr; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Łażewski, Dawid; Murias, Marek; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    In screening studies, the cytotoxic activity of four metabolites of resveratrol analogue 3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) against A-2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was investigated. The most active metabolite, 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-214), was chosen for further studies. The cytotoxicity of DMU-214 was shown to be higher than that of the parent compound, DMU-212, in both cell lines tested. Since DMU-212 was supposed to undergo metabolic activation through its conversion to DMU-214, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-proliferative activity. We found that in SKOV-3 cells lacking p53, DMU-214 induced receptor-mediated apoptosis. In A-2780 cell line with expression of wild-type p53, DMU-214 modulated the expression pattern of p53-target genes driving intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, as well as DNA repair and damage prevention. Regardless of the up-regulation of p48, p53R2, sestrins and Gaad45 genes involved in cancer cell DNA repair, we demonstrated the stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DMU-214 in A-2780 cells when compared to those in SKOV-3. Hence we verified DMU-214 activity in the xenograft model using SCID mice injected with A-2780 cells. The strong anti-proliferative activity of DMU-214 in the in vivo model allowed to suggest the tested compound as a potential therapeutic in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27585955

  6. AZ17: a new bispecific drug targeting IL-6 and IL-23 with potential clinical use--improves psoriasis in a human xenograft transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Shanebeck, Kurt; Brady, William; Van Brunt, Michael P; King, Gordon; Marelli, Marcello; Slagle, Paul; Xu, Hengyu; Nairn, Natalie W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Wang, Aijun A; Li, Gary; Thornton, Kenneth C; Dam, Tomas N; Grabstein, Kenneth H

    2015-10-01

    Targeting more than one molecule in multifactorial diseases involving several disease mediators may provide improved therapeutic efficacy. Psoriasis is a multifactorial disease in which interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23 are important disease mediators because they facilitate development of Th17 cells; widely accepted to be associated with psoriasis. To meet the need for new therapeutics, we aimed to create a clinically relevant bispecific drug, by combining the inhibitory properties of anti-IL-6 and anti-IL-23 antibodies, exhibiting high affinity, high stability and the ability to be produced in high yield. The bispecific molecule AZ17 was created by combining high affinity binding domains originating from monoclonal antibodies targeting human IL-6 and IL-23. To allow for high and efficient production, AZ17 was assembled by site-specific bioconjugation from two individual single chain fragment variables that were synthesized separately in Escherichia coli. To improve stability and extend pharmacokinetics, a flexible poly-ethylene glycol molecule was used as linker. In preclinical psoriasis models, AZ17 reduced IL-23-induced ear inflammation and improved psoriasis in a xenograft transplantation model where psoriasis skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice. The data presented here suggest AZ17 to be a promising drug candidate in psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th17 cell development. PMID:26271488

  7. A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Nardella, Caterina; Chen, Zhenbang; Clohessy, John G.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Cheng, Ke; Varmeh, Shohreh; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rosivatz, Erika; Woscholski, Rudiger; Cognetti, Francesco; Scher, Howard I.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible cell growth arrest, a process termed cellular senescence, is emerging as an intrinsic tumor suppressive mechanism. Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to be invariably preceded by hyperproliferation, aberrant replication, and activation of a DNA damage checkpoint response (DDR), rendering therapeutic enhancement of this process unsuitable for cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated in a mouse model of prostate cancer that inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) elicits a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Pten-loss–induced cellular senescence (PICS) represents a senescence response that is distinct from oncogene-induced senescence and can be targeted for cancer therapy. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we determined that PICS occurs rapidly after Pten inactivation, in the absence of cellular proliferation and DDR. Further, we found that PICS is associated with enhanced p53 translation. Consistent with these data, we showed that in mice p53-stabilizing drugs potentiated PICS and its tumor suppressive potential. Importantly, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN drives senescence and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo in a human xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, our data identify a type of cellular senescence that can be triggered in nonproliferating cells in the absence of DNA damage, which we believe will be useful for developing a “pro-senescence” approach for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:20197621

  8. Fluorescence-guided surgery, but not bright-light surgery, prevents local recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC)

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CEA-positive tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS + NAC; FGS only; and FGS + NAC. An anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via tail vein of mice with a pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was clearly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. Only one out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS only group and zero out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS + NAC which was significantly lower than BLS only or BLS +NAC mice, where local disease recurred in 6 out of 8 mice in each treatment group (p = 0.041 and p = 0.007, respectively). NAC did not significantly reduce recurrence rates when combined with either FGS or BLS. These results indicate that FGS can significantly reduce local recurrence compared to BLS in pancreatic cancer resistant to NAC. PMID:25800176

  9. Impact of bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models with T790M mutation or MET amplification.

    PubMed

    Furugaki, Koh; Fukumura, Junko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Moriya, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kaname; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Harada, Naoki

    2016-02-15

    Erlotinib (ERL), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows notable efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Bevacizumab (BEV), a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), in combination with ERL (BEV+ERL) significantly extended progression-free survival in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC compared with ERL alone. However, the efficacy of BEV+ERL against EGFR-mutated NSCLC harboring T790M mutation or MET amplification, is unclear. Here, we examined the antitumor activity of BEV+ERL in four xenograft models of EGFR-mutated NSCLC (three harboring ERL resistance mutations). In the HCC827 models (exon 19 deletion: DEL), ERL significantly inhibited tumor growth by blocking EGFR signal transduction. Although there was no difference between ERL and BEV+ERL in maximum tumor growth inhibition, BEV+ERL significantly suppressed tumor regrowth during a drug-cessation period. In the HCC827-EPR model (DEL+T790M) and HCC827-vTR model (DEL+MET amplification), ERL reduced EGFR signal transduction and showed less pronounced but still significant tumor growth inhibition than in the HCC827 model. In these models, tumor growth inhibition was significantly stronger with BEV+ERL than with each single agent. In the NCI-H1975 model (L858R+T790M), ERL did not inhibit growth or EGFR signal transduction, and BEV+ERL did not inhibit growth more than BEV. BEV alone significantly decreased microvessel density in each tumor. In conclusion, addition of BEV to ERL did not enhance antitumor activity in primarily ERL-resistant tumors with T790M mutation; however, BEV+ERL enhanced antitumor activity in T790M mutation- or MET amplification-positive tumors as long as their growth remained significantly suppressed by ERL. PMID:26370161

  10. Edaravone Decreases Paraquat Toxicity in A549 Cells and Lung Isolated Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Shaki, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Rezagholizadeh, Neda; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone, an antioxidant and radical scavenger, showed protective effects against oxidative stress-like condition. Paraquat (PQ) is toxic herbicide considerable evidence suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to PQ toxicity. In this study, protective effect of edaravone against PQ induced toxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in A549 cells and lung isolated mitochondria were evaluated. A549 cells and lung isolated mitochondria were divided into control group, PQ group, edaravone group and PQ plus edaravone-pretreated group. Cellular and mitochondrial viability assayed using MTT test and ROS generations in both cellular and mitochondrial fraction were determined by fluorometry using DCFH-DA as indicator. Our results showed that edaravone (5–100 µM) prevented PQ (500 µM) induced cytotoxicity in A549 cells that the best protective effect was observed at concentration of 50 µM of edaravone. In addition, PQ-induced ROS generation in A549 cells significantly inhibited by edaravone. Moreover, PQ decreased mitochondria viability and also increased ROS generation in lung isolated mitochondria that edaravone (25–400 µM) markedly inhibited these toxic effects. In overall, the results of this study suggest that lung mitochondria maintenance is essential for maintaining PQt cytotoxicity and Edaravone is a protective drug against PQ toxicity in-vitro. PMID:25237364

  11. Methotrexate influx via folate transporters into alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Kawami, Masashi; Miyamoto, Mioka; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2015-08-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a drug used for the treatment of certain cancers as well as rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes induces serious interstitial lung injury. Although lung toxicity of MTX is related to its accumulation, the information concerning MTX transport in the lungs is lacking. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying MTX influx into human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. MTX influx into A549 cells was time-, pH-, and temperature-dependent and showed saturation kinetics. The influx was inhibited by folic acid with IC50 values of 256.1 μM at pH 7.4 and 1.6 μM at pH 5.5, indicating that the mechanisms underlying MTX influx would be different at these pHs. We then examined the role of two folate transporters in MTX influx, reduced folate carrier (RFC) and proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). The expression of RFC and PCFT mRNAs in A549 cells was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, MTX influx was inhibited by thiamine monophosphate, an RFC inhibitor, at pH 7.4, and by sulfasalazine, a PCFT inhibitor, at pH 5.5. These results indicated that RFC and PCFT are predominantly involved in MTX influx into A549 cells at pH 7.4 and pH 5.5, respectively. PMID:26190800

  12. Effect of fucoidan from Turbinaria conoides on human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cells.

    PubMed

    Alwarsamy, Madhavarani; Gooneratne, Ravi; Ravichandran, Ramanibai

    2016-11-01

    Fucoidan was purified from seaweed, Turbinaria conoides. Isolated fragments were characterized with NMR ((13)C, (1)H), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectronomy (GC-MS) and HPLC analysis. The autohydrolysate of fucoidans consisted of sulfated fuco-oligosaccharides having the backbone of α-(1, 3)-linked fuco-pyranose derivatives and minor components of galactose, glucose, mannose and xylose sugars. Fucoidan induced a dose-dependent reduction in cell survival of lung cancer A549 cells by MTT assay (GI50, 75μg/mL). However, it was not cytotoxic to a non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte cell line of skin tissue (HaCaT) (GI50>1.0mg/mL). The apoptotic cells in fucoidan-treated A549 cells were visualized by laser confocal microscopy and cell cycle analysis showed induction of G0/G1 phase arrest of the cell progression cycle. Further, CFSE labeling and flow cytometry highlighted that fucoidan significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the proliferation rate of A549 cells by up to 2-fold compared with the control cells. It is concluded that fucoidan has the potential to act as an anti-proliferative agent on lung carcinoma (A549) cells. PMID:27516266

  13. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  14. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  15. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Brian A; Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  16. Rapamycin‐induced autophagy sensitizes A549 cells to radiation associated with DNA damage repair inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liu, Fen; Wang, Yong; Li, Donghai; Guo, Fei; Xu, Liyao; Zeng, Zhengguo; Zhong, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Autophagy has been reported to increase in cancer cells after radiation. However, it remains unknown whether increased autophagy as a result of radiation affects DNA damage repair and sensitizes cancer cells. In this study, the radiosensitization effect of rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that induces autophagy, on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was investigated. Methods A549 cells were treated with different concentrations of rapamycin. Cell viability was evaluated by methyl‐thiazolyl‐tetrazolium assay. Survival fraction values of A549 cells after radiotherapy were detected by colony formation assay. Autophagosome was observed by a transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, Western blot was employed to examine alterations in autophagy protein LC3 and p62, DNA damage protein γ–H2AX, and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80. Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels were examined by real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Rapamycin suppressed A549 cell proliferation in dose and time‐dependent manners. An inhibitory concentration (IC) 10 dose of rapamycin could induce autophagy in A549 cells. Rapamycin combined with radiation significantly decreased the colony forming ability of cells, compared with rapamycin or radiation alone. Rapamycin and radiation combined increased γ–H2AX expression levels and decreased Rad51 and Ku80 expression levels, compared with single regimens. However, rapamycin treatment did not induce any change in Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 mRNA levels, regardless of radiation. Conclusions These findings indicate that increasing autophagy sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation. PMID:27385978

  17. Development of a Preclinical Orthotopic Xenograft Model of Ewing Sarcoma and Other Human Malignant Bone Disease Using Advanced In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Batey, Michael A.; Almeida, Gilberto S.; Wilson, Ian; Dildey, Petra; Sharma, Abhishek; Blair, Helen; Hide, I. Geoff; Heidenreich, Olaf; Vormoor, Josef; Maxwell, Ross J.; Bacon, Chris M.

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma represent the two most common primary bone tumours in childhood and adolescence, with bone metastases being the most adverse prognostic factor. In prostate cancer, osseous metastasis poses a major clinical challenge. We developed a preclinical orthotopic model of Ewing sarcoma, reflecting the biology of the tumour-bone interactions in human disease and allowing in vivo monitoring of disease progression, and compared this with models of osteosarcoma and prostate carcinoma. Human tumour cell lines were transplanted into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NSG) and Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice by intrafemoral injection. For Ewing sarcoma, minimal cell numbers (1000–5000) injected in small volumes were able to induce orthotopic tumour growth. Tumour progression was studied using positron emission tomography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and bioluminescent imaging. Tumours and their interactions with bones were examined by histology. Each tumour induced bone destruction and outgrowth of extramedullary tumour masses, together with characteristic changes in bone that were well visualised by computed tomography, which correlated with post-mortem histology. Ewing sarcoma and, to a lesser extent, osteosarcoma cells induced prominent reactive new bone formation. Osteosarcoma cells produced osteoid and mineralised “malignant” bone within the tumour mass itself. Injection of prostate carcinoma cells led to osteoclast-driven osteolytic lesions. Bioluminescent imaging of Ewing sarcoma xenografts allowed easy and rapid monitoring of tumour growth and detection of tumour dissemination to lungs, liver and bone. Magnetic resonance imaging proved useful for monitoring soft tissue tumour growth and volume. Positron emission tomography proved to be of limited use in this model. Overall, we have developed an orthotopic in vivo model for Ewing sarcoma and other primary and secondary human bone malignancies, which

  18. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with doxorubicin eradicate soft tissue sarcoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; DeLong, Jonathan; Eilber, Fritz C.; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Nan; Singh, Arun; Russell, Tara; Deng, Samantha; Reynoso, Jose; Quan, Cuong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Chawla, Sant; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    A patient with high grade undifferentiated pleomorphic soft-tissue sarcoma from a striated muscle was grown orthotopically in the right biceps femoris muscle of mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. Twenty PDOX mice were divided into 4 groups: G1, control without treatment; G2, Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium)A1-R administered by intratumoral (i.t.) injection once a week for 4 weeks; G3, doxorubicin (DOX) administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once a week for 4 weeks; G4, S. typhimurium A1-R (i.t.) administered once a week for 2 weeks followed by i.p. doxorubicin once a week for 2 weeks. On day 25 from the initiation of treatment, tumor volume in G2, G3, and G4 was significantly lower than G1. Mice found without gross tumor included one mouse (20%) in G2; one mouse (20%) in G3; and 3 mice (60%) in G4. Body weight loss did not significantly differ between the 3 treated groups or from the untreated control. Histological examination revealed eradication of tumor only in G4 where mice were treated with S. typhimurium A1-R followed by DOX. Our present study indicates future clinical potential of combining S. typhimurium A1-R with chemotherapy such as DOX for soft tissue sarcoma patients. PMID:26859573

  19. A xenograft mouse model coupled with in-depth plasma proteome analysis facilitates identification of novel serum biomarkers for human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hsin-Yao; Beer, Lynn A; Chang-Wong, Tony; Hammond, Rachel; Gimotty, Phyllis; Coukos, George; Speicher, David W

    2012-02-01

    Proteomics discovery of novel cancer serum biomarkers is hindered by the great complexity of serum, patient-to-patient variability, and triggering by the tumor of an acute-phase inflammatory reaction. This host response alters many serum protein levels in cancer patients, but these changes have low specificity as they can be triggered by diverse causes. We addressed these hurdles by utilizing a xenograft mouse model coupled with an in-depth 4-D protein profiling method to identify human proteins in the mouse serum. This strategy ensures that identified putative biomarkers are shed by the tumor, and detection of low-abundance proteins shed by the tumor is enhanced because the mouse blood volume is more than a thousand times smaller than that of a human. Using TOV-112D ovarian tumors, more than 200 human proteins were identified in the mouse serum, including novel candidate biomarkers and proteins previously reported to be elevated in either ovarian tumors or the blood of ovarian cancer patients. Subsequent quantitation of selected putative biomarkers in human sera using label-free multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry (MS) showed that chloride intracellular channel 1, the mature form of cathepsin D, and peroxiredoxin 6 were elevated significantly in sera from ovarian carcinoma patients. PMID:22032327

  20. Comparison of IgE and IgG antibody-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and in a SCID mouse xenograft model of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gould, H J; Mackay, G A; Karagiannis, S N; O'Toole, C M; Marsh, P J; Daniel, B E; Coney, L R; Zurawski, V R; Joseph, M; Capron, M; Gilbert, M; Murphy, G F; Korngold, R

    1999-11-01

    Allergic reactions are mediated by IgE antibodies bound to high-affinity receptors on mast cells in peripheral tissues and are characterized by their immediacy and hypersensitivity. These properties could also be advantageous in immunotherapy against cancer growth in peripheral tissues. We have constructed chimeric IgE and IgG1 antibodies with murine V regions and human C regions corresponding to the MOv18 monoclonal antibody against the human ovarian tumor-associated antigen, folate binding protein. The antibodies exhibited the expected binding affinities for antigen and Fc receptors, and effector activities with human basophils and platelets in vitro. The protective activities of MOv18-IgE and MOv18-IgG1 were compared in a SCID mouse xenograft model of ovarian carcinoma. The beneficial effects of MOv18-IgE were greater and of longer duration than those of MOv18-IgG1. Our results suggest that the allergic reaction could be harnessed for the suppression of ovarian tumors. PMID:10556807

  1. Tubeimoside-1 suppresses tumor angiogenesis by stimulation of proteasomal VEGFR2 and Tie2 degradation in a non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuan; Körbel, Christina; Scheuer, Claudia; Nenicu, Anca; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) is a potent anti-tumor phytochemical. Its functional and molecular mode of action, however, remains elusive so far. Since angiogenesis is essential for tumor progression and metastasis, we herein investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of the compound. In a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft model we found that treatment of CD1 nu/nu mice with TBMS1 (5mg/kg) significantly suppressed the growth and vascularization of NCI-H460 flank tumors. Moreover, TBMS1 dose-dependently reduced vascular sprouting in a rat aortic ring assay. In vitro, TBMS1 induced endothelial cell apoptosis without decreasing the viability of NSCLC tumor cells and inhibited the migration of endothelial cells by disturbing their actin filament organization. TBMS1 further stimulated the proteasomal degradation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and Tie2 in endothelial cells, which down-regulated AKT/mTOR signaling. These findings indicate that TBMS1 represents a novel phytochemical for anti-angiogenic treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26701724

  2. Assessing Metabolic Changes in Response to mTOR Inhibition in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma Xenograft Model Using AcidoCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J.; Hanke, Neale T.; Gill, Alexander; Persky, Daniel O.; Howison, Christine M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Baker, Amanda F.

    2016-01-01

    AcidoCEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to measure tumor extracellular pH (pHe) with excellent accuracy and precision. This study investigated the ability of acidoCEST MRI to monitor changes in tumor pHe in response to therapy. To perform this study, we used the Granta 519 human mantle cell lymphoma cell line, which is an aggressive B-cell malignancy that demonstrates activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies using the Granta 519 cell line to investigate the efficacy and associated changes induced by the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001). AcidoCEST MRI studies showed a statistically significant increase in tumor pHe of 0.10 pH unit within 1 day of initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a decrease in tumor growth of the Granta 519 xenograft model. AcidoCEST MRI then measured a decrease in tumor pHe 7 days after initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a return to normal tumor growth rate. Therefore, this study is a strong example that acidoCEST MRI can be used to measure tumor pHe that may serve as a marker for therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies. PMID:27140422

  3. Ultrasound Targeted Apoptosis Imaging in Monitoring Early Tumor Response of Trastuzumab in a Murine Tumor Xenograft Model of Her-2–Positive Breast Cancer11

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xi; Li, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Gao, Xiujun; Luo, Yi; Gao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to monitor the trastuzumab therapy response of murine tumor xenograft model with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her-2)–positive breast cancer using ultrasound targeted apoptosis imaging. METHODS: We prepared targeted apoptosis ultrasound probes by nanobubble (NB) binding with Annexin V. In vitro, we investigated the binding rate of NB–Annexin V with breast cancer apoptotic cells after the trastuzumab treatment. In vivo, tumor-bearing mice underwent ultrasound targeted imaging over 7 days. After imaging was completed, the tumors were excised to determine Her-2 and caspase-3 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The correlation between parameters of imaging and histologic results was then analyzed. RESULTS: For seeking the ability of targeted NB binding with apoptotic tumor cells (Her-2 positive), we found that binding rate in the treatment group was higher than that of the control group in vitro (P = .001). There were no differences of tumor sizes in all groups over the treatment process in vivo (P = .98). However, when using ultrasound imaging to visualize tumors by targeted NB in vivo, we observed that the mean and peak intensities from NBs gradually increased in the treatment group after trastuzumab therapy (P = .001). Furthermore, these two parameters were significantly associated with caspase-3 expression of tumor excised samples (P = .0001). CONCLUSION: Ultrasound targeted apoptosis imaging can be a non-invasive technique to evaluate the early breast tumor response to trastuzumab therapy. PMID:24685547

  4. Discovery of imidazo[1,2-a]-pyridine inhibitors of pan-PI3 kinases that are efficacious in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Wooseok; Menezes, Daniel L; Xu, Yongjin; Knapp, Mark S; Elling, Robert; Burger, Matthew T; Ni, Zhi-Jie; Smith, Aaron; Lan, Jiong; Williams, Teresa E; Verhagen, Joelle; Huh, Kay; Merritt, Hanne; Chan, John; Kaufman, Susan; Voliva, Charles F; Pecchi, Sabina

    2016-02-01

    Alterations in PI3K/AKT signaling are known to be implicated with tumorigenesis. The PI3 kinases family of lipid kinases has been an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Imidazopyridine compound 1, a potent, selective, and orally available pan-PI3K inhibitor, identified by scaffold morphing of a benzothiazole hit, was further optimized in order to achieve efficacy in a PTEN-deleted A2780 ovarian cancer mouse xenograft model. With a hypothesis that a planar conformation between the core and the 6-heteroaryl ring will allow for the accommodation of larger 5'-substituents in a hydrophobic area under P-loop, SAR efforts focused on 5'-alkoxy heteroaryl rings at the 6-position of imidazopyridine and imidazopyridazine cores that have the same dihedral angle of zero degrees. 6'-Alkoxy 5'-aminopyrazines in the imidazopyridine series were identified as the most potent compounds in the A2780 cell line. Compound 14 with 1,1,1-trifluoroisopropoxy group at 6'-position demonstrated excellent potency and selectivity, good oral exposure in rats and in vivo efficacy in A2780 tumor-bearing mouse. Also, we disclose the X-ray co-crystal structure of one enantiomer of compound 14 in PI3Kα, confirming that the trifluoromethyl group fits nicely in the hydrophobic hot spot under P-loop. PMID:26774655

  5. Efficacy and toxicity of a CD22-targeted antibody-saporin conjugate in a xenograft model of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Jason; O’Donnell, Robert T.; Abuhay, Mastewal; Tuscano, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) can deliver potent drugs to cancer cells by employing the specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). ADCs have demonstrated significant anticancer activity and, in 2011, brentuximab vedotin has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of Hodgkin's and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. CD22 is an ideal target for ADC against B-cell malignancies because of its lineage-specific expression and rapid internalization upon antibody binding. In this study, we evaluated the anti-CD22 mAb HB22.7 as a vehicle for the targeted delivery of the potent toxin saporin (SAP). In vitro, HB22.7-SAP was cytotoxic against a panel of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cell lines representing the most common types of the disease. Moreover, in a xenograft model of NHL, HB22.7-SAP significantly inhibited the growth of established lesions and completely prevented tumor development when treatment was initiated within 24 h from tumor-cell inoculation. HB22.7-SAP had no significant in vivo toxicity. In conclusion, HB22.7 constitutes a potential platform for CD22-targeted ADCs. PMID:23264893

  6. Assessing Metabolic Changes in Response to mTOR Inhibition in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma Xenograft Model Using AcidoCEST MRI.

    PubMed

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Hanke, Neale T; Gill, Alexander; Persky, Daniel O; Howison, Christine M; Pagel, Mark D; Baker, Amanda F

    2016-01-01

    AcidoCEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to measure tumor extracellular pH (pHe) with excellent accuracy and precision. This study investigated the ability of acidoCEST MRI to monitor changes in tumor pHe in response to therapy. To perform this study, we used the Granta 519 human mantle cell lymphoma cell line, which is an aggressive B-cell malignancy that demonstrates activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies using the Granta 519 cell line to investigate the efficacy and associated changes induced by the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001). AcidoCEST MRI studies showed a statistically significant increase in tumor pHe of 0.10 pH unit within 1 day of initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a decrease in tumor growth of the Granta 519 xenograft model. AcidoCEST MRI then measured a decrease in tumor pHe 7 days after initiating treatment, which foreshadowed a return to normal tumor growth rate. Therefore, this study is a strong example that acidoCEST MRI can be used to measure tumor pHe that may serve as a marker for therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies. PMID:27140422

  7. Long-term exposure to dietary sources of genistein induces estrogen-independence in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Juan E.; Ju, Young H.; Baker, Chandra; Doerge, Daniel R.; Helferich, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Scope The long-term effect of exposure to relevant dietary levels of genistein (GEN) on estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) human breast cancer (MCF-7) progression after GEN withdrawal in athymic mice xenograft model was studied. Materials and methods Feeding studies were conducted to determine the estrogenic effect of diets on MCF-7 tumor growth: 1) implantation (19 weeks) and withdrawal (6 weeks) of 17β-estradiol (E2); 2) dietary GEN 500 and 750 ppm during treatment/withdrawal for 23/10 and 15/9 weeks, respectively; and, 3) dietary soy protein isolate (SPI) containing GEN 180 ppm for 31/9 weeks of treatment/withdrawal. MCF-7 tumors grew fast in the presence of E2 implantation and abruptly regressed completely after E2 withdrawal. At different rates, dietary GEN alone (500 and 750 ppm) and GEN (180 ppm)-containing SPI stimulated MCF-7 tumor growth. After removal of the stimulus diet, tumors induced by 750 ppm GEN, but not 500 ppm GEN or SPI, regressed completely. The protein expression of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was higher in the GEN- and SPI-induced non-regressing (GINR) tumors compared to MCF-7 and E2 controls. Conclusion Long-term consumption of low GEN doses (≤500 ppm) promotes MCF-7 tumor growth and results in GINR tumors with more aggressive and advanced growth phenotypes. PMID:24668689

  8. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-12-22

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  9. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  10. Diverse in vivo effects of soluble and membrane-bound M-CSF on tumor-associated macrophages in lymphoma xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jinfeng; Feng, Wenli; Wang, Rong; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Feifei; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is an important cytokine for monocyte/macrophage lineage. Secretory M-CSF (sM-CSF) and membrane-bound M-CSF (mM-CSF) are two major alternative splicing isoforms. The functional diversity of these isoforms in the activation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), especially in lymphoma microenvironment, has not been documented. Here, we studied the effects of M-CSF isoforms on TAMs in xenograft mouse model. More infiltrating TAMs were detected in microenvironment with mM-CSF and sM-CSF. TAMs could be divided into three subpopulations based on their expression of CD206 and Ly6C. While sM-CSF had greater potential to recruit and induce differentiation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations, mM-CSF had greater potential to induce proliferation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations. Though both isoforms educated TAMs and TAM subpopulations to M2-like macrophages, mM-CSF and sM-CSF induced different spectrums of phenotype-associated genes in TAMs and TAM subpopulations. These results suggested the diverse effects of M-CSF isoforms on the activation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations in lymphoma microenvironments. PMID:26595525

  11. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  12. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP) 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:22694981

  13. A mononuclear Cu(II) complex with 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA- and BSA-binding, molecular modeling, and anticancer activity against MCF-7, A-549, and HT-29 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Fatemi, Seyed Jamilaldin; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Nardo, Viviana Mollica

    2015-01-01

    The copper(II) complex of 1,2,4-triazine derivatives, [Cu(dppt)2(H2O)](PF6)2(dppt is 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), has been synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro DNA-binding studies of the complex have been investigated by several methods. The results showed that the complex intercalates into the base pairs of DNA. The complex also indicated good binding propensity to BSA. The results of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods confirm the experimental results. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity indicate that the complex has excellent anticancer activity against the three human carcinoma cell lines, MCF-7, A-549, and HT-29, with IC50 values of 9.8, 7.80, and 4.50 μM, respectively. The microscopic analyses of the cancer cells demonstrate that the Cu(II) complex apparently induced apoptosis. PMID:25874332

  14. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  15. Expression analysis of secreted and cell surface genes of five transformed human cell lines and derivative xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Robert A; Tavassoli, Roya; Kennedy, Scot; Osborn, Steve; Harte, Rachel; Lu, Yan; Napier, Cheryl; Abo, Arie; Chin, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Background Since the early stages of tumorigenesis involve adhesion, escape from immune surveillance, vascularization and angiogenesis, we devised a strategy to study the expression profiles of all publicly known and putative secreted and cell surface genes. We designed a custom oligonucleotide microarray containing probes for 3531 secreted and cell surface genes to study 5 diverse human transformed cell lines and their derivative xenograft tumors. The origins of these human cell lines were lung (A549), breast (MDA MB-231), colon (HCT-116), ovarian (SK-OV-3) and prostate (PC3) carcinomas. Results Three different analyses were performed: (1) A PCA-based linear discriminant analysis identified a 54 gene profile characteristic of all tumors, (2) Application of MANOVA (Pcorr < .05) to tumor data revealed a larger set of 149 differentially expressed genes. (3) After MANOVA was performed on data from individual tumors, a comparison of differential genes amongst all tumor types revealed 12 common differential genes. Seven of the 12 genes were identified by all three analytical methods. These included late angiogenic, morphogenic and extracellular matrix genes such as ANGPTL4, COL1A1, GP2, GPR57, LAMB3, PCDHB9 and PTGER3. The differential expression of ANGPTL4 and COL1A1 and other genes was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Conclusion Overall, a comparison of the three analyses revealed an expression pattern indicative of late angiogenic processes. These results show that a xenograft model using multiple cell lines of diverse tissue origin can identify common tumorigenic cell surface or secreted molecules that may be important biomarker and therapeutic discoveries. PMID:15836779

  16. Ketogenic Diets Enhance Oxidative Stress and Radio-Chemo-Therapy Responses in Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Brandt, Kristin E.; Lindholm, Kaleigh E.; Button, Anna M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Smith, Brian J.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ketogenic diets (KDs) are high in fat and low in carbohydrates as well as protein which forces cells to rely on lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration rather than glycolysis for energy metabolism. Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) are believed to exist in a state of chronic oxidative stress mediated by mitochondrial metabolism. The current study tests the hypothesis that KDs enhance radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by enhancing oxidative stress. Experimental Design Mice bearing NCI-H292 and A549 lung cancer xenografts were fed a KD (KetoCal® 4:1 fats: proteins+carbohydrates) and treated with either conventionally fractionated (1.8-2 Gy) or hypofractionated (6 Gy) radiation as well as conventionally fractionated radiation combined with carboplatin. Mice weights and tumor size were monitored. Tumors were assessed for immuno-reactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-(4HNE) modified proteins as a marker of oxidative stress as well as PCNA and γH2AX as indices of proliferation and DNA damage, respectively. Results The KD combined with radiation resulted in slower tumor growth in both NCI-H292 and A549 xenografts (p<0.05), relative to radiation alone. The KD also slowed tumor growth when combined with carboplatin and radiation, relative to control. Tumors from animals fed a KD in combination with radiation demonstrated increases in oxidative damage mediated by lipid peroxidation as determined by 4HNE-modified proteins as well as decreased proliferation as assessed by decreased immunoreactive PCNA. Conclusions These results show that a KD enhances radio-chemo-therapy responses in lung cancer xenografts by a mechanism that may involve increased oxidative stress. PMID:23743570

  17. Effect of recombinant Newcastle disease virus transfection on lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YAN, YULAN; JIA, LIJUAN; ZHANG, JIN; LIU, YANG; BU, XUEFENG

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been reported to selectively duplicate in and then destroy tumor cells, whilst sparing normal cells. However, the effect of NDV on lung cancer has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, recombinant NDV (rl-RVG) was applied to lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell tumor-bearing mice to explore its effect on the proliferation of the cells and the immune response of the mice. Following rl-RVG transfection, RVG and NDV gene expression, decreased tumor growth, subcutaneous tumor necrosis, tumor apoptosis and an increased number of cluster of differentiation (CD)3−/CD49+ natural killer cells were more evident in the rl-RVG group. The present study demonstrated that rl-RVG transfection effectively restrained lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell growth in vivo, which may have been accomplish by inducing tumor cell apoptosis and regulating the cell immune response. PMID:25364430

  18. Deactivation of A549 cancer cells in vitro by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Chen Wei; Li Hui; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Wang Pengye; Khohsa, M. Latif; Guo Ming; Feng Kecheng; Yang Size

    2011-03-01

    An inactivation mechanism study on A549 cancer cells by means of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle is presented. The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of cell viability after plasma treatment. Experimental results show that the efficiency of argon plasma for the inactivation process is very dependent on power and treatment time. A 27 W power and 120 s treatment time along with 900 standard cubic centimeter per minute Ar flow and a nozzle-to-sample separation of 3 mm are the best parameters of the process. According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the optical microscope images of the A549 cells after plasma treatment, it is concluded that the reactive species (for example, OH and O) in the argon plasma play a major role in the cell deactivation.

  19. The biophysical property of A549 cells transferred by VEGF-D.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Xiu-Li; Wang, Xu; Tian, Hong-Xia; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Li, Yang-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-D (VEGF-D) together with VEGF-C is considered to be associated with lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis and involve in tumorization. This study aims to investigate the influence of exogenous VEGF-D gene on the biophysical property of cell surface of lung adenocarcinoma cell line. A panel of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were examined the expression of VEGF-D and VEGF-C by real-time PCR. The VEGF-D recombinant plasmid containing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was constructed and transfected to the cell line with no expression of VEGF-D and confirmed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Topographic images of cells were obtained by using atomic force microscope (AFM) in contact mode. Unlike VEGF-C, VEGF-D was found to have a very low expression or undetectable expression in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The VEGF-D recombinant plasmid had been constructed successfully and was transferred into the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells which had no endogenous expression of VEGF-D, and exogenous VEGF-D could be detected in mRNA and protein expression levels in the gene modified cells, while the VEGF-C gene expression had no change after VEGF-D transfection. After transfection, the irregular microspikes or nano clusters could observe on the surface of A549 cells, and VEGF-D transfected A549 cells became more rigid. The exogenous VEGF-D gene might cause the remarkable biophysical architectural changes in the A549 cells, which might as a novel biomarker for evaluation of its biological function. PMID:23526563

  20. Brusatol Enhances the Radiosensitivity of A549 Cells by Promoting ROS Production and Enhancing DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Xu, Chang; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been identified as a master regulatory factor in the protection of cells from oxidative and electrophilic stress. However, overexpression of Nrf2 in lung cancer may cause chemoresistance, as well as radioresistance. In this study, we examined the relationship between radioresistance and Nrf2 protein levels in H1299, A549, and H460 cells, and finally chose the A549 cell line to continue with due to its strong radioresistance and high Nrf2 protein levels. We found that the Nrf2 inhibitor, brusatol, could prevent the increase and accumulation of Nrf2 after exposure to irradiation. Additionally, following treatment with 80 nM brusatol, A549 cells became sensitive to irradiation, suffering severe DNA damage. Combination treatment with brusatol and ionizing radiation (IR) can distinctly increase the level of reactive oxygen species in A549 cells, causing a 1.8-fold increase compared with the control, and a 1.4-fold increase compared with IR alone. In fact, in the treatment with both brusatol and IR, lung cancer cell proliferation is halted, gradually leading to cell death. Because Nrf2 is closely linked to DNA damage repair, inhibiting the function of Nrf2, as in brusatol treatment, may increase the DNA damage caused by radiotherapy or chemotherapy, possibly enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Our study is the first to demonstrate brusatol's ability to enhance the responsiveness of lung cancer cells to irradiation, and its potential application as a natural sensitizer in radiotherapy. PMID:27347930

  1. Brusatol Enhances the Radiosensitivity of A549 Cells by Promoting ROS Production and Enhancing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin; Wang, Yan; Du, Liqing; Xu, Chang; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been identified as a master regulatory factor in the protection of cells from oxidative and electrophilic stress. However, overexpression of Nrf2 in lung cancer may cause chemoresistance, as well as radioresistance. In this study, we examined the relationship between radioresistance and Nrf2 protein levels in H1299, A549, and H460 cells, and finally chose the A549 cell line to continue with due to its strong radioresistance and high Nrf2 protein levels. We found that the Nrf2 inhibitor, brusatol, could prevent the increase and accumulation of Nrf2 after exposure to irradiation. Additionally, following treatment with 80 nM brusatol, A549 cells became sensitive to irradiation, suffering severe DNA damage. Combination treatment with brusatol and ionizing radiation (IR) can distinctly increase the level of reactive oxygen species in A549 cells, causing a 1.8-fold increase compared with the control, and a 1.4-fold increase compared with IR alone. In fact, in the treatment with both brusatol and IR, lung cancer cell proliferation is halted, gradually leading to cell death. Because Nrf2 is closely linked to DNA damage repair, inhibiting the function of Nrf2, as in brusatol treatment, may increase the DNA damage caused by radiotherapy or chemotherapy, possibly enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Our study is the first to demonstrate brusatol’s ability to enhance the responsiveness of lung cancer cells to irradiation, and its potential application as a natural sensitizer in radiotherapy. PMID:27347930

  2. Cell-cycle changes and oxidative stress response to magnetite in A549 human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Könczöl, Mathias; Weiss, Adilka; Stangenberg, Evi; Gminski, Richard; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Gieré, Reto; Merfort, Irmgard; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2013-05-20

    In a recent study, magnetite was investigated for its potential to induce toxic effects and influence signaling pathways. It was clearly demonstrated that ROS formation leads to mitochondrial damage and genotoxic effects in A549 cells. On the basis of these findings, we wanted to elucidate the origin of magnetite-mediated ROS formation and its influence on the cell cycle of A549 and H1299 human lung epithelial cells. Concentration- and size-dependent superoxide formation, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), was observed. Furthermore, we could show that the GSH level decreased significantly after exposure to magnetite particles, while catalase (CAT) activity was increased. These effects were also dependent on particle size, albeit less pronounced than those observed with EPR. We were able to show that incubation of A549 cells prior to particle treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, leads to decreased ROS formation, but this effect was not observed for the NOX inhibitor apocynin. Soluble iron does not contribute considerably to ROS production. Analysis of cell-cycle distribution revealed a pronounced sub-G1 peak, which cannot be linked to increased cell death. Western blot analysis did not show activation of p53 but upregulation of p21 in A549. Here, we were unexpectedly able to demonstrate that exposure to magnetite leads to p21-mediated G1-like arrest. This has been reported previously only for low concentrations of microtubule stabilization drugs. Importantly, the arrested sub-G1 cells were viable and showed no caspase 3/7 activation. PMID:23607891

  3. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  4. Imaging and histological characterization of a human brain xenograft in pig: the first induced glioma model in a large animal.

    PubMed

    Selek, Laurent; Seigneuret, Eric; Nugue, Guillaume; Wion, Didier; Nissou, Marie France; Salon, Caroline; Seurin, Marie José; Carozzo, Claude; Ponce, Frédérique; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François

    2014-01-15

    The prognosis of glioblastoma remains poor despite significant improvement in cytoreductive surgery, external irradiation and new approach of systemic treatment as antiangiogenic therapy. One of the issues is the low concentration in the infiltrated parenchyma of therapeutic agent administered intravenously mainly due to the blood-brain barrier. An intracerebral injection is advocated to overpass this barrier, this kind of administration need a low flow and continuous injection. The development of sophisticated implanted devices for convection-enhanced delivery is a mandatory step to have a controlled released of a therapeutic agent in glioblastoma treatment. Before testing such a device in a clinical trial a serious preclinical studies are required, in order to test it in realistic conditions we have develop the first induced high grade glioma model in a non-rodent animal: the pig. 21 pigs have been implanted in the parietal lobe with human glioblastoma cell lineage under a chemical immunosuppression by ciclosporine. A MRI follow up was then realized. 15 pigs have been implanted with U87MG, 14 have presented a macroscopic significant tumor, with radiological and anatomapathological characteristics of high grade glioma. 6 pigs were implanted with G6, stem-like cells tumors of glioblastoma, 1 pig develops a macroscopic tumor. This is the first reproducible glioma model in a large animal described, it open the way to preclinical studies to test implanted devices in anatomic realistic conditions, without the ethical issues of a primate use. PMID:24126047

  5. Sunitinib malate (SU-11248) reduces tumour burden and lung metastasis in an intratibial human xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ram Mohan Ram; Arlt, Matthias JE; Kuzmanov, Aleksandar; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare type of cancer that commonly occurs as a primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite complex treatment protocols, including chemotherapy combined with surgical resection, the prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma and metastases remains poor and more effective therapies are required. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of sunitinib malate, a wide-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a preclinical mouse model of osteosarcoma. Sunitinib significantly inhibited proliferation, provoked apoptosis and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in the human osteosarcoma cell lines SaOS-2 and 143B in vitro. Importantly, sunitinib treatment significantly reduced tumour burden, microvessel density and suppressed pulmonary metastasis in a 143B cell-derived intratibial osteosarcoma model in SCID mice. Sunitinib significantly decreased primary tumor tissue proliferation and reduced tumor vasculature. Our study indicates that sunitinib has potential for effective treatment of metastasizing osteosarcoma and provides the framework for future clinical trials with sunitinib alone or in combination with conventional and other novel therapeutics aiming at increased treatment efficacy and improved patient outcome. PMID:26328246

  6. Isolation of Pancreatic Cancer Cells from a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Allows for Practical Expansion and Preserved Heterogeneity in Culture.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien; Delitto, Daniel; Knowlton, Andrea E; Hartlage, Emily R; Madhavan, Ricky; Gonzalo, David H; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; George, Thomas J; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G

    2016-06-01

    Commercially available, highly passaged pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines are of limited translational value. Attempts to overcome this limitation have primarily consisted of cancer cell isolation and culture directly from human PC specimens. However, these techniques are associated with exceedingly low success rates. Here, we demonstrate a highly reproducible culture of primary PC cell lines (PPCLs) from patient-derived xenografts, which preserve, in part, the intratumoral heterogeneity known to exist in PC. PPCL expansion from patient-derived xenografts was successful in 100% of attempts (5 of 5). Phenotypic analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and short tandem repeat profiling. Importantly, tumorigenicity of PPCLs expanded from patient-derived xenografts was assessed by subcutaneous injection into nonobese diabeteic.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Morphologically, subcutaneous injection of all PPCLs into mice yielded tumors with similar characteristics to the parent xenograft. PPCLs uniformly expressed class I human leukocyte antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, and cytokeratin-19. Heterogeneity within each PPCL persisted in culture for the frequency of cells expressing the cancer stem cell markers CD44, CD133, and c-Met and the immunologic markers human leukocyte antigen class II and programmed death ligand 1. This work therefore presents a reliable method for the rapid expansion of primary human PC cells and, thereby, provides a platform for translational investigation and, importantly, potential personalized therapeutic approaches. PMID:27102771

  7. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei; Uesato, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Michiaki

    2013-04-19

    The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients. PMID:23501104

  8. Effect of evodiamine on the proliferation and apoptosis of A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Ren, Li; Wen, Liujing; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Evodia rutaecarpa is a plant, which has antitumor activity. Evodiamine is an alkaloid with antitumor activity present in E. rutaecarpa and has potential to be developed into a therapeutic antitumor agent. The present study investigated the effect of evodiamine on the proliferation of A549 human lung cancer cells and the mechanism underlying these effects. The results indicated that evodiamine significantly inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis and the expression of reactive oxygen species, arrested the cell cycle, regulated the expression of Survivin, Bcl-2 and Cyclin B1, regulated the activity of caspase-3/8 and glutathione in tumor cells, and decreased the activity of AKT/nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) and Sonic hedgehog/GLI family zinc finger 1 (SHH/GLI1) signaling pathways in A549 cells. In conclusion, the evodiamine-induced inhibition of the proliferation of A549 lung cancer cells may be attributable to its ability to promote oxidative injury in the cells, induce apoptosis, arrest the cell cycle and regulate the AKT/NF‑κB and SHH/GLI1 signaling pathways, subsequently controlling the expression of tumor‑associated genes. PMID:27485202

  9. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  10. Selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guihua

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells. Methods Proliferation assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, apoptosis detecting, flow cytometry and western blot were performed. Results It was found that treatment with propafenone at the concentration of 0.014 g/L or higher for 48 h could induce apoptosis in Hela cells greatly, while it was not observed in oxytetracycline and metamizole at the concentration of 0.20 g/L for 48 h. Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. The results of LDH assay demonstrated that the drugs at the test range of concentration did not cause necrosis in the cells. Propafenone could elevate the protein level of P53 effectively (P<0.01). Conclusions Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizol (dipyrone) all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. Propafenone also displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of Hela cells. PMID:24385693

  11. MicroRNA-1228(*) inhibit apoptosis in A549 cells exposed to fine particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Ding, Zhen; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xin; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Chen, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Studies have reported associations between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and respiratory disorders; however, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear owing to the complex components of PM2.5. microRNAs (miRNAs) demonstrate tremendous regulation to target genes, which are sensitive to exogenous stimulation, and facilitate the integrative understood of biological responses. Here, significantly modulated miRNA were profiled by miRNA microarray, coupled with bioinformatic analysis; the potential biological function of modulated miRNA were predicted and subsequently validated by cell-based assays. Downregulation of miR-1228-5p (miR-1228(*)) expression in human A549 cells were associated with PM2.5-induced cellular apoptosis through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. Further, overexpression of miR-1228(*) rescued the cellular damages induced by PM2.5. Thus, our results demonstrate that PM2.5-induced A549 apoptosis is initiated by mitochondrial dysfunction and miR-1228(*) could protect A549 cells against apoptosis. The involved pathways and target genes might be used for future mechanistic studies. PMID:26867688

  12. Anacardic acid induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeong-Ae; Shin, Pyung-Gyun; Kim, Gun-Do

    2013-03-01

    Anacardic acid (AA) is a constituent of the cashew nut shell and is known as an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We investigated the cytotoxicity of AA on cancer cells and more experiments to reveal the cell death mechanism focused on A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells for our interest in lung cancer. To examine the molecular mechanism of cell death in AA treated A549 cells, we performed experiments such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), western blot analysis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), genomic DNA extraction and staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). For the first time we revealed that AA induces caspase-independent apoptosis with no inhibition of cytotoxicity by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk, in A549 cells. Our results showed the possibility of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis through the activation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and an intrinsic pathway executioner such as cytochrome c. This study will be helpful in revealing the cell death mechanisms and in developing potential drugs for lung cancer using AA. PMID:23314312

  13. Sinomenine inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell invasion by mediating the STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shulong; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Liu, Rui; Qi, Xin; Xu, Xia; Li, Jie; Bao, Yanju; Zheng, Honggang; Hua, Baojin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the failure of lung cancer treatment may occur as a result of tumor invasion and metastasis. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor, is a key signaling molecule involved in the proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Sinomenine is an alkaloid compound with an antineoplastic potential against a variety of cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the antitumor mechanisms of sinomenine in the A549 human lung cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that sinomenine manifested dose-dependent cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. The protein expression of Janus kinase 2, STAT3, phosphorylated-STAT3, Snail, N-cadherin and vimentin decreased in sinomenine-treated cells, while E-cadherin protein expression increased. The regulation of STAT3, N-cadherin and E-cadherin by sinomenine was further confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescent staining. It was demonstrated that sinomenine exerts inhibitory effects on A549 human lung cancer cell invasion, possibly through the inhibition of STAT3 signaling. These results provide a novel insight into the role of sinomenine in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27446441

  14. Effect of taxol from Pestalotiopsis mangiferae on A549 cells-In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Govindarajan; Sureban, Sripathi M

    2009-12-01

    Pestalotiopsis mangiferae Coelomycete fungi were used to examine the production of taxol. The taxol isolated from this fungus is biologically active against cancer cell lines were investigated for its antiproliferative activity in human Non Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 cells. The results showed that the methylene chloride extraction of Pestalotiopsis mangiferae inhibited the proliferation of A 549 cells as measured by MTT and Trypan blue assay. Flow cytometric analysis showed that methylene chloride extraction of Pestalotiopsis mangiferae blocked cell cycle progression in G0/G1 phase. In addition fungal taxol induced A549 cell apoptosis as determined by propidium iodide staining. Further the percentage of LDH release was increased at increasing concentrations which is a measure of cell death. The levels of sialic acid levels and DNA, RNA and protein levels were decreased after treatment with methylene chloride extraction of Pestalotiopsis mangiferae. We suggests that methylene chloride extraction of Pestalotiopsis mangiferae might be considered for future therapeutic application with further studies against lung cancer. PMID:25206246

  15. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  16. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Deng, Yubin; Zeng, Mian

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. PMID:27103436

  17. Establishment of a human multiple myeloma xenograft model in the chicken to study tumor growth, invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Kern, Johann; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Untergasser, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a malignant plasma cell disease, remains incurable and novel drugs are required to improve the prognosis of patients. Due to the lack of the bone microenvironment and auto/paracrine growth factors human MM cells are difficult to cultivate. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish proper in vitro and in vivo culture systems to study the action of novel therapeutics on human MM cells. Here we present a model to grow human multiple myeloma cells in a complex 3D environment in vitro and in vivo. MM cell lines OPM-2 and RPMI-8226 were transfected to express the transgene GFP and were cultivated in the presence of human mesenchymal cells and collagen type-I matrix as three-dimensional spheroids. In addition, spheroids were grafted on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and tumor growth was monitored by stereo fluorescence microscopy. Both models allow the study of novel therapeutic drugs in a complex 3D environment and the quantification of the tumor cell mass after homogenization of grafts in a transgene-specific GFP-ELISA. Moreover, angiogenic responses of the host and invasion of tumor cells into the subjacent host tissue can be monitored daily by a stereo microscope and analyzed by immunohistochemical staining against human tumor cells (Ki-67, CD138, Vimentin) or host mural cells covering blood vessels (desmin/ASMA). In conclusion, the onplant system allows studying MM cell growth and angiogenesis in a complex 3D environment and enables screening for novel therapeutic compounds targeting survival and proliferation of MM cells. PMID:25993267

  18. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, MasamichI; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  19. Oral administration of naturally occurring chitosan-based nanoformulated green tea polyphenol EGCG effectively inhibits prostate cancer cell growth in a xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical animal models, several phytochemicals have shown excellent potential to be used as effective agents in preventing and treating many cancers. However, the limited bioavailability of active agents could be one reason for their restricted usefulness for human consumption. To overcome this limitation, we recently introduced the concept of nanochemoprevention by encapsulating useful bioactive food components for their slow and sustained release. Here, we report the synthesis, characterization and efficacy assessment of a nanotechnology-based oral formulation of chitosan nanoparticles encapsulating epigallocatechin-3-gallate (Chit-nanoEGCG) for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) in a preclinical setting. Chit-nanoEGCG with a size of <200nm diameter and encapsulating EGCG as determined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope showed slow release of EGCG in simulated gastric juice acidic pH and faster release in simulated intestinal fluid. The antitumor efficacy of Chit-nanoEGCG was assessed in subcutaneously implanted 22Rν1 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Treatment with Chit-nanoEGCG resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and secreted prostate-specific antigen levels compared with EGCG and control groups. In tumor tissues of mice treated with Chit-nanoEGCG, compared with groups treated with EGCG and controls, there was significant (i) induction of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases cleavage, (ii) increase in the protein expression of Bax with concomitant decrease in Bcl-2, (iii) activation of caspases and (iv) reduction in Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Through this study, we propose a novel preventive and therapeutic modality for PCa using EGCG that addresses issues related to bioavailability. PMID:24072771

  20. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masato; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Misawa, Takeyuki; Homma, Sadamu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15), a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression. PMID:26642349

  1. Combination of Calcitriol and Dietary Soy Exhibits Enhanced Anticancer Activity and Increased Hypercalcemic Toxicity in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer Y.; Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V.; Feldman, David

    2012-01-01

    Background The potential role of vitamin D and soy in prostate cancer (PCa) prevention/treatment has gained much attention in recent years. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer activity of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, dietary soy, and their combinations in a mouse model of PCa. Methods Athymic male nude mice bearing PC-3 human PCa xenografts received diets containing 10 kcal% or 20 kcal% soy, calcitriol injections, or a combination of dietary soy and calcitriol. Changes in tumor growth, serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D and calcium, and regulation of tumor gene expression were examined. Results The combination treatments resulted in substantially greater inhibition of tumor growth than either agent alone. Soy diets alone caused a modest elevation in serum 1,25(OH)2D, whereas the calcitriol-soy combinations led to substantially elevated serum 1,25(OH)2D, hypercalcemia, and in some cases lethal toxicity. The combinations enhanced calcitriol activity in regulating target gene expression, including greater up-regulation of anti-proliferative (p21, IGFBP-3) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes, increased inhibition of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and cell cycle promoting (cyclin D1) genes, and suppression of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and signaling (COX-2, 15-PGDH, PG receptors). Increases in serum calcium were accompanied by elevated expression of intestinal calcium absorption genes (TRPV6, calbindin-9k). Conclusions Soy increases the bioavailability of endogenous and administered calcitriol, thereby enhancing its anticancer effects and risk of hypercalcemia. Since both agents are easily available as dietary supplements, the increased potential for hypercalcemic toxicity becomes an important factor when considering the combined use of vitamin D and soy in PCa therapy. PMID:22457201

  2. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  3. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs)in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138−CD34− phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:26314844

  4. Iron-Oxide-Based Nanovector for Tumor Targeted siRNA Delivery in an Orthotopic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenograft Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Sham, Jonathan G; Jeon, Mike; Stephen, Zachary R; Bakthavatsalam, Arvind; Park, James O; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-01-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) holds promise as a new class of therapeutics for HCC, as it can achieve sequence-specific gene knockdown with low cytotoxicity. However, the main challenge in the clinical application of siRNA lies in the lack of effective delivery approaches that need to be highly specific and thus incur low or no systemic toxicity. Here, a nonviral nanoparticle-based gene carrier is presented that can specifically deliver siRNA to HCC. The nanovector (NP-siRNA-GPC3 Ab) is made of an iron oxide core coated with chitosan-polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted polyethyleneimine copolymer, which is further functionalized with siRNA and conjugated with a monoclonal antibody (Ab) against human glypican-3 (GPC3) receptor highly expressed in HCC. A rat RH7777 HCC cell line that coexpresses human GPC3 and firefly luciferase (Luc) is established to evaluate the nanovector. The nanoparticle-mediated delivery of siRNA against Luc effectively suppresses Luc expression in vitro without notable cytotoxicity. Significantly, NP-siLuc-GPC3 Ab administered intravenously in an orthotopic model of HCC is able to specifically bound to tumor and induce remarkable inhibition of Luc expression. The findings demonstrate the potential of using this nanovector for targeted delivery of therapeutic siRNA to HCC. PMID:26641029

  5. Cryo-image Analysis of Tumor Cell Migration, Invasion, and Dispersal in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Qutaish, Mohammed Q.; Sullivant, Kristin E.; Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Lu, Hong; Roy, Debashish; Wang, Jing; Basilion, James P.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Wilson, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goals of this study were to create cryo-imaging methods to quantify characteristics (size, dispersal, and blood vessel density) of mouse orthotopic models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to enable studies of tumor biology, targeted imaging agents, and theranostic nanoparticles. Procedures Green fluorescent protein-labeled, human glioma LN-229 cells were implanted into mouse brain. At 20–38 days, cryo-imaging gave whole brain, 4-GB, 3D microscopic images of bright field anatomy, including vasculature, and fluorescent tumor. Image analysis/visualization methods were developed. Results Vessel visualization and segmentation methods successfully enabled analyses. The main tumor mass volume, the number of dispersed clusters, the number of cells/cluster, and the percent dispersed volume all increase with age of the tumor. Histograms of dispersal distance give a mean and median of 63 and 56 μm, respectively, averaged over all brains. Dispersal distance tends to increase with age of the tumors. Dispersal tends to occur along blood vessels. Blood vessel density did not appear to increase in and around the tumor with this cell line. Conclusion Cryo-imaging and software allow, for the first time, 3D, whole brain, microscopic characterization of a tumor from a particular cell line. LN-229 exhibits considerable dispersal along blood vessels, a characteristic of human tumors that limits treatment success. PMID:22125093

  6. Anti-tumor activity of fenretinide complexed with human serum albumin in lung cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Tesei, Anna; Pignatta, Sara; Falconi, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    Sufficient knowledge regarding cellular and molecular basis of lung cancer progression and metastasis would help in the development of novel and effective strategies for the treatment of lung cancer. 4HPR is a synthetic retinoid with potential anti-tumor activity but is still limited because of its poor bioavailability. The use of albumin as a complexing agent for a hydrophobic drug is expected to improve the water solubility and consequently their bioavailability.This study investigated the antitumor activity of a novel complex between albumin and 4-HPR in a mouse model of human lung cancer and focuses on role and mechanism of Cav-1 mainly involved in regulating cancer and Acsvl3 mainly connected with tumor growth. Their expressions were assayed by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, to demonstrate the reduction of the tumor growth following the drug treatment. Our results showed a high antitumor activity of 4HPR-HSA by reduction of the volume of tumor mass and the presence of a high level of apoptotic cell by TUNEL assay. The downregulation of Cav-1 and Acsvl3 suggested a reduction of tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated the great potential of 4HPR-HSA in the treatment of lung cancer. More data about the mechanism of drug delivery the 4HPR-HSA are necessary. PMID:25015569

  7. In vivo sampling of Verteporfin uptake in pancreas cancer xenograft models: comparison of surface, oral, and interstitial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; O'Hara, Julia A.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Mosse, Sandy; Pereira, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with Verteporfin is being investigated as a pancreatic cancer treatment in the cases for non-surgical candidates. Tissue response to PDT is based on a number of parameters including photosensitizer (PS) dose, light dose and time interval between light application and PS injection. In this study, PS uptake and distribution in animal leg muscle, oral cavity tissues, pancreas and tumor was measured in vivo using light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) via an Aurora Optics Inc. PDT fluorescence dosimeter. An orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (AsPC-1) was implanted in SCID mice and treated with the PS. Probe measurements were made using a surface probe and an interstitial needle probe before and up to one hour after intravenous tail vein injection of the PS. The study demonstrated that it is possible to correlate in-vivo LIFS measurements of the PS uptake in the pancreas with measurements taken from the oral cavity indicating that light dosimetry of PDT of the pancreas can be ascertained from the LIFS measurements in the oral cavity. These results emphasize the importance of light dosimetry in improving the therapeutic outcome of PDT through light dose adaptation to the relative in situ tissue PS concentration.

  8. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotube variants: a comparative in vitro exposure study with A549 epithelial and J774 macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Kumarathasan, Prem; Breznan, Dalibor; Das, Dharani; Salam, Mohamed A; Siddiqui, Yunus; MacKinnon-Roy, Christine; Guan, Jingwen; de Silva, Nimal; Simard, Benoit; Vincent, Renaud

    2015-03-01

    While production of engineered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has escalated in recent years, knowledge of risk associated with exposure to these materials remains unclear. We report on the cytotoxicity of four CNT variants in human lung epithelial cells (A549) and murine macrophages (J774). Morphology, metal content, aggregation/agglomeration state, pore volume, surface area and modifications were determined for the pristine and oxidized single-walled (SW) and multi-walled (MW) CNTs. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by cellular ATP content, BrdU incorporation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and CellTiter-Blue (CTB) reduction assays. All CNTs were more cytotoxic than respirable TiO2 and SiO2 reference particles. Oxidation of CNTs removed most metallic impurities but introduced surface polar functionalities. Although slopes of fold changes for cytotoxicity endpoints were steeper with J774 compared to A549 cells, CNT cytotoxicity ranking in both cell types was assay-dependent. Based on CTB reduction and BrdU incorporation, the cytotoxicity of the polar oxidized CNTs was higher compared to the pristine CNTs. In contrast, pristine CNTs were more cytotoxic than oxidized CNTs when assessed for cellular ATP and LDH. Correlation analyses between CNTs' physico-chemical properties and average relative potency revealed the impact of metal content and surface area on the potency values estimated using ATP and LDH assays, while surface polarity affected the potency values estimated from CTB and BrdU assays. We show that in order to reliably estimate the risk posed by these materials, in vitro toxicity assessment of CNTs should be conducted with well characterized materials, in multiple cellular models using several cytotoxicity assays that report on distinct cellular processes. PMID:24713075

  9. Growth and Metastases of Human Lung Cancer Are Inhibited in Mouse Xenografts by a Transition State Analogue of 5′-Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Indranil; Locker, Joseph; Cassera, Maria B.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Dong, Xinyuan; Hemeon, Ivan; Evans, Gary B.; Guha, Chandan; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    The S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) salvage enzyme 5′-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) has been implicated as both a cancer target and a tumor suppressor. We tested these hypotheses in mouse xenografts of human lung cancers. AdoMet recycling from 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA) was blocked by inhibition of MTAP with methylthio-DADMe-Immucillin-A (MTDIA), an orally available, nontoxic, picomolar transition state analogue. Blood, urine, and tumor levels of MTA increased in response to MTDIA treatment. MTDIA treatment inhibited A549 (human non-small cell lung carcinoma) and H358 (human bronchioloalveolar non-small cell lung carcinoma cells) xenograft tumor growth in immunodeficient Rag2−/−γC−/− and NCr-nu mice. Systemic MTA accumulation is implicated as the tumor-suppressive metabolite because MTDIA is effective for in vivo treatment of A549 MTAP−/− and H358 MTAP+/+ tumors. Tumors from treated mice showed increased MTA and decreased polyamines but little alteration in AdoMet, methionine, or adenine levels. Gene expression profiles of A549 tumors from treated and untreated mice revealed only modest alterations with 62 up-regulated and 63 down-regulated mRNAs (≥3-fold). MTDIA antitumor activity in xenografts supports MTAP as a target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:21135097

  10. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei; Uesato, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Michiaki

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.

  11. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  12. Differentiation of xenografted human fetal lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Floros, Joanna; Phelps, David S.; Wigdahl, Brian; Welsh, Patricia; Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A.; Pree, Alphonse Leure du; Myers, Roland; Howett, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize xenografted human fetal lung tissue with respect to developmental stage-specific cytodifferentiation. Human fetal lung tissue (pseudoglandular stage) was grafted either beneath the renal capsule or the skin of athymic mice (NCr-nu). Tissues were analyzed from 3 to 42 days post-engraftment for morphological alterations by light and electron microscopy (EM), and for surfactant protein mRNA and protein by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC), respectively. The changes observed resemble those seen in human lung development in utero in many respects, including the differentiation of epithelium to the saccular stage. Each stage occurred over approximately one week in the graft in contrast to the eight weeks of normal in utero development. At all time points examined, all four surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) were detected in the epithelium by ICC. Lamellar bodies were first identified by EM in 14 day xenografts. By day 21, a significant increase in lamellar body expression was observed. Cellular proliferation, as marked by PCNA ICC and elastic fiber deposition resembled those of canalicular and saccular in utero development. This model in which xenografted lung tissue in different stages of development is available may facilitate the study of human fetal lung development and the impact of various pharmacological agents on this process. PMID:17555893

  13. Evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced and photoacoustic CT to assess intra-tumor heterogeneity in xenograft mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Dzemidzic, Mario; Liang, Yun; Kruger, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate photoacoustic CT spectroscopy (PCT-S) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) ability to measure parameters - oxygen saturation and vascular physiology - associated with the intra-tumor oxygenation status. Material and Methods: Breast (VEGF165 enhance MCF-7) and ovarian (SKOV3x) cancer cells were implanted into the fat pads and flanks of immune deficient mice and allowed to grow to a diameter of 8-15 mm. CT was used to determine physiological parameters by acquiring a sequence of scans over a 10 minute period after an i.v. injection of a radio-opaque contrast agent (Isovue). These time-dependent contrast-enhanced curves were fit to a two-compartmental model determining tumor perfusion, fractional plasma volume, permeability-surface area produce, and fractional interstitial volume on a voxel-by-voxel basis. After which, the tumors were imaged using photoacoustic CT (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202). The near infrared spectra (700-910 nm) within the vasculature was fit to linear combination of measured oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin blood samples to obtain oxygen saturation levels (SaO II). Results: The PCT-S scanner was first calibrated using different samples of oxygenated blood, from which a statistical error ranging from 2.5-6.5% was measured and a plot of the hemoglobin dissociation curve was consistent with empirical formula. In vivo determination of tumor vasculature SaO II levels were measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Tumor depend variations in SaO II - 0.32 (ovarian) and 0.60 (breast) - and in vascular physiology - perfusion, 1.03 and 0.063 mL/min/mL, and fractional plasma volume, 0.20 and 0.07 - were observed. Conclusion: Combined, PCT-S and CED-CT has the potential to measure intra-tumor levels of tumor oxygen saturation and vascular physiology, key parameters associated with hypoxia.

  14. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma in Ar/O{sub 2} promoting apoptosis behavior in A549 cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Li Hui; Chen Wei; Lv Guohua; Wang Xingquan; Zhang Guoping; Wang Pengye; Ostrikov, Kostya; Yang Size

    2011-12-19

    The Ar/O{sub 2} plasma needle in the induction of A549 cancer cells apoptosis process is studied by means of real-time observation. The entire process of programmed cell death is observed. The typical morphological changes of A549 apoptosis are detected by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, for example, chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation. Cell viability is determined and quantified by neutral red uptake assay, and the survival rate of A549 from Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas is presented. Further spectral analysis indicates the reactive species, including O and OH play crucial roles in the cell inactivation.

  15. Inhibition of PARP-1 by olaparib (AZD2281) increases the radiosensitivity of a lung tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Senra, Joana M; Telfer, Brian A; Cherry, Kim E; McCrudden, Cian M; Hirst, David G; O'Connor, Mark J; Wedge, Stephen R; Stratford, Ian J

    2011-10-01

    PARP-1 is a critical enzyme in the repair of DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of PARP-1 increases the effectiveness of radiation in killing tumor cells. However, although the mechanism(s) are well understood for these radiosensitizing effects in vitro, the underlying mechanism(s) in vivo are less clear. Nicotinamide, a drug structurally related to the first generation PARP-1 inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide, reduces tumor hypoxia by preventing transient cessations in tumor blood flow, thus improving tumor oxygenation and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Here, we investigate whether olaparib, a potent PARP-1 inhibitor, enhances radiotherapy, not only by inhibiting DNA repair but also by changing tumor vascular hemodynamics in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In irradiated Calu-6 and A549 cells, olaparib enhanced the cytotoxic effects of radiation (sensitizer enhancement ratio at 10% survival = 1.5 and 1.3) and DNA double-strand breaks persisted for at least 24 hours after treatment. Combination treatment of Calu-6 xenografts with olaparib and fractionated radiotherapy caused significant tumor regression (P = 0.007) relative to radiotherapy alone. To determine whether this radiosensitization was solely due to effects on DNA repair, we used a dorsal window chamber model to establish the drug/radiation effects on vessel dynamics. Olaparib alone, when given as single or multiple daily doses, or in combination with fractionated radiotherapy, increased the perfusion of tumor blood vessels. Furthermore, an ex vivo assay in phenylephrine preconstricted arteries confirmed olaparib to have higher vasodilatory properties than nicotinamide. This study suggests that olaparib warrants consideration for further development in combination with radiotherapy in clinical oncology settings such as NSCLC. PMID:21825006

  16. Molecular profiling of patient-derived breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Identification of new therapeutic agents for breast cancer (BC) requires preclinical models that reproduce the molecular characteristics of their respective clinical tumors. In this work, we analyzed the genomic and gene expression profiles of human BC xenografts and the corresponding patient tumors. Methods Eighteen BC xenografts were obtained by grafting tumor fragments from patients into Swiss nude mice. Molecular characterization of patient tumors and xenografts was performed by DNA copy number analysis and gene expression analysis using Affymetrix Microarrays. Results Comparison analysis showed that 14/18 pairs of tumors shared more than 56% of copy number alterations (CNA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis showed that 16/18 pairs segregated together, confirming the similarity between tumor pairs. Analysis of recurrent CNA changes between patient tumors and xenografts showed losses in 176 chromosomal regions and gains in 202 chromosomal regions. Gene expression profile analysis showed that less than 5% of genes had recurrent variations between patient tumors and their respective xenografts; these genes largely corresponded to human stromal compartment genes. Finally, analysis of different passages of the same tumor showed that sequential mouse-to-mouse tumor grafts did not affect genomic rearrangements or gene expression profiles, suggesting genetic stability of these models over time. Conclusions This panel of human BC xenografts maintains the overall genomic and gene expression profile of the corresponding patient tumors and remains stable throughout sequential in vivo generations. The observed genomic profile and gene expression differences appear to be due to the loss of human stromal genes. These xenografts, therefore, represent a validated model for preclinical investigation of new therapeutic agents. PMID:22247967

  17. PET Imaging of Serotonin Transporters With 4-[(18)F]-ADAM in a Parkinsonian Rat Model With Porcine Neural Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Li, I-Hsun; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chou, Ta-Kai; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. Apart from effective strategies to halt the underlying neuronal degeneration, cell replacement now offers novel prospects for PD therapy. Porcine embryonic neural tissue has been considered an alternative source to human fetal grafts in neurodegenerative disorders because its use avoids major practical and ethical issues. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of embryonic day 27 (E27) porcine mesencephalic tissue transplantation in a PD rat model using animal positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with 4-[(18)F]-ADAM, a serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent. The parkinsonian rat was induced by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the right nigrostriatal pathway. The apomorphine-induced rotation behavioral test and 4-[(18)F]-ADAM/animal PET scanning were carried out following 6-OHDA lesioning. At the second week following 6-OHDA lesioning, the parkinsonian rat rotates substantially on apomorphine-induced contralateral turning. In addition, the mean striatal-specific uptake ratio (SUR) of 4-[(18)F]-ADAM decreased by 44%. After transplantation, the number of drug-induced rotations decreased markedly, and the mean SUR of 4-[(18)F]-ADAM and the level of SERT immunoreactivity (SERT-ir) in striatum were partially restored. The mean SUR level was restored to 71% compared to that for the contralateral intact side, which together with the abundant survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons accounted for functional recovery at the fourth week postgraft. In regard to the extent of donor-derived cells, we found the neurons of the xenografts from E27 transgenic pigs harboring red fluorescent protein (RFP) localized with TH-ir cells and SERT-ir in the grafted area. Thus, transplanted E27 porcine mesencephalic tissue may restore dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in the parkinsonian rat

  18. Anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody enhances antitumor immunity by modulating tumor-infiltrating Tregs in an ovarian cancer xenograft humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Kuan; Peterson, Eric; Sun, Jiusong; Goudie, Calum; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Liu, Joyce F.; Matulonis, Ursula; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are recruited to tumor sites where they can suppress antitumor immunity. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed at high levels on functional CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs and production of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 by tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages is associated with Treg recruitment to the tumor site. Here, we tested IgG1 and IgG4 isotypes of human anti-CCR4 mAb2-3 for their in vitro activity and in vivo capacity in a NSG mouse model bearing CCL22-secreting ovarian cancer (OvCA) xenograft to modulate Tregs and restore antitumor activity. Both mAb2-3 isotypes blocked in vitro chemoattraction of Tregs to CCL22-secreting OvCA cells. However, they differed in their in vivo mode of action with IgG1 causing Treg depletion and IgG4 blocking migration to the tumors. Primary T cells that were primed with OvCA-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) demonstrated INFγ secretion that could be enhanced through Treg depletion by mAb2-3. Humanized mice reconstructed with allogeneic tumor-primed T cells (TP-T) were used to evaluate the restoration of OvCA immunity by depletion or blockade of Tregs with mAb2-3. We observed that IgG1 was more potent than IgG4 in inhibiting tumor growth. Mechanism studies demonstrated that mAb2-3 treatment lead to inhibition of IL-2 binding to its receptor. Further studies showed that mAb2-3 induced CD25 shedding (sCD25) from Tregs which lead to a decrease in IL-2-dependent survival. Together, the results demonstrate that mAb2-3 is an agonist antibody that can restore anti-OvCA immunity through modulation of Treg activity. PMID:27141347

  19. Burkholderia pseudomallei Biofilm Promotes Adhesion, Internalization and Stimulates Proinflammatory Cytokines in Human Epithelial A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunyanee, Chanikarn; Kamjumphol, Watcharaporn; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Wongwajana, Suwin; Wongratanacheewin, Surasak; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis. Inhalational exposure leading to pulmonary melioidosis is the most common clinical manifestation with significant mortality. However, the role of B. pseudomallei biofilm phenotype during bacterial-host interaction remains unclear. We hypothesize that biofilm phenotype may play a role in such interactions. In this study, B. pseudomallei H777 (biofilm wild type), B. pseudomallei M10 (biofilm mutant) and B. pseudomallei C17 (biofilm-complemented) strains were used to assess the contribution of biofilm to adhesion to human lung epithelial cells (A549), intracellular interactions, apoptosis/necrosis and impact on proinflammatory responses. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that B. pseudomallei H777 and C17 produced biofilm, whereas M10 did not. To determine the role of biofilm in host interaction, we assessed the ability of each of the three strains to interact with the A549 cells at MOI 10. Strain H777 exhibited higher levels of attachment and invasion compared to strain M10 (p < 0.05). In addition, the biofilm-complemented strain, C17 exhibited restored bacterial invasion ability. Flow cytometry combined with a double-staining assay using annexin V and propidium iodide revealed significantly higher numbers of early apoptotic and late apoptotic A549 cells when these were infected with strain H777 (1.52%) and C17 (1.43%) compared to strain M10 (0.85%) (p < 0.05). Strains H777 and C17 were able to stimulate significant secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 compared with the biofilm mutant (p < 0.05). Together, these findings demonstrated the role of biofilm-associated phenotypes of B. pseudomallei in cellular pathogenesis of human lung epithelial cells with respect to initial attachment and invasion, apoptosis and proinflammatory responses. PMID:27529172

  20. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Ho, Yen Fong; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthohumol, a major prenylated chalcone found in female hop plant, Humulus lupulus, was reported to have various chemopreventive and anti-cancer properties. However, its apoptotic effect on human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was unknown. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the effects of xanthohumol on apoptosis in A549 human NSCLC cells. Materials and Methods: A549 cell proliferation was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Morphological changes of the cells were studied via phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V-FITC/PI) staining, DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay mitochondrial membrane potential assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity studies. Results: Xanthohumol was found to decrease cell proliferation in A549 cells but had relatively low cytotoxicity on normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Typical cellular and nuclear apoptotic features were also observed in A549 cells treated with xanthohumol. Onset of apoptosis in A549 cells was further confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells after treatment. Xanthohumol induced accumulation of cells in sub G1 and S phase based on cell cycle analysis and also increased the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion: This work suggests that xanthohumol as an apoptosis inducer, may be a potent therapeutic compound for NSCLC. PMID:26664015

  1. [Astaxanthin inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of A549 lung cancer cells via blocking JAK1/STAT3 pathway].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuntao; Zhang, Jinji; Liu, Tienan; Jiao, Guimei; Li, Changzai; Hu, Baoshan

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-tumor effects of astaxanthin on A549 lung cancer cells and the related mechanisms. Methods A549 cells were cultured with various concentrations of astaxanthin (20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μmol/L), and DMSO at the same concentrations served as vehicle controls. The viability of A549 cells was detected by CCK-8 assay; cell cycle and apoptosis were observed by flow cytometry; and the expressions of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax), signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), and Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) were evaluated by Western blotting. Results CCK-8 assay showed that astaxanthin decreased the proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that astaxanthin increased the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Western blotting showed that astaxanthin up-regulated the expression of Bax and down-regulated the expressions of Bcl-2, STAT3 and JAK1. Conclusion Astaxanthin functions as a potent inhibitor of A549 lung cancer cell growth by targeting JAK1/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27371847

  2. Efficacy of treatment of colon, lung and breast human carcinoma xenografts with: doxorubicin, cisplatin, irinotecan or topotecan.

    PubMed

    Hardman, W E; Moyer, M P; Cameron, I L

    1999-01-01

    Given that human cancer xenografts tend to retain chemosensitivities similar to the cancerous tissue of origin, human carcinoma xenografts grown in nude mice were tested for sensitivity to four drug protocols: doxorubicin at 5 mg/kg, i.v., q5d; irinotecan at 60 mg/kg, i.v., q4d; cisplatin 5 mg/kg, i.p., q7d; and topotecan 1.5 mg/kg, p.o., qd (5 of 7 days). Irinotecan and doxorubicin protocols either halted or caused significant regression of the breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB 231 and T47D). None of the protocols tested resulted in significant regression in the lung cancer xenografts (H460, A549 and H226) although both irinotecan and doxorubicin did halt growth of the H226 xenograft. The ability of the irinotecan treatment to cause regression of xenograft size in all three colon cancer cell lines (SW620, COLO205 and HT29) justifies further clinical trials of irinotecan as an especially promising drug for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:10472342

  3. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Le; Serra, Stefano; Law, Calvin; Wei, Alice; Stockley, Tracy L; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are increasing in incidence yet the cause of these tumors remains unknown. Familial associations have shed light on the genetic basis of some of these tumors, but sporadic tumors seem to have primarily epigenetic dysregulation. The rarity of cell lines and animal models has been a barrier to studies of treatment modalities. We set out to develop a xenograft model of gastrointestinal NETs. Primary human NETs were collected at the time of surgery under sterile conditions and xenografted into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was measured and when tumors reached 1500 mm(3), they were excised and half was re-xenografted through multiple generations. The other half was bisected; a part was frozen and a part was fixed for morphologic and immunohistochemical characterization as well as molecular validation of fidelity of a successful xenograft. Of 106 human NETs, seven were successfully engrafted of which only one tumor was successfully propagated for eight passages. Two years later, the tumor retains its neuroendocrine features and similarity to the original primary human tumor. It has retained expression of keratin as well as chromogranin A reactivity. The establishment of a NET xenograft provides a model for further study of the biological behavior of these tumors and can be used to examine the in vivo effects of various medical and targeted radiotherapeutic agents on tumor growth. PMID:27067082

  4. Analysis of the Lipidome of Xenografts Using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M. Laura; Escribá, Pablo V.; Fernández, José A.

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  5. Overexpression of the hydatidiform mole-related gene F10 inhibits apoptosis in A549 cells through downregulation of BCL2-associated X protein and caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Song, Yali; Zhang, Gong; Zhu, Xiulan; Pang, Zhanjun; Xing, Fuqi; Quan, Song

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the overexpression of the hydatidiform mole-related gene F10 affects apoptosis in human lung cancer A549 cells. A549 cells were transfected with pEGFP-N1-F10 (A549-F10) or pEGFP-N1 empty vector (A549-empty). Untransfected A549, A549-F10 or A549-empty cells were examined using the MTT cell proliferation assay and the TUNEL-FITC/Hoechst 33258 apoptosis assay. Western blotting was used to examine the expression levels of the pro-apoptotic genes, BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) and caspase-3. F10 was stably expressed in A549 cells. From 12 h, A549-F10 cells proliferated markedly faster than the untransfected and A549-empty cells. F10 overexpression also significantly inhibited apoptosis, as shown by the reduced number of TUNEL and Hoechst 33258 double-positive cells. This inhibition was likely due to an F10-induced reduction in the BAX and caspase-3 levels. The results of this study indicate that F10 overexpression inhibits apoptosis in A549 cells through the downregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes BAX and caspase-3. PMID:23741243

  6. Patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Carina; Costa, Céu; Sousa, Nuno; Amado, Francisco; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-10-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTXs) are said to accurately reflect the heterogeneity of human tumors. In the case of human bladder cancer, few studies are available featuring these models. The best methodology to develop and the real value of the model remain unclear. This systematic review aims to elucidate the best methodology to establish and use PDTXs to study the characteristics and behavior of human bladder tumors. The value and potential application of these models are also addressed. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify published studies using xenograft models directly established from human bladder cancer samples into mice. A total of 12 studies were included in the final analysis. All studies differed in design; the reported take rate varied between 11% and 80%, with the implantation via dorsal incision and with matrigel obtaining the higher take rate. Advanced stage and high-grade tumors were associated with increased take rate. Xenografts preserved the original tumor identity in the establishment phase and after serial passages. Although some studies suggest a correlation between engraftment success and clinical prognosis, evidence about the association between the response of xenografts to treatment and the clinical response of the tumor of origin is still missing. All methodological approaches resulted in the establishment of tumor xenografts with preservation of the original tumor identity but variable take rate. The time needed to establish the model and propagate xenografts to a number suitable for drug testing is the main limitation of the model, along with the success rate and lack of consistency in the early passages. Comparison between tumor response in mice and clinical outcome remains to be assessed. PMID:25742701

  7. αTAT1 downregulation induces mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chien, J-Y; Tsen, S-D; Chien, C-C; Liu, H-W; Tung, C-Y; Lin, C-H

    2016-01-01

    α-Tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (αTAT1) controls reversible acetylation on Lys40 of α-tubulin and modulates multiple cellular functions. αTAT1 depletion induced morphological defects of touch receptor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans and impaired cell adhesion and contact inhibition in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however, no morphological or proliferation defects in human RPE-hTERT cells were found after αTAT1-specific siRNA treatment. Here, we compared the effect of three αTAT1-specific shRNAs on proliferation and morphology in two human cell lines, HeLa and A549. The more efficient two shRNAs induced mitotic catastrophe in both cell lines and the most efficient one also decreased F-actin and focal adhesions. Further analysis revealed that αTAT1 downregulation increased γ-H2AX, but not other DNA damage markers p-CHK1 and p-CHK2, along with marginal change in microtubule outgrowth speed and inter-kinetochore distance. Overexpression of αTAT1 could not precisely mimic the distribution and concentration of endogenous acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tu), although no overt phenotype change was observed, meanwhile, this could not completely prevent αTAT1 downregulation-induced deficiencies. We therefore conclude that efficient αTAT1 downregulation could impair actin architecture and induce mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells through mechanisms partly independent of Ac-Tu. PMID:27551500

  8. Measuring Attachment and Internalization of Influenza A Virus in A549 Cells by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Marie O; Stertz, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Attachment to target cells followed by internalization are the very first steps of the life cycle of influenza A virus (IAV). We provide here a detailed protocol for measuring relative changes in the amount of viral particles that attach to A549 cells, a human lung epithelial cell line, as well as in the amount of particles that are internalized into the cell. We use biotinylated virus which can be easily detected following staining with Cy3-labeled streptavidin (STV-Cy3). We describe the growth, purification and biotinylation of A/WSN/33, a widely used IAV laboratory strain. Cold-bound biotinylated IAV particles on A549 cells are stained with STV-Cy3 and measured using flow cytometry. To investigate uptake of viral particles, cold-bound virus is allowed to internalize at 37 °C. In order to differentiate between external and internalized viral particles, a blocking step is applied: Free binding spots on the biotin of attached virus on the cell surface are bound by unlabeled streptavidin (STV). Subsequent cell permeabilization and staining with STV-Cy3 then enables detection of internalized viral particles. We present a calculation to determine the relative amount of internalized virus. This assay is suitable to measure effects of drug-treatments or other manipulations on attachment or internalization of IAV. PMID:26575457

  9. Apoptosis inducing ability of silver decorated highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites in A549 lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Merajuddin; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Marri, Abdulhadi H; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Nayak, Vadithe Lakshma; Kamal, Ahmed; Adil, Syed F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene and graphene-based materials have been increasingly used for various biological applications due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. Here, we demonstrate the anticancer properties and apoptosis-inducing ability of silver doped highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites synthesized by employing green approach. These nano composites (PGE-HRG-Ag) were synthesized by using Pulicaria glutinosa extract (PGE) as a reducing agent and were evaluated for their anticancer properties against various human cancer cell lines with tamoxifen as the reference drug. A correlation between the amount of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) and the anticancer activity of nanocomposite was observed, wherein an increase in the concentration of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of HRG led to the enhanced anticancer activity of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than standard drug in A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. A detailed investigation was undertaken and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 showed G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Studies such as, measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Annexin V-FITC staining assay suggested that this compound induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:27022256

  10. High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Dengue Virus Type 2 Infected A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Han-Chen; Hannemann, Holger; Heesom, Kate J.; Matthews, David A.; Davidson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:24671231

  11. COPD promotes migration of A549 lung cancer cells: the role of chemokine CCL21.

    PubMed

    Kuźnar-Kamińska, Barbara; Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Książek, Krzysztof; Batura-Gabryel, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD develop lung cancer more frequently than healthy smokers. At the same time, molecular mediators promoting various aspects of cancer cell progression are still elusive. In this report, we examined whether COPD can be coupled with increased migration of non-small-cell lung cancer cells A549 and, if so, whether this effect may be related to altered production and activity of chemokines CCL21, CXCL5, and CXCL12. The study showed that the migration of A549 cells through the polycarbonate membrane and basement membrane extract toward a chemotactic gradient elicited by serum from patients with COPD was markedly higher as compared with serum from healthy donors. The concentration of CCL21 and CXCL12, but not CXCL5, in serum from patients with COPD was also increased. Experiments in which CCL21- and CXCL12-dependent signaling was blocked revealed that increased migration of the cancer cells upon treatment with serum from patients with COPD was mediated exclusively by CCL21. Collectively, our results indicate that COPD may contribute to the progression of lung cancer via CCL21-dependent intensification of cancer cell migration. PMID:27307721

  12. Cytotoxic effects of natural and semisynthetic cucurbitacins on lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Silva, Izabella Thaís; Geller, Fabiana Cristina; Persich, Lara; Dudek, Sabine Eva; Lang, Karen Luise; Caro, Miguel Soriano Balparda; Durán, Fernando Javier; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Ludwig, Stephan; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Cucurbitacins and their derivatives are triterpenoids that are found in various plant families, and are known for their pharmacological and biological activities, including anti-cancer effects. Lung cancer represents a major public health problem, with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) being the most frequent and aggressive type of lung cancer. The objective of this work was to evaluate four cucurbitacins (CUCs) for their cytotoxic activity, effects on apoptosis induction, cell cycle progression, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive effects on the human NSCLC cell line (A549 cells). Our findings showed that these CUCs could suppress human NSCLC cell growth in vitro through their effects on the PI3Kinase and MAPK pathways, which lead to programmed cell death induction, as well as inhibition of cell migration and cell invasion. Additionally, these effects culminate in apoptosis induction and G2/M cell cycle arrest by modulating cyclin B1 expression, and in the mitigation of strategic steps of lung cancer metastasis, including migration and invasion of A549 cells. These results suggest that two natural (DDCB and CB) and two novel semisynthetic derivatives of cucurbitacin B (ACB and DBCB) could be considered as promising compounds with antitumor potential. PMID:26780083

  13. αTAT1 downregulation induces mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, J-Y; Tsen, S-D; Chien, C-C; Liu, H-W; Tung, C-Y; Lin, C-H

    2016-01-01

    α-Tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (αTAT1) controls reversible acetylation on Lys40 of α-tubulin and modulates multiple cellular functions. αTAT1 depletion induced morphological defects of touch receptor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans and impaired cell adhesion and contact inhibition in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however, no morphological or proliferation defects in human RPE-hTERT cells were found after αTAT1-specific siRNA treatment. Here, we compared the effect of three αTAT1-specific shRNAs on proliferation and morphology in two human cell lines, HeLa and A549. The more efficient two shRNAs induced mitotic catastrophe in both cell lines and the most efficient one also decreased F-actin and focal adhesions. Further analysis revealed that αTAT1 downregulation increased γ-H2AX, but not other DNA damage markers p-CHK1 and p-CHK2, along with marginal change in microtubule outgrowth speed and inter-kinetochore distance. Overexpression of αTAT1 could not precisely mimic the distribution and concentration of endogenous acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tu), although no overt phenotype change was observed, meanwhile, this could not completely prevent αTAT1 downregulation-induced deficiencies. We therefore conclude that efficient αTAT1 downregulation could impair actin architecture and induce mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells through mechanisms partly independent of Ac-Tu. PMID:27551500

  14. Iron stimulates plasma-activated medium-induced A549 cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Nonomura, Saho; Horiba, Minori; Hirayama, Tasuku; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hara, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is applicable to living cells and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only by direct irradiation, but also by indirect treatments with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). Iron is an indispensable element but is also potentially toxic because it generates the hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via the Fenton reaction. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the contribution of iron to PAM-induced A549 adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis. We detected the generation of •OH and elevation of intracellular ferrous ions in PAM-treated cells and found that they were inhibited by iron chelator. The elevations observed in ferrous ions may have been due to their release from the intracellular iron store, ferritin. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA injury was followed by the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, depletion of NAD+ and ATP, and elevations in intracellular Ca2+. The sensitivities of normal cells such as smooth muscle cells and keratinocytes to PAM were less than that of A549 cells. These results demonstrated that H2O2 in PAM and/or •OH generated in the presence of iron ions disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells. PMID:26865334

  15. High-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of dengue virus type 2 infected A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Han-Chen; Hannemann, Holger; Heesom, Kate J; Matthews, David A; Davidson, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:24671231

  16. Iron stimulates plasma-activated medium-induced A549 cell injury.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Nonomura, Saho; Horiba, Minori; Hirayama, Tasuku; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hara, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is applicable to living cells and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only by direct irradiation, but also by indirect treatments with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). Iron is an indispensable element but is also potentially toxic because it generates the hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via the Fenton reaction. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the contribution of iron to PAM-induced A549 adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis. We detected the generation of •OH and elevation of intracellular ferrous ions in PAM-treated cells and found that they were inhibited by iron chelator. The elevations observed in ferrous ions may have been due to their release from the intracellular iron store, ferritin. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA injury was followed by the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, depletion of NAD(+) and ATP, and elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). The sensitivities of normal cells such as smooth muscle cells and keratinocytes to PAM were less than that of A549 cells. These results demonstrated that H2O2 in PAM and/or •OH generated in the presence of iron ions disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells. PMID:26865334

  17. Apoptosis inducing ability of silver decorated highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites in A549 lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Merajuddin; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Marri, Abdulhadi H; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Nayak, Vadithe Lakshma; Kamal, Ahmed; Adil, Syed F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene and graphene-based materials have been increasingly used for various biological applications due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. Here, we demonstrate the anticancer properties and apoptosis-inducing ability of silver doped highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites synthesized by employing green approach. These nano composites (PGE-HRG-Ag) were synthesized by using Pulicaria glutinosa extract (PGE) as a reducing agent and were evaluated for their anticancer properties against various human cancer cell lines with tamoxifen as the reference drug. A correlation between the amount of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) and the anticancer activity of nanocomposite was observed, wherein an increase in the concentration of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of HRG led to the enhanced anticancer activity of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than standard drug in A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. A detailed investigation was undertaken and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 showed G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Studies such as, measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Annexin V-FITC staining assay suggested that this compound induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:27022256

  18. Genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation via miR-27a and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zang, Aimin; Jia, Youchao; Shang, Yanhong; Zhang, Zhuoqi; Ge, Kun; Zhang, Jinchao; Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soybean isoflavone; in its aglycone it has various biological activities. Animal experiments, clinical studies and epidemiological investigations suggest that genistein has preventative and curative functions for a number of diseases, particularly in cancer. The present study explored the potential anti-cancer effect of genistein by observing its role in inhibiting A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation and investigating the possible mechanism. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of genistein (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM; dissolved in physiological saline) for 1, 2 and 3 days. Subsequently, the viability of A549 cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell apoptosis was examined using a flow cytometer, caspase 3/9 activity was measured using commercial kits, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the miR-27a expression and western blotting was used to investigate MET protein expression. The results suggested a significant inhibition of A549 cell growth following treatment with genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The current study also indicated that treatment with genistein significantly induces cell apoptosis and promotes caspase-3/9 activation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further functional assays revealed that the anti-cancer effect of genistein activated microRNA-27a (miR-27a) expression levels and reduced MET protein expression in A549 cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, this study reports, for the first time, a correlation between the anti-cancer effect of genistein and miR-27a-mediated MET signaling. PMID:27602162

  19. The synergistic antitumor effects of all-trans retinoic acid and C-phycocyanin on the lung cancer A549 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Gao, Mei-Hua; Chu, Xian-Ming; Teng, Lei; Lv, Cong-Yi; Yang, Peng; Yin, Qi-Feng

    2015-02-15

    The anticancer effects and mechanism of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), C-phycocyanin (C-PC) or ATRA+C-PC on the growth of A549 cells were studied in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The effects of C-PC and ATRA on the growth of A549 cells were determined. The expression of CDK-4 and caspase-3, and the cellular apoptosis levels were detected. The tumor model was established by subcutaneous injection of A549 cells to the left axilla of the NU/NU mice. The weights of tumor and the spleen were tested. The viabilities of T-cells and spleen cells, TNF levels, the expression of Bcl-2 protein and Cyclin D1 gene were examined. Results showed both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. ATRA+C-PC cooperatively showed a higher antitumor activity. The dosage of ATRA was reduced when it was administered with C-PC together, and the toxicity was reduced as well. ATRA+C-PC could decrease CDK-4 but increase caspase-3 protein expression level and induce cell apoptosis. ATRA alone could lower the activities of T lymphocytes and spleen weights, but the combination with C-PC could effectively promote viability of T cells and spleen. C-PC+ATRA could up-regulate TNF, and down-regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D1 gene. The combination might inhibit tumor growth by inhibiting the progress of cell cycle, inducing cell apoptosis and enhancing the body immunity. PMID:25617793

  20. Resveratrol reduces IL-6 and VEGF secretion from co-cultured A549 lung cancer cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Erhan; Baycu, Cengiz; Koparal, Ayse Tansu; Burukoglu Donmez, Dilek; Bektur, Ezgi

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapies are important treatment methodologies used in many areas of experimental or clinical medicine. In recent studies of cancer models, Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) suppressed the growth of cancer cells. However, also in some studies, stem cell treatments have been shown to induce cancer formation, increase tumor volume, induce the formation of new vessels, and lead to cancer invasion. The presence of MSC-secreted cytokines and their effects on cancer cells limits the reliability of MSC-based treatments. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), an antioxidant found in red wine, has been shown to have therapeutic effects against several cancers. The aim of this study was to co-culture MSCs with A549 cancer cells to suppress the release of cancer-promoting cytokines from MSCs and to increase the applicability and reliability of stem cell therapies with resveratrol. MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and neutral red cell viability assays were used to find safety dose of resveratrol. The MSCs secreted the cytokines IL-6 and VEGF, and the effect of resveratrol on these cytokines was analyzed by ELISA and western blot analysis of conditioned medium. One μM of resveratrol was found to be the safety dose for the A549 cancer cells and MSCs. We observed the highest release of IL-6 and VEGF from the co-cultured A549 cells and MSCs, and resveratrol was found to significantly decrease the release of these cytokines. Our study suggests that resveratrol exerts a positive effect on the release of cytokines. The safety dose of resveratrol can be administered together with stem cells during stem cell treatment. PMID:26687643

  1. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A.

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na+ adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na+/K+ ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na+ and K+ adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results.

  2. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-02-28

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  3. Comparison of the antitumor activity of gemcitabine and ara-C in a panel of human breast, colon, lung and pancreatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Merriman, R L; Hertel, L W; Schultz, R M; Houghton, P J; Houghton, J A; Rutherford, P G; Tanzer, L R; Boder, G B; Grindey, G B

    1996-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a new deoxycytidine analog that exhibits significant cytotoxicity against a variety of cultured murine and human tumor cells. The cytotoxic action of gemcitabine appears to be due to the inhibition of DNA synthesis by inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase and by competition with dCTP for incorporation into DNA. We have previously shown that gemcitabine, but not cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), has a broad spectrum of antitumor activity against 7 different types of murine solid tumors. The activity of gemcitabine was schedule dependent. To further characterize its activity, gemcitabine was tested against 12 human carcinoma xenografts. When given on an every 3 day x 4 schedule, the following percent inhibitions (at maximally tolerated doses [MTD]; MTD/2) in tumor growth were seen: MX-1 mammary (93%; 80%), CX-1 colon (92%; 82%), HC-1 colon (96%; 92%), GC3 colon (98%; 94%), VRC5 colon (99%; 100%), LX-1 lung (76%; 61%), CALU-6 lung (75%; 38%), NCI-H460 lung (45%; 46%), HS766T pancreatic (73%; not tested), PaCa-2 pancreatic (69%; 40%), PANC-1 pancreatic (70%; 60%), and BxPC-3 pancreatic (9%; 19%). In contrast, only the LX-1 lung carcinoma xenograft was responsive to ara-C treatment, which inhibited tumor growth by a marginal 62 percent. Thus, like its activity against murine solid tumors, gemcitabine has excellent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human solid tumors. PMID:8958178

  4. Use of a Conformational Switching Aptamer for Rapid and Specific Ex Vivo Identification of Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Mooney, Michael A.; Joy, Anna; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.; Anderson, Trent; Yan, Hao; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Improved tools for providing specific intraoperative diagnoses could improve patient care. In neurosurgery, intraoperatively differentiating non-operative lesions such as CNS B-cell lymphoma from operative lesions can be challenging, often necessitating immunohistochemical (IHC) procedures which require up to 24-48 hours. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of generating rapid ex vivo specific labeling using a novel lymphoma-specific fluorescent switchable aptamer. Our B-cell lymphoma-specific switchable aptamer produced only low-level fluorescence in its unbound conformation and generated an 8-fold increase in fluorescence once bound to its target on CD20-positive lymphoma cells. The aptamer demonstrated strong binding to B-cell lymphoma cells within 15 minutes of incubation as observed by flow cytometry. We applied the switchable aptamer to ex vivo xenograft tissue harboring B-cell lymphoma and astrocytoma, and within one hour specific visual identification of lymphoma was routinely possible. In this proof-of-concept study in human cell culture and orthotopic xenografts, we conclude that a fluorescent switchable aptamer can provide rapid and specific labeling of B-cell lymphoma, and that developing aptamer-based labeling approaches could simplify tissue staining and drastically reduce time to histopathological diagnoses compared with IHC-based methods. We propose that switchable aptamers could enhance expeditious, accurate intraoperative decision-making. PMID:25876071

  5. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  6. 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide effects human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by regulating the expression of POLD4

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, QIN-MIAO; ZENG, YI-MING; ZHANG, HUA-PING; LV, LIANG-CHAO; YANG, DONG-YONG; LIN, HUI-HUANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the expression of POLD4 in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells under 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) stimulation to investigate the role of POLD4 in smoking-induced lung cancer. The lung cancer A549 cell line was treated with 4NQO, with or without MG132 (an inhibitor of proteasome activity), and subsequently the POLD4 level was determined by western blot analysis. Secondly, the cell sensitivity to 4NQO and Taxol was determined when the POLD4 expression level was downregulated by siRNA. The POLD4 protein levels in the A549 cells decreased following treatment with 4NQO; however, MG132 could reverse this phenotype. Downregulation of the POLD4 expression by siRNA enhanced A549 cell sensitivity to 4NQO, but not to Taxol. In conclusion, 4NQO affects human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by regulating the expression of POLD4. PMID:26998273

  7. [Effects of paclitaxel loaded-drug micelles on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human lung cancer A549 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Yu, Rui-shuang; Yang, Wen-liang; Luan, Shu-juan; Qin, Ben-kai; Pang, Xiao-bin; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the paclitaxel loaded by hydrazone bonds in poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(caprolactone) micelles (mPEG-PCL-PTX) on proliferation and apoptosis of human lung cancer A549 cells and its possible mechanisms of anti-tumor activity. The cell proliferation was measured with MTT assay. Flow cytometry were used to analyze the cell cycle. The cell apoptosis was analyzed using Hoechst/P staining. The expression levels of apoptotic genes expression in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The mPEG-PCL-PTX could inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells and promote the apoptosis. The Bax, caspase-3 protein expression were increased while Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased in A549 cells. Results showed that the polymer containing hydrazone bond is non-toxic in vitro, the mPEG-PCL-PTX micelles can inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of A549 cells. Key words: paclitaxel; micelle; A549 cell; proliferation; cell cycle; apoptosis PMID:26837168

  8. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  9. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with 111In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of 111In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  10. Epigenetic induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition by LCN2 mediates metastasis and tumorigenesis, which is abrogated by NF-κB inhibitor BRM270 in a xenograft model of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MONGRE, RAJ KUMAR; SODHI, SIMRINDER SINGH; SHARMA, NEELESH; GHOSH, MRINMOY; KIM, JEONG HYUN; KIM, NAMEUN; PARK, YANG HO; SHIN, YOUNG GYU; KIM, SUNG JIN; JIAO, ZHANG JIAO; HUYNH, DO LUONG; JEONG, DONG KEE

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cancer stem-like cells (TICSCs) have recently become the object of intensive study. Human-Lipocalin-2 (hLCN2) acts as a biomarker for cancers. The aim of the present study was to explore new insights regarding the potential role of LCN2 in inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) by transfecting LCN2 into CD133+-A549-TICSCs and its cross-talk with the NF-κB signaling pathway in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Furthermore, EMT was confirmed by transcriptomic analysis, immunoblotting and immunocyto/histochemical analyses. Tumorigenesis and metastasis were confirmed by molecular therapeutics tracer 2DG infrared optical probe in BALB/cSIc-nude mice. It was observed that the CD133+-expressing-LCN2-A549 TICSCs population increased in adenocarcinoma of the lung compared to the normal lung tissue. The expressions of genes involved in stemness, adhesion, motility and drug efflux was higher in these cells than in their non-LCN2 expressing counterparts. The present study revealed that elevated expression of LCN2 significantly induced metastasis via EMT. Overexpression of LCN2 significantly increased stemness and tumor metastasis by modulating NF-κB cellular signaling. BRM270, a novel inhibitor of NF-κB plays a significant role in the EMT reversal. BRM270, a naturaceutical induces cell shrinkage, karyorrhexis and programmed cell death (PCD) which were observed by Hoechst 33342 staining while flow cytometry analysis showed significant (P<0.05) decrease in cell population from G0–G1 phases. Also, 2DG guided in vivo model revealed that BRRM270 significantly (P<0.0003) reduced tumor metastasis and increased percent survival in real-time with complete resection. An elaborate study on the novel concept with respect to linking of naturaceutics as selective and potential anticancer agent that eliminates the elevated LCN2 induced EMT and tumor dissemination through cooperation with the NF-κB signaling as the baseline data for the planning of new

  11. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity studies of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes on A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Lai, Shang-Hai; Zhang, Cheng; Yin, Hui; Tang, Bing; Wan, Dan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Four new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(N-N)2(bddp)](ClO4)21-4 (N-N=dmb: 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine 1, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine 2, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline 3 and dmp: 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline 4, bddp=benzilo[2,3-b]-1,4-diazabenzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS and (1)H NMR. The cytotoxicity in vitro of the complexes against BEL-7402, HeLa, MG-63 and A549 cell lines was investigated by MTT method. The complexes show high cytotoxic activity toward the selected cell lines with an IC50 value ranging from 5.3±0.6 to 15.7±3.6μM. The apoptosis was studied with acridine orange (AO)/ethdium bromide (EB) and Hoechst 33258 staining methods. The cellular uptake was investigated with DAPI staining method. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential were performed under fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry. The complexes can induce an increase in the ROS levels and a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. The comet assay was studied with fluorescent microscope. The percentage in apoptotic and necrotic cells and cell cycle arrest were assayed by flow cytometry. The effects of the complexes on the expression of caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins were studied by western blot analysis. The results show that the complexes induce apoptosis in A549 cells through an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway, which was accompanied by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27288660

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of 3-Arylcoumarin Derivatives in A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    MUSA, MUSILIYU A.; JOSEPH, MOISE Y.; LATINWO, LEKAN M.; BADISA, VEERA; COOPERWOOD, JOHN S.

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins are naturally-occurring compounds with diverse and interesting biological activities. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxic effect of 8-(acetyloxy)-3-[4-(acetyloxy)phenyl]-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate (6); 8-(acetyloxy)-3-(4-methanesulfonyl phenyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate (7); 4-(2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)phenyl acetate (8); 3-(4-methanesulfonylphenyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (9); 4-(4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)phenyl acetate (10); 3-(4-methanesulfonylphenyl)-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one (11); 8-(acetyloxy)-3-[4-(acetyloxy)phenyl]-4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate (12); and 5-(acetyloxy)-3-[4-(acetyloxy) phenyl]-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl acetate (13) in human lung (A549) cancer and normal lung (MRC-9) cell lines at different concentrations for 48 h using crystal violet dye binding assay. The cytotoxic effect of these coumarin derivatives were compared to the standard drug, docetaxel. Furthermore, the effect of the most active compound on the cell-cycle using propidium iodide, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (rhodamine-123) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (PCFDA) were also evaluated. Results Compound 7 had the greatest cytotoxic effect (cytotoxic concentration, CC50=24 μM) and selectivity (MRC-9; CC50 >100 μM; inactive) in the A549 cell line, and caused cells to arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, loss of MMP and increased ROS production in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion These findings suggest that compound 7 could serve as a new lead for the development of novel synthetic compounds with enhanced anticancer activity. PMID:25667442

  13. Gimeracil, a component of S-1, may enhance the antitumor activity of X-ray irradiation in human cancer xenograft models in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masakazu; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Sakata, Minoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Saito, Hitoshi; Sakata, Yu

    2010-11-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is a useful treatment strategy in patients with locally advanced cancers. In particular, combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with X-ray irradiation is effective for the treatment of some types of gastrointestinal cancers. We investigated the antitumor effects of combination treatment with X-ray and S-1, a unique formulation of 5-FU, on human cancer xenografts in nude mice and compared the efficacy of this treatment to that of radiotherapy combined with cisplatin, UFT, another oral 5-FU prodrug, and intravenous 5-FU. Tumors implanted into the left hind legs of mice were treated with a dose of 2 or 5 Gy X-ray irradiation on days 1 and 8, and S-1, UFT and 5-FU were administered for 14 days. The efficacy of combined treatment with 8.3 mg/kg S-1 and 2 Gy X-ray irradiation in treating non-small cell lung cancer xenografts (Lu-99 and LC-11) was significantly higher than that of treatment with S-1 alone or 2 Gy X-ray irradiation alone, and the antitumor activity of combined treatment was similar to that of 5 Gy X-ray irradiation alone. Although 8.3 mg/kg S-1 and 17.5 mg/kg UFT had equivalent antitumor activity; the antitumor efficacy of combination treatment with S-1 and 2 Gy X-ray irradiation on LC-11 tumors was significantly higher than that of combination treatment with UFT and 2 Gy X-ray irradiation. Combination treatment with S-1 and X-ray irradiation was also more effective against pancreatic tumors than combination treatment with intravenous 5-FU and X-ray irradiation. To elucidate the reason for the increased antitumor efficacy of combination treatment with S-1 and X-ray irradiation, the antitumor effect of gimeracil, one of the components of S-1, was tested in combination with 2 Gy X-ray irradiation. These experiments demonstrated that gimeracil enhanced the efficacy of X-ray irradiation against lung as well as head and neck cancer xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we observed decreased expression of γ-H2AX protein, a marker

  14. Reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis induction of human respiratory epithelial (A549) cells by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andréia Ferreira Eduardo; Moraes, João Alfredo; de Oliveira, Jessica Silva Santos; dos Santos, Michelle Hanthequeste Bittencourt; Santos, Gabriela da Silva; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Nagao, Prescilla Emy

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus; GBS) is an important pathogen and is associated with pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis in neonates and adults. GBS infections induce cytotoxicity of respiratory epithelial cells (A549) with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ψm). The apoptosis of A549 cells by GBS was dependent on the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 with increased pro-apoptotic Bim and Bax molecules and decreased Bcl-2 pro-survival protein. Treatment of infected A549 cells with ROS inhibitors (diphenyleniodonium chloride or apocynin) prevented intracellular ROS production and apoptosis. Consequently, oxidative stress is included among the cellular events leading to apoptosis during GBS human invasive infections. PMID:26490153

  15. Different mechanisms for metal-induced adaptation to cadmium in the human lung cell lines A549 and H441.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, Josée-Anne; Jumarie, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Sensitivity to Cd and Zn as well as the capacity to develop tolerance were characterized in human lung cells A549 and H441. In the A549 cells, a 2-fold lower LC(50) was obtained for Cd compared to Zn, whereas H441 cells were similarly sensitive to both metals. H441 cells were twice as resistant to Cd as the A549 cells. Higher HSP70, but not metallothionein (MT) or glutathione (GSH) levels, could contribute to this better resistance. A 1.5- and 2-fold increase in the LC(50) for Cd was obtained in the A549 cells pre-exposed to non-cytotoxic concentrations of Cd (20 μM) or Zn (40 μM) for 24 h. On the other hand, only Zn increased H441 cells' resistance to Cd. Maximum Zn- and Cd-induced tolerances were reached as early as 3 and 12 h, respectively. Increases in MT-IIa and HSP70 messenger RNA levels were higher in A549 cells, but cycloheximide eliminated the induction of tolerance only in the H441 cells. Protein synthesis is a prerequisite for metal-induced tolerance to Cd in the H441 cells but not the A549 cells. Results obtained with L-buthionine sulfoximine revealed that GSH synthesis is not responsible for the acquired tolerance in both cell lines. However, GSH plays a critical role against Cd toxicity, and pro-oxidant conditions sensitized cells to Cd with different impacts on the metal-induced mechanisms of acquired tolerance. GSH and catalase both provide antioxidative protection, but only the stress related to low GSH content, not that resulting from catalase inhibition, may be alleviated with Zn. PMID:23584637

  16. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  17. Farnesol inhibits tumor growth and enhances the anticancer effects of bortezomib in multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model through the modulation of STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Chulwon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently observed in multiple myeloma (MM) cancer and can upregulate the expression of several genes involved in proliferation, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The effect of farnesol (FOH) on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases, its regulated gene products, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis was examined. The in vivo effect of FOH on the growth of human MM xenograft tumors alone and in combination with bortezomib (Bor) in athymic nu/nu female mice was also investigated. We found that FOH suppressed both constitutive and inducible STAT3 activation at Tyr705 in MM cells. The suppression of STAT3 was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream JAK1, JAK2, and c-Src kinases. Also, treatment with the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor, pervanadate treatment reversed the FOH-induced down-regulation of STAT3, possibly indicating the involvement of a PTP. Indeed, we found that FOH treatment induces the increased expression of SHP-2 protein and knockdown of the SHP-2 gene by small interfering RNA suppressed the ability of FOH to inhibit STAT3 activation. FOH inhibited proliferation and significantly potentiated the apoptotic effects of bortezomib (Bor) in U266 cells. When administered intraperitoneally, FOH enhanced Bor-induced growth suppression of human MM xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu female mice. Our results suggest that FOH is a novel blocker of STAT3 signaling pathway and exerts both anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities in MM in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25697480

  18. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  19. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer. PMID:24535083

  20. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  1. Synthesis and cytotoxicity evaluation of 4-amino-4-dehydroxylarctigenin derivatives in glucose-starved A549 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Min; Gan, Xianwen; Zhao, Kun; Yu, Qiang; Hu, Lihong

    2015-02-01

    The natural product arctigenin (ATG) demonstrated preferential cytotoxicity to cancer cells under glucose starvation. A series of 4-amino-4-dehydroxylarctigenin derivatives based on lead compound ATG were designed and synthesized by bioisosteric modifications. Their cytotoxicities were evaluated in glucose-starved A549 tumor cells and the results indicated that the 4-amino-4-dehydroxylarctigenin showed more potent cytotoxicity than arctigenin, and the further substituent group on 4-amino would result in the cytotoxicities decreased significantly. 4-Substituted-arctigenin could selectively target on glucose-starved A549 tumor cells which provide an alternative strategy for anticancer drug development with minimal normal tissue toxicity. PMID:25571795

  2. Intracellular dynamics and fate of polystyrene nanoparticles in A549 Lung epithelial cells monitored by image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy and single particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Deville, Sarah; Penjweini, Rozhin; Smisdom, Nick; Notelaers, Kristof; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef; Ameloot, Marcel

    2015-10-01

    Novel insights in nanoparticle (NP) uptake routes of cells, their intracellular trafficking and subcellular targeting can be obtained through the investigation of their temporal and spatial behavior. In this work, we present the application of image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (IC(C)S) and single particle tracking (SPT) to monitor the intracellular dynamics of polystyrene (PS) NPs in the human lung carcinoma A549 cell line. The ensemble kinetic behavior of NPs inside the cell was characterized by temporal and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS and STICS). Moreover, a more direct interpretation of the diffusion and flow detected in the NP motion was obtained by SPT by monitoring individual NPs. Both techniques demonstrate that the PS NP transport in A549 cells is mainly dependent on microtubule-assisted transport. By applying spatiotemporal image cross-correlation spectroscopy (STICCS), the correlated motions of NPs with the early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes are identified. PS NPs were equally distributed among the endolysosomal compartment during the time interval of the experiments. The cotransport of the NPs with the lysosomes is significantly larger compared to the other cell organelles. In the present study we show that the complementarity of ICS-based techniques and SPT enables a consistent elaborate model of the complex behavior of NPs inside biological systems. PMID:26164626

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  4. α-Mangostin: A Dietary Antioxidant Derived from the Pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. Inhibits Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W.; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. Results: The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. Innovation: We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 682–699. PMID:24295217

  5. Antitumor Activity of TAK-285, an Investigational, Non-Pgp Substrate HER2/EGFR Kinase Inhibitor, in Cultured Tumor Cells, Mouse and Rat Xenograft Tumors, and in an HER2-Positive Brain Metastasis Model.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Akiko; Takagi, Shinji; Yusa, Tadashi; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Hayashi, Akira; Tamura, Toshiya; Kawakita, Youichi; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Ohta, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer therapy has improved following the development of drugs with specific molecular targets, exemplified by inhibitors of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as trastuzumab and lapatinib. However, these drugs have little effect on brain metastasis due to the combined effects of poor penetration of the blood-brain barrier and their removal from the central nervous system (CNS) by the p-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux pump. We investigated the effects of TAK-285, a novel, investigational, dual EGFR/HER2 inhibitor that has been shown to penetrate the CNS and has comparable inhibitory efficacy to lapatinib which is a known Pgp substrate. Tested against a panel of 96 kinases, TAK-285 showed specificity for inhibition of HER family kinases. Unlike lapatinib, TAK-285 is not a substrate for Pgp efflux. In mouse and rat xenograft tumor models, TAK-285 showed antitumor activity against cancers that expressed HER2 or EGFR. TAK-285 was as effective as lapatinib in antitumor activity in a mouse subcutaneous BT-474 breast cancer xenograft model. TAK-285 was examined in a model of breast cancer brain metastasis using direct intracranial injection of BT-474-derived luciferase-expressing cells and showed greater inhibition of brain tumor growth compared to animals treated with lapatinib. Our studies suggest that investigational drugs such as TAK-285 that have strong antitumor activity and are not Pgp substrates may be useful in the development of agents with the potential to treat brain metastases. PMID:23983820

  6. The synergistic effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin on apoptosis via modulating autophagy in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Li, Xiaolin; Xu, Rongrong; Ye, Lingyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Hong; Xie, Weiping

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have shown that combination treatment with natural products and chemotherapy agents can improve the sensitivity and cytotoxicity of chemotherapy agents. Resveratrol, a natural product, has many biological effects including antitumor and antiviral activities, as well as vascular protective effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic anticancer effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin and the potential anticancer mechanisms involved in A549 cells. The results obtained from Cell Counting Kit-8 and isobolographic analysis demonstrated that combination of resveratrol and cisplatin resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in A549 cells. Results from Hoechst staining, flow cytometry and western blot analysis suggested that resveratrol enhanced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Meanwhile, the changes of LC3-II and P62 levels and formation of autophagosome suggested that resveratrol in combination with cisplatin triggered autophagy. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine markedly attenuated the apoptosis caused by combination of resveratrol and cisplatin in A549 cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that resveratrol combined with cisplatin synergistically induce apoptosis via modulating autophagic cell death in A549 cells. These findings also help us to understand the role of natural products in combination with chemotherapy agents in lung cancer. PMID:27084520

  7. Antimetastatic Effects of Phyllanthus on Human Lung (A549) and Breast (MCF-7) Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sau Har; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2011-01-01

    Background Current chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells mainly by inducing apoptosis. However, they become ineffective once cancer cell has the ability to metastasize, hence the poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimetastatic potential of Phyllanthus (P. niruri, P. urinaria, P. watsonii, and P. amarus) on lung and breast carcinoma cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Cytotoxicity of Phyllanthus plant extracts were first screened using the MTS reduction assay. They were shown to inhibit MCF-7 (breast carcinoma) and A549 (lung carcinoma) cells growth with IC50 values ranging from 50–180 µg/ml and 65–470 µg/ml for methanolic and aqueous extracts respectively. In comparison, they have lower toxicity on normal cells with the cell viability percentage remaining above 50% when treated up to 1000 µg/ml for both extracts. After determining the non-toxic effective dose, several antimetastasis assays were carried out and Phyllanthus extracts were shown to effectively reduce invasion, migration, and adhesion of both MCF-7 and A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner, at concentrations ranging from 20–200 µg/ml for methanolic extracts and 50–500 µg/ml for aqueous extracts. This was followed by an evaluation of the possible modes of cell death that occurred along with the antimetastatic activity. Phyllanthus was shown to be capable of inducing apoptosis in conjunction with its antimetastastic action, with more than three fold increase of caspases-3 and -7, the presence of DNA-fragmentation and TUNEL-positive cells. The ability of Phyllanthus to exert antimetastatic activities is mostly associated to the presence of polyphenol compounds in its extracts. Conclusions/Significance The presence of polyphenol compounds in the Phyllanthus plant is critically important in the inhibition of the invasion, migration, and adhesion of cancer cells, along with the involvement of apoptosis induction. Hence

  8. β-elemene reverses the drug resistance of lung cancer A549/DDP cells via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cheng-Cai; Tu, Yuan-Rong; Jiang, Jie; Ye, Sheng-Fang; Du, Hao-Xin; Zhang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    β-elemene (β-ELE) is a new anticancer drug extracted from Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe and has been widely used to treat malignant tumors. Recent studies have demonstrated that β-ELE reverses the drug resistance of tumor cells. To explore the possible mechanisms of action of β-ELE, we investigated its effects on cisplatin-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma A549/DDP cells. The effects of β-ELE on the growth of A549/DDP cells in vitro were determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis was assessed by fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining. Mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed using JC-1 fluorescence probe and laser confocal scanning microscopy, and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate staining and flow cytometry. Cytosolic glutathione content was determined using GSH kits. The expression of cytochrome c, caspase-3, procaspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family proteins was assessed by western blotting. The results demonstrated that β-ELE inhibited the proliferation of A549/DDP cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, β-ELE enhanced the sensitivity of A549/DDP cells to cisplatin and reversed the drug resistance of A549/DDP cells. Consistent with a role in activating apoptosis, β-ELE decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration and decreased the cytoplasmic glutathione levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The combination of β-ELE and cisplatin enhanced the protein expression of cytochrome c, caspase-3 and Bad, and reduced protein levels of Bcl-2 and procaspase-3 in the A549/DDP lung cancer cells. These results define a pathway of procaspase‑3-β-ELE function that involves decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis triggered by the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm and the modulation of apoptosis-related genes. The reversal of drug

  9. Identification of a novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine able to inhibit cell proliferation of a human osteogenic sarcoma in vitro and in a xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa; Locatelli, Giada A; Maga, Giovanni; Spreafico, Adriano; Serchi, Tommaso; Orlandini, Maurizio; Bernardini, Giulia; Caradonna, Nicola P; Spallarossa, Andrea; Brullo, Chiara; Schenone, Silvia; Bruno, Olga; Ranise, Angelo; Bondavalli, Francesco; Hoffmann, Oskar; Bologna, Mauro; Angelucci, Adriano; Botta, Maurizio

    2007-11-15

    New pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines were synthesized and found to inhibit Src phosphorylation in a cell-free assay. Some of them significantly reduced the growth of human osteogenic sarcoma (SaOS-2) cells. The best compound, in terms of inhibitory properties toward both Src and SaOS-2 cells, was further investigated and found to reduce bone resorption when used to treat mouse osteoclasts, without interfering with normal osteoblast growth. Moreover, its metabolic stability prompted its study on a human SaOS-2 xenograft tumor model in nude mice, where the compound reduced significantly both the volume and weight of the tumor. These experimental findings make the new compound an interesting hit in the field of bone-related diseases. PMID:17929792

  10. Optimized S-Trityl-l-cysteine-Based Inhibitors of Kinesin Spindle Protein with Potent in Vivo Antitumor Activity in Lung Cancer Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic kinesin Eg5 is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and is a promising chemotherapy target. Previously, we identified S-trityl-l-cysteine as a selective inhibitor of Eg5 and developed triphenylbutanamine analogues with improved potency, favorable drug-like properties, but moderate in vivo activity. We report here their further optimization to produce extremely potent inhibitors of Eg5 (Kiapp < 10 nM) with broad-spectrum activity against cancer cell lines comparable to the Phase II drug candidates ispinesib and SB-743921. They have good oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetics and induced complete tumor regression in nude mice explanted with lung cancer patient xenografts. Furthermore, they display fewer liabilities with CYP-metabolizing enzymes and hERG compared with ispinesib and SB-743921, which is important given the likely application of Eg5 inhibitors in combination therapies. We present the case for this preclinical series to be investigated in single and combination chemotherapies, especially targeting hematological malignancies. PMID:23394180

  11. SN38 polymeric nanoparticles: in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor efficacy in xenograft balb/c model with breast cancer versus irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Nima; Rouhani, Hasti; Tavassolian, Faranak; Montazeri, Hamed; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2014-08-25

    SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxyl camptothecin), a potent metabolite of irinotecan, has been considered as an anticancer candidate. Its clinical development has been hampered due to its poor solubility. As a result, SN38 loaded poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) was developed in current study to solve its poor water solubility problem while maintaining its cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PLGA NPs were prepared using modified emulsification-solvent evaporation technique and their characteristics were optimized by central composite experimental design in which average size, entrapment efficiency and drug loading were 170.5±11.87 nm, 77.35%±2.314 and 5.95%±0.087, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and in vitro studies consisting of drug release and cytotoxicity in 4T1 breast cancer cells followed by in vivo biodistribution and blood cytotoxicity were carried out. Therapeutic efficacy of SN38-NPs was evaluated in xenograft balb/c animal with 4T1 breast cancer. The results demonstrated that the treatment with SN38-NPs was more efficacious in comparison with irinotecan. In conclusion, superior cytotoxic effect and improved in vivo antitumor efficacy of SN38-NPs versus irinotecan introduced SN38-NPs as a promising candidate for cancer treatment investigation. PMID:24879937

  12. Effects of autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Huang, Lu; Yang, Yunmei; Xu, Liqian; Yang, Ji; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-01

    It is reported that the autocrine loop of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is crucial for the survival and proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. In this study we aimed to systematically investigate the role of autocrine vascular VEGF in NSCLC cell line A549 through inhibition of endogenous VEGF. A549 cells were transfected with florescence-labeled VEGF oligodeoxynucleotide with lipofectamine. For the experimental group, cells were transfected with VEGF anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN), sense oligodeoxynucleotide (SODN) and mutant oligodeoxynuleotide (MODN) respectively. For the control group cells were mock transfected with lipofectamine or culture medium. At indicated time point after transfection, the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in A549 cells were analyzed by RT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry. As revealed by RT-PCR assay, the mRNA level of VEGF in cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 and 48 h after transfection. ELISA assay yielded similar result with significantly decreased level of VEGF protein expression (P < 0.05). The survival fraction of A549 cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 h after transfection. Also the percentage of G2 phase cells of ASODN group was significantly lower than other four groups. Our data indicate that VEGF expression is efficiently inhibited in A549 cells by ASODN transfection and this inhibition leads to inhibited cell growth and impaired cell cycle distribution. PMID:23459872

  13. Inhibition of lung cancer cells A549 and H460 by curcuminoid extracts and nanoemulsions prepared from Curcuma longa Linnaeus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hong-Bin; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the inhibition mechanism of lung cancer cells A549 and H460 by curcuminoid extracts and nanoemulsions prepared from Curcuma longa Linnaeus. In addition, human bronchus epithelial cell line BEAS-2B (normal cell) was selected for comparison. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to separate and quantify the various curcuminoids in C. longa extract, including curcumin (1,714.5 μg/mL), demethoxycurcumin (1,147.4 μg/mL), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (190.2 μg/mL). A high-stability nanoemulsion composed of Tween 80, water, and curcuminoid extract was prepared, with mean particle size being 12.6 nm. The cell cycle was retarded at G2/M for both the curcuminoid extract and nanoemulsion treatments; however, the inhibition pathway may be different. H460 cells were more susceptible to apoptosis than A549 cells for both curcuminoid extract and nanoemulsion treatments. Growth of BEAS-2B remained unaffected for both the curcuminoid extract and nanoemulsion treatments, with a concentration range from 1 to 4 μg/mL. Also, the activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 followed a dose-dependent increase for both A549 and H460 cells for both the treatments, accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome C expression and a dose-dependent decrease in CDK1 expression. Interestingly, a dose-dependent increase in cyclin B expression was shown for A549 cells for both the treatments, while a reversed trend was found for H460 cells. Both mitochondria and death receptor pathways may be responsible for apoptosis of both A549 and H460 cells. PMID:26345201

  14. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer. PMID:25813723

  15. MicroRNA-490-3p inhibits proliferation of A549 lung cancer cells by targeting CCND1

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Haihua; Yang, Tao; Fu, Shaozi; Chen, Xiaofan; Guo, Lei; Ni, Yiming

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • We examined the level of miR-490-3p in A549 lung cancer cells compared with normal bronchial epithelial cell line. • We are the first to show the function of miR-490-3p in A549 lung cancer cells. • We demonstrate CCND1 may be one of the targets of miR-490-3p. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate the translation of messenger RNAs by binding their 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). In this study, we found that miR-490-3p is significantly down-regulated in A549 lung cancer cells compared with the normal bronchial epithelial cell line. To better characterize the role of miR-490-3p in A549 cells, we performed a gain-of-function analysis by transfecting the A549 cells with chemically synthesized miR-490-3P mimics. Overexpression of miR-490-3P evidently inhibits cell proliferation via G1-phase arrest. We also found that forced expression of miR-490-3P decreased both mRNA and protein levels of CCND1, which plays a key role in G1/S phase transition. In addition, the dual-luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-490-3P directly targets CCND1 through binding its 3′UTR. These findings indicated miR-490-3P could be a potential suppressor of cellular proliferation.

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles and related cytotoxicity evaluation using A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, M; Pavagadhi, S; Mahadevan, A; Balasubramanian, R

    2015-04-01

    Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has become an attractive area of research as it is environmentally benign. The toxicity of AuNPs synthesized by chemical routes has been widely studied. However, little is known about the toxicity associated with the biological synthesis of AuNPs. The present study was carried out to synthesize AuNPs using star anise (Illicium verum; a commercially available spice in abundance)and evaluate its toxicity using human epithelial lung cells (A549) in comparison with AuNPs synthesized by the traditional chemical methods (using sodium citrate and sodium borohydride). Apart from cell viability, markers of oxidative stress (reduced glutathione) and cell death (caspases) were also evaluated to understand the mechanisms of toxicity. Cell viability was observed to be 65.7 percent and 72.3 percent in cells exposed to chemically synthesized AuNPs at the highest dose (200nM) as compared to 80.2 percent for biologically synthesized AuNPs. Protective coating/capping of AuNPs by various polyphenolic compounds present in star anise extract appears to be a major contributor to lower toxicity observed in biologically synthesized AuNPs. PMID:24835429

  17. In vitro anticancer activity of fucoidan from Turbinaria conoides against A549 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Marudhupandi, Thangapandi; Ajith Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappan; Lakshmanasenthil, Shanmugaasokan; Suja, Gunasekaran; Vinothkumar, Thirumalairaj

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the anticancer activity of fucoidan isolated from brown seaweed Turbinaria conoides. Extracted fucoidan contained 53 ± 0.69% of fucose and 38 ± 0.42% of sulphate, respectively. Functional groups and structural characteristics of the fucoidan were analyzed by FT-IR and NMR. In vitro anticancer effect was studied on A549 cell line. Fucoidan inhibited the growth of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and potent anticancer activities were 24.9-73.5% in the concentrations of 31.25-500 μg/ml. The CTC50 value against the cancer cell was found to be 45 μg/ml and the CTC50 value of normal Vero cell line is 325 μg/ml. This study suggests that the fucoidan from T. conoides could be significantly improved if the active component is further purified and tested for further investigation in various cancer cell lines. PMID:25451746

  18. Nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii leaf extract inhibit human lung cancer cells A549

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaefudin; Juniarti, A.; Rosiyana, L.; Setyani, A.; Khodijah, S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate cytotoxicity effect of nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii (S. doederleinii) leaves extract. S. doederleinii was extracted by maceration method using 70%(v/v) ethanol as solvent. Phytochemical content was analyzed qualitatively by using Harborne and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) methods. Nanoparticle extract was prepared by ionic gelation using chitosan as encapsulant agent. Anticancer activity was performed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that S. doederleinii contains of flavonoids. Nanoparticle of S. doederleinii leaves extract greatly inhibited A549 cells growth (cancer cells), with IC50 of 3% or 1020 μg/ml. These nanoparticles extract also inhibited the growth of Chang cells (normal cells), with IC50 of 4% or 1442 μg/ml. The effective concentration of nanoparticles extract which inhibits cancer cells without harming the normal cells is 0.5% or 167 μg/ml. Further studies are needed to obtain the concentration of nanoparticles extract which can selectively suppress cancer cells.

  19. Induction of nucleolin translocation by acharan sulfate in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Ji; Yang, Hui; Park, Youmie; Park, Nam Young; Toida, Toshihiko; Linhardt, Robert J; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2010-08-01

    Acharan sulfate (AS), isolated from the giant African snail Achatina fulica, is a novel glycosaminoglycan, consisting primarily of the repeating disaccharide structure alpha-D-N-acetylglucosaminyl (1 --> 4) 2-sulfoiduronic acid. AS shows anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Despite this activity, AS is only weakly cytotoxic towards cancer cells. We examine the interactions between AS and cell-surface proteins in an effort to explain this anti-tumor activity. Using flow cytometry and affinity column chromatography, we confirm that AS has strong affinity to specific cell-surface proteins including nucleolin (NL) in A549 human lung adenocarcinomas. Surprisingly, we found the translocation of NL from nucleus to cytoplasm under the stimulation of AS (100 microg/ml) in vitro. Also, as NL exits the nucleus, the levels of growth factors such as bFGF and signaling cascade proteins, such as p38, p53, and pERK, are altered. These results suggest that the communication between AS and NL plays a critical role on signal transduction in tumor inhibition. PMID:20564223

  20. Taxol-induced paraptosis-like A549 cell death is not senescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-yang; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    Our previous studies have shown that taxol, a potent anticancer agent, induces caspase-independent cell death and cytoplasmic vacuolization in human lung cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization are poorly understood. Cytoplasmic vacuolization have been reported to be a characteristic of cell senescence. Here, we employed confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to study the reversibility of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and whether taxol triggers senescence in A549 cells. We found that taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization at 6 or 9 h after treatment with taxol did not decrease but increase at 24 h or 72 h after refreshing the culture medium without taxol, indicating taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization is irreversible. We used SA-β-Gal (senescence-associated β-galactosidase) to assess whether taxol-induced cell death in cytoplasmic vacuolization fashion is senescence, and found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated, but not taxol-treated cells is significantly stained by the SA-β-Gal, a senescence testing kit, indicating that the form of taxol-induced cell death is not senescence.

  1. Cytotoxic Effect of a Novel Synthesized Carbazole Compound on A549 Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Molatlhegi, Refilwe P.; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M.; Tiloke, Charlette; Chuturgoon, Anil A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased death rates due to lung cancer have necessitated the search for potential novel anticancer compounds such as carbazole derivatives. Carbazoles are aromatic heterocyclic compounds with anticancer, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. The study investigated the ability of the novel carbazole compound (Z)-4-[9-ethyl-9aH-carbazol-3-yl) amino] pent-3-en-2-one (ECAP) to induce cytotoxicity of lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. ECAP was synthesized as a yellow powder with melting point of 240-247 °C. The 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lipid peroxidation and comet assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of the compound on A549 lung cancer cells. Protein expression was determined using western blots, apoptosis was measured by luminometry (caspase-3/7, -8 and -9) assay and flow cytometry was used to measure phosphatidylserine (PS) externalisation. ECAP induced a p53 mediated apoptosis of lung cancer cells due to a significant reduction in the expression of antioxidant defence proteins (Nrf2 and SOD), Hsp70 (p < 0.02) and Bcl-2 (p < 0.0006), thereby up-regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This resulted in DNA damage (p < 0.0001), up-regulation of Bax expression and caspase activity and induction of apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The results show the anticancer potential of ECAP on lung cancer. PMID:26134408

  2. Role of cytoskeleton network in anisosmotic volume changes of intact and permeabilized A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Platonova, Alexandra; Ponomarchuk, Olga; Boudreault, Francis; Kapilevich, Leonid V; Maksimov, Georgy V; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Orlov, Sergei N

    2015-10-01

    Recently we found that cytoplasm of permeabilized mammalian cells behaves as a hydrogel displaying intrinsic osmosensitivity. This study examined the role of microfilaments and microtubules in the regulation of hydrogel osmosensitivity, volume-sensitive ion transporters, and their contribution to volume modulation of intact cells. We found that intact and digitonin-permeabilized A549 cells displayed similar rate of shrinkage triggered by hyperosmotic medium. It was significantly slowed-down in both cell preparations after disruption of actin microfilaments by cytochalasin B, suggesting that rapid water release by intact cytoplasmic hydrogel contributes to hyperosmotic shrinkage. In hyposmotic swelling experiments, disruption of microtubules by vinblastine attenuated the maximal amplitude of swelling in intact cells and completely abolished it in permeabilized cells. The swelling of intact cells also triggered ~10-fold elevation of furosemide-resistant (86)Rb+ (K+) permeability and the regulatory volume decrease (RVD), both of which were abolished by Ba2+. Interestingly, RVD and K+ permeability remained unaffected in cytocholasin/vinblastine treated cells demonstrating that cytoskeleton disruption has no direct impact on Ba2+-sensitive K+-channels involved in RVD. Our results show, for the first time, that the cytoskeleton network contributes directly to passive cell volume adjustments in anisosmotic media via the modulation of the water retained by the cytoplasmic hydrogel. PMID:26171817

  3. In vitro photodynamic effect by phthalocyanine in A549 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrelova, Pavla; Kolarova, Hana; Bajgar, Robert; Strnad, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizes a combination of sensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen to generate singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and superoxid anion. Photochemical reactions lead to damage and destruction of cancer cells. The most suitable and effective source of radiation used in PDT is a laser. For this study, a semiconductor laser with output power of 50 mW and 675 nm was selected. In this paper we report a generation of ROS using chloroaluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine (ClAlPcS II) in A549 bronchogenic carcinoma cell line after PDT in vitro. Phthalocyanines, belonging to a new generation of substances for PDT, exhibit effective tissue penetration because of their proper light absorption region, chemical stability and photodynamic stability. The fluorescence measurement with molecular probes, CM-H IIDCFDA and Amplex Red, was performed for detection of ROS generation and hydrogen peroxide release from cells. Our results demonstrated, that irradiation of cells by laser dose of 10 J.cm -2 induces higher rates of fluorescence in cells loaded with phthalocyanine compared to 20 J.cm -2. Furthermore, the production of ROS increases up to sensitizer concentration of 10 μM. The highest ROS generation was observed at laser dose of 10 J.cm -2 and 10 μM ClAlPcS II. The rates of fluorescence for hydrogen peroxid measurements were almost identical with all chosen concentrations at laser doses of 10 and 20 J.cm -2.

  4. Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of keratin intermediate filaments in mechanically stimulated A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Mehta, Semil; Na, Ni; Ciechanover, Aaron; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-09-12

    We previously reported that shear stress induces phosphorylation and disassembly of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs). Shear stress also induces a time- and strain-dependent degradation of keratin IFs, and the current study examines the mechanisms involved in degradation of keratin proteins in human A549 cells exposed to 0-24 h of shear stress (7.5-30 dynes/cm(2)). Ubiquitin was found to be covalently associated with keratin proteins immunoprecipitated from shear-stressed cells, and pretreatment with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 prevented the degradation of the keratin IF network. Importantly, phosphorylation of K8 Ser-73 is required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitination, disassembly, and degradation of the keratin IF network. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that shear stress caused the thin array of keratin fibrils observed in control cells to be reorganized into a perinuclear aggregate, known as an aggresome, and that ubiquitin was also associated with this structure. Finally, the E2 enzymes, UbcH5b, -c, and Ubc3, but not E2-25K are required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of keratin proteins. These data suggest that shear stress promotes the disassembly and degradation of the keratin IF network via phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18617517

  5. Reliable Establishment of Human Sarcoma Xenografts in the Nude Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tinkey, Peggy T.; Milas, Mira

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. The ability to establish consistent human tumor xenografts in experimental animals is a crucial part of preclinical investigations.The goal of this study was to develop a method of establishing a human tumor xenograft in the leg of a nude rat for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatments of human extremity sarcoma. Methods and results. Initial attempts to produce sarcoma nodules by subcutaneous injection of a human leiomyosarcoma tumor cell suspension (SKLMS-1) resulted in tumor nodule formation in only four of 10 sites (40%).The xenograft method was modified to include younger nude rats of a different source and substrain (HSD:rnu/rnu, 5–9 weeks old), treated with 500 cGy whole-body irradiation, and the transplantation of tumor cells or small tumor fragments which had been embedded in Matrigel.These changes improved the tumor take rate per site to 52/52 (100%).Tumor nodules demonstrated rapid and progressive growth and histological features consistent with the original human sarcoma. Discussion. Successful human leiomyosarcoma establishment in these nude rats permits the investigation of sarcoma biology and treatment with surgical procedures for which a mouse model would be inadequate. In this study we identified modifications in technique which enhanced the xenografting of a leiomyosarcoma cell line in nude rats; these techniques may increase tumor take rates for other tumor types as well. PMID:18521275

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 adhesion to and invasion of A549 lung epithelial cells by natural extracts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ghada F; Elkhatib, Walid F; Noreddin, Ayman M

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonizes the lungs in cystic fibrosis (CF) and mechanically ventilated patients by binding to the cellular receptors on the surface of the lung epithelium. Studies have shown that blocking this interaction could be achieved with sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance is a probable drawback of such an intervention. The use of natural extracts to interfere with bacterial adhesion and invasion has recently gained substantial attention and is hypothesized to inhibit bacterial binding and consequently prevent or reduce pathogenicity. This study used an A549 lung epithelial cell infection model, and the results revealed that a combination of aqueous cranberry extract with ciprofloxacin could completely prevent the adhesion and invasion of P. aeruginosa PAO1 compared to the untreated control. All of the natural extracts (cranberry, dextran, and soybean extracts) and ciprofloxacin showed a significant reduction (P<0.0001) in P. aeruginosa PAO1 adhesion to and invasion of lung epithelial cells relative to the control. The cranberry, dextran, and soybean extracts could substantially increase the anti-adhesion and anti-invasion effects of ciprofloxacin to the averages of 100% (P<0.0001), 80% (P<0.0001), and 60% (P<0.0001), respectively. Those extracts might result in a lower rate of the development of bacterial resistance; they are relatively safe and inexpensive agents, and utilizing such extracts, alone or in combination with ciprofloxacin, as potential anti-adhesion and anti-invasion remedies, could be valuable in preventing or reducing P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:24894307

  7. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study on anti-cancer activity of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives against human lung cancer A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sehyeon; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Minju; Lee, Sunhoe; Lee, Jinsung; Lee, Seok Joon; Cho, Haelim; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2015-03-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives with anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer A549 cells were subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) approaches. The most potent compound, 1 was used to align the molecules. As a result, the best prediction was obtained with CoMSIA combined the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (q2 = 0.720, r2 = 0.897). This model was validated by an external test set of 6 compounds giving satisfactory predictive r2 value of 0.923 as well as the scrambling stability test. This model would guide the design of potent 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives as anti-cancer agent for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  8. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors. PMID:24782648

  9. Targeting Cdc42 with the small molecule drug AZA197 suppresses primary colon cancer growth and prolongs survival in a preclinical mouse xenograft model by downregulation of PAK1 activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rho GTPases play important roles in cytoskeleton organization, cell cycle progression and are key regulators of tumor progression. Strategies to modulate increased Rho GTPase activities during cancer progression could have therapeutic potential. Methods We report here the characterization of a Cdc42-selective small-molecule inhibitor AZA197 for the treatment of colon cancer that was developed based on structural information known from previously developed compounds affecting Rho GTPase activation. We investigated the effects of AZA197 treatment on RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activities and associated molecular mechanisms in colon cancer cells in vitro. Therapeutic effects of AZA197 were examined in vivo using a xenograft mouse model of SW620 human colon cancer cells. After treatment, tumors were excised and processed for Ki-67 staining, TUNEL assays and Western blotting to evaluate proliferative and apoptotic effects induced by AZA197. Results In SW620 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells, AZA197 demonstrated selectivity for Cdc42 without inhibition of Rac1 or RhoA GTPases from the same family. AZA197 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion and increased apoptosis associated with down-regulation of the PAK1 and ERK signaling pathways in vitro. Furthermore, systemic AZA197 treatment reduced tumor growth in vivo and significantly increased mouse survival in SW620 tumor xenografts. Ki-67 staining and tissue TUNEL assays showed that both inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis associated with reduced PAK/ERK activation contributed to the AZA197-induced therapeutic effects in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate the therapeutic potential of the small-molecule inhibitor AZA197 based on targeting Cdc42 GTPase activity to modulate colorectal cancer growth. PMID:24279335

  10. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA).

    PubMed

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect

  11. A novel ligand-independent peptide inhibitor of TREM-1 suppresses tumor growth in human lung cancer xenografts and prolongs survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the inflammatory response and plays a role in cancer and sepsis. Inhibition of TREM-1 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in macrophages suppresses cancer cell invasion in vitro. In the clinical setting, high levels of TREM-1 expression on tumor-associated macrophages are associated with cancer recurrence and poor survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TREM-1 upregulation on peritoneal neutrophils has been found in human sepsis patients and in mice with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock. However, the precise function of TREM-1 and the nature of its ligand are not yet known. In this study, we used the signaling chain homooligomerization (SCHOOL) model of immune signaling to design a novel, ligand-independent peptide-based TREM-1 inhibitor and demonstrated that this peptide specifically silences TREM-1 signaling in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing two human lung tumor xenograft nude mouse models (H292 and A549) and mice with LPS-induced sepsis, we show for the first time that blockade of TREM-1 function using non-toxic and non-immunogenic SCHOOL peptide inhibitors: 1) delays tumor growth in xenograft models of human NSCLC, 2) prolongs survival of mice with LPS-induced septic shock, and 3) substantially decreases cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. In addition, targeted delivery of SCHOOL peptides to macrophages utilizing lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles significantly increased peptide half-life and dosage efficacy. Together, the results suggest that ligand-independent modulation of TREM-1 function using small synthetic peptides might be a suitable treatment for sepsis and NSCLC and possibly other types of inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24836682

  12. Anticancer activity of pyrithione zinc in oral cancer cells identified in small molecule screens and xenograft model: Implications for oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Matta, Ajay; Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Datti, Alessandro; Walfish, Paul G; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options, underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to identify novel anticancer agents for OSCC using quantitative high throughput assays for screening six chemical libraries consisting of 5170 small molecule inhibitors. In depth characterization resulted in identification of pyrithione zinc (PYZ) as the most effective cytotoxic agent inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Further, treatment with PYZ reduced colony forming, migration and invasion potential of oral cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. PYZ treatment also led to altered expression of several key components of the major signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT/mTOR and WNT/β-catenin in OSCC cells. In addition, treatment with PYZ also reduced expression of 14-3-3ζ, 14-3-3σ, cyclin D1, c-Myc and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), proteins identified in our earlier studies to be involved in development and progression of OSCCs. Importantly, PYZ treatment significantly reduced tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. Taken together, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PYZ in OSCC. In conclusion, we identified PYZ in HTS assays and demonstrated in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy of PYZ as a novel anticancer therapeutic candidate in OSCC. PMID:26115765

  13. Study of the radiotherapy sensitization effects and mechanism of capecitabine (Xeloda) against non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Shan, J J; Sun, L B; Qiu, W S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the radiotherapy sensitization effects and the mechanism of capecitabine (Xeloda) against the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line, A549. γ-[(60)Co] radiation was used as the intervention method. Proliferative inhibition of capecitabine on A549 cells was determined by the CCK-8 method. The effects of capecitabine on the apoptosis rate and cell cycle distribution of A549 were detected with the flow cytometric method. We found that capecitabine inhibited the proliferation of A549 in a dose-dependent manner, notably increased the cell apoptosis rate and blocked the cellular G0/G1 phase after radiotherapy by γ-[(60)Co]. Therefore, capecitabine can significantly increase the radiosensitivity of A549; its mechanism may be related to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. PMID:26662434

  14. Kinematic modeling and its implication in longitudinal chemotherapy study of tumor physiology: ovarian xenograft mouse model and contrast-enhanced dynamic CT (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that dynamic CT provides the necessary sensitivity to quantify tumor physiology and differences in chemotherapeutic response. A compartmental mouse model utilizing measured contrast-enhanced dynamic CT scans is used to simulate systematic and statistical errors associated with tumor physiology: perfusion, permeability (PS), fractional plasma volume (fp), and fractional interstitial volume. The solute utilized is a small molecular weight radio-opaque contrast agent (isovue). For such an intravascular-interstitial medium, the kinematics simplifies to a two compartmental diffusive dominated set of coupled differential equations. Each combination of physiological parameters is repeatedly simulated fifteen times from which statistical errors calculated. The fractional change relative to the true value (systematic error) and standard deviation (statistical error) are plotted as a function of PS, fp, scanner temporal resolution and noise, and contrast media injection rates. By extrapolating from experimental data found in literature, a relative change in PS and fp of approximately 40% is required. Thus, the longitudinal response of two chemotherapeutic drugs under investigation - proteasome and IMPDH inhibitors - are hypothesized to induce different physiological responses. The first set of simulations varies PS from 0.05 to 0.40 mL/min/mL and fp from 0.01 to 0.07 mL/mL while holding all other physiological parameters constant. Errors in PS remain below 3% while statistical errors for fp increase significantly as the volume decreases toward 1-2%: errors remain less than 6% for fp>0.03 while increasing to above 15% for fp<0.02. The second set of simulations are performed quantifying the relationship between scanner temporal resolution and contrast media injection rate for various tumor permeabilities. For the majority of cases, the errors remain below 5%. As PS approaches perfusion, a total error less than 6% can be maintained

  15. Discovery of LY2457546: a multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitor with a novel spectrum of activity and exquisite potency in the acute myelogenous leukemia-Flt-3-internal tandem duplication mutant human tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Timothy P; Clayton, Joshua R; Rempala, Mark E; Henry, James R; Knobeloch, John M; Mendel, David; McLean, Johnathan A; Hao, Yan; Barda, David A; Considine, Eileen L; Uhlik, Mark T; Chen, Yuefeng; Ma, Liandong; Bloem, Laura J; Akunda, Jacqueline K; McCann, Denis J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel; Clawson, David K; Lahn, Michael M; Starling, James J

    2012-06-01

    LY2457546 is a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenic and tumorigenic signalling. In biochemical and cellular assays, LY2457546 demonstrates potent activity against targets that include VEGFR2 (KDR), PDGFRβ, FLT-3, Tie-2 and members of the Eph family of receptors. With activities against both Tie2 and Eph receptors, LY2457546 possesses an activity profile that distinguishes it from multikinase inhibitors. When compared head to head with sunitinib, LY2457546 was more potent for inhibition of endothelial tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis co-culture model with an intermittent treatment design. In vivo, LY2457546 inhibited VEGF-driven autophosphorylation of lung KDR in the mouse and rat in a dose and concentration dependent manner. LY2457546 was well tolerated and exhibited efficacy in a 13762 syngeneic rat mammary tumor model in both once and twice daily continuous dosing schedules and in mouse human tumor xenograft models of lung, colon, and prostate origin. Additionally, LY2457546 caused complete regression of well-established tumors in an acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) FLT3-ITD mutant xenograft tumor model. The observed efficacy that was displayed by LY2457546 in the AML FLT3-ITD mutant tumor model was superior to sunitinib when both were evaluated using equivalent doses normalized to in vivo inhibition of pKDR in mouse lung. LY2457546 was well tolerated in non-clinical toxicology studies conducted in rats and dogs. The majority of the toxicities observed were similar to those observed with other multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitors (MAKs) and included bone marrow hypocellularity, hair and skin depigmentation, cartilage dysplasia and lymphoid organ degeneration and necrosis. Thus, the unique spectrum of target activity, potent in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in a variety of rodent and human solid tumor models, exquisite potency against a clinically relevant model of AML, and non

  16. Therapeutic effect against human xenograft tumors in nude mice by the third generation microtubule stabilizing epothilones.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Zhong, Zi-Yang; Li, Yong; Feng, Li; Eng, Sara; Myles, David R; Johnson, Robert; Wu, Nian; Yin, Ye Ingrid; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2008-09-01

    The epothilones represent a promising class of natural product-based antitumor drug candidates. Although these compounds operate through a microtubule stabilization mechanism similar to that of taxol, the epothilones offer a major potential therapeutic advantage in that they retain their activity against multidrug-resistant cell lines. We have been systematically synthesizing and evaluating synthetic epothilone congeners that are not accessible through modification of the natural product itself. We report herein the results of biological investigations directed at two epothilone congeners: iso-fludelone and iso-dehydelone. Iso-fludelone, in particular, exhibits a number of properties that render it an excellent candidate for preclinical development, including biological stability, excellent solubility in water, and remarkable potency relative to other epothilones. In nude mouse xenograft settings, iso-fludelone was able to achieve therapeutic cures against a number of human cancer cell lines, including mammarian-MX-1, ovarian-SK-OV-3, and the fast-growing, refractory, subcutaneous neuroblastoma-SK-NAS. Strong therapeutic effect was observed against drug-resistant lung-A549/taxol and mammary-MCF-7/Adr xenografts. In addition, iso-fludelone was shown to exhibit a significant therapeutic effect against an intracranially implanted SK-NAS tumor. PMID:18755900

  17. Imaging and characterization of stretch-induced ATP release from alveolar A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Mechano-transduction at cellular and tissue levels often involves ATP release and activation of the purinergic signalling cascade. In the lungs, stretch is an important physical stimulus but its impact on ATP release, the underlying release mechanisms and transduction pathways are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of unidirectional stretch on ATP release from human alveolar A549 cells by real-time luciferin–luciferase bioluminescence imaging coupled with simultaneous infrared imaging, to monitor the extent of cell stretch and to identify ATP releasing cells. In subconfluent (<90%) cell cultures, single 1 s stretch (10–40%)-induced transient ATP release from a small fraction (≤1.5%) of cells that grew in number dose-dependently with increasing extent of stretch. ATP concentration in the proximity (≤150 μm) of releasing cells often exceeded 10 μm, sufficient for autocrine/paracrine purinoreceptor stimulation of neighbouring cells. ATP release responses were insensitive to the putative ATP channel blockers carbenoxolone and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropyl-amino) benzoic acid, but were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and bafilomycin. In confluent cell cultures, the maximal fraction of responding cells dropped to <0.2%, but was enhanced several-fold in the wound/scratch area after it was repopulated by new cells during the healing process. Fluo8 fluorescence experiments revealed two types of stretch-induced intracellular Ca2+ responses, rapid sustained Ca2+ elevations in a limited number of cells and delayed secondary responses in neighbouring cells, seen as Ca2+ waves whose propagation was consistent with extracellular diffusion of released ATP. Our experiments revealed that a single >10% stretch was sufficient to initiate intercellular purinergic signalling in alveolar cells, which may contribute to the regulation of surfactant secretion and wound healing. PMID:23247110

  18. Characterization of indoor dust from Brazil and evaluation of the cytotoxicity in A549 lung cells.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, E; Weidler, P G; Friedrich, F; Weiss, C; Diabaté, S

    2014-04-01

    Over the past decade, ambient air particulate matter (PM) has been clearly associated with adverse health effects. In Brazil, small and poor communities are exposed to indoor dust derived from both natural sources, identified as blowing soil dust, and anthropogenic particles from mining activities. This study investigates the physicochemical and mineralogical composition of indoor PM10 dust samples collected in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and evaluates its cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential. The mean PM10 mass concentration was 206 μg/m(3). The high dust concentration in the interior of the residences is strongly related to blowing soil dust. The chemical and mineralogical compositions were determined by ICP-OES and XRD, and the most prominent minerals were clays, Fe-oxide, quartz, feldspars, Al(hydr)oxides, zeolites, and anatase, containing the transition metals Fe, Cr, V, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ti, and Mn as well as the metalloid As. The indoor dust samples presented a low water solubility of about 6 %. In vitro experiments were carried out with human lung alveolar carcinoma cells (A549) to study the toxicological effects. The influence of the PM10 dust samples on cell viability, intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was analysed. The indoor dust showed little effects on alamarBlue reduction indicating unaltered mitochondrial activity. However, significant cell membrane damage, ROS production, and IL-8 release were detected in dependence of dose and time. This study will support the implementation of mitigation actions in the investigated area in Brazil. PMID:23990125

  19. Suitable parameter choice on quantitative morphology of A549 cell in epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhou-Xin; Yu, Hai-Bin; Li, Jian-Sheng; Shen, Jun-Ling; Du, Wen-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of morphological changes in cells is an integral part of study on epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), however, only a few papers reported the changes in quantitative parameters and no article compared different parameters for demanding better parameters. In the study, the purpose was to investigate suitable parameters for quantitative evaluation of EMT morphological changes. A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line was selected for the study. Some cells were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) for EMT, and other cells were as control without TGF-β1 stimulation. Subsequently, cells were placed in phase contrast microscope and three arbitrary fields were captured and saved with a personal computer. Using the tools of Photoshop software, some cells in an image were selected, segmented out and exchanged into unique hue, and other part in the image was shifted into another unique hue. The cells were calculated with 29 morphological parameters by Image Pro Plus software. A parameter between cells with or without TGF-β1 stimulation was compared statistically and nine parameters were significantly different between them. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve) of a parameter was described with SPSS software and F-test was used to compare two areas under the curves (AUCs) in Excel. Among them, roundness and radius ratio were the most AUCs and were significant higher than the other parameters. The results provided a new method with quantitative assessment of cell morphology during EMT, and found out two parameters, roundness and radius ratio, as suitable for quantification. PMID:26182364

  20. Downregulation of AATK mediates microRNA-558-induced resistance of A549 cells to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui-Xia; Song, Chun-Hui; Yang, Jin-Shan; Yi, Qing-Ting; Li, Bao-Jian; Liu, Si-Hai

    2016-09-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is often implicated in the control of sensitivity to radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to identify the association between miR‑558 and apoptosis‑associated tyrosine kinase (AATK), and their importance in regulating the development of resistance to radiotherapy. The current study demonstrated that AATK, a radiosensitization-associated gene, is a target of miR‑558 in lung cancer cells, using in silico analysis and a luciferase reporter system. Furthermore, it was determined that transfection of 30 or 50 nM miR‑558 mimics and AATK specific siRNA markedly suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of AATK. To determine whether miR‑558 was required for lung cancer cell radioresistance, A549 cells were treated with different doses of ionizing radiation, from 0 to 10 Gy, following transfection with miR‑558 mimics or AATK specific siRNA. It was determined that the administration of miR‑558 mimics or AATK specific siRNA alone did not significantly alter the survival rate of the cells. By contrast, in the cells exposed to 4, 6 or 8 Gy, the administration of miR‑558 mimics or AATK specific siRNA significantly promoted cell survival rate and overexpression of AATK reversed this effect. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the miR‑558/AATK cascade is important for the radiosensitization of lung cancer cells and may be a potential radiotherapy target. PMID:27485693

  1. SchA-p85-FAK complex dictates isoform-specific activation of Akt2 and subsequent PCBP1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of TGFβ-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xinying; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuxia; Teng, Guigen; Wang, Yong; Zang, Xuefeng; Wang, Kaifei; Zhang, Jinghui; Xu, Yali; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Lei

    2014-08-01

    A post-transcriptional pathway by which TGF-β modulates expression of specific proteins, Disabled-2 (Dab2) and Interleukin-like EMT Inducer (ILEI), inherent to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in murine epithelial cells through Akt2-mediated phosphorylation of poly r(C) binding protein (PCBP1), has been previously elucidated. The aims of the current study were to determine if the same mechanism is operative in the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, A549, and to delineate the underlying mechanism. Steady-state transcript and protein expression levels of Dab2 and ILEI were examined in A549 cells treated with TGF-β for up to 48 h. Induction of translational de-repression in this model was quantified by polysomal fractionation followed by qRT-PCR. The underlying mechanism of isoform-specific activation of Akt2 was elucidated through a combination of co-immunoprecipitation studies. TGF-β induced EMT in A549 cells concomitant with translational upregulation of Dab2 and ILEI proteins through isoform-specific activation of Akt2 followed by phosphorylation of PCBP1 at serine-43. Our experiments further elucidated that the adaptor protein SchA is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues following TGF-β treatment, which initiated a signaling cascade resulting in the sequential recruitment of p85 subunit of PI3K and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The SchA-FAK-p85 complex subsequently selectively recruited and activated Akt2, not Akt1. Inhibition of the p85 subunit through phosphorylated 1257 peptide completely attenuated EMT in these cells. We have defined the underlying mechanism responsible for isoform-specific recruitment and activation of Akt2, not Akt1, during TGF-β-mediated EMT in A549 cells. Inhibition of the formation of this complex thus represents an important and novel therapeutic target in metastatic lung carcinoma. PMID:24819169

  2. Improving In Vivo High-Resolution CT Imaging of the Tumour Vasculature in Xenograft Mouse Models through Reduction of Motion and Bone-Streak Artefacts

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Kannan, Pavitra; Beech, John S.; Bates, Russell; Irving, Benjamin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Thompson, James; Kinchesh, Paul; Casteleyn, Christophe; Schnabel, Julia; Partridge, Mike; Muschel, Ruth J.; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical in vivo CT is commonly used to visualise vessels at a macroscopic scale. However, it is prone to many artefacts which can degrade the quality of CT images significantly. Although some artefacts can be partially corrected for during image processing, they are best avoided during acquisition. Here, a novel imaging cradle and tumour holder was designed to maximise CT resolution. This approach was used to improve preclinical in vivo imaging of the tumour vasculature. Procedures A custom built cradle containing a tumour holder was developed and fix-mounted to the CT system gantry to avoid artefacts arising from scanner vibrations and out-of-field sample positioning. The tumour holder separated the tumour from bones along the axis of rotation of the CT scanner to avoid bone-streaking. It also kept the tumour stationary and insensitive to respiratory motion. System performance was evaluated in terms of tumour immobilisation and reduction of motion and bone artefacts. Pre- and post-contrast CT followed by sequential DCE-MRI of the tumour vasculature in xenograft transplanted mice was performed to confirm vessel patency and demonstrate the multimodal capacity of the new cradle. Vessel characteristics such as diameter, and branching were quantified. Results Image artefacts originating from bones and out-of-field sample positioning were avoided whilst those resulting from motions were reduced significantly, thereby maximising the resolution that can be achieved with CT imaging in vivo. Tumour vessels ≥ 77 μm could be resolved and blood flow to the tumour remained functional. The diameter of each tumour vessel was determined and plotted as histograms and vessel branching maps were created. Multimodal imaging using this cradle assembly was preserved and demonstrated. Conclusions The presented imaging workflow minimised image artefacts arising from scanner induced vibrations, respiratory motion and radiopaque structures and enabled in vivo CT imaging

  3. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via STAT3 pathway inhibition in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MENG; BIAN, ZHI-GANG; ZHANG, YI; WANG, JIA-HE; KAN, LIANG; WANG, XIN; NIU, HUI-YAN; HE, PING

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are a great source of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), one of the most potent and widely used cucurbitacins, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the A549 lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, CuB induced apoptosis of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The present study also demonstrated that CuB dose-dependently inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, with cell cycle inhibition and cyclin B1 downregulation. Apoptosis induced by CuB was shown to be associated with cytochrome c release, B-cell lymphoma 2 downregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway inhibition. CuB may prove to be a useful approach for the chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:25242136

  4. Inhibitory effect of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid from Eriobotrya fragrans on A549 cell viability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y S; Yuan, Y; Song, G; Lin, S Q

    2016-01-01

    Loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Lindl.)] is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been used as an anti-inflammatory and for curing chronic bronchitis among other potential applications. Extracted ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) from wild loquat were previously found capable of suppressing the proliferation of A549 cells in vitro. In the current study, nude mice were used to determine the inhibitory effect of UA and OA on tumor formation in vivo. The results demonstrate that UA and OA reduced the proliferation of A549 cells in nude mice, and increased the expression of Bid while decreasing the protein levels of MMP-2, Ki-67, and CD34. In this study, we identified potential antitumor activity in a wild loquat extract containing UA and OA, which demonstrates that traditional Chinese medicine may have a role in treating certain types of cancer. PMID:27323036

  5. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via STAT3 pathway inhibition in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Bian, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jia-He; Kan, Liang; Wang, Xin; Niu, Hui-Yan; He, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Natural products are a great source of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), one of the most potent and widely used cucurbitacins, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the A549 lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, CuB induced apoptosis of A549 cells in a -concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The present study also demonstrated that CuB dose-dependently inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, with cell cycle inhibition and cyclin B1 downregulation. Apoptosis induced by CuB was shown to be associated with cytochrome c release, B-cell lymphoma 2 downregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway inhibition. CuB may prove to be a useful approach for the chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:25242136

  6. Knockdown of Aurora-B inhibits the growth of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    YU, JING JING; ZHOU, LONG DIAN; ZHAO, TIAN TIAN; BAI, WEI; ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Elevated expression of Aurora-B affects cell apoptosis and proliferation in a variety of solid tumors. However, the role of Aurora-B has been poorly evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, it was found that Aurora-B was overexpressed in tissue specimens obtained from 174 patients with lung cancer. It was also demonstrated that knockdown of Aurora-B induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of lung cancer A549 cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it was found that silencing Aurora-B decreased the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Therefore, it was concluded that knockdown of Aurora-B induces apoptosis and inhibits growth in NSCLC A549 cells, in addition to inhibiting the activity of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Targeting Aurora-B may provide a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26622725

  7. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors. PMID:19390482

  8. Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Yano, Shuya; Sato, Sho; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential. PMID:25402324

  9. The omega-hydroxy palmitic acid induced apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell lines H596 and A549.

    PubMed

    Abe, Akihisa; Yamane, Mototeru; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Isamu

    2002-02-01

    We have found that omega-hydroxy palmitic acid (16-hydroxy palmitic acid, omega-HPA) has both cell growth inhibiting and cell death inducing actions on human lung adenosquamous carcinoma cell line H596 and adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Further, these effects were dose- and time-dependent in both cell lines. However, in squamous carcinoma cell line H226, omega-HPA had no cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, in the human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell line H128, this compound showed weak cytotoxicity. The sensitivity toward omega-HPA was higher in H596 cells than in A549 cells. In both H596 and A549 cells, cell growth was inhibited to 24.4 and 9.4%, respectively, by treatment with 100 microM omega-HPA for 12 h. In the 24 h treatment cells, growth inhibition was increased to 100 and 38.1%, respectively. In cytotoxicity experiments, the number of dead cells increased with incubation times in the presence of omega-HPA: on three days incubation with 100 microM omega-HPA, viability was 0 and 13.5%, respectively, in H596 and A549 cells. Further, the fragmentation of DNA to oligonucleosomal-sized ladder fragments, which is an index of apoptosis, was observed in both cell lines on treatment with omega-HPA. Therefore, it is assumed that these cell deaths induced by omega-HPA, were apoptosis in these cell lines. Since the number of dead cells following treatment with omega-HPA decreased by treatment with omega-HPA in combination with Z-VAD-fmk, a caspase family inhibitor, it is thought that apoptotic cell death was related to caspase activity. PMID:12186781

  10. Caveolin-1 regulates cell apoptosis and invasion ability in paclitaxel-induced multidrug-resistant A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Yongxin; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of caveolin-1 (Cav1) knockdown in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. The human paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cell line A549/Taxol was transfected with a Cav1 shRNA lentiviral vector. Interference efficiency for Cav1 was detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle stage and apoptosis. Cell migration and invasion capability were detected by a transwell assay. Protein levels of related signaling molecules were detected by Western blotting. We successfully constructed a stable A549/Taxol cell line expressing low levels of Cav1. Cav1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced G0/G1 arrest and cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these effects correlated significantly with a reduction in cyclin D1 expression and activation of the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of Cav1 inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this may be related to the inhibition of AKT and the subsequent decreased protein expression of MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9. PMID:26464635

  11. A novel polysaccharide from Sargassum integerrimum induces apoptosis in A549 cells and prevents angiogensis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ge; Kuang, Shan; Wu, Shimei; Jin, Weihua; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Many polysaccharides isolated from plants have exhibited promising antitumor activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of the novel polysaccharide named SPS from Sargassum integerrimum, elucidate the underlying anticancer mechanism in a human lung cancer cell line A549, and evaluate its anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The results show that SPS significantly reduces A549 cells viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner via MTT method. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that SPS could induce cell apoptosis, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest of A549 cells. Up-regulation of the expressions of P53 and Bax, down-regulation of the expression of Bcl-2, and activation of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP are also detected by western blotting after the treatment of SPS. In addition, SPS inhibits the proliferation, migration and cord formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, and prevents the vascular development of zebrafish embryos in vivo. Altogether, our data prove the anticancer and anti-angiogenesis properties of SPS, and provide further insights into the potential pharmacological application of SPS as antitumor and anti-angiogenic agent against lung cancer. PMID:27216943

  12. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Keiko; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12) were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC), an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX), 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation. PMID:26167183