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Sample records for a7r5 vascular smooth

  1. Erk1/2 MAPK and Caldesmon Differentially Regulate Podosome Dynamics in A7r5 Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhizhan; Kordowska, Jolanta; Williams, Geoffrey L.; Wang, C.-L. Albert; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the MEK/Erk/caldesmon phosphorylation cascade regulates PKC-mediated podosome dynamics in A7r5 cells. We observed the phosphorylation of MEK, Erk and caldesmon, and their translocation to the podosomes upon phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) stimulation, together with the nuclear translocation of phospho-MEK and phospho-Erk. After MEK inhibition by U0126, Erk translocated to the interconnected actin-rich columns but failed to translocate to the nucleus, suggesting that podosomes served as a site for Erk phosphorylation. The interconnected actin-rich columns in U0126-treated, PDBu-stimulated cells contained α-actinin, caldesmon, vinculin, and metalloproteinase-2. Caldesmon and vinculin became integrated with F-actin at the columns, in contrast to their typical location at the ring of podosomes. Live-imaging experiments suggested the growth of these columns from podosomes that were slow to disassemble. The observed modulation of podosome size and life time in A7r5 cells overexpressing wild-type and phosphorylation-deficient caldesmon-GFP mutants in comparison to untransfected cells suggests that caldesmon and caldesmon phosphorylation modulate podosome dynamics in A7r5 cells. These results suggest that Erk1/2 and caldesmon differentially modulate PKC-mediated formation and/or dynamics of podosomes in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:17239373

  2. Erk1/2 MAPK and caldesmon differentially regulate podosome dynamics in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Zhizhan; Kordowska, Jolanta; Williams, Geoffrey L.; Wang, C.-L. Albert; Hai, C.-M. . E-mail: Chi-Ming_Hai@brown.edu

    2007-03-10

    We tested the hypothesis that the MEK/Erk/caldesmon phosphorylation cascade regulates PKC-mediated podosome dynamics in A7r5 cells. We observed the phosphorylation of MEK, Erk and caldesmon, and their translocation to the podosomes upon phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) stimulation, together with the nuclear translocation of phospho-MEK and phospho-Erk. After MEK inhibition by U0126, Erk translocated to the interconnected actin-rich columns but failed to translocate to the nucleus, suggesting that podosomes served as a site for Erk phosphorylation. The interconnected actin-rich columns in U0126-treated, PDBu-stimulated cells contained {alpha}-actinin, caldesmon, vinculin, and metalloproteinase-2. Caldesmon and vinculin became integrated with F-actin at the columns, in contrast to their typical location at the ring of podosomes. Live-imaging experiments suggested the growth of these columns from podosomes that were slow to disassemble. The observed modulation of podosome size and life time in A7r5 cells overexpressing wild-type and phosphorylation-deficient caldesmon-GFP mutants in comparison to untransfected cells suggests that caldesmon and caldesmon phosphorylation modulate podosome dynamics in A7r5 cells. These results suggest that Erk1/2 and caldesmon differentially modulate PKC-mediated formation and/or dynamics of podosomes in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. OUABAIN- AND MARINOBUFAGENIN-INDUCED PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS AND A RAT VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL LINE, A7R5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the growth-promoting effects of 2 sodium pump-selective cardiotonic steroids, ouabain and marinobufagenin, on cultured cells from vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) from human umbilical vein and a rat VSMC line, A7r5. Both ouabain and marinobufagenin activated proliferation of these cells in...

  4. DHEA attenuates PDGF-induced phenotypic proliferation of vascular smooth muscle A7r5 cells through redox regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kawakatsu, Miho; Yodoi, Junji; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Kondo, Takahito

    2010-05-28

    It is known that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits a phenotypic switch in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB. However, the mechanism behind the effect of DHEA on VSMC is not clear. Previously we reported that low molecular weight-protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) dephosphorylates PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-{beta} via a redox-dependent mechanism involving glutathione (GSH)/glutaredoxin (GRX)1. Here we demonstrate that the redox regulation of PDGFR-{beta} is involved in the effect of DHEA on VSMC. DHEA suppressed the PDGF-BB-dependent phosphorylation of PDGFR-{beta}. As expected, DHEA increased the levels of GSH and GRX1, and the GSH/GRX1 system maintained the redox state of LMW-PTP. Down-regulation of the expression of LMW-PTP using siRNA restored the suppression of PDGFR-{beta}-phosphorylation by DHEA. A promoter analysis of GRX1 and {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), a rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis, showed that DHEA up-regulated the transcriptional activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) response element, suggesting PPAR{alpha} plays a role in the induction of GRX1 and {gamma}-GCS expression by DHEA. In conclusion, the redox regulation of PDGFR-{beta} is involved in the suppressive effect of DHEA on VSMC proliferation through the up-regulation of GSH/GRX system.

  5. Possible Mechanisms of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate-Induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 Expression in A7r5 Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei-Fen; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are important in the development and/or progression of many cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Evidence shows that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 are related to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in atherosclerosis are regulated via various pathways, such as p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB). Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been shown to induce atherosclerosis by increasing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) productions. However, whether DEHP poses any effects on MMP-2 or MMP-9 expression in VSMC has not yet been answered. In our studies, rat aorta VSMC was treated with DEHP (between 2 and 17.5 ppm) and p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, NF-κB, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins and activities were measured. Results showed that the presence of DEHP can induce higher MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression than the controls. Similar results on MMP-regulating proteins, i.e., p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB, were also observed. In summary, our current results have showed that DEHP can be a potent inducer of atherosclerosis by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression at least through the regulations of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB. PMID:26690114

  6. Possible Mechanisms of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate-Induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 Expression in A7r5 Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mei-Fen; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2015-12-04

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are important in the development and/or progression of many cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Evidence shows that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 are related to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in atherosclerosis are regulated via various pathways, such as p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB). Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been shown to induce atherosclerosis by increasing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) productions. However, whether DEHP poses any effects on MMP-2 or MMP-9 expression in VSMC has not yet been answered. In our studies, rat aorta VSMC was treated with DEHP (between 2 and 17.5 ppm) and p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, NF-κB, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins and activities were measured. Results showed that the presence of DEHP can induce higher MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression than the controls. Similar results on MMP-regulating proteins, i.e., p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB, were also observed. In summary, our current results have showed that DEHP can be a potent inducer of atherosclerosis by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression at least through the regulations of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB.

  7. Rotenone-stimulated superoxide release from mitochondrial complex I acutely augments L-type Ca2+ current in A7r5 aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Rikuo; Dhagia, Vidhi; Lakhkar, Anand; Patel, Dhara; Wolin, Michael S; Gupte, Sachin A

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa,L) induces contraction of arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and ICa,L is increased by H2O2 in ASMCs. Superoxide released from the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is dismutated to H2O2 We studied whether superoxide per se acutely modulates ICa,L in ASMCs using cultured A7r5 cells derived from rat aorta. Rotenone is a toxin that inhibits complex I of the MRC and increases mitochondrial superoxide release. The superoxide content of mitochondria was estimated using mitochondrial-specific MitoSOX and HPLC methods, and was shown to be increased by a brief exposure to 10 μM rotenone. ICa,L was recorded with 5 mM BAPTA in the pipette solution. Rotenone administration (10 nM to 10 μM) resulted in a greater ICa,L increase in a dose-dependent manner to a maximum of 22.1% at 10 μM for 1 min, which gradually decreased to 9% after 5 min. The rotenone-induced ICa,L increase was associated with a shift in the current-voltage relationship (I-V) to a hyperpolarizing direction. DTT administration resulted in a 17.9% increase in ICa,L without a negative shift in I-V, and rotenone produced an additional increase with a shift. H2O2 (0.3 mM) inhibited ICa,L by 13%, and additional rotenone induced an increase with a negative shift. Sustained treatment with Tempol (4-hydroxy tempo) led to a significant ICa,L increase but it inhibited the rotenone-induced increase. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor, partially inhibited ICa,L and completely suppressed the rotenone-induced increase. Superoxide released from mitochondria affected protein kinases and resulted in stronger ICa,L preceding its dismutation to H2O2 The removal of nitric oxide is a likely mechanism for the increase in ICa,L. PMID:26873970

  8. Effects of extracellular pH on receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in A7r5 rat smooth muscle cells: involvement of two different types of channel.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, K; Nakajima, T; Hazama, H; Goto, A; Shin, W S; Toyo-oka, T; Omata, M

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular pH (pHo) on receptor (vasopressin or endothelin-1)-mediated Ca2- entry and Ca(2+)-permeable channels were investigated in aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) from rat embryonic thoracic aorta. Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) was measured using fura-2 AM and whole-cell voltage clamp techniques were employed. 2. Vasopressin and endothelin-1 (100 nM) in the presence of nicardipine (10 microM) evoked a sustained rise in [Ca2+]i due to calcium entry. Extracellular acidosis decreased receptor (vasopressin or endothelin-1)-mediated Ca2+ entry, while extracellular alkalosis potentiated it. 3. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin (1 microM) also evoked Ca2+ entry activated by emptying of intracellular Ca2+ stores (capacitative Ca2+ entry). Extracellular acidosis decreased this capacitative Ca2+ entry, while extracellular alkalosis potentiated it. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions with Ca+ internal solution, vasopressin and endothelin-1 activated non-selective cation currents (ICAT). Ba2+ or Ca2+ were also charge carriers of ICAT. Reducing the pHo inhibited ICAT, while increasing pHo potentiated it in a reversible manner. 5. Intracellular pH (pHi) changes did not cause the same marked effects as pHo changes, and a high concentration of Hepes (50 mM) in the patch pipette did not inhibit the effects of pHo on ICAT. 6. Similar results were obtained when ICAT was activated by GTP gamma S (1 mM) applied through the patch pipette, even in the absence of agonists, probably because of direct activation of GTP-binding proteins coupled to the receptors. 7. In cells treated with thapsigargin, addition of Ca2+ to the bath solution induced Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents activated by capacitative Ca2+ entry. However, no measurable ionic currents activated by capacitative Ca2+ entry (ICRAC) were observed under conditions with Cs+ internal solution and EGTA (5 mM), although vasopressin still activated ICAT. 8. These results suggest that the

  9. Low-frequency low energy ultrasound combined with microbubbles induces distinct apoptosis of A7r5 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Hongsheng; Cheng, Qian; Lei, Lei; Hu, Bing

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether low frequency low energy ultrasound combined with microbubbles induces apoptotic cell death of A7r5 rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, and to identify the possible mechanisms underlying this effect. Ultrasonic waves (45 kHz with 0.3 Wcm2 of intensity for 0, 10, 20 and 30 sec) were used together with different dosages of SonoVue™ microbubbles (0, 14, 28, 42 and 56 µl), respectively. The cell viability and apoptotic rate were determined by trypan blue staining immediately following treatment and flow cytometry 24 h thereafter. The treatment conditions resulting in the lowest amount of necrosis, highest apoptotic rate and lowest microbubble dosage was selected for the US+MB group, which was treated with ultrasound combined with microbubbles. The cell proliferation 24 h following treatment was determined and western blot analysis was applied to examine the expression of apoptosis‑associated proteins, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl-2-associated X (Bax). The harmonic acoustic pressure amplitude was measured to obtain the cavitation intensity. The combination of 20 sec ultrasound irradiation and 14 µl SonoVue™ was selected as the treatment conditions for the US+MB group. The results demonstrated that both ultrasound alone (the US group) and in combination with microbubbles significantly inhibited the proliferation of A7r5 cells compared with that of the control (P<0.01), and the suppression in the US+MB group was significantly greater (P<0.01). The apoptotic rate in A7r5 cells induced by this combination treatment (16.62±0.93%) was significantly higher than that in the control (3.93±0.39%; P<0.01) and US (6.88±1.87%; P<0.01) groups. Treatment with ultrasound combined with microbubbles increased the expression of Bax and decreased the ratio of Bcl‑2/Bax compared with those in the control and US groups. The cavitation induced by ultrasound combined with microbubble treatment was more intense than that by

  10. Biophysical Induction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Podosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Kohn, Julie C.; Huynh, John; Carey, Shawn P.; Mason, Brooke N.; Vouyouka, Ageliki G.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. PMID:25785437

  11. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Sayo; Yano, Shozo; Tanaka, Sayuri; Sheikh, Abdullah M.; Nagai, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD). To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5) was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA). Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(P)H oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD. PMID:27649164

  12. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Koike, Sayo; Yano, Shozo; Tanaka, Sayuri; Sheikh, Abdullah M; Nagai, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD). To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5) was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA). Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(P)H oxidase components including Nox4 and p22(phox), and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22(phox). Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22(phox) showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD. PMID:27649164

  13. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:24162233

  14. Caveolin-3 Promotes a Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractile Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Iturrieta, Jeannette; Dulam, Vipin; Wang, Yu; Pavlides, Stephanos; Malacari, Gabriella; Lisanti, Michael P.; Frank, Philippe G.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle (SM) cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular SM cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature, contractile SM cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of SM cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial SM cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured SM cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 SM cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as SM α-actin, SM myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing SM cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic SM cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating SM function in atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26664898

  15. Vascular calcification: Mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  16. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 correlates with vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rat heterotopic heart transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Yan, Daliang; Li, Yangcheng; Sha, Xilin; Wu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) decreases the long-term survival of heart transplantation recipients. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis is an important pathological feature of CAV. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 (Ets-2), as a transcription factor, participates in cell apoptosis and plays an important role in organ transplantation. Methods Hearts from Wistar-Furth (WF:RT1u) rats were heterotopically transplanted into Lewis (Lew:RT1l) rats without immunosuppression. Additional syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantations were performed in Lewis rats. HE staining was used to identify CAV. Ets-2 expression was examined by western blot. Ets-2 tissue location was examined by immunohistochemical assay and double immunostaining. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was detected by western blot. Co-localization of Ets-2 and cleaved caspase 3 was detected by double immunostaining. Ets-2, p53, cleaved caspase 3 and Bcl-xl expression in rat VSMC line A7R5 was examined after Ets-2 siRNA transfection. TUNEL assay was applied to detect A7R5 apoptosis with or without ETS-2 siRNA transfection. Immunoprecipitation was performed to explore the interaction between Ets-2 and p53. Results Ets-2 expression decreased in the allograft group but had no obvious change in the isograft group. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of CAV was observed in the allograft group and there is neointima formation in the isograft group which is not obvious compared with allograft group. Additionally, Ets-2 expression was opposite to VSMC apoptosis in the allograft group. In vitro, Ets-2 siRNA transfection in A7R5cells resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis. Finally, Ets-2 interacted with p53. Conclusions Ets-2 might inhibit VSMC apoptosis via p53 pathway. The results further elucidate the molecular mechanism of VSMC apoptosis after heart transplantation during CAV and provide theoretical basis for seeking new specific drug targets for CAV prevention and treatment.

  17. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 correlates with vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rat heterotopic heart transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Yan, Daliang; Li, Yangcheng; Sha, Xilin; Wu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) decreases the long-term survival of heart transplantation recipients. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis is an important pathological feature of CAV. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 (Ets-2), as a transcription factor, participates in cell apoptosis and plays an important role in organ transplantation. Methods Hearts from Wistar-Furth (WF:RT1u) rats were heterotopically transplanted into Lewis (Lew:RT1l) rats without immunosuppression. Additional syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantations were performed in Lewis rats. HE staining was used to identify CAV. Ets-2 expression was examined by western blot. Ets-2 tissue location was examined by immunohistochemical assay and double immunostaining. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was detected by western blot. Co-localization of Ets-2 and cleaved caspase 3 was detected by double immunostaining. Ets-2, p53, cleaved caspase 3 and Bcl-xl expression in rat VSMC line A7R5 was examined after Ets-2 siRNA transfection. TUNEL assay was applied to detect A7R5 apoptosis with or without ETS-2 siRNA transfection. Immunoprecipitation was performed to explore the interaction between Ets-2 and p53. Results Ets-2 expression decreased in the allograft group but had no obvious change in the isograft group. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of CAV was observed in the allograft group and there is neointima formation in the isograft group which is not obvious compared with allograft group. Additionally, Ets-2 expression was opposite to VSMC apoptosis in the allograft group. In vitro, Ets-2 siRNA transfection in A7R5cells resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis. Finally, Ets-2 interacted with p53. Conclusions Ets-2 might inhibit VSMC apoptosis via p53 pathway. The results further elucidate the molecular mechanism of VSMC apoptosis after heart transplantation during CAV and provide theoretical basis for seeking new specific drug targets for CAV prevention and treatment. PMID:27621856

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism. PMID:26807480

  20. Urethane and contraction of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Altura, B. M.; Weinberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    1 In vitro studies were undertaken on rat aortic strips and portal vein segments in order to determine whether or not the anaesthetic, urethane, can exert direct actions on vascular smooth muscle. 2 Urethane was found to inhibit development of spontaneous mechanical activity. This action took place with a urethane concentration as little as one tenth of that found in anaesthetic plasma concentratios, i.e., 10(-3) M. 3 Urethane (10(-3 to 10(-1) M) dose-dependently attenuated contractions induced by adrenaline, angiotensin and KCl. These inhibitory actions were observed with urethane added either before or after the induced contractions. 4 Ca2+-induced contractions of K+-depolarized aortae and portal veins were also attenuated, dose-dependently, by urethane. 5 All of these inhibitory effects were completely, and almost immediately, reversed upon washing out the anaesthetic from the organ baths. 6 A variety of pharmacological antagonists failed to mimic or affect the inhibitory effects induced by urethane. 7 These data suggest that plasma concentrations of urethane commonly associated with induction of surgical anaesthesia can induce, directly, relaxation of vascular muscle. PMID:497529

  1. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis.

  2. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  3. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  4. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  5. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-01

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  6. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  7. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease.

  8. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  9. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  10. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  11. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  12. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS.

  13. Vasopressin-stimulated Ca2+ spiking in vascular smooth muscle cells involves phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Shiels, A J; Maszak, G; Byron, K L

    2001-06-01

    Physiological concentrations of [Arg(8)]vasopressin (AVP; 10-500 pM) stimulate oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spikes) in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. We previously reported that this effect of AVP was blocked by a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). In the present study, the products of PLA2, arachidonic acid (AA), and lysophospholipids were found to be ineffective in stimulating Ca2+ spiking, and inhibitors of AA metabolism did not prevent AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Thin layer chromatography was used to monitor the release of AA and phosphatidic acid (PA), which are the products of PLA2 and phospholipase D (PLD), respectively. AVP (100 pM) stimulated both AA and PA formation, but only PA formation was inhibited by ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). Exogenous PLD (type VII; 2.5 U/ml) stimulated Ca2+ spiking equivalent to the effect of 100 pM AVP. AVP stimulated transphosphatidylation of 1-butanol (a PLD-catalyzed reaction) but not 2-butanol, and 1-butanol (but not 2-butanol) completely prevented AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition, which completely prevents AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking, did not inhibit AVP-stimulated phosphatidylbutanol formation. These results suggest that AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking depends on activation of PLD rather than PLA2 and that PKC activation may be downstream of PLD in the signaling cascade.

  14. Effect of urea and osmotic cell shrinkage on Ca2+ entry and contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C A; Huber, S M; Wärntges, S; Zempel, G; Kaba, N K; Fux, R; Orth, N; Busch, G L; Waldegger, S; Lambert, I; Nilius, B; Heinle, H; Lang, F

    2000-06-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the effects of urea on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Addition of urea (20, 50, 100 mM) to physiological salt solution blunted the vasoconstrictory effect of phenylephrine (by 17, 25 and 30%, respectively) and of an increased extracellular K+ concentration (by 7, 14 and 19%, respectively) without affecting the basal tone of rabbit arterial rings. According to Fura-2 fluorescence in cultured SMC (A7r5), urea had no effect on basal intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i), but significantly blunted the increase of [Ca2+]i following an increase of extracellular K+. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the Ca2+ current through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels is significantly inhibited in the presence of urea. As evident from calcein fluorescence, addition of urea leads to sustained cell shrinkage. The effects of urea on vascular tone, [Ca2+]i activity, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and cell volume are mimicked by addition of raffinose or NaCl. However, the cell shrinkage induced by urea is sustained, whereas the addition of equiosmolar NaCl is only transient and followed by a regulatory cell volume increase. Moreover, hypertonic NaCl increases, whereas urea decreases, the transcription of cell-volume-regulated kinase hsgk. In conclusion, urea leads to sustained shrinkage of vascular smooth muscle cells, which is followed by inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, a decrease of [Ca2+]i and thus blunts the vasoconstrictory action of phenylephrine and increased extracellular K+ concentration. PMID:10898530

  15. Carbon monoxide effects on calcium levels in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.; McGrath, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Previously the authors showed that carbon monoxide (CO) relaxes vascular smooth muscle in the working heart and thoracic aorta preparation perfused with hemoglobin-free, Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution. The CO-induced relaxation was not caused by hypoxia, nor was it mediated by adrenergic influences, adenosine, or prostaglandins. In these studies the effect of CO on calcium (Ca/sup + +/) concentrations in vascular smooth muscle was determined using /sup 45/Ca as a tracer. Isolated rat thoracic aorta segments were incubated with /sup 45/Ca and gassed with O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, or CO for 60 min. Verapamil was used to verify the effectiveness of the test system. Ca/sup + +/ concentrations were 488 /+ -/ 35 and 515 /+ -/ 26 mM/g tissue (X /+ -/ SE) in aortic rings gassed with O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/, respectively. CO reduced Ca/sup + +/ concentrations significantly (P<0.01) by 29% to 369 /+ -/ 18 mM/g tissue. Verapamil treatment reduced Ca/sup + +/ concentrations by 40% to 314 /+ -/ 23 mM/g tissue. These results suggest that CO relaxes vascular smooth muscle and dilates blood vessels by decreasing Ca/sup + +/ concentrations in vascular smooth muscle.

  16. Vasopressin modulates the spontaneous electrical activity in aortic cells (line A7r5) by acting on three different types of ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Van Renterghem, C; Romey, G; Lazdunski, M

    1988-01-01

    A7r5 smooth muscle (aorta) cells have a spontaneous electrical activity. Application of vasopressin produces a hyperpolarization accompanied by an interruption of the spontaneous activity, which is followed by a depolarization associated with a recovery of the spiking activity. Vasopressin action is produced by an action of the peptide on three different types of ionic channels. Vasopressin activates a Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance, presumably by producing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellularly and liberating Ca2+ from internal stores. This activation is transient (0.5-4 min) and is related to the vasopressin-induced hyperpolarization. Intracellular perfusion of inositol trisphosphate triggers by itself a transient K+ current and prevents subsequent activation by vasopressin. Vasopressin inhibits an L-type Ca2+ channel through both protein kinase C activation and a [Ca2+]i-dependent inactivation mechanism triggered by inositol trisphosphate production. The addition of the activation of a Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel and of the inhibition of a voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel is responsible for the transient blockade of the spontaneous activity. Vasopressin also provokes the activation of an inward current (2-20 min) due to a nonselective channel able to transfer Ca2+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ across the membrane. This effect of the peptide is associated with the depolarization following the hyperpolarization phase. Images PMID:2461570

  17. Contractile properties of isolated vascular smooth muscle after photoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freas, W.; Hart, J.L.; Golightly, D.; McClure, H.; Muldoon, S.M.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the responses of various types of vascular smooth muscle to conditions that would be encountered during photodynamic therapy, namely laser illumination of photosensitizer-pretreated tissue. Vascular smooth muscle obtained from representative canine, rodent, and rabbit vascular beds was cut into rings and placed in organ baths (37 degrees C, aerated with 95% O2-5% CO2). These vessels were pretreated for 30 min with the photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD, 3-30 micrograms/ml) washed, and then exposed to red laser light (633 nm, 1-3.5 mW) for up to 20 min. Under basal tension conditions laser illumination of HpD-pretreated vessels resulted in an increase in tension, whereas laser illumination of vessels not exposed to HpD did not contract. This sustained contraction was not reversed by washing the tissue with fresh Krebs-Ringer solution. Responses to norepinephrine, transmural electrical stimulation, and elevated concentrations of KCl were reduced in blood vessels tested after HpD laser illumination. Laser-induced contractions of canine carotid arteries did not require the presence of an intact vascular endothelium. Vascular effect of these photosensitizers appears to involve the formation of oxygen-derived radicals. This preparation could provide a good model for examining the effects of free radicals on vascular physiology.

  18. Previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to neointima formation following vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The origins of neointimal smooth muscle cells that arise following vascular injury remains controversial. Studies have suggested that these cells may arise from previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells, resident stem cells or blood born progenitors. In the current study we examined the contribution of the previously differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells to the neointima that forms following carotid artery ligation. Methods We utilized transgenic mice harboring a cre recombinase-dependent reporter gene (mTmG). These mice express membrane targeted tandem dimer Tomato (mTomato) prior to cre-mediated excision and membrane targeted EGFP (mEGFP) following excision. The mTmG mice were crossed with transgenic mice expressing either smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (Myh11) or smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) driven tamoxifen regulated cre recombinase. Following treatment of adult mice with tamoxifen these mice express mEGFP exclusively in differentiated smooth muscle cells. Subsequently vascular injury was induced in the mice by carotid artery ligation and the contribution of mEGFP positive cells to the neointima determined. Results Analysis of the cellular composition of the neointima that forms following injury revealed that mEGFP positive cells derived from either Mhy11 or Acta2 tagged medial vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to the majority of neointima formation (79 ± 17% and 81 ± 12%, respectively). Conclusion These data demonstrate that the majority of the neointima that forms following carotid ligation is derived from previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:25309723

  19. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity.

  20. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity. PMID:24613839

  1. Myocardin Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Inflammatory Activation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ackers-Johnson, Matthew; Talasila, Amarnath; Sage, Andrew P; Long, Xiaochun; Bot, Ilze; Morrell, Nicholas W; Bennett, Martin R; Miano, Joseph M.; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis, the cause of 50% of deaths in westernised societies, is widely regarded as a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) inflammatory activation in response to local pro-inflammatory stimuli contributes to disease progression and is a pervasive feature in developing atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, it is of considerable therapeutic importance to identify mechanisms that regulate the VSMC inflammatory response. Approach and Results We report that myocardin, a powerful myogenic transcriptional coactivator, negatively regulates VSMC inflammatory activation and vascular disease. Myocardin levels are reduced during atherosclerosis, in association with phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells. Myocardin deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. Conversely, increased myocardin expression potently abrogates the induction of an array of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in VSMCs. Expression of myocardin in VSMCs reduces lipid uptake, macrophage interaction, chemotaxis and macrophage-endothelial tethering in vitro, and attenuates monocyte accumulation within developing lesions in vivo. These results demonstrate that endogenous levels of myocardin are a critical regulator of vessel inflammation. Conclusions We propose myocardin as a guardian of the contractile, non-inflammatory VSMC phenotype, with loss of myocardin representing a critical permissive step in the process of phenotypic transition and inflammatory activation, at the onset of vascular disease. PMID:25614278

  2. Rapid NOS-1-derived nitric oxide and peroxynitrite formation act as signaling agents for inducible NOS-2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Scheschowitsch, Karin; de Moraes, João Alfredo; Sordi, Regina; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Assreuy, Jamil

    2015-10-01

    Septic vascular dysfunction is characterized by hypotension and hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors and nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species and peroxynitrite have a prominent role in this condition. However, the mechanism whereby the vascular dysfunction is initiated is poorly understood. Based on previous studies of our group and the literature,we hypothesize that constitutive nitric oxide synthases (c-NOS) and peroxynitrite may play a role in the development of septic vascular dysfunction. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN) were used to stimulate rat aorta smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and rat aorta slices. This stimulation led to a rapid (within minutes) production of NO and superoxide anion, which led to peroxynitrite formation. When this rapid initial burst was reduced, through the inhibition of c-NOS and NADPH oxidases (NOX) or the scavenging of NO and superoxide the NF-κB activation, NOS-2 expression and nitrite production were significantly attenuated. Although vascular smooth muscle cells express both c-NOS isoforms, gene knockdown revealed that only NOS-1-dependent NO and peroxynitrite formation are important for the later NOS-2 expression. Similar findings were obtained by knockdown NOX-1 gene, one source of superoxide for peroxynitrite formation. Taking together, we show that smooth muscle cell activation by LPS/IFN leads to a rapid formation of NOS-1-derived NO and NOX-1-derived superoxide, forming peroxynitrite; and that this species act as a trigger for NOS-2 expression through NF-κB activation. Therefore, our findings suggest a critical role for NOS-1 and NOX-1 in the initiation of the vascular dysfunction associated with sepsis and septic shock.

  3. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension. PMID:27777977

  4. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D’Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  5. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function.

    PubMed

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D'Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties.

  6. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  7. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes.

  8. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  9. Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular remodelling and atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R

    1999-02-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has recently been identified as an important process in a variety of human vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, arterial injury, and restenosis after angioplasty. VSMC apoptosis is regulated by interactions between the local cell-cell and cytokine environment within the arterial wall, and the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins by the cell, including death receptors, proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. This review summarises our current knowledge of the occurrence and mechanisms underlying VSMC apoptosis in atherosclerosis and arterial remodelling.

  10. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  11. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  12. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  13. Luteolin Ameliorates Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling through Inhibiting the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jie; Xu, Han-Ting; Yu, Jing-Jing; Gao, Jian-Li; Lei, Jing; Yin, Qiao-Shan; Li, Bo; Pang, Min-Xia; Su, Min-Xia; Mi, Wen-Jia; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Preliminary researches showed that luteolin was used to treat hypertension. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin has effect on the hypertensive complication such as vascular remodeling. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of luteolin on the hypertensive vascular remodeling and its molecular mechanism. Method and Results. We evaluated the effect of luteolin on aorta thickening of hypertension in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) and found that luteolin could significantly decrease the blood pressure and media thickness of aorta in vivo. Luteolin could inhibit angiotensin II- (Ang II-) induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) staining result showed that luteolin reduced Ang II-stimulated ROS production in VSMCs. Furthermore, western blot and gelatin zymography results showed that luteolin treatment leaded to a decrease in ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, MMP2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein level. Conclusion. These data support that luteolin can ameliorate hypertensive vascular remodeling by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of Ang II-induced VSMCs. Its mechanism is mediated by the regulation of MAPK signaling pathway and the production of ROS. PMID:26495010

  14. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  15. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  16. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  17. Pasteur effect in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, G; Lundholm, L

    1985-01-01

    The increase in lactate production on changing from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, i.e. the Pasteur effect, has been reported to be small in vascular muscle and especially in aorta. It has been suggested that this may be an artefact caused by damage to the intimal endothelium. We have compared the Pasteur effect in different kinds of pig arteries, but also in rabbit colon. The aerobic lactate production in 60 min was 11-15 mumol/g in the aorta and the carotid artery, but 3 mumol/g in the mesenteric and renal arteries and 4 mumol/g in the rabbit colon. The increase in lactate production under anaerobic conditions was 12-20 mumol/g/60 min in the carotid artery, aorta and rabbit colon and 10 mumol/g/60 min in the mesenteric and renal arteries. When calculated in per cent, the Pasteur effect was greater in the mesenteric artery than in the aorta, but the actual rise in lactate production in mumol/g was higher in the aorta and carotid artery. The high aerobic lactate production of smooth muscle in vitro may be related to its low ability to oxidize glucose; some other substrates may be preferentially oxidized when present in vitro or in vivo.

  18. Mulberry leaf extract inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration involving a block of small GTPase and Akt/NF-kappaB signals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Huang, Chien-Ning; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Hsiang-Mei; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2009-10-14

    Mulberry, the fruit of Morus alba, is commonly used in Chinese medicines because of its many pharmacologic effects. Mulberry leaves contain many phenolic antioxidants that can reduce cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis involves proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Thus, we investigated the mechanisms by which mulberry leaf extract (MLE) might inhibit migration of VSMC. MLE was rich in polyphenols (44.82%), including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, catechin, gallocatechin gallate, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, and quercetin. MLE could inhibit the migration of A7r5 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MLE also inhibited the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP-2 and MMP-9, protein expressions, and phosphorylation of FAK and Akt, and protein expressions of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases: c-Raf, Ras, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA) in a dose-dependent manner. NF-kappaB expression was also inhibited by MLE. MLE could effectively inhibit the migration of VSMC by blocking small GTPase and Akt/NF-kappaB signals.

  19. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  20. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  1. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-12-29

    BACKGROUND Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE-/- mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-kB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. RESULTS Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE-/- mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE-/- mice against atherosclerosis.

  2. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  3. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Vascular Calcification in Association with the TGF-β/Smad Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Huang, Yaqian; Du, Junbao; Liu, Angie Dong; Tang, Chaoshu; Qi, Yongfen; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate whether endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO2) plays a role in vascular calcification (VC) in rats and its possible mechanisms. In vivo medial vascular calcification was induced in rats by vitamin D3 and nicotine for four weeks. In vitro calcification of cultured A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced by calcifying media containing 5 mmol/L CaCl2. Aortic smooth muscle (SM) α-actin, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Smad expression was measured. VC rats showed dispersed calcified nodules among the elastic fibers in calcified aorta with increased aortic calcium content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. SM α-actin was markedly decreased, but the osteochondrogenic marker Runx2 concomitantly increased and TGF-β/Smad signaling was activated, in association with the downregulated SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway. However, SO2 supplementation successfully ameliorated vascular calcification, and increased SM α-actin expression, but inhibited Runx2 and TGF-β/Smad expression. In calcified A7r5 VSMCs, the endogenous SO2/AAT pathway was significantly downregulated. SO2 treatment reduced the calcium deposits, calcium content, ALP activity and Runx2 expression and downregulated the TGF-β/Smad pathway in A7r5 cells but increased SM α-actin expression. In brief, SO2 significantly ameliorated vascular calcification in association with downregulation of the TGF-β/Smad pathway. PMID:26907267

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Methods and Application

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Biraja C.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Suh, Carol; Qyang, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and their capability to differentiation into virtually every cell type in the human body make this field a ray of hope for vascular regenerative therapy and for understanding disease mechanism. In this review, we first discuss the recent iPSC technology and vascular smooth muscle development from embryo and then examine different methodology to derive VSMCs from iPSCs and their applications in regenerative therapy and disease modeling. PMID:25559088

  5. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    PubMed

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  6. Loss of Notch2 and Notch3 in vascular smooth muscle causes patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Jeremy T; Jackson, Ashley R; McHugh, Kirk M; Lilly, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    The overlapping roles of the predominant Notch receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells, Notch2 and Notch3, have not been clearly defined in vivo. In this study, we use a smooth muscle-specific deletion of Notch2 together with a global Notch3 deletion to produce mice with combinations of mutant and wild-type Notch2/3 alleles in vascular smooth muscle cells. Mice with complete loss of Notch3 and smooth muscle-expressed Notch2 display late embryonic lethality and subcutaneous hemorrhage. Mice without smooth muscle-Notch2 and only one wild-type copy of Notch3 die within one day of birth and present with vascular defects, most notably patent ductus arteriosus (DA) and aortic dilation. These defects were associated with decreased expression of contractile markers in both the DA and aorta. These results demonstrate that Notch2 and Notch3 have overlapping roles in promoting development of vascular smooth muscle cells, and together contribute to functional closure of the DA.

  7. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  8. Gax regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Hu, Zhenlei; Zhai, Xinming; Wang, Yongyi; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Weijun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and restenosis after angioplasty. Transcription factors have emerged as critical regulators for VSMCs function, and recently we verified inhibiting transcription factor Gax was important for controlling VSMCs proliferation and migration. This study aimed to determine its role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. Western blot revealed that overexpression of Gax increased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes such as calponin and SM-MHC 11. Then, Gax overexpression potently suppressed proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without platelet-derived growth factor-induced-BB (PDGF-BB) stimuli whereas Gax silencing inhibited these processes. Furthermore, cDNA array analysis indicated that Rap1A gene was the downstream target of Gax in human VSMCs. And overexpression of Gax significantly inhibited expression of Rap1A in VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Moreover, overexpression of Rap1A decreased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes and increased proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Finally, Gax overexpression significantly inhibited the neointimal formation in carotid artery injury of mouse models, specifically through maintaining VSMCs contractile phenotype by decreasing Rap1A expression. In conclusion, these results indicated that Gax was a regulator of human VSMCs phenotypic modulation by targeting Rap1A gene, which suggested that targeting Gax or its downstream targets in human VSMCs may provide an attractive approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27508012

  9. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    PubMed

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging.

  10. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-01

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  11. Adipocytokines in Atherothrombosis: Focus on Platelets and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anfossi, Giovanni; Russo, Isabella; Doronzo, Gabriella; Pomero, Alice; Trovati, Mariella

    2010-01-01

    Visceral obesity is a relevant pathological condition closely associated with high risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease including myocardial infarction and stroke. The increased vascular risk is related also to peculiar dysfunction in the endocrine activity of adipose tissue responsible of vascular impairment (including endothelial dysfunction), prothrombotic tendency, and low-grade chronic inflammation. In particular, increased synthesis and release of different cytokines, including interleukins and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and adipokines—such as leptin—have been reported as associated with future cardiovascular events. Since vascular cell dysfunction plays a major role in the atherothrombotic complications in central obesity, this paper aims at focusing, in particular, on the relationship between platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the impaired secretory pattern of adipose tissue. PMID:20652043

  12. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  13. Endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) activity in human vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Janet J; Johnson, Christopher M; Mockridge, James W; Davenport, Anthony P

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the human smooth muscle endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) present in the media of the endothelium-denuded human umbilical vein preparation. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET-2 were potent constrictors of umbilical vein with EC50 values of 9.2 nM and 29.6 nM, respectively. ET-1 was at least 30 times more potent than ET-3 suggesting the presence of constrictor ETA receptors. Little or no response was obtained to the ETB-selective agonist sarafotoxin 6c. These data suggest that endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction is via ETA receptors in this preparation. Autoradiographical visualization of endothelin receptors with subtype selective ligands confirmed the predominance of the ETA receptor in the media of umbilical vein. High density of binding was obtained with the ETA selective [125I]-PD151242, with much lower levels detected with the ETB selective [125I]-BQ3020. Big ET-1 (EC50=42.7 nM) and big ET-2(1-38) (EC50=99.0 nM) were less potent than ET-1 and ET-2, respectively. Big ET-2(1-38) was more potent than its isoform big ET-2(1-37) with concentration–response curves to big ET-2(1-37) incomplete at 300 nM. No response was obtained to big ET-3 at concentrations up to 700 nM. The C-terminal fragments, big ET-1(22-38) and big ET-2(22-38) were inactive. Responses to ET-1 were unaffected by either the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor thiorphan (10−5 M) or by the dual NEP/ECE inhibitor phosphoramidon (10−5 M). Big ET-1 was also unaffected by thiorphan but antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by phosphoramidon (10−5 M and 10−4 M). Addition of all four big endothelin peptides to human umbilical vein preparations resulted in detectable amounts of ET-IR in the bathing medium. Therefore, although big ET-3 was functionally inactive this reflects the low potency of ET-3 at the ETA receptor rather than the lack of ability of this smooth muscle ECE to convert big ET-3 to ET-3. To conclude we have demonstrated the presence

  14. Inhibition of the Ca sup 2+ -ATPase of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Ford, G.D. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of oxygen free radicals generated by hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase on the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum from bovine aortic smooth muscle were studied. Exogenous hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase produced an hypoxanthine concentration dependent inhibition of the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The inhibition could be completely blocked by superoxide dismutase but not by either mannitol or deferoxamine. Direct addition of reagent hydrogen peroxide in the {mu}M range did not cause significant inhibition. These results suggest that superoxide is the primary damaging species. Additionally, 1.16 {plus minus} 0.17 mU/g wet wt of xanthine oxidase activity were detected in the post-nuclear supernatant of bovine aortic smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular source of superoxide. This value was calculated to be approximately 5 mU/ml by using a usual value of vascular smooth muscle cellular volume. Thus the level of endogenous xanthine oxidase resident in vascular smooth muscle is comparable with the level of exogenous xanthine oxidase used in the present study. These findings suggest a potential role of xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide in free radical injury to vascular smooth muscle.

  15. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  16. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  17. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  18. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  19. Bumetanide-sensitive sodium-22 transport in vascular smooth muscle cell of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Tokushige, A.; Kino, M.; Tamura, H.; Hopp, L.; Searle, B.M.; Aviv, A.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of bumetanide, a known probe of Na+, K+ cotransport, on /sup 22/Na+ uptake and washout was examined in serially passed cultured vascular smooth muscle cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), and Wistar rats. In Ca2+-deficient medium, the drug exerted the greatest effect on /sup 22/Na+ washout in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR and the least effect on cells from WKY. The respective mean values for the apparent bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ washout rate constants (Ke; X 10(-2)/min) were 7.2, 4.3, and 1.7 for cells from SHR, WKY, and Wistar rats. In both 1 mM Ca2+ and Ca2+-deficient medium, in the presence of 1 mM ouabain, vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR had the highest plateau phase of /sup 22/Na+ uptake among the three cell preparations. All cells exhibited higher /sup 22/Na+ uptake in Ca2+-deficient medium than in 1 mM Ca2+ medium. Under this condition, bumetanide caused an additional rise in steady state /sup 22/Na+ uptake that was most pronounced in cells from SHR (21.3% versus 16.6% for Wistar rats and 4.8% for WKY). This finding indicates that a quantitatively greater inhibition of washout than of the uptake component of the bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ transport occurs in Ca2+-deficient medium. It is concluded that, in Ca2+-deficient medium, the bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ washout is higher in vascular smooth muscle cells of SHR than in those of normotensive controls and that this phenomenon reflects a higher Na+ turnover in vascular smooth muscle cell in the hypertensive rat strain.

  20. Distribution of a lanthanide (147 Pm) in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G B; Goodman, F R

    1976-08-01

    In order to ascertain whether trivalent rare earth ions such as lanthanum (La+++) penetrate the cell membrane under physiological conditions, the extracellular and cellular distribution of promethium (147 Pm), a carrier-free rare earth radioisotope, was examined in rabbit aortic smooth muscle. As the duration of incubation was lengthened, uptake of 147Pm continued to increase; it was inhibited by La+++ and other rare earth ions (Nd+++, Lu+++) only when the 147 Pm/rare earth concentration ratio exceeded 1:10(6). However, equally high concentrations of Ca++ had no effect on 147Pm uptake. Efflux of 147Pm was only transiently increased by 1.5 mM La+++, and exposure to 0.05 mM EDTA elicited an increased 147Pm efflux with both transient and maintained components. The magnitude of the EDTA-induced increase in 147 Pm efflux was similar over a 30-fold range of EDTA concentration (0.05-1.5 mM); the limiting factor for 147Pm efflux is the rate of 147Pm desorption from the tissue rather than the extracellular concentration of EDTA. Loss of 147Pm in the presence of 0.05 mM EDTA could be described in terms of two specific washout components (the more rapid of which included 147Pm within the extracellular space and the slower of which had half-times of washout of approximately 7-10 minutes). Uptake of 147Pm was inhibited by lowering the incubation solution temperature to 0 degrees C or by procaine. However, concentrations of metabolic inhibitors (iodoacetate and dinitrophenol) which diminish loss of Ca++ from the cell did not decrease either the uptake or efflux of 147Pm. Thus, significant quantities of 147Pm do not appear to be accumulated within the cell or transported out of the cell; distribution of 147Pm can be most simply described in terms of a binding at and desorption from surface acessible fiber sites.

  1. Azelnidipine inhibits Msx2-dependent osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Iso, Tatsuya; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active and regulated process that is similar to bone formation. While calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been shown to improve outcomes in atherosclerotic vascular disease, it remains unknown whether CCBs have an effect on the process of vascular calcification. Here we investigated whether CCBs inhibit osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Msx2, a key factor of vascular calcification. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were transduced with adenovirus expressing MSX2 and were treated with 3 distinct CCBs. Azelnidipine, a dihydropyridine subclass of CCBs, significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of Msx2-overexpressed HASMCs, whereas verapamil and diltiazem had no effect. Furthermore, azelnidipine, but not verapamil and diltiazem, significantly decreased matrix mineralization of Msx2-overexpressing HASMCs. Azelnidipine significantly attenuated the induction of ALP gene expression by Msx2, a key transcription factor in osteogenesis, while it did not reduce enzymatic activity of ALP. Furthermore, azelnidipine inhibited the ability of Msx2 to activate the ALP gene, but had no effect on Notch-induced Msx2 expression. Given that L-type calcium channels are equally blocked by these CCBs, our results suggest that azelnidipine inhibits the Msx2-dependent process of vascular calcification by mechanisms other than inhibition of calcium channel activity.

  2. Calcium ion-regulated thin filaments from vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marston, S B; Trevett, R M; Walters, M

    1980-01-01

    Myosin and actin competition tests indicated the presence of both thin-filament and myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory systems in pig aorta and turkey gizzard smooth-muscle actomyosin. A thin-filament preparation was obtained from pig aortas. The thin filaments had no significant ATPase activity [1.1 +/- 2.6 nmol/mg per min (mean +/- S.D.)], but they activated skeletal-muscle myosin ATPase up to 25-fold [500 nmol/mg of myosin per min (mean +/- S.D.)] in the presence of 10(-4) M free Ca2+. At 10(-8) M-Ca2+ the thin filaments activated myosin ATPase activity only one-third as much. Thin-filament activation of myosin ATPase activity increased markedly in the range 10(-6)-10(-5) M-Ca2+ and was half maximal at 2.7 x 10(-6) M (pCa2+ 5.6). The skeletal myosin-aorta-thin-filament mixture gave a biphasic ATPase-rate-versus-ATP-concentration curve at 10(-8) M-Ca2+ similar to the curve obtained with skeletal-muscle thin filaments. Thin filaments bound up to 9.5 mumol of Ca2+/g in the presence of MgATP2-. In the range 0.06-27 microM-Ca2+ binding was hyperbolic with an estimated binding constant of (0.56 +/- 0.07) x 10(6) M-1 (mean +/- S.D.) and maximum binding of 8.0 +/- 0.8 mumol/g (mean +/- S.D.). Significantly less Ca2+ bound in the absence of ATP. The thin filaments contained actin, tropomyosin and several other unidentified proteins. 6 M-Urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at pH 8.3 showed proteins that behaved like troponin I and troponin C. This was confirmed by forming interspecific complexes between radioactive skeletal-muscle troponin I and troponin C and the aorta thin-filament proteins. The thin filaments contained at least 1.4 mumol of a troponin C-like protein/g and at least 1.1 mumol of a troponin I-like protein/g. PMID:6446898

  3. Aldosterone promotes vascular remodeling by direct effects on smooth muscle cell mineralocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Dafina; McCurley, Amy; Aronovitz, Mark; Galayda, Carol; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Vascular remodeling occurs after endothelial injury resulting in smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and vascular fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that the blood pressure-regulating hormone aldosterone enhances vascular remodeling in mice at sites of endothelial injury in a placental growth factor (PlGF)-dependent manner. We now test the hypothesis that SMC mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) directly mediate the remodeling effects of aldosterone and further explore the mechanism. Approach and Results A wire-induced carotid injury model was performed in wild type (WT) mice and mice with inducible SMC-specific deletion of MR (SMC-MR-KO). Aldosterone did not affect re-endothelialization after injury in WT mice. Deletion of SMC-MR prevented the 79% increase in SMC proliferation induced by aldosterone after injury in MR-Intact littermates. Moreover, both injury-induced and aldosterone-enhanced vascular fibrosis were attenuated in SMC-MR-KO mice. Further exploration of the mechanism revealed that aldosterone-induced vascular remodeling is prevented by blockade of the PlGF-specific receptor, VEGFR1, in vivo. Immunohistochemistry of carotid vessels shows that the induction of VEGFR1 expression in SMC after vascular injury is attenuated by 72% in SMC-MR-KO mice. Moreover, aldosterone induction of vascular PlGF mRNA expression and protein release are also prevented in vessels lacking SMC-MR. Conclusions These studies reveal that SMC-MR is necessary for aldosterone-induced vascular remodeling independent of renal effects on blood pressure. SMC-MR contributes to induction of SMC VEGFR1 in the area of vascular injury and to aldosterone-enhanced vascular PlGF expression and hence the detrimental effects of aldosterone are prevented by VEGFR1-blockade. This study supports exploring MR antagonists and VEGFR1-blockade to prevent pathological vascular remodeling induced by aldosterone. PMID:24311380

  4. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  5. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  6. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  7. BMP-2 gene expression and effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Gu, J L; Lysko, P G; Anderson, K M; Minehart, H; Yue, T

    1999-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their serine/threonine kinase receptors have been identified in atherosclerotic arteries and vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Thus, BMPs (the largest subfamily of the TGF-beta superfamily) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the origins of BMP biosynthesis and the functional roles of BMP in blood vessels are unclear. The present study explored BMP-2 gene expression in various human blood vessels and vascular cell types. Functional in vitro studies were also performed to determine the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 on migration (transwell assay) and proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RT-PCR experiments revealed BMP-2 gene expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries as well as cultured human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human macrophages. In cellular migration studies, incubation with BMP-2 produced efficacious (smooth muscle cell response to vascular injury. PMID:10213907

  8. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fu; Chambon, Pierre; Tellides, George; Kong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  9. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  10. Emerging roles for vascular smooth muscle cell exosomes in calcification and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Shanahan, C M

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to 'synthetic' state contributes to vascular pathologies including restenosis, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. We have recently found that the secretion of exosomes is a feature of 'synthetic' VSMCs and that exosomes are novel players in vascular repair processes as well as pathological vascular thrombosis and calcification. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors as well as mineral imbalance stimulate exosome secretion by VSMCs, most likely by the activation of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3) and cytoskeletal remodelling. Calcium stress induces dramatic changes in VSMC exosome composition and accumulation of phosphatidylserine (PS), annexin A6 and matrix metalloproteinase-2, which converts exosomes into a nidus for calcification. In addition, by presenting PS, VSMC exosomes can also provide the catalytic surface for the activation of coagulation factors. Recent data showing that VSMC exosomes are loaded with proteins and miRNA regulating cell adhesion and migration highlight VSMC exosomes as potentially important communication messengers in vascular repair. Thus, the identification of signalling pathways regulating VSMC exosome secretion, including activation of SMPD3 and cytoskeletal rearrangements, opens up novel avenues for a deeper understanding of vascular remodelling processes. PMID:26864864

  11. Direct Role for Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Vascular Remodeling: Novel Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jenny B.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a key regulator of blood pressure. MR-antagonist drugs are used to treat hypertension and heart failure, resulting in decreased mortality by mechanisms that are not completely understood. In addition to the kidney, MR is also expressed in the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the vasculature, where it is activated by the hormone aldosterone and affects the expression of genes involved in vascular function at the cellular and systemic levels. Following vascular injury due to mechanical or physiological stresses, vessels undergo remodeling resulting in SMC hypertrophy, migration, and proliferation, as well as vessel fibrosis. Exuberant vascular remodeling is associated with poor outcomes in cardiovascular patients. This review compiles recent findings on the specific role of SMC-MR in the vascular remodeling process. The development and characterization of a SMC-specific MR-knockout mouse has demonstrated a direct role for SMC-MR in vascular remodeling. Additionally, several novel mechanisms contributing to SMC-MR-mediated vascular remodeling have been identified and are reviewed here, including Rho-kinase signaling, placental growth factor signaling through vascular endothelial growth factor type 1 receptor, and galectin signaling. PMID:24633842

  12. [Ionic mechanisms of endothelium-dependent relaxation of vascular smooth muscle under the action of acetylcholine].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, V M; Talaeva, T V; Bratus', V V

    1988-04-01

    Acetylcholine and nitroglycerin were shown to induce relaxation in muscles of the ring vascular segments of canine coronary arteries and rabbit aortic archs, the magnitude of the reaction depending on the level of initial tonic tension. Methylene blue abolished the relaxation. Mechanical removal of endothelium abolished the reaction to acetylcholine but not to nitroglycerin. Verapamil decreased the relaxation by 70%. The endothelium-dependent relaxation seems to be connected mainly with a decrease in the calcium entering vascular smooth muscle cells through voltage-dependent channels.

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling to Attenuate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Ya-Qian; Chen, Qing-Hua; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Jia; Tang, Chao-Shu; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clarifying the mechanisms underlying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is important for the prevention and treatment of vascular remodeling and the reverse of hyperplastic lesions. Previous research has shown that the gaseous signaling molecule sulfur dioxide (SO2) inhibits VSMC proliferation, but the mechanism for the inhibition of the angiotensin II (AngII)-induced VSMC proliferation by SO2 has not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate if SO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in mice with hypertension induced by AngII. Methods: Thirty-six male C57 mice were randomly divided into control, AngII, and AngII + SO2 groups. Mice in AngII group and AngII + SO2 group received a capsule-type AngII pump implanted under the skin of the back at a slow-release dose of 1000 ng·kg−1·min−1. In addition, mice in AngII + SO2 received intraperitoneal injections of SO2 donor. Arterial blood pressure of tail artery was determined. The thickness of the aorta was measured by elastic fiber staining, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) were detected in aortic tissues. The concentration of SO2 in serum and aortic tissue homogenate supernatant was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence determination. In the in vitro study, VSMC of A7R5 cell lines was divided into six groups: control, AngII, AngII + SO2, PD98059 (an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation), AngII + PD98059, and AngII + SO2 + PD98059. Expression of PCNA, ERK, and P-ERK was determined by Western blotting. Results: In animal experiment, compared with the control group, AngII markedly increased blood pressure (P < 0.01) and thickened the aortic wall in mice (P < 0.05) with an increase in the expression of PCNA (P < 0.05). SO2, however, reduced the systemic hypertension and the wall thickness induced by AngII (P < 0.05). It inhibited the increased expression of PCNA and P

  14. Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis for vascular homeostasis: role in neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal increases in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the intimal region after a vascular injury is a key event in developing neointimal hyperplasia. To maintain vascular function, proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs is tightly controlled during vascular remodeling. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) system, a key component of the oxidative stress response that acts in maintaining homeostasis, plays an important role in neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury; however, the role of Nrf2/Keap1 in VSMC apoptosis has not been clarified. Here we report that 14 days after arterial injury in mice, TUNEL-positive VSMCs are detected in both the neointimal and medial layers. These layers contain cells expressing high levels of Nrf2 but low Keap1 expression. In VSMCs, Keap1 depletion induces features of apoptosis, such as positive TUNEL staining and annexin V binding. These changes are associated with an increased expression of nuclear Nrf2. Simultaneous Nrf2 depletion inhibits Keap1 depletion-induced apoptosis. At 14 days after the vascular injury, Nrf2-deficient mice demonstrated fewer TUNEL-positive cells and increased neointimal formation in the neointimal and medial areas. The results suggest that the Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates VSMC apoptosis during neointimal formation, thereby inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury. PMID:27198574

  15. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T.; Lerman, Daniel. A.; Dweck, Marc R.; Newby, David E.; Smith, Lee B.; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  16. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  17. The effect of deuterium oxide (D sub 2 O) on in vitro vascular smooth muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliam, T.M.; Liepins, A.; Rankin, A.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), a stable nonradioactive isotope of water, has been demonstrated to reduce L-type calcium channel conductance in isolated myocytes. Since the concentration of intracellular free calcium has been implicated in the mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction, the authors investigated whether it inhibits contraction of vascular smooth muscle. Phenylephrine concentration-contraction curves were carried out in the rat aortic ring preparation to determine whether D{sub 2}O inhibits contraction of rat aorta induced through activation of receptor-operated calcium channels. D{sub 2}O depressed these response curves in a concentration dependent manner with 50% inhibition of maximum contraction observed with 60% D{sub 2}O; this effect proved to be reversible and non-toxic. D{sub 2}O also depressed potassium chloride curves, demonstrating an effect on voltage-operated calcium channels. Since vascular endothelium releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) when stimulated by a range of pharmacological agents, it was examined whether the endothelium has a role in these actions of D{sub 2}O on vascular contraction. Mechanical disruption of the endothelium had no effect.

  18. Mesenchymal tumors of the mouse urinary bladder with vascular and smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Butler, W H; Cohen, S H; Squire, R A

    1997-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide/miticide, has been fed to male and female Swiss Webster mice at levels of 0, 50, 200, 500, and 600 ppm in the diet for between 604 and 644 days. Tumors of the urinary bladder were observed and initially reported as leiomyosarcomas. Subsequently, the bladders were reviewed and the tumors showed a pattern of both epithelioid cells and spindle cells forming irregular vascular channels. The tumors appeared to arise from the trigone of the bladder and, in some cases, invaded the bladder wall. No metastases were recorded. The tumor is usually considered rare; however, in this study, it was commonly observed in all groups but predominantly in males. The histogenesis of the tumor is uncertain, but from its pleomorphic histological features, including smooth muscle and vascularity, it is probably derived from vascular mesenchyme.

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  20. A(2B) receptors mediate antimitogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dubey, R K; Gillespie, D G; Shue, H; Jackson, E K

    2000-01-01

    Adenosine inhibits growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. The goals of this study were to determine which adenosine receptor subtype mediates the antimitogenic effects of adenosine and to investigate the signal transduction mechanisms involved. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) (25 ng/mL) stimulated DNA synthesis ([(3)H]thymidine incorporation), cellular proliferation (cell number), collagen synthesis ([(3)H]proline incorporation), total protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. The adenosine receptor agonists 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, but not N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine or CGS21680, inhibited the growth effects of PDGF-BB, an agonist profile consistent with an A(2B) receptor-mediated effect. The adenosine receptor antagonists KF17837 and 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine, but not 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, blocked the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, an antagonist profile consistent with an A(2) receptor-mediated effect. Antisense, but not sense or scrambled, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor stimulated basal and PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and MAP kinase activity. Moreover, the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine, 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine plus iodotubericidin (inhibitors of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, respectively) were abolished by antisense, but not scrambled or sense, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that adenosine causes inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating A(2B) receptors coupled to inhibition of MAP kinase activity. Pharmacological or molecular biological activation of A(2B) receptors may prevent vascular remodeling associated with hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis

  1. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 as a Potential Mediator of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Chronic Vascular Remodeling in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Belo, V A; Guimarães, Danielle A; Castro, Michele Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    For vascular remodeling in hypertension, it is essential that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) reshape in order to proliferate and migrate. The extracellular matrix (ECM) needs to be degraded to favor VSMC migration. Many proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), contribute to ECM proteolysis and VSMC migration. Bioactive peptides, hemodynamic forces and reactive oxygen-nitrogen species regulate MMP-2 expression and activity. Increased MMP-2 activity contributes to hypertension-induced maladaptive arterial changes and sustained hypertension. New ECM is synthesized to supply VSMCs with bioactive mediators, which stimulate hypertrophy. MMP-2 stimulates the interaction of VSMCs with newly formed ECM, which triggers intracellular signaling via integrins to induce a phenotypic switch and persistent migration. VSMCs switch from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype in order to migrate and contribute to vascular remodeling in hypertension. MMPs also disrupt growth factors bound to ECM, thus contributing to their capacity to regulate VSMC migration. This review sheds light on the proteolytic effects of MMP-2 on ECM and non-ECM substrates in the vasculature and how these effects contribute to VSMC migration in hypertension. The inhibition of MMP activity as a therapeutic target may make it possible to reduce arterial maladaptation caused by hypertension and prevent the resulting fatal cardiovascular events. PMID:26731549

  2. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10806116

  3. Pathophysiological role of vascular smooth muscle alkaline phosphatase in medial artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; Kuss, Pia; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C; Nigro, Jessica; Wang, Wei; Chhea, T Nicole; Sergienko, Eduard A; Kapoor, Kapil; Jackson, Michael R; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Pinkerton, Anthony B; O'Neill, W Charles; Millán, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is a pathological phenomenon that causes vascular stiffening and can lead to heart failure; it is common to a variety of conditions, including aging, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and a variety of rare genetic diseases. These conditions share the common feature of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) upregulation in the vasculature. To evaluate the role of TNAP in MVC, we developed a mouse model that overexpresses human TNAP in vascular smooth muscle cells in an X-linked manner. Hemizygous overexpressor male mice (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/Y) or TNAP-OE) show extensive vascular calcification, high blood pressure, and cardiac hypertrophy, and have a median age of death of 44 days, whereas the cardiovascular phenotype is much less pronounced and life expectancy is longer in heterozygous (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/-) ) female TNAP-OE mice. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of osteoblast and chondrocyte markers and decreased expression of vascular smooth muscle markers in the aortas of TNAP-OE mice. Through medicinal chemistry efforts, we developed inhibitors of TNAP with drug-like pharmacokinetic characteristics. TNAP-OE mice were treated with the prototypical TNAP inhibitor SBI-425 or vehicle to evaluate the feasibility of TNAP inhibition in vivo. Treatment with this inhibitor significantly reduced aortic calcification and cardiac hypertrophy, and extended lifespan over vehicle-treated controls, in the absence of secondary effects on the skeleton. This study shows that TNAP in the vasculature contributes to the pathology of MVC and that it is a druggable target.

  4. Role played by Prx1-dependent extracellular matrix properties in vascular smooth muscle development in embryonic lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Juliana; Chokshi, Mithil; Aiad, Norman; Sanyal, Sonali; Kawabata, Kimihito C.; Levental, Ilya; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Burdick, Jason A.; Janmey, Paul; Miyazono, Kohei; Wells, Rebecca G.; Jones, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies focusing on the molecular pathways underlying lung vascular morphogenesis, the extracellular matrix (ECM)–dependent regulation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in vascular smooth muscle development needs better understanding. In this study, we demonstrate that the paired related homeobox gene transcription factor Prx1 maintains the elastic ECM properties, which are essential for vascular smooth muscle precursor cell differentiation. We have found that Prx1null mouse lungs exhibit defective vascular smooth muscle development, downregulated elastic ECM expression, and compromised transforming growth factor (TGF)–β localization and signaling. Further characterization of ECM properties using decellularized lung ECM scaffolds derived from Prx1 mice demonstrated that Prx1 is required to maintain lung ECM stiffness. The results of cell culture using stiffness-controlled 2-D and 3-D synthetic substrates confirmed that Prx1-dependent ECM stiffness is essential for promotion of smooth muscle precursor differentiation for effective TGF-β stimulation. Supporting these results, both decellularized Prx1null lung ECM and Prx1WT (wild type) ECM scaffolds with blocked TGF-β failed to support mesenchymal cell to 3-D smooth muscle cell differentiation. These results suggest a novel ECM-dependent regulatory pathway of lung vascular development wherein Prx1 regulates lung vascular smooth muscle precursor development by coordinating the ECM biophysical and biochemical properties. PMID:26064466

  5. Smooth Muscle-Targeted Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Disrupts Vascular Wall Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhenz, Jennifer M.; Murphy, Tamara C.; Pokutta-Paskaleva, Anastassia P.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Taylor, W. Robert; Blount, Mitsi A.; Cheng, Juan; Yang, Qinglin; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor, PPARγ, with pharmacological agonists promotes a contractile vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype and reduces oxidative stress and cell proliferation, particularly under pathological conditions including vascular injury, restenosis, and atherosclerosis. However, pharmacological agonists activate both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in multiple cell types confounding efforts to clarify the precise role of PPARγ in smooth muscle cell structure and function in vivo. We, therefore, designed and characterized a mouse model with smooth muscle cell-targeted PPARγ overexpression (smPPARγOE). Our results demonstrate that smPPARγOE attenuated contractile responses in aortic rings, increased aortic compliance, caused aortic dilatation, and reduced mean arterial pressure. Molecular characterization revealed that compared to littermate control mice, aortas from smPPARγOE mice expressed lower levels of contractile proteins and increased levels of adipocyte-specific transcripts. Morphological analysis demonstrated increased lipid deposition in the vascular media and in smooth muscle of extravascular tissues. In vitro adenoviral-mediated PPARγ overexpression in human aortic smooth muscle cells similarly increased adipocyte markers and lipid uptake. The findings demonstrate that smooth muscle PPARγ overexpression disrupts vascular wall structure and function, emphasizing that balanced PPARγ activity is essential for vascular smooth muscle homeostasis. PMID:26451838

  6. Hypercholesterolemic diet induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in sympathectomized rats via intrinsic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Rafik; Dab, Houcine; Feriani, Anouar; Saber, Sami; Sakly, Mohsen; Vicaut, Eric; Callebert, Jacques; Sercombe, Richard; Kacem, Kamel

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we intend to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemic diet, a high risk factor for atherosclerosis, on vascular cell apoptosis in rats that have been previously sympathectomized. Thus, newborn male Wistar rats received injections of guanethidine for sympathectomy. Sham received injections of vehicle. The two groups were fed 1% cholesterol diet for 3months. Sympathectomy alone group was also exploited. Apoptosis in abdominal aortic tissue was identified by TUNEL method and conventional agarose gel electrophoresis to detect specific DNA fragmentation. Caspases 3 and 9, Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c were examined by immunoblotting. Oil Red O staining was used to reveal lipid in the arterial wall. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages were identified by immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and rat macrophage marker (ED1), respectively. The efficacy of sympathectomy was evaluated by analysis of perivascular sympathetic fibers. Our study showed that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, 1) increased aortic TUNEL-positive cells compared to sham and sympathectomy alone groups, 2) illustrated a typical apoptotic DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis, 3) induced Bax translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, 4) enhanced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, 5) increased expression of active caspases 3 and 9, and 6) decreased Bcl-2 expression. VSMCs are identified as the major cell type exhibiting apoptosis in this model. Taken together, it can be concluded that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, induces vascular cell apoptosis in an intrinsic pathway.

  7. Rosiglitazone induces the unfolded protein response, but has no significant effect on cell viability, in monocytic and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caddy, J.; Isa, S.; Mainwaring, L.S.; Adam, E.; Roberts, A.; Lang, D.; Morris, R.H.K.; Thomas, A.W.; Webb, R.

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Rosiglitazone rapidly (30 min) inhibited microsomal Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity (IC{sub 50} {approx}2 {mu}M). {yields} After 4 h rosiglitazone exposure, the UPR transcription factor XBP-1 was activated. {yields} Within 24-72 h, UPR target genes were upregulated, enhancing ER Ca{sup 2+} sequestration. {yields} Replenishment of ER Ca{sup 2+} stores appeared to restore normal cell physiology. {yields} Monocyte/VSMC viability was not decreased during 2 weeks' rosiglitazone treatment. -- Abstract: Given the safety concerns expressed over negative cardiovascular outcomes resulting from the clinical use of rosiglitazone, and the view that rosiglitazone exerts PPAR{gamma}-independent effects alongside its insulin-sensitising PPAR{gamma}-dependent effects, we hypothesised that rosiglitazone may trigger Unfolded Protein Responses (UPRs) due to disruptions in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} homeostasis within two cardiovascular cell types: monocytic (MM6) and vascular smooth muscle (A7r5) cells. In microsomal samples derived from both cell types, pre-incubation with rosiglitazone rapidly (30 min) brought about concentration-dependent PPAR{gamma}-independent inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity (IC{sub 50} {approx}2 {mu}M). Fluo-3 fluorimetric data demonstrated in intact cells that 1 h treatment with 1 or 10 {mu}M rosiglitazone caused Ca{sup 2+} ions to leak into the cytoplasm. Gene expression analysis showed that within 4 h of rosiglitazone exposure, the UPR transcription factor XBP-1 was activated (likely due to corresponding ER Ca{sup 2+} depletion), and the UPR target genes BiP and SERCA2b were subsequently upregulated within 24-72 h. After 72 h 1 or 10 {mu}M rosiglitazone treatment, microsomal Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity increased to >2-fold of that seen in control microsomes, while [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} returned to basal, indicating that UPR-triggered SERCA2b upregulation was responsible for enhanced enzymatic Ca{sup 2+} sequestration within the ER. This

  8. The role of vascular peroxidase 1 in ox-LDL-induced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yixin; Xu, Qian; Peng, Haiyang; Liu, Zhaoya; Yang, Tianlun; Yu, Zaixin; Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Guogang; Shi, Ruizheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is associated with the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1), a peroxidase in the cardiovascular system, utilizes the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by co-expressed NADPH oxidases to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and catalyze peroxidative reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether VPO1 plays a role in the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs in the setting of the vascular calcification induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). In cultured primary rat VSMCs, we observed that the expression of VPO1 was significantly increased in combination with increases in calcification, as demonstrated via increased mineralization, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in ox-LDL-treated cells. Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification and Runx2 expression were both inhibited by knockdown of VPO1 using a small interfering RNA or by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, the knockdown of VPO1 in VSMCs suppressed the production of HOCl and the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK and P38 MAPK. Furthermore, HOCl treatment facilitated the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and P38 MAPK and the expression of Runx2, whereas LY294002 (a specific inhibitor of PI3K), U0126 (a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2) and SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of P38 MAPK) significantly attenuated the HOCl-induced up-regulation of Runx2. Collectively, these results demonstrated that VPO1 promotes ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification via the VPO1/HOCl/PI3K/AKT, ERK1/2, and P38 MAPK/Runx2 signaling pathways.

  9. Roles of protein kinase C on the mechanical activity of vascular smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Fujiwara, T; Kubota, Y; Nishiye, E; Kuriyama, H

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the role of protein kinase C in the mechanical responses evoked by high K or by acetylcholine (ACh) in intact vascular smooth muscle tissues, and by Ca in skinned vascular smooth muscle tissues. To activate protein kinase C, the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent tumor promoter, or 1,2-diolein, plus phosphatidylserine (PS) was used. TPA enhanced or reduced the amplitude of the contraction evoked by increased concentrations of K below 39 mmol/L or over 90 mmol/L, respectively, but consistently enhanced the resting tension at any given concentration of high K. Similar effects of TPA were observed on the Ca-induced contraction in saponin skinned muscle tissues. The enhancing action of TPA on the K-induced contraction was not related to activation of either the voltage-dependent Ca channel or the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and did not occur in the case of Ca-independent contraction in skinned muscle tissues. During the enhancement of the contraction induced by TPA, the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and the shortening velocity of contraction as measured using the slack test, were enhanced with no remarkable change in the free Ca concentration in the cytosol. TPA consistently inhibited the ACH-induced contraction accompanied by a marked reduction in free Ca due to inhibition of the hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Under the assumption that TPA possesses the same action as DG, activation of protein kinase C increased the Ca sensitivity of contractile proteins in vascular smooth muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Chronic stimulation of farnesoid X receptor impairs nitric oxide sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kida, Taiki; Murata, Takahisa; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is highly expressed in enterohepatic tissue, is implicated in bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolisms. Although recent studies showed that FXR is also expressed in vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, its physiological and/or pathological roles in vasculature tissue remain unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the chronic effect of synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 on vascular contraction and endothelium-dependent relaxation using tissue culture procedure. In cultured rabbit mesenteric arteries, the treatment with 0.1-10 microM GW4064 for 7 days did not influence vascular contractility induced by high K(+) (15-65 mM), norepinephrine (0.1-100 microM), and endothelin-1 (0.1-100 nM). However, the chronic treatment with GW4064 (1-10 microM for 7 days) dose dependently impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by substance P (0.1-30 nM). In hematoxylin-eosin cross sectioning and en face immunostaining, GW4064 had no effects on the morphology of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In endothelium-denuded arteries treated with GW4064 (1-10 microM) for 7 days, 3 nM-100 microM sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation, but not membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromoguanosine-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; 1-100 microM)-induced vasorelaxation, was significantly impaired. In these GW4064-treated arteries, 1 muM sodium nitroprusside-induced intracellular cGMP elevations were impaired. In RT-PCR, any changes were detected in mRNA expression level of alpha(1)- and beta(1)-subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that chronic stimulation of FXR impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation, which is due to decreased sensitivity of smooth muscle cells to nitric oxide.

  11. Toona sinensis Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammation and Migration in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species and NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Huang, Pei-Jane; Liu, Yi-Ru; Kumar, K. J. Senthil; Hsu, Li-Sung; Lu, Te-Ling; Chia, Yi-Chen; Takajo, Tokuko; Kazunori, Anzai; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Toona sinensis is one of the most popular vegetarian cuisines in Taiwan and it has been shown to possess antioxidant, antiangiogenic, and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the antiatherosclerotic potential of aqueous leaf extracts from Toona sinensis (TS; 25–100 μg/mL) and its major bioactive compound, gallic acid (GA; 5 μg/mL), in LPS-treated rat aortic smooth muscle (A7r5) cells. We found that pretreatment with noncytotoxic concentrations of TS and GA significantly inhibited inflammatory NO and PGE2 production by downregulating their precursors, iNOS and COX-2, respectively, in LPS-treated A7r5 cells. Furthermore, TS and GA inhibited LPS-induced intracellular ROS and their corresponding mediator, p47phox. Notably, TS and GA pretreatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced migration in transwell assays. Gelatin zymography and western blotting demonstrated that treatment with TS and GA suppressed the activity or expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, and t-PA. Additionally, TS and GA significantly inhibited LPS-induced VEGF, PDGF, and VCAM-1 expression. Further investigation revealed that the inhibition of iNOS/COX-2, MMPs, growth factors, and adhesion molecules was associated with the suppression of NF-κB activation and MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38) phosphorylation. Thus, Toona sinensis may be useful for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:24723997

  12. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  13. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function.

  14. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  15. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function. PMID:24120039

  16. Epidermal growth factor-mediated effects on equine vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grosenbaugh, D.A.; Amoss, M.S.; Hood, D.M.; Morgan, S.J.; Williams, J.D. )

    1988-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding kinetics and EGF-mediated stimulation of DNA synthesis and cellular proliferation were studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the equine thoracic aorta. Binding studies, using murine {sup 125}I-labeled EGF, indicate the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites, with an estimated maximal binding capacity of 5,800 sites/cells. EGF stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake in confluent quiescent monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, half-maximal stimulation occurring at 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M. Likewise, EGF-mediated cellular proliferation was dose dependent under reduced serum concentrations. Equine VSMC contain specific receptors for EGF, and EGF can stimulate DNA synthesis and proliferation in these cultured cells, which suggests that EGF may participate in the proliferative changes observed in equine distal digital peripheral vascular disease.

  17. Capsaicin from chili ( Capsicum spp.) inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongxia; Heiss, Elke H; Guo, Dean; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is implied in cardiovascular disease and significantly contributes to vessel lumen reduction following surgical interventions such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or bypass surgery. Therefore, identification and characterization of compounds and mechanisms able to counteract VSMC proliferation is of potential therapeutic relevance. This work reveals the anti-proliferative effect of the natural product capsaicin from Capsicum spp. by quantification of metabolic activity and DNA synthesis in activated VSMC. The observed in vitro activity profile of capsaicin warrants further research on its mechanism of action and potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25685327

  18. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  19. Calcifying nanoparticles promote mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Larry W; Charlesworth, Jon E; Yu, Sam; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Background Nano-sized complexes of calcium phosphate mineral and proteins (calcifying nanoparticles [CNPs]) serve as mineral chaperones. Thus, CNPs may be both a result and cause of soft tissue calcification processes. This study determined if CNPs could augment calcification of arterial vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. Methods CNPs 210 nm in diameter were propagated in vitro from human serum. Porcine aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured for up to 28 days in medium in the absence (control) or presence of 2 mM phosphate ([P] positive calcification control) or after a single 3-day exposure to CNPs. Transmission electron-microscopy was used to characterize CNPs and to examine their cellular uptake. Calcium deposits were visualized by light microscopy and von Kossa staining and were quantified by colorimetry. Cell viability was quantified by confocal microscopy of live-/dead-stained cells and apoptosis was examined concurrently by fluorescent labeling of exposed phosphatidylserine. Results CNPs, as well as smaller calcium crystals, were observed by transmission electron-microscopy on day 3 in CNP-treated but not P-treated cells. By day 28, calcium deposits were visible in similar amounts within multicellular nodules of both CNP- and P-treated cells. Apoptosis increased with cell density under all treatments. CNP treatment augmented the density of apoptotic bodies and cellular debris in association with mineralized multicellular nodules. Conclusion Exogenous CNPs are taken up by aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro and potentiate accumulation of smooth-muscle-derived apoptotic bodies at sites of mineralization. Thus, CNPs may accelerate vascular calcification. PMID:24920905

  20. Ion channel remodeling in vascular smooth muscle during hypertension: Implications for novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Biny K.; Thakali, Keshari M.; Moore, Christopher L.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are multimeric, transmembrane proteins that selectively mediate ion flux across the plasma membrane in a variety of cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dynamic interplay of Ca2+ and K+ channels on the plasma membrane of VSMCs plays a pivotal role in modulating the vascular tone of small arteries and arterioles. The abnormally-elevated arterial tone observed in hypertension thus points to an aberrant expression and function of Ca2+ and K+ channels in the VSMCs. In this short review, we focus on the three well-studied ion channels in VSMCs, namely the L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channels, the voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, and the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. First, we provide a brief overview on the physiological role of vascular CaV1.2, KV and BK channels in regulating arterial tone. Second, we discuss the current understanding of the expression changes and regulation of CaV1.2, KV and BK channels in the vasculature during hypertension. Third, based on available proof-of-concept studies, we describe the potential therapeutic approaches targeting these vascular ion channels in order to restore blood pressure to normotensive levels. PMID:23376354

  1. Activating transcription factor-4 promotes mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L.; Shiozaki, Yuji; Okamura, Kayo; Chick, Wallace S.; Williams, Kristina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Tintut, Yin; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that upregulation of the ER stress–induced pro-osteogenic transcription factor ATF4 plays an important role in vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ATF4 in vascular calcification using global Atf4 KO, smooth muscle cell–specific (SMC-specific) Atf4 KO, and transgenic (TG) mouse models. Reduced expression of ATF4 in global ATF4-haplodeficient and SMC-specific Atf4 KO mice reduced medial and atherosclerotic calcification under normal kidney and CKD conditions. In contrast, increased expression of ATF4 in SMC-specific Atf4 TG mice caused severe medial and atherosclerotic calcification. We further demonstrated that ATF4 transcriptionally upregulates the expression of type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporters (PiT1 and PiT2) by interacting with C/EBPβ. These results demonstrate that the ER stress effector ATF4 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through increased phosphate uptake in vascular SMCs. PMID:27812542

  2. Dehydroleucodine inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in G2 phase.

    PubMed

    Cruzado, M; Castro, C; Fernandez, D; Gomez, L; Roque, M; Giordano, O E; Lopez, L A

    2005-11-08

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis and in the vascular changes seen in hypertension. Dehydroleucodine (DhL) is a sesquiterpene lactone that inhibits cell proliferation in plant cells. In this paper, we study the effect of DhL in the proliferation of VSMCs stimulated with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Very low concentrations of DhL (2-6 microM) inhibited VSMC proliferation and induced cell accumulation in G2. DhL did not affect the dynamics of 3H-thymidine incorporation, and did not modify either the activity of DNA polymerase or the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides in an in vitro assay. Moreover, DhL did not induce apoptosis in VSMCs. These results indicate that DhL, in very low concentration, induces a transient arrest of VSMCs in G2. Our data show that VSMCs are especially sensitive to DhL effect, suggesting that DhL could be potentially useful to prevent the vascular pathological changes seen in hypertension and other vascular diseases.

  3. Contact-mediated and humoral communication between vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) co-exist in close apposition to each other in all blood vessels except capillaries. Investigations of the metabolic interactions that may occur between these cells are essential to an understanding of vascular homeostasis and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The authors have developed two in vitro models of co-temporal vascular cell communication. The first facilitates reversible microcarrier-mediated gap junctional communication between EC and SMC monolayers. When either EC or SMC were prelabelled with /sup 3/H-uridine, intracellular nucleotide rapidly transferred across the region of heterocellular attachment to the complementary cell population. Cytoplasmic continuity between EC and SMC allowed metabolic cooperation via ions and small molecules (<1.5 KD). Thus, vascular reactivity, particularly in the microcirculation where myoendothelial gap junctions have been observed, may involve cytoplasmic second messengers transported from EC to SMC. In the second model, humoral communication was established between separated cultures of EC and SMC which shared the same culture medium. Endothelial-specific stimulation of SMC growth and lipoprotein metabolism via soluble factors was demonstrated. Two mechanisms of stimulation of SMC lipoprotein metabolism were identified; one endothelial derived mitogen-dependent, the other mitogen-independent which was mediated via low molecular weight endothelial cell products.

  4. Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction Reverses Vascular Remodeling by Inducing Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; He, Fei; Chen, Hongwei; Lin, Shan; Shen, Aling; Chen, Youqin; Chu, Jianfeng; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction (QXJYD), a traditional Chinese medicine formula prescribed by academician Ke-ji Chen, has been used in China to clinically treat hypertension for decades of years. However, the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of QXJYD against elevated systolic blood pressure in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that oral administration of QXJYD significantly reduced the elevation of systolic blood pressure in SHR but had no effect on body weight change. Additionally, QXJYD treatment significantly decreased the media thickness and ratio of media thickness/lumen diameter in the carotid arteries of SHR. Moreover, QXJYD remarkably promoted apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and reduced the expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2. Furthermore, QXJYD significantly decreased the plasma Angiotensin II level in SHR. Collectively, our findings suggest that reversing vascular remodeling via inducing VSMC apoptosis could be one of the mechanisms whereby QXJYD treats hypertension. PMID:27455221

  5. Notch activation mediates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling by promoting the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Yukako; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Qin, Yingjie; Tateno, Kaoru; Ito, Kaoru; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Yano, Masamichi; Yabumoto, Chizuru; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Minamino, Tohru; Nagai, Toshio; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Komuro, Issei

    2013-10-01

    Notch signaling is involved in an intercellular communication mechanism that is essential for coordinated cell fate determination and tissue morphogenesis. The biological effects of Notch signaling are context-dependent. We investigated the functional and hierarchical relationship between angiotensin (Ang) II receptor signaling and Notch signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A fluorogenic substrate assay revealed directly that the enzymatic activity of γ-secretase was enhanced after 10 min of Ang II stimulation in HEK293 cells expressing Ang II type 1 receptor. Notch cleavage by γ-secretase was consistently induced and peaked at 10 min after Ang II stimulation, and the Ang II-stimulated increase in Notch intracellular domain production was significantly suppressed by treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Treatment with DAPT also significantly reduced the Ang II-stimulated proliferation and migration of human aortic VSMCs, as revealed by BrdU incorporation and the Boyden chamber assay, respectively. Systemic administration of the γ-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine reduced Ang II-induced medial thickening and perivascular fibrosis in the aortas of wild-type mice. These findings suggest that the hierarchical Ang II receptor-Notch signaling pathway promotes the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, and thereby contributes to the progression of vascular remodeling. PMID:23719127

  6. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  7. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  8. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  9. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  10. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  11. Chemical induction of cellular antioxidants affords marked protection against oxidative injury in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuoxiao; Li, Yunbo

    2002-03-22

    Extensive evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are critically involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Consistent with this concept, administration of exogenous antioxidants has been shown to be protective against oxidative cardiovascular injury. However, whether induction of endogenous antioxidants by chemical inducers in vasculature also affords protection against oxidative vascular cell injury has not been extensively investigated. In this study, using rat aortic smooth muscle A10 cells as an in vitro system, we have studied the induction of cellular antioxidants by the unique chemoprotector, 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione [corrected] (D3T) and the protective effects of the D3T-induced cellular antioxidants against oxidative cell injury. Incubation of A10 cells with micromolar concentrations of D3T for 24 h resulted in a significant induction of a battery of cellular antioxidants in a concentration-dependent manner. These included reduced glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase, GSSG reductase, GSH S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. To further examine the protective effects of the induced endogenous antioxidants against oxidative cell injury, A10 cells were pretreated with D3T and then exposed to either xanthine oxidase (XO)/xanthine, 4-hydroxynonenal, or cadmium. We observed that D3T pretreatment of A10 cells led to significant protection against the cytotoxicity induced by XO/xanthine, 4-hydroxynonenal or cadmium, as determined by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium reduction assay. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time that a number of endogenous antioxidants in vascular smooth muscle cells can be induced by exposure to D3T, and that this chemical induction of cellular antioxidants is accompanied by markedly increased resistance to oxidative vascular cell injury.

  12. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  13. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  14. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  15. Slug Is Increased in Vascular Remodeling and Induces a Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Peinado, Victor I.; Pisano, María V.; Párrizas, Marcelina; Blanco, Isabel; Evers, Maurits; Engelmann, Julia C.; García-Lucio, Jessica; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have confirmed Slug as a key player in regulating phenotypic changes in several cell models, however, its role in smooth muscle cells (SMC) has never been assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of Slug during the phenotypic switch of SMC in vitro and throughout the development of vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Slug expression was decreased during both cell-to-cell contact and TGFβ1 induced SMC differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a known inductor of a proliferative/dedifferentiated SMC phenotype, induces the expression of Slug in SMC. Slug knockdown blocked TNFα-induced SMC phenotypic change and significantly reduced both SMC proliferation and migration, while its overexpression blocked the TGFβ1-induced SMC differentiation and induced proliferation and migration. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis showed that in SMC, Slug knockdown induced changes mainly in genes related to proliferation and migration, indicating that Slug controls these processes in SMC. Notably, Slug expression was significantly up-regulated in lungs of mice using a model of pulmonary hypertension-related vascular remodeling. Highly remodeled human pulmonary arteries also showed an increase of Slug expression compared to less remodeled arteries. Conclusions Slug emerges as a key transcription factor driving SMC towards a proliferative phenotype. The increased Slug expression observed in vivo in highly remodeled arteries of mice and human suggests a role of Slug in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27441378

  16. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material.

  17. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Optimization of Vasculogenesis within Naturally Derived, Biodegradable Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Reiffel, Alyssa J.; Perez, Justin L.; Fullerton, Natalia; Lekic, Nikola; Campbell, Rachel; Spector, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND As vascularization represents the rate-limiting step in permanent incorporation of hydrogel-based tissue-regeneration templates, we sought to identify the material chemistry that would optimize endothelial cell adhesion and invasion into custom hydrogel constructs. We further investigated induction of endothelial tubule formation by growth factor supplementation and paracrine stimulation. METHODS Hydrogel scaffolds consisting of combinations of alginate, collagen type I, and chitosan were seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and maintained under standard conditions for 14d. Cell density and invasion were then evaluated. Tubule formation was evaluated following basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) addition or co-culture with human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RESULTS HUVECs demonstrated greatest cell-surface density and invasion volumes with alginate+collagen 10:1 w/w scaffolds (p<0.05). Supplementation with bFGF increased surface-density but neither invasion nor tubule formation. A significant increase in tubule content/organization was observed with increasing HASMC:HUVEC ratio co-culture. CONCLUSIONS Alginate+collagen 10:1 scaffolds allow for maximal cellularization compared with other combinations studied. Growth factor supplementation did not affect HUVEC invasion or morphology. Paracrine signaling via co-culture with HASMC stimulated endothelial tubule formation and vascular proto-network organization. These findings serve to guide our future endeavors towards fabrication of pre-vascularized tissue constructs. PMID:24281642

  18. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell endothelin-1 expression modulates the pulmonary vascular response to chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Francis Y.; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Ying, Lihua; Chen, Chihhsin; Lee, Lori; Alvira, Cristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) increases pulmonary vascular tone through direct effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) via membrane-bound ET-1 receptors. Circulating ET-1 contributes to vascular remodeling by promoting SMC proliferation and migration and inhibiting SMC apoptosis. Although endothelial cells (EC) are the primary source of ET-1, whether ET-1 produced by SMC modulates pulmonary vascular tone is unknown. Using transgenic mice created by crossbreeding SM22α-Cre mice with ET-1 flox/flox mice to selectively delete ET-1 in SMC, we tested the hypothesis that PASMC ET-1 gene expression modulates the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. ET-1 gene deletion and selective activity of SM22α promoter-driven Cre recombinase were confirmed. Functional assays were performed under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (5% O2) conditions using murine PASMC obtained from ET-1+/+ and ET-1−/− mic and in human PASMC (hPASMC) after silencing of ET-1 using siRNA. Under baseline conditions, there was no difference in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) between SM22α-ET-1−/− and SM22α-ET-1+/+ (control) littermates. After exposure to hypoxia (10% O2, 21–24 days), RVSP was and vascular remodeling were less in SM22α-ET-1−/− mice compared with control littermates (P < 0.01). Loss of ET-1 decreased PASMC proliferation and migration and increased apoptosis under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Exposure to selective ET-1 receptor antagonists had no effect on either the hypoxia-induced hPASMC proliferative or migratory response. SMC-specific ET-1 deletion attenuates hypoxia-induced increases in pulmonary vascular tone and structural remodeling. The observation that loss of ET-1 inhibited SMC proliferation, survival, and migration represents evidence that ET-1 derived from SMC plays a previously undescribed role in modulating the response of the pulmonary circulation to hypoxia. Thus PASMC ET-1 may modulate vascular tone independently of ET-1 produced by EC

  19. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma) zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Thomas R; Kennedy, Regan M; Carter, Alyson D; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M; Childs, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  20. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  1. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    SciTech Connect

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T.

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  2. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  3. Glucose and glucosamine regulate growth factor gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    McClain, D A; Paterson, A J; Roos, M D; Wei, X; Kudlow, J E

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the expression of two growth factors found in vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells cultured in medium containing 30 mM glucose exhibited a 2-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA and a 3-fold increase in bFGF mRNA compared with cells grown in normal (5.5 mM) glucose. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, leading to a 6-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA. TGF alpha protein levels were also increased by glucosamine treatment, and the predominant species present was the membrane-bound precursor form of TGF alpha. To examine further the regulation of growth factors by sugars, cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were transfected with a plasmid construct consisting of a 1.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the TGF alpha promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Increasing the concentration of glucose in the culture medium from 5.5 mM to 30 mM led to a rapid, 1.7-fold increase in the activity of the TGF alpha promoter. Glucosamine was much more potent than glucose in this stimulation, with 2 mM glucosamine causing a 12-fold increase in TGF alpha promoter activity. Insulin had no effect on luciferase activity in either the presence or the absence of added sugars. The glucose response element of the TGF alpha gene maps to a 130-base-pair segment that includes three potential binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. We conclude that high glucose concentrations such as are reached in diabetes mellitus can stimulate the transcription of the genes for growth factors in vascular smooth muscle cells. This signaling pathway apparently involves the metabolism of glucose to glucosamine. This effect could be representative of nutritional regulation of a family of genes and could contribute to the toxicity of hyperglycemia and the vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:1518840

  4. Glucose and glucosamine regulate growth factor gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, D A; Paterson, A J; Roos, M D; Wei, X; Kudlow, J E

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the expression of two growth factors found in vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells cultured in medium containing 30 mM glucose exhibited a 2-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA and a 3-fold increase in bFGF mRNA compared with cells grown in normal (5.5 mM) glucose. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, leading to a 6-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA. TGF alpha protein levels were also increased by glucosamine treatment, and the predominant species present was the membrane-bound precursor form of TGF alpha. To examine further the regulation of growth factors by sugars, cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were transfected with a plasmid construct consisting of a 1.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the TGF alpha promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Increasing the concentration of glucose in the culture medium from 5.5 mM to 30 mM led to a rapid, 1.7-fold increase in the activity of the TGF alpha promoter. Glucosamine was much more potent than glucose in this stimulation, with 2 mM glucosamine causing a 12-fold increase in TGF alpha promoter activity. Insulin had no effect on luciferase activity in either the presence or the absence of added sugars. The glucose response element of the TGF alpha gene maps to a 130-base-pair segment that includes three potential binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. We conclude that high glucose concentrations such as are reached in diabetes mellitus can stimulate the transcription of the genes for growth factors in vascular smooth muscle cells. This signaling pathway apparently involves the metabolism of glucose to glucosamine. This effect could be representative of nutritional regulation of a family of genes and could contribute to the toxicity of hyperglycemia and the vascular complications of diabetes. Images PMID:1518840

  5. Effects of 4-hydroxynonenal on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell redox signaling and function in health and disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Sarah J.; Cheng, Xinghua; Mann, Giovanni E.

    2013-01-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a lipid hydroperoxide end product formed from the oxidation of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative abundance of HNE within the vasculature is dependent not only on the rate of lipid peroxidation and HNE synthesis but also on the removal of HNE adducts by phase II metabolic pathways such as glutathione-S-transferases. Depending on its relative concentration, HNE can induce a range of hormetic effects in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, including kinase activation, proliferation, induction of phase II enzymes and in high doses inactivation of enzymatic processes and apoptosis. HNE also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and in utero diseases such as pre-eclampsia. This review examines the known production, metabolism and consequences of HNE synthesis within vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, highlighting alterations in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function and their association with various vascular pathologies. PMID:24024167

  6. Vasopressin induced production of inositol trisphosphate and calcium efflux in a smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, V.M.; Rueegg, U.T.

    1985-08-30

    Phosphatidylinositol metabolism and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were examined in a vascular smooth muscle cell line (A7r5). (Arg 8)Vasopressin stimulated the rapid formation (measurable at 1 sec) of inositol phosphates in a concentration-dependent manner. The time course for formation of inositol phosphates was similar to that for /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from preloaded cells. The efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in response to (Arg8)vasopressin could be inhibited by a vasopressin antagonist. This supports the hypothesis that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate plays a role in vasopressin stimulated calcium mobilization from an intracellular source in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

  7. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  8. Vascular smooth cell proliferation in perfusion culture of porcine carotid arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Dan; Lin, Peter H.; Yao Qizhi; Chen Changyi

    2008-08-08

    Objective of this study was to develop a novel in vitro artery culture system to study vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation of porcine carotid arteries in response to injury, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), and FGF2 conjugated with cytotoxin saporin (SAP). Perfusion-cultured porcine carotid arteries remained contractile in response to norepinephrine and relaxant to acetylcholine for up to 96 h. SMC proliferation of cultured arteries was detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in both non-injured and balloon-injured arteries. In the inner layer of the vessel wall near the lumen, SMC proliferation were less than 10% in uninjured vessels, 66% in injured vessels, 80% in injured vessels with FGF2 treatment, and 5% in injured vessels with treatment of FGF2-SAP. Thus, the cultured porcine carotid arteries were viable; and the injury stimulated SMC proliferation, which was significantly enhanced by FGF2 and inhibited by FGF2-SAP.

  9. Inhibitory Effects and Mechanisms of Luteolin on Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dehua; Li, Dongye; Wu, Wanling

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a complicated progress, involving many types of cells. Although the exact mechanisms of progression of atherosclerosis are uncertain, the balance of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation and apoptosis appears to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, and much discussion has been undertaken to elucidate the detailed mechanisms, relevant gene expression and transduction pathways. Drug treatment has focused on ameliorating atherosclerosis. Some researchers have indicated that inhibiting VSMCs proliferation is involved in attenuating atherosclerosis. Luteolin is a kind of flavonoids naturally occurring in many plants and possesses beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Luteolin can reduce VSMCs’ proliferation and migration and this reduction is stimulated by several factors. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing inhibitory effects and mechanisms of luteolin on proliferation and migration of VSMCs, and consider whether luteolin may be a potential candidate for preventing and treating atherosclerosis. PMID:23686014

  10. MicroRNA-141 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through targeting PAPP-A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Chen, Bainan; Ming, Liu; Qin, Hongsong; Zheng, Liu; Yue, Zhang; Cheng, Zhixin; Wang, Yannan; Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Chunmei; Bin, Wang; Hao, Qingzhi; Song, Fuchen; Ji, Bo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that ox-LDL plays key roles in the development of atherosclerosis, partly by inducing vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, could regulate cell proliferation in many physiological and pathological conditions. However, the role and function of miRNAs on ox-LDL induced VSMC proliferation are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that ox-LDL could suppress miR-141 expression and inhibition of miR-141 could promote VSMCs proliferation. Moreover, we found that PAPPA was the direct target gene of miR-141. Overexpression of PAPPA impaired the miR-141-induced inhibition of proliferation in the VSMCs. Taken together; miR-141 may play important roles in ox-LDL-induced abnormal proliferation of the VSMC. PMID:26823756

  11. Involvement of phospholipase D in store-operated calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Neusser, M; Assmann, G; Zidek, W

    2000-08-11

    In non-excitable cells, sustained intracellular Ca2+ increase critically depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Such Ca2+ influx is thought to occur by a 'store-operated' mechanism, i.e. the signal for Ca2+ entry is believed to result from the initial release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores. Here we show that the depletion of cellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or bradykinin is functionally linked to a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase D (PLD) activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and that phosphatidic acid formed via PLD enhances sustained calcium entry in this cell type. These results suggest a regulatory role for PLD in store-operated Ca2+ entry in VSMC.

  12. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events.

  13. In vascular smooth muscle cells paricalcitol prevents phosphate-induced Wnt/β-catenin activation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Herencia, Carmen; Oca, Addy Montes de; Estepa, Jose C; Canalejo, Rocio; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda

    2012-10-15

    The present study investigates the differential effect of two vitamin D receptor agonists, calcitriol and paricalcitol, on human aortic smooth muscle cells calcification in vitro. Human vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated in a high phosphate (HP) medium alone or supplemented with either calcitriol 10(-8)M (HP + CTR) or paricalcitol 3·10(-8) M (HP + PC). HP medium induced calcification, which was associated with the upregulation of mRNA expression of osteogenic factors such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), Runx2/Cbfa1, Msx2, and osteocalcin. In these cells, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was evidenced by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and the increase in the expression of direct target genes as cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN/versican. Addition of calcitriol to HP medium (HP + CTR) further increased calcification and also enhanced the expression of osteogenic factors together with a significant elevation of nuclear β-catenin levels and the expression of cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN. By contrast, the addition of paricalcitol (HP + PC) not only reduced calcification but also downregulated the expression of BMP2 and other osteoblastic phenotype markers as well as the levels of nuclear β-catenin and the expression of its target genes. The role of Wnt/β-catenin on phosphate- and calcitriol-induced calcification was further demonstrated by the inhibition of calcification after addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), a specific natural antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the differential effect of calcitriol and paricalcitol on vascular calcification appears to be mediated by a distinct regulation of the BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  14. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  15. Vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx modulates shear-induced proliferation, migration, and NO production responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    The endothelial cell glycocalyx, a structure coating the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium, and its related mechanotransduction have been studied by many over the last decade. However, the role of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) glycocalyx in cell mechanotransduction has triggered little attention. This study addressed the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), a major component of the glycocalyx, in the shear-induced proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide (NO) production of the rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). A parallel plate flow chamber and a peristaltic pump were employed to expose RASMC monolayers to a physiological level of shear stress (12 dyn/cm(2)). Heparinase III (Hep.III) was applied to selectively degrade heparan sulfate on the SMC surface. Cell proliferation, migration, and NO production rates were determined and compared among the following four groups of cells: 1) untreated with no flow, 2) Hep.III treatment with no flow, 3) untreated with flow of 12 dyn/cm(2) exposure, and 4) Hep.III treatment with flow of 12 dyn/cm(2) exposure. It was observed that flow-induced shear stress significantly suppressed SMC proliferation and migration, whereas cells preferred to aligning along the direction of flow and NO production were enhanced substantially. However, those responses were not found in the cells with Hep.III treatment. Under flow condition, the heparinase III-treated cells remained randomly oriented and proliferated as if there were no flow presence. Disruption of HSPG also enhanced wound closure and inhibited shear-induced NO production significantly. This study suggests that HSPG may play a pivotal role in mechanotransduction of SMCs. PMID:21037235

  16. Sustained diacylglycerol formation from inositol phospholipids in angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Griendling, K.K.; Rittenhouse, S.E.; Brock, T.A.; Ekstein, L.S.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1986-05-05

    Angiotensin II acts on cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells to stimulate phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides and subsequent formation of diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates. In intact cells, angiotensin II induces a dose-dependent increase in diglyceride which is detectable after 5 s and sustained for at least 20 min. Angiotensin II (100 nM)-stimulated diglyceride formation is biphasic, peaking at 15 s (227 +/- 19% control) and at 5 min (303 +/- 23% control). Simultaneous analysis of labeled inositol phospholipids shows that at 15 s phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) decline to 52 +/- 6% control and 63 +/- 5% control, respectively, while phosphatidylinositol (PI) remains unchanged. In contrast, at 5 min, PIP2 and PIP have returned toward control levels (92 +/- 2 and 82 +/- 4% control, respectively), while PI has decreased substantially (81 +/- 2% control). The calcium ionophore ionomycin (15 microM) stimulates diglyceride accumulation but does not cause PI hydrolysis. 4 beta-Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C, inhibits early PIP and PIP2 breakdown and diglyceride formation, without inhibiting late-phase diglyceride accumulation. Thus, angiotensin II induces rapid transient breakdown of PIP and PIP2 and delayed hydrolysis of PI. The rapid attenuation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown is likely caused by a protein kinase C-mediated inhibition of PIP and PIP2 hydrolysis. While in vascular smooth muscle stimulated with angiotensin II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation is transient, diglyceride production is biphasic, suggesting that initial and sustained diglyceride formation from the phosphoinositides results from different biochemical and/or cellular processes.

  17. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Macrae, Vicky E; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1(-/-) VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two of these inhibitors, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0% of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74% of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that "phosphatase inhibition" may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC.

  18. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  19. A potential gravity-sensing role of vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx in altered gravitational stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Liu, Meili; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2013-07-01

    Previously, we have shown that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exhibit varied physiological responses when exposed to altered gravitational conditions. In the present study, we focused on elucidating whether the cell surface glycocalyx could be a potential gravity sensor. For this purpose, a roller culture apparatus was used with the intent to provide altered gravitational conditions to cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Heparinase III (Hep.III) was applied to degrade cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) selectively. Sodium chlorate was used to suppress new synthesis of HSPG. Glycocalyx remodeling, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation, and F-actin expression induced by gravity alteration were assessed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. Results indicate that the exposure of cultured RASMCs to altered gravitational conditions led to a reduction in cell surface HSPG content and the activation of NOS. It also down-regulated the expression of glypican-1, constitutive NOS (NOSI and NOSIII), and F-actin. On the other hand, Hep.III followed by sodium chlorate treatment of HSPG attenuated the aforementioned NOS and F-actin modulation under altered gravitational conditions. All these findings suggest that the glycocalyx, and HSPG in particular, may be an important sensor of gravitational changes. This may play an important role in the regulation of NOS activation, F-actin modulation, and HSPG remodeling in VSMCs.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  1. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, promotes vascular smooth muscle cells differentiation via PTEN induction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Lee, Dany-Young; Hsu, Lung-An; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), independent of its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have an antiatherosclerotic effect. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of PTU on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as phenotypic modulation may contribute to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and neointimal formation after arterial injury. Propylthiouracil reduced neointimal formation in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. In vitro, PTU may convert VSMCs from a serum-induced dedifferentiation state to a differentiated state, as indicated by a spindle-shaped morphology and an increase in the expression of SMC differentiation marker contractile proteins, including calponin and smooth muscle (SM)-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Transient transfection studies in VSMCs demonstrated that PTU induced the activity of SMC marker genes (calponin and SM-MHC) promoters, indicating that PTU up-regulates these genes expression predominantly at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, PTU enhanced the expression of PTEN and inhibition of PTEN by siRNA knockdown blocked PTU-induced activation of contractile proteins expression and promoter activity. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU reversed the down-regulation of contractile proteins and up-regulated PTEN in the neointima induced by balloon injury. Propylthiouracil promotes VSMC differentiation, at lest in part, via induction of the PTEN-mediated pathway. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which PTU may contribute to its beneficial effects on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury.

  2. Invasive Trophoblasts Stimulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis by a Fas Ligand-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lynda K.; Keogh, Rosemary J.; Wareing, Mark; Baker, Philip N.; Cartwright, Judith E.; Aplin, John D.; Whitley, Guy St J.

    2006-01-01

    During pregnancy, trophoblasts migrate from the placenta into uterine spiral arteries, transforming them into wide channels that lack vasoconstrictive properties. In pathological pregnancies, this process is incomplete. To define the fundamental events involved in spiral artery remodeling, we have studied the effect of trophoblasts on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here we demonstrate for the first time that apoptosis of SMCs can be initiated by invading trophoblasts. When trophoblasts isolated from normal placenta (primary trophoblasts) or conditioned medium was perfused into spiral or umbilical artery segments, apoptosis of SMCs resulted. Culture of human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) with primary trophoblasts, primary trophoblast-conditioned medium, or a trophoblast-derived cell line (SGHPL-4) also significantly increased SMC apoptosis. Fas is expressed by spiral artery SMCs, and a Fas-activating antibody triggered HASMC apoptosis. Furthermore, a Fas ligand (FasL)-blocking antibody significantly inhibited HASMC apoptosis induced by primary trophoblasts, SGHPL-4, or trophoblast-conditioned medium. Depleting primary trophoblast-conditioned medium of FasL also abrogated SMC apoptosis in vessels in situ. These results suggest that apoptosis triggered by the release of soluble FasL from invading trophoblasts contributes to the loss of smooth muscle from the walls of spiral arteries during pregnancy. PMID:17071607

  3. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin.

  4. Inhibitory effects of fermented extract of Ophiopogon japonicas on thrombin-induced vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Hui; Jeong, Gi Hee; Park, Sung Lyea; Won, Se Yeon; Paek, Nam Soo; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Ophiopogon japonicus is known to have various pharmacological effects. The present study investigated the effects of an extract of fermented Ophiopogon japonicas (FEOJ) on thrombin‑treated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). FEOJ treatment inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs treated with thrombin as indicated by an MTT assay. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased phosphorylation of AKT, reduced expression of cyclin D1 and increased expression of p27KIP1 in thrombin‑induced VSMCs. In addition, FEOJ treatment suppressed the thrombin‑stimulated migration of VSMCs as demonstrated by a wound‑healing migration assay. Furthermore, zymographic analyses demonstrated that treatment of FEOJ with VSMCs suppressed the thrombin‑induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2, which was attributed to the reduction of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB binding activity. Collectively, these results demonstrated that FEOJ induced p27KIP1 expression, reduced cyclin D1 expression and AKT phosphorylation, and inhibited MMP‑2 expression mediated by downregulation of NF‑κB binding activity in thrombin‑treated VSMCs, which led to growth inhibition and repression of migration. These results supported the use of FEOJ for the prevention of vascular diseases and provided novel insight into the underlying mechanism of action.

  5. Expression of apolipoprotein E by cultured vascular smooth muscle cells is controlled by growth state

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture synthesize and secrete a approximately 38,000-Mr protein doublet or triplet that, as previously described (Majack and Bornstein. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 99:1688- 1695), rapidly and reversibly accumulates in the SMC culture medium upon addition of heparin. In the present study, we show that this approximately 38,000-Mr heparin-regulated protein is electrophoretically and immunologically identical to apolipoprotein E (apo-E), a major plasma apolipoprotein involved in cholesterol transport. In addition, we show that expression of apo-E by cultured SMC varies according to growth state: while proliferating SMC produced little apo-E and expressed low levels of apo-E mRNA, quiescent SMC produced significantly more apo-E (relative to other proteins) and expressed markedly increased levels of apo-E mRNA. Northern analysis of RNA extracted from aortic tissue revealed that fully differentiated, quiescent SMC contain significant quantities of apo-E mRNA. These data establish aortic SMC as a vascular source for apo-E and suggest new functional roles for this apolipoprotein, possibly unrelated to traditional concepts of lipid metabolism. PMID:2458361

  6. Zinc Restored the Decreased Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Viability under Atherosclerotic Calcification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mee-Young; Kwun, In-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is considered to be involved in maintaining healthy vascular condition. Atherosclerotic calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) occurs via the mechanism of cell death; therefore, cell viability is a critical factor for preventing VSMC calcification. In this study, we tested whether zinc affected VSMC viability under both normal physiological non-calcifying (0 mM P) and atherosclerotic calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P), since VSMC physiological characters change during the VSMC calcification process. The study results showed that an optimal zinc level (15 μM) restored the decreased VSMC viability which was induced under low zinc levels (0 and 1 μM) and calcifying conditions (3 and 5 mM P) at 9 and 15 days culture. This zinc-protecting effect for VSMC viability is more prominent under atherosclerotic calcifying condition (3 and 5 mM P) than normal condition (0 mM P). Also, the increased VSMC viability was consistent with the decreased Ca and P accumulation in VSMC cell layers. The results suggested that zinc could be an effective biomineral for preventing VSMC calcification under atherosclerotic calcifying conditions. PMID:25580404

  7. Mechanism of oxidative stress-induced GADD153 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jia-Rong; Nakamura, Michitsugu; Okura, Takafumi; Takata, Yasunori; Watanabe, Sanae; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Jun; Kitami, Yutaka; Hiwada, Kunio

    2002-02-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in normal functioning of cardiac and vascular cells as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), which is upregulated by oxidative stress, regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis. Previously an AP-1 was reported to contribute significantly to GADD153 gene transcriptional activation by oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that GADD153 gene promoter activity is negatively regulated by nuclear factor 1 (NF1), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the roles of AP-1 and NF1 in GADD153 gene induction by oxidative stress in VSMCs. H(2)O(2) induced GADD153 mRNA and reduced NF1 mRNA expression. In the electromobility shift assay, H(2)O(2) induced AP-1-binding activity and reduced NF1-binding activity. Overexpression of NF1 significantly suppressed the induction of the GADD153 gene after treatment with H(2)O(2). These results revealed that induction of the GADD153 gene by oxidative stress is regulated mainly by two nuclear factors, NF1 and AP-1.

  8. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  9. The flavonoid quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits JNK activation in intimal vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco . E-mail: fperez@med.ucm.es; Bishop-Bailley, David; Lodi, Federica; Duarte, Juan; Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Bosca, Lisardo; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2006-08-04

    Quercetin, the most abundant dietary flavonol, exerts vasodilator, anti-hypertensive, and anti-atherogenic effects and reduces the vascular remodelling associated with elevated blood pressure. Here, we have compared the effects of quercetin in intimal- and medial-type rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in culture. After 48 h, quercetin reduced the viability of a polyclonal intimal-type cell line derived from neonatal aorta but not of a medial-type cell line derived from adult aorta. These differential effects were similar in both proliferating and quiescent VSMC. Quercetin also preferentially reduced the viability of intimal-type over medial-type VSMC in primary cultures derived from balloon-injured carotid arteries. The effects of quercetin on cell viability were mainly dependent upon induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and were unrelated to PPAR{gamma}, pro-oxidant effects or nitric oxide. The expression of MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK) and ERK phosphorylation were not different between intimal- and medial-type VSMC. p38 phosphorylation was negligible in both cell types. Medial-type showed a weak JNK phosphorylation while this was markedly increased in intimal-type cells. Quercetin reduced JNK phosphorylation but had no consistent effect on ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, quercetin preferentially produced apoptosis in intimal-type compared to medial-type VSMC. This might play a role in the anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive effects of quercetin.

  10. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  11. Blocking interferon {beta} stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Stephan H; Bot, Pieter T; Fledderus, Joost O; van der Laan, A M; Volger, Oscar L; Laufs, Ulrich; Böhm, Michael; de Vries, Carlie J M; Horrevoets, Anton J G; Piek, Jan J; Hoefer, Imo E; van Royen, Niels

    2010-11-01

    Increased interferon (IFN)-β signaling in patients with insufficient coronary collateralization and an inhibitory effect of IFNβ on collateral artery growth in mice have been reported. The mechanisms of IFNβ-induced inhibition of arteriogenesis are unknown. In stimulated monocytes from patients with chronic total coronary artery occlusion and decreased arteriogenic response, whole genome expression analysis showed increased expression of IFNβ-regulated genes. Immunohistochemically, the IFNβ receptor was localized in the vascular media of murine collateral arteries. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with IFNβ resulted in an attenuated proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-1A (p21). The growth inhibitory effect of IFNβ was attenuated by inhibition of p21 by RNA interference. IFNβ-treated THP1 monocytes showed enhanced apoptosis. Subsequently, we tested if collateral artery growth can be stimulated by inhibition of IFNβ-signaling. RNA interference of the IFNβ receptor-1 (IFNAR1) increased VSMC proliferation, cell cycle progression, and reduced p21 gene expression. IFNβ signaling and FAS and TRAIL expression were attenuated in monocytes from IFNAR1(-/-) mice, indicating reduced monocyte apoptosis. Hindlimb perfusion restoration 1 week after femoral artery ligation was improved in IFNAR1(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice as assessed by infusion of fluorescent microspheres. These results demonstrate that IFNβ inhibits collateral artery growth and VSMC proliferation through p21-dependent cell cycle arrest and induction of monocyte apoptosis. Inhibition of IFNβ stimulates VSMC proliferation and collateral artery growth. PMID:20736166

  12. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  13. Loss of Notch3 Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Promotes Severe Heart Failure Upon Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Hélène; Monfort, Astrid; Baudet, Mathilde; Azibani, Fériel; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Régine; Polidano, Evelyne; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Vodovar, Nicolas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension, which is a risk factor of heart failure, provokes adaptive changes at the vasculature and cardiac levels. Notch3 signaling plays an important role in resistance arteries by controlling the maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Notch3 deletion is protective in pulmonary hypertension while deleterious in arterial hypertension. Although this latter phenotype was attributed to renal and cardiac alterations, the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. To investigate the role of Notch3 signaling in the cardiac adaptation to hypertension, we used mice with either constitutive Notch3 or smooth muscle cell-specific conditional RBPJκ knockout. At baseline, both genotypes exhibited a cardiac arteriolar rarefaction associated with oxidative stress. In response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, the heart of Notch3 knockout and SM-RBPJκ knockout mice did not adapt to pressure overload and developed heart failure, which could lead to an early and fatal acute decompensation of heart failure. This cardiac maladaptation was characterized by an absence of media hypertrophy of the media arteries, the transition of smooth muscle cells toward a synthetic phenotype, and an alteration of angiogenic pathways. A subset of mice exhibited an early fatal acute decompensated heart failure, in which the same alterations were observed, although in a more rapid timeframe. Altogether, these observations indicate that Notch3 plays a major role in coronary adaptation to pressure overload. These data also show that the hypertrophy of coronary arterial media on pressure overload is mandatory to initially maintain a normal cardiac function and is regulated by the Notch3/RBPJκ pathway. PMID:27296994

  14. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation to an osteogenic phenotype involves matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulation by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingjiao; Lin, Jinghan; Ju, Ting; Chu, Lei; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Arterial calcification is common in vascular diseases and involves conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to an osteoblast phenotype. Clinical studies suggest that the development of atherosclerosis can be promoted by homocysteine (HCY), but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined whether increases in HCY levels lead to an increase in VSMC calcification and differentiation, and examined the role of an extracellular matrix remodeler, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Rat VSMCs were exposed to calcification medium in the absence or presence of HCY (10, 100 or 200 μmol/L) or an MMP-2 inhibitor (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L). MTT assays were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the MMP-2 inhibitor in calcification medium containing 200 μmol/L HCY. Calcification was assessed by measurements of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as von Kossa staining. Expression of osteocalcin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and osteopontin, and MMP-2 was determined by immunoblotting. Calcification medium induced osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. HCY promoted calcification, increased osteocalcin and BMP-2 expression, and decreased expression of osteopontin. MMP-2 expression was increased by HCY in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs exposed to both control and calcification medium. The MMP-2 inhibitor decreased the calcium content and ALP activity, and attenuated the osteoblastic phenotype of VSMCs. Vascular calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs were positively regulated by HCY through increased/restored MMP-2 expression, increased expression of calcification proteins, and decreased anti-calcification protein levels. In summary, MMP-2 inhibition may be a protective strategy against VSMC calcification. PMID:25987498

  15. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation.

  16. [Effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 on vascular smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Saneshige, S; Shigehiro, K

    1997-07-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and essential hypertension are associated with hyperinsulinemia that results from insulin resistance and insulin has been reported to accelerate atherosclerosis. We studied the effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the growth of porcine vascular smooth muscle cells and on the synthesis of extracellular matrix. The cells were cultured 3-8 changes of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with 10% FCS. Subconfulent cells were put in wells 1 x 10(4) or 1 x 10(5) cells/well in DMEM with or without insulin or IGF-1. The number of cells was counted, and protein and DNA synthesis, expression of genes for collagen alpha1(1), and collagen synthesis were measured. Insulin (0, 16, and 160 nM) and IGF-1 (0, 1, 31, and 13.1 nM) increased number of cells by 50% and 40%, in a dose-dependent manner. Protein and DNA synthesis were also increased by insulin (3.8 and 3.0 times) and by IGF-1 (3.9 and 1.8 time). Collaged protein synthesis was increased 2.3-fold by IGF-1 at 13.1 nM, and insulin (16,000 nM) caused a 26.5-fold increase. Levels of collagen alpha1(1) mRNA were also increased by both insulin and IGF-1. These results suggest that insulin and IGF-1 can cause vascular hyperplasia associated with increased collagen synthesis, which indicates that insulin, IGF-1, or both may have an important role in vascular growth. PMID:9388374

  17. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Eun Jig

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  18. Characterisation of K+ channels in human fetoplacental vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Melissa F; Wareing, Mark; Jones, Rebecca L; Greenwood, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Adequate blood flow through placental chorionic plate resistance arteries (CPAs) is necessary for oxygen and nutrient transfer to the fetus and a successful pregnancy. In non-placental vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), K(+) channels regulate contraction, vascular tone and blood flow. Previous studies showed that K(+) channel modulators alter CPA tone, but did not distinguish between effects on K(+) channels in endothelial cells and SMCs. In this study, we developed a preparation of freshly isolated CPASMCs of normal pregnancy and investigated K(+) channel expression and function. CPASMCs were isolated from normal human term placentas using enzymatic digestion. Purity and phenotype was confirmed with immunocytochemistry. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to assess K(+) channel currents, and mRNA and protein expression was determined in intact CPAs and isolated SMCs with RT-PCR and immunostaining. Isolated SMCs expressed α-actin but not CD31, a marker of endothelial cells. CPASMCs and intact CPAs expressed h-caldesmon and non-muscle myosin heavy chain-2; phenotypic markers of contractile and synthetic SMCs respectively. Whole-cell currents were inhibited by 4-AP, TEA, charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin implicating functional K(v) and BK(Ca) channels. 1-EBIO enhanced whole cell currents which were abolished by TRAM-34 and reduced by apamin indicating activation of IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) respectively. BK(Ca), IK(Ca) and SK(Ca)3 mRNA and/or protein were expressed in CPASMCs and intact CPAs. This study provides the first direct evidence for functional K(v), BK(Ca,) IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels in CPASMCs. These cells display a mixed phenotype implicating a dual role for CPASMCs in controlling both fetoplacental vascular resistance and vasculogenesis. PMID:23437391

  19. UAP56 is a novel interacting partner of Bcr in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 is an important regulator of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 binds to Bcr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between Bcr and UAP56 is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis. -- Abstract: Bcr is a serine/threonine kinase that is a critical regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell inflammation and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that Bcr acts in part via phosphorylation and inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. We have identified the RNA helicase UAP56 as another substrate of Bcr. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 blocks Bcr induced DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We also found that over expression of Bcr increased the expression of cyclin E and decreased the expression of p27. Knockdown of UAP56 reversed the effect of Bcr on cyclin E and p27 expression. Furthermore, we found that Bcr binds to UAP56 and demonstrate that binding of UAP56 to Bcr is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis in VSMC. Our data identify UAP56 as an important binding partner of Bcr and a novel target for inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  20. Real-Time Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Intracellular cGMP in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kara F.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time and noninvasive imaging of intracellular second messengers in mammalian cells, while preserving their in vivo phenotype, requires biosensors of exquisite constitution. Here we provide the methodology for utilizing the single wavelength cGMP-biosensor δ-FlincG in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:23709030

  1. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Lv, Jiaju; Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  2. Effects of phenol on vascular smooth muscle in rabbit mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Akata, T; Kodama, K; Takahashi, S

    1996-03-01

    Although phenol has long been used clinically as a neurolytic agent or as a preservative for injections, little information is available regarding its direct vascular action. We therefore studied the effects of phenol (0.1 μM-2mM) on isolated rabbit small mesenteric arteries, using isometric tension recording methods. All experiments were performed on endothelium-denuded strips. Phenol (≥10 μM) generated transsient contractions in a concentration-dependent manner in both normal Krebs and Ca(2+)-free solutions with EC50 values (concentrations that produced 50% of the maximal response) of 39.8 μM and 99.7 μM, respectively. Depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by A23187 or ryanodine completely elimited the phenol-induced contractions. When caffeine (10 mM) and noradrenaline (NA, 10μM) were consecutively applied in Ca(2+)-free solution with an interval of 7 min (sufficient to prevent caffeine-induced inhibition of Ca(2+) sensitivity), caffeine eliminated the contractions induced by subsequent application of NA. In similar experiments where phenol (1 mM) and NA (10 μM) were consecutively applied in Ca(2+)-free solution, phenol significantly inhibited contractions induced by subsequent application of NA. Phenol (0.1 mM, ∼EC65), applied in the presence of either 128 mM K(+) or NA (10 μM), produced transient vasoconstrictions superimposed on both high K(+)-and NA-induced contractions, but had a lesser effect on maintenance of these contractions. The vascular responses to high K(+), NA, and caffeine after washout of phenol were not significantly different from those before application of phenol (up to 2 mM). The results suggest that phenol stimulates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which are sensitive to both caffine and NA in this resistance artery. The effect does not appear to reflect a toxic effect on vascular smooth muscle. It seems unlikely that phenol causes adverse hemodynamic changes because of the observed direct vascular action

  3. Retinoids inhibit the actions of angiotensin II on vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Haxsen, V; Adam-Stitah, S; Ritz, E; Wagner, J

    2001-03-30

    Retinoids are derivatives of vitamin A and powerful inhibitors of cell proliferation and inflammation. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to vascular lesions by promoting cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we examined whether retinoids interfere with the proproliferative actions of Ang II in VSMCs via AT(1) receptor-dependent or activator protein-1 (AP-1)-dependent mechanisms. VSMCs express retinoid receptor proteins, ie, retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and retinoid X receptor (RXR) alpha. Long-term exposure to 1 micromol/L all-trans retinoic acid (RA) dose-dependently inhibited Ang II-induced cell proliferation (P<0.005) as well as DNA and protein synthesis (P<0.001). All-trans RA blocked Ang II stimulation of transforming growth factor-beta(1) mRNA (P<0.005). All-trans RA inhibition of vascular VSMC growth was mediated both via RAR- and RXR-dependent pathways, as shown by receptor-specific synthetic retinoids. Transfection experiments revealed that inhibition of AP-1-dependent gene transcription is one mechanism by which all-trans RA inhibits Ang II action. RARalpha cotransfection enhanced the anti-AP-1 effects of all-trans RA dose-dependently. AP-1 activity was similarly inhibited by cotransfection with either RARalpha or RXRalpha. Ang II-induced gene expression of c-fos was abrogated by all-trans RA treatment (P<0.005). In VSMCs, all-trans RA downregulated AT(1) receptor mRNA (P<0.01) and reduced B(max) (P<0.001). All-trans RA repressed Ang II-stimulated AT(1) receptor promoter activity. The all-trans RA inhibitory effect was abolished when the AP-1 consensus site on the AT(1) receptor promoter was deleted. Our findings demonstrate that retinoids are potent inhibitors of the actions of Ang II on VSMCs. The findings support the notion that retinoids may interfere with proliferative vascular disease.

  4. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  5. /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ transport in vascular smooth muscle of SHR, Wistar Kyoto, and Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, S.; Denny, T.N.; Aviv, A.

    1988-06-01

    To gain further insight into differences in cellular Na+ and K+ regulation between the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY), and American Wistar (W) rats, 22Na+ and 86Rb+ washouts were performed under steady-state conditions in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells from the three rat strains. SHR vascular smooth muscle cells showed significantly higher bumetanide sensitive 86Rb+ washout rate constant (x 10(-4)/min; mean +/- SEM) than WKY cells (-38.6 +/- 2.84 and -23.8 +/- 3.58, respectively; p less than 0.005). SHR vascular smooth muscle cells also exhibited significantly higher values than WKY cells in the total 22Na+ washout rate constant (x 10(-2)/min) (-61.0 +/- 1.57 vs. -53.8 +/- 1.24; p less than 0.005). The amiloride sensitive component of the 22Na+ washout rate constant accounted for these differences (-18.6 +/- 1.04 for SHR and -12.1 +/- 2.00 for WKY; p less than 0.05). There were no apparent differences in cellular Na+ concentrations between WKY and SHR cells. In general, the 86Rb+ and 22Na+ washout parameters of W rat cells were quite similar to those of cells from SHR. We conclude that the bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ washout (the Na+ K+-cotransport), the overall, and the amiloride-sensitive 22Na+ washout (the latter primarily represents the Na+/H+ antiport) are higher in SHR than WKY rat vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings indicate innate differences in cellular Na+ and K+ transport in vascular smooth muscle cells of the SHR and WKY rat. The mechanisms responsible for these differences are yet to be determined.

  6. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G.; Gahtan, Vivian

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  7. Verapamil stereoisomers induce antiproliferative effects in vascular smooth muscle cells via autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Balakumaran, Arun; Frey, Justin C.; Boor, Paul J.; Treinen-Moslen, Mary; Conklin, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are important in the management of hypertension and limit restenosis. Although CCB efficacy could derive from decreased blood pressure, other mechanisms independent of CCB activity also can contribute to antiproliferative action. To understand mechanisms of CCB-mediated antiproliferation, we studied two structurally dissimilar CCBs, diltiazem and verapamil, in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). To elucidate CCB-independent effects, pure stereoisomers of verapamil (R-verapamil, inactive VR; S-verapamil, active, VS) were used. The effects of CCB exposure on cell viability (MTT reduction), cell proliferation ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation), VSMC morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and autophagy (LC3I/II, ATG5) were measured. In general, verapamil, VR or VS treatment alone (80 μM) appreciably enhanced MTT absorbance although higher concentrations (VR or VS) slightly decreased MTT absorbance. Diltiazem (140 μM) markedly decreased MTT absorbance (40%) at 120 h. VR or VS treatment inhibited {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation (24 h) and induced cytological alterations (i.e., karyokinesis, enhanced perinuclear MTT deposition, accumulated perinuclear “vacuoles”). TEM revealed perinuclear “vacuoles” to be aggregates of highly laminated and electron-dense vesicles resembling autophagosomes and lysosomes, respectively. Increased autophagosome activity was confirmed by a concentration-dependent increase in LC3-II formation by Western blotting and by increased perinuclear LC3-GFP{sup +} puncta in verapamil-treated VSMC. Verapamil stereoisomers appeared to decrease perinuclear mitochondrial density. These observations indicate that antiproliferative effects of verapamil stereoisomers are produced by enhanced mitochondrial damage and upregulated autophagy in VSMC. These effects are independent of CCB activity indicating a distinct mechanism of action that could be targeted for more efficacious anti

  8. Sodium pump activity and calcium relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt rats

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, E.E.; Field, F.P.

    1986-11-01

    The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity was determined in femoral arterial smooth muscle from deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats using potassium relaxation and ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake as indices. The membrane-stabilizing effect of calcium and its relation to Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity also were examined. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats exhibited a greater relaxation in response to potassium addition after contraction with norepinephrine in a low potassium (0.6 mM) Krebs solution. The concentration of potassium required to produce a 50% relaxation was significantly less in DOCA-salt rats. Ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake was significantly greater at 3, 10, and 20 minutes of /sup 86/Rb incubation in femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the uptake of /sup 86/Rb and time of incubation in both control and DOCA-salt rats. A significant difference in the slopes of the regression lines showed that the rate of uptake was greater in DOCA-salt rats. No difference was observed in ouabain-insensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. A dose-dependent relaxation in response to increasing concentrations of calcium following contraction to norepinephrine was observed in femoral arteries from control and DOCA-salt rats. The relaxation was directly dependent on the level of extracellular potassium and was blocked by ouabain. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats relaxed to a significantly greater extent in response to calcium at each level of potassium when compared with controls. These results provide further evidence for an increase in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity in vascular smooth muscle from DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

  9. The non-excitable smooth muscle: Calcium signaling and phenotypic switching during vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    House, Suzanne J.; Potier, Marie; Bisaillon, Jonathan; Singer, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a highly versatile second messenger that controls vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction, proliferation, and migration. By means of Ca2+ permeable channels, Ca2+ pumps and channels conducting other ions such as potassium and chloride, VSMC keep intracellular Ca2+ levels under tight control. In healthy quiescent contractile VSMC, two important components of the Ca2+ signaling pathways that regulate VSMC contraction are the plasma membrane voltage-operated Ca2+ channel of the high voltage-activated type (L-type) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Injury to the vessel wall is accompanied by VSMC phenotype switch from a contractile quiescent to a proliferative motile phenotype (synthetic phenotype) and by alteration of many components of VSMC Ca2+ signaling pathways. Specifically, this switch that culminates in a VSMC phenotype reminiscent of a non-excitable cell is characterized by loss of L-type channels expression and increased expression of the low voltage-activated (T-type) Ca2+ channels and the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. The expression levels of intracellular Ca2+ release channels, pumps and Ca2+-activated proteins are also altered: the proliferative VSMC lose the RyR3 and the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase isoform 2a pump and reciprocally regulate isoforms of the ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. This review focuses on the changes in expression of Ca2+ signaling proteins associated with VSMC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological implications of the altered expression of these Ca2+ signaling molecules, their contribution to VSMC dysfunction during vascular disease and their potential as targets for drug therapy will be discussed. PMID:18365243

  10. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  11. Zoledronate upregulates MMP-9 and -13 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Mehmet Zuhuri; Reel, Buket; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Bond, Mark; Tsaousi, Aikaterini; Maskell, Perry; Newby, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates, including zoledronate, target osteoclasts and are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone resorption diseases, despite side effects that include damaging the stomach epithelium. Beneficial and adverse effects on other organ systems, including the cardiovascular system, have also been described and could impact on the use of bisphosphonates as therapeutic agents. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are major constituents of the normal vascular wall and have a key role in intimal thickening and atherosclerosis, in part by secreting MMPs that remodel the extracellular matrix and cleave cell surface proteins or secreted mediators. In this study, we investigated the effects of zoledronate on MMP expression. Methods Rat VSMCs were stimulated by PDGF (50 ng/mL) plus TNF-α (10 ng/mL) or left unstimulated for a further 24 hours in serum-free medium. In other series of experiments, cells were pre-treated either with SC-514 (50 μM) or with apocynin (20 nM) for 2 hours, then zoledronate (100 μM) was added into 2% fetal calf serum containing medium for 24 hours. Results and discussion Using isolated rat VSMCs in culture, zoledronate (100 μM) increased MMP-9 and -13 mRNA expressions but inhibited MMP-2 expression. MMP-9 and MMP-13 up-regulation was shown to depend on the NF-κB pathway; and this was activated by zoledronate. Furthermore, zoledronate elevated the levels of reactive oxygen species detected by either dichlorofluorescein in isolated VSMCs or lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence in rat aortic rings in vitro. Apocynin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, reversed NF-κB activation and MMP-9 and MMP-13 up-regulation by zoledronate. Conclusion We conclude that zoledronate increases MMP-9 and MMP-13 expressions in rat VSMCs dependent upon stimulation of the NF-κB pathway by reactive oxygen species. Effects on MMP expression may contribute to the pharmacologic profile of bisphosphonates. PMID:27143852

  12. Critical Parameters of the In Vitro Method of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hortells, Luis; Sosa, Cecilia; Millán, Ángel; Sorribas, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular calcification (VC) is primarily studied using cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the use of very different protocols and extreme conditions can provide findings unrelated to VC. In this work we aimed to determine the critical experimental parameters that affect calcification in vitro and to determine the relevance to calcification in vivo. Experimental Procedures and Results Rat VSMC calcification in vitro was studied using different concentrations of fetal calf serum, calcium, and phosphate, in different types of culture media, and using various volumes and rates of change. The bicarbonate content of the media critically affected pH and resulted in supersaturation, depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and Pi. Such supersaturation is a consequence of the high dependence of bicarbonate buffers on CO2 vapor pressure and bicarbonate concentration at pHs above 7.40. Such buffer systems cause considerable pH variations as a result of minor experimental changes. The variations are more critical for DMEM and are negligible when the bicarbonate concentration is reduced to ¼. Particle nucleation and growth were observed by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Using 2mM Pi, particles of ~200nm were observed at 24 hours in MEM and at 1 hour in DMEM. These nuclei grew over time, were deposited in the cells, and caused osteogene expression or cell death, depending on the precipitation rate. TEM observations showed that the initial precipitate was amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which converts into hydroxyapatite over time. In blood, the scenario is different, because supersaturation is avoided by a tightly controlled pH of 7.4, which prevents the formation of PO43--containing ACP. Conclusions The precipitation of ACP in vitro is unrelated to VC in vivo. The model needs to be refined through controlled pH and the use of additional procalcifying agents other than Pi in order to reproduce calcium phosphate deposition in vivo

  13. Chemerin promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle and increases mouse blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Hidemizu; Kazama, Kyosuke; Takai, Mizuho; Oda, Mayuko; Okada, Muneyoshi; Yamawaki, Hideyuki

    2015-09-01

    Blood chemerin concentration shows positive correlation not only with body mass index and serum triglyceride level but also with systolic blood pressure. While it seems likely that chemerin influences vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration, which are crucial to the development of hypertension, this remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated whether chemerin controls SMC proliferation and migration in vitro and also affects blood pressure in vivo. In vitro, chemerin significantly stimulated rat mesenteric arterial SMC proliferation and migration, as determined by a cell counting assay and Boyden chamber assay, respectively. The migratory effect of chemerin was confirmed in human aortic SMCs. Chemerin significantly increased ROS production in SMCs and phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)) and ERK, as measured by fluorescent staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Various inhibitors (ROS inhibitor: N-acetyl-l-cysteine, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor: LY-294002, MAPKK inhibitor: PD-98059, NADPH oxidase inhibitor: gp91 ds-tat, and xanthine oxidase inhibitor: allopurinol) as well as chemokine-like receptor 1 small interfering RNA significantly inhibited chemerin-induced SMC proliferation and migration. Furthermore, chemerin-neutralizing antibody prevented carotid neointimal hyperplasia in the mouse ligation model. In vivo, chronic chemerin treatment (6 μg/kg, 6 wk) increased systolic blood pressure as well as phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in the mouse isolated aorta. In summary, we, for the first time, demonstrate that chemerin/chemokine-like receptor 1 stimulates SMC proliferation and migration via ROS-dependent phosphorylation of Akt/ERK, which may lead to vascular structural remodeling and an increase in systolic blood pressure.

  14. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  15. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs.

  16. Hsc70 regulates cell surface ASIC2 expression and vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Samira C; McKey, Susan E; Drummond, Heather A

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies suggest members of the degenerin (DEG)/epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)/acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) protein family play an important role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration. In a previous investigation, we found suppression of a certain DEG/ENaC/ASIC member, ASIC2, increased VSMC chemotactic migration, raising the possibility that ASIC2 may play an inhibitory role. Because ASIC2 protein was retained in the cytoplasm, we reasoned increasing surface expression of ASIC2 might unmask the inhibitory role of ASIC2 in VSMC migration so we could test the hypothesis that ASIC2 inhibits VSMC migration. Therefore, we used the chemical chaperone glycerol to enhance ASIC2 expression. Glycerol 1) increased cytoplasm ASIC2 expression, 2) permitted detection of ASIC2 at the cell surface, and 3) inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-bb mediated VSMC migration. Furthermore, ASIC2 silencing completely abolished the inhibitory effect of glycerol on migration, suggesting upregulation of ASIC2 is responsible for glycerol-induced inhibition of VSMC migration. Because other investigators have shown that glycerol regulates ENaC/ASIC via interactions with a certain heat shock protein, heat shock protein 70 (Hsc70), we wanted to determine the importance of Hsc70 on ASIC2 expression in VSMCs. We found that Hsc70 silencing increases ASIC2 cell surface expression and inhibits VSMC migration, which is abolished by cosilencing ASIC2. These data demonstrate that Hsc70 inhibits ASIC2 expression, and, when the inhibitory effect of Hsc70 is removed, ASIC2 expression increases, resulting in reduced VSMC migration. Because VSMC migration contributes to vasculogenesis and remodeling following vascular injury, our findings raise the possibility that ASIC2-Hsc70 interactions may play a role in these processes. PMID:18310515

  17. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs. PMID:27114541

  18. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  19. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  20. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  1. The neuropeptide catestatin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Chunyan; Sun, Ningling

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Catestatin stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} Catestatin provokes sustained increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Catestatin produces increased activation of calcineurin and promotes NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus. -- Abstract: The Chromogranin A-derived neuropeptide catestatin is an endogenous nicotinic cholinergic antagonist that acts as a pleiotropic hormone. Since catestatin shares several functions with other members derived from the chromogranin/secretogranin protein family and other neuropeptides which exert proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we therefore hypothesized that catestatin would regulate VSMC proliferation. The present study demonstrates that catestatin caused a dose-dependent induction of proliferation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and furthermore evoked a sustained increase in intracellular calcium. This subsequently leaded to enhanced activation of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin and resulted in an activation of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), initiating transcription of proliferative genes. In addition, cyclosporin A (CsA), a potent inhibitor of calcineurin, abrogated catestatin-mediated effect on VSMCs, indicating that the calcineurin-NFAT signaling is strongly required for catestatin-induced growth of VSMCs. The present study establishes catestatin as a novel proliferative cytokine on vascular smooth muscle cells and this effect is mediated by the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway.

  2. Vascular smooth muscle cells from injured rat aortas display elevated matrix production associated with transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, L. M.; Wolf, Y. G.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1995-01-01

    The arterial response to injury is characterized by a short period of increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, followed by an extended period of extracellular matrix accumulation in the intima. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has been implicated as a causative factor in the formation of extracellular matrix in this process, which leads to progressive thickening of the intima, known as intimal hyperplasia. In vitro analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells harvested from normal rat aortas and from aortas injured 14 days earlier showed that both types of cells attached equally well to culture dishes but that the initial spreading of the cells was increased in cells derived from injured vessels. Cells from the injured arteries produced more fibronectin and proteoglycans into the culture medium than the cells from normal arteries and contained more TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 increased proteoglycan synthesis by normal smooth muscle cells, and the presence of a neutralizing anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody reduced proteoglycan synthesis by the cells from injured arteries in culture. Fibronectin synthesis was not altered by these treatments. These results indicate that the accumulation of extracellular matrix components in neointimal lesions is at least partially caused by autocrine TGF-beta activity in vascular smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7573349

  3. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  4. An ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas improves atherosclerosis by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Young; Kim, Jihyun; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Tae-Su; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Park, Sung Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas (EAG) on the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and high-cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (25 ng/mL) for the induction of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. EAG (1-10 µg/mL) significantly inhibited both the thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by feeding male New Zealand white rabbits with 0.5% cholesterol in diet for 10 weeks, during which EAG (1% in diet) was given for the final 8 weeks after 2-week induction of hypercholesterolemia. Hypercholesterolemic rabbits exhibited great increases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) levels, and finally severe atheromatous plaque formation covering 28.4% of the arterial walls. EAG significantly increased high-density lipoproteins (HDL), slightly decreased LDL, and potentially reduced the atheroma area to 16.6%. The results indicate that EAG attenuates atherosclerosis not only by inhibiting VASC proliferation, but also by increasing blood HDL levels. Therefore, it is suggested that EAG could be an alternative or an adjunct therapy for the improvement of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:24999363

  5. Impaired coronary microvascular dilation correlates with enhanced vascular smooth muscle MLC phosphorylation in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Richard T; Sodha, Neel R.; Feng, Jun; Boodhwani, Munir; Liu, Yuhong; Mieno, Shigetoshi; Khabbaz, Kamal; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Impaired endothelium-independent vasodilation is a known consequence of type-1 and 2 diabetes, and the mechanism of impaired vasodilation is not well understood. The following study investigated the effects of type-1 and 2 diabetes in endothelial-independent vasodilation associated with coronary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) relaxation and contractile signaling mechanisms. Methods Type-1 diabetes was induced in Yucatan mini-swine via alloxan injection and treated with or without insulin(DM and IDM). Non-diabetic swine served as controls(ND). Expression and/or phosphorylation of determinants of VSM relaxation and contraction signaling were examined in coronary arteries and microvessels. Coronary microvessel relaxation was assessed using sodium nitroprusside(SNP). In addition, SNP-induced vasodilation and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was determined in coronary microvessels isolated from ND and type-2 diabetic human atrial appendage. Results Diabetic impairment in SNP-induced relaxation was completely normalized by insulin. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) VSM expression decreased in both DM and IDM groups and did not correlate with vasorelaxation. Phosphorylation of MLC and myosin phosphatase increased in the DM group and MLC phosphorylation strongly correlated with impaired VSM relaxation(r=.670, p<0.01). Coronary microvessels from type-2 diabetic human patients exhibited similarly impaired vasodilation and enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation. Conclusions Impaired vasodilation in type-1 diabetes correlates with enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation. In addition, enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation is associated with impaired vasodilation in type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:19152178

  6. Inhibitory effects of bezoar bovis on intimal formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rat.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masaki; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Maruyama, Ikuro; Tani, Tadato

    2005-01-01

    Intimal formation of animal carotid arteries induced by balloon endothelial denudation has been considered to be an "accelerated atherosclerosis" model and used in primary screening methods to evaluate natural drugs and chemical candidates. The aim of the present study was to examine whether intimal formation is prevented by Bezoar Bovis (dried cattle gallbladder stones: Niuhuang in Chinese and Go-o in Japanese), which has been used to prevent heart palpitation in patients with hypertension. The intimal-to-medial area ratio in rat carotid arteries 7 days after balloon endothelial denudation was significantly reduced by oral administration of Bezoar Bovis. Bezoar Bovis also suppressed vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation, which is thought to play important roles in the intimal formation after endothelial damage and also atherosclerosis resulting from long-term inappropriate lifestyle. The present findings suggest that Bezoar Bovis may be useful for preventing atherosclerosis and for protection against restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention, for which effective reduction method is not currently available.

  7. Alpha adrenergic modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump of canine vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Navran, S.S.; Adair, S.E.; Allen, J.C.; Seidel, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Some vasoactive agents, eg. beta adrenergic agonists and forskolin, stimulate the Na/sup 7/ pump by a cAMP- dependent mechanism. The authors have now demonstrated that phenylephrine (PE) stimulates the Na/sup 7/ pump in intact blood vessels as quantitated by an increased ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. The stimulation is dose-dependent (ED/sub 50/, 3 x 10/sup -6/M) and blocked by phentolamine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -7/M), prazosin (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -8/M) yohimbine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -6/M) or elevated intracellular Na/sup +/. These data suggest that the Na/sup +/ pump stimulation is mediated through alpha/sub 1/ receptors which produce an influx of extracellular Na/sup +/. In vascular smooth muscle cell cultures PE stimulates the Na/sup +/ pump, but only when cells have been deprived of fetal calf serum (FCS). Since FCS is known to stimulate Na/sup +/influx, in the continuous presence of FCS, these cells may already be Na/sup +/-loaded and therefore refractory to further stimulation by alpha-adrenergic agents. Unlike those vasorelaxants whose mechanism involves stimulation of the Na/sup +/ pump, alpha adrenergic agents are vasoconstrictors and therefore the role of Na/sup +/ pump stimulation in this case may be as a mechanism of feedback inhibition of contractility.

  8. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Sara; Bielli, Alessandra; Mauriello, Alessandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs) activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR) are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R) activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies. PMID:26473856

  9. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  10. A model for the generation of localized transient [Na{sup +}] elevations in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Fameli, Nicola; Kuo, Kuo-Hsing; Breemen, Cornelis van

    2009-11-20

    We present a stochastic computational model to study the mechanism of signaling between a source and a target ionic transporter, both localized on the plasma membrane (PM). In general this requires a nanometer-scale cytoplasmic space, or nanodomain, between the PM and a peripheral organelle to reflect ions back towards the PM. Specifically we investigate the coupling between Na{sup +} entry via the transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX), a process which is essential for reloading the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}ATPase (SERCA) and maintaining Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in activated vascular smooth muscle. Having previously modeled the flow of Ca{sup 2+} between reverse NCX and SERCA during SR refilling, this quantitative approach now allows us to model the upstream linkage of Na{sup +} entry through TRPC6 to reversal of NCX. We have implemented a random walk (RW) Monte Carlo (MC) model with simulations mimicking a diffusion process originating at the TRPC6 within PM-SR junctions. The model calculates the average Na{sup +} in the nanospace and also produces profiles as a function of distance from the source. Our results highlight the necessity of a strategic juxtaposition of the relevant ion translocators as well as other physical structures within the nanospaces to permit adequate Na{sup +} build-up to initiate NCX reversal and Ca{sup 2+} influx to refill the SR.

  11. Increased proliferation of explanted vascular smooth muscle cells: a marker presaging atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Absher, P M; Schneider, D J; Baldor, L C; Russell, J C; Sobel, B E

    1997-06-01

    The JCR:LA-cp homozygous cp/cp corpulent rat is genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis evident after 9 and 18 months of age in males and females and to manifest metabolic derangements resembling those seen in type II diabetes in humans (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia). The present study was undertaken to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) explanted from vessels destined to become atherosclerotic later in life exhibit intrinsic properties ex vivo that presage atherogenesis to provide a means for evaluating promptly intervention designed to modify it. SMCs were cultured from aortic explants of JCR:LA-cp corpulent (cp/cp) and lean control (+/+) rats of 4, 5, 6, and 9 months of age. Compared with SMCs from controls, SMCs from cp/cp rats exhibited increased proliferation, higher saturation density, increased augmentation of proliferation in response to selected mitogens and greater adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. The increased proliferative activity ex vivo anteceded by several months the development of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Thus, it is a promising marker in assessments of the efficacy of interventions designed to retard or prevent atherosclerosis.

  12. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  13. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  14. Evodiamine Attenuates PDGF-BB-Induced Migration of Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells through Activating PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xie; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Tingming; Liu, Chang

    2015-11-26

    The uncontrolled migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is a critical process in the development of atherosclerosis. Evodiamine, an indole alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicine evodia, has been shown to inhibit tumor cell invasion and protect the cardiovascular system, but its effects on VSMCs remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of evodiamine on the platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced VSMC migration using wound healing and transwell assays, and assessed its role in decreasing the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases and cell adhesion molecules. More importantly, we found that evodiamine activated the expression and nuclear translocation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Inhibition of PPARγ activity by using its antagonist T0070907 and its specific siRNA oligonucleotides significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of evodiamine on VSMC migration. Taken together, our results indicate a promising anti-atherogenic effect of evodiamine through attenuation of VSMC migration by activating PPARγ.

  15. Intracellular Na+ regulation of Na+ pump sites in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.C.; Navran, S.S.; Seidel, C.L.; Dennison, D.K.; Amann, J.M.; Jemelka, S.K.

    1989-04-01

    Enzymatically dispersed cells from canine saphenous vein and femoral artery were grown in fetal calf serum and studied at day 0 (freshly dispersed) through confluence in primary culture. Intracellular Na levels (Nai), but not intracellular K (Ki), were increased after 24 h in culture and then decreased to a steady state by 4 days. Na+ pump site number (( /sup 3/H) ouabain binding) increased through day 3 and remained elevated. Nai was still elevated at 2 days when the Na+ pump site number began to increase. Total pump turnover (maximum ouabain-inhibited /sup 86/Rb uptake) reflected the increase in Na+ pump site number. These key events precede the observed increases in both protein production and cellular proliferation. If the same cells are maintained in defined medium, without fetal calf serum, Nai, Ki, and the number of (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding sites do not change with time. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the initial mitogenic response of vascular smooth muscle cells to fetal calf serum involves an increased Na+ influx, and a Nai accumulation, caused by low Na+ pump density. The synthesis of new pump sites effects a decrease in the accumulated Nai, which may be related to cell proliferation.

  16. TRAIL-expressing T cells induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kayoko; Niessner, Alexander; Kopecky, Stephen L.; Frye, Robert L.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2006-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are precipitated by a rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque, often at the site of T cell and macrophage infiltration. Here, we show that plaque-infiltrating CD4 T cells effectively kill vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). VSMCs sensitive to T cell–mediated killing express the death receptor DR5 (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand [TRAIL] receptor 2), and anti-TRAIL and anti-DR5 antibodies block T cell–mediated apoptosis. CD4 T cells that express TRAIL upon stimulation are expanded in patients with ACS and more effectively induce VSMC apoptosis. Adoptive transfer of plaque-derived CD4 T cells into immunodeficient mice that are engrafted with human atherosclerotic plaque results in apoptosis of VSMCs, which was prevented by coadministration of anti-TRAIL antibody. These data identify that the death pathway is triggered by TRAIL-producing CD4 T cells as a direct mechanism of VSMC apoptosis, a process which may lead to plaque destabilization. PMID:16418392

  17. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment

    PubMed Central

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146−/Low and CD146High cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146−/Low and CD146High bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146−/Low clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146High clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage. PMID:24188055

  18. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment.

    PubMed

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146(-/Low) clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146(High) clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage.

  19. Regulation of ERK5 by insulin and angiotensin-II in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Girish; Goalstone, Marc Lee; E-mail: Marc.Goalstone@uchsc.edu

    2007-03-23

    ERK5 is involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The proliferative actions of insulin and angiotensin-II (A-II) in VSMC are mediated in part by ERK1/2. We hypothesized that insulin and A-II also regulate ERK5 activity in VSMC. Acute treatment (<60 min) with insulin or A-II increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and ERK5 at 5 min. Chronic treatment ({<=}8 h) with insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 4 h and ERK5 by 8 h. A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 8 h and ERK5 by 4 h. The EC{sub 50} for insulin treatment effecting ERK1/2 and ERK5 phosphorylation was 1.5 and 0.1 nM, whereas the EC{sub 50} for A-II was 2 nM, each. Insulin plus A-II induced an additive effect only on ERK5 phosphorylation. Inhibition of insulin- and A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK5 and ERK1/2 by PD98059 and Wortmannin exhibited differential and time-dependent effects. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin and A-II regulate the activity of ERK5, but different from that seen for ERK1/2.

  20. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease. PMID:20809708

  1. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-κB—a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo. PMID:22995306

  2. Statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Hiromichi Abe, Mitsuru; Ono, Koh; Morimoto, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Takaya, Tomohide; Satoh, Noriko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kita, Toru; Shimatsu, Akira; Hasegawa, Koji

    2008-10-03

    The beneficial effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) beyond cholesterol lowering involve their direct actions on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the effects of statins on phenotypic modulation of VSMCs are unknown. We herein show that simvastatin (Sm) and atorvastatin (At) inhibited DNA synthesis in human aortic VSMCs dose-dependently, while cell toxicity was not observed below the concentration of 1 {mu}M of Sm or 100 nM of At. Stimulating proliferative VSMCs with Sm or At induced the expression of SM-{alpha}-actin and SM-MHC, highly specific markers of differentiated phenotype. Sm up-regulated the binding activity of GATA-6 to SM-MHC GATA site and activated the transfected SM-MHC promoter in proliferative VSMCs, while mutating the GATA-6 binding site abolished this activation. Geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (10 {mu}M), an inhibitor of Rho family proteins, abolished the statin-mediated induction of the differentiated phenotype in VSMCs. These findings suggest that statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated VSMCs.

  3. Down-regulation of endothelin binding sites in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roubert, P.; Gillard, V.; Plas, P.; Chabrier, P.E.; Braquet, P. )

    1990-04-01

    In cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells, ({sup 125}I)endothelin (ET-1) bound to an apparent single class of high affinity recognition sites with a dissociation constant of 1.84 +/- 0.29 nmol/L and a maximum binding of 62 +/- 10.5 fmol/10(6) cells. The binding was not affected by calcium antagonists or vasoactive substances, including angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic factor and bradykinin. Exposure of the cells to ET-1 (0.01 nmol/L to 10 nmol/L) resulted in an apparent dose-dependent reduction of the number of endothelin binding sites with no significant modification of its binding affinity. The time course of the down-regulation of ET-1 binding sites showed that this effect was present after 30 min incubation and persisted after 18 h. This indicates that down-regulation of ET-1 binding sites can modulate the activity of ET-1 and suggests a rapid internalization of ET-1 in vascular cells.

  4. miR-599 Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation and Migration by Targeting TGFB2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Baodong; Zhang, Chunfeng; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease, restenosis and atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding and endogenous RNAs that play critical roles in VSMCs function. In this study, we showed that PDGF-bb, as a stimulant, promoted VSMCs proliferation and suppressed the expression of miR-599. Moreover, overexpression of miR-599 inhibited VSMCs proliferation and also suppressed the PCNA and ki-67 expression. In addition, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-599 repressed the VSMCs migration. We also showed that miR-599 inhibited type I collagen, type V collagen and proteoglycan expression. Furthermore, we identified TGFb2 as a direct target gene of miR-599 in VSMCs. Overexpression of TGFb2 reversed miR-599-induced inhibition of VSMCs proliferation and type I collagen, type V collagen and proteoglycan expression. In conclusion, our findings suggest miR-599 plays a crucial role in controlling VSMCs proliferation and matrix gene expression by regulating TGFb2 expression.

  5. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  6. Morelloflavone blocks injury-induced neointimal formation by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Pinkaew, Decha; Cho, Sung Gook; Hui, David Y.; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Hutadilok-Towatana, Nongporn; Mahabusarakam, Wilawan; Tonganunt, Moltira; Stafford, Lewis J.; Phongdara, Amornrat; Liu, Mingyao; Fujise, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Background In-stent restenosis, or renarrowing within a coronary stent, is the most ominous complication of percutaneous coronary intervention, caused by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration into and proliferation in the intima. Although drug-eluting stents reduce restenosis, they delay the tissue healing of the injured arteries. No promising alternative anti-restenosis treatments are currently on the horizon. Methods & Results In endothelium-denudated mouse carotid arteries, oral morelloflavone—an active ingredient of the Thai medicinal plant Garcinia dulcis—significantly decreased the degree of neointimal hyperplasia, without affecting neointimal cell cycle progression or apoptosis as evaluated by Ki-67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. At the cellular level, morelloflavone robustly inhibited VSMC migration as shown by both scratch wound and invasion assays. In addition, morelloflavone prevented VSMCs from forming lamellipodia, a VSMC migration apparatus. Mechanistically, the inhibition by morelloflavone of VSMC migration was through its negative regulatory effects on several migration-related kinases, including FAK, Src, ERK, and RhoA. Consistently with the animal data, morelloflavone did not affect VSMC cell cycle progression or induce apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that morelloflavone blocks injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia via the inhibition of VSMC migration, without inducing apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. General Significance We propose morelloflavone to be a viable oral agent for the prevention of restenosis, without compromising effects on the integrity and healing of the injured arteries. PMID:18930785

  7. Cation-induced aggregation of membrane vesicles isolated from vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, C.Y.

    1986-12-01

    Cations stimulated aortic muscle membrane aggregation with increasing potency according to their effective charge, e.g., K+ less than Mg2+ less than La3+, and the stimulation is reciprocally related to the apparent affinity for these cations. Divalent metal ion-induced membrane aggregation showed a dependence on the ionic radius, being optimal for Cd2+. Polyvalent cation-induced membrane aggregation was reversibly suppressed by high ionic strength as well as by metal ion chelators, irreversibly inhibited by the cross-linking agent glutaraldehyde, and enhanced by increasing concentrations of ethanol and increased temperature of the medium. When the pH is lowered below 6.0, membrane aggregation progressively increased with a concomitant decrease in cation-induced aggregation. The patterns of aggregation of microsomal membranes and further purified plasma membranes were almost identical whereas the aggregation of the heterogeneous mitochondrial membrane-enriched fraction was distinctly different in the initial rate of aggregation, its pH dependence, and metal ion concentration dependence. Our results indicate that cation-induced membrane aggregation can also be used to isolate a plasma membrane-enriched fraction from vascular smooth muscle.

  8. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington’s epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington’s theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  9. Vascular smooth muscle, endothelial regulation and effects of aspirin in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M A

    1998-04-27

    Dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is at the center of occlusive disorders of the cardiovascular system such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and hypoxia. In addition to circulating biogenic amines and various neurotransmitters originating from the central nervous system and endocrine system, various autocoids of arachidonic acid metabolism in the blood as well as in the endothelium play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the tone and the contractile function of VSM. A monolayer of endothelial cells lining the heart and large blood vessels is responsible for producing and releasing both endocrine and paracrine substances such as endothelins, nitric oxide, prostaglandins and prostacyclins. Aspirin, (acetylsalicylic acid/ASA) an ancient remedy against fever and pain, is emerging as an effective drug not only against occlusive disorders but also against various cancers and the AIDs virus. During pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and in occlusive disorders, aspirin provides relief through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme required for the metabolism of arachidonic acid to produce prostaglandins and prostacyclins in platelets and in endothelial cells. Because of its unique molecular constitution, synergistic ability and solubility in the lipidic environment, various mechanisms of aspirin's actions are being currently investigated. In this review, the effect of aspirin on the regulation of VSM in the presence and absence of endothelium are discussed.

  10. MicroRNAs 29b, 133b, and 211 Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Calcification Mediated by High Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Panizo, Sara; Naves-Díaz, Manuel; Carrillo-López, Natalia; Martínez-Arias, Laura; Fernández-Martín, José Luis; Ruiz-Torres, María Piedad; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodríguez, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD and the general population. The common association between vascular calcification and osteoporosis suggests a link between bone and vascular disorders. Because microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteoblast-like cells, we investigated whether miRs implicated in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation are involved in vascular calcification. Different levels of uremia, hyperphosphatemia, and aortic calcification were induced by feeding nephrectomized rats a normal or high-phosphorus diet for 12 or 20 weeks, at which times the levels of eight miRs (miR-29b, miR-125, miR-133b, miR-135, miR-141, miR-200a, miR-204, and miR-211) in the aorta were analyzed. Compared with controls and uremic rats fed a normal diet, uremic rats fed a high-phosphorous diet had lower levels of miR-133b and miR-211 and higher levels of miR-29b that correlated respectively with greater expression of osteogenic RUNX2 and with lower expression of several inhibitors of osteoblastic differentiation. Uremia per se mildly reduced miR-133b levels only. Similar results were obtained in two in vitro models of vascular calcification (uremic serum and high-calcium and -phosphorus medium), and experiments using antagomirs and mimics to modify miR-29b, miR-133b, and miR-211 expression levels in these models confirmed that these miRs regulate the calcification process. We conclude that miR-29b, miR-133b, and miR-211 have direct roles in the vascular smooth muscle calcification induced by high phosphorus and may be new therapeutic targets in the management of vascular calcification.

  11. Response Gene to Complement 32 Promotes Vascular Lesion Formation through Stimulation of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Ning; Shi, Ning; Xie, Wei-bing; Guo, Xia; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) in vascular lesion formation after experimental angioplasty and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model, we documented for the first time that neointima formation was closely associated with a significantly increased expression of RGC-32 protein. shRNA Knockdown of RGC-32 via adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery dramatically inhibited the lesion formation by 62% as compared to control groups 14 days after injury. Conversely, RGC-32 overexpression significantly promoted the neointima formation by 33%. Gain and loss of function studies in primary culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) indicated that RGC-32 is essential for both the proliferation and migration of RASMCs. RGC-32 induced RASMC proliferation by enhancing p34CDC2 activity. RGC-32 stimulated the migration of RASMC via inducing focal adhesion contact and stress fiber formation. These effects were caused by the enhanced ROKα activity due to RGC-32-induced downregulation of Rad GTPase. Conclusions RGC-32 plays an important role in vascular lesion formation following vascular injury. Increased RGC-32 expression in vascular injury appears to be a novel mechanism underlying the migration and proliferation of vascular SMCs. Therefore, targeting RGC-32 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular remodeling in proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:21636805

  12. P2 receptor expression profiles in human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingwei; Karlsson, Lena; Moses, Sara; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Andersson, Maria; Borna, Catharina; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Jern, Sverker; Erlinge, David

    2002-12-01

    P2 receptors mediate the actions of the extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, UTP, and UDP, regulating several physiologic responses including cardiac function, vascular tone, smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, platelet aggregation, and the release of endothelial factors. P2 receptor characterization has been hampered by the lack of selective antagonists. The aim of the current study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of P2X and P2Y receptors in human SMC and in endothelial cells (EC). Smooth muscle cells were obtained from human mammary artery and EC from human umbilical vein. Using real-time PCR, the authors established quantitative mRNA assays. Protein expression was studied using Western blotting with recently developed antibodies. The P2X1 receptor was highly specific for human SMC, while the P2X4 was the highest expressed receptor in EC. The P2Y2 receptor was present in both SMC and EC. UTP-mediated effects in these cells are likely to be mediated by P2Y2 and not P2Y4 receptors since the latter had considerably lower expression. The P2Y6 receptor was expressed in both SMC and EC. The P2Y1 and surprisingly the P2Y11 receptors were the most abundantly expressed P2Y receptors in the endothelium. Overall, Western blotting confirmed the mRNA findings in most aspects, and most interestingly, indicated oligomerization of the P2Y1 receptor that may be important for its function. In conclusion, P2X1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 are the most expressed P2 receptors in SMC and are thus probably mediating the contractile and mitogenic actions of extracellular nucleotides. The P2X4, P2Y11, P2Y1, and P2Y2 are the most expressed P2 receptors in EC, and are most likely mediating release of nitric oxide, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), and t-PA induced by extracellular nucleotides. These findings will help to direct future cardiovascular drug development against the large P2 receptor family.

  13. Conditional deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells leads to the developmental delay and embryonic mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yaoqian; Balazs, Louisa; Tigyi, Gabor; Yue, Junming

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs) leads to embryonic mortality. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to developmental delay. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to hemorrhage in various organs including brain, skin and liver. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to vascular wall remodeling. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs dysregulates the expression of miRNA and VSMC marker genes. -- Abstract: Dicer is a RNAase III enzyme that cleaves double stranded RNA and generates small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). The goal of this study is to examine the role of Dicer and miRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We deleted Dicer in VSMCs of mice, which caused a developmental delay that manifested as early as embryonic day E12.5, leading to embryonic death between E14.5 and E15.5 due to extensive hemorrhage in the liver, brain, and skin. Dicer KO embryos showed dilated blood vessels and a disarray of vascular architecture between E14.5 and E15.5. VSMC proliferation was significantly inhibited in Dicer KOs. The expression of VSMC marker genes were significantly downregulated in Dicer cKO embryos. The vascular structure of the yolk sac and embryo in Dicer KOs was lost to an extent that no blood vessels could be identified after E15.5. Expression of most miRNAs examined was compromised in VSMCs of Dicer KO. Our results indicate that Dicer is required for vascular development and regulates vascular remodeling by modulating VSMC proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Synergistic Effects of Matrix Nanotopography and Stiffness on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H.; Tsui, Jonathan H.; Lam, Christoffer H.; Ho, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  15. Synergistic effects of matrix nanotopography and stiffness on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

    PubMed

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H; Tsui, Jonathan H; Lam, Christoffer H; Ho, Derek S; Baker, Aaron B; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  16. /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport in saponin skinned vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Diecke, F.P.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport were studied in chemically skinned strips of caudal artery from Kyoto Wistar rats. Sarcolemmal membranes were made hyperpermeable by exposure for 60 min to solutions containing 0.1 mg/ml of saponin. Skinned helical strips responded with graded contractions to changes in ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid buffered free Ca solutions (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and were sensitive to the Mg-ATP concentration. Tissues loaded in the presence of 10(-7) M Ca contracted in response to 10 mM caffeine. These experiments indicate the strips are skinned and possess a functional regulatory and contractile system and an intact Ca sequestering system. /sup 45/Ca distributes in three compartments in skinned caudal artery strips. The Ca contents of two components are linear functions of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration and desaturate at rapid rates. They correspond to the extracellular and cytoplasmic spaces. A significantly smaller component releases Ca at comparatively slower rates. /sup 45/Ca uptake by the slow component consists of an ATP-dependent and an ATP-independent fraction. The /sup 45/Ca content of the ATP-dependent fraction is a function of the free Ca concentration and is independent of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration. Its content was enhanced by oxalate and was abolished by Triton X-100 skinning solutions. The ATP-independent component was not affected by Triton X-100 skinning and may represent Ca binding to cytoplasmic molecules and structures. The sequestered Ca was released with caffeine or Ca but not by epinephrine. The observations indicate that the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of vascular smooth muscle strips skinned with saponin retain their functional integrity after saponin skinning.

  17. Suppression of EC-SOD by oxLDL During Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Makino, Junya; Asai, Rei; Hashimoto, Mao; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Koketsu, Mamoru; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by endothelial cells and macrophages play important roles in atherogenesis because they promote the formation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Extracellular-superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is mainly produced by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is secreted into the extracellular space, and protects cells from the damaging effects of the superoxide anion. Thus, the expression of EC-SOD in VSMCs is crucial for protecting cells against atherogenesis; however, oxLDL-induced changes in the expression of EC-SOD in VSMCs have not yet been examined. We herein showed that oxLDL decreased EC-SOD mRNA and protein levels by binding to lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). Moreover, we demonstrated the significant role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling in oxLDL-elicited reductions in the expression of EC-SOD and proliferation of VSMCs. The results obtained with the FCS treatment indicate that oxLDL-elicited reductions in the expression of EC-SOD are related to the proliferation of VSMCs. We herein showed for the first time that luteolin, a natural product, restored oxLDL-induced decreases in the expression of EC-SOD and proliferation of VSMCs. Collectively, the results of the present study suggest that oxLDL accelerates the development of atherosclerosis by suppressing the expression of EC-SOD and also that luteolin has potential as a treatment for atherosclerosis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2496-2505, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990420

  18. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  19. Inhibitory effects of lithospermic acid on proliferation and migration of rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Wen-yi; Wang, Yi-ping

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To understand the effects of lithospermic acid (LA), a potent antioxidant from the water-soluble extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza, on the migration and proliferation of rat thoracic aorta vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: VSMC migration, proliferation, DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression were investigated by transwell migration analysis, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay, and flow cytometric detection, respectively. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was detected using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA). The expression of cyclin D1 protein and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein, as well as the phosphorylation state of ERK1/2, were determined using Western blots. The activity of MMP-9 and the expression of MMP-9 mRNA were assessed by gelatin zymography analysis and RT-PCR, respectively. Results: LA (25−100 μmol/L) inhibited both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and fetal bovine serum (FBS)-induced ROS generation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. By down-regulating the expression of cyclin D1 and arresting cell cycle progression at the G1 phase, LA inhibited both VSMC proliferation and DNA synthesis as induced by 5% FBS. Furthermore, LA attenuated LPS-induced VSMC migration by inhibiting MMP-9 expression and its enzymatic activity. Conclusion: LA is able to inhibit FBS-induced VSMC proliferation and LPS-induced VSMC migration, which suggests that LA may have therapeutic effects in the prevention of atherosclerosis, restenosis and neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:19701233

  20. Mechanism of enhanced vasoconstrictor hormone action in vascular smooth muscle cells by cyclosporin A

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, Alexandre; Passaquin, Anne-Catherine; Rüegg, Urs T

    1997-01-01

    The use of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) is limited by two major side effects, nephrotoxicity and hypertension, which are caused by drug-induced local vasoconstriction. We have recently shown that CsA potentiates the contraction of isolated resistance arteries to vasoconstrictor hormones and increases the calcium response to these agents in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The goal of the present study was to investigate further the molecular mechanism(s) involved in these effects. Stimulation of VSMC with [Arg]8vasopressin (AVP) induced a concentration-dependent increase in total inositol phosphates (InsP) and cellular calcium response (as measured by 45Ca2+ efflux). Preincubation of VSMC with CsA increased both InsP formation and 45Ca2+ efflux. The potentiating effect of CsA on AVP-elicited InsP formation and 45Ca2+ efflux was inhibited by co-incubation with the protein synthesis inhibitors actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that CsA acted on gene expression. Binding experiments with [3H]-AVP on VSMC showed that CsA increased the number of AVP receptors by about two fold without affecting receptor affinity. Actinomycin D completely blocked this increase. These results demonstrate for the first time that incubation of VSMC with CsA increases the expression of AVP receptors, resulting in a potentiation of InsP formation and calcium response upon stimulation with AVP. This effect of CsA is likely to occur with other vasoconstrictor hormone receptors as well and could be a key mechanism in the induction of vasoconstriction, and subsequent drug-induced nephrotoxicity and hypertension. PMID:9154334

  1. Effects of total flavones from Dendranthema morifolium on vasocontraction and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Tang, Yi-Ming; Tang, Li-Jiang; Wang, Ya-Li; Du, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological studies have shown that the active components in Dendranthema morifolium exhibit protective effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury; however, its pharmacological action on blood vessels has not yet been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the total flavones extracted from D. morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. cv. Hangju (FDM) on the vasocontraction and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The tension of rat thoracic aortic rings was measured using a mechanical force transducer attached to a recording system. FDM induced a dose‑dependent relaxation of rings with endothelium pre‑contracted by either phenylephrine (PE; 10(‑6) mol/l) or a high concentration of potassium chloride (KCl; 60 mmol/l). FDM did not significantly affect the vasorelaxant effects on mechanically removed endothelium. In endothelium‑denuded aortic rings depolarized by 60 mmol/l KCl, FDM inhibited the contraction induced by Ca2+. FDM reduced the transient contraction caused by PE in a Ca2+‑free solution, but did not affect the contraction induced by phorbol ester. Furthermore, FDM inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs with or without growth stimulation by insulin. In conclusion, that the vasorelaxation induced by FDM in rat aortic rings is not dependent on the endothelium but is mediated via a reduction of the influx of extracellular Ca2+ through the voltage‑dependent and receptor‑operated channels and via the inhibition of the release of intracellular Ca2+ in VSMCs. The anti‑proliferative activity of FDM suggests that it may be beneficial in inhibiting atherosclerosis.

  2. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  3. Dependence of stress on cross-bridge phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, P H; Hai, C M; Murphy, R A

    1989-01-01

    Cross-bridge phosphorylation associated with agonist-stimulated contraction of vascular smooth muscle is often transiently elevated. Such observations led to the concept that phosphorylation of the 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain (Mp) was required for initial activation and cross-bridge cycling but might not be necessary for steady-state maintenance of stress in the latch state. The possibility that stress maintenance is not regulated by phosphorylation has received some experimental support in contractions induced by phorbol esters and the calcium channel activator BAY K 8644 in which significant increases in Mp were not detected. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that phosphorylation is both necessary and sufficient for activation and for maintenance of steady-state stress. Activation of swine carotid media using agents that bypass receptor activation and elevate Ca2+ influx without mobilizing intracellular Ca2+ stores (BAY K 8644 and ionomycin) produced monotonic increases in both stress and Mp. Transient initial peaks in Mp were absent. Steady-state stress induced by both receptor- and nonreceptor-mediated activation was dependent on small increases in Mp. Increases in Mp greater than 0.3 mol Pi/mol myosin light chain had small effects on stress but produced large increases in the maximum rate of cross-bridge cycling at zero load (Vo). The experimentally determined dependence of stress on Mp was quantitatively predicted by our working hypothesis. This model proposes that Ca2+-stimulated cross-bridge phosphorylation is obligatory for cross-bridge attachment. However, dephosphorylation of attached cross bridges to form noncycling "latch bridges" allows stress maintenance with reduced Mp and cycling.

  4. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  5. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  6. ECM-mimetic heparin glycosamioglycan-functionalized surface favors constructing functional vascular smooth muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Wang, Jianing; Wei, Yongzhen; Gao, Cheng; Chen, Xuejiao; Kong, Wei; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Contractile vascular smooth muscle accounts for the normal physiological function of artery. Heparin, as a native glycosaminoglycan, has been well known for its important function in promoting or maintaining the contractile phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, heparin-functionalized non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) mat was fabricated by a facile and efficient surface modification protocol, which enables the control of surface heparin density within a broad range. Surface heparization remarkably increased the hydrophilicity of PCL, and reduced platelet adhesion. MTT assay showed that VSMC proliferation was evidently inhibited on the heparin-functionalized PCL surface in a dose-dependent manner. Gene analysis confirmed that surface heparization also promoted the transition of VSMCs from synthetic phenotype to contractile one. Furthermore, with a proper surface density of heparin, it allowed VSMCs to grow in a certain rate, while exhibiting contractile phenotype. Culture of VSMCs on a modified PCL mat with moderate heparin density (PCL-Hep-20) for 2 days resulted in a confluent layer of contractile smooth muscle cells. These data suggest that the heparin-modified PCL scaffolds may be a promising candidate to generate functional vascular tissues in vitro. PMID:27351139

  7. HEPARIN TREATMENT OF VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS RESULTS IN THE SYNTHESIS OF THE DUAL-SPECIFICITY PHOSPHATASE MKP-1*

    PubMed Central

    Blaukovitch, Cheryl Isleib; Pugh, Raymond; Gilotti, Albert C.; Kanyi, Daniela; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of heparin to block proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells has been well documented. It is clear that heparin treatment can decrease the level of ERK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells that are sensitive to heparin. In this study, the mechanism by which heparin induces decreases in ERK activity was investigated by evaluating the dual specificity phosphatase, MKP-1, in heparin treated cells. Heparin induced MKP-1 synthesis in a time and concentration dependent manner. The time-course of MKP-1 expression correlated with the decrease in ERK activity. Over the same time frame, heparin treatment did not result in decreases in MEK-1 activity which could have, along with constitutive phosphatase activity, accounted for the decrease in ERK activity. Antibodies against a heparin receptor also induced the synthesis of MKP-1 along with decreasing ERK activity. Blocking either phosphatase activity or synthesis also blocked heparin-induced decreases in ERK activity. Consistent with a role for MKP-1, a nuclear phosphatase, heparin treated cells exhibited decreases in nuclear ERK activity more rapidly than cells not treated with heparin. The data support MKP-1 as a heparin-induced phosphatase that dephosphorylates ERK, decreasing ERK activity, in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:20235148

  8. Plumericin inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by blocking STAT3 signaling via S-glutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Elke H; Liu, Rongxia; Waltenberger, Birgit; Khan, Shafaat; Schachner, Daniel; Kollmann, Paul; Zimmermann, Kristin; Cabaravdic, Muris; Uhrin, Pavel; Stuppner, Hermann; Breuss, Johannes M; Atanasov, Atanas G; Dirsch, Verena M

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of atherosclerosis and restenosis involves aberrant inflammation and proliferation, rendering compounds with both anti-inflammatory and anti-mitogenic properties as promising candidates for combatting vascular diseases. A recent study identified the iridoid plumericin as a new scaffold inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway in endothelial cells. We here examined the impact of plumericin on the proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Plumericin inhibited serum-stimulated proliferation of rat VSMC. It arrested VSMC in the G1/G0-phase of the cell cycle accompanied by abrogated cyclin D1 expression and hindered Ser 807/811-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Transient depletion of glutathione by the electrophilic plumericin led to S-glutathionylation as well as hampered Tyr705-phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). Exogenous addition of glutathione markedly prevented this inhibitory effect of plumericin on Stat3. It also overcame downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and the reduction of biomass increase upon serum exposure. This study revealed an anti-proliferative property of plumericin towards VSMC which depends on plumericin’s thiol reactivity and S-glutathionylation of Stat3. Hence, plumericin, by targeting at least two culprits of vascular dysfunction –inflammation and smooth muscle cell proliferation -might become a promising electrophilic lead compound for vascular disease therapy. PMID:26858089

  9. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret; Kusch, Angelika; Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  10. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  11. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Carlos; Yee, Sarah; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Kobayashi, Miharu; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA) remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT) interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration. Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37°C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected, and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software). Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30%) invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 × 108 ± 2.5 × 108 particles/106 cells) compared to JEG-3 (2.86 × 108 ± 0.78 × 108 particles/106 cells). VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (−exosomes) (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, vs. control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p < 0.05). Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content, and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls. PMID:25157233

  12. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  13. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  14. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-01

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  15. Nitric oxide from vascular smooth muscle cells: regulation of platelet reactivity and smooth muscle cell guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Mollace, V.; Salvemini, D.; Anggard, E.; Vane, J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Incubation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) from bovine aorta for 3 min with human washed platelets treated with indomethacin (10 microM) promoted a cell number-related inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin (40 mu ml-1). This inhibition was not attributable to products of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway for the SMC were also treated with indomethacin (10 microM). 2. The inhibitory activity of the SMC on platelet aggregation was enhanced by incubating the SMC with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 micrograms ml-1) for a period of 9 to 24 h. This effect was attenuated when cycloheximide (10 micrograms ml-1) was incubated together with LPS. Cycloheximide did not prevent the inhibitory activity of the non-treated cells. 3. The inhibition of platelet aggregation obtained with non-treated or LPS-treated SMC was potentiated by superoxide dismutase (SOD, 60 u ml-1) and ablated by oxyhaemoglobin (OxyHb, 10 microM). Preincubation of the SMC with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 30-300 microM) for 60 min prevented their antiaggregatory activity. This effect was reversed by concurrent incubation with L-arginine (L-Arg, 100 microM) but not with D-arginine (D-Arg, 100 microM). 4. Exposure of the non-treated SMC (5 x 10(5) cells) to stirring (1000 r.p.m., 37 degrees C) for 10 min led to a significant increase in their levels of guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) but not adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). L-NMMA (300 microM) attenuated the increase in cyclic GMP induced by stirring but did not affect the basal levels of cyclic GMP in the cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1724627

  16. GPR30 decreases with vascular aging and promotes vascular smooth muscle cells maintaining differentiated phenotype and suppressing migration via activation of ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Yin, Jianguo; Li, Keyu; Li, Ying; Qi, Heng; Fang, Li; Yuan, Cong; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Min; Li, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, including classic nuclear receptors ERα, ERβ, and membrane receptor GPR30, are expressed in vascular tissues and exert protective actions in vascular diseases. But the expression pattern and functional roles of GPR30 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) remain unclear. In this study, we found that ERα, ERβ, and GPR30 were decreased with VSMCs passaging in vitro or growing in vivo and activation of GPR30 promoted ERα expression. Then, we validated that activation of GPR30 significantly decreased migratory capability of VSMCs and suppressed ERα, whereas PDGF-BB (20 ng/mL) treatment caused increase of migration. And activation of GPR30 led to reduction of osteopontin and cellular retinol binding protein 1, enhancement of calponin and 3F8, and upregulation of total and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression in VSMCs knocked down by GPR30, ERα, and ERβ or treated with PDGF-BB. These data suggest that GPR30 promotes VSMCs reducing migration and maintaining differentiated phenotype via activation of ERK1/2 pathway. Our findings provide novel mechanisms of GPR30 protection of VSMCs as well as a new target for prevention of vascular aging. PMID:27354813

  17. Differential miRNA Expression in Cells and Matrix Vesicles in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Rats with Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Praneet; Chen, Neal X.; O’Neill, Kalisha; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Moe, Sharon M.; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex process and has been associated with aging, diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although there have been several studies that examine the role of miRNAs (miRs) in bone osteogenesis, little is known about the role of miRs in vascular calcification and their role in the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities. Matrix vesicles (MV) are known to play in important role in initiating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. In the present study, we performed miRNA microarray analysis to identify the dysregulated miRs between MV and VSMC derived from CKD rats to understand the role of post-transcriptional regulatory networks governed by these miRNAs in vascular calcification and to uncover the differential miRNA content of MV. The percentage of miRNA to total RNA was increased in MV compared to VSMC. Comparison of expression profiles of miRNA by microarray demonstrated 33 miRs to be differentially expressed with the majority (~ 57%) of them down-regulated. Target genes controlled by differentially expressed miRNAs were identified utilizing two different complementary computational approaches Miranda and Targetscan to understand the functions and pathways that may be affected due to the production of MV from calcifying VSMC thereby contributing to the regulation of genes by miRs. We found several processes including vascular smooth muscle contraction, response to hypoxia and regulation of muscle cell differentiation to be enriched. Signaling pathways identified included MAP-kinase and wnt signaling that have previously been shown to be important in vascular calcification. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that miRs are concentrated in MV from calcifying VSMC, and that important functions and pathways are affected by the miRs dysregulation between calcifying VSMC and the MV they produce. This suggests that miRs may play a very important regulatory role in vascular calcification in CKD by controlling an extensive network

  18. Mechanical strain induces specific changes in the synthesis and organization of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, R T; Yamamoto, C; Feng, Y; Potter-Perigo, S; Briggs, W H; Landschulz, K T; Turi, T G; Thompson, J F; Libby, P; Wight, T N

    2001-04-27

    In the mechanically active environment of the artery, cells sense mechanical stimuli and regulate extracellular matrix structure. In this study, we explored the changes in synthesis of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells in response to precisely controlled mechanical strains. Strain increased mRNA for versican (3.2-fold), biglycan (2.0-fold), and perlecan (2.0-fold), whereas decorin mRNA levels decreased to a third of control levels. Strain also increased versican, biglycan, and perlecan core proteins, with a concomitant decrease in decorin core protein. Deformation did not alter the hydrodynamic size of proteoglycans as evidenced by molecular sieve chromatography but increased sulfate incorporation in both chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05 for both). Using DNA microarrays, we also identified the gene for the hyaluronan-linking protein TSG6 as mechanically induced in smooth muscle cells. Northern analysis confirmed a 4.0-fold increase in steady state mRNA for TSG6 following deformation. Size exclusion chromatography under associative conditions showed that versican-hyaluronan aggregation was enhanced following deformation. These data demonstrate that mechanical deformation increases specific vascular smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis and aggregation, indicating a highly coordinated extracellular matrix response to biomechanical stimulation. PMID:11278699

  19. Low levels of the reverse transactivator fail to induce target transgene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time.

  20. Drop in endo/sarcoplasmic calcium precedes the unfolded protein response in Brefeldin A-treated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, Gabriela; van Breemen, Cornelis; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2015-10-01

    The present study addresses the causal relationship between induction of endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress and dysregulation of calcium transport, while examining whether the most widely-used experimental endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum stressors can be considered appropriate for elucidating underlying cellular mechanisms involved during the progression of the unfolded protein response in vascular smooth muscle cells. Brefeldin A is most commonly cited as inducing the stress response through an accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen as a result of a blockage of protein transport from the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. We investigated the effects of Brefeldin A on cellular calcium regulation during the the unfolded protein response in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Acute exposure of cells to Brefeldin A caused a small transient increase in cytoplasmic calcium, which did not cause a significant decrease in endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content. However, over the time course of 0-12 h post-treatment with Brefeldin A, we observed that the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited an approximate fifty percent decrease in calcium concentration after the first hour of exposure, which is maintained over the next eleven hours, whereas concentrations of unfolded protein response markers only began to increase significantly around nine to twelve hours post-treatment. We have concluded that the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium drop, which up to now, has been considered as a characteristic of the late onset of cellular stress response, occurs prior to the initiation of the unfolded protein response, rather than as a result of its many corrective pathways.

  1. Tyrphostin inhibition of ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and fos-protein expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erlinge, D.; Heilig, M.; Edvinsson, L.

    1996-01-01

    1. We and others have shown that extracellular ATP (adenosine triphosphate), released from sympathetic nerves and platelets, stimulates growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). To study the importance of tyrosine kinases for ATP-mediated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells we used tyrphostins, a recently developed group of highly specific inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. 2. ATP induced a powerful concentration-dependent increase in DNA synthesis measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation in rat aorta SMC (RASMC) and an increase in total cell number after 72 h of incubation as measured by an enzymatic cell proliferation assay. Tyrphostin 25 (10(-5) M) had no effect per se on basal DNA synthesis but reduced ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis and increase in cell number in a dose-dependent manner. Higher concentrations of ATP could not reverse the inhibitory effect of tyrphostin 25. The potency of several (six) other tyrphostins was also examined and found to be slightly greater than tyrphostin 25 with equal efficacy. 3. When RASMC were incubated with 10(-5) M ATP for 2 h, nearly all of the cells (87 +/- 5%) were intensely stained with an antibody to the Fos protein while in the controls only 1 +/- 2% of the cells were weakly stained. Tyrphostin 25 greatly reduced the Fos-protein staining (14 +/- 2%). 4. ATP induced a concentration-dependent increase in 45Ca(2+)-influx and formation of inositol phosphates (IPtotal) in RASMC. These effects were not inhibited by tyrphostin 25. 5. Tyrphostin 25 did not alter ATP-induced contraction in ring segments of rat aorta. 6. In conclusion, tyrphostin 25 inhibited ATP-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and Fos-protein expression, but not ATP-induced 45Ca(2+)-influx, inositolphosphate-production or vasoconstriction. This indicates that the mitogenic effect of ATP on vascular smooth muscle cells is dependent on tyrosine kinases in contrast to the contractile effect of ATP in blood vessels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8799578

  2. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-02-12

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility.

  3. Antiproliferative effects of novel, nonanticoagulant heparin derivatives on vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pukac, L. A.; Hirsch, G. M.; Lormeau, J. C.; Petitou, M.; Choay, J.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is strongly inhibited by whole heparin both in vitro and in vivo. To identify and characterize antiproliferative, but nonanticoagulant heparin derivatives, heparin fragments made by periodate treatment were produced and acylated with 2-, 4-, or 6-carbon chain lengths. In culture, the 4- and 6-carbon acylated compounds were more effective than whole heparin in inhibiting serum stimulated VSMC growth at equal mass or approximately equal mean molar concentrations. Further testing was performed in the rat carotid balloon injury model. Myointimal VSMC proliferation produced by balloon catheterization of rat carotid arteries was inhibited by the 4-carbon acylated compound as effectively as heparin at the same mass dose. Importantly, unlike heparin, the 4-carbon acylated compound had no anticoagulant effect in vivo. These experiments suggest nonanticoagulant, acylated heparin derivatives may have a pharmacologic role in preventing myointimal proliferative lesions that are responsible for failures of vascular surgeries and angioplasties. Images Figure 3 PMID:1750515

  4. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  5. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  6. Tungstate-Targeting of BKαβ1 Channels Tunes ERK Phosphorylation and Cell Proliferation in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Cidad, Pilar; Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Köhler, Ralf; López-López, José R.; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Guinovart, Joan J.; Fernández-Fernández, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation and its relevance for VSMC proliferation. Western blot analysis in HEK cell lines showed that expression of vascular BKαβ1 channels potentiates the tungstate-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Gi/o protein-dependent manner. Tungstate activated BKαβ1 channels upstream of G proteins as channel activation was not altered by the inhibition of G proteins with GDPβS or pertussis toxin. Moreover, analysis of Gi/o protein activation measuring the FRET among heterologously expressed Gi protein subunits suggested that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes G protein activation. Single channel recordings on VSMCs from wild-type and β1-knockout mice indicated that the presence of the regulatory β1 subunit was essential for the tungstate-mediated activation of BK channels in VSMCs. Moreover, the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin lowered tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation by 55% and partially reverted (by 51%) the tungstate-produced reduction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation in human VSMCs. Our observations indicate that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes activation of PTX-sensitive Gi proteins to enhance the tungstate-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and inhibits PDGF-stimulated cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle. PMID:25659150

  7. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (<=15 s, <70°C) and low dilatation pressure (<0.4 MPa) without arterial injuries in our previous in vivo studies. Smooth muscle cells, which play most important role in chronic treatment effects, were heated during PTDBA and stretch-fixed after PTDBA. The dead cell rate by heating, estimated by Arrhenius equation with A=2.5x1016 s-1 and Ea=1.17×105 J mol-1, was 15.7+/-2.2% after PTDBA. The measured deformation rate of smooth muscle cells' nuclei was 1.6+/-0.1 after PTDBA in vivo. We found that the expression of smooth muscle cells' growth factor after PTDBA was inhibited 0.52 fold compared to that after the conventional balloon angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  8. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  9. Superoxide radicals stimulate IP sub 3 -induced Ca sup 2+ -release from vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, G.D.; Suzuki, Y. )

    1991-03-15

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in a variety of pathophysiological conditions and vascular smooth muscle can be a site of damage in such oxygen toxicity. Mechanisms of the effects of these radials on the vascular smooth muscle at the cellular level, however, have not been well studied. In the present study, the authors report that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3})-induced Ca{sup 2+}-release from bovine aortic SR was also affected by O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in the presence of catalase stimulated the IP{sub 3}-induced Ca{sup 2+}-release from SR monitored using arsenazo III. At 10 {mu}M IP{sub 3}, the release was doubled by O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} treatment. As a consequence of using higher SR protein concentrations required to observe the Ca{sup 2+}-uptake inhibition induced by O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Since the effect of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} was not seen when a non-hydrolyzable analogue of IP{sub 3} is used to induce Ca{sup 2+}-release, O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} may be inhibiting the degradation processes of IP{sub 3} rather than having an influence on the release channel per se.

  10. Inhibition of PTEN expression and activity by angiotensin II induces proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Yu, Lu-Gang; Sun, Rong; Cheng, Yan-Na; Cao, Hua; Yang, Kang-Min; Dong, Yi-Ning; Wu, Yan; Guo, Xiu-Li

    2013-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) is a tumor suppressor and has been suggested recently to be involved in the regulation of cardiovascular diseases. The molecular mechanisms of this regulation are however poorly understood. This study shows that down regulation of PTEN expression and activity by angiotensin II (Ang II) increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The presence of Ang II induced rapid PTEN phosphorylation and oxidation in accordance with increased AKT and FAK phosphorylation. The Ang II-mediated VSMC proliferation and migration was inhibited when cellular PTEN expression was increased by AT1 inhibitor losartan, PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082. Over expression of PTEN in VSMCs by adenovirus transduction also resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and migration in response to Ang II. These results suggest that PTEN down-regulation is involved in proliferation and migration of VSMCs induced by Ang II. This provides insight into the molecular regulation of PTEN in vascular smooth muscle cells and suggests that targeting the action of PTEN may represent an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. The Rho/Rac exchange factor Vav2 controls nitric oxide-dependent responses in mouse vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Sevilla, María A; Montero, María J; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of arterial contractility is essential for blood pressure control. The GTPase RhoA promotes vasoconstriction by modulating the cytoskeleton of vascular smooth muscle cells. Whether other Rho/Rac pathways contribute to blood pressure regulation remains unknown. By studying a hypertensive knockout mouse lacking the Rho/Rac activator Vav2, we have discovered a new signaling pathway involving Vav2, the GTPase Rac1, and the serine/threonine kinase Pak that contributes to nitric oxide-triggered blood vessel relaxation and normotensia. This pathway mediated the Pak-dependent inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5, a process that favored RhoA inactivation and the subsequent depolymerization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in vascular smooth muscle cells. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 required its physical interaction with autophosphorylated Pak1 but, unexpectedly, occurred without detectable transphosphorylation events between those 2 proteins. The administration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors prevented the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in Vav2-deficient animals, demonstrating the involvement of this new pathway in blood pressure regulation. Taken together, these results unveil one cause of the cardiovascular phenotype of Vav2-knockout mice, identify a new Rac1/Pak1 signaling pathway, and provide a mechanistic framework for better understanding blood pressure control in physiological and pathological states. PMID:20038798

  12. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC. PMID:12787890

  13. Angiotensin II type I and prostaglandin F2α receptors cooperatively modulate signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goupil, Eugénie; Fillion, Dany; Clément, Stéphanie; Luo, Xiaoyan; Devost, Dominic; Sleno, Rory; Pétrin, Darlaine; Saragovi, H Uri; Thorin, Éric; Laporte, Stéphane A; Hébert, Terence E

    2015-01-30

    The angiotensin II type I (AT1R) and the prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) F prostanoid (FP) receptors are both potent regulators of blood pressure. Physiological interplay between AT1R and FP has been described. Abdominal aortic ring contraction experiments revealed that PGF2α-dependent activation of FP potentiated angiotensin II-induced contraction, whereas FP antagonists had the opposite effect. Similarly, PGF2α-mediated vasoconstriction was symmetrically regulated by co-treatment with AT1R agonist and antagonist. The underlying canonical Gαq signaling via production of inositol phosphates mediated by each receptor was also regulated by antagonists for the other receptor. However, binding to their respective agonists, regulation of receptor-mediated MAPK activation and vascular smooth muscle cell growth were differentially or asymmetrically regulated depending on how each of the two receptors were occupied by either agonist or antagonist. Physical interactions between these receptors have never been reported, and here we show that AT1R and FP form heterodimeric complexes in both HEK 293 and vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings imply that formation of the AT1R/FP dimer creates a novel allosteric signaling unit that shows symmetrical and asymmetrical signaling behavior, depending on the outcome measured. AT1R/FP dimers may thus be important in the regulation of blood pressure.

  14. Extracellular Nucleotides Can Induce Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 Expression in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeung-Il; Kim, Hye-Young; Kim, Sun-Mi; Lee, Sae-A; Son, Yong-Hae; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong

    2011-01-01

    To understand the roles of purinergic receptors and cellular molecules below the receptors in the vascular inflammatory response, we determined if extracellular nucleotides up-regulated chemokine expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) abundantly express P2Y1, P2Y6, and P2Y11 receptors, which all respond to extracellular nucleotides. Exposure of human AoSMCs to NAD+, an agonist of the human P2Y11 receptor, and NADP+ as well as ATP, an agonist for P2Y1 and P2Y11 receptors, caused increase in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 gene (CCL2) transcript and CCL2 release; however, UPT did not affect CCL2 expression. CCL2 release by NAD+ and NADP+ was inhibited by a concentration dependent manner by suramin, an antagonist of P2-purinergic receptors. NAD+ and NADP+ activated protein kinase C and enhanced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt. NAD+- and NADP+-mediated CCL2 release was significantly attenuated by SP6001250, U0126, LY294002, Akt inhibitor IV, RO318220, GF109203X, and diphenyleneiodium chloride. These results indicate that extracellular nucleotides can promote the proinflammatory VSMC phenotype by up-regulating CCL2 expression, and that multiple cellular elements, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, protein kinase C, and mitogen-activated protein kinases, are involved in that process. PMID:21461238

  15. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC.

  16. Leptin augments recruitment of IRF-1 and CREB to thrombospondin-1 gene promoter in vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Soumyadip; Ganguly, Rituparna; Raman, Priya

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that high pathophysiological concentrations of leptin, the adipocyte-secreted peptide, upregulate the expression of a potent proatherogenic matricellular protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), in vascular smooth muscle cells. Moreover, this regulation was found to occur at the level of transcription; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate the specific transcriptional mechanisms that mediate upregulation of TSP-1 expression by leptin. Primary human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures were transiently transfected with different TSP-1 gene (THBS1) promoter-linked luciferase reporter constructs, and luciferase activity in response to leptin (100 ng/ml) was assessed. We identified a long THBS1 promoter (-1270/+750) fragment with specific leptin response elements that are required for increased TSP-1 transcription by leptin. Promoter analyses, protein/DNA array and gel shift assays demonstrated activation and association of transcription factors, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), to the distal fragment of the THBS1 promoter in response to leptin. Supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed formation of a single complex between IRF-1 and CREB in response to leptin; importantly, recruitment of this complex to the THBS1 promoter mediated leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Finally, binding sequence decoy oligomer and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that regulatory elements for both IRF-1 (-1019 to -1016) and CREB (-1198 to -1195), specific to the distal THBS1 promoter, were required for leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes a cooperative association between IRF-1 and CREB on the THBS1 promoter driving TSP-1 transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:27281481

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor binds specifically to receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells and the binding becomes nondissociable.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L T; Tremble, P; Antoniades, H N

    1982-01-01

    Radioiodinated platelet-derived growth factor (125I-PDGF) was used in studies of PDGF binding sites on vascular smooth muscle cells. There was an excellent correlation between the ability of 125I-PDGF to stimulate cell proliferation and to bind specifically to cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. The half-maximal concentration for both processes was 0.1 nM. There were 50,000 binding sites per cell. Reduced PDGF, prepared by treatment of PDGF with 20 mM dithiothreitol, had neither the ability to bind to smooth muscle cells nor to stimulate cellular proliferation. Epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and histone B did not compete for the binding sites at a concentration of 10 nM. 125I-PDGF binding was slowly reversible at 4 degrees C and was rapidly and totally reversible after a 1-min incubation at 37 degrees C. After continued incubation at 37 degrees C, the binding became irreversible. The half-time for formation of the nondissociable state of 125I-PDGF binding was approximately equal to 5 min at 37 degrees C. The nondissociable state of binding was not formed at 4 degrees C even after 1 hr of incubation. These data suggest that the sites we labeled are the PDGF receptors that mediate PDGF's mitogenic action and that a nondissociable state of PDGF binding is formed at 37 degrees C. It is likely that nondissociable PDGF represents internalized ligand or binding to sites that are converted to a high-affinity state after the ligand binds. PMID:6310551

  18. An Egr-1-specific DNAzyme regulates Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNBIAO; GUO, CHANGLEI; WANG, RAN; HUANG, LULI; LIANG, WANQIAN; LIU, RUNNAN; SUN, BING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to transfect rat aortic smooth muscle cells with an early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1)-specific DNAzyme (ED5), to observe its effect on Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and to elucidate the mechanism of ED5-mediated inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. VSMCs in primary culture obtained by tissue block adhesion were identified by morphological observation and α smooth muscle actin (α-SM-actin) immunocytochemistry. The cells were then transfected with ED5 or scrambled ED5 (ED5SCR). The three groups of cells used in the present study were the control group, ED5 group and ED5SCR group. The expression levels of Egr-1 and PCNA protein were detected following transfection by analyzing and calculating the integral optical density value in each group. Primary culture of VSMCs and transfection of ED5 and ED5SCR were successfully accomplished. Following stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum, the Egr-1 protein was expressed most strongly at 1 h and demonstrated a declining trend over time; the expression of PCNA protein began at 4 h, peaked at 24 h and then demonstrated a slightly declining trend over time. Compared with the control group and the ED5SCR group, ED5 inhibited the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA (P<0.05). ED5 was able to inhibit the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA proteins in VSMCs to a certain extent and VSMC proliferation in vitro. DNAzyme gene therapy may be useful as a new method for treating vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:23737882

  19. The smooth muscle-selective RhoGAP GRAF3 is a critical regulator of vascular tone and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xue; Lenhart, Kaitlin C.; Bird, Kim E.; Suen, Alisa A.; Rojas, Mauricio; Kakoki, Masao; Li, Feng; Smithies, Oliver; Mack, Christopher P.; Taylor, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    Although hypertension is a worldwide health issue, an incomplete understanding of its etiology has hindered our ability to treat this complex disease. Here we identify arhgap42 (also known as GRAF3) as a Rho-specific GAP expressed specifically in smooth muscle cells in mice and humans. We show that GRAF3-deficient mice exhibit significant hypertension and increased pressor responses to angiotensin II and endothelin-1; these effects are prevented by treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y-27632. RhoA activity and myosin light chain phosphorylation are elevated in GRAF3-depleted smooth muscle cells in vitro and in vivo, and isolated vessel segments from GRAF3-deficient mice show increased contractility. Taken together our data indicate that GRAF3-mediated inhibition of RhoA activity in vascular smooth muscle cells is necessary for maintaining normal blood pressure homeostasis. Moreover, these findings provide a potential mechanism for a hypertensive locus recently identified within arhgap42 and provide a foundation for the future development of innovative hypertension therapies. PMID:24335996

  20. In vitro evaluation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell survival and apoptosis in response to hypothermia and freezing.

    PubMed

    Tatsutani, Kristine N; Joye, James D; Virmani, Renu; Taylor, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    The success of endovascular techniques such as balloon angioplasty and stenting in the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been limited by an aggressive proliferative response leading to neointimal hyperplasia and re-stenosis. A new endovascular therapy combining cold treatment with balloon dilation has been proposed to prevent arterial re-stenosis. In order to evaluate the potential of this application, studies were conducted investigating the effects of hypothermia and freezing on human arteries at the cellular level. Cultured arterial endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were chilled or frozen under controlled thermal conditions. The viability response of the cells was measured with a variety of assays quantifying necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. These data establish correlations between thermal conditions and the extent and nature of arterial freezing injury. Arterial smooth muscle cells were found to be susceptible to freeze-induced apoptosis in a temperature range of -5 to -15 degrees C. Endovascular cryotherapy designed to induce apoptosis in arterial smooth muscle cells may limit neointimal formation and thereby improve the durability of conventional angioplasty. PMID:15772713

  1. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on vascular smooth muscle cells: reduction in arachidonic acid incorporation into inositol phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Yerram, N R; Spector, A A

    1989-07-01

    A rapid increase in arachidonic acid incorporation into phosphatidylinositol (PI) occurred following exposure of cultured porcine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells to calcium ionophore A23187. This response was specific for PI and phosphatidic acid; none of the other phosphoglycerides showed any increase in arachidonic acid incorporation. The incorporation of [3H]inositol also was increased, indicating that complete synthesis of PI rather than only fatty acylation occurred in response to the ionophore. The presence of omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), reduced arachidonic acid but not inositol incorporation into PI. Stimulated incorporation of EPA also occurred under these conditions, suggesting that EPA replaces arachidonic acid in the newly synthesized pool of PI. Although much less arachidonic acid was incorporated into the polyphosphoinositides following exposure to the ionophore, arachidonic acid incorporation into these phosphorylated derivatives also decreased when EPA was present. These findings suggest that when omega-3 fatty acids are available, less arachidonic acid is channeled into the inositol phospholipids of activated smooth muscle cells because of replacement by EPA. This may represent a mechanism whereby omega-3 fatty acids, especially EPA, can accumulate in the metabolically active pools of inositol phospholipids and thereby possibly influence the properties or responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle.

  2. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  3. Static pressure drives proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Di-xian; Cheng, Jiming; Xiong, Yan; Li, Junmo; Xia, Chenglai; Xu, Canxin; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Bingyang; Hu, Zhuowei; Liao, Duan-fang

    2010-01-22

    Intimal hyperplasia plays an important role in various types of vascular remodeling. Mechanical forces derived from blood flow are associated with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This contributes to many vascular disorders such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In this study, we show that static pressure induces the proliferation of VSMC and activates its related signal pathway. VSMC from a rat aorta were treated with different pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 24 h. The most active proliferation of VSMC was detected at a pressure of 120 mm Hg. VSMC was also incubated under a static pressure of 120 mm Hg for different time intervals (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h). We found that static pressure significantly stimulates VSMC proliferation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation showed a peak at the pressure of 120 mm Hg at 4-h time point. Moreover, caveolin-1 expression was significantly inhibited by rising static pressure. Downregulation of VSMC proliferation could be found after PD98059 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor) treatment. Our data also showed that a siRNA-mediated caveolin-1 knock down increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that static pressure promotes VSMC proliferation via the Caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway.

  4. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  5. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23084979

  6. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 35 Mediates Human Saphenous Vein Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Jennifer E.; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Divorty, Nina; Clarke, Carolyn; Delles, Christian; Milligan, Graeme; Nicklin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation is central to neointima formation in vein graft failure following coronary artery bypass. However, there are currently no pharmacological interventions that prevent vein graft failure through intimal occlusion. It is hence a therapeutic target. Here, we investigated the contribution of GPR35 to human VSMC and endothelial cell (EC) migration, using a scratch-wound assay, and also the contribution to proliferation, using MTS and BrdU assays, in in vitro models using recently characterized human GPR35 ortholog-selective small-molecule agonists and antagonists. Real-time PCR studies showed GPR35 to be robustly expressed in human VSMCs and ECs. Stimulation of GPR35, with either the human-selective agonist pamoic acid or the reference agonist zaprinast, promoted VSMC migration in the scratch-wound assay. These effects were blocked by coincubation with either of the human GPR35-specific antagonists, CID-2745687 or ML-145. These GPR35-mediated effects were produced by inducing alterations in the actin cytoskeleton via the Rho A/Rho kinase signaling axis. Additionally, the agonist ligands stimulated a proliferative response in ECs. These studies highlight the potential that small molecules that stimulate or block GPR35 activity can modulate vascular proliferation and migration. These data propose GPR35 as a translational therapeutic target in vascular remodeling. PMID:27064272

  7. Redox-sensitive vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation is mediated by GKLF and Id3 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nickenig, Georg; Baudler, Stephanie; Müller, Cornelius; Werner, Christian; Werner, Nikos; Welzel, Hilke; Strehlow, Kerstin; Böhm, Michael

    2002-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals have been implicated in the pathogenic growth of various cell types. The molecular mechanisms involved in redox-sensitive cell growth control are poorly understood. Stimulation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with xanthin/xanthin oxidase (X/XO) increases proliferation, whereas stimulation with hydrogen peroxide and Fe3+NTA (H-Fe) causes growth arrest of VSMC. Differential Display led to the identification of two novel, differentially regulated redox-sensitive genes. The dominant negative helix-loop-helix protein Id3 is induced by X/XO and down-regulated by H-Fe. The transcription factor gut-enriched Kruppel-like factor (GKLF) is induced by H-Fe but not by X/XO. Induction of GKLF and inhibition of Id3 via transfection experiments leads to growth arrest, whereas overexpression of Id3 and inhibition of GKLF cause cell growth. Id3 down-regulation is induced via binding of GKLF to the Id3 promotor and concomitantly reduced Id3 gene transcription rate. GKLF induction by H-Fe is mediated through hydroxyl radicals, p38MAP kinase-, calcium-, and protein synthesis-dependent pathways. Id3 is induced by X/XO via superoxide, calcium, p38, and p42/44 MAP kinase. GKLF induces and Id3 depresses expression of p21WAF1/Cip1, p27KIP1, p53. Induction of Id3 is accomplished by angiotensin II via superoxide release. A vascular injury mouse model revealed that Id3 is overexpressed in proliferating vascular tissue in vivo. These findings reveal novel mechanisms of redox-controlled cellular proliferation involving GKLF and Id3 that may have general implications for our understanding of vascular and nonvascular growth control.

  8. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials.

  9. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials. PMID:27634843

  10. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R.; Redondo, Santiago; Peçanha, Franck; Martín, Angela; Fortuño, Ana; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tejerina, Teresa; Salaices, Mercedes; and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  11. Study of the function of sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle during activation due to depolarization-induced calcium influx

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vascular smooth muscle was evaluated with respect to regulation of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} during the Ca{sup 2+} entry induced by depolarization. Calcium agonist, Bay K8644, stimulated Ca{sup 2+} influx as well as tension in physiological salt solution, (PSS) in contrast to the priming effects due to the depolarization originally reported. Disparity, however, was found between the Ca{sup 2+} entered and tension developed. Correlation between the tension and {sup 45}Ca influx showed a typical threshold phenomenon; the basal Ca{sup 2+} influx can be raised to a certain level (25%) without tension induction, after which a minor increase in Ca{sup 2+} influx produced significant tension. This subthreshold Ca{sup 2+} influx was found accumulated in the caffeine-sensitive Ca stores, the SR. This confirmed the dependency of tension on the rate of Ca{sup 2+} entry demonstrated by a previous report.

  12. Leptin promotes the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells from female mice by increasing RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guan-Ying; Liang, Qiu-Hua; Cui, Rong-Rong; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Shan-Shan; Shan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Arterial calcification is a complex and active regulated process, which results from a process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Leptin, the product of the ob gene, mainly regulates food intake and energy expenditure and recently has been considered to be correlated with the arterial calcification. However, the mechanisms of the effects of leptin on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs are unknown. We used calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) as a model to investigate the relationship between leptin and the osteoblastic differentiation of CVSMCs and the signaling pathways involved. Our experiments demonstrated that leptin could increase expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, runt-related transcription factor 2 expression, calcium deposition, and the formation of mineralized nodules in CVSMCs. Suppression of RANKL with small interfering RNA abolished the leptin-induced ALP activity and BMP4 expression in CVSMCs. Leptin could activate the ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abolished leptin-induced RANKL expression and blocked the promotion of ALP activity of CVSMCs. Silencing of the leptin receptor OB-Rb with small interfering RNA abolished leptin-induced activation of ERK and Akt and the expression of RANKL and reversed the effects of leptin on ALP activity. Meanwhile, addition of Noggin (the BMP4 inhibitor) blunted the effect of leptin on ALP activity. These results show that leptin can promote osteoblastic differentiation of CVSMCs by the OB-Rb/ERK1/2/RANKL-BMP4 and OB-Rb/PI3K/Akt/RANKL-BMP4 pathways.

  13. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From Hypertensive Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Advance Hypertension Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Biel, Nikolett M.; Santostefano, Katherine E.; DiVita, Bayli B.; El Rouby, Nihal; Carrasquilla, Santiago D.; Simmons, Chelsey; Nakanishi, Mahito; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in hypertension (HTN) pharmacogenomics seek to identify genetic sources of variable antihypertensive drug response. Genetic association studies have detected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that link to drug responses; however, to understand mechanisms underlying how genetic traits alter drug responses, a biological interface is needed. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a potential source for studying otherwise inaccessible tissues that may be important to antihypertensive drug response. The present study established multiple iPSC lines from an HTN pharmacogenomics cohort. We demonstrated that established HTN iPSCs can robustly and reproducibly differentiate into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), a cell type most relevant to vasculature tone control. Moreover, a sensitive traction force microscopy assay demonstrated that iPSC-derived VSMCs show a quantitative contractile response on physiological stimulus of endothelin-1. Furthermore, the inflammatory chemokine tumor necrosis factor α induced a typical VSMC response in iPSC-derived VSMCs. These studies pave the way for a large research initiative to decode biological significance of identified SNPs in hypertension pharmacogenomics. Significance Treatment of hypertension remains suboptimal, and a pharmacogenomics approach seeks to identify genetic biomarkers that could be used to guide treatment decisions; however, it is important to understand the biological underpinnings of genetic associations. Mouse models do not accurately recapitulate individual patient responses based on their genetics, and hypertension-relevant cells are difficult to obtain from patients. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology provides a great interface to bring patient cells with their genomic data into the laboratory and to study hypertensive responses. As an initial step, the present study established an iPSC bank from patients with primary hypertension and demonstrated

  14. Receptor Interacting Protein 3 Suppresses Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Inhibition of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase-Akt Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Li, Geng; Lan, Xiaomei; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Cao, Chun-Mei; Xiao, Rui-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a primary mechanism underlying cardiovascular proliferative disorders. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt (or protein kinase B) axis has been assigned at the center of pathways that regulate cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate that enhanced PI3K-Akt signaling by mitogenic stimulation or arterial injury profoundly elevates expression of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in primary cultured rat VSMCs and in vivo and that the up-regulation of RIP3 leads to VSMC growth arrest and apoptosis via inhibiting the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, thereby alleviating balloon injury-induced neointimal formation. Specifically, mitogenic stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor-BB or angiotensin II leads to a profound increase in RIP3 expression, which is abolished by inhibition of PI3K or Akt, and increased PI3K-Akt signaling by expression of a constitutively active PI3K mutant also elevates RIP3 expression. Importantly, adenoviral overexpression of RIP3 not only triggers apoptosis but also causes cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phases that is associated with suppressed Akt activation. In sharp contrast, RIP3 gene silencing enhances serum- and platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and Akt activation. In vivo adenoviral gene delivery of rat RIP3 (rRIP3) increased apoptosis and reduced VSMC proliferation, thus, effectively alleviating balloon injury-induced neointimal formation. The growth-suppressive and pro-apoptotic effects are independent of rRIP3 Ser/Thr kinase activity, because overexpression of a kinase-inactive mutant of rRIP3, similar to its wild type, is sufficient to induce growth arrest and apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel growth-suppressive action of RIP3, marking RIP3 as an important factor to prevent excessive mitogenic stimulation- or injury-induced vascular smooth muscle cells hyperplasia. PMID:20042608

  15. Regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by extracellular pyrophosphate homeostasis: synergistic modulation by cyclic AMP and hyperphosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Wyler, Steven C.; Romani, Andrea M.; O'Neill, W. Charles

    2010-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a multifaceted process involving gain of calcification inducers and loss of calcification inhibitors. One such inhibitor is inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and regulated generation and homeostasis of extracellular PPi is a critical determinant of soft-tissue mineralization. We recently described an autocrine mechanism of extracellular PPi generation in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that involves both ATP release coupled to the ectophosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase ENPP1 and efflux of intracellular PPi mediated or regulated by the plasma membrane protein ANK. We now report that increased cAMP signaling and elevated extracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi) act synergistically to induce calcification of these VSMC that is correlated with progressive reduction in ability to accumulate extracellular PPi. Attenuated PPi accumulation was mediated in part by cAMP-dependent decrease in ANK expression coordinated with cAMP-dependent increase in expression of TNAP, the tissue nonselective alkaline phosphatase that degrades PPi. Stimulation of cAMP signaling did not alter ATP release or ENPP1 expression, and the cAMP-induced changes in ANK and TNAP expression were not sufficient to induce calcification. Elevated extracellular Pi alone elicited only minor calcification and no significant changes in ANK, TNAP, or ENPP1. In contrast, combined with a cAMP stimulus, elevated Pi induced decreases in the ATP release pathway(s) that supports ENPP1 activity; this resulted in markedly reduced rates of PPi accumulation that facilitated robust calcification. Calcified VSMC were characterized by maintained expression of multiple SMC differentiation marker proteins including smooth muscle (SM) α-actin, SM22α, and calponin. Notably, addition of exogenous ATP (or PPi per se) rescued cAMP + phosphate-treated VSMC cultures from progression to the calcified state. These observations support a model in which extracellular PPi generation mediated

  16. Curcumin Exerts its Anti-hypertensive Effect by Down-regulating the AT1 Receptor in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Wei; Li, Meixiang; Ren, Hongmei; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Wang, Wei Eric; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin exerts beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. However, its mechanisms are unknown. We propose that curcumin prevents the development of hypertension by regulating AT1 receptor (AT1R) expression in arteries. The present study examined how curcumin regulates AT1R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and investigated the physiological significance of this regulation in angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hypertension. The results showed that curcumin decreased AT1R expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular smooth muscle cells. Using luciferase reporters with an entire AT1 or a mutant AT1R in A10 cells, the AT1R promoter activity was inhibited by 10−6 M curcumin, and the proximal element (from −61 to +25 bp) of the AT1R promoter was crucial for curcumin-induced AT1R down-regulation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that curcumin decreased specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding with the AT1R promoter in A10 cells. Curcumin treatment reduced Ang II-induced hypertension in C57Bl/6J mice, which was accompanied by lower AT1R expression in the arteries and decreased Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction in the mesenteric artery. These findings indicate that curcumin down-regulates AT1R expression in A10 cells by affecting SP1/AT1R DNA binding, thus reducing AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction and subsequently prevents the development of hypertension in an Ang II-induced hypertensive model. PMID:27146402

  17. Phosphatidylcholine is a major source of phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol in angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth-muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lassègue, B; Alexander, R W; Clark, M; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1993-06-01

    In cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, angiotensin II produces a sustained formation of diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Since the fatty acid composition of these molecules is likely to determine their efficacy as second messengers, it is important to ascertain the phospholipid precursors and the biochemical pathways from which they are produced. Our experiments suggest that phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) hydrolysis is the major source of both DG and PtdOH during the late signalling phase. First, in cells labelled with [3H]myristate, which preferentially labels PtdCho, formation of [3H]PtdOH precedes formation of [3H]DG. Second, in contrast with phospholipase C (PLC) activation, DG mass accumulation is dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Similarly, DG mass accumulation is not attenuated by protein kinase C activation, which we have previously shown to inhibit the phosphoinositide-specific PLC. Third, the fatty acid composition of late-phase DG and PtdOH more closely resembles that of PtdCho than that of phosphatidylinositol. Finally, in cells labelled for a short time with [3H]glycerol, the radioactivity incorporated into [3H]DG and PtdOH was greater than that incorporated into PtdIns, but not into PtdCho. We found no evidence that synthesis de novo or phosphatidylethanolamine breakdown contributes to sustained DG and PtdOH formation. Thus, in angiotensin II-stimulated cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, PLD-mediated PtdCho hydrolysis is the major source of sustained DG and PtdOH, whereas phosphoinositide breakdown is a minor contributor. Furthermore, PtdOH phosphohydrolase, which determines the relative levels of DG and PtdOH, appears to be regulated by protein kinase C. These results have important implications for the role of these second messengers in growth and contraction.

  18. Store depletion induces Gαq-mediated PLCβ1 activity to stimulate TRPC1 channels in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian; Miralles, Francesc; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Large, William A.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ stores activates store-operated channels (SOCs) composed of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 1 proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which contribute to important cellular functions. We have previously shown that PKC is obligatory for activation of TRPC1 SOCs in VSMCs, and the present study investigates if the classic phosphoinositol signaling pathway involving Gαq-mediated PLC activity is responsible for driving PKC-dependent channel gating. The G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S, anti-Gαq antibodies, the PLC inhibitor U73122, and the PKC inhibitor GF109203X all inhibited activation of TRPC1 SOCs, and U73122 and GF109203X also reduced store-operated PKC-dependent phosphorylation of TRPC1 proteins. Three distinct SR Ca2+ store-depleting agents, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester, cyclopiazonic acid, and N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamineed, induced translocations of the fluorescent biosensor GFP-PLCδ1-PH from the cell membrane to the cytosol, which were inhibited by U73122. Knockdown of PLCβ1 with small hairpin RNA reduced both store-operated PLC activity and stimulation of TRPC1 SOCs. Immunoprecipitation studies and proximity ligation assays revealed that store depletion induced interactions between TRPC1 and Gαq, and TRPC1 and PLCβ1. We propose a novel activation mechanism for TRPC1 SOCs in VSMCs, in which store depletion induces formation of TRPC1-Gαq-PLCβ1 complexes that lead to PKC stimulation and channel gating.—Shi, J., Miralles, F., Birnbaumer, L., Large, W. A., Albert, A. P. Store depletion induces Gαq-mediated PLCβ1 activity to stimulate TRPC1 channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:26467792

  19. Smooth muscle calcium and endothelium-derived relaxing factor in the abnormal vascular responses of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Conger, J D; Robinette, J B; Schrier, R W

    1988-01-01

    Abnormal renovascular reactivity, characterized by paradoxical vasoconstriction to a reduction in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) in the autoregulatory range, increased sensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS), and loss of vasodilatation to acetylcholine have all been demonstrated in ischemic acute renal failure (ARF). To determine if ischemic injury alters vascular contractility by increasing smooth muscle cell calcium or calcium influx, the renal blood flow (RBF) response to reductions in RPP within the autoregulatory range and to RNS were tested before and after a 90-min intrarenal infusion of verapamil or diltiazem in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Both calcium entry blockers, verapamil and diltiazem, blocked the aberrant vasoconstrictor response to a reduction in RPP and RNS (both P less than 0.001). In a second series of experiments the potential role of an ischemia-induced endothelial injury and of the absence of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) production were examined to explain the lack of vasodilatation to acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, bradykinin (a second EDRF-dependent vasodilator), or prostacyclin, an EDRF-independent vasodilator, was infused intrarenally for 90 min, and RBF responses to a reduction in RPP and RNS were tested in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Neither acetylcholine nor bradykinin caused vasodilatation or altered the slope of the relationship between RBF and RPP. By contrast, prostacyclin increased RBF (P less than 0.001), but did not change the vascular response to changes in RPP. It was concluded that the abnormal pressor sensitivity to a reduction in RPP and RNS was due to changes in renovascular smooth muscle cell calcium activity that could be blocked by calcium entry blockers. A lack of response to EDRF-dependent vasodilators, as a result of ischemic endothelial injury, may contribute to the increased pressor sensitivity of the renal vessels. PMID:3261301

  20. Effects of nitrendipine on growth activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Absher, M P; Baldor, L; Warshaw, D M

    1988-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial wall may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. If cell migration and proliferation are dependent on extracellular calcium, then treatment with calcium channel blockers such as nitrendipine may alter these cellular responses. In the studies reported here, proliferation and migration activities were assessed in cultured bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells exposed to nitrendipine. SMCs in long-term culture are characterized by periods of either stable or enhanced proliferative activity. During the stable periods, 1 microM nitrendipine has no effect on proliferation, but during periods of enhanced proliferation, 1 microM nitrendipine augments growth by approximately 20%. SMC migration rates and interdivision times were determined from analysis of time-lapse cinematography films. During stable periods of growth, cell migration rate was inversely related to interdivision time (i.e., fast migrating cells had the shortest interdivision times). Treatment with 1 microM nitrendipine abolished the relationship between migration rate and interdivision time and prolonged interdivision times. These data suggest that the ability of nitrendipine to alter SMC proliferation, interdivision time, and migration is dependent upon the overall proliferative state of the culture.

  1. Non-genomic mechanism of 17 beta-oestradiol-induced inhibition of contraction in mammalian vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, T; Hamada, E; Kitazawa, K; Gaznabi, A K

    1997-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (E2) at 0.1-10 microM directly inhibited various tonic and phasic smooth muscle contractions. The mechanism(s) of oestrogen-induced inhibition of contraction was studied using intact and permeabilized strips and isolated single cells of smooth muscle. 2. In endothelium-denuded vascular smooth muscle, E2 attenuated high K(+)-induced force development and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and produced rapid and reversible relaxation. There were no significant differences in these inhibitory effects between tissue types (femoral artery vs. portal vein), species (rat vs. rabbit) or sexes. 3. The inhibitory potencies of several steroidal and non-steroidal oestrogen analogues were examined and their effects were for the most part stereo-specific. However, two steroids with negligible affinities for the nuclear oestrogen receptor also strongly inhibited high K(+)-induced contraction. 4. Genomic modulators including a protein synthesis inhibitor, an RNA synthesis inhibitor, and oestrogen receptor antagonists did not affect the inhibitory actions of E2. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases did not reduce the E2 effect. 5. Ca2+ release from intracellular stores by agonists and by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) does not appear to be modulated by E2. Neither pretreatment with ryanodine nor with thapsigargin affected the E2-induced inhibition of high K(+)-induced contraction. 6. E2 had no effect on either normal or GTP gamma S-increased Ca2+ sensitivity of the regulatory and contractile apparatus. 7. E2 and its analogues rapidly inhibited voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Repetitive stimulation was not required for E2-induced inhibition of the currents. 8. This study strongly suggests that at pharmacological concentrations oestrogen primarily reduces Ca2+ influx through inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels in a non-genomic manner and decreases myosin light chain phosphorylation and

  2. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C.; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P.; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  3. ERK1/2 activation by angiotensin II inhibits insulin-induced glucose uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Yuki; Yoshizumi, Masanori; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ali, Nermin; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Obata, Toshiyuki; Ebina, Yousuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2005-08-15

    Clinical evidence suggests a relationship between hypertension and insulin resistance, and cross-talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin signaling pathways may take place. We now report the effect of Ang II on insulin-induced glucose uptake and its intracellular mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We examined the translocation of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucose uptake in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and Akt activities, and phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at the serine and tyrosine residues were measured by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. As a result, Ang II inhibited insulin-induced GLUT-4 translocation from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in RASMC. Ang II induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and IRS-1 phosphorylation at Ser307 and Ser616. Ang II-induced Ser307 and Ser616 phophorylation of IRS-1 was inhibited by a MEK inhibitor, PD98059, and a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Ang II inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosyl phophorylation and Akt activation were reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. Ang II inhibited insulin-induced glucose uptake, which was also reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. It is shown that Ang II-induced ERK1/2 activation inhibits insulin-dependent glucose uptake through serine phophorylation of IRS-1 in RASMC.

  4. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  5. [Influence of curcumin--loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) films on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Ren, Ling; Wang, Jin; Tang, Jiaju; Pan, Changjiang; Huang, Nan

    2008-08-01

    In-stent restenosis is the major problem of percutaneous coronary interventions. Drug-eluting stent became a landmark in the treatment of coronary disease. Curcumin could be used for drug-eluting stent due to its antithrombogenity and antiproliferative properties. In this paper, 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were performed to decide the optimal concentration of curcumin for inhibiting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The result disclosed that more than 80% of VSMC were inhibited when the concentration of curcumin ranged from 2.5 microg/ml to 10 microg/ml (P < 0.05, compared to ethanol). Three weight percent curcumin-loaded films (3wt%, 5wt%, 8wt%) were prepared using a biodegradable polymer (poly (lactic acid-co-glycol acid), PLGA) as the carrier of curcumin. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was used to evaluate the immediate toxicity of the curcumin-loaded PLGA films, and the three concentration curcumin-loaded films were revealed to be of no acute toxicity to the smooth muscle cells. The results of Alamar Blue test indicated that the curcumin-loaded films had better antiproliferation effect than did the 316 stainless steel (SS). Therefore, these films may be used for stent coating to inhibit the in-stent restenosis induced by VSMC proliferation. PMID:18792454

  6. Role of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) in vasopressin-induced responses of a vascular smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nambi, P.; Aiyar, N.; Whitman, M.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A-10) carry vascular V1 vasopressin receptors. In these cells, vasopressin inhibits isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation and stimulates phosphatidylinositol turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Pretreatment of the cells with phorbol esters resulted in inhibition of the vasopressin-induced responses. The inactive phorbol ester aPDD was ineffective. These data suggested that phorbol ester might cause phosphorylation of the vasopressin receptor and/or coupling protein(s). Here, they studied the role of guanine nucleotide binding proteins by employing the novel radiolabeled vasopressin antagonist (/sup 3/H)-SKF 101926. In competition experiments with cell membranes, Gpp(NH)p shifted the vasopressin curve to the right indicating decreased agonist affinity. Phorbol ester pretreatment abolished the Gpp(NH)p effect. Pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of vasopressin-induced phosphatidyinositol turnover. NEM also abolished the decrease in agonist affinity caused by Gpp(NH)p. These data showed that NEM and phorbol ester pretreatment of smooth muscle cells functionally uncoupled the vasopressin receptors and suggested that vasopressin V1 receptor responses are mediated through guanine nucleotide binding protein(s).

  7. MiR-21 inhibits c-Ski signaling to promote the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Yang, Ting; Yang, Kang

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we reported that the decrease of endogenous c-Ski expression is implicated in the progression of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation after arterial injury. However, the molecular mechanism of the down-regulation of c-Ski is not clear. In this study, a potential miR-21 recognition element was identified in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of rat c-Ski mRNA. A reporter assay revealed that miR-21 could recognize the miR-21 recognition element of c-Ski mRNA. In A10 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, overexpression of miR-21 significantly inhibited the expression of c-Ski protein and promoted cell proliferation, which could be blocked by inhibition of miR-21 or overexpression of c-Ski. Further investigation demonstrated that the effect of miR-21 on VSMC proliferation resulted from negative regulation of c-Ski to suppress p38-p21/p27 signaling, the downstream pathway of c-Ski in VSMCs. These results indicate that c-Ski is a target gene of miR-21. miR-21 specifically binds to the 3'-untranslated region of c-Ski and negatively regulates c-Ski expression to diminish the protective effects of c-Ski and stimulate VSMC proliferation in the progression of arterial injury.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis Contributing to High Glucose-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Chang; Fu, Duguan; Liu, Fuyuan; Hu, Jiefen; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a common feature in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) in the context of insulin resistance and a relative lack of insulin. Recently, a few studies have indicated that a high concentration of glucose amplifies the osteogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Some previous reports state that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis was activated in and contributed to VC. However, whether or not high glucose could induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis and then involve the pathogenesis of VC remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high blood glucose-induced VC in diabetes mellitus is caused by the ER response and subsequent apoptosis. We examined the effects of high glucose on the ER stress response of VSMCs. High glucose treatment drastically increased the ER stress response in VSMCs. The high glucose-induced osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with 500 μM of 4-PBA (an ER stress inhibitor) prior to the exposure to high glucose, as evidenced by decreases in the expression of Runx2 and activity of alkaline phosphatase, as well as calcium nodules. These results suggest that high glucose induces the ER stress response and apoptosis, leading to high glucose-elicited VC.

  9. A comparison of human smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cells as potential cell sources for tissue-engineered vascular patches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Corin; Xie, Angela W; Emani, Sirisha; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Emani, Sitaram M; Wong, Joyce Y

    2012-05-01

    In pediatric patients requiring vascular reconstruction, the development of a cell-based tissue-engineered vascular patch (TEVP) has great potential to overcome current issues with nonliving graft materials. Determining the optimal cell source is especially critical to TEVP success. In this study, we compared the ability of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HuAoSMCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to form cell sheets on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) substrates. hMSCs treated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and ascorbic acid (AA) had higher expression of SMC-specific proteins compared to HuAoSMCs. hMSCs also had larger cell area and grew to confluence more quickly on PIPAAm than did HuAoSMCs. hMSCs typically formed cell sheets in 2-3 weeks and had greater wet tissue weight and collagen content compared with HuAoSMC sheets, which generally required growth for up to 5 weeks. Assays for calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the osteogenic potential of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs was low; however, Alcian Blue staining suggested high chondrogenic behavior of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs. Although hMSCs are promising for cell-based TEVPs in their ability to form robust tissue with significant extracellular matrix content, improved control over hMSC behavior will be required for long-term TEVP success.

  10. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  11. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  12. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  13. Doxazosin inhibits proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth-muscle cells independent of alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z W; Shi, X Y; Hoffman, B B

    1998-06-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs), stimulated by a variety of growth factors, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. We found unexpectedly that doxazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic-receptor antagonist, inhibits serum-stimulated proliferation of cultured human VSMCs. Subsequent experiments systematically investigated inhibitory effects of doxazosin on mitogenesis stimulated in VSMCs by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor, and G protein-coupled receptor agonists thrombin and angiotensin II. Doxazosin attenuated the stimulation of DNA synthesis for each of these ligands with median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) from 0.3 to 1 microM. PDGF-AB (1 nM) increased cell number; doxazosin inhibited this response by 70-80%. Prazosin, a related alpha1-receptor antagonist, had similar but less potent effects on inhibiting mitogenesis in these cells. Doxazosin and prazosin inhibited PDGF-AB-stimulated and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I)-stimulated migration of VSMCs by approximately 40-50%. These effects of doxazosin were likely unrelated to alpha1-receptor blockade because pretreatment of cells with phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible alpha1 antagonist, did not change the capacity of doxazosin to inhibit of PDGF-stimulated mitogenesis. Also, doxazosin inhibited PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells, which do not express alpha1 receptors. These results suggest that doxazosin is a potent inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and migration through a mechanism unrelated to alpha1-receptor antagonism.

  14. Biomimetic control of vascular smooth muscle cell morphology and phenotype for functional tissue-engineered small-diameter blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Chan-Park, Mary B; Shen, Jin Ye; Cao, Ye; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Yunxiao; Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Kang, Gavin Chun-Wei; Greisler, Howard P

    2009-03-15

    Small-diameter blood vessel substitutes are urgently needed for patients requiring replacements of their coronary and below-the-knee vessels and for better arteriovenous dialysis shunts. Circulatory diseases, especially those arising from atherosclerosis, are the predominant cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Current therapies include the use of autologous vessels or synthetic materials as vessel replacements. The limited availability of healthy vessels for use as bypass grafts and the failure of purely synthetic materials in small-diameter sites necessitate the development of a biological substitute. Tissue engineering is such an approach and has achieved promising results, but reconstruction of a functional vascular tunica media, with circumferentially oriented contractile smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix, appropriate mechanical properties, and vasoactivity has yet to be demonstrated. This review focuses on strategies to effect the switch of SMC phenotype from synthetic to contractile, which is regarded as crucial for the engineering of a functional vascular media. The synthetic SMC phenotype is desired initially for cell proliferation and tissue remodeling, but the contractile phenotype is then necessary for sufficient vasoactivity and inhibition of neointima formation. The factors governing the switch to a more contractile phenotype with in vitro culture are reviewed.

  15. Synthesis and Protective Effects of Kaempferol-3'-sulfonate on Hydrogen Peroxide-induced injury in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinbin; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunmei; Qin, Xiaolin; Huang, Yu; Zeng, Renquan

    2016-06-01

    A novel water-soluble sulfated derivative, kaempferol-3'-sulfonate acid sodium (KS) with the composition of [C15 H9 O9 SNa]·2.5H2 O, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, and HRMS. Its protective effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells injured by hydrogen peroxide were evaluated by CCK-8 method, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. The experimental results indicated that the KS can significantly increase cell viability and reduce apoptosis on H2 O2 -injured VSMCs, as well as reverse the effects of H2 O2 on Bcl-2, Bad, and caspase-3 expressions. In addition, LDH leakage, MDA levels, and SOD and GSH activities were also measured with spectrophotometry. The results indicated that the KS acted as antioxidant preventing LDH leakage and MDA production, while increasing intracellular SOD and GSH activities. These findings revealed that KS might potentially serve as an effective antioxidant agent for prevention and treatment of vascular disease caused by H2 O2 -injured VSMCs.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis Contributing to High Glucose-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Chang; Fu, Duguan; Liu, Fuyuan; Hu, Jiefen; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a common feature in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) in the context of insulin resistance and a relative lack of insulin. Recently, a few studies have indicated that a high concentration of glucose amplifies the osteogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Some previous reports state that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis was activated in and contributed to VC. However, whether or not high glucose could induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis and then involve the pathogenesis of VC remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high blood glucose-induced VC in diabetes mellitus is caused by the ER response and subsequent apoptosis. We examined the effects of high glucose on the ER stress response of VSMCs. High glucose treatment drastically increased the ER stress response in VSMCs. The high glucose-induced osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with 500 μM of 4-PBA (an ER stress inhibitor) prior to the exposure to high glucose, as evidenced by decreases in the expression of Runx2 and activity of alkaline phosphatase, as well as calcium nodules. These results suggest that high glucose induces the ER stress response and apoptosis, leading to high glucose-elicited VC. PMID:26890314

  17. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induces osteogenic differentiation through a Runx2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Sato, Hiroko; Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Matsui, Hiroki; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Sato, Mahito; Iso, Tatsuya; Arai, Masashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2010-04-02

    Expression of bone-associated proteins and osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2 in arterial cells has been implicated in the development of vascular calcification. However, the signaling upstream of the Runx2-mediated activation of osteoblastic program in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is poorly understood. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an important regulator of bone formation, on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC. Stimulation of cultured rat aortic SMC (RASMC) with FGF-2 induced the expression of the osteoblastic markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin. Luciferase assays showed that FGF-2 induced osteocyte-specific element (OSE)-dependent transcription. Downregulation of Runx2 by siRNA repressed the basal and FGF-2-stimulated expression of the OPN gene in RASMC. FGF-2 produced hydrogen peroxide in RASMC, as evaluated by fluorescent probe. Induction of OPN expression by FGF-2 was inhibited not only by PD98059 (MEK1 inhibitor) and PP1 (c-Src inhibitor), but also by an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Nuclear extracts from FGF-2-treated RASMC exhibited increased DNA-binding of Runx2 to its target sequence. Immunohistochemistry of human coronary atherectomy specimens and calcified aortic tissues showed that expression of FGF receptor-1 and Runx2 was colocalized. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF-2 plays a role in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC by activating Runx2 through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent- and oxidative stress-sensitive-signaling pathways.

  18. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  19. Involvement of the Antioxidant Effect and Anti-inflammatory Response in Butyrate-Inhibited Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Omana P.; Ranganna, Kasturi; Milton, Shirlette G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by altering the expression and, in turn, functions of target genes have potential to modify cellular processes that are characteristics of atherosclerosis, including inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis/cell death. Butyrate, a natural epigenetic modifier and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a critical event in atherogenesis. Here, we examined whether glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), a family of antioxidant enzymes, are modulated by butyrate, contributing to its antiproliferation action on VSMC through the regulation of the inflammatory response by using western blotting, immunostaining methods and activity assay. Treatment of VSMC with butyrate not only upregulates glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 3 and GPx4, but also increases the overall catalytic activity of GPx supporting involvement of antioxidant effect in butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation. Moreover, analysis of the redox-sensitive NF-κB transcription factor system, the target of GPx, reveals that butyrate causes downregulation of IKKα, IKKβ, IkBα and NF-κBp65 expression and prevents NF-κBp65 phosphorylation at serine536 causing inhibition of the expression NF-κB target inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, VCAM-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Overall, these observations suggest a link between the antioxidant effect and anti-inflammatory response in butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation, accentuating the atheroprotective and therapeutic potential of natural products, like butyrate, in vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:25390157

  20. Platonin inhibited PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells via JNK1/2-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi; Uen, Yih-Huei; Chen, Chang-Chih; Lin, Song-Chow; Tseng, Shiao-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the inhibitory actions of the immunoregulator platonin against proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: VSMCs were prepared from the thoracic aortas of male Wistar rats. Cell proliferation was examined using MTT assays. Cell cycles were analyzed using flow cytometry. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, AKT, and c-Jun phosphorylation or p27 expression were detected using immunoblotting. Results: Pretreatment with platonin (1–5 μmol/L) significantly suppressed VSMC proliferation stimulated by PDGF-BB (10 ng/mL) or 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), and arrested cell cycle progression in the S and G2/M phases. The same concentrations of platonin significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 but not ERK1/2 or AKT in VSMCs stimulated by PDGF-BB. Furthermore, platonin also attenuated c-Jun phosphorylation and markedly reversed the down-regulation of p27 expression after PDGF-BB stimulation. Conclusion: Platonin inhibited VSMC proliferation, possibly via inhibiting phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and c-Jun, and reversal of p27 down-regulation, thereby leading to cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases. Thus, platonin may represent a novel approach for lowering the risk of abnormal VSMC proliferation and related vascular diseases. PMID:21892199

  1. A comparative study of potassium-induced relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of tiger salamanders and rats.

    PubMed

    Malvin, G M; Webb, R C

    1984-07-01

    This study compares potassium-induced relaxation in vascular tissue of an amphibian (Ambystoma tigrinum) and a mammal (rat). Aortas (salamanders) and tail arteries (rats) were cut into helical strips for isometric force recording. After norepinephrine-induced contraction in potassium-free solution, arteries relaxed in response to added potassium (1-20 mmol/l). Potassium-induced relaxation was greater in rat tail arteries than in salamander aortas. Half-maximal relaxation occurred at a potassium concentration of approximately 3 mmol/l in both species. Ouabain inhibited potassium-induced relaxation; salamanders were more sensitive to the glycoside than rats. Potassium-induced relaxation decreased as the temperature of the bathing medium was lowered; half-maximal inhibition occurred at 19 and 29 degrees C for salamander aortas and rat tail arteries, respectively. Potassium-induced relaxation also varied with the interval in potassium-free solution, the hydrogen ion concentration (rats only), and the magnitude of norepinephrine-induced contraction. It appears that the cellular mechanism causing potassium-induced relaxation is similar in blood vessels of salamanders and rats. The observations are consistent with the hypothesis that stimulated electrogenic sodium transport produced membrane hyperpolarization and relaxation in vascular smooth muscle.

  2. Role of ROS signaling in differential hypoxic Ca2+ and contractile responses in pulmonary and systemic vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Zheng, Yun-Min

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia causes a large increase in [Ca2+]i and attendant contraction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), but not in systemic artery SMCs. The different responses meet the respective functional needs in these two distinct vascular myocytes; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. We and other investigators have provided extensive evidence to reveal that voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels, canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels, ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyRs), cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose, FK506 binding protein 12.6, protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the essential effectors and signaling intermediates in the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV, but they may not primarily underlie the diverse cellular responses in pulmonary and systemic vascular myocytes. Hypoxia significantly increases mitochondrial ROS generation in PASMCs, which can induce intracellular Ca2+ release by opening RyRs, and may also cause extracellular Ca2+ influx by inhibiting KV channels and activating TRPC channels, leading to a large increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV. In contrast, hypoxia has no or a minor effect on mitochondrial ROS generation in systemic SMCs, thereby causing no change or a negligible increase in [Ca2+]i and contraction. Further preliminary work indicates that Rieske iron–sulfur protein in the mitochondrial complex III may perhaps serve as a key initial molecular determinant for the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and HPV, suggesting its potential important role in different cellular changes to respond to hypoxic stimulation in pulmonary and systemic artery myocytes. All these findings have greatly improved our understanding of the molecular processes for the differential hypoxic Ca2+ and contractile responses in vascular SMCs from distinct pulmonary and systemic circulation systems. PMID:20713188

  3. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  4. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo.

  5. WISP1 overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells via AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun; Liu, Hao; Lu, Lihe; Wan, Heng; Lin, Zhiqi; Qian, Kai; Yao, Xingxing; Chen, Qing; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jianyun; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-10-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play crucial roles in the development of vascular restenosis. Our previous study showed that CCN4, namely Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), significantly promotes proliferation and migration of rat VSMCs, but its mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether and how WISP1 stimulates proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Western blot analysis showed that FBS treatment increased WISP1 protein levels in human VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of WISP1 using adenovirus encoding WISP1 (AD-WISP1) significantly increased proliferation rate of human VSMCs by 2.98-fold compared with empty virus (EV)-transfected cells, shown by EdU incorporation assay. Additionally, Scratch-induced wound healing assay revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of WISP1 significantly increased cell migration compared with EV-transfected cells from 6h (4.56±1.14% vs. 11.23±2.25%, P<0.05) to 48h (25.25±5.51% vs. 97.54±13.12%, P<0.01) after injury. Transwell Migration Assay confirmed that WISP1 overexpression significantly promoted human VSMC migration by 2.25-fold compared with EV. Furthermore, WISP1 overexpression stimulated Akt signaling activation in human VSMCs. Blockage of Akt signaling by Akt inhibitor AZD5363 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, led to an inhibitory effect of WISP1-induced proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. Moreover, we found that WISP1 overexpression stimulated GSK3α/β phosphorylation, and increased expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in human VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by AZD5363. Collectively, we demonstrated that Akt signaling pathway mediates WISP1-induced migration and proliferation of human VSMCs, suggesting that WISP1 may act as a novel potential therapeutic target for vascular restenosis.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Brazilin on the vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration induced by PDGF-BB.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Li, Li; Wu, Yu-Jie; Yan, Yu; Xu, Xiao-Na; Wang, Shou-Bao; Yuan, Tian-Yi; Fang, Lian-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L. has been reported to exhibit various biological activities, such as anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammation, vasorelaxation and pro-apoptosis. However, the functional effects of Brazilin on VSMCs remain unexplored. The present study investigated the potential effects of Brazilin on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB induced VSMC proliferation and migration as well as the underlying mechanism of action. VSMC proliferation and migration were measured by Crystal Violet Staining, wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays, respectively. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Enzymatic action of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was carried out by gelatin zymography. Expression of adhesion molecules, cell cycle regulatory proteins, the phosphorylated levels of PDGF receptor β (PDGF-Rβ), Src, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt were tested by immunoblotting. The present study demonstrated that pretreatment with Brazilin dose-dependently inhibited PDGF-BB stimulated VSMC proliferation and migration, which were associated with a cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, a reduction in the adhesion molecule expression and MMP-9 activation in VSMCs. Furthermore, the increase in PDGF-Rβ, Src, ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation induced by PDGF-BB were suppressed by Brazilin. These findings indicate that Brazilin inhibits PDGF-BB induced VSMC proliferation and migration, and the inhibitory effects of Brazilin may be associated with the blockade of PDGF-Rβ - ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. In conclusion, the present study implicates that Brazilin may be useful as an anti-proliferative agent for the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:24228601

  7. Piperine inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation and migration in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Pa; Lee, Kwan; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Hong, Heeok

    2015-02-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in blood vessels are important in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Piperine, a major component of black pepper, has antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, the antiatherosclerotic effects of piperine have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of piperine on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs were investigated. The antiproliferative effects of piperine were determined using MTT assays, cell counting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blots. Our results showed that piperine significantly attenuated the proliferation of VSMCs by increasing the expression of p27(kip1), regulating the mRNA expression of cell cycle enzymes (cyclin D, cyclin E, and PCNA), and decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in a noncytotoxic concentration-dependent manner (30-100 μM). Moreover, we examined the effects of piperine on the migration of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs, as determined by the Boyden chamber assay, H2DCFDA staining, and western blots. Our results showed that 100 μM piperine decreased cell migration, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results suggest that piperine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the migration of VSMCs by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing MAPK phosphorylation and ROS. These findings suggest that piperine may be beneficial for the treatment of vascular-related disorders and diseases.

  8. Adipokines enhance oleic acid-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing CD36 expression.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Raphaela; Lamers, Daniela; Eckel, Jürgen; Sell, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only releasing lipids but also various adipokines that are both dysregulated in the obese state and may contribute to obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. We have previously shown that the combination of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) and oleic acid (OA) increases proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in a synergistic way. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a component within CM that is responsible for most of the observed effects. In this study, we investigate novel mechanisms that underlie the combined effects of adipokine and oleic acid-induced proliferation of VSMC. Oleic acid leads to significant lipid accumulation in VSMC that is further enhanced by the combined treatment with CM. Accordingly CM stimulates CD36 expression in VSMC while OA is not affecting CD36. Silencing of CD36 was established and prevents lipid accumulation in all tested conditions. CD36 silencing also abrogates CM- and OA-induced proliferation and considerably reduces proliferation induced by the combination of CM and OA. At the same time, VEGF secretion and VEGF-receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) by VSMC was not affected by CD36 silencing. However, VEGF was not able to induce any proliferation in VSMC after CD36 silencing that also blunted VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Finally, combined silencing of CD36 together with a blocking antibody against VEGF prevented most of CMOA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CD36 is mediating CM-induced proliferation of VSMC. Induction of CD36 by adipokines enhances the response of VSMC towards VEGF and OA.

  9. Piperine inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation and migration in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Pa; Lee, Kwan; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Hong, Heeok

    2015-02-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in blood vessels are important in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Piperine, a major component of black pepper, has antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, the antiatherosclerotic effects of piperine have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of piperine on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs were investigated. The antiproliferative effects of piperine were determined using MTT assays, cell counting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blots. Our results showed that piperine significantly attenuated the proliferation of VSMCs by increasing the expression of p27(kip1), regulating the mRNA expression of cell cycle enzymes (cyclin D, cyclin E, and PCNA), and decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in a noncytotoxic concentration-dependent manner (30-100 μM). Moreover, we examined the effects of piperine on the migration of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs, as determined by the Boyden chamber assay, H2DCFDA staining, and western blots. Our results showed that 100 μM piperine decreased cell migration, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results suggest that piperine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the migration of VSMCs by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing MAPK phosphorylation and ROS. These findings suggest that piperine may be beneficial for the treatment of vascular-related disorders and diseases. PMID:25384161

  10. Vascular Smooth Muscle LRP6 Limits Arteriosclerotic Calcification in Diabetic LDLR-/- Mice by Restraining Noncanonical Wnt Signals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Su-Li; Ramachandran, Bindu; Behrmann, Abraham; Shao, Jian-Su; Mead, Megan; Smith, Carolyn; Krchma, Karen; Arredondo, Yoanna Bello; Kovacs, Attila; Kapoor, Kapil; Brill, Laurence M.; Perera, Ranjan; Williams, Bart O.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Wnt signaling regulates key aspects of diabetic vascular disease. Objective We generated SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- mice to determine contributions of Wnt co-receptor LRP6 in the vascular smooth muscle lineage (VSM) of male LDLR-null mice, a background susceptible to diet (HFD) - induced diabetic arteriosclerosis. Methods and Results As compared to LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- controls, SM22-Cre;LRP6(fl/fl);LDLR-/- (LRP6-VKO) siblings exhibited increased aortic calcification on HFD without changes in fasting glucose, lipids, or body composition. Pulse wave velocity (index of arterial stiffness) was also increased. Vascular calcification paralleled enhanced aortic osteochondrogenic programs and circulating osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular regulator of arteriosclerosis. Survey of ligands and Frizzled (Fzd) receptor profiles in LRP6-VKO revealed upregulation of canonical and noncanonical Wnts alongside Fzd10. Fzd10 stimulated noncanonical signaling and OPN promoter activity via an USF-activated cognate inhibited by LRP6. RNAi revealed that USF1 but not USF2 supports OPN expression in LRP6-VKO VSM, and immunoprecipitation confirmed increased USF1 association with OPN chromatin. ML141, an antagonist of cdc42/Rac1 noncanonical signaling, inhibited USF1 activation, osteochondrogenic programs, alkaline phosphatase, and VSM calcification. Mass spectrometry identified LRP6 binding to protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) - 1, and nuclear asymmetric dimethylarginine modification was increased with LRP6-VKO. RNAi demonstrated that PRMT1 inhibits OPN and TNAP while PRMT4 supports expression. USF1 complexes containing the H3R17Me2a signature of PRMT4 are increased with LRP6-VKO. Jmjd6, a demethylase downregulated with LRP6 deficiency, inhibits OPN and TNAP expression, USF1:H3R17Me2a complex formation and transactivation. Conclusions LRP6 restrains VSM noncanonical signals that promote osteochondrogenic differentiation, mediated in part via USF1- and arginine methylation

  11. BMP-9 regulates the osteoblastic differentiation and calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells through an ALK1 mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil Charles Wallace; Shanahan, Catherine M; Shroff, Rukshana C; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The process of vascular calcification shares many similarities with that of physiological skeletal mineralization, and involves the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in arteries. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully explained. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-9) has been shown to exert direct effects on both bone development and vascular function. In the present study, we have investigated the role of BMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Vessel calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins pre-dialysis, with factors specific to the dialysis milieu triggering accelerated calcification. Intriguingly, BMP-9 was markedly elevated in serum from CKD children on dialysis. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed that BMP-9 treatment causes a significant increase in VSMC calcium content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mRNA expression of osteogenic markers. BMP-9-induced calcium deposition was significantly reduced following treatment with the ALP inhibitor 2,5-Dimethoxy-N-(quinolin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide confirming the mediatory role of ALP in this process. The inhibition of ALK1 signalling using a soluble chimeric protein significantly reduced calcium deposition and ALP activity, confirming that BMP-9 is a physiological ALK1 ligand. Signal transduction studies revealed that BMP-9 induced Smad2, Smad3 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. As these Smad proteins directly bind to Smad4 to activate target genes, siRNA studies were subsequently undertaken to examine the functional role of Smad4 in VSMC calcification. Smad4-siRNA transfection induced a significant reduction in ALP activity and calcium deposition. These novel data demonstrate that BMP-9 induces VSMC osteogenic differentiation and calcification via ALK1, Smad and ALP dependent mechanisms. This may identify new potential therapeutic strategies for clinical intervention.

  12. Control of vascular smooth muscle function by Src-family kinases and reactive oxygen species in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Charles E; Knock, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognised as second messenger molecules that regulate cellular function by reversibly oxidising specific amino acid residues of key target proteins. Amongst these are the Src-family kinases (SrcFKs), a multi-functional group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). In this review we examine the evidence supporting a role for ROS-induced SrcFK activity in normal VSM contractile function and in vascular remodelling in cardiovascular disease. VSM contractile responses to G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, as well as hypoxia in pulmonary artery, are shown to be dependent on both ROS and SrcFK activity. Specific phosphorylation targets are identified amongst those that alter intracellular Ca2+ concentration, including transient receptor potential channels, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and various types of K+ channels, as well as amongst those that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics and myosin phosphatase activity, including focal adhesion kinase, protein tyrosine kinase-2, Janus kinase, other focal adhesion-associated proteins, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors. We also examine a growing weight of evidence in favour of a key role for SrcFKs in multiple pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signalling pathways relating to oxidative stress and vascular remodelling, with a particular focus on pulmonary hypertension, including growth-factor receptor transactivation and downstream signalling, hypoxia-inducible factors, positive feedback between SrcFK and STAT3 signalling and positive feedback between SrcFK and NADPH oxidase dependent ROS production. We also discuss evidence for and against the potential therapeutic targeting of SrcFKs in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25384773

  13. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolotina, V M; Najibi, S; Palacino, J J; Pagano, P J; Cohen, R A

    1994-04-28

    Nitric oxide is the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), and it is thought to relax smooth muscle cells by stimulation of guanylate cyclase, accumulation of its product cyclic GMP, and cGMP-dependent modification of several intracellular processes, including activation of potassium channels through cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Here we present evidence that both exogenous nitric oxide and native EDRF can directly activate single Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (K+Ca) in cell-free membrane patches without requiring cGMP. Under conditions when guanylate cyclase was inhibited by methylene blue, considerable relaxation of rabbit aorta to nitric oxide persisted which was blocked by charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of K+Ca channels. These studies demonstrate a novel direct action of nitric oxide on K+Ca channels. PMID:7512692

  14. Inhibition of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Gentiana lutea Root Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Rushendhiran; Potunuru, Uma Rani; Nastasijević, Branislav; T, Avaneesh; Joksić, Gordana; Dixit, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Gentiana lutea belonging to the Gentianaceae family of flowering plants are routinely used in traditional Serbian medicine for their beneficial gastro-intestinal and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the study was to determine whether aqueous root extracts of Gentiana lutea consisting of gentiopicroside, gentisin, bellidifolin-8-O-glucoside, demethylbellidifolin-8-O-glucoside, isovitexin, swertiamarin and amarogentin prevents proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells in response to PDGF-BB. Cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis were performed based on alamar blue assay and propidium iodide labeling respectively. In primary cultures of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs), PDGF-BB (20 ng/ml) induced a two-fold increase in cell proliferation which was significantly blocked by the root extract (1 mg/ml). The root extract also prevented the S-phase entry of synchronized cells in response to PDGF. Furthermore, PDGF-BB induced ERK1/2 activation and consequent increase in cellular nitric oxide (NO) levels were also blocked by the extract. These effects of extract were due to blockade of PDGF-BB induced expression of iNOS, cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Docking analysis of the extract components on MEK1, the upstream ERK1/2 activating kinase using AutoDock4, indicated a likely binding of isovitexin to the inhibitor binding site of MEK1. Experiments performed with purified isovitexin demonstrated that it successfully blocks PDGF-induced ERK1/2 activation and proliferation of RASMCs in cell culture. Thus, Gentiana lutea can provide novel candidates for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:23637826

  15. Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by Gentiana lutea root extracts.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, Rushendhiran; Potunuru, Uma Rani; Nastasijević, Branislav; T, Avaneesh; Joksić, Gordana; Dixit, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Gentiana lutea belonging to the Gentianaceae family of flowering plants are routinely used in traditional Serbian medicine for their beneficial gastro-intestinal and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the study was to determine whether aqueous root extracts of Gentiana lutea consisting of gentiopicroside, gentisin, bellidifolin-8-O-glucoside, demethylbellidifolin-8-O-glucoside, isovitexin, swertiamarin and amarogentin prevents proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells in response to PDGF-BB. Cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis were performed based on alamar blue assay and propidium iodide labeling respectively. In primary cultures of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs), PDGF-BB (20 ng/ml) induced a two-fold increase in cell proliferation which was significantly blocked by the root extract (1 mg/ml). The root extract also prevented the S-phase entry of synchronized cells in response to PDGF. Furthermore, PDGF-BB induced ERK1/2 activation and consequent increase in cellular nitric oxide (NO) levels were also blocked by the extract. These effects of extract were due to blockade of PDGF-BB induced expression of iNOS, cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Docking analysis of the extract components on MEK1, the upstream ERK1/2 activating kinase using AutoDock4, indicated a likely binding of isovitexin to the inhibitor binding site of MEK1. Experiments performed with purified isovitexin demonstrated that it successfully blocks PDGF-induced ERK1/2 activation and proliferation of RASMCs in cell culture. Thus, Gentiana lutea can provide novel candidates for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  16. Calcium and magnesium transport by in situ mitochondria: electron probe analysis of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, R.; Somlyo, A.P.

    1987-10-01

    The extent, time course, and reversibility of mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake secondary to cellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx stimulated by massive Na+ efflux were evaluated by electron probe microanalysis of rabbit portal vein smooth muscle. Strips of portal vein were Na+ loaded for 3 hours at 37/sup 0/C in a K+-free 1 mM ouabain solution, after which rapid Na+ efflux was induced by washing with a Na+-free K+-Li+ solution (1 mM ouabain). Li+ washing Na+-loaded portal vein produced a large transient contraction accompanied by an increase (over 100-fold) in mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ and also significant (p less than 0.05) increases in phosphorus and Mg/sup 2 +/. The Ca/sup 2 +/ loading of the mitochondria was reversed during prolonged Li+ wash, and by 2 hours, mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and phosphorus had returned to control levels. The maximal contractile response to stimulation remained normal, demonstrating that pathologic Ca/sup 2 +/ loading of mitochondria is reversible in situ and compatible with normal maximal force developed by the smooth muscle. Mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphorus uptake were reduced but still significant when the Li+ wash contained 0.2 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ or when ouabain was omitted. The fact that mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ loading accompanied submaximal contractions during 0.2 mM Ca/sup 2 +/-Li wash suggests supranormal affinity of mitochondria for Ca/sup 2 +/ and may be due, in part, to reverse operation of the mitochondrial Na+-Ca/sup 2 +/ exchanger. Mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and phosphorus uptake were eliminated when the Li+ wash was performed at 2/sup 0/C or when the wash contained no Ca/sup 2 +/.

  17. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    PubMed

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  18. Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Connexin Gene Knockdown in Vascular Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Good, Miranda E; Begandt, Daniela; DeLalio, Leon J; Johnstone, Scott R; Isakson, Brant E

    2016-01-01

    Global knockout of vascular connexins can result in premature/neonatal death, severe developmental complications, or compensatory up-regulation of different connexin isoforms. Thus, specific connexin gene knockdown using RNAi-mediated technologies is a technique that allows investigators to efficiently monitor silencing effects of single or multiple connexin gene products. The present chapter describes the transient knockdown of connexins in vitro and ex vivo for cells of the blood vessel wall. In detail, different transfection methods for primary endothelial cells and ex vivo thoracodorsal arteries are described. Essential controls for validating transfection efficiency as well as targeted gene knockdown are explained. These protocols provide researchers with the ability to modify connexin gene expression levels in a multitude of experimental setups. PMID:27207287

  19. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol on the agonist responses of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.; Wooles, W.R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors studied the effects of ETOH on the response of isolated rat thoracic aorta rings to phenylephrine (PE) and angiotensin II (AII). They also examined the effect of chronic ETOH on vascular reactivity to PE and ETOH in vitro for up to 18 weeks during the development of ETOH-induced hypertension. The dose-responses (DR) of both PE and AII were shifted to the right by ETOH in a dose dependent manner. All was more sensitive to this shift which was significantly different from the controls at 50 mM ETOH compared to 150 mM ETOH for PE. The combination of 1 nM saralasin and 150 mM ETOH depressed the AII DR more than saralasin alone but was comparable to that of ETOH. The combination of 150 mM ETOH and 0.3 nM prazosin depressed the PE DR less than prazosin alone but more than ETOH alone. The effect of .01 nM verapamil on the PE DR was similar to that of saralasin on the AII DR. The results of the chronic study showed that the PE DR of the aortic rings from ETOH rats was comparable to that of control rats until the 18th week when it was shifted to the right. The PE DR was shifted rightward by 150 mM ETOH to the same extent in both control and ETOH rats which suggests that ETOH has ..cap alpha..-receptor blocking properties. Vascular reactivity to PE and to ETOH remained the same throughout the ETOH drinking period indicating a lack of development of hypersensitivity to PE or tolerance to ETOH which may contribute to the hypertensive effect of ETOH.

  20. Age decreases mitochondrial motility and increases mitochondrial size in vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Susan; Saunter, Christopher D.; Girkin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Age is proposed to be associated with altered structure and function of mitochondria; however, in fully‐differentiated cells, determining the structure of more than a few mitochondria at a time is challenging. In the present study, the structures of the entire mitochondrial complements of cells were resolved from a pixel‐by‐pixel covariance analysis of fluctuations in potentiometric fluorophore intensity during ‘flickers’ of mitochondrial membrane potential.Mitochondria are larger in vascular myocytes from aged rats compared to those in younger adult rats.A subpopulation of mitochondria in myocytes from aged, but not younger, animals is highly‐elongated.Some mitochondria in myocytes from younger, but not aged, animals are highly‐motile.Mitochondria that are motile are located more peripherally in the cell than non‐motile mitochondria. Abstract Mitochondrial function, motility and architecture are each central to cell function. Age‐associated mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to vascular disease. However, mitochondrial changes in ageing remain ill‐defined because of the challenges of imaging in native cells. We determined the structure of mitochondria in live native cells, demarcating boundaries of individual organelles by inducing stochastic ‘flickers’ of membrane potential, recorded as fluctuations in potentiometric fluorophore intensity (flicker‐assisted localization microscopy; FaLM). In freshly‐isolated myocytes from rat cerebral resistance arteries, FaLM showed a range of mitochondrial X‐Y areas in both young adult (3 months; 0.05–6.58 μm2) and aged rats (18 months; 0.05–13.4 μm2). In cells from young animals, most mitochondria were small (mode area 0.051 μm2) compared to aged animals (0.710 μm2). Cells from older animals contained a subpopulation of highly‐elongated mitochondria (5.3% were >2 μm long, 4.2% had a length:width ratio >3) that was rare in younger animals (0.15% of mitochondria >2

  1. Identify potential drugs for cardiovascular diseases caused by stress-induced genes in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciou, Jin-Shuei; Chen, Shun-Tsung; Chung, Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is a major cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Many studies suggest that vascular injury triggers VSMC dedifferentiation, which results in VSMC changes from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Methods In this study, we examined how VSMC responds under mechanical stress by using time-course microarray data. A three-phase study was proposed to investigate the stress-induced differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in VSMC. First, DEGs were identified by using the moderated t-statistics test. Second, more DEGs were inferred by using the Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM). Finally, the topological parameters-based method and cluster analysis approach were employed to predict the last batch of DEGs. To identify the potential drugs for vascular diseases involve VSMC proliferation, the drug-gene interaction database, Connectivity Map (cMap) was employed. Success of the predictions were determined using in-vitro data, i.e. MTT and clonogenic assay. Results Based on the differential expression calculation, at least 23 DEGs were found, and the findings were qualified by previous studies on VSMC. The results of gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the most often found enriched biological processes are cell-cycle-related processes. Furthermore, more stress-induced genes, well supported by literature, were found by applying graph theory to the gene association network (GAN). Finally, we showed that by processing the cMap input queries with a cluster algorithm, we achieved a substantial increase in the number of potential drugs with experimental IC50 measurements. With this novel approach, we have not only successfully identified the DEGs, but also improved the DEGs prediction by performing the topological and cluster analysis. Moreover, the findings are remarkably validated and in line with the literature. Furthermore, the cMap and

  2. HYPOXIA TRIGGERS SUBCELLULAR COMPARTMENTAL REDOX SIGNALING IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Waypa, Gregory B.; Marks, Jeremy D.; Guzy, Robert; Mungai, Paul T.; Schriewer, Jacqueline; Dokic, Danijela; Schumacker, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies have implicated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in regulating hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), but controversy exists regarding whether hypoxia increases or decreases ROS generation. Objective This study tested the hypothesis that hypoxia induces redox changes that differ among sub-cellular compartments in pulmonary (PASMC) and systemic (SASMC) smooth muscle cells. Methods and Results We employed a novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (RoGFP) to assess the effects of hypoxia on redox signaling in cultured PASMC and SASMC. Using genetic targeting sequences, RoGFP was expressed in the cytosol (Cyto-RoGFP), the mitochondrial matrix (Mito-RoGFP), or the mitochondrial inter-membrane space (IMS-RoGFP), allowing assessment of oxidant signaling in distinct intracellular compartments. Superfusion of PASMC or SASMC with hypoxic media increased oxidation of both Cyto-RoGFP and IMS-RoGFP. However, hypoxia decreased oxidation of Mito-RoGFP in both cell types. The hypoxia-induced oxidation of Cyto-RoGFP was attenuated through the over-expression of cytosolic catalase in PASMC. Conclusions These results indicate that hypoxia causes a decrease in non-specific ROS generation in the matrix compartment, while it increases regulated ROS production in the IMS, which diffuses to the cytosol of both PASMC and SASMC. PMID:20019331

  3. Agonist-induced redistribution of calponin in contractile vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, C A; Takahashi, K; Tao, T; Morgan, K G

    1994-11-01

    Calponin is a thin filament-associated protein that has been implicated in playing an auxiliary regulatory role in smooth muscle contraction. We have used immunofluorescence and digital imaging microscopy to determine the cellular distribution of calponin in single cells freshly isolated from the ferret portal vein. In resting cells calponin is distributed throughout the cytosol, associated with filamentous structures, and is excluded from the nuclear area of the cell. The ratio of surface cortex-associated calponin to cytosol-associated calponin (R) was found to be 0.639 +/- 0.021. Upon depolarization of the cell with physiological saline solution containing 96 mM K+, the distribution of calponin did not change from that of a resting cell (R = 0.678 +/- 0.025, P = 0.369). Upon stimulation with an agonist (10 microM phenylephrine) that is known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) in these cells, the cellular distribution of calponin changed from primarily cytosolic to primarily surface cortex associated (R = 1.24 +/- 0.085, P < 0.001). This agonist-induced redistribution of calponin was partially inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin, overlapped in time with PKC translocation, and preceded contraction of these cells. These results suggest that the physiological function of calponin may be to mediate agonist-activated contraction via a PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:7526695

  4. Inhibitory role of reactive oxygen species in the differentiation of multipotent vascular stem cells into vascular smooth muscle cells in rats: a novel aspect of traditional culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Haibo; Wang, Hui; Wu, Weiwei; Qi, Lei; Shao, Lei; Wang, Fang; Lai, Yimu; Leach, Desiree; Mathis, Bryan; Janicki, Joseph S; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2015-10-01

    Proliferative or synthetic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are widely accepted to be mainly derived from the dedifferentiation or phenotypic modulation of mature contractile VSMCs, i.e., a phenotype switch from a normally quiescent and contractile type into a proliferative or synthetic form. However, this theory has been challenged by recent evidence that synthetic VSMCs predominantly originate instead from media-derived multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs). To test these hypotheses further, we re-examine whether the conventional rat aortic SMC (RASMC) culture involves the VSMC differentiation of MVSCs or the dedifferentiation of mature VSMCs and the potential mechanism for controlling the synthetic phenotype of RASMCs. We enzymatically isolated RASMCs and cultured the cells in both a regular growth medium (RGM) and a stem cell growth medium (SCGM). Regardless of culture conditions, only a small portion of freshly isolated RASMCs attaches, survives and grows slowly during the first 7 days of primary culture, while expressing both SMC- and MVSC-specific markers. RGM-cultured cells undergo a process of synthetic SMC differentiation, whereas SCGM-cultured cells can be differentiated into not only synthetic SMCs but also other somatic cells. Notably, compared with the RGM-cultured differentiated RASMCs, the SCGM-cultured undifferentiated cells exhibit the phenotype of MVSCs and generate greater amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that act as a negative regulator of differentiation into synthetic VSMCs. Knockdown of phospholipase A2, group 7 (Pla2g7) suppresses ROS formation in the MVSCs while enhancing SMC differentiation of MVSCs. These results suggest that cultured synthetic VSMCs can be derived from the SMC differentiation of MVSCs with ROS as a negative regulator.

  5. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  6. A Novel System for Studying Mechanical Strain Waveform-Dependent Responses in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason; Wong, Mitchell; Smith, Quentin; Baker, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    While many studies have examined the effects mechanical forces on vSMCs, there is a limited understanding of how the different arterial strain waveforms that occur in disease and different vascular beds alter vSMC mechanotransduction and phenotype. Here, we present a novel system for applying complex, time-varying strain waveforms to cultured cells and use this system to understand how these waveforms can alter vSMC phenotype and signaling. We have developed a highly adaptable cell culture system that allows the application of mechanical strain to cells in culture and can reproduce the complex dynamic mechanical environment experienced by arterial cells in the body. Using this system, we examined whether the type of applied strain waveform altered phenotypic modulation of vSMCs by mechanical forces. Cells exposed to the brachial waveform had increased phosphorylation of AKT, EGR-1, c-Fos expression and cytoskeletal remodeling in comparison to cells treated with the aortic waveform. In addition, vSMCs exposed to physiological waveforms had adopted a more differentiated phenotype in comparison to those treated with static or sinusoidal cyclic strain, with increased expression of vSMC markers desmin, calponin and SM-22 as well as increased expression of regulatory miRNAs including miR-143, -145 and -221. Taken together, our studies demonstrate the development of a novel system for applying complex, timevarying mechanical forces to cells in culture. In addition, we have shown that physiological strain waveforms have powerful effects on vSMC phenotype. PMID:24096612

  7. Sequential activation of alpha-actin genes during avian cardiogenesis: vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene transcripts mark the onset of cardiomyocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The expression of cytoplasmic beta-actin and cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle alpha-actins during early avian cardiogenesis was analyzed by in situ hybridization with mRNA-specific single-stranded DNA probes. The cytoplasmic beta-actin gene was ubiquitously expressed in the early chicken embryo. In contrast, the alpha-actin genes were sequentially activated in avian cardiac tissue during the early stages of heart tube formation. The accumulation of large quantities of smooth muscle alpha-actin transcripts in epimyocardial cells preceded the expression of the sarcomeric alpha-actin genes. The accumulation of skeletal alpha-actin mRNAs in the developing heart lagged behind that of cardiac alpha-actin by several embryonic stages. At Hamburger- Hamilton stage 12, the smooth muscle alpha-actin gene was selectively down-regulated in the heart such that only the conus, which subsequently participates in the formation of the vascular trunks, continued to express this gene. This modulation in smooth muscle alpha- actin gene expression correlated with the beginning of coexpression of sarcomeric alpha-actin transcripts in the epimyocardium and the onset of circulation in the embryo. The specific expression of the vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene marks the onset of differentiation of cardiac cells and represents the first demonstration of coexpression of both smooth muscle and striated alpha-actin genes within myogenic cells. PMID:3204121

  8. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  9. Vasorelaxing action of rutaecarpine: effects of rutaecarpine on calcium channel activities in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Wu, X C; Chen, C F; Lin, L C; Huang, Y T; Shan, J; Pang, P K

    1999-06-01

    Rutaecarpine (Rut) has been shown to induce hypotension and vasorelaxation. In vitro studies indicated that the vasorelaxant effect of Rut was largely endothelium-dependent. We previously reported that Rut increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in cultured rat endothelial cells (ECs) and decreased [Ca2+]i in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) cells. The present results showed that the hypotensive effect of Rut (10-100 microgram/kg i.v.) was significantly blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine. In aortic rings, Rut (0. 1-3.0 microM)-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by Nomega-nitro-L-arginine and hydroquinone but not by antagonists of the various K+ channels, 4-aminopyridine, apamin, charybdotoxin, or glibenclamide. Rut (0.1 and 1.0 microM) inhibited the norepinephrine-induced contraction generated by Ca2+ influx and at 1.0 microM increased cyclic GMP (cGMP) production in endothelium-intact rings and to a lesser extent in endothelium-denuded rings. In whole-cell patch-clamp recording, nonvoltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were recorded in ECs and Rut (0.1, 1.0 microM) elicited an opening of such channels. However, in VSMCs, Rut (10.0 microM) inhibited significantly the L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. In ECs cells, Rut (1.0, 10.0 microM) increased nitric oxide release in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together, the results suggested that Rut lowered blood pressure by mainly activating the endothelial Ca2+-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway to reduce smooth muscle tone. Although the contribution seemed to be minor in nature, inhibition of contractile response in VSMCs, as evidenced by inhibition of Ca2+ currents, was also involved. Potassium channels, on the other hand, had no apparent roles. PMID:10336511

  10. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  11. Phosphotidylinositol turnover in vascular, uterine, fundal, and tracheal smooth muscle: effect of serotonin (5HT)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Wittenauer, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    In brain, platelets, and aorta, 5HT has been reported to increase phosphotidylinositol turnover, an effect linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors. The authors examined the effect of 5HT on /sup 3/H-inositol-1-phosphate (/sup 3/H-I-P) in tissues possessing 5HT/sub 2/ receptors that mediate contraction to 5HT (rat jugular vein, aorta, uterus and guinea pig trachea) and in a tissue in which contraction to 5HT is not mediated by 5HT/sub 2/ receptors (rat stomach fundus). Tissues were incubated (37/sup 0/C, 95% O/sub 2/, 5% CO/sub 2/) with /sup 3/H-inositol (90 min), washed, LiCl/sub 2/ (10 mM) and 5HT added for 90 min, extracted, and /sup 3/H-I-P eluted from a Dowex-1 column. Basal /sup 3/H-I-P was 10-fold higher in the uterus than in the other tissues. 5HT (10/sup -6/-10/sup -4/M) increased /sup 3/H-I-P in the jugular vein, aorta, and uterus but not in the trachea or fundus. Maximum increase was greatest in the jugular vein (8-fold) with an ED/sub 50/ of 0.4 ..mu..M 5HT. The selective 5HT/sub 2/ receptor blocker, LY53857 (10/sup -8/M) antagonized the increase in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in the jugular vein, aorta and uterus. Pargyline (10/sup -5/M) added to the trachea and fundus did not unmask an effect of 5HT (10/sup -4/M). These data suggest that (1) the jugular vein produced the most sensitive response to 5HT-induced increases in /sup 3/H-I-P, (2) increases in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in smooth muscle may be linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors and (3) activation of 5HT/sub 2/ receptors as occurred in the trachea will not always increase /sup 3/H-I-P.

  12. The mechanism of action of endothelin-1 as compared with other agonists in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Wallnoefer, A.W.; Weir, S.; Rueegg, U.C.; Cauvin, C. )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on tension and membrane potential in rat isolated mesenteric resistance vessels (MRVs) and on 45Ca influx, 45Ca efflux, inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) production, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ((Ca2+)1) in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells were compared with those of other agonists. ET-1 induced contractions of the MRVs, which were slow in onset, but reached a similar maximum amplitude (at 10 nM ET-1) as that seen with norepinephrine (NE, 10 microM) or (arg8)vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 microM). The EC50 for ET-1 was 1.3 +/- 0.1 nM. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ reduced ET-1-induced contractions to 11 +/- 3% of those in Ca2+-containing medium. With NE, the same procedure reduced contractions to 47 +/- 7% of those in Ca2+-containing medium, while with AVP, the reduction was similar in magnitude to that induced by ET-1 (11 +/- 5% of those in Ca2+-containing medium). Relaxation of ET-1-induced and NE-induced contractions by diltiazem was not complete (maximal at 58 +/- 6% with 10 microM diltiazem after 6 nM ET-1, and at 70 +/- 3% after 0.1 microM NE), in contrast to that of 80 mM K+-induced contractions, which were potently (IC50 = 0.2 microM) and completely reversed (100% relaxation at 10 microM diltiazem). ET-1 (6 nM) caused a small but significant depolarization of the MRVs (approximately 7 mV), the magnitude of which was only about one-third of that induced by equieffective contractile concentrations of NE and AVP. The voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K 8644 (1 microM), in contrast to ET-1, NE, and AVP, produced a small contraction (30 +/- 2% of the maximum response to NE), but no further depolarization when added in the presence of 15 mM K+ (which elicited approximately 12 mV depolarization but no contraction).

  13. K channel activation by nucleotide diphosphates and its inhibition by glibenclamide in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J; Zhang, H; Nakao, K; Bolton, T B

    1993-10-01

    1. Whole-cell and inside-out patch recordings were made from single smooth muscle cells that had been isolated enzymatically and mechanically from the rabbit portal vein. 2. In whole-cells the inclusion in the recording pipette solution of nucleotide diphosphates (NDPs), but not tri- or monophosphates, induced a K-current that developed gradually over 5 to 15 min. Intracellular 1 mM guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) induced a slowly developing outward K-current at -37 mV that reached a maximum on average of 72 +/- 4 pA (n = 40). Half maximal effect was estimated to occur with about 0.2 mM GDP. Except for ADP, other NDPs had comparable effects. At 0.1 mM, ADP was equivalent to GDP but at higher concentration ADP was less effective. ADP induced its maximum effect at 1 mM but had almost no effect at 10 mM. 3. In 14% of inside-out patches exposed to 1 mM GDP at the intracellular surface, characteristic K channel activity was observed which showed long (> 1 s) bursts of openings separated by longer closed periods. The current-voltage relationship for the channel was linear in a 60 mM:130 mM K-gradient and the unitary conductance was 24 pS. 4. Glibenclamide applied via the extracellular solution was found to be a potent inhibitor of GDP-induced K-current (IK(GDP)) in the whole-cell. The Kd was 25 nM and the inhibition was fully reversible on wash-out. 5. IK(GDP) was not evoked if Mg ions were absent from the pipette solution. In contrast the omission of extracellular Mg ions had no effect on outward or inward IK(GDP). 6. Inclusion of 1 mM ATP in the recording pipette solution reduced IK(GDP) and also attenuated its decline during long (25 min) recordings. 7. When perforated-patch whole-cell recording was used, metabolic poisoning with cyanide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose induced a glibenclamide-sensitive K-current. This current was not observed when conventional whole-cell recording was used. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed. 8. These K channels appear similar to

  14. Temporal analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell elasticity and adhesion reveals oscillation waveforms that differ with aging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Qiu, Hongyu; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Sun, Zhe; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Zhongkui; Hill, Michael A; Hunter, William C; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2012-10-01

    A spectral analysis approach was developed for detailed study of time-resolved, dynamic changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) elasticity and adhesion to identify differences in VSMC from young and aged monkeys. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure Young's modulus of elasticity and adhesion as assessed by fibronectin (FN) or anti-beta 1 integrin interaction with the VSMC surface. Measurements demonstrated that VSMC cells from old vs. young monkeys had increased elasticity (21.6 kPa vs. 3.5 kPa or a 612% increase in elastic modulus) and adhesion (86 pN vs. 43 pN or a 200% increase in unbinding force). Spectral analysis identified three major frequency components in the temporal oscillation patterns for elasticity (ranging from 1.7 × 10(-3) to 1.9 × 10(-2) Hz in old and 8.4 × 10(-4) to 1.5 × 10(-2) Hz in young) and showed that the amplitude of oscillation was larger (P < 0.05) in old than in young at all frequencies. It was also observed that patterns of oscillation in the adhesion data were similar to the elasticity waveforms. Cell stiffness was reduced and the oscillations were inhibited by treatment with cytochalasin D, ML7 or blebbistatin indicating the involvement of actin-myosin-driven processes. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved analysis of AFM cell elasticity and adhesion measurements and that it provides a uniquely sensitive method to detect real-time functional differences in biomechanical and adhesive properties of cells. The oscillatory behavior suggests that mechanisms governing elasticity and adhesion are coupled and affected differentially during aging, which may link these events to changes in vascular stiffness.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulates heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle. Role in cell survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Peyton, Kelly J; Ensenat, Diana; Wang, Hong; Schafer, Andrew I; Alam, Jawed; Durante, William

    2005-01-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective protein that catalyzes the degradation of heme to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). In the present study, we found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by a variety of experimental agents stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent increase in HO-1 mRNA and protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). The induction of HO-1 by ER stress was blocked by actinomycin D or cycloheximide and was independent of any changes in HO-1 mRNA stability. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that ER stress stimulated HO-1 promoter activity via the antioxidant response element. Moreover, ER stress induced the nuclear import of Nrf2 and the binding of Nrf2 to the HO-1 antioxidant response element. Interestingly, ER stress stimulated SMC apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding, caspase-3 activation, and DNA laddering. The induction of apoptosis by ER stress was potentiated by HO inhibition, whereas it was prevented by addition of HO substrate. In addition, exposure of SMC to exogenously administered CO inhibited ER stress-mediated apoptosis, and this was associated with a decrease in the expression of the proapoptotic protein, GADD153. In contrast, the other HO-1 products failed to block apoptosis or GADD153 expression during ER stress. These results demonstrated that ER stress is an inducer of HO-1 gene expression in vascular SMC and that HO-1-derived CO acts in an autocrine fashion to inhibit SMC apoptosis. The capacity of ER stress to stimulate the HO-1/CO system provides a novel mechanism by which this organelle regulates cell survival.

  16. Neuronal chemorepellent Slit2 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by suppressing small GTPase Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Hou, Jie; Hu, Xing; Wang, Xuerong; Xiao, Yan; Mou, Yongshan; De Leon, Hector

    2006-03-01

    The Slits are secreted proteins with roles in axonal guidance and leukocyte migration. On binding to Robo receptors, Slit2 repels developing axons and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Slit2 is cleaved into Slit2-N, a protein tightly binding to cell membranes, and Slit2-C, a diffusible fragment. In the present study, we characterized the functional role of Slit2-N in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the cell association properties of 2 truncated versions of Slit2-N. Here, we document for the first time that Slit2-N is a chemorepellent of VSMCs. Intact blood vessels expressed Slit2 and Robo receptors as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR. Recombinant Slit2-N prevented the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated migration of VSMCs. Slit2-N also abrogated PDGF-mediated activation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, a member of the Rho GTPase superfamily of proteins involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, Slit2-N inhibited the PDGF-induced formation of lamellipodia, a crucial cytoskeletal reorganization event for cell motility. Slit2-N had no effect on the PDGF-mediated increase in DNA synthesis determined by [3H]thymidine uptake, suggesting that VSMC growth is unaffected by Slit2. Analysis of 2 engineered Slit2-N fragments (Slit2-N/1118 and Slit2-N/1121) indicated that 3 amino acids upstream of the putative cleavage site (Arg1121, Thr1122) are involved in the association of Slit2-N to the cell membrane. Our data assign a novel functional role to Slit2 in vascular function and show that cell guidance mechanisms that operate in the developing central nervous system are conserved in VSMCs.

  17. Expression and Suppressive Effects of Interleukin-19 on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Pathophysiology and Development of Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ying; Sommerville, Laura J.; Cuneo, Anthony; Kelemen, Sheri E.; Autieri, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory cytokines may play a protective role in the progression of vascular disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize interleukin (IL)-19 expression and function in the development of intimal hyperplasia, and discern a potential mechanism of its direct effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). IL-19 is an immunomodulatory cytokine, the expression of which is reported to be restricted to inflammatory cells. In the present study, we found that IL-19 is not expressed in quiescent VSMCs or normal arteries but is induced in human arteries by injury and in cultured human VSMCs by inflammatory cytokines. Recombinant IL-19 significantly reduced VSMC proliferation (37.1 ± 4.8 × 103 versus 72.2 ± 6.1 × 103 cells/cm2) in a dose-dependent manner. IL-19 adenoviral gene transfer significantly reduced proliferation and neointimal formation in balloon angioplasty-injured rat carotid arteries (0.172 ± 29.9, versus 0.333 ± 71.9, and 0.309 ± 56.6 μm2). IL-19 induced activation of STAT3 as well as the expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5) in VSMCs. IL-19 treatment significantly reduced the activation of p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in stimulated VSMCs. Additionally, SOCS5 was found to interact with both p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in IL-19-treated human VSMCs. This is the first description of the expression of both IL-19 and SOCS5 in VSMCs and of the functional interaction between SOCS5 and MAPKs. We propose that through induction of SOCS5 and inhibition of signal transduction, IL-19 expression in VSMCs may represent a novel, protective, autocrine response of VSMCs to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:18669613

  18. A Decoy Peptide Targeted to Protein Phosphatase 1 Attenuates Degradation of SERCA2a in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seung Pil; Oh, Jae Gyun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Ju Young; Kang, Sang Won; Hajjar, Roger J.; Park, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Neointimal growth in the injured vasculature is largely facilitated by the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which associates with reduced sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) activity. The gene transfer-mediated restoration of the SERCA2a level thus attenuates neointimal growth and VSMC proliferation. We previously reported that a peptide targeted to protein phosphatase 1, ψPLB-SE, normalizes SERCA2a activity in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we found that ψPLB-SE attenuated neointimal growth in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries, and the proliferation and migration of VSMC cultured in high-serum media (synthetic conditions). In parallel, ψPLB-SE inhibited the degradation of SERCA2a in the injured carotid arteries and VSMC under synthetic conditions. The calpain inhibitor MDL28170 also attenuated SERCA2a degradation and VSMC proliferation under synthetic conditions, indicating that calpain degrades SERCA2a. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced SERCA2a degradation in VSMC, which was blocked by either ψPLB-SE or MDL28170. Additionally, ψPLB-SE normalized the cytosolic Ca2+ level in VSMC that was increased by either A23187 or synthetic stimulation. Collectively, these data indicate that ψPLB-SE corrects the abnormal Ca2+ handling by activating SERCA2a, which further protects SERCA2a from calpain-dependent degradation in VSMC. We conclude that ψPLB-SE may form the basis of a therapeutic strategy for vascular proliferative disorders. PMID:27792751

  19. Magnesium inhibits Wnt/β-catenin activity and reverses the osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Addy; Guerrero, Fatima; Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Madueño, Juan A; Herencia, Carmen; Peralta, Alan; Almaden, Yolanda; Lopez, Ignacio; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Gundlach, Kristina; Büchel, Janine; Peter, Mirjam E; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Rodriguez, Mariano; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium reduces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro but the mechanism has not been revealed so far. This work used only slightly increased magnesium levels and aimed at determining: a) whether inhibition of magnesium transport into the cell influences VSMC calcification, b) whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a key mediator of osteogenic differentiation, is modified by magnesium and c) whether magnesium can influence already established vascular calcification. Human VSMC incubated with high phosphate (3.3 mM) and moderately elevated magnesium (1.4 mM) significantly reduced VSMC calcification and expression of the osteogenic transcription factors Cbfa-1 and osterix, and up-regulated expression of the natural calcification inhibitors matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The protective effects of magnesium on calcification and expression of osteogenic markers were no longer observed in VSMC cultured with an inhibitor of cellular magnesium transport (2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate [2-APB]). High phosphate induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as demonstrated by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus, increased expression of the frizzled-3 gene, and downregulation of Dkk-1 gene, a specific antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The addition of magnesium however inhibited phosphate-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, TRPM7 silencing using siRNA resulted in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additional experiments were performed to test the ability of magnesium to halt the progression of already established VSMC calcification in vitro. The delayed addition of magnesium decreased calcium content, down-regulated Cbfa-1 and osterix and up-regulated MGP and OPG, when compared with a control group. This effect was not observed when 2-APB was added. In conclusion, magnesium transport through the cell membrane is important to inhibit VSMC calcification in vitro

  20. Aldosterone Increases Oxidant Stress to Impair Guanylyl Cyclase Activity by Cysteinyl Thiol Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E.; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO·); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO· to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10-9-10-7 mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a β1-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO· sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC β1-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H2O2 did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO·-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC. PMID:19141618

  1. Aldosterone increases oxidant stress to impair guanylyl cyclase activity by cysteinyl thiol oxidation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maron, Bradley A; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2009-03-20

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO(.)); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO(.) to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10(-9)-10(-7) mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a beta(1)-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO(.) sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC beta(1)-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H(2)O(2) did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO(.)-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC.

  2. Profiling the role of mammalian target of rapamycin in the vascular smooth muscle metabolome in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Tatiana V.; Goncharov, Dmitry A.; Pena, Andressa; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; DeLisser, Horace; Kawut, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis of pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMCs), coupled with metabolic reprogramming, are key components of pulmonary vascular remodeling, a major and currently irreversible pathophysiological feature of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We recently reported that activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in increased energy generation and maintenance of the proliferative, apoptosis-resistant PAVSMC phenotype in human PAH, but the downstream effects of mTOR activation on PAH PAVSMC metabolism are not clear. Using liquid and gas chromatography–based mass spectrometry, we performed pilot metabolomic profiling of human microvascular PAVSMCs from idiopathic-PAH subjects before and after treatment with the selective adenosine triphosphate–competitive mTOR inhibitor PP242 and from nondiseased lungs. We have shown that PAH PAVSMCs have a distinct metabolomic signature of altered metabolites—components of fatty acid synthesis, deficiency of sugars, amino sugars, and nucleotide sugars—intermediates of protein and lipid glycosylation, and downregulation of key biochemicals involved in glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism. We also report that mTOR inhibition attenuated or reversed the majority of the PAH-specific abnormalities in lipogenesis, glycosylation, glutathione, and NAD metabolism without affecting altered polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. Collectively, our data demonstrate a critical role of mTOR in major PAH PAVSMC metabolic abnormalities and suggest the existence of de novo lipid synthesis in PAVSMCs in human PAH that may represent a new, important component of disease pathogenesis worthy of future investigation. PMID:26697174

  3. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Vitronectin Expression Level and Stoichiometry Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration through Physiological Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Goyal, N.; Strawn, T. L.; Wu, J.; Mann, K. M.; Lawrence, D. A.; Fay, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is a critical process in arterial remodeling. Purified plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is reported to both promote and inhibit VSMC migration on 2-dimensional (D) surfaces. Objective To determine the effects of PAI-1 and vitronectin (VN) expressed by VSMC themselves on migration through physiological collagen matrices. Methods We studied migration of wild-type (WT), PAI-1-deficient, VN-deficient, PAI-1/VN doubly-deficient (DKO), and PAI-1-transgenic (Tg) VSMC through 3-D collagen gels. Results WT VSMC migrated significantly slower than PAI-1- and VN-deficient VSMC, but significantly faster than DKO VSMC. Experiments with recombinant PAI-1 suggested that basal VSMC PAI-1 expression inhibits migration by binding VN, which is secreted by VSMC and binds collagen. However, PAI-1-over-expressing Tg VSMC migrated faster than WT VSMC. Reconstitution experiments with recombinant PAI-1 mutants suggested that the pro-migratory effect of PAI-1 over-expression required its anti-plasminogen activator (PA) and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP) binding functions, but not VN binding. While promoting VSMC migration in the absence of PAI-1, VN inhibited the pro-migratory effect of active PAI-1. Conclusions In isolation, VN and PAI-1 are each pro-migratory. However, via formation of a high-affinity, non-motogenic complex, PAI-1 and VN each buffers the other's pro-migratory effect. The level of PAI-1 expression by VSMC and the concentration of VN in extracellular matrix are critical determinants of whether PAI-1 and VN promote or inhibit migration. These findings help to rectify previously conflicting reports and suggest that PAI-1/VN stoichiometry plays an important role in VSMC migration and vascular remodeling. PMID:20492459

  4. c-Ski inhibits autophagy of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by oxLDL and PDGF.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; Yang, Ting; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Yang, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is increasingly being recognized as a critical determinant of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) biology. Previously, we have demonstrated that c-Ski inhibits VSMC proliferation stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), but it is not clear whether c-Ski has the similar protective role against other vascular injury factors and whether regulation of autophagy is involved in its protective effects on VSMC. Accordingly, in this study, rat aortic A10 VSMCs were treated with 40 µg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) or 20 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), both of which were autophagy inducers and closely related to the abnormal proliferation of VSMCs. Overexpression of c-Ski in A10 cells significantly suppressed the oxLDL- and PDGF- induced autophagy. This action of c-Ski resulted in inhibiting the cell proliferation, the decrease of contractile phenotype marker α-SMA expression while the increase of synthetic phenotype marker osteopontin expression stimulated by oxLDL or PDGF. Inversely, knockdown of c-Ski by RNAi enhanced the stimulatory effects of oxLDL or PDGF on A10 cell growth and phenotype transition. And further investigation found that inhibition of AKT phosphorylation to downregulate proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression, was involved in the regulation of autophagy and associated functions by c-Ski in the oxLDL- and PDGF-stimulated VSMCs. Collectively, c-Ski may play an important role in inhibiting autophagy to protect VSMCs against some harsh stress including oxLDL and PDGF.

  5. Fetuin-A and Albumin Alter Cytotoxic Effects of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles on Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dautova, Yana; Kozlova, Diana; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Epple, Matthias; Bootman, Martin D.; Proudfoot, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Calcification is a detrimental process in vascular ageing and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In particular, small calcium phosphate (CaP) crystal deposits are associated with inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque de-stabilisation. We previously reported that CaP particles caused human vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) death and that serum reduced the toxic effects of the particles. Here, we found that the serum proteins fetuin-A and albumin (≥1 µM) reduced intracellular Ca2+ elevations and cell death in VSMCs in response to CaP particles. In addition, CaP particles functionalised with fetuin-A, but not albumin, were less toxic than naked CaP particles. Electron microscopic studies revealed that CaP particles were internalised in different ways; via macropinocytosis, membrane invagination or plasma membrane damage, which occurred within 10 minutes of exposure to particles. However, cell death did not occur until approximately 30 minutes, suggesting that plasma membrane repair and survival mechanisms were activated. In the presence of fetuin-A, CaP particle-induced damage was inhibited and CaP/plasma membrane interactions and particle uptake were delayed. Fetuin-A also reduced dissolution of CaP particles under acidic conditions, which may contribute to its cytoprotective effects after CaP particle exposure to VSMCs. These studies are particularly relevant to the calcification observed in blood vessels in patients with kidney disease, where circulating levels of fetuin-A and albumin are low, and in pathological situations where CaP crystal formation outweighs calcification-inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:24849210

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta positively regulates Notch signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells: role in cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Guha, Shaunta; Cullen, John P; Morrow, David; Colombo, Alberto; Lally, Caitríona; Walls, Dermot; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) in modulating Notch control of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) growth (proliferation and apoptosis) was examined in vitro under varying conditions of cyclic strain and validated in vivo following changes in medial tension and stress. Modulation of GSK-3β in vSMC following ectopic expression of constitutively active GSK-3β, siRNA knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with SB-216763 demonstrated that GSK-3β positively regulates Notch intracellular domain expression, CBF-1/RBP-Jκ transactivation and downstream target gene mRNA levels, while concomitantly promoting vSMC proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. In contrast, inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to cyclic strain environments in vitro using both a Flexercell™ Tension system and a novel Sylgard™ phantom vessel following bare metal stent implantation revealed that cyclic strain inhibits GSK-3β activity independent of p42/p44 MAPK and p38 activation concomitant with reduced Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to changes in medial strain microenvironments in vivo following carotid artery ligation revealed that enhanced GSK-3β activity was predominantly localized to medial and neointimal vSMC concomitant with increased Notch signaling, proliferating nuclear antigen and decreased Bax expression, respectively, as vascular remodeling progressed. GSK-3β is an important modulator of Notch signaling leading to altered vSMC cell growth where low strain/tension microenvironments prevail.

  7. Atherogenic, fibrotic and glucose utilising actions of glucokinase activators on vascular endothelium and smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical interventions for diabetes aim to control glycaemia and to prevent the development of complications, such as cardiovascular diseases. Some anti-hyperglycaemic drugs have been found to have adverse cardiovascular effects in their own right, limiting their therapeutic role. Glucokinase activity in the pancreas is critical in enhancing insulin release in response to hyperglycaemia. Glucokinase activators (GKAs) are novel agents for diabetes which act by enhancing the formation of glucose-6-phosphate leading to increased insulin production and subsequent suppression of blood glucose. Little, however, is known about the direct effects of GKAs on cardiovascular cells. Methods The effect of the GKAs RO28-1675 and Compound A on glucose utilisation in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) and rat MIN6 was observed by culturing the cells at high and low glucose concentration in the presence and absence of the GKAs and measuring glucose consumption. The effect of RO28-1675 at various concentrations on glucose-dependent signalling in BAEC was observed by measuring Smad2 phosphorylation by Western blotting. The effect of RO28-1675 on TGF-β stimulated proteoglycan synthesis was measured by 35S-SO4 incorporation and assessment of proteoglycan size by SDS-PAGE. The effects of RO28-1675 on TGF-β mediated Smad2C phosphorylation in BAEC was observed by measurement of pSmad2C levels. The direct actions of RO28-1675 on vascular reactivity were observed by measuring arteriole tone and lumen diameter. Results GKAs were demonstrated to increase glucose utilisation in pancreatic but not endothelial cells. Glucose-activated Smad2 phosphorylation was decreased in a dose-dependent fashion in the presence of RO28-1675. No effect of RO28-1675 was observed on TGF-β stimulated proteoglycan production. RO28-1675 caused a modest dilation in arteriole but not contractile sensitivity. Conclusions GKA RO28-1675 did not increase glucose consumption in endothelial cells

  8. High sodium augments angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the ERK 1/2-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular injury is exacerbated by high-salt diets. This study examined the effects of high-sodium level on Ang II-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The cells were cultured in a standard medium containing 137.5 mmol l(-1) of sodium. The high-sodium medium (140 mmol l(-1)) contained additional sodium chloride. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation. Ang II (100 nmol l(-1)) significantly increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in the both medium containing standard sodium and high sodium. High-sodium level augmented Ang II-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation compared with standard sodium. Pre-treatment with candesartan (1 μmol l(-1), Ang II type 1 receptor blocker) or PD98095 (10 μmol l(-1), ERK kinase iinhibitor) abolished the proliferative effect induced by high sodium/Ang II. Pre-treatment with 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (30 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor), but not SN-6 (10 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) or ouabain (1 mmol l(-1), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) attenuated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Osmotic pressure or chloride had no effect on Ang II-induced proliferative changes. High-sodium level did not affect Ang II receptor expression. Ang II increased intracellular pH via NHE-1 activation, and high-sodium level augmented the pH increase induced by Ang II. These data suggest that high-sodium level directly augments Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through NHE-1- and ERK 1/2-dependent pathways and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vascular remodeling by high-sodium/Ang II.

  9. The combination of lanthanum chloride and the calcimimetic calindol delays the progression of vascular smooth muscle cells calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Ciceri, Paola; Volpi, Elisa; Brenna, Irene; Elli, Francesca; Borghi, Elisa; Brancaccio, Diego; Cozzolino, Mario

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum reduces the progression of high phosphate-induced calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium receptor agonists and the calcimimetic calindol reduce calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum and calindol cooperate on reducing calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum and calindol may interact with the same receptor. -- Abstract: Phosphate (Pi)-binders are commonly used in dialysis patients to control high Pi levels, that associated with vascular calcification (VC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl{sub 3}) on the progression of high Pi-induced VC, in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Pi-induced Ca deposition was inhibited by LaCl{sub 3}, with a maximal effect at 100 {mu}M (59.0 {+-} 2.5% inhibition). Furthermore, we studied the effects on VC of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) agonists. Gadolinium chloride, neomycin, spermine, and the calcimimetic calindol significantly inhibited Pi-induced VC (55.9 {+-} 2.2%, 37.3 {+-} 4.7%, 30.2 {+-} 5.7%, and 63.8 {+-} 5.7%, respectively). To investigate the hypothesis that LaCl{sub 3} reduces the progression of VC by interacting with the CaSR, we performed a concentration-response curve of LaCl{sub 3} in presence of a sub-effective concentration of calindol (10 nM). Interestingly, this curve was shifted to the left (IC{sub 50} 9.6 {+-} 2.6 {mu}M), compared to the curve in the presence of LaCl{sub 3} alone (IC{sub 50} 19.0 {+-} 4.8 {mu}M). In conclusion, we demonstrated that lanthanum chloride effectively reduces the progression of high phosphate-induced vascular calcification. In addition, LaCl{sub 3} cooperates with the calcimimetic calindol in decreasing Ca deposition in this in vitro model. These results suggest the potential role of lanthanum in the treatment of VC induced by high Pi.

  10. Divergent signaling pathways cooperatively regulate TGFβ induction of cysteine-rich protein 2 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of the arterial wall play a critical role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2) is a VSMC-expressed LIM-only protein, which functionally limits VSMC migration and protects against pathological vascular remodeling. The multifunctional cytokine TGFβ has been implicated to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through numerous downstream signaling pathways. We showed previously that TGFβ upregulates CRP2 expression; however, the detailed signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Results TGFβ treatment of VSMCs activated both Smad2/3 and ATF2 phosphorylation. Individually knocking down Smad2/3 or ATF2 pathways with siRNA impaired the TGFβ induction of CRP2, indicating that both contribute to CRP2 expression. Inhibiting TβRI kinase activity by SB431542 or TβRI knockdown abolished Smad2/3 phosphorylation but did not alter ATF2 phosphorylation, indicating while Smad2/3 phosphorylation was TβRI-dependent ATF2 phosphorylation was independent of TβRI. Inhibiting Src kinase activity by SU6656 suppressed TGFβ-induced RhoA and ATF2 activation but not Smad2 phosphorylation. Blocking ROCK activity, the major downstream target of RhoA, abolished ATF2 phosphorylation and CRP2 induction but not Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, JNK inhibition with SP600125 reduced TGFβ-induced ATF2 (but not Smad2) phosphorylation and CRP2 protein expression while ROCK inhibition blocked JNK activation. These results indicate that downstream of TβRII, Src family kinase-RhoA-ROCK-JNK signaling pathway mediates TβRI-independent ATF2 activation. Promoter analysis revealed that the TGFβ induction of CRP2 was mediated through the CRE and SBE promoter elements that were located in close proximity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that two signaling pathways downstream of TGFβ converge on the CRE and SBE sites of the Csrp2 promoter to cooperatively control CRP2 induction in VSMCs, which

  11. Responses of cultured smooth muscle cells from human nonatherosclerotic arteries and primary stenosing lesions after photoradiation: Implications for photodynamic therapy of vascular stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Dartsch, P.C.; Ischinger, T.; Betz, E. )

    1990-06-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells from human nonatherosclerotic arteries and from primary stenosing lesions were labeled with dihematoporphyrinester and ether, a photosensitizing probe used mainly for the detection and photodynamic therapy of tumors. After labeling for 24 h, cells were irradiated with ultraviolet light (wavelength 365 nm, energy densities ranging from 30 to 1,200 mJ/cm{sup 2}). Twenty-four hours after photoradiation, 80% of smooth muscle cells from nonatherosclerotic arteries and only 20% of smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic plaques were viable and still adherent. Moreover, dynamic cell and cytoskeletal alterations in response to irradiation are described. The differential sensitivity of smooth muscle cells from nonatherosclerotic arteries and from atherosclerotic plaques provides evidence that a photodynamic treatment might be a valuable therapeutic approach to vascular stenosis.

  12. Senescent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Drive Inflammation Through an Interleukin-1α–Dependent Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sarah E.; Humphry, Melanie; Bennett, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective— Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that become senescent are both present within atherosclerotic plaques and thought to be important to the disease process. However, senescent VSMCs are generally considered to only contribute through inaction, with failure to proliferate resulting in VSMC- and collagen-poor unstable fibrous caps. Whether senescent VSMCs can actively contribute to atherogenic processes, such as inflammation, is unknown. Approach and Results— We find that senescent human VSMCs develop a proinflammatory state known as a senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent human VSMCs release high levels of multiple cytokines and chemokines driven by secreted interleukin-1α acting in an autocrine manner. Consequently, the VSMC senescence-associated secretory phenotype promotes chemotaxis of mononuclear cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, senescent VSMCs release active matrix metalloproteinase-9, secrete less collagen, upregulate multiple inflammasome components, and prime adjacent endothelial cells and VSMCs to a proadhesive and proinflammatory state. Importantly, maintaining the senescence-associated secretory phenotype places a large metabolic burden on senescent VSMCs, such that they can be selectively killed by inhibiting glucose utilization. Conclusions— Senescent VSMCs may actively contribute toward the chronic inflammation associated with atherosclerosis through the interleukin-1α–driven senescence-associated secretory phenotype and the priming of adjacent cells to a proatherosclerotic state. These data also suggest that inhibition of this potentially important source of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis requires blockade of interleukin-1α and not interleukin-1β. PMID:26139463

  13. Adhesion, Growth, and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Low-Density Polyethylene Grafted with Bioactive Substances

    PubMed Central

    Parizek, Martin; Slepickova Kasalkova, Nikola; Bacakova, Lucie; Bacakova, Marketa; Lisa, Vera; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2013-01-01

    The attractiveness of synthetic polymers for cell colonization can be affected by physical, chemical, and biological modification of the polymer surface. In this study, low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was treated by an Ar+ plasma discharge and then grafted with biologically active substances, namely, glycine (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), colloidal carbon particles (C), or BSA+C. All modifications increased the oxygen content, the wettability, and the surface free energy of the materials compared to the pristine LDPE, but these changes were most pronounced in LDPE with Gly or PEG, where all the three values were higher than in the only plasma-treated samples. When seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the Gly- or PEG-grafted samples increased mainly the spreading and concentration of focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin in these cells. LDPE grafted with BSA or BSA+C showed a similar oxygen content and similar wettability, as the samples only treated with plasma, but the nano- and submicron-scale irregularities on their surface were more pronounced and of a different shape. These samples promoted predominantly the growth, the formation of a confluent layer, and phenotypic maturation of VSMC, demonstrated by higher concentrations of contractile proteins alpha-actin and SM1 and SM2 myosins. Thus, the behavior of VSMC on LDPE can be regulated by the type of bioactive substances that are grafted. PMID:23586032

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction.

  15. Differential modulation of immunostimulant-triggered NO production by endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Satoshi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Kikuo

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the effects of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (Tm) on immunostimulant lipopolysaccharide/interferon (LPS/IFN)-induced expression of isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular smooth muscle cells. LPS/IFN-induced iNOS mRNA expression was markedly enhanced by TG, whereas iNOS mRNA expression was strongly attenuated by Tm. Similarly, production of iNOS protein was markedly upregulated by TG but virtually eliminated by Tm. LPS/IFN-induced guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I mRNA expression was slightly reduced by TG and markedly inhibited by Tm. Similarly, LPS/IFN-mediated induction of cellular biopterin was modestly reduced by TG and markedly inhibited by Tm. TG modestly enhanced LPS/IFN-induced activation of NF-κB, whereas Tm had no effect on it. Cellular respiration was reduced by TG and Tm in a concentration-dependent manner, which was confirmed by apoptosis assay. Thus, TG and Tm-induced ER stress and differently modulated NO production through alterations in iNOS expression and activity independently of NF-κB activation and caused a similar degree of ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  16. Cinnamon and its Components Suppress Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Up-Regulating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeeun; Lee, Jung-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Won-Kyung; Gu, Min Jung; Lee, Kwang Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark has been used in traditional herbal medicine to treat a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the antiproliferative effect of cinnamon extract on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the corresponding restenosis has not been explored. Hence, after examining the effect of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation, we investigated the possible involvement of signal transduction pathways associated with early signal and cell cycle analysis, including regulatory proteins. Besides, to identify the active components, we investigated the components of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation. Cinnamon extract inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and suppressed the PDGF-stimulated early signal transduction. In addition, cinnamon extract arrested the cell cycle and inhibited positive regulatory proteins. Correspondingly, the protein levels of p21 and p27 not only were increased in the presence of cinnamon extract, also the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was inhibited by cinnamon extract. Besides, among the components of cinnamon extract, cinnamic acid (CA), eugenol (EG) and cinnamyl alcohol significantly inhibited the VSMC proliferation. Overall, the present study demonstrates that cinnamon extract inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs through a G0/G1 arrest, which down-regulated the expression of cell cycle positive regulatory proteins by up-regulating p21 and p27 expression.

  17. Cell-based microfluidic device for screening anti-proliferative activity of drugs in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, R; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Demming, S; Büttgenbach, S; Herrera, M D; Llobera, A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device consisting of five parallel microchambers with integrated readout-grid for the screening of anti-proliferative activity of drugs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A two-level SU-8 master was fabricated and replicated with poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS, using standard soft-lithographic methods. The relative small height (4-10 μm) of the integrated grid allowed the identification of single-cells or cell groups and the monitoring of their motility, morphology and size with time, without disturbing their proliferation pattern. This is of particular interest when considering VSMC which, apart of being crucial in the atherosclerotic process, do not proliferate in a single layer but in a non-homogenous hill and valley phenotype. The performance of the microfluidic device has been validated by comparison with conventional culturing methods, proving that the cell proliferation remains unaffected by the microchamber structure (with the integrated grid) and the experimental conditions. Finally, the microfluidic device was also used to evaluate the anti-proliferative activity of curcumin and colchicine in VSMC. With this cellular type, the anti-proliferative activity of curcumin (IC(50) =35 ± 5 μM) was found to be much lower than colchicine (IC(50) =3.2 ± 1.2 μM). These results demonstrate the good performance of the microfluidic device in the evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity (or cytotoxicity) of drugs.

  18. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits angiotensin II- stimulated PAI-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Min, Ae-Kyung; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Park, Young Joo; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Wan-Ju; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2010-01-31

    Angiotensin II is a major effector molecule in the development of cardiovascular disease. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II promotes cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation through the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression. Previously, we demonstrated that small heterodimer partner (SHP) represses PAI-1 expression in the liver through the inhibition of TGF-beta signaling pathways. Here, we investigated whether SHP inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated PAI-1 expression in VSMCs. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP (Ad- SHP) in VSMCs inhibited angiotensin II- and TGF-beta-stimulated PAI-1 expression. Ad-SHP also inhibited angiotensin II-, TGF-beta- and Smad3-stimulated PAI-1 promoter activity, and angiotensin II-stimulated AP-1 activity. The level of PAI-1 expression was significantly higher in VSMCs of SHP(-/-) mice than wild type mice. Moreover, loss of SHP increased PAI-1 mRNA expression after angiotensin II treatment. These results suggest that SHP inhibits PAI-1 expression in VSMCs through the suppression of TGF-beta/Smad3 and AP-1 activity. Thus, agents that target the induction of SHP expression in VSMCs might help prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  19. Neocuproine, a selective Cu(I) chelator, and the relaxation of rat vascular smooth muscle by S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    Al-Sa'doni, H H; Megson, I L; Bisland, S; Butler, A R; Flitney, F W

    1997-07-01

    1. A study has been made of the effect of neocuproine, a specific Cu(I) chelator, on vasodilator responses of rat isolated perfused tail artery to two nitrosothiols: S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO). 2. Bolus injections (10 microl) of SNAP or GSNO (10(-7)-10(-3) M) were delivered into the lumen of perfused vessels pre-contracted with sufficient phenylephrine (1-7 microM) to develop pressures of 100-120 mmHg. Two kinds of experiment were made: SNAP and GSNO were either (a) pre-mixed with neocuproine (10(-4) M) and then injected into arteries; or (b) vessels were continuously perfused with neocuproine (10(-5) M) and then injected with either pure SNAP or GSNO. 3. In each case, neocuproine significantly attenuated vasodilator responses to both nitrosothiols, although the nature of the inhibitory effect differed in the two types of experiment. We conclude that the ability of exogenous nitrosothiols to relax vascular smooth muscle in our ex vivo model is dependent upon a Cu(I) catalyzed process. Evidence is presented which suggests that a similar Cu(I)-dependent mechanism is responsible for the release of NO from endogenous nitrosothiols and that this process may assist in maintaining vasodilator tone in vivo.

  20. In vitro inhibition of proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by serum of rats treated with Dahuang Zhechong pill.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Hui; Liu, Jun-Tian; Wen, Bin-Yu; Xiao, Xiang-Hua

    2007-06-13

    Dahuang Zhechong pill (DHZCP) is a famous and classical Chinese herbal prescription, which is clinically used to treat hepatic, gynecological and cardiovascular diseases in China. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of the serum of rats treated with DHZCP on the proliferation of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and hyperlipidemic serum (HLS), and on DNA, protein and collagen syntheses of VSMCs induced by PDGF in vitro. VSMCs proliferation was assayed by measuring the cell viability with MTT method, and syntheses of DNA, protein and collagen were evaluated by detecting [(3)H]-thymidine, [(3)H]-leucine and [(3)H]-proline incorporations, respectively. The results showed that PDGF, ox-LDL and HLS stimulated the proliferation of rat VSMCs in vitro. The serum of rats treated with DHZCP significantly inhibited the proliferation of rat VSMCs induced by the above stimulants and the incorporations of [(3)H]-thymidine, [(3)H]-leucine and [(3)H]-proline into rat VSMCs induced by PDGF in comparison with the model control group (P<0.01). The data suggest that DHZCP is able to obviously inhibit VSMCs proliferation via interfering with syntheses of DNA and protein, and to decrease production of extracellular matrix by VSMCs through antagonizing collagen synthesis.

  1. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  2. Nonprenylated Xanthones from Gentiana lutea, Frasera caroliniensis, and Centaurium erythraea as Novel Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Waltenberger, Birgit; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Schwaiger, Stefan; Heiss, Elke H; Dirsch, Verena M; Stuppner, Hermann

    2015-11-13

    Aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) plays a major role in restenosis, the pathological renarrowing of the blood vessel lumen after surgical treatment of stenosis. Since available anti-proliferative pharmaceuticals produce unfavorable side effects, there is high demand for the identification of novel VSMC proliferation inhibitors. A natural product screening approach using a resazurin conversion assay enabled the identification of gentisin (1) from Gentiana lutea as a novel inhibitor of VSMC proliferation with an IC50 value of 7.84 µM. Aiming to identify further anti-proliferative compounds, 13 additional nonprenylated xanthones, isolated from different plant species, were also tested. While some compounds showed no or moderate activity at 30 µM, 1-hydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (4), swerchirin (6), and methylswertianin (7) showed IC50 values between 10.2 and 12.5 µM. The anti-proliferative effect of 1, 4, 6, and 7 was confirmed by the quantification of DNA synthesis (BrdU incorporation) in VSMC. Cell death quantification (determined by LDH release in the culture medium) revealed that the compounds are not cytotoxic in the investigated concentration range. In conclusion, nonprenylated xanthones are identified as novel, non-toxic VSMC proliferation inhibitors, which might contribute to the development of new therapeutic applications to combat restenosis.

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction. PMID:26324193

  4. A Theoretical Model for F-actin Remodeling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Subjected to Cyclic Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Na, S.; Meininger, G.A.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    A constrained mixture theory model was developed and used to estimate remodeling of F-actin in vascular smooth muscle cells that were subjected to 10% equibiaxial stretching for up to 30 minutes. The model was based on a synthesis of data on time-dependent changes in atomic force microscopy measured cell stiffness and immunofluorescence measured focal adhesion associated vinculin as well as data on stress fiber stiffness and pre-stretch. Results suggest that an observed acute (after 2 minutes of stretching) increase in cell stiffness is consistent with an increased stretch of the originally present F-actin plus an assembly of new F-actin having nearly homeostatic values of stretch. Moreover, the subsequent (after 30 minutes of stretching) decrease in cell stiffness back towards the baseline value is consistent with a replacement of the overstretched original filaments with the new (reassembled), less stretched filaments. That is, overall cell response is consistent with a recently proposed concept of “tensional homeostasis” whereby cells seek to maintain constant certain mechanical factors via a remodeling of intracellular and transmembrane proteins. Although there is a need to refine the model based on more comprehensive data sets, using multiple experimental approaches, the present results suggest that a constrained mixture theory can capture salient features of the dynamics of F-actin remodeling and that it offers some advantages over many past methods of modeling, particularly those based on classical linearized viscoelasticity. PMID:17240401

  5. Vasostatin-2 inhibits cell proliferation and adhesion in vascular smooth muscle cells, which are associated with the progression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghong; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Junnong

    2016-01-22

    Recently, the serum expression level of vasostatin-2 was found to be reduced and is being studied as an important indicator to assess the presence and severity of coronary artery disease; the functional properties of vasostatin-2 and its relationship with the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to detect the expression of vasostatin-2 and its impact on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot were used to assess the expression level of vasostatin-2 in VSMCs between those from atherosclerosis and disease-free donors; we found that vasostatin-2 was significantly down-regulated in atherosclerosis patient tissues and cell lines. In addition, the over-expression of vasostatin-2 apparently inhibits cell proliferation and migration in VSMCs. Gain-of-function in vitro experiments further show that vasostatin-2 over-expression significantly inhibits inflammatory cytokines release in VSMCs. In addition, cell adhesion experimental analysis showed that soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1) had decreased expression when vasostatin-2 was over-expressed in VSMCs. Therefore, our results indicate that vasostatin-2 is an atherosclerosis-related factor that can inhibit cell proliferation, inflammatory response and cell adhesion in VSMCs. Taken together, our results indicate that vasostatin-2 could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic option for human atherosclerosis in the near future.

  6. Role of integrin-linked kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells: Regulation by statins and angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Erik B. . E-mail: efriedrich@med-in.uni-sb.de; Clever, Yvonne P.; Wassmann, Sven; Werner, Nikos; Boehm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2006-10-27

    Our goal was to characterize the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which play a crucial role in atherogenesis. Transfection of VSMC with wild-type and dominant-negative ILK cDNA constructs revealed that ILK mediates migration and proliferation of VSMC but has no effect on VSMC survival. The pro-atherogenic mediator angiotensin II increases ILK protein expression and kinase activity while statin treatment down-regulates ILK in VSMC. Functionally, ILK is necessary for angiotensin II-mediated VSMC migration and proliferation. In VSMC transduced with dominant-negative ILK, statins mediate an additive inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation, while transfection with wild-type ILK is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of statin treatment on VSMC migration and proliferation. In vivo, ILK is expressed in VSMC of aortic sections from wild-type mice where it is down-regulated following statin treatment and up-regulated following induction of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. These data identify ILK as a novel target in VSMC for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  7. Overexpression of membrane sialic acid-specific sialidase Neu3 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sung-Kwon; Cho, Seung-Hak; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Jeon, Jae Heung; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho . E-mail: chkimbio@skku.edu

    2007-05-11

    The ganglioside-specific sialidase Neu3 has been suggested to participate in cell growth, migration, and differentiation. Recent reports suggest that sialidase may be involved in intimal thickening, an early stage in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of the Neu3 gene in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) responses has not yet been elucidated. To determine whether a Neu3 is able to modulate VSMC growth, the effect of overexpression of the Neu3 gene on cell proliferation was examined. However, the results show that the overexpression of this gene has no effect on DNA synthesis and ERK phosphorylation in cultured VSMC in the presence of TNF-{alpha}. Because atherogenic effects need not be limited to proliferation, we decided to examine whether Neu3 exerted inhibitory effects on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in TNF-{alpha}-induced VSMC. The expression of the Neu3 gene led to the inhibition of TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in VSMC as determined by zymography and immunoblot. Furthermore, Neu3 gene expression strongly decreased MMP-9 promoter activity in response to TNF-{alpha}. This inhibition was characterized by the down-regulation of MMP-9, which was transcriptionally regulated at NF-{kappa}B and activation protein-1 (AP-1) sites in the MMP-9 promoter. These findings suggest that the Neu3 gene represents a physiological modulator of VSMC responses that may contribute to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  8. Effects and underlying mechanisms of curcumin on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Chol:MbetaCD.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Yang, Yun-Bo; Tuo, Qin-Hui; Zhu, Bing-Yang; Chen, Lin-Xi; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2009-02-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Curcumin, extracted from Curcumae longae, has been shown a variety of beneficial effects on human health, including anti-atherosclerosis by mechanisms poorly understood. In the present study, we attempted to investigate whether curcumin has any effect on VSMCs proliferation and the potential mechanisms involved. Our data showed curcumin concentration-dependently abrogated the proliferation of primary rat VSMCs induced by Chol:MbetaCD. To explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, we found that curcumin was capable of restoring caveolin-1 expression which was reduced by Chol:MbetaCD treatment. Moreover, curcumin abrogated the increment of phospho-ERK1/2 and nuclear accumulation of ERK1/2 in primary rat VSMCs induced by Chol:MbetaCD, which led to a suppression of AP-1 promoter activity stimulated by Chol:MbetaCD. In addition, curcumin was able to reverse cell cycle progression induced by Chol:MbetaCD, which was further supported by its down-regulation of cyclinD1 and E2F promoter activities in the presence of Chol:MbetaCD. Taking together, our data suggest curcumin inhibits Chol:MbetaCD-induced VSMCs proliferation via restoring caveolin-1 expression that leads to the suppression of over-activated ERK signaling and causes cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase. These novel findings support the beneficial potential of curcumin in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Generation and Characterization of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Lines Derived from a Patient with a Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Lazar-Karsten, Pamela; Belge, Gazanfer; Schult-Badusche, Detlev; Focken, Tim; Radtke, Arlo; Yan, Junfeng; Renhabat, Pramod; Mohamed, Salah A.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dilation is the most common malformation of the proximal aorta and is responsible for 1%–2% of all deaths in industrialized countries. In approximately 50% of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), dilation of any or all segments of the aorta occurs. BAV patients with aortic dilation show an increased incidence of cultured vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) loss. In this study, VSMC, isolated from the ascending aorta of BAV, was treated with Simian virus 40 to generate a BAV-originated VSMC cell line. To exclude any genomic DNA or cross-contamination, highly polymorphic short tandem repeats of the cells were profiled. The cells were then characterized using flow cytometry and karyotyping. The WG-59 cell line created is the first reported VSMC cell line isolated from a BAV patient. Using an RT2 Profiler PCR Array, genes within the TGFβ/BMP family that are dependent on losartan treatment were identified. Endoglin was found to be among the regulated genes and was downregulated in WG-59 cells following treatment with different losartan concentrations, when compared to untreated WG-59 cells. PMID:27110824

  10. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  11. The inhibitory effect and mechanism of luteolin 7-glucoside on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tack-Joong; Kim, Jin-Ho; Jin, Yong-Ri; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2006-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty and possibly also in the development of hypertension. The present study was designed to examine the inhibitory effects and the mechanism of luteolin 7-glucoside (L7G) on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs. L7G significantly inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the DNA synthesis of the VSMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pre-incubation of the VSMCs with L7G significantly inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt and the phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma1 activation. However, L7G had almost no affect on the phosphorylation of PDGF-beta receptor tyrosine kinase, which was induced by PDGF-BB. These results suggest that L7G inhibits the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs via the blocking of PLC-gamma1, Akt, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  12. Factor Xa generation at the surface of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells in an in vitro flow system.

    PubMed

    Hall, C L; Taubman, M B; Nemerson, Y; Turitto, V T

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to explore the effects of well-defined flow conditions on the activity of tissue factor (TF) expressed on the surface of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Cells were cultured to confluence on Permanox brand slides and stimulated to express TF by a 90 min incubation with fresh growth medium containing 10 percent calf serum. The stimulated cells were then placed in a parallel plate flow chamber and perfused with Hank's Balanced Salt Solution containing factor VIIa, factor X (FX), and calcium. The chamber effluent was collected and assayed for factor Xa (FXa) and the steady-state flux of FXa was calculated. The flux values were 68.73, 94.81, 139.75, 138.19, 316.82, and 592.92 fmole/min/cm2 at wall shear rates of 10, 20, 40, 80, 320, and 1280 s-1, respectively. The FXa flux depended on the wall shear rate to a greater degree than predicted by classical mass transport theory. The flux at each shear rate was three to five times less than that calculated according to the Leveque solution. These features of the experimental data imply nonclassical behavior, which may partially result from a direct effect of flow on the cell layer.

  13. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Control Aorta Immunity and Protect against Atherosclerosis via Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Lymphotoxin β Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Desheng; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Yin, Changjun; Peng, Li; Ma, Zhe; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Grassia, Gianluca; MacRitchie, Neil; Dever, Gary; Gordon, Peter; Burton, Francis L.; Ialenti, Armando; Sabir, Suleman R.; McInnes, Iain B.; Brewer, James M.; Garside, Paul; Weber, Christian; Lehmann, Thomas; Teupser, Daniel; Habenicht, Livia; Beer, Michael; Grabner, Rolf; Maffia, Pasquale; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) emerge during nonresolving peripheral inflammation, but their impact on disease progression remains unknown. We have found in aged Apoe−/− mice that artery TLOs (ATLOs) controlled highly territorialized aorta T cell responses. ATLOs promoted T cell recruitment, primed CD4+ T cells, generated CD4+, CD8+, T regulatory (Treg) effector and central memory cells, converted naive CD4+ T cells into induced Treg cells, and presented antigen by an unusual set of dendritic cells and B cells. Meanwhile, vascular smooth muscle cell lymphotoxin β receptors (VSMC-LTβRs) protected against atherosclerosis by maintaining structure, cellularity, and size of ATLOs though VSMC-LTβRs did not affect secondary lymphoid organs: Atherosclerosis was markedly exacerbated in Apoe−/−Ltbr−/− and to a similar extent in aged Apoe−/−Ltbrfl/flTagln-cre mice. These data support the conclusion that the immune system employs ATLOs to organize aorta T cell homeostasis during aging and that VSMC-LTβRs participate in atherosclerosis protection via ATLOs. PMID:26084025

  14. In vitro elastogenesis: instructing human vascular smooth muscle cells to generate an elastic fiber-containing extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Svenja; Shena, Nian; Ringuette, Léa-Jeanne; Hansmann, Jan; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Brucker, Sara Y; Davis, Elaine C; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-06-01

    Elastic fibers are essential for the proper function of organs including cardiovascular tissues such as heart valves and blood vessels. Although (tropo)elastin production in a tissue-engineered construct has previously been described, the assembly to functional elastic fibers in vitro using human cells has been highly challenging. In the present study, we seeded primary isolated human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) onto 3D electrospun scaffolds and exposed them to defined laminar shear stress using a customized bioreactor system. Increased elastin expression followed by elastin deposition onto the electrospun scaffolds, as well as on newly formed fibers, was observed after six days. Most interestingly, we identified the successful deposition of elastogenesis-associated proteins, including fibrillin-1 and -2, fibulin-4 and -5, fibronectin, elastin microfibril interface located protein 1 (EMILIN-1) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) within our engineered constructs. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a developing extracellular matrix (ECM) similar to native human fetal tissue, which is composed of collagens, microfibrils and elastin. To conclude, the combination of a novel dynamic flow bioreactor and an electrospun hybrid polymer scaffold allowed the production and assembly of an elastic fiber-containing ECM. PMID:25784676

  15. Investigation of calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel interactions by a vascular smooth muscle cell membrane chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; He, Jianyu; Wang, Sicen; He, Langchong

    2010-07-01

    The dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) is an important affinity parameter for studying drug-receptor interactions. A vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method was developed for determination of the K(D) values for calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel (L-CC) interactions. VSM cells, by means of primary culture with rat thoracic aortas, were used for preparation of the cell membrane stationary phase in the VSM/CMC model. All measurements were performed with spectrophotometric detection (237 nm) at 37 degrees C. The K(D) values obtained using frontal analysis were 3.36 x 10(-6) M for nifedipine, 1.34 x 10(-6) M for nimodipine, 6.83 x 10(-7) M for nitrendipine, 1.23 x 10(-7) M for nicardipine, 1.09 x 10(-7) M for amlodipine, and 8.51 x 10(-8) M for verapamil. This affinity rank order obtained from the VSM/CMC method had a strong positive correlation with that obtained from radioligand binding assay. The location of the binding region was examined by displacement experiments using nitrendipine as a mobile-phase additive. It was found that verapamil occupied a class of binding sites on L-CCs different from those occupied by nitrendipine. In addition, nicardipine, amlodipine, and nitrendipine had direct competition at a single common binding site. The studies showed that CMC can be applied to the investigation of drug-receptor interactions.

  16. Diminished Lipid Raft SNAP23 Increases Blood Pressure by Inhibiting the Membrane Fluidity of Vascular Smooth-Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi So; Won, Kyung-Jong; Kim, Do-Yoon; Hwang, Dae Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Jung, Seung Hyo; Lee, Kang Pa; Jung, Dongju; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2015-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) is involved in microvesicle trafficking and exocytosis in various cell types, but its functional role in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not yet been defined. Here, we found that lipid raft SNAP23 expression was much lower in vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) than in those from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. This led us to investigate the hypothesis that this lower expression may be linked to the spontaneous hypertension found in SHR. The expression level of lipid raft SNAP23 and the fluidity in the plasma membrane of VSMCs were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. Cholesterol content in the VSMC membrane was higher, but the secreted cholesterols found in VSMC-conditioned medium and in the blood serum were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. SNAP23 knockdown in WKY rat VSMCs reduced the membrane fluidity and increased the membrane cholesterol level. Systemic overexpression of SNAP23 in SHR resulted in an increase of cholesterol content in their serum, a decrease in cholesterol in their aorta and the reduction of their BP. Our findings suggest that the low expression of the lipid raft SNAP23 in VSMCs might be a potential cause for the characteristic hypertension of SHR.

  17. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate prevents isoproterenol-induced morphological change in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nabika, Toru; Chaldakov, G.N.; Nara, Yasuo; Endo, Jiro; Yamori, Yukio )

    1988-10-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on isoproterenol (ISO)- and dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP)-induced morphological change and cytoskeletal reorganization was studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) using the fluorescence staining of actin and microtubules. The treatment of VSMC with 1.0 {mu}M of ISO or with 1.0 mM of dBcAMP for 90 min induced the disruption of actin-containing stress fibers followed by cytoplasmic arborization. The addition of 100 nM of PMA prevented both the destruction of actin fibers and cell arborization induced either by ISO or by dBcAMP. These results indicated that the inhibition of arborization by PMA was mediated through the activation of protein kinase C. Colchicine at 5.0 {mu}M also had an inhibitory effect on ISO- and dBcAMP-induced cell arborization. However, immunofluorescence studies revealed that colchicine but not PMA elicited the reorganization of microtubules, suggesting that the effect of PMA was mediated through a mechanism different from that of colchicine. The observations indicated that the morphology of VSMC was regulated through the alteration of cytoskeletal organization induced by cAMP-mediated and by protein kinase C-dependent systems.

  18. The inhibitory effect and mechanism of luteolin 7-glucoside on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tack-Joong; Kim, Jin-Ho; Jin, Yong-Ri; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2006-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty and possibly also in the development of hypertension. The present study was designed to examine the inhibitory effects and the mechanism of luteolin 7-glucoside (L7G) on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs. L7G significantly inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the DNA synthesis of the VSMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pre-incubation of the VSMCs with L7G significantly inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt and the phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma1 activation. However, L7G had almost no affect on the phosphorylation of PDGF-beta receptor tyrosine kinase, which was induced by PDGF-BB. These results suggest that L7G inhibits the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs via the blocking of PLC-gamma1, Akt, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. PMID:16491846

  19. Induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in vascular smooth muscle cells by interferon-gamma contributes to medial immunoprivilege.

    PubMed

    Cuffy, Madison C; Silverio, Amanda M; Qin, Lingfeng; Wang, Yinong; Eid, Raymond; Brandacher, Gerald; Lakkis, Fadi G; Fuchs, Dietmar; Pober, Jordan S; Tellides, George

    2007-10-15

    Atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis are characterized by leukocytic infiltration of the vessel wall that spares the media. The mechanism(s) for medial immunoprivilege is unknown. In a chimeric humanized mouse model of allograft rejection, medial immunoprivilege was associated with expression of IDO by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of rejecting human coronary artery grafts. Inhibition of IDO by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) increased medial infiltration by allogeneic T cells and increased VSMC loss. IFN-gamma-induced IDO expression and activity in cultured human VSMCs was considerably greater than in endothelial cells (ECs) or T cells. IFN-gamma-treated VSMCs, but not untreated VSMCs nor ECs with or without IFN-gamma pretreatment, inhibited memory Th cell alloresponses across a semipermeable membrane in vitro. This effect was reversed by 1-MT treatment or tryptophan supplementation and replicated by the absence of tryptophan, but not by addition of tryptophan metabolites. However, IFN-gamma-treated VSMCs did not activate allogeneic memory Th cells, even after addition of 1-MT or tryptophan. Our work extends the concept of medial immunoprivilege to include immune regulation, establishes the compartmentalization of immune responses within the vessel wall due to distinct microenvironments, and demonstrates a duality of stimulatory EC signals versus inhibitory VSMC signals to artery-infiltrating T cells that may contribute to the chronicity of arteriosclerotic diseases.

  20. Vascular smooth muscle cells preloaded with eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid fail to respond to serotonin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pakala, R; Pakala, R; Sheng, W L; Benedict, C R

    2000-11-01

    Epidemiological, animal and clinical studies indicate that n-3 fatty acids may benefit individuals with known history of cardiovascular disease or at risk of developing it. Though there is indirect evidence to suggest that the beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids may be because of their ability to inhibit smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, there are no studies that have examined this hypothesis. In this study, the mitogenic effect of serotonin (5HT) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), known mitogens for vascular SMC, on aortic SMCs preloaded with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is examined. 5HT and PDGF could only partially stimulate proliferation of SMC that were preloaded with EPA or DHA as compared to the control cells. gamma-Linolenic acid (LA) and oleic acid (OA) did not block the 5HT or PDGF induced 3[H]thymidine incorporation suggesting that the anti-proliferative effect was specific to n-3 fatty acids only. Further, when EPA and DHA were combined in the ratio they are present in fishoils, there was a synergistic interaction in inhibiting the proliferation of SMC. Further, SMC grown in the presence of EPA or DHA, when stimulated with 5HT, failed to show an increase in 5HT(2) receptor mRNA. One of the potential mechanism by which fish oils may prevent the development of atherosclerosis or restenosis could be inhibition of the mitogen induced SMC proliferation. Combination of EPA with DHA is likely to be more beneficial.

  1. Susceptibility of caffeine- and Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced contractions to oxidants in permeabilized vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Okabe, E

    1997-02-01

    Two principal pathways of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of excitable and non-excitable cells have been described: one pathway dependent on the second messenger D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), and a second pathway sensitive to Ca2+ and regulated by caffeine and ryanodine. It was found that the Ca(2+)-pump activity of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum is inhibited by superoxide anion radicals (O2.-); however, the effects of reactive oxygen intermediates on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in vascular muscle cells are not well defined. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of reactive oxygen intermediates generated from the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase reaction system on contractions induced by caffeine, Ins(1,4,5)P3 and norepinephrine in staphylococcal alpha-toxin-permeabilized rabbit mesenteric arteries. This system generates O2.-, H2O2, and hydroxyl radicals. We wished to identify which class of reactive oxygen intermediates is responsible for the associated loss of vascular smooth muscle contractile function. Caffeine and Ins(1,4,5)P3 produced a transient contraction when the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the permeabilized, preparations was preloaded with pCa 7.0 solution for 5 min before washing with 0.5 mM EGTA solution; norepinephrine also produced a transient contraction. Exposure of the preparations to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (for 30 min) attenuated caffeine-induced contraction, but was without effect on Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced contraction. The observed effect of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase exposure was superoxide dismutase-inhibitable, suggesting O2.- involvement. Hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase also inhibited norepinephrine-induced contraction. The effect of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase on norepinephrine contraction was protected by catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase and dimethyl sulfoxide; exogenously added H2O2 mimicked the effect of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase exposure. H2O

  2. Angiotensin-(1-7) counteracts the effects of Ang II on vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular remodeling and hemorrhagic stroke: Role of the NFкB inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Yuhui; Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiaotang; Chen, Yusen; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is a potential vasoprotective peptide. In the present study, we investigated its counteractive effects to Ang II on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke (ICH) through inflammatory mechanism. In in vitro experiments, human brain VSMCs (HBVSMCs) were treated with vehicle, Ang II, Ang II+Ang-(1-7), Ang II+A-779 or Ang II+Ang-(1-7)+A-779 (Mas receptor antagonist). HBVSMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis were determined by methyl thiazolyltetrazolium, wound healing assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In in vivo experiments, C57BL/6 mice were divided into vehicle, Ang II, Ang II+Ang-(1-7), Ang II+A-779 or Ang II+Ang-(1-7)+A-779 groups before they were subjected to collagenase-induced ICH or sham surgery. Hemorrhage volume and middle cerebral artery (MCA) remodeling were determined by histological analyses. Levels of NFκB, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin (IL-8) were measured by western blot or ELISA. We found that 1) Ang II increased HBVSMC migration, proliferation and apoptosis, and increased the blood pressure (BP), neurological deficit score, MCA remodeling and hemorrhage volume in ICH mice. 2) Ang-(1-7) counteracted these effects of Ang II, which was independent of BP, with the down-regulation of NFκB, up-regulation of IκBα, and decreased levels of TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-8. 3) The beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7) could be abolished by A-779. In conclusion, Ang-(1-7) counteracts the effects of Ang II on ICH via modulating NFκB inflammation pathway in HBVSMCs and cerebral microvessels.

  3. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Marcelo H.; Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine; Ellertsen, Ingvill; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Bäck, Magnus

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  4. Overexpression of Mitofusin 2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yanhong; Chen Kuanghueih; Gao Wei; Li Qian; Chen Li; Wang Guisong Tang Jian

    2007-11-16

    Our previous studies have implies that Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), which was progressively reduced in arteries from ApoE{sup -/-} mice during the development of atherosclerosis, may take part in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein or serum induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by down-regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation. Then we investigated the in vivo role of Mfn2 on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits using adenovirus expressing Mitofusin 2 gene (AdMfn2). By morphometric analysis we found overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation and intima/media ratio by 66.7% and 74.6%, respectively, compared with control group. These results suggest that local Mfn2 treatment suppresses the development of atherosclerosis in vivo in part by attenuating the smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipid deposition and vascular injury.

  5. Magnesium Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin Activity and Reverses the Osteogenic Transformation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Addy; Guerrero, Fatima; Martinez-Moreno, Julio M.; Madueño, Juan A.; Herencia, Carmen; Peralta, Alan; Almaden, Yolanda; Lopez, Ignacio; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Gundlach, Kristina; Büchel, Janine; Peter, Mirjam E.; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Rodriguez, Mariano; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium reduces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro but the mechanism has not been revealed so far. This work used only slightly increased magnesium levels and aimed at determining: a) whether inhibition of magnesium transport into the cell influences VSMC calcification, b) whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a key mediator of osteogenic differentiation, is modified by magnesium and c) whether magnesium can influence already established vascular calcification. Human VSMC incubated with high phosphate (3.3 mM) and moderately elevated magnesium (1.4 mM) significantly reduced VSMC calcification and expression of the osteogenic transcription factors Cbfa-1 and osterix, and up-regulated expression of the natural calcification inhibitors matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The protective effects of magnesium on calcification and expression of osteogenic markers were no longer observed in VSMC cultured with an inhibitor of cellular magnesium transport (2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate [2-APB]). High phosphate induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as demonstrated by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus, increased expression of the frizzled-3 gene, and downregulation of Dkk-1 gene, a specific antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The addition of magnesium however inhibited phosphate-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, TRPM7 silencing using siRNA resulted in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additional experiments were performed to test the ability of magnesium to halt the progression of already established VSMC calcification in vitro. The delayed addition of magnesium decreased calcium content, down-regulated Cbfa-1 and osterix and up-regulated MGP and OPG, when compared with a control group. This effect was not observed when 2-APB was added. In conclusion, magnesium transport through the cell membrane is important to inhibit VSMC calcification in vitro

  6. Defective autophagy in vascular smooth muscle cells alters contractility and Ca²⁺ homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Cédéric F; Fransen, Paul; De Munck, Dorien G; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Martinet, Wim

    2015-03-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionary preserved process that prevents the accumulation of unwanted cytosolic material through the formation of autophagosomes. Although autophagy has been extensively studied to understand its function in normal physiology, the role of vascular smooth muscle (SM) cell (VSMC) autophagy in Ca(2+) mobilization and contraction remains poorly understood. Recent evidence shows that autophagy is involved in controlling contractile function and Ca(2+) homeostasis in certain cell types. Therefore, autophagy might also regulate contractile capacity and Ca(2+)-mobilizing pathways in VSMCs. Contractility (organ chambers) and Ca(2+) homeostasis (myograph) were investigated in aortic segments of 3.5-mo-old mice containing a SM cell-specific deletion of autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) mice) and in segments of corresponding control mice (Atg7(+/+) SM22α-Cre(+)). Our results indicate that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs were more sensitive to depolarization, independent of changes in resting membrane potential. Contractions elicited with K(+) (50 mM) or the VGCC agonist BAY K8644 (100 nM) were significantly higher due to increased VGCC expression and activity. Interestingly, the sarcoplasmic reticulum of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs was enlarged, which, combined with increased sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 expression and higher store-operated Ca(2+) entry, promoted inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated contractions of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) segments and maximized the Ca(2+) storing capacity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, decreased plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs hampered Ca(2+) extrusion to the extracellular environment. Overall, our study indicates that defective autophagy in VSMCs leads to an imbalance between Ca(2+) release/influx and Ca(2+) reuptake/extrusion, resulting in higher basal Ca(2+) concentrations and

  7. Binding of the P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor to Filamin A Regulates Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ningpu; Erb, Laurie; Shivaji, Rikka; Weisman, Gary A.; Seye, Cheikh I.

    2013-01-01

    The functional expression of the G protein– coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) has been associated with proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), 2 processes involved in atherosclerosis and restenosis. Activation of the P2Y2R causes dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which transmits biochemical signals and forces necessary for cell locomotion, suggesting that P2Y2Rs may be linked to the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we identified filamin A (FLNa) as a P2Y2R-interacting protein using a yeast 2-hybrid system screen with the C-terminal region of the P2Y2R as bait. The FLNa binding site in the P2Y2R is localized between amino acids 322 and 333. Deletion of this region led to selective loss of FLNa binding to the P2Y2R and abolished Tyr phosphorylation of FLNa induced by the P2Y2R agonist UTP. Using both time-lapse microscopy and the Transwell cell migration assay, we showed that UTP significantly increased SMC spreading on collagen I (6.8 fold; P≤0.01) and migration (3.6 fold; P≤0.01) of aortic SMCs isolated from wild-type mice, as compared with unstimulated SMCs. UTP-induced spreading and migration of aortic SMCs did not occur with cells isolated from P2Y2R knockout mice. Expression of the full-length P2Y2R in SMCs isolated from P2Y2R knockout mice restored both UTP-induced spreading and migration. In contrast, UTP-induced spreading and migration did not occur in SMCs isolated from P2Y2R knockout mice transfected with a mutant P2Y2R that does not bind FLNa. Furthermore, ex vivo studies showed that both ATP and UTP (10 µmol/L) promoted migration of SMCs out of aortic explants isolated from wild-type but not P2Y2R knockout mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that P2Y2R/FLNa interaction selectively regulates spreading and migration of vascular SMCs. PMID:18202316

  8. Modulation of vascular human endothelial and rat smooth muscle cell growth by a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from echinoderm.

    PubMed

    Tapon-Bretaudière, J; Drouet, B; Matou, S; Mourão, P A; Bros, A; Letourneur, D; Fischer, A M

    2000-08-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate is a glycosaminoglycan extracted from the sea cucumber Ludwigothurea grisea. This polysaccharide has the same structure as a mammalian chondroitin sulfate but some of the glucuronic acid residues display sulfated fucose branches. Anticoagulant and antithrombotic properties of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate have already been described. In order to further investigate its potential therapeutic use as an antithrombotic agent, we studied its effect on vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and endothelial cell proliferation, migration and Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI) release. The experiments were performed on SMC from rat thoracic aorta and on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in culture with or without added fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1 and FGF-2). Our results showed that: (i) fucosylated chondroitin sulfate had a strong inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation (IC50 =10 +/- 5 microg/ml) and (ii) no effect on HUVEC proliferation and migration assays, in the absence of exogenous FGF, while heparin had inhibitory effects; (iii) fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (10 microg/ml) enhanced FGF-1 and FGF-2 induced HUVEC proliferation by 45% (145.4 +/- 7.2%) and 27% (126.9 +/- 4.2%), respectively; (iv) on FGF-induced HUVEC migration, fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (10 microg/ml) had a strong enhancing effect with FGF-1, +122% (222.2 +/- 15.8%), three times higher than that of heparin, and a lower enhancing effect with FGF-2, +43% (142.7 +/- 4.6%), whereas heparin had no effect; (v) fucosylated chondroitin sulfate stimulated TFPI release, mainly on the free form. +98% (198.2 +/- 25%). In addition, the structural features of the polysaccharide associated with its biological activity were resolved using chemically modified fucosylated chondroitin sulfates. Sulfated fucose branches groups are essential to the potentiating effect of the polysaccharide on HUVEC proliferation and migration. Surprisingly, removal of

  9. Simvastatin induces the apoptosis of normal vascular smooth muscle through the disruption of actin integrity via the impairment of RhoA/Rac-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seojin; Kim, Keunyoung; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Yeryeon; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2016-08-30

    Statins, lipid-lowering agents for the prevention of atherosclerosis and fatal coronary heart diseases, have pleiotropic modalities on the function and physiology of vascular smooth muscle that include anti-contractile and pro-apoptotic effects. These effects were suggested to stem from the inhibition of small GTPase Rho A, but they are largely regarded as distinct and unrelated. Recently, we discovered that simvastatin causes both contractile dysfunction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), reflecting that they may be closely related, yet their connecting link remains unexplained. Here, we elaborated the mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced apoptosis of normal VSMCs in connection with contractile dysfunction. Repeated oral administration of simvastatin to rats in vivo resulted in contractile dysfunction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle, of which pattern was well reproduced in rat VSMCs in vitro. Of note, contractile dysfunction and apoptosis occurred in concerted manners both in vivo and in vitro in the aspects of time course and dose of exposure. In rat VSMCs, simvastatin impaired the activation of small GTPases, RhoA along with Rac-1, which resulted in the disruption of actin integrity, a pivotal factor both for the generation of contractile force and survival of VSMCs. In line with the disruption of actin integrity, Bmf, a pro-apoptotic factor bound to intact actin, dissociated and translocated into mitochondria, which corresponded well with the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation and ultimately apoptosis. These events were all rescued by an actin stabilisation agent, jasplakinolide as well as geranylgeraniol, indicating that damages of the actin integrity from disrupted activation of RhoA/Rac-1 lies at the center of simvastatin-induced contractile dysfunction and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle.

  10. Simvastatin induces the apoptosis of normal vascular smooth muscle through the disruption of actin integrity via the impairment of RhoA/Rac-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seojin; Kim, Keunyoung; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Yeryeon; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2016-08-30

    Statins, lipid-lowering agents for the prevention of atherosclerosis and fatal coronary heart diseases, have pleiotropic modalities on the function and physiology of vascular smooth muscle that include anti-contractile and pro-apoptotic effects. These effects were suggested to stem from the inhibition of small GTPase Rho A, but they are largely regarded as distinct and unrelated. Recently, we discovered that simvastatin causes both contractile dysfunction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), reflecting that they may be closely related, yet their connecting link remains unexplained. Here, we elaborated the mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced apoptosis of normal VSMCs in connection with contractile dysfunction. Repeated oral administration of simvastatin to rats in vivo resulted in contractile dysfunction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle, of which pattern was well reproduced in rat VSMCs in vitro. Of note, contractile dysfunction and apoptosis occurred in concerted manners both in vivo and in vitro in the aspects of time course and dose of exposure. In rat VSMCs, simvastatin impaired the activation of small GTPases, RhoA along with Rac-1, which resulted in the disruption of actin integrity, a pivotal factor both for the generation of contractile force and survival of VSMCs. In line with the disruption of actin integrity, Bmf, a pro-apoptotic factor bound to intact actin, dissociated and translocated into mitochondria, which corresponded well with the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation and ultimately apoptosis. These events were all rescued by an actin stabilisation agent, jasplakinolide as well as geranylgeraniol, indicating that damages of the actin integrity from disrupted activation of RhoA/Rac-1 lies at the center of simvastatin-induced contractile dysfunction and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle. PMID:27306926

  11. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  12. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ann E.; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M.; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J.; Byron, Kenneth L.; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Volkman, Brian F.; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α1-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca2+-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α1-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  13. Oxidative stress regulates IGF1R expression in vascular smooth-muscle cells via p53 and HDAC recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kavurma, Mary M.; Figg, Nichola; Bennett, Martin R.; Mercer, John; Khachigian, Levon M.; Littlewood, Trevor D.

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis of VSMCs (vascular smooth-muscle cells) leads to features of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We have demonstrated previously that plaque-derived VSMCs have reduced IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) signalling, resulting from a decrease in the expression of IGF1R (IGF1 receptor) compared with normal aortic VSMCs [Patel, Zhang, Siddle, Soos, Goddard, Weissberg and Bennett (2001) Circ. Res. 88, 895–902]. In the present study, we show that apoptosis induced by oxidative stress is inhibited by ectopic expression of IGF1R. Oxidative stress repressed IGF1R expression at multiple levels, and this was also blocked by mutant p53. Oxidative stress also induced p53 phosphorylation and apoptosis in VSMCs. p53 negatively regulated IGF1R promoter activity and expression and, consistent with this, p53−/− VSMCs demonstrated increased IGF1R expression, both in vitro and in advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Oxidative-stress-induced interaction of endogenous p53 with TBP (TATA-box-binding protein) was dependent on p53 phosphorylation. Oxidative stress also increased the association of p53 with HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1). Trichostatin A, a specific HDAC inhibitor, or p300 overexpression relieved the repression of IGF1R following oxidative stress. Furthermore, acetylated histone-4 association with the IGF1R promoter was reduced in cells subjected to oxidative stress. These results suggest that oxidative-stress-induced repression of IGF1R is mediated by the association of phosphorylated p53 with the IGF1R promoter via TBP, and by the subsequent recruitment of chromatin-modifying proteins, such as HDAC1, to the IGF1R promoter–TBP–p53 complex. PMID:17600529

  14. NR6A1 couples with cAMP response element binding protein and regulates vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinfang; Zhang, Yahui; Dai, Xiuqin; Liu, Zongjun; Yin, Peihao; Wang, Nanping; Zhang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is implicated in atherosclerosis and restenosis. Nuclear receptor subfamily 6, group A, member 1 (NR6A1) is involved in regulating embryonic stem cell differentiation, reproduction, neuronal differentiation. Functional cooperation between cAMP response element modulator tau (CREMtau) and NR6A1 can direct gene expression in cells. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a key role in VSMC migration. In this study, we sought to determine whether CREB involved in NR6A1-modulated VSMC migration. VSMCs treated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) displayed reduced mRNA and protein levels of NR6A1. Adenovirus-mediated expression of NR6A1 (Ad-NR6A1) could inhibit PDGF-BB- and serum-induced VSMC migration. The mRNA and protein expressions of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) were down-regulated by NR6A1 overexpression. SPP1 promoter reporter activity was repressed by NR6A1. NR6A1 was found to physically couple with nuclear actin and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Furthermore, we showed that CREB interacted with NR6A1 in VSMCs. NR6A1 overexpression repressed cAMP response element (CRE) activity. ChIP assay revealed that NR6A1 bind to SPP1 promoter. Luciferase reporter assay showed that NR6A1 regulated SPP1 promoter activity via a putative CRE site. Adenovirus mediated local NR6A1 gene transfer attenuated stenosis after balloon-induced arterial injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. Taken together, this study provided experimental evidence that NR6A1 modulated SPP1 expression via its binding with CREB protein in VSMCs. We also revealed a NR6A1-CREB-SPP1 axis that serves as a regulatory mechanism for atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26546462

  15. Mitophagy acts as a safeguard mechanism against human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by atherogenic lipids.

    PubMed

    Swiader, Audrey; Nahapetyan, Hripsime; Faccini, Julien; D'Angelo, Romina; Mucher, Elodie; Elbaz, Meyer; Boya, Patricia; Vindis, Cécile

    2016-05-17

    Mitophagy is a critical cellular process that selectively targets damaged mitochondria for autophagosomal degradation both under baseline conditions and in response to stress preventing oxidative damage and cell death. Recent studies have linked alterations in mitochondria function and reduced autophagy with the development of age-related pathologies. However, the significance of mitochondrial autophagy in vessel wall in response to atherogenic lipid stressors is not known. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We reported for the first time that the engulfment of defective mitochondria by autophagosomes occurred in human VSMC in response to oxidized LDL. The molecular mechanism mediating mitophagy in human VSMC involved dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission, accumulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and the recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Likewise, we found increased voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and mitofusin 2 (Mnf2) mitochondrial proteins ubiquitination and LC3 association to mitochondria. Using flow cytometry in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors, we showed that PINK1 and Parkin silencing impaired mitophagy flux and enhanced oxidized LDL-induced VSMC apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of PINK1 and Parkin were protective by limiting cell death. Moreover, reduced Bax levels found in VSMC-overexpressing Parkin indicated cross talk among mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptotic signalling pathways. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitophagy is a safeguard mechanism against human VSMC apoptosis induced by atherogenic stressors and highlight mitophagy as a potential target to stabilize atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:27119505

  16. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Umetani, Keiji; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Okura, Yasuhiko; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2010-07-01

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 μm resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres (˜30 μm) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  17. Increased atherosclerosis and vascular smooth muscle cell activation in AIF-1 transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Laura J; Kelemen, Sheri E; Ellison, Stephen P; England, Ross N; Autieri, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic, scaffold signal transduction protein constitutively expressed in inflammatory cells, but inducible in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in response to injury or inflammatory stimuli. Although several basic science and population studies have reported increased AIF-1 expression in human and experimental atherosclerosis, a direct causal effect of AIF-1 expression on development of atherosclerosis has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to establish a direct relationship between AIF-1 expression and development of atherosclerosis. AIF-1 expression is detected VSMC in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE(-/-) mice, but not normal arteries from wild-type mice. AIF-1 expression can be induced in cultured VSMC by stimulation with oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Transgenic mice in which AIF-1 expression is driven by the G/C modified SM22 alpha promoter to restrict AIF-1 expression to VSMC develop significantly increased atherosclerosis compared with wild-type control mice when fed a high-fat diet (P=0.022). Cultured VSMC isolated from Tg mice demonstrated significantly increased migration in response to ox-LDL compared with matched controls (P<0.001). VSMC isolated from Tg mice and cultured human VSMC which over express AIF-1 demonstrated increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA and protein and increased NF-κB activation in response to ox-LDL as compared with wild-type control mice. VSMC which over express AIF-1 have significantly increased uptake of ox-LDL, and increased CD36 expression. Together, these data suggest a strong association between AIF-1 expression, NF-κB activation, and development of experimental atherosclerosis.

  18. Factors controlling the proliferative rate, final cell density, and life span of bovine vascular smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Hirabayashi, K; Giguère, L; Tauber, J P

    1981-06-01

    Low density vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell cultures maintained on extracellular-matrix(ECM)-coated dishes and plated in the presence of either plasma or serum will proliferate actively when serum-containing medium is replaced by a synthetic medium supplemented with three factors: high density lipoprotein (HDL, 250 micrograms protein/ml); insulin (2.5 micrograms/ml) or somatomedin C (10 ng/ml); and fibroblast growth factor (FGF, 100 ng/ml) or epidermal growth factor (EGF, 50 ng/ml). The omission of any of these three factors from the synthetic medium results in a lower growth rate of the cultures, as well as in a lower final cell density once cultures reach confluence. When cells are plated in the total absence of serum, transferrin (10 micrograms/ml) is also required to induce optimal cell growth. The effects of the substrate and medium supplements on the life span of VSM cultures have also been analyzed. Cultures maintained on plastic and exposed to medium supplemented with 5% bovine serum underwent 15 generations. However, when maintained on ECM-coated dishes the serum-fed cultures had a life span of at least 88 generations. Likewise, when cultures were maintained in a synthetic medium supplemented with HDL and either FGF or EGF, an effect on the tissue culture life span by the substrate was observed. Cultures maintained on plastic underwent 24 generations, whereas those maintained on ECM-coated dishes could be passaged repeatedly for 58 generations. These experiments demonstrate the influence of the ECM-substrate only in promoting cell growth but also in increasing the longevity of the cultures.

  19. The vasorelaxing action of rutaecarpine: direct paradoxical effects on intracellular calcium concentration of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Shan, J; Pang, P K; Yang, M C; Chou, C J; Chen, C F

    1996-03-01

    We have examined both the hypotensive effect and the mechanism of intracellular Ca++ regulation, underlying rutaecarpine (Rut)-induced vasodilatation. An i.v. bolus injection of Rut in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats produced a dose-dependent hypotensive effect. In isolated rat aorta rings, Rut (0.1-3 mu M) inhibited the phasic and tonic responses of norepinephrine- and phyenylephrine-induced contractions, respectively, mainly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism. However, the vasorelaxing effect of Rut (3 microM) persisted in denuded aorta, although to a much less extent than in intact tissue. As determined by the fura-2/AM (1-[2-(5-carboxyoxazol-2-yl)-6-aminobenzofuran-5-oxy]-2-(2'- amino-5'-methylphenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid pentaacetoxymethyl ester) method, Rut (10 microM), in the presence of extracellular Ca++, suppressed the KCI-induced increment in the intracellular Ca++ concentration ([Ca++]i) of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Rut (10 microM) also attenuated the norepinephrine-induced peak rise of [Ca++]i in VSMC placed in Ca++-free solution. On the other hand, Rut (1 and 10 microM) increased the level of [Ca++]i of cultured endothelial cells (EC) in the presence of extracellular Ca++. In conclusion, Rut acts on both VSMC and EC directly. In VSMC, it reduces [Ca++]i through the inhibition of Ca++ influx and Ca++ release from intracellular stores. In EC, Rut augments EC [Ca++]i by increasing Ca++ influx, possibly leading to nitric oxide release. The paradoxical regulation of Ca++ in both VSMC and EC acts simultaneously to cause vasorelaxation which could account, at least in part, for the hypotensive action. This is a most significant and a unique feature of this study. PMID:8786530

  20. Vitamin D modulates tissue factor and protease-activated receptor 2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Herencia, Carmen; Montes de Oca, Addy; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Rodríguez-Ortiz, M Encarnación; Díaz-Tocados, Juan M; Peralbo-Santaella, Esther; Camargo, Antonio; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodriguez, Mariano; Velasco-Gimena, Francisco; Almaden, Yolanda

    2016-03-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies reveal an association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-derived tissue factor (TF) is suggested to be critical for arterial thrombosis, we investigated whether the vitamin D molecules calcitriol and paricalcitol could reduce the expression of TF induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in human aortic VSMCs. We found that, compared with controls, incubation with TNF-α increased TF expression and procoagulant activity in a NF-κB-dependent manner, as deduced from the increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein 65 (p65-NF-κB) and direct interaction of NF-κB to the TF promoter. This was accompanied by the up-regulation of TF signaling mediator protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) expression and by the down-regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in a miR-346-dependent way. However, addition of calcitriol or paricalcitol blunted the TNF-α-induced TF expression and activity (2.01 ± 0.24 and 1.32 ± 0.14 vs. 3.02 ± 0.39 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.05), which was associated with down-regulation of NF-κB signaling and PAR-2 expression, as well as with restored levels of vitamin D receptor and enhanced expression of TF pathway inhibitor. Our data suggest that inflammation promotes a prothrombotic state through the up-regulation of TF function in VSMCs and that the beneficial cardiovascular effects of vitamin D may be partially due to decreases in TF expression and its activity in VSMCs.

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  2. Ribozyme-mediated gene knock down strategy to dissect the consequences of PDGF stimulation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs), due to their plasticity and ability to shift from a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype to a pathological proliferating-activated status, play a central role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. PDGF-BB, among a series of cytokines and growth factors, has been identified as the critical factor in this phenotypic switch. In order to obtain new insights on the molecular effects triggered by PDGF-BB, a hammerhead ribozyme targeting the membrane receptor PDGFR-β was applied to inhibit PDGF pathway in porcine VSMCs. Findings Ribozymes, loaded on a cationic polymer-based vehicle, were delivered into cultured VSMCs. A significant impairment of the activation mechanisms triggered by PDGF-BB was demonstrated since cell migration decreased after treatments. In order to functionally validate the effects of PDGFR-β partial knock down we focused on the phosphorylation status of two proteins, protein disulfide isomerase-A3 (PDI-A3) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP-60), previously identified as indicative of VSMC phenotypic switch after PDGF-BB stimulation. Interestingly, while PDI-A3 phosphorylation was counteracted by the ribozyme administration indicating that PDI-A3 is a factor downstream the receptor signalling cascade, the HSP-60 phosphorylation status was greatly increased by the ribozyme administration. Conclusion These contradictory observations suggested that PDGF-BB might trigger different parallel pathways that could be modulated by alternative isoforms of the receptors for the growth factor. In conclusion the knock down strategy here described enables to discriminate between two tightly intermingled pathways. Moreover it opens new attractive perspectives in functional investigations where combined gene knock down and proteomic technologies would allow the identification of key factors and pathways involved in VSMC-linked pathological disorders. PMID:22676333

  3. Thromboxane Receptor Activates the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Dong, Yunzhou; Xu, Jian; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Song, Ping; Guzman, Melissa; Wu, Jiliang; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 receptor (TPr) stimulation induces cellular hypertrophy in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs); however, regulation of VSMC hypertrophy remains poorly understood. Here we show that TPr stimulation activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), which in turn limits TPr-induced protein synthesis in VSMCs. Exposure of cultured VSMCs to either TPr agonists, IBOP and U46619, or exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) caused time- and dose-dependent AMPK activation, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of both AMPK-Thr172 and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase–Ser79, a downstream enzyme of AMPK, whereas SQ29548, a selective TPr antagonist, significantly attenuated TPr-enhanced AMPK activation. In parallel, both IBOP and U46619 significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of catalase (an H2O2 scavenger) abolished, whereas superoxide dismutase (which catalyzes H2O2 formation) enhanced, IBOP-induced AMPK activation, suggesting that TPr-activated AMPK was mediated by H2O2. Consistently, exposure of VSMCs to either TPr agonists or exogenous H2O2 dose-dependently increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 (at serines 428 and 307), an AMPK kinase, as well as coimmunoprecipitation of AMPK with LKB1. In addition, direct mutagenesis of either Ser428 or Ser307 of LKB1 into alanine, like the kinase-dead LKB1 mutant, abolished both TPr-stimulated AMPK activation and coimmunoprecipitation. Finally, genetic inhibition of AMPK significantly accentuated IBOP-enhanced protein synthesis, whereas adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active AMPK abolished IBOP-enhance protein synthesis in VSMCs. We conclude that TPr stimulation triggers reactive oxygen species–mediated LKB1-dependent AMPK activation, which in return inhibits cellular protein synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:18063812

  4. Mitophagy acts as a safeguard mechanism against human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by atherogenic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Swiader, Audrey; Nahapetyan, Hripsime; Faccini, Julien; D'Angelo, Romina; Mucher, Elodie; Elbaz, Meyer; Boya, Patricia; Vindis, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Mitophagy is a critical cellular process that selectively targets damaged mitochondria for autophagosomal degradation both under baseline conditions and in response to stress preventing oxidative damage and cell death. Recent studies have linked alterations in mitochondria function and reduced autophagy with the development of age-related pathologies. However, the significance of mitochondrial autophagy in vessel wall in response to atherogenic lipid stressors is not known. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We reported for the first time that the engulfment of defective mitochondria by autophagosomes occurred in human VSMC in response to oxidized LDL. The molecular mechanism mediating mitophagy in human VSMC involved dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission, accumulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and the recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Likewise, we found increased voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and mitofusin 2 (Mnf2) mitochondrial proteins ubiquitination and LC3 association to mitochondria. Using flow cytometry in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors, we showed that PINK1 and Parkin silencing impaired mitophagy flux and enhanced oxidized LDL-induced VSMC apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of PINK1 and Parkin were protective by limiting cell death. Moreover, reduced Bax levels found in VSMC-overexpressing Parkin indicated cross talk among mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptotic signalling pathways. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitophagy is a safeguard mechanism against human VSMC apoptosis induced by atherogenic stressors and highlight mitophagy as a potential target to stabilize atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:27119505

  5. Suppression of vascular smooth muscle cell responses induced by TNF-α in GM3 synthase gene transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Suk; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The natural accumulation of ganglioside GM3 (N-glycolylneuraminic acid) on atherosclerotic lesions is a common theory. The present study is the first to examine the effects of the GM3 synthase gene on the responses of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found that overexpression of the GM3 synthase gene inhibited DNA synthesis and ERK1/2 activity induced by TNF-α in VSMC, whereas the basal levels of DNA synthesis and ERK1/2 activity remained unchanged. In addition, GM3 synthase gene transfectants significantly reduced the migration and invasion of VSMC following TNF-α treatment, compared with empty vector transfectants. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and promoter activity were also decreased in GM3 synthase gene transfectants. GM3 synthase gene expression markedly suppressed the TNF-α-stimulated transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are the controlling factors of MMP-9 expression. Consistent with these results, the addition of anti-GM3 antibody into the GM3 synthase gene transfectants blocked inhibition of DNA synthesis, ERK1/2 activity, migration and invasion. Finally, GM3 synthase gene transfectants treated with anti-GM3 antibody reversed the suppression of MMP-9 expression by reducing AP-1 and NF-κB binding activity. These results suggest regulatory roles for the GM3 synthase gene in VSMC proliferation and migration during the formation of atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Umetani, Keiji; Okura, Yasuhiko

    2010-07-23

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 {mu}m resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres ({approx}30 {mu}m) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  7. The effects of different size gold nanoparticles on mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells under mechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Tri Minh

    Nanotechnology is an emerging and promising frontier for medicine and biomedical research due to its potential for applications such as drug delivery, imaging enhancement, and cancer treatment. While these materials may possess significant possibilities, the effects of these particles in the body and how the particles affect the cells is not fully understood. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) will be exposed to 5 and 20 nm diameter citrate AuNPs under mechanical conditions. The cytotoxicity properties of these particles will be investigated using LDH and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy will be used to study how the size of the nanoparticles affect the mechanical properties of the VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining for alpha actin will also be performed to enhance understanding of the phenotypic shift. The LDH and MTT cytotoxicity assay results demonstrated that neither 5 nor 20 nm diameter nanoparticles are cytotoxic to the cells. However, the mechanical properties and cell morphology of the VSMCs was altered. Under static conditions, both AuNP treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells. The size of the nanoparticles had a softening effect on elastic modulus of the cell and sign of a synthetic phenotype was observed. The VSMCs subjected to mechanical stretching exhibited higher elastic modulus compared to the static experimental groups. Again, both AuNPs treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells and signs of more synthetic phenotype was seen. However, the size of the nanoparticles did not have any influence on cell's elastic modulus unlike the static treated cells. The mechanical testing condition provided a better look at how these particles would affect the cells in vivo. While the nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to the VSMCs, they are altering the mechanical properties and phenotype of the cell.

  8. Interactions, functions and independence of plasma membrane STIM1 and TRPC1 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Sukumar, Piruthivi; Milligan, Carol J; Kumar, Bhaskar; Ma, Zhi-yong; Munsch, Christopher M; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Porter, Karen E; Beech, David J

    2009-01-01

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a predicted single membrane-spanning protein involved in store-operated calcium-entry and interacting with ion channels including TRPC1. Here we focus on endogenous STIM1 of modulated vascular smooth muscle cells, which exhibited a non-selective cationic current in response to store-depletion despite strong buffering of intracellular calcium at the physiological concentration. STIM1 mRNA and protein were detected and suppressed by specific short interfering RNA (siRNA). Calcium entry evoked by store-depletion was partially inhibited by STIM1 siRNA, where as calcium-release was unaffected. STIM1 siRNA suppressed cell migration but not proliferation. Antibody that specifically bound STIM1 revealed constitutive extracellular N-terminus of STIM1 and extracellular application of the antibody caused fast inhibition of the current evoked by store-depletion. The antibody also inhibited calcium entry and cell migration but not proliferation. STIM1 interacted with TRPC1 and TRPC1 contributed partially to calcium entry and cationic current. However, the underlying processes could not be explained only by a STIM1-TRPC1 partnership because extracellular TRPC1 antibody suppressed cationic current only in a fraction of cells, TRPC1-containing channels were important for cell proliferation as well as migration, and cell surface localisation studies revealed TRPC1 alone as well as with STIM1. The data suggest a complex situation where there is plasma membrane-spanning STIM1 that is important for cell migration and TRPC1-independent store-operated cationic current, but also TRPC1-STIM1 interaction, a TRPC1-dependent component of store-operated current, and STIM1-independent TRPC1 linked to cell proliferation. PMID:18802022

  9. Phosphorylation of β-catenin by PKA promotes ATP-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M.; Sethakorn, Nan; Dulin, Nickolai O.

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through activation of G protein-coupled P2Y purinergic receptors. We have previously shown that ATP stimulates a transient activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which, together with the established mitogenic signaling of purinergic receptors, promotes proliferation of VSMC (Hogarth DK, Sandbo N, Taurin S, Kolenko V, Miano JM, Dulin NO. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287: C449–C456, 2004). We also have shown that PKA can phosphorylate β-catenin at two novel sites (Ser552 and Ser675) in vitro and in overexpression cell models (Taurin S, Sandbo N, Qin Y, Browning D, Dulin NO. J Biol Chem 281: 9971–9976, 2006). β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation by activation of a family of T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors, which drive the transcription of genes implicated in cell cycle progression including cyclin D1. In the present study, using the phosphospecific antibodies against phospho-Ser552 or phospho-Ser675 sites of β-catenin, we show that ATP can stimulate PKA-dependent phosphorylation of endogenous β-catenin at both of these sites without affecting its expression levels in VSMC. This translates to a PKA-dependent stimulation of TCF transcriptional activity through an increased association of phosphorylated (by PKA) β-catenin with TCF-4. Using the PKA inhibitor PKI or dominant negative TCF-4 mutant, we show that ATP-induced cyclin D1 promoter activation, cyclin D1 protein expression, and proliferation of VSMC are all dependent on PKA and TCF activities. In conclusion, we show a novel mode of regulation of endogenous β-catenin through its phosphorylation by PKA, and we demonstrate the importance of this mechanism for ATP-induced proliferation of VSMC. PMID:18353896

  10. Effect of irreversibly glycated LDL in human vascular smooth muscle cells: lipid loading, oxidative and inflammatory stress

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Anca V; Botez, Gabriela M; Stancu, Camelia S; Manea, Adrian; Raicu, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The major complication of diabetes is accelerated atherosclerosis, the progression of which entails complex interactions between the modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and the cells of the arterial wall. Advanced glycation end product-modified-LDL (AGE-LDL) that occurs at high rate in diabetes contributes to diabetic atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of AGE-LDL on human vascular smooth muscle cells (hSMC) dysfunction. Cultured hSMC incubated (24 hrs) with human AGE-LDL, native LDL (nLDL) or oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were subjected to: (i) quantification of the expression of the receptors for modified LDL and AGE proteins (LRP1, CD36, RAGE) and estimation of lipid loading, (ii) determination of NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and (iii) evaluation of the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). The results show that exposure of hSMC to AGE-LDL (compared to nLDL) induced: (a) increased NADPH oxidase activity (30%) and ROS production (28%) by up-regulation of NOX1, NOX4, p22phox and p67phox expression, (b) accumulation of intracellular cholesteryl esters, (c) enhanced gene expression of LRP1 (160%) and CD36 (35%), and protein expression of LRP1, CD36 and RAGE, (d) increased MCP-1 gene expression (160%) and protein secretion (300%) and (e) augmented cell proliferation (30%). In conclusion, AGE-LDL activates hSMC (increasing CD36, LRP1, RAGE), inducing a pro-oxidant state (activation of NADPHox), lipid accumulation and a pro-inflammatory state (expression of MCP-1). These results may partly explain the contribution of AGE-LDL and hSMC to the accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes. PMID:19818091

  11. CaMKIIδ-dependent inhibition of cAMP-response element-binding protein activity in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Sun, Li-Yan; Singer, Diane V; Ginnan, Roman; Singer, Harold A

    2013-11-22

    One transcription factor mediator of Ca(2+)-signals is cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). CREB expression and/or activity negatively correlates with vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell proliferation and migration. Multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including CaMKII, have been demonstrated to regulate CREB activity through both positive and negative phosphorylation events in vitro, but the function of CaMKII as a proximal regulator of CREB in intact cell systems, including VSM, is not clear. In this study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to determine the function of CaMKIIδ in regulating CREB phosphorylation, localization, and activity in VSM. Overexpression of constitutively active CaMKIIδ specifically increased CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) and silencing CaMKIIδ expression by siRNA or blocking endogenous CaMKII activity with KN93 abolished thrombin- or ionomycin-induced CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) without affecting Ser(133) phosphorylation. CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation correlated with transient nucleocytoplasmic translocation of CREB. Thrombin-induced CREB promoter activity, CREB binding to Sik1 and Rgs2 promoters, and Sik1/Rgs2 transcription were enhanced by a kinase-negative CaMKIIδ2 (K43A) mutant and inhibited by a constitutively active (T287D) mutant. Taken together, these studies establish negative regulation of CREB activity by endogenous CaMKIIδ-dependent CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation and suggest a potential mechanism for CaMKIIδ/CREB signaling in modulating proliferation and migration in VSM cells. PMID:24106266

  12. The Ang II-induced growth of vascular smooth muscle cells involves a phospholipase D-mediated signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E J

    2000-02-15

    Angiotensin (Ang) II acts as a mitogen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) via the activation of multiple signaling cascades, including phospholipase C, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. However, increasing evidence supports signal-activated phospholipases A(2) and D (PLD) as additional mechanisms. Stimulation of PLD results in phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, and PA has been linked to cell growth. However, the direct involvement of PA or its metabolite diacylglycerol (DAG) in Ang II-induced growth is unclear. PLD activity was measured in cultured rat VSMC prelabeled with [(3)H]oleic acid, while the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine was used to monitor growth. We have previously reported the Ang II-dependent, AT(1)-coupled stimulation of PLD and growth in VSMC. Here, we show that Ang II (100 nM) and exogenous PLD (0.1-100 units/mL; Streptomyces chromofuscus) stimulated thymidine incorporation (43-208% above control). PA (100 nM-1 microM) also increased thymidine incorporation to 135% of control. Propranolol (100 nM-10 microM), which inhibits PA phosphohydrolase, blocked the growth stimulated by Ang II, PLD, or PA by as much as 95%, an effect not shared by other beta-adrenergic antagonists. Propranolol also increased the production of PA in the presence of Ang II by 320% and reduced DAG and arachidonic acid (AA) accumulation. The DAG lipase inhibitor RHC-80267 (1-10 microM) increased Ang II-induced DAG production, while attenuating thymidine incorporation and release of AA. Thus, it appears that activation of PLD, formation of PA, conversion of PA to DAG, and metabolism of DAG comprise an important signaling cascade in Ang II-induced growth of VSMC.

  13. Downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor by all-trans retinoic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Ichiki, T; Funakoshi, Y; Ito, K; Takeshita, A

    2000-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a biologically active metabolite of vitamin A that plays an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation. Although neointimal formation after balloon injury of rat carotid artery is inhibited by atRA, the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Because the renin-angiotensin system is one of the crucial components of atherosclerosis, we examined the effects of atRA on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)-R) in vascular smooth muscle cells. atRA (1 micromol/L) decreased the AT(1)-R mRNA level by 50% after 24 hours; AT(1)-R number was also reduced to the same extent after 48 hours. atRA markedly suppressed promoter activity of the AT(1)-R promoter-luciferase construct, but AT(1)-R mRNA stability was not affected. Cycloheximide blocked the atRA-induced decrease in AT(1)-R mRNA expression, suggesting that this process requires de novo protein synthesis. Simultaneous treatment with an agonist (Ro40-6055) specific for retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and an agonist (Ro25-7836) specific for retinoid X receptor (RXR) suppressed the AT(1)-R mRNA expression comparable to that with treatment with atRA, suggesting that the RAR/RXR heterodimer mediates the effect of atRA in AT(1)-R downregulation. These results suggest that atRA suppressed AT(1)-R mRNA transcription through new protein synthesis induced by RAR/RXR-dependent transcription. This study provides novel insight into a role of atRA as an important molecule that regulates AT(1)-R gene expression and provides possible mechanisms for the suppression of neointimal formation by atRA.

  14. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  15. Vascular smooth muscle actions of carnosine as its zinc complex are mediated by histamine H(1) and H(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Miller, D J; O'Dowd, A

    2000-07-01

    The endogenous d