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Sample records for aaa atpase family

  1. Meiotic Clade AAA ATPases: Protein Polymer Disassembly Machines.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Nicole; Hill, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic clade AAA ATPases (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities), which were initially grouped on the basis of phylogenetic classification of their AAA ATPase cassette, include four relatively well characterized family members, Vps4, spastin, katanin and fidgetin. These enzymes all function to disassemble specific polymeric protein structures, with Vps4 disassembling the ESCRT-III polymers that are central to the many membrane-remodeling activities of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) pathway and spastin, katanin p60 and fidgetin affecting multiple aspects of cellular dynamics by severing microtubules. They share a common domain architecture that features an N-terminal MIT (microtubule interacting and trafficking) domain followed by a single AAA ATPase cassette. Meiotic clade AAA ATPases function as hexamers that can cycle between the active assembly and inactive monomers/dimers in a regulated process, and they appear to disassemble their polymeric substrates by translocating subunits through the central pore of their hexameric ring. Recent studies with Vps4 have shown that nucleotide-induced asymmetry is a requirement for substrate binding to the pore loops and that recruitment to the protein lattice via MIT domains also relieves autoinhibition and primes the AAA ATPase cassettes for substrate binding. The most striking, unifying feature of meiotic clade AAA ATPases may be their MIT domain, which is a module that is found in a wide variety of proteins that localize to ESCRT-III polymers. Spastin also displays an adjacent microtubule binding sequence, and the presence of both ESCRT-III and microtubule binding elements may underlie the recent findings that the ESCRT-III disassembly function of Vps4 and the microtubule-severing function of spastin, as well as potentially katanin and fidgetin, are highly coordinated. PMID:26555750

  2. Genomic organization and mapping of the mouse P26s4 ATPase gene: A member of the remarkably conserved AAA gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, J.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome contains a large family of ATPases in which each member has at least one highly conserved domain of approximately 200 amino acids with an ATP binding motif (the {open_quotes}AAA{close_quotes} domain). AAA ATPases play diverse roles in the cell and are of considerable interest to researchers investigating a number of different phenomena, including control of the cell cycle. We have characterized the mouse P26s4 AAA ATPase gene that encodes a subunit of the 26S protease, a multimeric complex that is responsible for the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of specific proteins. The normal functioning of eukaryotic cells depends on this pathway to remove regulatory proteins such as cyclins or signal transduction molecules from the intracellular environment, with the appropriate timing to allow normal cell division and development. We have isolated mouse P26s4 cDNAs and mapped the P26s4 gene to chromosome 12. We have analyzed the intron-exon structure of the P26s4 genomic locus and have determined that the gene contains at least 10 introns, the first of which separates the start methionine from the rest of the coding sequence. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  4. Characterization of ATPase activity of the AAA ARC from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Mabel; de la Rosa, Ana Paulina Barba; Santos, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be probiotics that exist in the large intestine and are helpful to maintain human health. Oral administration of bifidobacteria may be effective in improving the intestinal flora and environment, stimulating the immune response and possibly preventing cancer. However, for consistent and positive results, further well-controlled studies are urgently needed to describe the basic mechanisms of this microorganism. Analysis of the proteasome-lacking Bifidobacterium longum genome reveals that it possesses a gene, IPR003593 AAA ATPase core, which codes a 56 kDa protein containing one AAA ATPase domain. Phylogenetic classification made by CLANS, positioned this sequence into the ARC divergent branch of the AAA ATPase family of proteins. N-terminal analysis of the sequence indicates this protein is closely related to other ATPases such as the Rhodococcus erythropolis ARC, Archaeoglobus fulgidus PAN, Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mpa and the human proteasomal Rpt1 subunit. This gene was cloned, the full-length recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified as a high-molecular size complex and named Bl-ARC. Enzymatic characterization showed that Bl-ARC ATPase is active, Mg(+2)-dependent and sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Gene organization positions bl-arc in a region flanked by a cluster of genes that includes pup, dop and pafA genes. These findings point to a possible function as a chaperone in the degradation pathway via pupylation. PMID:26015994

  5. TRIP13 is a protein-remodeling AAA+ ATPase that catalyzes MAD2 conformation switching

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Rosenberg, Scott C; Moeller, Arne; Speir, Jeffrey A; Su, Tiffany Y; Corbett, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    The AAA+ family ATPase TRIP13 is a key regulator of meiotic recombination and the spindle assembly checkpoint, acting on signaling proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family. Here we present the structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans TRIP13 ortholog PCH-2, revealing a new family of AAA+ ATPase protein remodelers. PCH-2 possesses a substrate-recognition domain related to those of the protein remodelers NSF and p97, while its overall hexameric architecture and likely structural mechanism bear close similarities to the bacterial protein unfoldase ClpX. We find that TRIP13, aided by the adapter protein p31(comet), converts the HORMA-family spindle checkpoint protein MAD2 from a signaling-active ‘closed’ conformer to an inactive ‘open’ conformer. We propose that TRIP13 and p31(comet) collaborate to inactivate the spindle assembly checkpoint through MAD2 conformational conversion and disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes. A parallel HORMA protein disassembly activity likely underlies TRIP13's critical regulatory functions in meiotic chromosome structure and recombination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07367.001 PMID:25918846

  6. Endosomal transport function in yeast requires a novel AAA-type ATPase, Vps4p.

    PubMed Central

    Babst, M; Sato, T K; Banta, L M; Emr, S D

    1997-01-01

    In a late-Golgi compartment of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vacuolar proteins such as carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) are actively sorted away from the secretory pathway and transported to the vacuole via a pre-vacuolar, endosome-like intermediate. The vacuolar protein sorting (vps) mutant vps4 accumulates vacuolar, endocytic and late-Golgi markers in an aberrant multilamellar pre-vacuolar compartment. The VPS4 gene has been cloned and found to encode a 48 kDa protein which belongs to the protein family of AAA-type ATPases. The Vps4 protein was purified and shown to exhibit an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity. A single amino acid change within the AAA motif of Vps4p yielded a protein that lacked ATPase activity and did not complement the protein sorting or morphological defects of the vps4 delta1 mutant. Indeed, when expressed at normal levels in wild-type cells, the mutant vps4 gene acted as a dominant-negative allele. The phenotypic characterization of a temperature-sensitive vps4 allele showed that the immediate consequence of loss of Vps4p function is a defect in vacuolar protein delivery. In this mutant, precursor CPY was not secreted but instead accumulated in an intracellular compartment, presumably the pre-vacuolar endosome. Electron microscopy revealed that upon temperature shift, exaggerated stacks of curved cisternal membranes (aberrant endosome) also accumulated in the vps4ts mutant. Based on these and other observations, we propose that Vps4p function is required for efficient transport out of the pre-vacuolar endosome. PMID:9155008

  7. AAA ATPases regulate membrane association of yeast oxysterol binding proteins and sterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Penghua; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hongzhe; Chieu, Hai Kee; Munn, Alan L; Yang, Hongyuan

    2005-09-01

    The yeast genome encodes seven oxysterol binding protein homologs, Osh1p-Osh7p, which have been implicated in regulating intracellular lipid and vesicular transport. Here, we show that both Osh6p and Osh7p interact with Vps4p, a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) family. The coiled-coil domain of Osh7p was found to interact with Vps4p in a yeast two-hybrid screen and the interaction between Osh7p and Vps4p appears to be regulated by ergosterol. Deletion of VPS4 induced a dramatic increase in the membrane-associated pools of Osh6p and Osh7p and also caused a decrease in sterol esterification, which was suppressed by overexpression of OSH7. Lastly, overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Osh7p (Osh7pCC) resulted in a multivesicular body sorting defect, suggesting a dominant negative role of Osh7pCC possibly through inhibiting Vps4p function. Our data suggest that a common mechanism may exist for AAA proteins to regulate the membrane association of yeast OSBP proteins and that these two protein families may function together to control subcellular lipid transport. PMID:16096648

  8. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP]. Photo-activation of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP resulted in its covalent binding to a 97-kDa purified soluble or membrane-associated protein, identified by amino acid sequencing as VCP. Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP covalently bound to the purified homo-hexameric VCP with an apparent high affinity (74-111 nM). A molar stoichiometry of 2.23+/-0.14 BzATP bound per homo-hexameric VCP (n =6) was determined using different methods for analysis of radiolabelling and protein determination. Nucleotides inhibited the binding of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP to VCP with the following efficiency: BzATP>ATP>ADP>>adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate>or=adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, whereas AMP, GTP and CTP were ineffective. VCP was observed to possess very low ATPase activity, with nucleotide specificity similar to that for BzATP binding. Conformational changes induced by an alternating site mechanism for ATP binding are suggested as a molecular mechanism for coupling ATP binding to the diverse activities of the AAA family. PMID:12747802

  9. Crystal structure of a novel archaeal AAA+ ATPase SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qingping; Rife, Christopher L.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-08-28

    Signal transduction ATPases with numerous domains (STAND), a large class of P-loop NTPases, belong to AAA+ ATPases. They include AP(apoptotic)-ATPases (e.g., animal apoptosis regulators CED4/Apaf-1, plant disease resistance proteins, and bacterial AfsR-like transcription regulators), NACHT NTPases (e.g. CARD4, NAIP, Het-E-1, TLP1), and several other less well-characterized families. STAND differ from other P-loop NTPases by their unique sequence motifs, which include an hhGRExE (h, hydrophobic; x, any residue) motif at the N-terminal region, a GxP/GxxP motif at the C-terminal region of the NTPase domain, in addition to a C-terminal helical domain and additional domains such as WD40, TPR, LRR or catalytic modules. Despite significant biological interests, structural coverage of STAND proteins is very limited and only two other structures are currently known: the cell death regulators Apaf-1 and CED-4. Here, we report the crystal structure of SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, which was determined using the semi-automated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG; http://www.jcsg.org), as part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). SSO1545 (NP-342973.1), a representative of the archaeal STANDs, is a member of Pfam PF01637 and encodes a protein of 356 residues with calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of 41.7 kD and 8.2, respectively.

  10. Structural Basis of ATP Hydrolysis and Intersubunit Signaling in the AAA+ ATPase p97.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Petra; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    p97 belongs to the superfamily of AAA+ ATPases and is characterized by a tandem AAA module, an N-terminal domain involved in substrate and cofactor interactions, and a functionally important unstructured C-terminal tail. The ATPase activity is controlled by an intradomain communication within the same protomer and an interdomain communication between neighboring protomers. Here, we present for the first time crystal structures in which the physiologically relevant p97 hexamer constitutes the content of the asymmetric unit, namely in the apo state without nucleotide in either the D1 or D2 module and in the pre-activated state with ATPγS bound to both modules. The structures provide new mechanistic insights into the interdomain communication mediated by conformational changes of the C terminus as well as an intersubunit signaling network, which couples the nucleotide state to the conformation of the central putative substrate binding pore. PMID:26712278

  11. Neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish by a large AAA+ ATPase/ubiquitin ligase, mysterin/RNF213

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Satoru; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Kawakami, Koichi; Takashima, Seiji; Hirata, Hiromi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Mysterin (also known as RNF213) is a huge intracellular protein with two AAA+ ATPase modules and a RING finger ubiquitin ligase domain. Mysterin was originally isolated as a significant risk factor for the cryptogenic cerebrovascular disorder moyamoya disease, and was found to be involved in physiological angiogenesis in zebrafish. However, the function and the physiological significance of mysterin in other than blood vessels remain largely unknown, although mysterin is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues. In this study, we performed antisense-mediated suppression of a mysterin orthologue in zebrafish larvae and revealed that mysterin-deficient larvae showed significant reduction in fast myofibrils and immature projection of primary motoneurons, leading to severe motor deficits. Fast muscle-specific restoration of mysterin expression cancelled these phenotypes, and interestingly both AAA+ ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities of mysterin were indispensable for proper fast muscle formation, demonstrating an essential role of mysterin and its enzymatic activities in the neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish. PMID:26530008

  12. An atypical AAA+ ATPase assembly controls efficient transposition through DNA remodeling and transposase recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Palomo, Ernesto; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposons are ubiquitous genetic elements that drive genome rearrangements, evolution, and the spread of infectious disease and drug-resistance. Many transposons, such as Mu, Tn7 and IS21, require regulatory AAA+ ATPases for function. We use x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy to show that the ATPase subunit of IS21, IstB, assembles into a clamshell-shaped decamer that sandwiches DNA between two helical pentamers of ATP-associated AAA+ domains, sharply bending the duplex into a 180° U-turn. Biochemical studies corroborate key features of the structure, and further show that the IS21 transposase, IstA, recognizes the IstB•DNA complex and promotes its disassembly by stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Collectively, these studies reveal a distinct manner of higher-order assembly and client engagement by a AAA+ ATPase and suggest a mechanistic model where IstB binding and subsequent DNA bending primes a selected insertion site for efficient transposition. PMID:26276634

  13. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  14. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  15. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell.

  16. The Archaeal Proteasome Is Regulated by a Network of AAA ATPases*

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Dara; Ammelburg, Moritz; Hobel, Cedric F.; Ströh, Luisa J.; Sessler, Nicole; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is the central machinery for targeted protein degradation in archaea, Actinobacteria, and eukaryotes. In its basic form, it consists of a regulatory ATPase complex and a proteolytic core particle. The interaction between the two is governed by an HbYX motif (where Hb is a hydrophobic residue, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) at the C terminus of the ATPase subunits, which stimulates gate opening of the proteasomal α-subunits. In archaea, the proteasome-interacting motif is not only found in canonical proteasome-activating nucleotidases of the PAN/ARC/Rpt group, which are absent in major archaeal lineages, but also in proteins of the CDC48/p97/VAT and AMA groups, suggesting a regulatory network of proteasomal ATPases. Indeed, Thermoplasma acidophilum, which lacks PAN, encodes one CDC48 protein that interacts with the 20S proteasome and activates the degradation of model substrates. In contrast, Methanosarcina mazei contains seven AAA proteins, five of which, both PAN proteins, two out of three CDC48 proteins, and the AMA protein, function as proteasomal gatekeepers. The prevalent presence of multiple, distinct proteasomal ATPases in archaea thus results in a network of regulatory ATPases that may widen the substrate spectrum of proteasomal protein degradation. PMID:22992741

  17. Recent Advances in Deciphering the Structure and Molecular Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPase N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minglei; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-05-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), first discovered in 1988, is a key factor for eukaryotic trafficking, including protein and hormone secretion and neurotransmitter release. It is a member of the AAA+ family (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities). NSF disassembles soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in conjunction with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP). Structural studies of NSF and its complex with SNAREs and SNAPs (known as 20S supercomplex) started about 20years ago. Crystal structures of individual N and D2 domains of NSF and low-resolution electron microscopy structures of full-length NSF and 20S supercomplex have been reported over the years. Nevertheless, the molecular architecture of the 20S supercomplex and the molecular mechanism of NSF-mediated SNARE complex disassembly remained unclear until recently. Here we review recent atomic-resolution or near-atomic resolution structures of NSF and of the 20S supercomplex, as well as recent insights into the molecular mechanism and energy requirements of NSF. We also compare NSF with other known AAA+ family members. PMID:26546278

  18. Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin in the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Leulliot, Nicolas; Meier, U. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin function in a staggering array of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, and assembly of macromolecular complexes, such as RNA polymerase II and small nucleolar (sno) RNPs. However, the molecular mechanism for all of these AAA+ ATPase associated activities is unknown. Here we document that, during the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs (including telomerase), the assembly factor SHQ1 holds the pseudouridine synthase NAP57/dyskerin in a viselike grip, and that pontin and reptin (as components of the R2TP complex) are required to pry NAP57 from SHQ1. Significantly, the NAP57 domain captured by SHQ1 harbors most mutations underlying X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) implicating the interface between the two proteins as a target of this bone marrow failure syndrome. Homing in on the essential first steps of H/ACA RNP biogenesis, our findings provide the first insight into the mechanism of action of pontin and reptin in the assembly of macromolecular complexes. PMID:22923768

  19. Subunit Interactions and Cooperativity in the Microtubule-severing AAA ATPase Spastin*

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Thomas; Link, Susanne; Le, Doan Tuong-Van; Sobczak, Jean-Philippe; Gieseke, Anja; Richter, Klaus; Woehlke, Günther

    2012-01-01

    Spastin is a hexameric ring AAA ATPase that severs microtubules. To see whether the ring complex funnels the energy of multiple ATP hydrolysis events to the site of mechanical action, we investigate here the cooperativity of spastin. Several lines of evidence indicate that interactions among two subunits dominate the cooperative behavior: (i) the ATPase activity shows a sigmoidal dependence on the ATP concentration; (ii) ATPγS displays a mixed-inhibition behavior for normal ATP turnover; and (iii) inactive mutant subunits inhibit the activity of spastin in a hyperbolic dependence, characteristic for two interacting species. A quantitative model based on neighbor interactions fits mutant titration experiments well, suggesting that each subunit is mainly influenced by one of its neighbors. These observations are relevant for patients suffering from SPG4-type hereditary spastic paraplegia and explain why single amino acid exchanges lead to a dominant negative phenotype. In severing assays, wild type spastin is even more sensitive toward the presence of inactive mutants than in enzymatic assays, suggesting a weak coupling of ATPase and severing activity. PMID:22637577

  20. Structural Insights into the Unusually Strong ATPase Activity of the AAA Domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans Fidgetin-like 1 (FIGL-1) Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wentao; Lin, Zhijie; Li, Weirong; Lu, Jing; Shen, Yuequan; Wang, Chunguang

    2013-01-01

    The FIGL-1 (fidgetin like-1) protein is a homolog of fidgetin, a protein whose mutation leads to multiple developmental defects. The FIGL-1 protein contains an AAA (ATPase associated with various activities) domain and belongs to the AAA superfamily. However, the biological functions and developmental implications of this protein remain unknown. Here, we show that the AAA domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans FIGL-1 protein (CeFIGL-1-AAA), in clear contrast to homologous AAA domains, has an unusually high ATPase activity and forms a hexamer in solution. By determining the crystal structure of CeFIGL-1-AAA, we found that the loop linking helices α9 and α10 folds into the short helix α9a, which has an acidic surface and interacts with a positively charged surface of the neighboring subunit. Disruption of this charge interaction by mutagenesis diminishes both the ATPase activity and oligomerization capacity of the protein. Interestingly, the acidic residues in helix α9a of CeFIGL-1-AAA are not conserved in other homologous AAA domains that have relatively low ATPase activities. These results demonstrate that the sequence of CeFIGL-1-AAA has adapted to establish an intersubunit charge interaction, which contributes to its strong oligomerization and ATPase activity. These unique properties of CeFIGL-1-AAA distinguish it from other homologous proteins, suggesting that CeFIGL-1 may have a distinct biological function. PMID:23979136

  1. The AAA-ATPase NVL2 is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Her, Joonyoung; Chung, In Kwon

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the AAA-ATPase NVL2 as a novel hTERT-interacting protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NVL2 associates with catalytically active telomerase via an interaction with hTERT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NVL2 is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP-binding activity of NVL2 is required for hTERT binding and telomerase assembly. -- Abstract: Continued cell proliferation requires telomerase to maintain functional telomeres that are essential for chromosome integrity. Although the core enzyme includes a telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and a telomerase RNA component (TERC), a number of auxiliary proteins have been identified to regulate telomerase assembly, localization, and enzymatic activity. Here we describe the characterization of the AAA-ATPase NVL2 as a novel hTERT-interacting protein. NVL2 interacts and co-localizes with hTERT in the nucleolus. NLV2 is also found in association with catalytically competent telomerase in cell lysates through an interaction with hTERT. Depletion of endogenous NVL2 by small interfering RNA led to a decrease in hTERT without affecting the steady-state levels of hTERT mRNA, thereby reducing telomerase activity, suggesting that NVL2 is an essential component of the telomerase holoenzyme. We also found that ATP-binding activity of NVL2 is required for hTERT binding as well as telomerase assembly. Our findings suggest that NVL2, in addition to its role in ribosome biosynthesis, is essential for telomerase biogenesis and provides an alternative approach for inhibiting telomerase activity in cancer.

  2. The AAA-type ATPase AtSKD1 contributes to vacuolar maintenance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mojgan; Keshavaiah, Channa; Scheuring, David; Sabovljevic, Aneta; Pimpl, Peter; Häusler, Rainer E; Hülskamp, Martin; Schellmann, Swen

    2010-10-01

    The vacuole is the most prominent organelle of plant cells. Despite its importance for many physiological and developmental aspects of plant life, little is known about its biogenesis and maintenance. Here we show that Arabidopsis plants expressing a dominant-negative version of the AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities) ATPase AtSKD1 (SUPPRESSOR OF K+ TRANSPORT GROWTH DEFECT1) under the control of the trichome-specific GLABRA2 (GL2) promoter exhibit normal vacuolar development in early stages of trichome development. Shortly after its formation, however, the large central vacuole is fragmented and finally disappears completely. Secretion assays with amylase fused to the vacuolar sorting signal of Sporamin show that dominant-negative AtSKD1 inhibits vacuolar trafficking of the reporter that is instead secreted. In addition, trichomes expressing dominant-negative AtSKD1 frequently contain multiple nuclei. Our results suggest that AtSKD1 contributes to vacuolar protein trafficking and thereby to the maintenance of the large central vacuole of plant cells, and might play a role in cell-cycle regulation. PMID:20663085

  3. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Berube, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N. . E-mail: wnf@jax.org

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  4. A yeast gene, MGS1, encoding a DNA-dependent AAA(+) ATPase is required to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Hishida, T; Iwasaki, H; Ohno, T; Morishita, T; Shinagawa, H

    2001-07-17

    Changes in DNA superhelicity during DNA replication are mediated primarily by the activities of DNA helicases and topoisomerases. If these activities are defective, the progression of the replication fork can be hindered or blocked, which can lead to double-strand breaks, elevated recombination in regions of repeated DNA, and genome instability. Hereditary diseases like Werner's and Bloom's Syndromes are caused by defects in DNA helicases, and these diseases are associated with genome instability and carcinogenesis in humans. Here we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MGS1 (Maintenance of Genome Stability 1), which encodes a protein belonging to the AAA(+) class of ATPases, and whose central region is similar to Escherichia coli RuvB, a Holliday junction branch migration motor protein. The Mgs1 orthologues are highly conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The Mgs1 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase and single-strand DNA annealing activities. An mgs1 deletion mutant has an elevated rate of mitotic recombination, which causes genome instability. The mgs1 mutation is synergistic with a mutation in top3 (encoding topoisomerase III), and the double mutant exhibits severe growth defects and markedly increased genome instability. In contrast to the mgs1 mutation, a mutation in the sgs1 gene encoding a DNA helicase homologous to the Werner and Bloom helicases suppresses both the growth defect and the increased genome instability of the top3 mutant. Therefore, evolutionarily conserved Mgs1 may play a role together with RecQ family helicases and DNA topoisomerases in maintaining proper DNA topology, which is essential for genome stability. PMID:11459965

  5. The AAA ATPase VPS4/SKD1 regulates endosomal cholesterol trafficking independently of ESCRT-III.

    PubMed

    Du, Ximing; Kazim, Abdulla S; Dawes, Ian W; Brown, Andrew J; Yang, Hongyuan

    2013-01-01

    The exit of low-density lipoprotein derived cholesterol (LDL-C) from late endosomes (LE)/lysosomes (Ly) is mediated by Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a multipass integral membrane protein on the limiting membranes of LE/Ly, and by NPC2, a cholesterol-binding protein in the lumen of LE/Ly. NPC2 delivers cholesterol to the N-terminal domain of NPC1, which is believed to insert cholesterol into the limiting membrane for subsequent transport to other subcellular organelles. Few cytoplasmic factors have been identified to govern cholesterol efflux from LE/Ly, and much less is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we establish VPS4, an AAA ATPase that has a well-established role in disassembling the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III polymer, as an important regulator of endosomal cholesterol transport. Knocking down VPS4 in HeLa cells resulted in prominent accumulation of LDL-C in LE/Ly, and disrupted cholesterol homeostatic responses at the endoplasmic reticulum. The level and localization of NPC1 and NPC2 appeared to be normal in VPS4 knockdown cells. Importantly, depleting any of the ESCRT-III components did not exert a significant effect on endosomal cholesterol transport. Our results thus identify an important cytoplasmic regulator of endosomal cholesterol trafficking and represent the first functional separation of VPS4 from ESCRT-III. PMID:23009658

  6. The catalytic power of magnesium chelatase: a benchmark for the AAA(+) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan B P; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2016-06-01

    In the first committed reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, magnesium chelatase couples ATP hydrolysis to the thermodynamically unfavorable Mg(2+) insertion into protoporphyrin IX (ΔG°' of circa 25-33 kJ·mol(-1) ). We explored the thermodynamic constraints on magnesium chelatase and demonstrate the effect of nucleotide hydrolysis on both the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. The enzyme produces a significant rate enhancement (kcat /kuncat of 400 × 10(6) m) and a catalytic rate enhancement, kcat/KmDIXK0.5Mgkuncat, of 30 × 10(15) m(-1) , increasing to 300 × 10(15) m(-1) with the activator protein Gun4. This is the first demonstration of the thermodynamic benefit of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA(+) family. PMID:27176620

  7. Maintenance of Nucleosomal Balance in cis by Conserved AAA-ATPase Yta7

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Laura M.; Davis, Matthew D.; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    The extent of chromatin compaction is a fundamental driver of nuclear metabolism . Yta7 is a chromatin-associated AAA-ATPase, the human ortholog of which, ANCCA/ATAD2 transcriptionally activates pathways of malignancy in a broad range of cancers. Yta7 directly binds histone H3, and bulk chromatin exhibits increased nucleosomal density in yta7Δ mutants. The suppression of yta7Δ mutant growth and transcriptional phenotypes in budding yeast by decreased dosage of histones H3 and H4 indicates the acute sensitivity of cells to deviations in nucleosome spacing. This study investigated the global changes in chromatin structure upon Yta7 loss or overexpression and determined which of these effects reflected direct Yta7 activity. Metagene analysis of Yta7’s genome-wide localization indicated peak binding of Yta7 just downstream of the transcription start site. Cells lacking Yta7 exhibited increased nucleosome density within genes downstream of the +1 nucleosome, as defined by decreased internucleosomal distance, resulting in progressively 5′-shifted nucleosomes within the gene. In contrast, cells overexpressing Yta7 displayed profound 3′-shifts in nucleosome position and reduced nucleosome density within genes. Importantly, Yta7-bound regions were enriched for nucleosomal shifts, indicating that Yta7 acted locally to modulate nucleosome spacing. The phenotype of cells lacking both Yta7 and Rtt106, the histone H3/H4 chaperone, indicated that Yta7 functions in both Rtt106-dependent and Rtt106-independent ways to modulate nucleosome spacing within genes. This study suggested that Yta7 affected nucleosome density throughout the gene by both blocking Rtt106 from entering the gene, as shown previously at HTA1, and facilitating the loss of nucleosomes from the 5′-end. PMID:25406467

  8. The AAA ATPase Vps4 Plays Important Roles in Candida albicans Hyphal Formation and is Inhibited by DBeQ.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yahui; Li, Wanjie; Chu, Mi; Chen, Hengye; Yu, Haoyuan; Fang, Chaoguang; Sun, Ningze; Wang, Qiming; Luo, Tian; Luo, Kaiju; She, Xueping; Zhang, Mengqian; Yang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen, and its pathogenicity is associated with hyphal formation. Previous studies have shown that at neutral-to-alkaline pH, hyphal growth is dependent on the Rim101 pathway whose activation requires Snf7, a member of the ESCRT system. In this work, we described the purification and characterization of the C. albicans Vps4, an AAA ATPase required for recycling of the ESCRTs. Its role on hyphal growth has been investigated. Our data suggest deletion of Vps4 decreases overall hyphal growth at pH 7 and increases the growth of multiple hyphae induced by serum, which indicates that the ESCRTs may make a Rim101-independent contribution to hyphal growth. Furthermore, DBeQ, an inhibitor of the AAA ATPase p97, was shown to inhibit the ATPase activity of Vps4 with an IC50 of about 11.5 μM. To a less degree, it also inhibits hyphal growth. Our work may provide a new strategy to control C. albicans infection. PMID:26700222

  9. Regulation of the transcriptional activator NtrC1: structural studies of the regulatory and AAA+ ATPase domains

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok-Yong; De La Torre, Armando; Yan, Dalai; Kustu, Sydney; Nixon, B. Tracy; Wemmer, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription by σ54 RNA polymerase depends on activators that contain ATPase domains of the AAA+ class. These activators, which are often response regulators of two-component signal transduction systems, remodel the polymerase so that it can form open complexes at promoters. Here, we report the first crystal structures of the ATPase domain of an activator, the NtrC1 protein from the extreme thermophile Aquifex aeolicus. This domain alone, which is active, crystallized as a ring-shaped heptamer. The protein carrying both the ATPase and adjacent receiver domains, which is inactive, crystallized as a dimer. In the inactive dimer, one residue needed for catalysis is far from the active site, and extensive contacts among the domains prevent oligomerization of the ATPase domain. Oligomerization, which completes the active site, depends on surfaces that are buried in the dimer, and hence, on a rearrangement of the receiver domains upon phosphorylation. A motif in the ATPase domain known to be critical for coupling energy to remodeling of polymerase forms a novel loop that projects from the middle of an α helix. The extended, structured loops from the subunits of the heptamer localize to a pore in the center of the ring and form a surface that could contact σ54. PMID:14561776

  10. The linker region plays a regulatory role in assembly and activity of the Vps4 AAA ATPase.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Anna; Curtiss, Matt; Davies, Brian A; Katzmann, David J; Babst, Markus

    2013-09-13

    The AAA-type ATPase Vps4 functions with components of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery in membrane fission events that are essential for endosomal maturation, cytokinesis, and the formation of retroviruses. A key step in these events is the assembly of monomeric Vps4 into the active ATPase complex, which is aided in part by binding of Vps4 via its N-terminal MIT (microtubule interacting and trafficking) domain to its substrate ESCRT-III. We found that the 40-amino acid linker region between the MIT and the ATPase domain of Vps4 is not required for proper function but plays a role in regulating Vps4 assembly and ATPase activity. Deletion of the linker is expected to bring the MIT domains into close proximity to the central pore of the Vps4 complex. We propose that this localization of the MIT domain in linker-deleted Vps4 mimics a repositioning of the MIT domain normally caused by binding of Vps4 to ESCRT-III. This structure would allow the Vps4 complex to engage ESCRT-III subunits with both the pore and the MIT domain simultaneously, which might be essential for the ATP-driven disassembly of ESCRT-III. PMID:23913684

  11. Targeting the AAA ATPase p97 as an approach to treat cancer through disruption of protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Daniel J.; Le Moigne, Ronan; Djakovic, Stevan; Kumar, Brajesh; Rice, Julie; Wong, Steve; Wang, Jinhai; Yao, Bing; Valle, Eduardo; von Soly, Szerenke Kiss; Madriaga, Antonett; Soriano, Ferdie; Menon, Mary-Kamala; Wu, Zhi Yong; Kampmann, Martin; Chen, Yuwen; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Aftab, Blake T.; Yakes, F. Michael; Shawver, Laura; Zhou, Han-Jie; Wustrow, David; Rolfe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Summary p97 is a AAA-ATPase with multiple cellular functions, one of which is critical regulation of protein homeostasis pathways. We describe the characterization of CB-5083, a potent, selective and orally bioavailable inhibitor of p97. Treatment of tumor cells with CB-5083 leads to accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, retention of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) substrates and generation of irresolvable proteotoxic stress leading to activation of the apoptotic arm of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In xenograft models, CB-5083 causes modulation of key p97-related pathways, induces apoptosis and has antitumor activity in a broad range of both hematological and solid tumor models. Molecular determinants of CB-5083 activity include expression of genes in the ERAD pathway providing a potential strategy for patient selection. PMID:26555175

  12. Improved Structures of Full-Length P97, An AAA ATPase: Implications for Mechanisms of Nucleotide-Dependent Conformational Change

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.M.; Brunger, A.T.; Weis, W.I.

    2009-05-14

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) protein p97 has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and homotypic membrane fusion. p97 belongs to a subgroup of AAA proteins that contains two nucleotide binding domains, D1 and D2. We determined the crystal structure of D2 at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. This model enabled rerefinement of full-length p97 in different nucleotide states against previously reported low-resolution diffraction data to significantly improved R values and Ramachandran statistics. Although the overall fold remained similar, there are significant improvements, especially around the D2 nucleotide binding site. The rerefinement illustrates the importance of knowledge of high-resolution structures of fragments covering most of the whole molecule. The structures suggest that nucleotide hydrolysis is transformed into larger conformational changes by pushing of one D2 domain by its neighbor in the hexamer, and transmission of nucleotide-state information through the D1-D2 linker to displace the N-terminal, effector binding domain.

  13. NVL2, a nucleolar AAA-ATPase, is associated with the nuclear exosome and is involved in pre-rRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikatsu, Yuki; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Sudo, Haruka; Yuasa, Keizo; Tsuji, Akihiko; Nagahama, Masami

    2015-08-28

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family and is involved in the biosynthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in mammalian cells. We previously showed the interaction of NVL2 with a DExD/H-box RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1, which is a known cofactor for an exoribonuclease complex, the exosome. This finding implicated NVL2 in RNA metabolic processes during ribosome biogenesis. In the present study, we found that a series of mutations within the ATPase domain of NVL2 causes a defect in pre-rRNA processing into mature 28S and 5.8S rRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that NVL2 was associated with the nuclear exosome complex, which includes RRP6 as a nucleus-specific catalytic subunit. This interaction was prevented by depleting either MTR4 or RRP6, indicating their essential role in mediating this interaction with NVL2. Additionally, knockdown of MPP6, another cofactor for the nuclear exosome, also prevented the interaction by causing MTR4 to dissociate from the nuclear exosome. These results suggest that NVL2 is involved in pre-rRNA processing by associating with the nuclear exosome complex and that MPP6 is required for maintaining the integrity of this rRNA processing complex. - Highlights: • ATPase-deficient mutants of NVL2 have decreased pre-rRNA processing. • NVL2 associates with the nuclear exosome through interactions with MTR4 and RRP6. • MPP6 stabilizes MTR4-RRP6 interaction and allows NVL2 to interact with the complex.

  14. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13) AAA-ATPase Is a Novel Mitotic Checkpoint-silencing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kexi; Sturt-Gillespie, Brianne; Hittle, James C.; Macdonald, Dawn; Chan, Gordon K.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (or spindle assembly checkpoint) is a fail-safe mechanism to prevent chromosome missegregation by delaying anaphase onset in the presence of defective kinetochore-microtubule attachment. The target of the checkpoint is the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Once all chromosomes are properly attached and bioriented at the metaphase plate, the checkpoint needs to be silenced. Previously, we and others have reported that TRIP13 AAA-ATPase binds to the mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein p31comet. Here we show that endogenous TRIP13 localizes to kinetochores. TRIP13 knockdown delays metaphase-to-anaphase transition. The delay is caused by prolonged presence of the effector for the checkpoint, the mitotic checkpoint complex, and its association and inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. These results suggest that TRIP13 is a novel mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein. The ATPase activity of TRIP13 is essential for its checkpoint function, and interference with TRIP13 abolished p31comet-mediated mitotic checkpoint silencing. TRIP13 overexpression is a hallmark of cancer cells showing chromosomal instability, particularly in certain breast cancers with poor prognosis. We suggest that premature mitotic checkpoint silencing triggered by TRIP13 overexpression may promote cancer development. PMID:25012665

  15. Disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes by the joint action of the AAA-ATPase TRIP13 and p31comet

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Wang, Kexi; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Kaisari, Sharon; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao; Hershko, Avram

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is active, a Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) assembles and inhibits the ubiquitin ligase Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled and the checkpoint is inactivated. The mechanisms of the disassembly of MCC are not sufficiently understood. We have previously observed that ATP hydrolysis is required for the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet to disassemble MCC. We now show that HeLa cell extracts contain a factor that promotes ATP- and p31comet-dependent disassembly of a Cdc20–Mad2 subcomplex and identify it as Thyroid Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13), an AAA-ATPase known to interact with p31comet. The joint action of TRIP13 and p31comet also promotes the release of Mad2 from MCC, participates in the complete disassembly of MCC and abrogates checkpoint inhibition of APC/C. We propose that TRIP13 plays centrally important roles in the sequence of events leading to MCC disassembly and checkpoint inactivation. PMID:25092294

  16. Structural insights into the Escherichia coli lysine decarboxylases and molecular determinants of interaction with the AAA+ ATPase RavA

    PubMed Central

    Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Carriel, Diego; Perard, Julien; Malet, Hélène; Bacia, Maria; Liu, Kaiyin; Chan, Sze W. S.; Houry, Walid A.; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine; Elsen, Sylvie; Gutsche, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI is an important enterobacterial acid stress response enzyme whereas LdcC is its close paralogue thought to play mainly a metabolic role. A unique macromolecular cage formed by two decamers of the Escherichia coli LdcI and five hexamers of the AAA+ ATPase RavA was shown to counteract acid stress under starvation. Previously, we proposed a pseudoatomic model of the LdcI-RavA cage based on its cryo-electron microscopy map and crystal structures of an inactive LdcI decamer and a RavA monomer. We now present cryo-electron microscopy 3D reconstructions of the E. coli LdcI and LdcC, and an improved map of the LdcI bound to the LARA domain of RavA, at pH optimal for their enzymatic activity. Comparison with each other and with available structures uncovers differences between LdcI and LdcC explaining why only the acid stress response enzyme is capable of binding RavA. We identify interdomain movements associated with the pH-dependent enzyme activation and with the RavA binding. Multiple sequence alignment coupled to a phylogenetic analysis reveals that certain enterobacteria exert evolutionary pressure on the lysine decarboxylase towards the cage-like assembly with RavA, implying that this complex may have an important function under particular stress conditions. PMID:27080013

  17. Structure and function of the AAA+ ATPase p97/Cdc48p.

    PubMed

    Xia, Di; Tang, Wai Kwan; Ye, Yihong

    2016-05-25

    p97 (also known as valosin-containing protein (VCP) in mammals or Cdc48p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is an evolutionarily conserved ATPase present in all eukaryotes and archaebacteria. In conjunction with a collection of cofactors and adaptors, p97/Cdc48p performs an array of biological functions mostly through modulating the stability of 'client' proteins. Using energy from ATP hydrolysis, p97/Cdc48p segregates these molecules from immobile cellular structures such as protein assemblies, membrane organelles, and chromatin. Consequently, the released polypeptides can be efficiently degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system or recycled. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure and function of this essential cellular chaperoning system. PMID:26945625

  18. The Multivesicular Bodies (MVBs)-Localized AAA ATPase LRD6-6 Inhibits Immunity and Cell Death Likely through Regulating MVBs-Mediated Vesicular Trafficking in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Yin, Junjie; Liang, Sihui; Liang, Ruihong; Zhou, Xiaogang; Chen, Zhixiong; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Jing; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Yuan, Can; Miyamoto, Koji; Ma, Bingtian; Wang, Jichun; Qin, Peng; Chen, Weilan; Wang, Yuping; Wang, Wenming; Wu, Xianjun; Yamane, Hisakazu; Zhu, Lihuang; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/endosomes-mediated vesicular trafficking may play key roles in plant immunity and cell death. However, the molecular regulation is poorly understood in rice. Here we report the identification and characterization of a MVBs-localized AAA ATPase LRD6-6 in rice. Disruption of LRD6-6 leads to enhanced immunity and cell death in rice. The ATPase activity and homo-dimerization of LRD6-6 is essential for its regulation on plant immunity and cell death. An ATPase inactive mutation (LRD6-6E315Q) leads to dominant-negative inhibition in plants. The LRD6-6 protein co-localizes with the MVBs marker protein RabF1/ARA6 and interacts with ESCRT-III components OsSNF7 and OsVPS2. Further analysis reveals that LRD6-6 is required for MVBs-mediated vesicular trafficking and inhibits the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds. Collectively, our study shows that the AAA ATPase LRD6-6 inhibits plant immunity and cell death most likely through modulating MVBs-mediated vesicular trafficking in rice. PMID:27618555

  19. The AAA-ATPase molecular chaperone Cdc48/p97 disassembles sumoylated centromeres, decondenses heterochromatin, and activates ribosomal RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Chumak, Nina; García-Aguilar, Marcelina; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Nishimura, Toshiro; Schoft, Vera K.; Bindics, János; Ślusarz, Lucyna; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Opravil, Susanne; Mechtler, Karl; Zilberman, Daniel; Fischer, Robert L.; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres mediate chromosome segregation and are defined by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3)/centromere protein A (CENP-A). Removal of CenH3 from centromeres is a general property of terminally differentiated cells, and the persistence of CenH3 increases the risk of diseases such as cancer. However, active mechanisms of centromere disassembly are unknown. Nondividing Arabidopsis pollen vegetative cells, which transport engulfed sperm by extended tip growth, undergo loss of CenH3; centromeric heterochromatin decondensation; and bulk activation of silent rRNA genes, accompanied by their translocation into the nucleolus. Here, we show that these processes are blocked by mutations in the evolutionarily conserved AAA-ATPase molecular chaperone, CDC48A, homologous to yeast Cdc48 and human p97 proteins, both of which are implicated in ubiquitin/small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted protein degradation. We demonstrate that CDC48A physically associates with its heterodimeric cofactor UFD1-NPL4, known to bind ubiquitin and SUMO, as well as with SUMO1-modified CenH3 and mutations in NPL4 phenocopy cdc48a mutations. In WT vegetative cell nuclei, genetically unlinked ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci are uniquely clustered together within the nucleolus and all major rRNA gene variants, including those rDNA variants silenced in leaves, are transcribed. In cdc48a mutant vegetative cell nuclei, however, these rDNA loci frequently colocalized with condensed centromeric heterochromatin at the external periphery of the nucleolus. Our results indicate that the CDC48ANPL4 complex actively removes sumoylated CenH3 from centromeres and disrupts centromeric heterochromatin to release bulk rRNA genes into the nucleolus for ribosome production, which fuels single nucleus-driven pollen tube growth and is essential for plant reproduction. PMID:25344531

  20. The AAA-ATPase molecular chaperone Cdc48/p97 disassembles sumoylated centromeres, decondenses heterochromatin, and activates ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Chumak, Nina; García-Aguilar, Marcelina; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Nishimura, Toshiro; Schoft, Vera K; Bindics, János; Slusarz, Lucyna; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Opravil, Susanne; Mechtler, Karl; Zilberman, Daniel; Fischer, Robert L; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2014-11-11

    Centromeres mediate chromosome segregation and are defined by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3)/centromere protein A (CENP-A). Removal of CenH3 from centromeres is a general property of terminally differentiated cells, and the persistence of CenH3 increases the risk of diseases such as cancer. However, active mechanisms of centromere disassembly are unknown. Nondividing Arabidopsis pollen vegetative cells, which transport engulfed sperm by extended tip growth, undergo loss of CenH3; centromeric heterochromatin decondensation; and bulk activation of silent rRNA genes, accompanied by their translocation into the nucleolus. Here, we show that these processes are blocked by mutations in the evolutionarily conserved AAA-ATPase molecular chaperone, CDC48A, homologous to yeast Cdc48 and human p97 proteins, both of which are implicated in ubiquitin/small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted protein degradation. We demonstrate that CDC48A physically associates with its heterodimeric cofactor UFD1-NPL4, known to bind ubiquitin and SUMO, as well as with SUMO1-modified CenH3 and mutations in NPL4 phenocopy cdc48a mutations. In WT vegetative cell nuclei, genetically unlinked ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci are uniquely clustered together within the nucleolus and all major rRNA gene variants, including those rDNA variants silenced in leaves, are transcribed. In cdc48a mutant vegetative cell nuclei, however, these rDNA loci frequently colocalized with condensed centromeric heterochromatin at the external periphery of the nucleolus. Our results indicate that the CDC48A(NPL4) complex actively removes sumoylated CenH3 from centromeres and disrupts centromeric heterochromatin to release bulk rRNA genes into the nucleolus for ribosome production, which fuels single nucleus-driven pollen tube growth and is essential for plant reproduction. PMID:25344531

  1. Noncanonical Role for the Host Vps4 AAA+ ATPase ESCRT Protein in the Formation of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Replicase

    PubMed Central

    Pogany, Judit; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Assembling of the membrane-bound viral replicase complexes (VRCs) consisting of viral- and host-encoded proteins is a key step during the replication of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the infected cells. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host have revealed the involvement of eleven cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) proteins in viral replication. The ESCRT proteins are involved in endosomal sorting of cellular membrane proteins by forming multiprotein complexes, deforming membranes away from the cytosol and, ultimately, pinching off vesicles into the lumen of the endosomes. In this paper, we show an unexpected key role for the conserved Vps4p AAA+ ATPase, whose canonical function is to disassemble the ESCRT complexes and recycle them from the membranes back to the cytosol. We find that the tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with Vps4p and three ESCRT-III proteins. Interestingly, Vps4p is recruited to become a permanent component of the VRCs as shown by co-purification assays and immuno-EM. Vps4p is co-localized with the viral dsRNA and contacts the viral (+)RNA in the intracellular membrane. Deletion of Vps4p in yeast leads to the formation of crescent-like membrane structures instead of the characteristic spherule and vesicle-like structures. The in vitro assembled tombusvirus replicase based on cell-free extracts (CFE) from vps4Δ yeast is highly nuclease sensitive, in contrast with the nuclease insensitive replicase in wt CFE. These data suggest that the role of Vps4p and the ESCRT machinery is to aid building the membrane-bound VRCs, which become nuclease-insensitive to avoid the recognition by the host antiviral surveillance system and the destruction of the viral RNA. Other (+)RNA viruses of plants and animals might also subvert Vps4p and the ESCRT machinery for formation of VRCs, which require membrane deformation and spherule formation. PMID:24763736

  2. Engagement of Arginine Finger to ATP Triggers Large Conformational Changes in NtrC1 AAA+ ATPase for Remodeling Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; De Carlo, Sacha; Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Haw; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2010-11-19

    The NtrC-like AAA+ ATPases control virulence and other important bacterial activities through delivering mechanical work to {sigma}54-RNA polymerase to activate transcription from {sigma}54-dependent genes. We report the first crystal structure for such an ATPase, NtrC1 of Aquifex aeolicus, in which the catalytic arginine engages the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP. Comparing the new structure with those previously known for apo and ADP-bound states supports a rigid-body displacement model that is consistent with large-scale conformational changes observed by low-resolution methods. First, the arginine finger induces rigid-body roll, extending surface loops above the plane of the ATPase ring to bind {sigma}54. Second, ATP hydrolysis permits Pi release and retraction of the arginine with a reversed roll, remodeling {sigma}54-RNAP. This model provides a fresh perspective on how ATPase subunits interact within the ring-ensemble to promote transcription, directing attention to structural changes on the arginine-finger side of an ATP-bound interface.

  3. The Torsin-family AAA+ Protein OOC-5 Contains a Critical Disulfide Adjacent to Sensor-II That Couples Redox State to Nucleotide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wrabl, James O.; Hayashi, Adam P.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    A subgroup of the AAA+ proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope including human torsinA, a protein mutated in hereditary dystonia, is called the torsin family of AAA+ proteins. A multiple-sequence alignment of this family with Hsp100 proteins of known structure reveals a conserved cysteine in the C-terminus of torsin proteins within the Sensor-II motif. A structural model predicts this cysteine to be a part of an intramolecular disulfide bond, suggesting that it may function as a redox sensor to regulate ATPase activity. In vitro experiments with OOC-5, a torsinA homolog from Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrate that redox changes that reduce this disulfide bond affect the binding of ATP and ADP and cause an attendant local conformational change detected by limited proteolysis. Transgenic worms expressing an ooc-5 gene with cysteine-to-serine mutations that disrupt the disulfide bond have a very low embryo hatch rate compared with wild-type controls, indicating these two cysteines are essential for OOC-5 function. We propose that the Sensor-II in torsin family proteins is a redox-regulated sensor. This regulatory mechanism may be central to the function of OOC-5 and human torsinA. PMID:18550799

  4. Identification of an AAA ATPase VPS4B-Dependent Pathway That Modulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Abundance and Signaling during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H. Helen; Li, Xu; Chen, Jo-Lin; Sun, Xiuzhu; Cooper, Fariba Norouziyan; Chen, Yun-Ru; Zhang, Wenyu; Chung, Yiyin; Li, Angela; Cheng, Chun-Ting; Yang, Lixin; Deng, XuTao; Liu, Xiyong; Yen, Yun; Johnson, Deborah L.; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Yang, Austin

    2012-01-01

    VPS4B, an AAA ATPase (ATPase associated with various cellular activities), participates in vesicular trafficking and autophagosome maturation in mammalian cells. In solid tumors, hypoxia is a common feature and an indicator of poor treatment outcome. Our studies demonstrate that exogenous or endogenous (assessed with anchorage-independent three-dimensional multicellular spheroid culture) hypoxia induces VPS4B downregulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Inhibition of VPS4B function by short hairpin VPS4B (sh-VPS4B) or expression of dominant negative VPS4B(E235Q) promotes anchorage-independent breast cancer cell growth and resistance to gefitinib, U0126, and genotoxicity. Biochemically, hyperactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for cell proliferation and survival, accompanied by increased EGFR accumulation and altered intracellular compartmentalization, is observed in cells with compromised VPS4B. Furthermore, enhanced FOS/JUN induction and AP-1 promoter activation are noted in EGF-treated cells with VPS4B knockdown. However, VPS4B depletion does not affect EGFRvIII stability or its associated signaling. An inverse correlation between VPS4B expression and EGFR abundance is observed in breast tumors, and high-grade or recurrent breast carcinomas exhibit lower VPS4B expression. Together, our findings highlight a potentially critical role of VPS4B downregulation or chronic-hypoxia-induced VPS4B degradation in promoting tumor progression, unveiling a nongenomic mechanism for EGFR overproduction in human breast cancer. PMID:22252323

  5. Role of AAA(+)-proteins in peroxisome biogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Immanuel; Erdmann, Ralf; Girzalsky, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the PEX1 gene, which encodes a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis, are the most common cause of the Zellweger spectrum diseases. The recognition that Pex1p shares a conserved ATP-binding domain with p97 and NSF led to the discovery of the extended family of AAA+-type ATPases. So far, four AAA+-type ATPases are related to peroxisome function. Pex6p functions together with Pex1p in peroxisome biogenesis, ATAD1/Msp1p plays a role in membrane protein targeting and a member of the Lon-family of proteases is associated with peroxisomal quality control. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the AAA+-proteins involved in peroxisome biogenesis and function. PMID:26453804

  6. A structural analysis of the AAA+ domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Gleave, Emma S; Schmidt, Helgo; Carter, Andrew P

    2014-06-01

    Dyneins are large protein complexes that act as microtubule based molecular motors. The dynein heavy chain contains a motor domain which is a member of the AAA+ protein family (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities). Proteins of the AAA+ family show a diverse range of functionalities, but share a related core AAA+ domain, which often assembles into hexameric rings. Dynein is unusual because it has all six AAA+ domains linked together, in one long polypeptide. The dynein motor domain generates movement by coupling ATP driven conformational changes in the AAA+ ring to the swing of a motile element called the linker. Dynein binds to its microtubule track via a long antiparallel coiled-coil stalk that emanates from the AAA+ ring. Recently the first high resolution structures of the dynein motor domain were published. Here we provide a detailed structural analysis of the six AAA+ domains using our Saccharomycescerevisiae crystal structure. We describe how structural similarities in the dynein AAA+ domains suggest they share a common evolutionary origin. We analyse how the different AAA+ domains have diverged from each other. We discuss how this is related to the function of dynein as a motor protein and how the AAA+ domains of dynein compare to those of other AAA+ proteins. PMID:24680784

  7. Mode of interaction of TRIP13 AAA-ATPase with the Mad2-binding protein p31comet and with mitotic checkpoint complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Kaisari, Sharon; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2015-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 13 (TRIP13), jointly with the Mad2-binding protein p31comet, promotes the inactivation of the mitotic (spindle assembly) checkpoint by disassembling the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). This checkpoint system ensures the accuracy of chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase until correct bipolar attachment of chromatids to the mitotic spindle is achieved. MCC inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3, in association with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The assembly of MCC in active checkpoint is initiated by the conversion of Mad2 from an open (O-Mad2) to a closed (C-Mad2) conformation, which then binds tightly to Cdc20. Conversely, the disassembly of MCC that takes place when the checkpoint is turned off involves the conversion of C-Mad2 back to O-Mad2. Previously, we found that the latter process is mediated by TRIP13 together with p31comet, but the mode of their interaction remained unknown. Here, we report that the oligomeric form of TRIP13 binds both p31comet and MCC. Furthermore, p31comet and checkpoint complexes mutually promote the binding of each other to oligomeric TRIP13. We propose that p31comet bound to C-Mad2–containing checkpoint complex is the substrate for the ATPase and that the substrate-binding site of TRIP13 is composed of subsites specific for p31comet and C-Mad2–containing complex. The simultaneous occupancy of both subsites is required for high-affinity binding to TRIP13. PMID:26324890

  8. Ubiquitination of the N-terminal Region of Caveolin-1 Regulates Endosomal Sorting by the VCP/p97 AAA-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Philipp; Bug, Monika; Meyer, Hemmo

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is the defining constituent of caveolae at the plasma membrane of many mammalian cells. For turnover, CAV1 is ubiquitinated and sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes. Sorting of CAV1 requires the AAA+-type ATPase VCP and its cofactor UBXD1. However, it is unclear in which region CAV1 is ubiquitinated and how ubiquitination is linked to sorting of CAV1 by VCP-UBXD1. Here, we show through site-directed mutagenesis that ubiquitination of CAV1 occurs at any of the six lysine residues, 5, 26, 30, 39, 47, and 57, that are clustered in the N-terminal region but not at lysines in the oligomerization, intramembrane, or C-terminal domains. Mutation of Lys-5–57 to arginines prevented binding of the VCP-UBXD1 complex and, importantly, strongly reduced recruitment of VCP-UBXD1 to endocytic compartments. Moreover, the Lys-5–57Arg mutation specifically interfered with trafficking of CAV1 from early to late endosomes. Conversely and consistently, depletion of VCP or UBXD1 led to accumulation of ubiquitinated CAV1, suggesting that VCP acts downstream of ubiquitination and is required for transport of the ubiquitinated form of CAV1 to late endosomes. These results define the N-terminal region of CAV1 as the critical ubiquitin conjugation site and, together with previous data, demonstrate the significance of this ubiquitination for binding to the VCP-UBXD1 complex and for sorting into lysosomes. PMID:23335559

  9. A Fragment-Based Ligand Screen Against Part of a Large Protein Machine: The ND1 Domains of the AAA+ ATPase p97/VCP.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Michael S; Bulfer, Stacie L; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Renslo, Adam R; Jacobson, Matthew P; James, Thomas L; Arkin, Michelle R; Kelly, Mark J S

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitous AAA+ ATPase p97 functions as a dynamic molecular machine driving several cellular processes. It is essential in regulating protein homeostasis, and it represents a potential drug target for cancer, particularly when there is a greater reliance on the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to degrade an overabundance of secreted proteins. Here, we report a case study for using fragment-based ligand design approaches against this large and dynamic hexamer, which has multiple potential binding sites for small molecules. A screen of a fragment library was conducted by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and followed up by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), two complementary biophysical techniques. Virtual screening was also carried out to examine possible binding sites for the experimental hits and evaluate the potential utility of fragment docking for this target. Out of this effort, 13 fragments were discovered that showed reversible binding with affinities between 140 µM and 1 mM, binding stoichiometries of 1:1 or 2:1, and good ligand efficiencies. Structural data for fragment-protein interactions were obtained with residue-specific [U-(2)H] (13)CH3-methyl-labeling NMR strategies, and these data were compared to poses from docking. The combination of virtual screening, SPR, and NMR enabled us to find and validate a number of interesting fragment hits and allowed us to gain an understanding of the structural nature of fragment binding. PMID:25690569

  10. Understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in crossbred bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Alex, Rani; Raja, T. V.; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R.; Kumar, Sushil; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal; Singh, Rani; Prakash, B.

    2015-12-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein composed of a large catalytic subunit (alpha), a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta), and gamma subunit. The beta subunit is essential for ion recognition as well as maintenance of the membrane integrity. Present study was aimed to analyze the expression pattern of ATPase beta subunit genes (ATPase B1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3) among the crossbred bulls under different ambient temperatures (20-44 °C). The present study was also aimed to look into the relationship of HSP70 with the ATPase beta family genes. Our results demonstrated that among beta family genes, transcript abundance of ATPase B1 and ATPase B2 is significantly ( P < 0.05) higher during the thermal stress. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis revealed that the expression of ATPase Β1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3 is highly correlated ( P < 0.01) with HSP70, representing that the change in the expression pattern of these genes is positive and synergistic. These may provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in cattle.

  11. Multiple genes, including a member of the AAA family, are essential for degradation of unassembled subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Nakai, T; Yasuhara, T; Fujiki, Y; Ohashi, A

    1995-08-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase consists of three mitochondrion- and several nucleus-encoded subunits. We previously found that in a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking nucleus-encoded subunit 4 of this enzyme (CoxIV), subunits 2 and 3 (CoxII and CoxIII), both encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, were unstable and rapidly degraded in mitochondria, presumably because the subunits cannot assemble normally. To analyze the molecular machinery involved in this proteolytic pathway, we obtained four mutants defective in the degradation of unassembled CoxII (osd mutants) by screening CoxIV-deficient cells for the accumulation of CoxII. All of the mutants were recessive and were classified into three different complementation groups. Tetrad analyses revealed that the phenotype of each mutant was caused by a single nuclear mutation. These results suggest strongly that at least three nuclear genes (the OSD genes) are required for this degradation system. Interestingly, degradation of CoxIII was not affected in the mutants, implying that the two subunits are degraded by distinct pathways. We also cloned the OSD1 gene by complementation of the temperature sensitivity of osd1-1 mutants with a COXIV+ genetic background on a nonfermentable glycerol medium. We found it to encode a member of a family (the AAA family) of putative ATPases, which proved to be identical to recently described YME1 and YTA11. Immunological analyses revealed that Osd1 protein is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Disruption of the predicted ATP-binding cassette by site-directed mutagenesis eliminated biological activities, thereby underscoring the importance of ATP for function. PMID:7623837

  12. Multiple genes, including a member of the AAA family, are essential for degradation of unassembled subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, T; Yasuhara, T; Fujiki, Y; Ohashi, A

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase consists of three mitochondrion- and several nucleus-encoded subunits. We previously found that in a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking nucleus-encoded subunit 4 of this enzyme (CoxIV), subunits 2 and 3 (CoxII and CoxIII), both encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, were unstable and rapidly degraded in mitochondria, presumably because the subunits cannot assemble normally. To analyze the molecular machinery involved in this proteolytic pathway, we obtained four mutants defective in the degradation of unassembled CoxII (osd mutants) by screening CoxIV-deficient cells for the accumulation of CoxII. All of the mutants were recessive and were classified into three different complementation groups. Tetrad analyses revealed that the phenotype of each mutant was caused by a single nuclear mutation. These results suggest strongly that at least three nuclear genes (the OSD genes) are required for this degradation system. Interestingly, degradation of CoxIII was not affected in the mutants, implying that the two subunits are degraded by distinct pathways. We also cloned the OSD1 gene by complementation of the temperature sensitivity of osd1-1 mutants with a COXIV+ genetic background on a nonfermentable glycerol medium. We found it to encode a member of a family (the AAA family) of putative ATPases, which proved to be identical to recently described YME1 and YTA11. Immunological analyses revealed that Osd1 protein is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Disruption of the predicted ATP-binding cassette by site-directed mutagenesis eliminated biological activities, thereby underscoring the importance of ATP for function. PMID:7623837

  13. Torsin ATPases: structural insights and functional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Laudermilch, Ethan; Schlieker, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Torsin ATPases are the only members of the AAA+ ATPase family that localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and contiguous perinuclear space. Accordingly, they are well positioned to perform essential work in these compartments, but their precise functions remain elusive. Recent studies have deciphered an unusual ATPase activation mechanism relying on Torsin-associated transmembrane cofactors, LAP1 or LULL1. These findings profoundly change our molecular view of the Torsin machinery and rationalize several human mutations in TorsinA or LAP1 leading to congenital disorders, symptoms of which have recently been recapitulated in mouse models. Here, we review these recent advances in the Torsin field and discuss the most pressing questions in relation to nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:26803745

  14. Late-stage maturation of the Rieske Fe/S protein: Mzm1 stabilizes Rip1 but does not facilitate its translocation by the AAA ATPase Bcs1.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tie-Zhong; Smith, Pamela M; Fox, Jennifer L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-11-01

    The final step in the assembly of the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase or bc(1) complex involves the insertion of the Rieske Fe/S cluster protein, Rip1. Maturation of Rip1 occurs within the mitochondrial matrix prior to its translocation across the inner membrane (IM) in a process mediated by the Bcs1 ATPase and subsequent insertion into the bc(1) complex. Here we show that the matrix protein Mzm1 functions as a Rip1 chaperone, stabilizing Rip1 prior to the translocation step. In the absence of Mzm1, Rip1 is prone to either proteolytic degradation or temperature-induced aggregation. A series of Rip1 truncations were engineered to probe motifs necessary for Mzm1 interaction and Bcs1-mediated translocation of Rip1. The Mzm1 interaction with Rip1 persists in Rip1 variants lacking its transmembrane domain or containing only its C-terminal globular Fe/S domain. Replacement of the globular domain of Rip1 with that of the heterologous folded protein Grx3 abrogated Mzm1 interaction; however, appending the C-terminal 30 residues of Rip1 to the Rip1-Grx3 chimera restored Mzm1 interaction. The Rip1-Grx3 chimera and a Rip1 truncation containing only the N-terminal 92 residues each induced stabilization of the bc(1):cytochrome oxidase supercomplex in a Bcs1-dependent manner. However, the Rip1 variants were not stably associated with the supercomplex. The induced supercomplex stabilization by the Rip1 N terminus was independent of Mzm1. PMID:22927643

  15. The BiP molecular chaperone plays multiple roles during the biogenesis of torsinA, an AAA+ ATPase associated with the neurological disease early-onset torsion dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zacchi, Lucía F; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Bell, Samantha L; Millen, Linda; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Thomas, Philip J; Zolkiewski, Michal; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-05-01

    Early-onset torsion dystonia (EOTD) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary and sustained muscle contractions that can lead to paralysis and abnormal posture. EOTD is associated with the deletion of a glutamate (ΔE) in torsinA, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident AAA(+) ATPase. To date, the effect of ΔE on torsinA and the reason that this mutation results in EOTD are unclear. Moreover, there are no specific therapeutic options to treat EOTD. To define the underlying biochemical defects associated with torsinAΔE and to uncover factors that might be targeted to offset defects associated with torsinAΔE, we developed a yeast torsinA expression system and tested the roles of ER chaperones in mediating the folding and stability of torsinA and torsinAΔE. We discovered that the ER lumenal Hsp70, BiP, an associated Hsp40, Scj1, and a nucleotide exchange factor, Lhs1, stabilize torsinA and torsinAΔE. BiP also maintained torsinA and torsinAΔE solubility. Mutations predicted to compromise specific torsinA functional motifs showed a synthetic interaction with the ΔE mutation and destabilized torsinAΔE, suggesting that the ΔE mutation predisposes torsinA to defects in the presence of secondary insults. In this case, BiP was required for torsinAΔE degradation, consistent with data that specific chaperones exhibit either pro-degradative or pro-folding activities. Finally, using two independent approaches, we established that BiP stabilizes torsinA and torsinAΔE in mammalian cells. Together, these data define BiP as the first identified torsinA chaperone, and treatments that modulate BiP might improve symptoms associated with EOTD. PMID:24627482

  16. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  17. Three semidominant barley mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the smallest magnesium chelatase subunit form defective AAA+ hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, A.; Willows, R. D.; Roberts, T. H.; Hansson, M.

    2002-01-01

    Many enzymes of the bacteriochlorophyll and chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways have been conserved throughout evolution, but the molecular mechanisms of the key steps remain unclear. The magnesium chelatase reaction is one of these steps, and it requires the proteins BchI, BchD, and BchH to catalyze the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX upon ATP hydrolysis. Structural analyses have shown that BchI forms hexamers and belongs to the ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) family of proteins. AAA+ proteins are Mg2+-dependent ATPases that normally form oligomeric ring structures in the presence of ATP. By using ATPase-deficient BchI subunits, we demonstrate that binding of ATP is sufficient to form BchI oligomers. Further, ATPase-deficient BchI proteins can form mixed oligomers with WT BchI. The formation of BchI oligomers is not sufficient for magnesium chelatase activity when combined with BchD and BchH. Combining WT BchI with ATPase-deficient BchI in an assay disrupts the chelatase reaction, but the presence of deficient BchI does not inhibit ATPase activity of the WT BchI. Thus, the ATPase of every WT segment of the hexamer is autonomous, but all segments of the hexamer must be capable of ATP hydrolysis for magnesium chelatase activity. We suggest that ATP hydrolysis of each BchI within the hexamer causes a conformational change of the hexamer as a whole. However, hexamers containing ATPase-deficient BchI are unable to perform this ATP-dependent conformational change, and the magnesium chelatase reaction is stalled in an early stage. PMID:12357035

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ATPase domain of the σ(54)-dependent transcription activator NtrC1 from Aquifex aeolicus bound to the ATP analog ADP-BeFx.

    PubMed

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A; Yennawar, Neela; Allaire, Marc; Nixon, B Tracy

    2013-12-01

    One way that bacteria regulate the transcription of specific genes to adapt to environmental challenges is to use different σ factors that direct the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to distinct promoters. Unlike σ(70) RNA polymerase (RNAP), σ(54) RNAP is unable to initiate transcription without an activator: enhancer-binding protein (EBP). All EBPs contain one ATPase domain that belongs to the family of ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ ATPases). AAA+ ATPases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel different target macromolecules to perform distinct functions. These mechanochemical enzymes are known to form ring-shaped oligomers whose conformations strongly depend upon nucleotide status. Here, the crystallization of the AAA+ ATPase domain of an EBP from Aquifex aeolicus, NtrC1, in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-BeFx is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected from two crystals from two different protein fractions of the NtrC1 ATPase domain. Previously, this domain was co-crystallized with ADP and ATP, but the latter crystals were grown from the Walker B substitution variant E239A. Therefore, the new data sets are the first for a wild-type EBP ATPase domain co-crystallized with an ATP analog and they reveal a new crystal form. The resulting structure(s) will shed light on the mechanism of EBP-type transcription activators. PMID:24316836

  19. AAAS: Politics. . . and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reviews topics discussed during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting held in Washington, D.C. Topics included: the equal rights amendment, laetrile, nuclear radiation hazards, sociobiology, and various science topics. (SL)

  20. Subunit dynamics and nucleotide-dependent asymmetry of an AAA(+) transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Joly, Nicolas; Lawton, Edward; Robinson, Carol V; Buck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcription activators that belong to the AAA(+) protein family. They form higher-order self-assemblies to regulate transcription initiation at stress response and pathogenic promoters. The precise mechanism by which these ATPases utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis energy to remodel their substrates remains unclear. Here we employed mass spectrometry of intact complexes to investigate subunit dynamics and nucleotide occupancy of the AAA(+) domain of one well-studied bEBP in complex with its substrate, the σ(54) subunit of RNA polymerase. Our results demonstrate that the free AAA(+) domain undergoes significant changes in oligomeric states and nucleotide occupancy upon σ(54) binding. Such changes likely correlate with one transition state of ATP and are associated with an open spiral ring formation that is vital for asymmetric subunit function and interface communication. We confirmed that the asymmetric subunit functionality persists for open promoter complex formation using single-chain forms of bEBP lacking the full complement of intact ATP hydrolysis sites. Outcomes reconcile low- and high-resolution structures and yield a partial sequential ATP hydrolysis model for bEBPs. PMID:24055699

  1. Identification of two partners from the bacterial Kef exchanger family for the apical plasma membrane V-ATPase of Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Day, Jonathan P; Wan, Susan; Allan, Adrian K; Kean, Laura; Davies, Shireen A; Gray, Joe V; Dow, Julian A T

    2008-08-01

    The vital task of vectorial solute transport is often energised by a plasma membrane, proton-motive V-ATPase. However, its proposed partner, an apical alkali-metal/proton exchanger, has remained elusive. Here, both FlyAtlas microarray data and in situ analyses demonstrate that the bacterial kefB and kefC (members of the CPA2 family) homologues in Drosophila, CG10806 and CG31052, respectively, are both co-expressed with V-ATPase genes in transporting epithelia. Immunocytochemistry localises endogenous CG10806 and CG31052 to the apical plasma membrane of the Malpighian (renal) tubule. YFP-tagged CG10806 and CG31052 both localise to the plasma membrane of Drosophila S2 cells, and when driven in principal cells of the Malpighian tubule, they localise specifically to the apical plasma membrane. V-ATPase-energised fluid secretion is affected by overexpression of CG10806, but not CG31052; in the former case, overexpression causes higher basal rates, but lower stimulated rates, of fluid secretion compared with parental controls. Overexpression also impacts levels of secreted Na+ and K+. Both genes rescue exchanger-deficient (nha1 nhx1) yeast, but act differently; CG10806 is driven predominantly to the plasma membrane and confers protection against excess K+, whereas CG31052 is expressed predominantly on the vacuolar membrane and protects against excess Na+. Thus, both CG10806 and CG31052 are functionally members of the CPA2 gene family, colocalise to the same apical membrane as the plasma membrane V-ATPase and show distinct ion specificities, as expected for the Wieczorek exchanger. PMID:18628302

  2. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C.

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  3. Structure of RavA MoxR AAA+ protein reveals the design principles of a molecular cage modulating the inducible lysine decarboxylase activity

    PubMed Central

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Gutsche, Irina; Kanjee, Usheer; Zhao, Boyu; Yu, Miao; Goret, Gael; Schoehn, Guy; Burmeister, Wim P.; Houry, Walid A.

    2010-01-01

    The MoxR family of AAA+ ATPases is widespread throughout bacteria and archaea but remains poorly characterized. We recently found that the Escherichia coli MoxR protein, RavA (Regulatory ATPase variant A), tightly interacts with the inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI/CadA, to form a unique cage-like structure. Here, we present the X-ray structure of RavA and show that the αβα and all-α subdomains in the RavA AAA+ module are arranged as in magnesium chelatases rather than as in classical AAA+ proteins. RavA structure also contains a discontinuous triple-helical domain as well as a β-barrel-like domain forming a unique fold, which we termed the LARA domain. The LARA domain was found to mediate the interaction between RavA and LdcI. The RavA structure provides insights into how five RavA hexamers interact with two LdcI decamers to form the RavA-LdcI cage-like structure. PMID:21148420

  4. Understanding the apparent stator-rotor connections in the rotary ATPase family using coarse-grained computer modeling.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Robin A; Papachristos, Konstantinos; Read, Daniel J; Harlen, Oliver G; Harrison, Michael; Paci, Emanuele; Muench, Stephen P; Harris, Sarah A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in structural biology, such as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have allowed for a number of sophisticated protein complexes to be characterized. However, often only a static snapshot of a protein complex is visualized despite the fact that conformational change is frequently inherent to biological function, as is the case for molecular motors. Computer simulations provide valuable insights into the different conformations available to a particular system that are not accessible using conventional structural techniques. For larger proteins and protein complexes, where a fully atomistic description would be computationally prohibitive, coarse-grained simulation techniques such as Elastic Network Modeling (ENM) are often employed, whereby each atom or group of atoms is linked by a set of springs whose properties can be customized according to the system of interest. Here we compare ENM with a recently proposed continuum model known as Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA), which represents the biomolecule as a viscoelastic solid subject to thermal fluctuations. These two complementary computational techniques are used to answer a critical question in the rotary ATPase family; implicit within these motors is the need for a rotor axle and proton pump to rotate freely of the motor domain and stator structures. However, current single particle cryo-EM reconstructions have shown an apparent connection between the stators and rotor axle or pump region, hindering rotation. Both modeling approaches show a possible role for this connection and how it would significantly constrain the mobility of the rotary ATPase family. PMID:25174610

  5. Loss of Drosophila i-AAA protease, dYME1L, causes abnormal mitochondria and apoptotic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y; Liu, H; Daniels, M P; Zhang, G; Xu, H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) proteases i-AAA (intermembrane space-AAA) and m-AAA (matrix-AAA) are closely related and have major roles in inner membrane protein homeostasis. Mutations of m-AAA proteases are associated with neuromuscular disorders in humans. However, the role of i-AAA in metazoans is poorly understood. We generated a deletion affecting Drosophila i-AAA, dYME1L (dYME1L(del)). Mutant flies exhibited premature aging, progressive locomotor deficiency and neurodegeneration that resemble some key features of m-AAA diseases. dYME1L(del) flies displayed elevated mitochondrial unfolded protein stress and irregular cristae. Aged dYME1L(del) flies had reduced complex I (NADH/ubiquinone oxidoreductase) activity, increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), severely disorganized mitochondrial membranes and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibiting apoptosis by targeting dOmi (Drosophila Htra2/Omi) or DIAP1, or reducing ROS accumulation suppressed retinal degeneration. Our results suggest that i-AAA is essential for removing unfolded proteins and maintaining mitochondrial membrane architecture. Loss of i-AAA leads to the accumulation of oxidative damage and progressive deterioration of membrane integrity, which might contribute to apoptosis upon the release of proapoptotic molecules such as dOmi. Containing ROS level could be a potential strategy to manage mitochondrial AAA protease deficiency. PMID:26160069

  6. Cytoplasmic dynein regulates its attachment to microtubules via nucleotide state-switched mechanosensing at multiple AAA domains.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Matthew P; Berger, Florian; Rao, Lu; Brenner, Sibylle; Cho, Carol; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-05-19

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a homodimeric microtubule (MT) motor protein responsible for most MT minus-end-directed motility. Dynein contains four AAA+ ATPases (AAA: ATPase associated with various cellular activities) per motor domain (AAA1-4). The main site of ATP hydrolysis, AAA1, is the only site considered by most dynein motility models. However, it remains unclear how ATPase activity and MT binding are coordinated within and between dynein's motor domains. Using optical tweezers, we characterize the MT-binding strength of recombinant dynein monomers as a function of mechanical tension and nucleotide state. Dynein responds anisotropically to tension, binding tighter to MTs when pulled toward the MT plus end. We provide evidence that this behavior results from an asymmetrical bond that acts as a slip bond under forward tension and a slip-ideal bond under backward tension. ATP weakens MT binding and reduces bond strength anisotropy, and unexpectedly, so does ADP. Using nucleotide binding and hydrolysis mutants, we show that, although ATP exerts its effects via binding AAA1, ADP effects are mediated by AAA3. Finally, we demonstrate "gating" of AAA1 function by AAA3. When tension is absent or applied via dynein's C terminus, ATP binding to AAA1 induces MT release only if AAA3 is in the posthydrolysis state. However, when tension is applied to the linker, ATP binding to AAA3 is sufficient to "open" the gate. These results elucidate the mechanisms of dynein-MT interactions, identify regulatory roles for AAA3, and help define the interplay between mechanical tension and nucleotide state in regulating dynein motility. PMID:25941405

  7. Nominations sought for AAAS award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science seeks nominations for its Award for International Scientific Cooperation, which recognizes an individual or small group for outstanding contributions to furthering international cooperation in science or engineering.AAAS presents this award in collaboration with its affiliated organizations in the AAAS Consortium of Affiliates for International Programs. A prize of $2,500, a certificate of citation, and travel expenses to the AAAS annual meeting to receive the award are included.

  8. DIDS inhibits Na-K-ATPase activity in porcine nonpigmented ciliary epithelial cells by a Src family kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Wei, Guojun; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2013-09-01

    The anion transport inhibitor DIDS is known to reduce aqueous humor secretion but questions remain about anion dependence of the effect. In some tissues, DIDS is reported to cause Na-K-ATPase inhibition. Here, we report on the ability of DIDS to inhibit Na-K-ATPase activity in nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) and investigate the underlying mechanism. Porcine NPE cells were cultured to confluence on permeable supports, treated with drugs added to both sides of the membrane, and then used for (86)Rb uptake measurements or homogenized to measure Na-K-ATPase activity or to detect protein phosphorylation. DIDS inhibited ouabain-sensitive (86)Rb uptake, activated Src family kinase (SFK), and caused a reduction of Na-K-ATPase activity. PP2, an SFK inhibitor, prevented the DIDS responses. In BCECF-loaded NPE, DIDS was found to reduce cytoplasmic pH (pHi). PP2-sensitive Na-K-ATPase activity inhibition, (86)Rb uptake suppression, and SFK activation were observed when a similar reduction of pHi was imposed by low-pH medium or an ammonium chloride withdrawal maneuver. PP2 and the ERK inhibitor U0126 prevented robust ERK1/2 activation in cells exposed to DIDS or subjected to pHi reduction, but U0126 did not prevent SFK activation or the Na-K-ATPase activity response. The evidence points to an inhibitory influence of DIDS on NPE Na-K-ATPase activity by a mechanism that hinges on SFK activation associated with a reduction of cytoplasmic pH. PMID:23677800

  9. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Nicolas; Sanders, Ian R

    2006-01-01

    Background The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota), which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. Results In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. Conclusion On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence that structural genomic

  10. Mei-1, a Gene Required for Meiotic Spindle Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Is a Member of a Family of ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Maguire, S.; Mains, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    Meiotic spindle formation in the female germline of Caenorhabditis elegans requires expression of the gene mei-1. We have cloned mei-1 by transformation rescue and found that it resides near a hot spot for recombination, in an area of high gene density. The highest levels of mei-1 mRNA accumulate in the female germline of adult hermaphrodites as well as in fertilized embryos. The message persists for several hours after the protein functions in embryos, implying the need for post-transcriptional regulation. Two alternatively spliced messages are made that would result in proteins that differ internally by three amino acids; the larger of the two mRNAs is preferentially enriched in the female germline. The sequence of mei-1 shows that it is a member of a newly described family of ATPases that share a highly conserved nucleotide-binding site; four dominant-negative mutations of mei-1 are found at or near this region. Divergent roles ascribed to this family include membrane function, proteolysis, transcription and cell cycle regulation. PMID:8150281

  11. Role of mitochondrial processing peptidase and AAA proteases in processing of the yeast acetohydroxyacid synthase precursor.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Suvarna; Kölling, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    We studied presequence processing of the mitochondrial-matrix targeted acetohydroxyacid synthase (Ilv2). C-terminal 3HA-tagging altered the cleavage pattern from a single step to sequential two-step cleavage, giving rise to two Ilv2-3HA forms (A and B). Both cleavage events were dependent on the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). We present evidence for the involvement of three AAA ATPases, m- and i-AAA proteases, and Mcx1, in Ilv2-3HA processing. Both, precursor to A-form and A-form to B-form cleavage were strongly affected in a ∆yme1 mutant. These defects could be suppressed by overexpression of MPP, suggesting that MPP activity is limiting in the ∆yme1 mutant. Our data suggest that for some substrates AAA ATPases could play an active role in the translocation of matrix-targeted proteins. PMID:27398316

  12. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  13. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  14. A novel inhibitor of vacuolar ATPase, FR167356, which can discriminate between osteoclast vacuolar ATPase and lysosomal vacuolar ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Niikura, Kazuaki; Takano, Mikiko; Sawada, Masae

    2004-01-01

    Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) has been proposed as a drug target in lytic bone diseases. Studies of bafilomycin derivatives suggest that the key issue regarding the therapeutic usefulness of V-ATPase inhibitors is selective inhibition of osteoclast V-ATPase. Previous efforts to develop therapeutic inhibitors of osteoclast V-ATPase have been frustrated by a lack of synthetically tractable and biologically selective leads. Therefore, we tried to find novel potent and specific V-ATPase inhibitors, which have new structural features and inhibition selectivity, from random screening using osteoclast microsomes. Finally, a novel V-ATPase inhibitor, FR167356, was obtained through chemical modification of a parental hit compound. FR167356 inhibited not only H+ transport activity of osteoclast V-ATPase but also H+ extrusion from cytoplasm of osteoclasts, which depends on the V-ATPase activity. As expected, FR167356 remarkably inhibited bone resorption in vitro. FR167356 also showed inhibitory effects on other V-ATPases, renal brush border V-ATPase, macrophage microsome V-ATPase and lysosomal V-ATPase. However, FR167356 was approximately seven-fold less potent in inhibiting lysosomal V-ATPase compared to osteoclast V-ATPase. Moreover, LDL metabolism in cells, which depends on acidification of lysosome, was blocked merely at higher concentration than bone resorption, suggesting that FR167356 inhibits V-ATPase of osteoclast ruffled border membrane still more selectively than lysosome at the cellular level. These results from the experiments seem to indicate that osteoclast V-ATPase may be different from lysosomal V-ATPase in respect of their structure. FR167356 had a novel chemical structural feature as well as inhibitory characteristics distinctly different from any previously known V-ATPase inhibitor family. Therefore, FR167356 is thought to be a useful tool for estimating the essential characteristics of V-ATPase inhibitors for drug development. PMID:15148249

  15. AAA proteases in mitochondria: diverse functions of membrane-bound proteolytic machines.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    FtsH/AAA proteases comprise a distinct family of membrane-bound, ATP-dependent proteases present in eubacteria and eukaryotic cells, where they are confined to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here, we will summarize versatile functions of AAA proteases within mitochondria, which ensure mitochondrial integrity and cell survival, acting both as quality control and processing enzymes. PMID:19781639

  16. Mutations in RCA1 and AFG3 inhibit F1-ATPase assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paul, M F; Tzagoloff, A

    1995-10-01

    The RCA1 (YTA12) and AFG3 (YTA10) genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae code for homologous mitochondrial proteins that belong to the recently described AAA protein-family [Kunau et al. (1993) Biochimie 75,209-224]. Mutations in either gene have been shown to induce a respiratory defect. In the case of rca1 mutants this phenotype has been ascribed to defective assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In the present study we show that the respiratory defect of afg3 mutants, like that of rca1 mutants, is also caused by an arrest in assembly of cytochrome oxidase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. In addition to the absence of the respiratory complexes, rca1 and afg3 mutants exhibit reduced mitochondrial ATPase activity. As a first step to an understanding of the biochemical basis for the ATPase defect we have examined the assembly of the F1 and F0 constituents of the ATPase complex. We present evidence that the ATPase lesion stems at least in part from the failure of rca1 and afg3 mutants to assemble F1. Although the mutants also display lower steady-state concentrations of some F0 subunits, this could be a secondary effect of defective F1 assembly. PMID:7589436

  17. Structural Insights into the Allosteric Operation of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chu; Su, Shih-Chieh; Su, Ming-Yuan; Liang, Pi-Hui; Feng, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) is an evolutionarily conserved protease that couples the ATPase cycle into motion to drive substrate translocation and degradation. A hallmark feature shared by AAA+ proteases is the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Here we report the structure of LonA bound to three ADPs, revealing the first AAA+ protease assembly where the six protomers are arranged alternately in nucleotide-free and bound states. Nucleotide binding induces large coordinated movements of conserved pore loops from two pairs of three non-adjacent protomers and shuttling of the proteolytic groove between the ATPase site and a previously unknown Arg paddle. Structural and biochemical evidence supports the roles of the substrate-bound proteolytic groove in allosteric stimulation of ATPase activity and the conserved Arg paddle in driving substrate degradation. Altogether, this work provides a molecular framework for understanding how ATP-dependent chemomechanical movements drive allosteric processes for substrate degradation in a major protein-destruction machine. PMID:27041592

  18. The AAA+ superfamily of functionally diverse proteins

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Jamie; Thibault, Guillaume; Houry, Walid A

    2008-01-01

    The AAA+ superfamily is a large and functionally diverse superfamily of NTPases that are characterized by a conserved nucleotide-binding and catalytic module, the AAA+ module. Members are involved in an astonishing range of different cellular processes, attaining this functional diversity through additions of structural motifs and modifications to the core AAA+ module. PMID:18466635

  19. Two ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I reflect on research on two ATPases. The first is F1F0-ATPase, also known as ATP synthase. It is the terminal enzyme in oxidative phosphorylation and famous as a nanomotor. Early work on mitochondrial enzyme involved purification in large amount, followed by deduction of subunit composition and stoichiometry and determination of molecular sizes of holoenzyme and individual subunits. Later work on Escherichia coli enzyme utilized mutagenesis and optical probes to reveal the molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and detailed facets of catalysis. The second ATPase is P-glycoprotein, which confers multidrug resistance, notably to anticancer drugs, in mammalian cells. Purification of the protein in large quantity allowed detailed characterization of catalysis, formulation of an alternating sites mechanism, and recently, advances in structural characterization. PMID:22822068

  20. Asymmetric processing of a substrate protein in sequential allosteric cycles of AAA+ nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Bucher, Ryan J.; Stan, George

    2013-09-01

    Essential protein quality control includes mechanisms of substrate protein (SP) unfolding and translocation performed by powerful ring-shaped AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) nanomachines. These SP remodeling actions are effected by mechanical forces imparted by AAA+ loops that protrude into the central channel. Sequential intra-ring allosteric motions, which underlie repetitive SP-loop interactions, have been proposed to comprise clockwise (CW), counterclockwise (CCW), or random (R) conformational transitions of individual AAA+ subunits. To probe the effect of these allosteric mechanisms on unfoldase and translocase functions, we perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of an all-alpha SP processed by the single-ring ClpY ATPase or by the double-ring p97 ATPase. We find that, in all three allosteric mechanisms, the SP undergoes conformational transitions along a common set of pathways, which reveals that the active work provided by the ClpY machine involves single loop-SP interactions. Nevertheless, the rates and yields of SP unfolding and translocation are controlled by mechanism-dependent loop-SP binding events, as illustrated by faster timescales of SP processing in CW allostery compared with CCW and R allostery. The distinct efficacy of allosteric mechanisms is due to the asymmetric collaboration of adjacent subunits, which involves CW-biased structural motions of AAA+ loops and results in CW-compatible torque applied onto the SP. Additional simulations of mutant ClpY rings, which render a subset of subunits catalytically-defective or reduce their SP binding affinity, reveal that subunit-based conformational transitions play the major role in SP remodeling. Based on these results we predict that the minimally functional AAA+ ring includes three active subunits, only two of which are adjacent.

  1. Two AAA family peroxins, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, interact with each other in an ATP-dependent manner and are associated with different subcellular membranous structures distinct from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Faber, K N; Heyman, J A; Subramani, S

    1998-02-01

    Two peroxins of the AAA family, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, are required for peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Cells from the corresponding deletion strains (Pp delta pex1 and Pp delta pex6) contain only small vesicular remnants of peroxisomes, the bulk of peroxisomal matrix proteins is mislocalized to the cytosol, and these cells cannot grow in peroxisome-requiring media (J. A. Heyman, E. Monosov, and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 127:1259-1273, 1994; A. P. Spong and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 123:535-548, 1993). We demonstrate that PpPex1p and PpPex6p interact in an ATP-dependent manner. Genetically, the interaction was observed in a suppressor screen with a strain harboring a temperature-sensitive allele of PpPEX1 and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Biochemially, these proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with antibodies raised against either of the proteins, but only in the presence of ATP. The protein complex formed under these conditions was 320 to 400 kDa in size, consistent with the formation of a heterodimeric PpPex1p-PpPex6p complex. Subcellular fractionation revealed PpPex1p and PpPex6p to be predominantly associated with membranous subcellular structures distinct from peroxisomes. Based on their behavior in subcellular fractionation experiments including flotation gradients and on the fact that these structures are also present in a Pp delta pex3 strain in which no morphologically detectable peroxisomal remnants have been observed, we propose that these structures are small vesicles. The identification of vesicle-associated peroxins is novel and implies a role for these vesicles in peroxisome biogenesis. We discuss the possible role of the ATP-dependent interaction between PpPex1p and PpPex6p in regulating peroxisome biogenesis events. PMID:9447990

  2. Molecular snapshots of the Pex1/6 AAA+ complex in action

    PubMed Central

    Ciniawsky, Susanne; Grimm, Immanuel; Saffian, Delia; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Wendler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The peroxisomal proteins Pex1 and Pex6 form a heterohexameric type II AAA+ ATPase complex, which fuels essential protein transport across peroxisomal membranes. Mutations in either ATPase in humans can lead to severe peroxisomal disorders and early death. We present an extensive structural and biochemical analysis of the yeast Pex1/6 complex. The heterohexamer forms a trimer of Pex1/6 dimers with a triangular geometry that is atypical for AAA+ complexes. While the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domains (D2) of Pex6 constitute the main ATPase activity of the complex, both D2 harbour essential substrate-binding motifs. ATP hydrolysis results in a pumping motion of the complex, suggesting that Pex1/6 function involves substrate translocation through its central channel. Mutation of the Walker B motif in one D2 domain leads to ATP hydrolysis in the neighbouring domain, giving structural insights into inter-domain communication of these unique heterohexameric AAA+ assemblies. PMID:26066397

  3. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  4. Mutational Analysis of Vaccinia Virus Nucleoside Triphosphate Phosphohydrolase I, a DNA-Dependent ATPase of the DExH Box Family

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Alexandra; Gross, Christian H.; Shuman, Stewart

    1999-01-01

    Vaccinia virus nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase I (NPH-I) is a DNA-dependent ATPase that serves as a transcription termination factor during viral mRNA synthesis. NPH-I is a member of the DExH box family of nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatases (NTPases), which is defined by the presence of several conserved sequence motifs. We have assessed the contributions of individual amino acids (underlined) in motifs I (GxGKT), II (DExHN), III (SAT), and VI (QxxGRxxR) to ATP hydrolysis by performing alanine scanning mutagenesis. Significant decrements in ATPase activity resulted from mutations at nine positions: Lys-61 and Thr-62 (motif I); Asp-141, Glu-142, His-144, and Asn-145 (motif II); and Gln-472, Arg-476, and Arg-479 (motif VI). Structure-function relationships at each of these positions were clarified by introducing conservative substitutions and by steady-state kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes. Comparison of our findings for NPH-I with those of mutational studies of other DExH and DEAD box proteins underscores similarities as well as numerous disparities in structure-activity relationships. We conclude that the functions of the conserved amino acids of the NTPase motifs are context dependent. PMID:9882335

  5. Rotary ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alastair G.; Sobti, Meghna; Harvey, Richard P.; Stock, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Rotary ATPases are molecular rotary motors involved in biological energy conversion. They either synthesize or hydrolyze the universal biological energy carrier adenosine triphosphate. Recent work has elucidated the general architecture and subunit compositions of all three sub-types of rotary ATPases. Composite models of the intact F-, V- and A-type ATPases have been constructed by fitting high-resolution X-ray structures of individual subunits or sub-complexes into low-resolution electron densities of the intact enzymes derived from electron cryo-microscopy. Electron cryo-tomography has provided new insights into the supra-molecular arrangement of eukaryotic ATP synthases within mitochondria and mass-spectrometry has started to identify specifically bound lipids presumed to be essential for function. Taken together these molecular snapshots show that nano-scale rotary engines have much in common with basic design principles of man made machines from the function of individual “machine elements” to the requirement of the right “fuel” and “oil” for different types of motors. PMID:23369889

  6. Expression of a putative ATPase suppresses the growth defect of a yeast potassium transport mutant: identification of a mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family.

    PubMed

    Périer, F; Radeke, C M; Raab-Graham, K F; Vandenberg, C A

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding a novel mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family was isolated from a mouse macrophage-like cell line (J774.1) cDNA library by suppression of the growth defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1 trk2 double mutant. The full-length version of this cDNA, termed SKD3, encodes a putative 76-kDa protein of 677 amino acids (aa). The deduced aa sequence of the SKD3 polypeptide contains four ankyrin-like repeats in the N-terminal domain and a single ATP-binding consensus site in the C-terminal domain. The 378-aa C-terminal domain of SKD3 has 57-64% similarity (30-40% identity) with members of the Clp/HSP104 family, including the ClpA regulatory subunit of the Clp protease and S. cerevisiae heat-shock protein 104. Northern analysis showed that the 2.3-kb SKD3 transcript is present in a wide variety of tissues, is abundant in mouse heart, skeletal muscle and kidney, and is most abundant in testis. Members of the Clp/HSP104 family have been identified previously from bacteria, yeast and chloroplasts, and are ATPases regulating Clp protease activity and specificity, or mediating cellular responses involved in thermotolerance. SKD3 is the first member of this protein family identified in a higher eukaryote. PMID:7835694

  7. Invited review: Microtubule severing enzymes couple atpase activity with tubulin GTPase spring loading.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Megan E; Jiang, Nan; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules are amazing filaments made of GTPase enzymes that store energy used for their own self-destruction to cause a stochastically driven dynamics called dynamic instability. Dynamic instability can be reproduced in vitro with purified tubulin, but the dynamics do not mimic that observed in cells. This is because stabilizers and destabilizers act to alter microtubule dynamics. One interesting and understudied class of destabilizers consists of the microtubule-severing enzymes from the ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities (AAA+) family of ATP-enzymes. Here we review current knowledge about GTP-driven microtubule dynamics and how that couples to ATP-driven destabilization by severing enzymes. We present a list of challenges regarding the mechanism of severing, which require development of experimental and modeling approaches to shed light as to how severing enzymes can act to regulate microtubule dynamics in cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 547-556, 2016. PMID:27037673

  8. Origin and Functional Evolution of the Cdc48/p97/VCP AAA+ Protein Unfolding and Remodeling Machine.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Sauer, Robert T

    2016-05-01

    The AAA+ Cdc48 ATPase (alias p97 or VCP) is a key player in multiple ubiquitin-dependent cell signaling, degradation, and quality control pathways. Central to these broad biological functions is the ability of Cdc48 to interact with a large number of adaptor proteins and to remodel macromolecular proteins and their complexes. Different models have been proposed to explain how Cdc48 might couple ATP hydrolysis to forcible unfolding, dissociation, or remodeling of cellular clients. In this review, we provide an overview of possible mechanisms for substrate unfolding/remodeling by this conserved and essential AAA+ protein machine and their adaption and possible biological function throughout evolution. PMID:26608813

  9. Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene Induces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activities. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome complexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fusion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)- dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress. PMID:21359673

  10. A Screen for Dominant Negative Mutants of SEC18 Reveals a Role for the AAA Protein Consensus Sequence in ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Gregor J.; Harley, Carol; Boyd, Alan; Morgan, Alan

    2000-01-01

    An evolutionarily ancient mechanism is used for intracellular membrane fusion events ranging from endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi traffic in yeast to synaptic vesicle exocytosis in the human brain. At the heart of this mechanism is the core complex of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs), and SNAP receptors (SNAREs). Although these proteins are accepted as key players in vesicular traffic, their molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. To illuminate important structure–function relationships in NSF, a screen for dominant negative mutants of yeast NSF (Sec18p) was undertaken. This involved random mutagenesis of a GAL1-regulated SEC18 yeast expression plasmid. Several dominant negative alleles were identified on the basis of galactose-inducible growth arrest, of which one, sec18-109, was characterized in detail. The sec18-109 phenotype (abnormal membrane trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway, accumulation of a membranous tubular network, growth suppression, increased cell density) is due to a single A-G substitution in SEC18 resulting in a missense mutation in Sec18p (Thr394→Pro). Thr394 is conserved in most AAA proteins and indeed forms part of the minimal AAA consensus sequence that serves as a signature of this large protein family. Analysis of recombinant Sec18-109p indicates that the mutation does not prevent hexamerization or interaction with yeast α-SNAP (Sec17p), but instead results in undetectable ATPase activity that cannot be stimulated by Sec17p. This suggests a role for the AAA protein consensus sequence in regulating ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, this approach of screening for dominant negative mutants in yeast can be applied to other conserved proteins so as to highlight important functional domains in their mammalian counterparts. PMID:10749934

  11. ALT1, a Snf2 Family Chromatin Remodeling ATPase, Negatively Regulates Alkaline Tolerance through Enhanced Defense against Oxidative Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mingxin; Wang, Ruci; Wang, Juan; Hua, Kai; Wang, Yueming; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yao, Shanguo

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline salt stress adversely affects rice growth, productivity and grain quality. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. We characterized here an alkaline tolerant mutant, alt1 in rice. Map-based cloning revealed that alt1 harbors a mutation in a chromatin remodeling ATPase gene. ALT1-RNAi transgenic plants under different genetic background mimicked the alt1 phenotype, exhibiting tolerance to alkaline stress in a transcript dosage-dependent manner. The predicted ALT1 protein belonged to the Ris1 subgroup of the Snf2 family and was localized in the nucleus, and transcription of ALT1 was transiently suppressed after alkaline treatment. Although the absorption of several metal ions maintained well in the mutant under alkaline stress, expression level of the genes involved in metal ions homeostasis was not altered in the alt1 mutant. Classification of differentially expressed abiotic stress related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis, found that the majority (50/78) were involved in ROS production, ROS scavenging, and DNA repair. This finding was further confirmed by that alt1 exhibited lower levels of H2O2 under alkaline stress and tolerance to methyl viologen treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that ALT1 negatively functions in alkaline tolerance mainly through the defense against oxidative damage, and provide a potential two-step strategy for improving the tolerance of rice plants to alkaline stress. PMID:25473841

  12. LMIP/AAA: Local Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA) Protocol for Mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenait, Manel

    Mobile IP represents a simple and scalable global mobility solution. However, it inhibits various vulnerabilities to malicious attacks and, therefore, requires the integration of appropriate security services. In this paper, we discuss two authentication schemes suggested for Mobile IP: standard authentication and Mobile IP/AAA authentication. In order to provide Mobile IP roaming services including identity verication, we propose an improvement to Mobile/AAA authentication scheme by applying a local politic key management in each domain, hence we reduce hando latency by avoiding the involvement of AAA infrastructure during mobile node roaming.

  13. Elements in nucleotide sensing and hydrolysis of the AAA+ disaggregation machine ClpB: a structure-based mechanistic dissection of a molecular motor

    SciTech Connect

    Zeymer, Cathleen Barends, Thomas R. M.; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution crystal structures together with mutational analysis and transient kinetics experiments were utilized to understand nucleotide sensing and the regulation of the ATPase cycle in an AAA+ molecular motor. ATPases of the AAA+ superfamily are large oligomeric molecular machines that remodel their substrates by converting the energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical force. This study focuses on the molecular chaperone ClpB, the bacterial homologue of Hsp104, which reactivates aggregated proteins under cellular stress conditions. Based on high-resolution crystal structures in different nucleotide states, mutational analysis and nucleotide-binding kinetics experiments, the ATPase cycle of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2), one of the motor subunits of this AAA+ disaggregation machine, is dissected mechanistically. The results provide insights into nucleotide sensing, explaining how the conserved sensor 2 motif contributes to the discrimination between ADP and ATP binding. Furthermore, the role of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg621), which controls binding of the essential Mg{sup 2+} ion, is described. Finally, a hypothesis is presented as to how the ATPase activity is regulated by a conformational switch that involves the essential Walker A lysine. In the proposed model, an unusual side-chain conformation of this highly conserved residue stabilizes a catalytically inactive state, thereby avoiding unnecessary ATP hydrolysis.

  14. Rotating with the brakes on and other unresolved features of the vacuolar ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Shaun; Harrison, Michael A.; Muench, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The rotary ATPase family comprises the ATP synthase (F-ATPase), vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) and archaeal ATPase (A-ATPase). These either predominantly utilize a proton gradient for ATP synthesis or use ATP to produce a proton gradient, driving secondary transport and acidifying organelles. With advances in EM has come a significant increase in our understanding of the rotary ATPase family. Following the sub nm resolution reconstructions of both the F- and V-ATPases, the secondary structure organization of the elusive subunit a has now been resolved, revealing a novel helical arrangement. Despite these significant developments in our understanding of the rotary ATPases, there are still a number of unresolved questions about the mechanism, regulation and overall architecture, which this mini-review aims to highlight and discuss. PMID:27284051

  15. Rotating with the brakes on and other unresolved features of the vacuolar ATPase.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Shaun; Harrison, Michael A; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The rotary ATPase family comprises the ATP synthase (F-ATPase), vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) and archaeal ATPase (A-ATPase). These either predominantly utilize a proton gradient for ATP synthesis or use ATP to produce a proton gradient, driving secondary transport and acidifying organelles. With advances in EM has come a significant increase in our understanding of the rotary ATPase family. Following the sub nm resolution reconstructions of both the F- and V-ATPases, the secondary structure organization of the elusive subunit a has now been resolved, revealing a novel helical arrangement. Despite these significant developments in our understanding of the rotary ATPases, there are still a number of unresolved questions about the mechanism, regulation and overall architecture, which this mini-review aims to highlight and discuss. PMID:27284051

  16. A P-type ATPase from the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii similar to animal Na,K-ATPases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, F S; Gomes, S L

    1998-04-01

    We have cloned a P-type ATPase gene from the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii (BePAT1) using a probe obtained with degenerate oligonucleotides, corresponding to two amino acid sequences highly conserved among all P-type ATPase isoforms, and the polymerase chain reaction technique. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed a 3.4 kb open reading frame encoding a putative peptide of 1080 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 119 kDa, which presents all diagnostic features of P-type transporting ATPases. Comparison to other members of the family and phylogenetic analyses have shown that the BePAT1 protein belongs to the subfamily of Na,K- and H,K-ATPases, indicating that the divergence between the alpha-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase and other members of the P-type ATPase family has occurred before the divergence between the animal and fungal lineages in evolution. PMID:9602120

  17. Nucleotide-dependent interactions between a fork junction–RNA polymerase complex and an AAA+ transcriptional activator protein

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, W. V.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.

    2004-01-01

    Enhancer-dependent transcriptional activators that act upon the σ54 bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme belong to the extensive AAA+ superfamily of mechanochemical ATPases. Formation and collapse of the transition state for ATP hydrolysis engenders direct interactions between AAA+ activators and the σ54 factor, required for RNA polymerase isomerization. A DNA fork junction structure present within closed complexes serves as a nucleation point for the DNA melting seen in open promoter complexes and restricts spontaneous activator-independent RNA polymerase isomerization. We now provide physical evidence showing that the ADP·AlFx bound form of the AAA+ domain of the transcriptional activator protein PspF changes interactions between σ54-RNA polymerase and a DNA fork junction structure present in the closed promoter complex. The results suggest that one functional state of the nucleotide-bound activator serves to alter DNA binding by σ54 and σ54-RNA polymerase and appears to drive events that precede DNA opening. Clear evidence for a DNA-interacting activity in the AAA+ domain of PspF was obtained, suggesting that PspF may make a direct contact to the DNA component of a basal promoter complex to promote changes in σ54-RNA polymerase–DNA interactions that favour open complex formation. We also provide evidence for two distinct closed promoter complexes with differing stabilities. PMID:15333692

  18. Unique double-ring structure of the peroxisomal Pex1/Pex6 ATPase complex revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blok, Neil B.; Tan, Dongyan; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Penczek, Pawel A.; Baker, David; DiMaio, Frank; Rapoport, Tom A.; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Members of the AAA family of ATPases assemble into hexameric double rings and perform vital functions, yet their molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report structures of the Pex1/Pex6 complex; mutations in these proteins frequently cause peroxisomal diseases. The structures were determined in the presence of different nucleotides by cryo-electron microscopy. Models were generated using a computational approach that combines Monte Carlo placement of structurally homologous domains into density maps with energy minimization and refinement protocols. Pex1 and Pex6 alternate in an unprecedented hexameric double ring. Each protein has two N-terminal domains, N1 and N2, structurally related to the single N domains in p97 and N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF); N1 of Pex1 is mobile, but the others are packed against the double ring. The N-terminal ATPase domains are inactive, forming a symmetric D1 ring, whereas the C-terminal domains are active, likely in different nucleotide states, and form an asymmetric D2 ring. These results suggest how subunit activity is coordinated and indicate striking similarities between Pex1/Pex6 and p97, supporting the hypothesis that the Pex1/Pex6 complex has a role in peroxisomal protein import analogous to p97 in ER-associated protein degradation. PMID:26170309

  19. Measuring In Vitro ATPase Activity for Enzymatic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Rule, Chelsea S; Patrick, Marcella; Sandkvist, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-hydrolyzing enzymes, or ATPases, play a critical role in a diverse array of cellular functions. These dynamic proteins can generate energy for mechanical work, such as protein trafficking and degradation, solute transport, and cellular movements. The protocol described here is a basic assay for measuring the in vitro activity of purified ATPases for functional characterization. Proteins hydrolyze ATP in a reaction that results in inorganic phosphate release, and the amount of phosphate liberated is then quantitated using a colorimetric assay. This highly adaptable protocol can be adjusted to measure ATPase activity in kinetic or endpoint assays. A representative protocol is provided here based on the activity and requirements of EpsE, the AAA+ ATPase involved in Type II Secretion in the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The amount of purified protein needed to measure activity, length of the assay and the timing and number of sampling intervals, buffer and salt composition, temperature, co-factors, stimulants (if any), etc. may vary from those described here, and thus some optimization may be necessary. This protocol provides a basic framework for characterizing ATPases and can be performed quickly and easily adjusted as necessary. PMID:27584824

  20. P2C-Type ATPases and Their Regulation.

    PubMed

    Retamales-Ortega, Rocío; Vio, Carlos P; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-03-01

    P2C-type ATPases are a subfamily of P-type ATPases comprising Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in several neurological diseases, whereas H(+)/K(+)-ATPase is found principally in the colon, stomach, and kidney. Both ATPases have two subunits, α and β, but Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase also has a regulatory subunit called FXYD, which has an important role in cancer. The most important functions of these ATPases are homeostasis, potassium regulation, and maintaining a gradient in different cell types, like epithelial cells. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has become a center of attention ever since it was proposed that it might play a crucial role in neurological disorders such as bipolar disorder, mania, depression, familial hemiplegic migraine, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, chronic stress, epileptogenesis, and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, it has been reported that lithium could have a neuroprotective effect against ouabain, which is the best known Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, but and high concentrations of lithium could affect negatively H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, that has a key role in regulating acidosis and potassium deficiencies. Finally, potassium homeostasis regulation is composed of two main mechanisms, extrarenal and renal. Extrarenal mechanism controls plasma levels, shifting potassium from the extracellular to the intracellular, whereas renal mechanism concerns with body balance and is influenced by potassium intake and its urinary excretion. In this article, we discuss the functions, isoforms, and localization of P2C-type ATPases, describe some of their modulators, and discuss their implications in some diseases. PMID:25631710

  1. Hansenula polymorpha Pex1p and Pex6p are peroxisome-associated AAA proteins that functionally and physically interact.

    PubMed

    Kiel, J A; Hilbrands, R E; van der Klei, I J; Rasmussen, S W; Salomons, F A; van der Heide, M; Faber, K N; Cregg, J M; Veenhuis, M

    1999-08-01

    We have cloned the Hansenula polymorpha PEX1 and PEX6 genes by functional complementation of the corresponding peroxisome-deficient (pex) mutants. The gene products, HpPex1p and HpPex6p, are ATPases which both belong to the AAA protein family. Cells deleted for either gene (Deltapex1 or Deltapex6) were characterized by the presence of small peroxisomal remnants which contained peroxisomal membrane proteins and minor amounts of matrix proteins. The bulk of the matrix proteins, however, resided in the cytosol. In cell fractionation studies HpPex1p and HpPex6p co-sedimented with the peroxisomal membrane protein HpPex3p in both wild-type cells and in Deltapex4, Deltapex8 or Deltapex14 cells. Both proteins are loosely membrane-bound and face the cytosol. Furthermore, HpPex1p and HpPex6p physically and functionally interact in vivo. Overexpression of PEX6 resulted in defects in peroxisomal matrix protein import. By contrast, overexpression of PEX1 was not detrimental to the cells. Interestingly, co-overproduction of HpPex1p rescued the protein import defect caused by HpPex6p overproduction. Overproduced HpPex1p and HpPex6p remained predominantly membrane-bound, but only partially co-localized with the peroxisomal membrane protein HpPex3p. Our data indicate that HpPex1p and HpPex6p function in a protein complex associated with the peroxisomal membrane and that overproduced, mislocalized HpPex6p prevents HpPex1p from reaching its site of activity. PMID:10455230

  2. P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, Michael G; Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    P-type ATPases form a large superfamily of cation and lipid pumps. They are remarkably simple with only a single catalytic subunit and carry out large domain motions during transport. The atomic structure of P-type ATPases in different conformations, together with ample mutagenesis evidence, has provided detailed insights into the pumping mechanism by these biological nanomachines. Phylogenetically, P-type ATPases are divided into five subfamilies, P1-P5. These subfamilies differ with respect to transported ligands and the way they are regulated. PMID:21351879

  3. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunit gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, Nikolay B.; Zhao, Hao; Basrur, Venkatesha; Modyanov, Nikolai N.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits are sharply different. {yields} BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. {yields} BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase {alpha}-subunit in skeletal muscle. {yields} Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. {yields} BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a {beta}-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was

  4. 26 CFR 1.1368-2 - Accumulated adjustments account (AAA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accumulated adjustments account (AAA). 1.1368-2 Section 1.1368-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1368-2 Accumulated adjustments account (AAA)....

  5. Experimental validation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Breitman, Karen; Rathee, Satyapal; Newcomb, Chris; Murray, Brad; Robinson, Donald; Field, Colin; Warkentin, Heather; Connors, Sherry; Mackenzie, Marc; Dunscombe, Peter; Fallone, Gino

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the performance of a newly released photon-beam dose calculation algorithm that is incorporated into an established treatment planning system (TPS). We compared the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) factory-commissioned with "golden beam data" for Varian linear accelerators with measurements performed at two institutions using 6-MV and 15-MV beams. The TG-53 evaluation regions and criteria were used to evaluate profiles measured in a water phantom for a wide variety of clinically relevant beam geometries. The total scatter factor (TSF) for each of these geometries was also measured and compared against the results from the AAA. At one institute, TLD measurements were performed at several points in the neck and thoracic regions of a Rando phantom; at the other institution, ion chamber measurements were performed in a CIRS inhomogeneous phantom. The phantoms were both imaged using computed tomography (CT), and the dose was calculated using the AAA at corresponding detector locations. Evaluation of measured relative dose profiles revealed that 97%, 99%, 97%, and 100% of points at one institute and 96%, 88%, 89%, and 100% of points at the other institution passed TG-53 evaluation criteria in the outer beam, penumbra, inner beam, and buildup regions respectively. Poorer results in the inner beam regions at one institute are attributed to the mismatch of the measured profiles at shallow depths with the "golden beam data." For validation of monitor unit (MU) calculations, the mean difference between measured and calculated TSFs was less than 0.5%; test cases involving physical wedges had, in general, differences of more than 1%. The mean difference between point measurements performed in inhomogeneous phantoms and Eclipse was 2.1% (5.3% maximum) and all differences were within TG-53 guidelines of 7%. By intent, the methods and evaluation techniques were similar to those in a previous investigation involving another convolution

  6. Unfolding the mechanism of the AAA+ unfoldase VAT by a combined cryo-EM, solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Ripstein, Zev A; Augustyniak, Rafal; Lazniewski, Michal; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Kay, Lewis E; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-07-19

    The AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) enzymes play critical roles in a variety of homeostatic processes in all kingdoms of life. Valosin-containing protein-like ATPase of Thermoplasma acidophilum (VAT), the archaeal homolog of the ubiquitous AAA+ protein Cdc48/p97, functions in concert with the 20S proteasome by unfolding substrates and passing them on for degradation. Here, we present electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) maps showing that VAT undergoes large conformational rearrangements during its ATP hydrolysis cycle that differ dramatically from the conformational states observed for Cdc48/p97. We validate key features of the model with biochemical and solution methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopY (TROSY) NMR experiments and suggest a mechanism for coupling the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to substrate unfolding. These findings illustrate the unique complementarity between cryo-EM and solution NMR for studies of molecular machines, showing that the structural properties of VAT, as well as the population distributions of conformers, are similar in the frozen specimens used for cryo-EM and in the solution phase where NMR spectra are recorded. PMID:27402735

  7. Chaperone-like activity of the AAA+ proteins Rvb1 and Rvb2 in the assembly of various complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nano, Nardin; Houry, Walid A.

    2013-01-01

    Rvb1 and Rvb2 are highly conserved and essential eukaryotic AAA+ proteins linked to a wide range of cellular processes. AAA+ proteins are ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities and are characterized by the presence of one or more AAA+ domains. These domains have the canonical Walker A and Walker B nucleotide binding and hydrolysis motifs. Rvb1 and Rvb2 have been found to be part of critical cellular complexes: the histone acetyltransferase Tip60 complex, chromatin remodelling complexes Ino80 and SWR-C, and the telomerase complex. In addition, Rvb1 and Rvb2 are components of the R2TP complex that was identified by our group and was determined to be involved in the maturation of box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) complexes. Furthermore, the Rvbs have been associated with mitotic spindle assembly, as well as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) signalling. This review sheds light on the potential role of the Rvbs as chaperones in the assembly and remodelling of these critical complexes. PMID:23530256

  8. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  9. Protein quality control in organelles - AAA/FtsH story.

    PubMed

    Janska, Hanna; Kwasniak, Malgorzata; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2013-02-01

    This review focuses on organellar AAA/FtsH proteases, whose proteolytic and chaperone-like activity is a crucial component of the protein quality control systems of mitochondrial and chloroplast membranes. We compare the AAA/FtsH proteases from yeast, mammals and plants. The nature of the complexes formed by AAA/FtsH proteases and the current view on their involvement in degradation of non-native organellar proteins or assembly of membrane complexes are discussed. Additional functions of AAA proteases not directly connected with protein quality control found in yeast and mammals but not yet in plants are also described shortly. Following an overview of the molecular functions of the AAA/FtsH proteases we discuss physiological consequences of their inactivation in yeast, mammals and plants. The molecular basis of phenotypes associated with inactivation of the AAA/FtsH proteases is not fully understood yet, with the notable exception of those observed in m-AAA protease-deficient yeast cells, which are caused by impaired maturation of mitochondrial ribosomal protein. Finally, examples of cytosolic events affecting protein quality control in mitochondria and chloroplasts are given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. PMID:22498346

  10. Effect of colchicine on sensitivity of duck salt gland Na,K-ATPase to Na+.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, S S; Kumskova, E M; Rubtsov, A M; Lopina, O D

    2008-09-01

    Low molecular mass proteins of the FXYD family that affect the sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase to Na+ and K+ are known to be present in Na,K-ATPases in various tissues. In particular, in Na,K-ATPase from kidney a gamma-subunit (with electrophoretic mobility corresponding to molecular mass of about 10 kD) is present, and Na,K-ATPase preparations from heart contain phospholemman (electrophoretic mobility of this protein corresponds to molecular mass of 13-14 kD), which provides for the interaction of heart Na,K-ATPase with cytoskeletal microtubules. Disruption of microtubules by colchicine removes phospholemman from heart Na,K-ATPase preparations. The goal of the present study was to reveal a low molecular mass protein (probably a member of FXYD family) in preparation of Na,K-ATPase from duck salt glands. Immunoprecipitation of solubilized duck salt gland Na,K-ATPase using antibodies against alpha1-subunit results in the coprecipitation of a 13 kD protein with the Na,K-ATPase complex. Treatment of homogenate from duck salt glands with colchicine removes this protein from the purified preparation of Na,K-ATPase. Simultaneously, we observed a decrease in the sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase to Na+ at pH 6.5. However, colchicine treatment of homogenate from rabbit kidney does not affect either the sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase obtained from this homogenate to Na+ or the content of 10 kD protein (presumably gamma-subunit). The data suggest that phospholemman (or a similar member of the FXYD family) tightly interacts with Na,K-ATPase from duck salt glands and binds it to microtubules, simultaneously participating in the regulation of the sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase to Na+. PMID:18976215

  11. Autocatalytic processing of m-AAA protease subunits in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Mirko; Bonn, Florian; Ehses, Sarah; Langer, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    m-AAA proteases are ATP-dependent proteolytic machines in the inner membrane of mitochondria which are crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial activities. Conserved nuclear-encoded subunits, termed paraplegin, Afg3l1, and Afg3l2, form various isoenzymes differing in their subunit composition in mammalian mitochondria. Mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits are associated with distinct neuronal disorders in human. However, the biogenesis of m-AAA protease complexes or of individual subunits is only poorly understood. Here, we have examined the processing of nuclear-encoded m-AAA protease subunits upon import into mitochondria and demonstrate autocatalytic processing of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. The mitochondrial processing peptidase MPP generates an intermediate form of Afg3l2 that is matured autocatalytically. Afg3l1 or Afg3l2 are also required for maturation of newly imported paraplegin subunits after their cleavage by MPP. Our results establish that mammalian m-AAA proteases can act as processing enzymes in vivo and reveal overlapping activities of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. These findings might be of relevance for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders associated with mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits. PMID:19656850

  12. New developments in the treatment of ruptured AAA.

    PubMed

    Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Rohlffs, Fiona; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Kölbel, Tilo

    2016-04-01

    Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (rAAA) represent the most common abdominal aortic emergency with an incidence of 6.3 per 100,000 inhabitants whereas the incidence of rAAA in the population over 65 years was 35.5/100.000 inhabitants. Early suspicion and diagnosis of rAAA is essential for good outcomes and over the past decades a great variety of perioperative management concepts, techniques and materials have been implemented to further improve the outcomes of this acute and life-threatening disease. Corner-stones for the improvement of outcomes include the introduction of management protocols for rAAA, the principle of hypotensive hemostasis and the introduction of endovascular techniques as well as the improved anesthesia and postoperative intensive care therapy with early identification and management of devastating complications such as the abdominal compartment syndrome. While the role of endovascular aortic repair in rAAA is not yet answered, it appears to be very promising especially in the presence of new techniques that could resolve a number of the problems restricting success of EVAR in rAAAs. PMID:26784556

  13. Determination of the self-association residues within a homomeric and a heteromeric AAA+ enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Edward; Jovanovic, Milija; Joly, Nicolas; Waite, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Baojun; Burrows, Patricia; Buck, Martin

    2014-04-17

    The σ(54)-dependent transcription in bacteria requires specific activator proteins, bacterial enhancer binding protein (bEBP), members of the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) protein family. The bEBPs usually form oligomers in order to hydrolyze ATP and make open promoter complexes. The bEBP formed by HrpR and HrpS activates transcription from the σ(54)-dependent hrpL promoter responsible for triggering the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas syringae pathovars. Unlike other bEBPs that usually act as homohexamers, HrpR and HrpS operate as a highly co-dependent heterohexameric complex. To understand the organization of the HrpRS complex and the HrpR and HrpS strict co-dependence, we have analyzed the interface between subunits using the random and directed mutagenesis and available crystal structures of several closely related bEBPs. We identified key residues required for the self-association of HrpR (D32, E202 and K235) with HrpS (D32, E200 and K233), showed that the HrpR D32 and HrpS K233 residues form interacting pairs directly involved in an HrpR-HrpS association and that the change in side-chain length at position 233 in HrpS affects self-association and interaction with the HrpR and demonstrated that the HrpS D32, E200 and K233 are not involved in negative regulation imposed by HrpV. We established that the equivalent residues K30, E200 and E234 in a homo-oligomeric bEBP, PspF, are required for the subunit communication and formation of an oligomeric lock that cooperates with the ATP γ-phosphate sensing PspF residue R227, providing insights into their roles in the heteromeric HrpRS co-complex. PMID:24434682

  14. Review: Structure and mechanism of the dynein motor ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Helgo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dyneins are multiprotein complexes that move cargo along microtubules in the minus end direction. The largest individual component of the dynein complex is the heavy chain. Its C‐terminal 3500 amino‐acid residues form the motor domain, which hydrolyses ATP in its ring of AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) domains to generate the force for movement. The production of force is synchronized with cycles of microtubule binding and release, another important prerequisite for efficient motility along the microtubule. Although the large scale conformational changes that lead to force production and microtubule affinity regulation are well established, it has been largely enigmatic how ATP‐hydrolysis in the AAA+ ring causes these rearrangements. The past five years have seen a surge of high resolution information on the dynein motor domain that finally allowed unprecedented insights into this important open question. This review, part of the “ATP and GTP hydrolysis in Biology” special issue, will summarize our current understanding of the dynein motor mechanism with a special emphasis on the recently obtained crystal and EM structures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 557–567, 2016. PMID:27062277

  15. Review: Structure and mechanism of the dynein motor ATPase.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Helgo; Carter, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are multiprotein complexes that move cargo along microtubules in the minus end direction. The largest individual component of the dynein complex is the heavy chain. Its C-terminal 3500 amino-acid residues form the motor domain, which hydrolyses ATP in its ring of AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) domains to generate the force for movement. The production of force is synchronized with cycles of microtubule binding and release, another important prerequisite for efficient motility along the microtubule. Although the large scale conformational changes that lead to force production and microtubule affinity regulation are well established, it has been largely enigmatic how ATP-hydrolysis in the AAA+ ring causes these rearrangements. The past five years have seen a surge of high resolution information on the dynein motor domain that finally allowed unprecedented insights into this important open question. This review, part of the "ATP and GTP hydrolysis in Biology" special issue, will summarize our current understanding of the dynein motor mechanism with a special emphasis on the recently obtained crystal and EM structures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 557-567, 2016. PMID:27062277

  16. Nucleotide binding and allosteric modulation of the second AAA+ domain of ClpB probed by transient kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Kellner, Julian N; Barends, Thomas R M; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    The bacterial AAA+ chaperone ClpB provides thermotolerance by disaggregating aggregated proteins in collaboration with the DnaK chaperone system. Like many other AAA+ proteins, ClpB is believed to act as a biological motor converting the chemical energy of ATP into molecular motion. ClpB has two ATPase domains, NBD1 and NBD2, on one polypeptide chain. The functional unit of ClpB is a homohexameric ring, with a total of 12 potential nucleotide binding sites. Previously, two separate constructs, one each containing NBD1 or NBD2, have been shown to form a functional complex with chaperone activity when mixed. Here we aimed to elucidate the nucleotide binding properties of the ClpB complex using pre-steady state kinetics and fluorescent nucleotides. For this purpose, we first disassembled the complex and characterized in detail the binding kinetics of a construct comprising NBD2 and the C-terminal domain of ClpB. The monomeric construct bound nucleotides very tightly. ADP bound 2 orders of magnitude more tightly than ATP; this difference in binding affinity resulted almost exclusively from different dissociation rate constants. The nucleotide binding properties of NBD2 changed when this construct was complemented with a construct comprising NBD1 and the middle domain. Our approach shows how complex formation can influence the binding properties of the individual domains and allows us to assign nucleotide binding features of this highly complex, multimeric enzyme to specific domains. PMID:19594134

  17. The Function of V-ATPases in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stransky, Laura; Cotter, Kristina; Forgac, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) are a family of proton pumps that couple ATP hydrolysis to proton transport into intracellular compartments and across the plasma membrane. They function in a wide array of normal cellular processes, including membrane traffic, protein processing and degradation, and the coupled transport of small molecules, as well as such physiological processes as urinary acidification and bone resorption. The V-ATPases have also been implicated in a number of disease processes, including viral infection, renal disease, and bone resorption defects. This review is focused on the growing evidence for the important role of V-ATPases in cancer. This includes functions in cellular signaling (particularly Wnt, Notch, and mTOR signaling), cancer cell survival in the highly acidic environment of tumors, aiding the development of drug resistance, as well as crucial roles in tumor cell invasion, migration, and metastasis. Of greatest excitement is evidence that at least some tumors express isoforms of V-ATPase subunits whose disruption is not lethal, leading to the possibility of developing anti-cancer therapeutics that selectively target V-ATPases that function in cancer cells. PMID:27335445

  18. Maintenance of mitochondrial genome distribution by mitochondrial AAA+ protein ClpX.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    The segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is important for the maintenance and transmission of the genome between generations. Recently, we clarified that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for equal distribution and symmetric segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells; however, the molecular mechanism involved is largely unknown. ClpX is an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) proteins that localize to the mitochondrial matrix and is suggested to associate with mtDNA. In this study, we found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of ClpX in HeLa cells resulted in enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, which is very similar to that observed in TFAM-knockdown cells in several properties. The expression of TFAM protein was not significantly reduced in ClpX-knockdown cells. However, the enlarged mtDNA nucleoids caused by ClpX-knockdown were suppressed by overexpression of recombinant TFAM and the phenotype was not observed in knockdown with ClpP, a protease subunit of ClpXP. Endogenous ClpX and TFAM exist in close vicinity, and ClpX enhanced DNA-binding activity of TFAM in vitro. These results suggest that human ClpX, a novel mtDNA regulator, maintains mtDNA nucleoid distribution through TFAM function as a chaperone rather than as a protease and its involvement in mtDNA segregation. PMID:22841477

  19. Protein unfolding and degradation by the AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal; Vishkautzan, Marina; Sauer, Robert T

    2012-02-01

    AAA+ proteases employ a hexameric ring that harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to unfold native substrates and translocate the unfolded polypeptide into an interior compartment for degradation. What determines the ability of different AAA+ enzymes to unfold and thus degrade different native protein substrates is currently uncertain. Here, we explore the ability of the E. coli Lon protease to unfold and degrade model protein substrates beginning at N-terminal, C-terminal, or internal degrons. Lon has historically been viewed as a weak unfoldase, but we demonstrate robust and processive unfolding/degradation of some substrates with very stable protein domains, including mDHFR and titin(I27) . For some native substrates, Lon is a more active unfoldase than related AAA+ proteases, including ClpXP and ClpAP. For other substrates, this relationship is reversed. Thus, unfolding activity does not appear to be an intrinsic enzymatic property. Instead, it depends on the specific protease and substrate, suggesting that evolution has diversified rather than optimized the protein unfolding activities of different AAA+ proteases. PMID:22162032

  20. Ex-congressman Rush Holt to lead AAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The particle physicist Rush Holt, who served in the US Congress for 15 years, has been named as the next chief executive of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) - the non-profit US society that promotes public engagement with science and technology.

  1. The Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA): A Diagnostic Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Robinson, Janine; Woodbury-Smith, Marc

    2005-01-01

    At the present time there are a large number of adults who have "suspected" Asperger syndrome (AS). In this paper we describe a new instrument, the Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA), developed in our clinic for adults with AS. The need for a new instrument relevant to the diagnosis of AS in adulthood arises because existing instruments are designed…

  2. Inhibition of early AAA formation by aortic intraluminal pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) infusion in a novel porcine AAA model

    PubMed Central

    Kloster, Brian O.; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of abdominal aortic aneurysms found in screening programs are small, and as no effective treatment exits, many will expand until surgery is indicated. Therefore, it remains intriguing to develop a safe and low cost treatment of these small aneurysms, that is able to prevent or delay their expansion. In this study, we investigated whether intraluminal delivered pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) can impair the early AAA development in a porcine model. Methods The infrarenal aorta was exposed in thirty pigs. Twenty underwent an elastase based AAA inducing procedure and ten of these received an additional intraluminal PGG infusion. The final 10 were sham operated and served as controls. Results All pigs who only had an elastase infusion developed macroscopically expanding AAAs. In pigs treated with an additional PGG infusion the growth rate of the AP-diameter rapidly returned to physiological values as seen in the control group. In the elastase group, histology revealed more or less complete resolution of the elastic lamellae in the media while they were more abundant, coherent and structurally organized in the PGG group. The control group displayed normal physiological growth and histology. Conclusion In our model, intraluminal delivered PGG is able to penetrate the aortic wall from the inside and impair the early AAA development by stabilizing the elastic lamellae and preserving their integrity. The principle holds a high clinical potential if it can be translated to human conditions, since it, if so, potentially could represent a new drug for stabilizing small abdominal aneurysms. PMID:27144001

  3. Mitf is a master regulator of the v-ATPase, forming a control module for cellular homeostasis with v-ATPase and TORC1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Qingxiang; Ogmundsdottir, Margret Helga; Möller, Katrin; Siddaway, Robert; Larue, Lionel; Hsing, Michael; Kong, Sek Won; Goding, Colin Ronald; Palsson, Arnar; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Pignoni, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The v-ATPase is a fundamental eukaryotic enzyme that is central to cellular homeostasis. Although its impact on key metabolic regulators such as TORC1 is well documented, our knowledge of mechanisms that regulate v-ATPase activity is limited. Here, we report that the Drosophila transcription factor Mitf is a master regulator of this holoenzyme. Mitf directly controls transcription of all 15 v-ATPase components through M-box cis-sites and this coordinated regulation affects holoenzyme activity in vivo. In addition, through the v-ATPase, Mitf promotes the activity of TORC1, which in turn negatively regulates Mitf. We provide evidence that Mitf, v-ATPase and TORC1 form a negative regulatory loop that maintains each of these important metabolic regulators in relative balance. Interestingly, direct regulation of v-ATPase genes by human MITF also occurs in cells of the melanocytic lineage, showing mechanistic conservation in the regulation of the v-ATPase by MITF family proteins in fly and mammals. Collectively, this evidence points to an ancient module comprising Mitf, v-ATPase and TORC1 that serves as a dynamic modulator of metabolism for cellular homeostasis. PMID:26092939

  4. Mitochondrial AAA proteases--towards a molecular understanding of membrane-bound proteolytic machines.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Florian; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial AAA proteases play an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis. They regulate and promote biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins by acting as processing enzymes and ensuring the selective turnover of misfolded proteins. Impairment of AAA proteases causes pleiotropic defects in various organisms including neurodegeneration in humans. AAA proteases comprise ring-like hexameric complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are functionally conserved from yeast to man, but variations are evident in the subunit composition of orthologous enzymes. Recent structural and biochemical studies revealed how AAA proteases degrade their substrates in an ATP dependent manner. Intersubunit coordination of the ATP hydrolysis leads to an ordered ATP hydrolysis within the AAA ring, which ensures efficient substrate dislocation from the membrane and translocation to the proteolytic chamber. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the molecular mechanisms underlying the versatile functions of mitochondrial AAA proteases and their relevance to those of the other AAA+ machines. PMID:22001671

  5. Polypeptide translocation by the AAA+ ClpXP protease machine

    PubMed Central

    Barkow, Sarah R.; Levchenko, Igor; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    In the AAA+ ClpXP protease, ClpX uses repeated cycles of ATP hydrolysis to pull native proteins apart and to translocate the denatured polypeptide into ClpP for degradation. Here, we probe polypeptide features important for translocation. ClpXP degrades diverse synthetic peptide substrates despite major differences in side-chain chirality, size, and polarity. Moreover, translocation occurs without a peptide –NH and with 10 methylenes between successive peptide bonds. Pulling on homopolymeric tracts of glycine, proline, and lysine also allows efficient ClpXP degradation of a stably folded protein. Thus, minimal chemical features of a polypeptide chain are sufficient for translocation and protein unfolding by the ClpX machine. These results suggest that the translocation pore of ClpX is highly elastic, allowing interactions with a wide-range of chemical groups, a feature likely to be shared by many AAA+ unfoldases. PMID:19549599

  6. Dynamic flexibility of the ATPase p97 is important for its interprotomer motion transmission

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Li, Guangtao; Lennarz, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The hexameric protein p97, a very abundant type II AAA ATPase (ATPase associated with various cellular activities), is involved in a diverse range of cellular functions. During its ATPase cycle p97 functions as an ATP motor, converting the chemical energy released upon hydrolysis of ATP to ADP into mechanical work, which is then directed toward the proteins that serve as substrates. A key question in this process is: How is the nucleotide-induced motion transmitted from the C-terminal ATPase domain (the D2 domain) of p97 to the distant N-terminal substrate-processing domain? We have previously reported the surprising finding that motion transmission between the two ATPase domains (the D2 and D1 domains) is mediated by the D1-D2 linker region of its neighboring protomer. In this study we report efforts to better understand this process. Our findings suggest that the amino acid sequence containing Gly-Gly that is located at the C terminus of the D1-D2 linker functions as a pivoting point that allows the dynamic movement of the D1-D2 linker. Furthermore, we found that locking the D1-D2 linker to the D2 domain by introducing disulfide bonds significantly impaired the motion-transmission process. These results support our previous model for interprotomer motion transmission, and provide more detailed information on how the motion transmission between the two ATPase domains of p97 is relayed by the flexible movement of the D1-D2 linker from its neighboring protomer. PMID:22675116

  7. P4-ATPases as Phospholipid Flippases-Structure, Function, and Enigmas.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jens P; Vestergaard, Anna L; Mikkelsen, Stine A; Mogensen, Louise S; Chalat, Madhavan; Molday, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    P4-ATPases comprise a family of P-type ATPases that actively transport or flip phospholipids across cell membranes. This generates and maintains membrane lipid asymmetry, a property essential for a wide variety of cellular processes such as vesicle budding and trafficking, cell signaling, blood coagulation, apoptosis, bile and cholesterol homeostasis, and neuronal cell survival. Some P4-ATPases transport phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine across the plasma membrane or intracellular membranes whereas other P4-ATPases are specific for phosphatidylcholine. The importance of P4-ATPases is highlighted by the finding that genetic defects in two P4-ATPases ATP8A2 and ATP8B1 are associated with severe human disorders. Recent studies have provided insight into how P4-ATPases translocate phospholipids across membranes. P4-ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate at the aspartate of the P-type ATPase signature sequence, and dephosphorylation is activated by the lipid substrate being flipped from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet similar to the activation of dephosphorylation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase by exoplasmic K(+). How the phospholipid is translocated can be understood in terms of a peripheral hydrophobic gate pathway between transmembrane helices M1, M3, M4, and M6. This pathway, which partially overlaps with the suggested pathway for migration of Ca(2+) in the opposite direction in the Ca(2+)-ATPase, is wider than the latter, thereby accommodating the phospholipid head group. The head group is propelled along against its concentration gradient with the hydrocarbon chains projecting out into the lipid phase by movement of an isoleucine located at the position corresponding to an ion binding glutamate in the Ca(2+)- and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases. Hence, the P4-ATPase mechanism is quite similar to the mechanism of these ion pumps, where the glutamate translocates the ions by moving like a pump rod. The accessory subunit CDC50 may be located in close association

  8. P4-ATPases as Phospholipid Flippases—Structure, Function, and Enigmas

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jens P.; Vestergaard, Anna L.; Mikkelsen, Stine A.; Mogensen, Louise S.; Chalat, Madhavan; Molday, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    P4-ATPases comprise a family of P-type ATPases that actively transport or flip phospholipids across cell membranes. This generates and maintains membrane lipid asymmetry, a property essential for a wide variety of cellular processes such as vesicle budding and trafficking, cell signaling, blood coagulation, apoptosis, bile and cholesterol homeostasis, and neuronal cell survival. Some P4-ATPases transport phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine across the plasma membrane or intracellular membranes whereas other P4-ATPases are specific for phosphatidylcholine. The importance of P4-ATPases is highlighted by the finding that genetic defects in two P4-ATPases ATP8A2 and ATP8B1 are associated with severe human disorders. Recent studies have provided insight into how P4-ATPases translocate phospholipids across membranes. P4-ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate at the aspartate of the P-type ATPase signature sequence, and dephosphorylation is activated by the lipid substrate being flipped from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet similar to the activation of dephosphorylation of Na+/K+-ATPase by exoplasmic K+. How the phospholipid is translocated can be understood in terms of a peripheral hydrophobic gate pathway between transmembrane helices M1, M3, M4, and M6. This pathway, which partially overlaps with the suggested pathway for migration of Ca2+ in the opposite direction in the Ca2+-ATPase, is wider than the latter, thereby accommodating the phospholipid head group. The head group is propelled along against its concentration gradient with the hydrocarbon chains projecting out into the lipid phase by movement of an isoleucine located at the position corresponding to an ion binding glutamate in the Ca2+- and Na+/K+-ATPases. Hence, the P4-ATPase mechanism is quite similar to the mechanism of these ion pumps, where the glutamate translocates the ions by moving like a pump rod. The accessory subunit CDC50 may be located in close association with the

  9. An Arabidopsis ATPase gene involved in nematode-induced syncytium development and abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Plattner, Stephan; Radakovic, Zoran; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Grundler, Florian MW; Ammelburg, Moritz; Siddique, Shahid; Bohlmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces syncytia in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana, which are its only nutrient source. One gene, At1g64110, that is strongly up-regulated in syncytia as shown by RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ RT-PCR and promoter::GUS lines, encodes an AAA+-type ATPase. Expression of two related genes in syncytia, At4g28000 and At5g52882, was not detected or not different from control root segments. Using amiRNA lines and T-DNA mutants, we show that At1g64110 is important for syncytium and nematode development. At1g64110 was also inducible by wounding, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, heat and cold, as well as drought, sodium chloride, abscisic acid and mannitol, indicating involvement of this gene in abiotic stress responses. We confirmed this using two T-DNA mutants that were more sensitive to abscisic acid and sodium chloride during seed germination and root growth. These mutants also developed significantly smaller roots in response to abscisic acid and sodium chloride. An in silico analysis showed that ATPase At1g64110 (and also At4g28000 and At5g52882) belong to the ‘meiotic clade’ of AAA proteins that includes proteins such as Vps4, katanin, spastin and MSP1. PMID:23480402

  10. Structure, mechanism and regulation of the clathrin-coated vesicle and yeast vacuolar H(+)-ATPases.

    PubMed

    Forgac, M

    2000-01-01

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (or V-ATPases) are a family of ATP-dependent proton pumps that carry out acidification of intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. This review is focused on our work on the V-ATPases of clathrin-coated vesicles and yeast vacuoles. The coated-vesicle V-ATPase undergoes trafficking to endosomes and synaptic vesicles, where it functions in receptor recycling and neurotransmitter uptake, respectively. The yeast V-ATPase functions to acidify the central vacuole and is necessary both for protein degradation and for coupled transport processes across the vacuolar membrane. The V-ATPases are multisubunit complexes composed of two functional domains. The V(1) domain is a 570 kDa peripheral complex composed of eight subunits of molecular mass 73-14 kDa (subunits A-H) that is responsible for ATP hydrolysis. The V(o) domain is a 260 kDa integral complex composed of five subunits of molecular mass 100-17 kDa (subunits a, d, c, c' and c") that is responsible for proton translocation. To explore the function of individual subunits in the V-ATPase complex as well as to identify residues important in proton transport and ATP hydrolysis, we have employed a combination of chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro reassembly. A central question concerns the mechanism by which vacuolar acidification is controlled in eukaryotic cells. We have proposed that disulfide bond formation between conserved cysteine residues at the catalytic site of the V-ATPase plays an important role in regulating V-ATPase activity in vivo. Other regulatory mechanisms that are discussed include reversible dissociation and reassembly of the V-ATPase complex, changes in the tightness of coupling between proton transport and ATP hydrolysis, differential targeting of V-ATPases within the cell and control of the Cl(-) conductance that is necessary for vacuolar acidification. PMID:10600675

  11. 83-kilodalton heat shock proteins of trypanosomes are potent peptide-stimulated ATPases.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K.; Sullivan, M. A.; Bradley, M.; Engman, D. M.; Walsh, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    A Crithidia fasciculata 83-kDa protein purified during a separate study of C. fasciculata trypanothione synthetase was shown to have ATPase activity and to belong to the hsp90 family of stress proteins. Because no ATPase activity has previously been reported for the hsp90 class, ATP utilization by C. fasciculata hsp83 was characterized: this hsp83 has an ATPase kcat of 150 min-1 and a Km of 60 microM, whereas the homologous mammalian hsp90 binds ATP but has no ATPase activity. Crithidia fasciculata hsp83 undergoes autophosphorylation on serine and threonine at a rate constant of 3.3 x 10(-3) min-1. Similar analysis was performed on recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi hsp83, and comparable ATPase parameters were obtained (kcat = 100 min-1, Km = 80 microM, kautophosphorylation = 6.3 x 10(-3) min-1). The phosphoenzyme is neither on the ATPase hydrolytic pathway nor does it affect ATPase catalytic efficiency. Both C. fasciculata and T. cruzi hsp83 show up to fivefold stimulation of ATPase activity by peptides of 6-24 amino acids. PMID:1304385

  12. Structural Characterization of a Newly Identified Component of α-Carboxysomes: The AAA+ Domain Protein CsoCbbQ.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Markus; Roberts, Evan W; Gonzalez, Raul C; Bates, Cassandra; Dawoud, Salma; Landry, Kimberly; Cannon, Gordon C; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Carboxysomes are bacterial microcompartments that enhance carbon fixation by concentrating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and its substrate CO2 within a proteinaceous shell. They are found in all cyanobacteria, some purple photoautotrophs and many chemoautotrophic bacteria. Carboxysomes consist of a protein shell that encapsulates several hundred molecules of RuBisCO, and contain carbonic anhydrase and other accessory proteins. Genes coding for carboxysome shell components and the encapsulated proteins are typically found together in an operon. The α-carboxysome operon is embedded in a cluster of additional, conserved genes that are presumably related to its function. In many chemoautotrophs, products of the expanded carboxysome locus include CbbO and CbbQ, a member of the AAA+ domain superfamily. We bioinformatically identified subtypes of CbbQ proteins and show that their genes frequently co-occur with both Form IA and Form II RuBisCO. The α-carboxysome-associated ortholog, CsoCbbQ, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus forms a hexamer in solution and hydrolyzes ATP. The crystal structure shows that CsoCbbQ is a hexamer of the typical AAA+ domain; the additional C-terminal domain, diagnostic of the CbbQ subfamily, structurally fills the inter-monomer gaps, resulting in a distinctly hexagonal shape. We show that CsoCbbQ interacts with CsoCbbO and is a component of the carboxysome shell, the first example of ATPase activity associated with a bacterial microcompartment. PMID:26538283

  13. Structural Characterization of a Newly Identified Component of α-Carboxysomes: The AAA+ Domain Protein CsoCbbQ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Markus; Roberts, Evan W.; Gonzalez, Raul C.; Bates, Cassandra; Dawoud, Salma; Landry, Kimberly; Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-11-05

    Carboxysomes are bacterial microcompartments that enhance carbon fixation by concentrating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and its substrate CO2 within a proteinaceous shell. They are found in all cyanobacteria, some purple photoautotrophs and many chemoautotrophic bacteria. Carboxysomes consist of a protein shell that encapsulates several hundred molecules of RuBisCO, and contain carbonic anhydrase and other accessory proteins. Genes coding for carboxysome shell components and the encapsulated proteins are typically found together in an operon. The α-carboxysome operon is embedded in a cluster of additional, conserved genes that are presumably related to its function. In many chemoautotrophs, products of the expanded carboxysome locus include CbbO and CbbQ, a member of the AAA+ domain superfamily. We bioinformatically identified subtypes of CbbQ proteins and show that their genes frequently co-occur with both Form IA and Form II RuBisCO. The α-carboxysome-associated ortholog, CsoCbbQ, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus forms a hexamer in solution and hydrolyzes ATP. The crystal structure shows that CsoCbbQ is a hexamer of the typical AAA+ domain; the additional C-terminal domain, diagnostic of the CbbQ subfamily, structurally fills the inter-monomer gaps, resulting in a distinctly hexagonal shape. Finally, we show that CsoCbbQ interacts with CsoCbbO and is a component of the carboxysome shell, the first example of ATPase activity associated with a bacterial microcompartment.

  14. Structural Characterization of a Newly Identified Component of α-Carboxysomes: The AAA+ Domain Protein CsoCbbQ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, Markus; Roberts, Evan W.; Gonzalez, Raul C.; Bates, Cassandra; Dawoud, Salma; Landry, Kimberly; Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-11-05

    Carboxysomes are bacterial microcompartments that enhance carbon fixation by concentrating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and its substrate CO2 within a proteinaceous shell. They are found in all cyanobacteria, some purple photoautotrophs and many chemoautotrophic bacteria. Carboxysomes consist of a protein shell that encapsulates several hundred molecules of RuBisCO, and contain carbonic anhydrase and other accessory proteins. Genes coding for carboxysome shell components and the encapsulated proteins are typically found together in an operon. The α-carboxysome operon is embedded in a cluster of additional, conserved genes that are presumably related to its function. In many chemoautotrophs, products of the expanded carboxysome locusmore » include CbbO and CbbQ, a member of the AAA+ domain superfamily. We bioinformatically identified subtypes of CbbQ proteins and show that their genes frequently co-occur with both Form IA and Form II RuBisCO. The α-carboxysome-associated ortholog, CsoCbbQ, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus forms a hexamer in solution and hydrolyzes ATP. The crystal structure shows that CsoCbbQ is a hexamer of the typical AAA+ domain; the additional C-terminal domain, diagnostic of the CbbQ subfamily, structurally fills the inter-monomer gaps, resulting in a distinctly hexagonal shape. Finally, we show that CsoCbbQ interacts with CsoCbbO and is a component of the carboxysome shell, the first example of ATPase activity associated with a bacterial microcompartment.« less

  15. Structural Characterization of a Newly Identified Component of α-Carboxysomes: The AAA+ Domain Protein CsoCbbQ

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Markus; Roberts, Evan W.; Gonzalez, Raul C.; Bates, Cassandra; Dawoud, Salma; Landry, Kimberly; Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxysomes are bacterial microcompartments that enhance carbon fixation by concentrating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and its substrate CO2 within a proteinaceous shell. They are found in all cyanobacteria, some purple photoautotrophs and many chemoautotrophic bacteria. Carboxysomes consist of a protein shell that encapsulates several hundred molecules of RuBisCO, and contain carbonic anhydrase and other accessory proteins. Genes coding for carboxysome shell components and the encapsulated proteins are typically found together in an operon. The α-carboxysome operon is embedded in a cluster of additional, conserved genes that are presumably related to its function. In many chemoautotrophs, products of the expanded carboxysome locus include CbbO and CbbQ, a member of the AAA+ domain superfamily. We bioinformatically identified subtypes of CbbQ proteins and show that their genes frequently co-occur with both Form IA and Form II RuBisCO. The α-carboxysome-associated ortholog, CsoCbbQ, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus forms a hexamer in solution and hydrolyzes ATP. The crystal structure shows that CsoCbbQ is a hexamer of the typical AAA+ domain; the additional C-terminal domain, diagnostic of the CbbQ subfamily, structurally fills the inter-monomer gaps, resulting in a distinctly hexagonal shape. We show that CsoCbbQ interacts with CsoCbbO and is a component of the carboxysome shell, the first example of ATPase activity associated with a bacterial microcompartment. PMID:26538283

  16. Mechanism and significance of P4 ATPase-catalyzed lipid transport: lessons from a Na+/K+-pump.

    PubMed

    Puts, Catheleyne F; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2009-07-01

    Members of the P(4) subfamily of P-type ATPases are believed to catalyze phospholipid transport across membrane bilayers, a process influencing a host of cellular functions. Atomic structures and functional analysis of P-type ATPases that pump small cations and metal ions revealed a transport mechanism that appears to be conserved throughout the family. A challenging problem is to understand how this mechanism is adapted in P(4) ATPases to flip phospholipids. P(4) ATPases form oligomeric complexes with members of the CDC50 protein family. While formation of these complexes is required for P(4) ATPase export from the endoplasmic reticulum, little is known about the functional role of the CDC50 subunits. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and closely-related H(+)/K(+)-ATPase are the only other P-type pumps that are oligomeric, comprising mandatory beta-subunits that are strikingly reminiscent of CDC50 proteins. Besides serving a role in the functional maturation of the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit also contributes specifically to intrinsic transport properties of the Na(+)/K(+) pump. As beta-subunits and CDC50 proteins likely adopted similar structures to accomplish analogous tasks, current knowledge of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase provides a useful guide for understanding the inner workings of the P(4) ATPase class of lipid pumps. PMID:19233312

  17. Differential expression of TRAIL and its receptors relative to calcification in AAA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xun . E-mail: mpscrs@bath.ac.uk; Winrow, Vivienne R.; Horrocks, Michael; Stevens, Cliff R.

    2007-06-22

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Human AAA tissue displays cells undergoing all stages of apoptosis. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in tumour cells but not in normal cells. It has death receptors and decoy receptors. An inhibitor of TRAIL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), is involved in osteogenesis and vascular calcification. We investigated TRAIL and its receptors in AAA compared within normal aorta (NA). Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of calcification in AAA walls were determined using Von Kossa staining and pre-operation computer tomography (CT) scans. There was a significant difference in calcification level at different locations in the AAA wall (p < 0.05). Apoptosis was confirmed in AAA by TUNEL assay. A significant difference in TRAIL and its receptor expression was observed between normal aortae and AAA (p < 0.05). Significant differences were also observed between tissues displaying different extents of calcification for TRAIL mRNA (p < 0.05) by RT-PCR examination and OPG protein (p < 0.01) by protein blotting examination. We propose that this pattern of expression of TRAIL and its receptors may contribute to AAA formation and calcification in the AAA wall.

  18. On archaebacterial ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hochstein, L.; Altekar, W.

    1984-01-01

    The energy transducing ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum was studied in order to define the origin of energy transducing systems. The ATPase required high salt concentration (4M NaCl) for activity; activity was rapidly lost when NaCl was below 1 Molar. At low salt concentration, the membrane bound ATPase activity could be stabilized in presence of spermine. However, following solubilization spermine was ineffective. Furthermore, F1 ATPase activity was stabilized by ammonium sulfate even when the NaCl concentration was less than 1 Molar. These studies suggest that stabilization by hydrophobic interactions preceded ionic ones in the evolution of the energy transducing ATPases.

  19. Training Scientists to be Effective Communicators: AAAS Communicating Science Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendes, L.; Lohwater, T.

    2012-12-01

    "Communicating Science: Tools for Scientists and Engineers" is a workshop program developed by AAAS to provide guidance and practice for scientists and engineers in communicating about science with public audiences. The program was launched at the 2008 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston and has since provided 24 workshops for more than 1,500 scientist and engineer attendees at universities, science society meetings, and government agency labs around the United States. Each interactive workshop targets scientists and engineers specifically and has included content such as message development, defining audience, identifying opportunities for engaging the public, and practice with public presentations and cameras. The workshop format allows for collaborative learning through small-group discussion, resource sharing, and participation in critique of other participants' presentations. Continuous monitoring of the program includes on-site and online surveys and evaluation. On an assessment of workshops from 2008-2010, attendees reported that knowledge gained from the workshop helped in crafting messages about their scientific work for use in communicating with public audiences, and approximately 80 percent of respondents reported participation in communication with a public audience after attending the workshop. Through workshop content and feedback of participating scientists, this presentation will highlight some best practices and resources for scientists who want to take a proactive role in science communication.

  20. Characterization of the Modular Design of the Autolysin/Adhesin Aaa from Staphylococcus Aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hirschhausen, Nina; Schlesier, Tim; Peters, Georg; Heilmann, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of serious and life-threatening infections, such as endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, and sepsis. Its adherence to various host structures is crucial for the establishment of diseases. Adherence may be mediated by a variety of adhesins, among them the autolysin/adhesins Atl and Aaa. Aaa is composed of three N-terminal repeated sequences homologous to a lysin motif (LysM) that can confer cell wall attachment and a C-terminally located cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) domain having bacteriolytic activity in many proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show by surface plasmon resonance that the LysM domain binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin respresenting a novel adhesive function for this domain. Moreover, we demonstrated that the CHAP domain not only mediates the bacteriolytic activity, but also adherence to fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin, thus demonstrating for the first time an adhesive function for this domain. Adherence of an S. aureus aaa mutant and the complemented aaa mutant is slightly decreased and increased, respectively, to vitronectin, but not to fibrinogen and fibronectin, which might at least in part result from an increased expression of atl in the aaa mutant. Furthermore, an S. aureus atl mutant that showed enhanced adherence to fibrinogen, fibronectin, and endothelial cells also demonstrated increased aaa expression and production of Aaa. Thus, the redundant functions of Aaa and Atl might at least in part be interchangeable. Lastly, RT-PCR and zymographic analysis revealed that aaa is negatively regulated by the global virulence gene regulators agr and SarA. Conclusions/Significance We identified novel functions for two widely distributed protein domains, LysM and CHAP, i.e. the adherence to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin. The adhesive properties of Aaa might promote S. aureus

  1. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand; Olesen, Claus; Andersen, Jens Peter; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2016-04-01

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca(2+). Vanadate is bound at the catalytic site as a planar VO3(-) in complex with water and Mg(2+) in a dephosphorylation transition-state-like conformation. Validating bound VO3(-) by anomalous difference Fourier maps using long-wavelength data we also identify a hitherto undescribed Cl(-) site near the dephosphorylation site. Crystallization was facilitated by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-derivatized nucleotides that bind with the TNP moiety occupying the binding pocket that normally accommodates the adenine of ATP, rationalizing their remarkably high affinity for E2P-like conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the configurations of bound nucleotide analogs in the E2·VO3(-) structure with that in E2·BeF3(-) (E2P ground state analog) reveals multiple binding modes to the Ca(2+)-ATPase. PMID:27050689

  2. Analysis of a Typical Chinese High School Biology Textbook Using the AAAS Textbook Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ye; Cobern, William W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a typical Chinese high school biology textbook using the textbook standards of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The data were composed of three chapters selected from the textbook. Each chapter was analyzed and rated using the AAAS textbook standards. Pearson correlations…

  3. Relationship of the Membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum to Vacuolar ATPases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Bowman, Emma J.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal antiserum against subunit A (67 kDa) of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa reacted with subunit I (87 kDa) from a membrane ATPase of the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum. The halobacterial ATPase was inhibited by nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; the extent of the latter inhibition was diminished in the presence of adenosine di- or triphosphates. 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan in- hibited the hatobacterial ATPase also in a nucleotide- protectable manner; the bulk of inhibitor was associated with subunit II (60 kDa). The data suggested that this halobacterial ATPase may have conserved structural features from both the vacuotar and the F-type ATPases.

  4. Relationship of the membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum to vacuolar ATPases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Bowman, Emma J.

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal antiserum against subunit A (67 kDa) of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa reacted with subunit I (87 kDa) from a membrane ATPase of the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum. The halobacterial ATPase was inhibited by nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; the extent of the latter inhibition was diminished in the presence of adenosine di- or triphosphates. 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan inhibited the halobacterial ATPase also in a nucleotide-protectable manner; the bulk of inhibitor was associated with subunit II (60 kDa). The data suggest that this halobacterial ATPase may have conserved structural features from both the vacuolar and the F-type ATPases.

  5. N-Terminal Coiled-Coil Structure of ATPase Subunits of 26S Proteasome Is Crucial for Proteasome Function

    PubMed Central

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome is an essential proteolytic machine in eukaryotic cells, where it removes damaged proteins and regulates many cellular activities by degrading ubiquitinated proteins. Its heterohexameric AAA+ ATPase Rpt subunits play a central role in proteasome activity by the engagement of substrate unfolding and translocation for degradation; however, its detailed mechanism remains poorly understood. In contrast to AAA+ ATPase domains, their N-terminal regions of Rpt subunits substantially differ from each other. Here, to investigate the requirements and roles of the N-terminal regions of six Rpt subunits derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed systematic mutational analysis using conditional knockdown yeast strains for each Rpt subunit and bacterial heterologous expression system of the base subcomplex. We showed that the formation of the coiled-coil structure was the most important for the N-terminal region of Rpt subunits. The primary role of coiled-coil structure would be the maintenance of the ring structure with the defined order. However, the coiled-coil region would be also be involved in substrate recognition and an interaction between lid and base subcomplexes. PMID:26208326

  6. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins. PMID:26265469

  7. Bacterial Rotary Export ATPases Are Allosterically Regulated by the Nucleotide Second Messenger Cyclic-di-GMP*

    PubMed Central

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Little, Richard H.; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M.; Malone, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins. PMID:26265469

  8. Directed evolution of a sphingomyelin flippase reveals mechanism of substrate backbone discrimination by a P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Roland, Bartholomew P; Graham, Todd R

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase (P4-ATPases) family establish membrane asymmetry and play critical roles in vesicular transport, cell polarity, signal transduction, and neurologic development. All characterized P4-ATPases flip glycerophospholipids across the bilayer to the cytosolic leaflet of the membrane, but how these enzymes distinguish glycerophospholipids from sphingolipids is not known. We used a directed evolution approach to examine the molecular mechanisms through which P4-ATPases discriminate substrate backbone. A mutagenesis screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has identified several gain-of-function mutations in the P4-ATPase Dnf1 that facilitate the transport of a novel lipid substrate, sphingomyelin. We found that a highly conserved asparagine (N220) in the first transmembrane segment is a key enforcer of glycerophospholipid selection, and specific substitutions at this site allow transport of sphingomyelin. PMID:27432949

  9. Auxin Activates the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase by Phosphorylation during Hypocotyl Elongation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Koji; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and development. The ubiquitin-ligase complex SCFTIR1/AFB (for Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein), which includes the TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE1/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (TIR1/AFB) auxin receptor family, has recently been demonstrated to be critical for auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. Early-phase auxin-induced hypocotyl elongation, on the other hand, has long been explained by the acid-growth theory, for which proton extrusion by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a functional prerequisite. However, the mechanism by which auxin mediates H+-ATPase activation has yet to be elucidated. Here, we present direct evidence for H+-ATPase activation in etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by auxin through phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine during early-phase hypocotyl elongation. Application of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to endogenous auxin-depleted hypocotyl sections induced phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine of the H+-ATPase and increased H+-ATPase activity without altering the amount of the enzyme. Changes in both the phosphorylation level of H+-ATPase and IAA-induced elongation were similarly concentration dependent. Furthermore, IAA-induced H+-ATPase phosphorylation occurred in a tir1-1 afb2-3 double mutant, which is severely defective in auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. In addition, α-(phenylethyl-2-one)-IAA, the auxin antagonist specific for the nuclear auxin receptor TIR1/AFBs, had no effect on IAA-induced H+-ATPase phosphorylation. These results suggest that the TIR1/AFB auxin receptor family is not involved in auxin-induced H+-ATPase phosphorylation. Our results define the activation mechanism of H+-ATPase by auxin during early-phase hypocotyl elongation; this is the long-sought-after mechanism that is central to the acid-growth theory. PMID:22492846

  10. Mechanism of Amyloidogenesis of a Bacterial AAA+ Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Yau, Jason; Ing, Christopher; Liu, Kaiyin; Farber, Patrick; Won, Amy; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Kara-Yacoubian, Nareg; Seraphim, Thiago V; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Kay, Lewis E; Yip, Christopher M; Pomès, Régis; Sharpe, Simon; Houry, Walid A

    2016-07-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein superstructures that are commonly associated with diseases in humans and with physiological functions in various organisms. The precise mechanisms of amyloid formation remain to be elucidated. Surprisingly, we discovered that a bacterial Escherichia coli chaperone-like ATPase, regulatory ATPase variant A (RavA), and specifically the LARA domain in RavA, forms amyloids under acidic conditions at elevated temperatures. RavA is involved in modulating the proper assembly of membrane respiratory complexes. LARA contains an N-terminal loop region followed by a β-sandwich-like folded core. Several approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, were used to determine the mechanism by which LARA switches to an amyloid state. These studies revealed that the folded core of LARA is amyloidogenic and is protected by its N-terminal loop. At low pH and high temperatures, the interaction of the N-terminal loop with the folded core is disrupted, leading to amyloid formation. PMID:27265850

  11. Structure-function relationship in P-type ATPases--a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Apell, H-J

    2003-01-01

    P-type ATPases are a large family of membrane proteins that perform active ion transport across biological membranes. In these proteins the energy-providing ATP hydrolysis is coupled to ion-transport that builds up or maintains the electrochemical potential gradients of one or two ion species across the membrane. P-type ATPases are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells and also in bacteria, and they are transporters of a broad variety of ions. So far, a crystal structure with atomic resolution is available only for one species, the SR Ca-ATPase. However, biochemical and biophysical studies provide an abundance of details on the function of this class of ion pumps. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of preferentially biophysical investigations of the three best-studied ion pumps, the Na,K-ATPase, the gastric H,K-ATPase, and the SR Ca-ATPase, and to compare functional properties to recent structural insights with the aim of contributing to the understanding of their structure-function relationship. PMID:12811587

  12. Evolution of Plant P-Type ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Christian N. S.; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Palmgren, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Five organisms having completely sequenced genomes and belonging to all major branches of green plants (Viridiplantae) were analyzed with respect to their content of P-type ATPases encoding genes. These were the chlorophytes Ostreococcus tauri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the streptophytes Physcomitrella patens (a non-vascular moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (a primitive vascular plant), and Arabidopsis thaliana (a model flowering plant). Each organism contained sequences for all five subfamilies of P-type ATPases. Whereas Na+ and H+ pumps seem to mutually exclude each other in flowering plants and animals, they co-exist in chlorophytes, which show representatives for two kinds of Na+ pumps (P2C and P2D ATPases) as well as a primitive H+-ATPase. Both Na+ and H+ pumps also co-exist in the moss P. patens, which has a P2D Na+-ATPase. In contrast to the primitive H+-ATPases in chlorophytes and P. patens, the H+-ATPases from vascular plants all have a large C-terminal regulatory domain as well as a conserved Arg in transmembrane segment 5 that is predicted to function as part of a backflow protection mechanism. Together these features are predicted to enable H+ pumps in vascular plants to create large electrochemical gradients that can be modulated in response to diverse physiological cues. The complete inventory of P-type ATPases in the major branches of Viridiplantae is an important starting point for elucidating the evolution in plants of these important pumps. PMID:22629273

  13. Cdc50p plays a vital role in the ATPase reaction cycle of the putative aminophospholipid transporter Drs2p.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Williamson, Patrick; Puts, Catheleyne F; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2009-07-01

    Members of the P(4) subfamily of P-type ATPases are believed to catalyze transport of phospholipids across cellular bilayers. However, most P-type ATPases pump small cations or metal ions, and atomic structures revealed a transport mechanism that is conserved throughout the family. Hence, a challenging problem is to understand how this mechanism is adapted in P(4)-ATPases to flip phospholipids. P(4)-ATPases form heteromeric complexes with Cdc50 proteins. The primary role of these additional polypeptides is unknown. Here, we show that the affinity of yeast P(4)-ATPase Drs2p for its Cdc50-binding partner fluctuates during the transport cycle, with the strongest interaction occurring at a point where the enzyme is loaded with phospholipid ligand. We also find that specific interactions with Cdc50p are required to render the ATPase competent for phosphorylation at the catalytically important aspartate residue. Our data indicate that Cdc50 proteins are integral components of the P(4)-ATPase transport machinery. Thus, acquisition of these subunits may have been a crucial step in the evolution of flippases from a family of cation pumps. PMID:19411703

  14. Modelling of residually stressed materials with application to AAA.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, T; Dorfmann, L; Ogden, R W

    2016-08-01

    Residual stresses are generated in living tissues by processes of growth and adaptation and they significantly influence the mechanical behaviour of the tissues. Thus, to effectively model the elastic response of the tissues relative to a residually stressed configuration the residual stresses need to be incorporated into the constitutive equations. The purposes of this paper are (a) to summarise a general elastic constitutive formulation that includes residual stress, (b) to specify the tensors needed for the three-dimensional implementation of the theory in a nonlinear finite element code, and (c) to use the theory and its implementation to evaluate the wall stress distribution in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using patient specific geometry and material model parameters. The considered material is anisotropic with two preferred directions indicating the orientation of the collagen fibres in the aortic tissue. The method described in this paper is general and can be used, by specifying appropriate energy functions, to investigate other residually stressed biological systems. PMID:26874252

  15. AAA: Road Debris a Mounting Danger on U.S. Highways

    MedlinePlus

    ... Highways Crashes involving objects that have fallen from vehicles up 40 percent since 2001 To use the ... the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Crashes involving vehicle-related debris are up 40 percent since the ...

  16. Substrate delivery by the AAA+ ClpX and ClpC1 unfoldases activates the mycobacterial ClpP1P2 peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterial Clp-family proteases function via collaboration of the heteromeric ClpP1P2 peptidase with a AAA+ partner, ClpX or ClpC1. These enzymes are essential for M. tuberculosis viability and are validated antibacterial drug targets, but the requirements for assembly and regulation of functional proteolytic complexes are poorly understood. Here, we report the reconstitution of protein degradation by mycobacterial Clp proteases in vitro and describe novel features of these enzymes that distinguish them from orthologs in other bacteria. Both ClpX and ClpC1 catalyze ATP-dependent unfolding and degradation of native protein substrates in conjunction with ClpP1P2, but neither mediates protein degradation with just ClpP1 or ClpP2. ClpP1P2 alone has negligible peptidase activity, but is strongly stimulated by translocation of protein substrates into ClpP1P2 by either AAA+ partner. Interestingly, our results support a model in which both binding of a AAA+ partner and protein-substrate delivery are required to stabilize active ClpP1P2. Our model has implications for therapeutically targeting ClpP1P2 in dormant M. tuberculosis, and our reconstituted systems should facilitate identification of novel Clp protease inhibitors and activators. PMID:24976069

  17. Determining the influence of calcification on the failure properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Mulvihill, John J; Barrett, Hilary E; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2015-02-01

    Varying degrees of calcification are present in most abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, their impact on AAA failure properties and AAA rupture risk is unclear. The aim of this work is evaluate and compare the failure properties of partially calcified and predominantly fibrous AAA tissue and investigate the potential reasons for failure. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed on AAA samples harvested from 31 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Individual tensile samples were divided into two groups: fibrous (n=31) and partially calcified (n=38). The presence of calcification was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 69 mechanical tests were performed and the failure stretch (λf), failure stress (σf) and failure tension (Tf) were recorded for each test. Following mechanical testing, the failure sites of a subset of both tissue types were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the potential reasons for failure. It has been shown that the failure properties of partially calcified tissue are significantly reduced compared to fibrous tissue and SEM and EDS results suggest that the junction between a calcification deposit and the fibrous matrix is highly susceptible to failure. This study implicates the presence of calcification as a key player in AAA rupture risk and provides further motivation for the development of non-invasive methods of measuring calcification. PMID:25482218

  18. First genetic analysis of aneurysm genes in familial and sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    van de Luijtgaarden, Koen M; Heijsman, Daphne; Maugeri, Alessandra; Weiss, Marjan M; Verhagen, Hence J M; IJpma, Arne; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle

    2015-08-01

    Genetic causes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have not been identified and the role of genes associated with familial thoracic aneurysms in AAA has not been explored. We analyzed nine genes associated with familial thoracic aortic aneurysms, the vascular Ehlers-Danlos gene COL3A1 and the MTHFR p.Ala222Val variant in 155 AAA patients. The thoracic aneurysm genes selected for this study were the transforming growth factor-beta pathway genes EFEMP2, FBN1, SMAD3, TGBF2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and the smooth muscle cells genes ACTA2, MYH11 and MYLK. Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of these genes was performed. Patients with at least one first-degree relative with an aortic aneurysm were classified as familial AAA (n = 99), the others as sporadic AAA. We found 47 different rare heterozygous variants in eight genes: two pathogenic, one likely pathogenic, twenty-one variants of unknown significance (VUS) and twenty-three unlikely pathogenic variants. In familial AAA we found one pathogenic and segregating variant (COL3A1 p.Arg491X), one likely pathogenic and segregating (MYH11 p.Arg254Cys), and fifteen VUS. In sporadic patients we found one pathogenic (TGFBR2 p.Ile525Phefs*18) and seven VUS. Thirteen patients had two or more variants. These results show a previously unknown association and overlapping genetic defects between AAA and familial thoracic aneurysms, indicating that genetic testing may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. In this view, genetic testing of these genes specifically or in a genome-wide approach may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. PMID:26017485

  19. Functional characterization of a Glycine soja Ca(2+)ATPase in salt-alkaline stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingzhe; Jia, Bowei; Cui, Na; Wen, Yidong; Duanmu, Huizi; Yu, Qingyue; Xiao, Jialei; Sun, Xiaoli; Zhu, Yanming

    2016-03-01

    It is widely accepted that Ca(2+)ATPase family proteins play important roles in plant environmental stress responses. However, up to now, most researches are limited in the reference plants Arabidopsis and rice. The function of Ca(2+)ATPases from non-reference plants was rarely reported, especially its regulatory role in carbonate alkaline stress responses. Hence, in this study, we identified the P-type II Ca(2+)ATPase family genes in soybean genome, determined their chromosomal location and gene architecture, and analyzed their amino acid sequence and evolutionary relationship. Based on above results, we pointed out the existence of gene duplication for soybean Ca(2+)ATPases. Then, we investigated the expression profiles of the ACA subfamily genes in wild soybean (Glycine soja) under carbonate alkaline stress, and functionally characterized one representative gene GsACA1 by using transgenic alfalfa. Our results suggested that GsACA1 overexpression in alfalfa obviously increased plant tolerance to both carbonate alkaline and neutral salt stresses, as evidenced by lower levels of membrane permeability and MDA content, but higher levels of SOD activity, proline concentration and chlorophyll content under stress conditions. Taken together, for the first time, we reported a P-type II Ca(2+)ATPase from wild soybean, GsACA1, which could positively regulate plant tolerance to both carbonate alkaline and neutral salt stresses. PMID:26801329

  20. Engineering Silicone Rubbers for In vitro Studies: Creating AAA Models and ILT Analogues with Physiological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, T.J.; Doyle, B.J.; Callanan, A.; Walsh, M.T.; McGloughlin, T.M

    2010-01-01

    Background In vitro studies of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have been widely reported. Frequently mock artery models with intraluminal thrombus (ILT) analogues are used to mimic the AAA in vivo. While the models used may be physiological, their properties are frequently either not reported or investigated. Method of Approach This study is concerned with the testing and characterisation of previously used vessel analogue materials and the development of new materials for the manufacture of AAA models. These materials were used in conjunction with a previously validated injection moulding technique to manufacture AAA models of ideal geometry. To determine the model properties (stiffness (β) and compliance) the diameter change of each AAA model was investigated under incrementally increasing internal pressures and compared to published in vivo studies to determine if the models behaved physiologically. A FEA study was implemented to determine if the pressure – diameter change behaviour of the models could be predicted numerically. ILT analogues were also manufactured and characterised. Ideal models were manufactured with ILT analogue internal to the aneurysm region and the effect of the ILT analogue on the model compliance and stiffness was investigated. Results The wall materials had similar properties to aortic tissue at physiological pressures (Einit 2.22MPa and 1.57MPa (aortic tissue: 1.8MPa)). ILT analogues had similar Young’s modulus to the medial layer of ILT (0.24 and 0.33MPa (ILT: 0.28MPa)). All models had aneurysm sac compliance in the physiological range (2.62 – 8.01×10-4/mmHg (AAA in vivo: 1.8 – 9.4×10-4/mmHg)). The necks of our AAA models had similar stiffness to healthy aortas (20.44 – 29.83 (healthy aortas in vivo: 17.5±5.5)). Good agreement was seen between the diameter changes due to pressurisation in the experimental and FEA wall models with a maximum error of 7.3% at 120mmHg. It was also determined that the inclusion of ILT analogue

  1. Verification of IMRT dose calculations using AAA and PBC algorithms in dose buildup regions.

    PubMed

    Oinam, Arun S; Singh, Lakhwant

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this comparative study was to test the accuracy of anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithms of Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculations in the low- and high-dose buildup regions. AAA and PBC algorithms were used to create two intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of the same optimal fluence generated from a clinically simulated oropharynx case in an in-house fabricated head and neck phantom. The TPS computed buildup doses were compared with the corresponding measured doses in the phantom using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD 100). Analysis of dose distribution calculated using PBC and AAA shows an increase in gamma value in the dose buildup region indicating large dose deviation. For the surface areas of 1, 50 and 100 cm2, PBC overestimates doses as compared to AAA calculated value in the range of 1.34%-3.62% at 0.6 cm depth, 1.74%-2.96% at 0.4 cm depth, and 1.96%-4.06% at 0.2 cm depth, respectively. In high-dose buildup region, AAA calculated doses were lower by an average of -7.56% (SD = 4.73%), while PBC was overestimated by 3.75% (SD = 5.70%) as compared to TLD measured doses at 0.2 cm depth. However, at 0.4 and 0.6 cm depth, PBC overestimated TLD measured doses by 5.84% (SD = 4.38%) and 2.40% (SD = 4.63%), respectively, while AAA underestimated the TLD measured doses by -0.82% (SD = 4.24%) and -1.10% (SD = 4.14%) at the same respective depth. In low-dose buildup region, both AAA and PBC overestimated the TLD measured doses at all depths except -2.05% (SD = 10.21%) by AAA at 0.2 cm depth. The differences between AAA and PBC at all depths were statistically significant (p < 0.05) in high-dose buildup region, whereas it is not statistically significant in low-dose buildup region. In conclusion, AAA calculated the dose more accurately than PBC in clinically important high-dose buildup region at 0.4 cm and 0.6 cm depths. The use of an orfit cast increases the dose buildup

  2. Vacuolar ATPase in Phagosome-Lysosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kissing, Sandra; Hermsen, Christina; Repnik, Urska; Nesset, Cecilie Kåsi; von Bargen, Kristine; Griffiths, Gareth; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Lee, Beth S.; Schwake, Michael; De Brabander, Jef; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase) complex is instrumental in establishing and maintaining acidification of some cellular compartments, thereby ensuring their functionality. Recently it has been proposed that the transmembrane V0 sector of v-ATPase and its a-subunits promote membrane fusion in the endocytic and exocytic pathways independent of their acidification functions. Here, we tested if such a proton-pumping independent role of v-ATPase also applies to phagosome-lysosome fusion. Surprisingly, endo(lyso)somes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the V0 a3 subunit of the v-ATPase acidified normally, and endosome and lysosome marker proteins were recruited to phagosomes with similar kinetics in the presence or absence of the a3 subunit. Further experiments used macrophages with a knockdown of v-ATPase accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2) expression, resulting in a strongly reduced level of the V0 sector of the v-ATPase. However, acidification appeared undisturbed, and fusion between latex bead-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, as analyzed by electron microscopy, was even slightly enhanced, as was killing of non-pathogenic bacteria by V0 mutant macrophages. Pharmacologically neutralized lysosome pH did not affect maturation of phagosomes in mouse embryonic cells or macrophages. Finally, locking the two large parts of the v-ATPase complex together by the drug saliphenylhalamide A did not inhibit in vitro and in cellulo fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Hence, our data do not suggest a fusion-promoting role of the v-ATPase in the formation of phagolysosomes. PMID:25903133

  3. The emerging structure of vacuolar ATPases.

    PubMed

    Drory, Omri; Nelson, Nathan

    2006-10-01

    Bioenergetics and physiology of primary pumps have been revitalized by new insights into the mechanism of energizing biomembranes. Structural information is becoming available, and the three-dimensional structure of F-ATPase is being resolved. The growing understanding of the fundamental mechanism of energy coupling may revolutionize our view of biological processes. The F- and V-ATPases (vacuolar-type ATPase) exhibit a common mechanical design in which nucleotide-binding on the catalytic sector, through a cycle of conformation changes, drives the transmembrane passage of protons by turning a membrane-embedded rotor. This motor can run in forward or reverse directions, hydrolyzing ATP as it pumps protons uphill or creating ATP as protons flow downhill. In contrast to F-ATPases, whose primary function in eukaryotic cells is to form ATP at the expense of the proton-motive force (pmf), V-ATPases function exclusively as an ATP-dependent proton pump. The pmf generated by V-ATPases in organelles and membranes of eukaryotic cells is utilized as a driving force for numerous secondary transport processes. V- and F-ATPases have similar structure and mechanism of action, and several of their subunits evolved from common ancestors. Electron microscopy studies of V-ATPase revealed its general structure at low resolution. Recently, several structures of V-ATPase subunits, solved by X-ray crystallography with atomic resolution, were published. This, together with electron microscopy low-resolution maps of the whole complex, and biochemistry cross-linking experiments, allows construction of a structural model for a part of the complex that may be used as a working hypothesis for future research. PMID:16990452

  4. Characterization of vacuolar-ATPase and selective inhibition of vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase in osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, GuanFeng; Feng, HaoTian; Cai, YanLing; Qi, WeiLi; Kong, KangMei . E-mail: kangmeikong@21cn.com

    2007-06-15

    V-ATPase plays important roles in controlling the extra- and intra-cellular pH in eukaryotic cell, which is most crucial for cellular processes. V-ATPases are composed of a peripheral V{sub 1} domain responsible for ATP hydrolysis and integral V{sub 0} domain responsible for proton translocation. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells responsible for bone resorption and relate to many common lytic bone disorders such as osteoporosis, bone aseptic loosening, and tumor-induced bone loss. This review summarizes the structure and function of V-ATPase and its subunit, the role of V-ATPase subunits in osteoclast function, V-ATPase inhibitors for osteoclast function, and highlights the importance of V-ATPase as a potential prime target for anti-resorptive agents.

  5. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-05-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation.

  6. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae. PMID:16350755

  7. Regulation of the plasma membrane proton pump (H(+)-ATPase) by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Gray, William M; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    In plants and fungi, energetics at the plasma membrane is provided by a large protonmotive force (PMF) generated by the family of P-type ATPases specialized for proton transport (commonly called PM H(+)-ATPases or, in Arabidopsis, AHAs for Arabidopsis H(+)-ATPases). Studies have demonstrated that this 100-kDa protein is essential for plant growth and development. Posttranslational modifications of the H(+)-ATPase play crucial roles in its regulation. Phosphorylation of several Thr and Ser residues within the carboxy terminal regulatory domain composed of ∼100 amino acids change in response to environmental stimuli, endogenous hormones, and nutrient conditions. Recently developed mass spectrometric technologies provide a means to carefully quantify these changes in H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the different sites. These chemical modifications can then be genetically tested in planta by complementing the loss-of-function aha mutants with phosphomimetic mutations. Interestingly, recent data suggest that phosphatase-mediated changes in PM H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation are important in mediating auxin-regulated growth. Thus, as with another hormone (abscisic acid), dephosphorylation by phosphatases, rather than kinase mediated phosphorylation, may be an important focal point for regulation during plant signal transduction. Although interactions with other proteins have also been implicated in ATPase regulation, the very hydrophobic nature and high concentration of this polytopic protein presents special challenges in evaluating the biological significance of these interactions. Only by combining biochemical and genetic experiments can we attempt to meet these challenges to understand the essential molecular details by which this protein functions in planta. PMID:26476298

  8. The Mechanism of Cu+ Transport ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; McCann, Courtney J.; Argüello, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Cu+-ATPases are membrane proteins that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the efflux of cytoplasmic Cu+. In cells, soluble chaperone proteins bind and distribute cytoplasmic Cu+, delivering the ion to the transmembrane metal-binding sites in the ATPase. The structure of Legionella pneumophila Cu+-ATPase (Gourdon, P., Liu, X. Y., Skjørringe, T., Morth, J. P., Møller, L. B., Pedersen, B. P., and Nissen, P. (2011) Nature 475, 59–64) shows that a kinked transmembrane segment forms a “platform” exposed to the cytoplasm. In addition, neighboring invariant Met, Asp, and Glu are located at the “entrance” of the ion path. Mutations of amino acids in these regions of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cu+-ATPase CopA do not affect ATPase activity in the presence of Cu+ free in solution. However, Cu+ bound to the corresponding chaperone (CopZ) could not activate the mutated ATPases, and in parallel experiments, CopZ was unable to transfer Cu+ to CopA. Furthermore, mutation of a specific electronegative patch on the CopZ surface abolishes the ATPase activation and Cu+ transference, indicating that the region is required for the CopZ-CopA interaction. Moreover, the data suggest that the interaction is driven by the complementation of the electropositive platform in the ATPase and the electronegative Cu+ chaperone. This docking likely places the Cu+ proximal to the conserved carboxyl and thiol groups in the entrance site that induce metal release from the chaperone via ligand exchange. The initial interaction of Cu+ with the pump is transient because Cu+ is transferred from the entrance site to transmembrane metal-binding sites involved in transmembrane translocation. PMID:23184962

  9. Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy for three-dimensional analysis of morphological changes in mitochondria regulated by Cdc48p/p97 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru; Murata, Kazuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Cdc48p is a highly conserved cytosolic AAA chaperone that is involved in a wide range of cellular processes. It consists of two ATPase domains (D1 and D2), with regulatory regions at the N- and C-terminals. We have recently shown that Cdc48p regulates mitochondrial morphology, in that a loss of the ATPase activity or positive cooperativity in the D2 domain leads to severe fragmentations and aggregations of mitochondria in the cytoplasm. We have now used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), an advanced three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopic technique to examine the structures and morphological changes of mitochondria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that mutants lacking ATPase activity of Cdc48p showed mitochondrial fragmentations and aggregations, without fusion of the outer membrane. This suggests that the ATPase activity of Cdc48p is necessary for fusion of the outer membranes of mitochondria. Our results also show that SBF-SEM has considerable advantages in morphological and quantitative studies on organelles and intracellular structures in entire cells. PMID:24893221

  10. Role of the D1-D2 Linker of Human VCP/p97 in the Asymmetry and ATPase Activity of the D1-domain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Kwan; Xia, Di

    2016-01-01

    Human AAA+ protein p97 consists of an N-domain and two tandem ATPase domains D1 and D2, which are connected by the N-D1 and the D1-D2 linkers. Inclusion of the D1-D2 linker, a 22-amino acid peptide, at the end of p97 N-D1 truncate has been shown to activate ATP hydrolysis of its D1-domain, although the mechanism of activation remains unclear. Here, we identify the N-terminal half of this linker, highly conserved from human to fungi, is essential for the ATPase activation. By analyzing available crystal structures, we observed that the D1-D2 linker is capable of inducing asymmetry in subunit association into a p97 hexamer. This observation is reinforced by two new crystal structures, determined in the present work. The effect of D1-D2 linker on the ATPase activity of the D1-domain is correlated to the side-chain conformation of residue R359, a trans-acting arginine-finger residue essential for ATP hydrolysis of the D1-domain. The activation in D1-domain ATPase activity by breaking perfect six-fold symmetry implies functional importance of asymmetric association of p97 subunits, the extent of which can be determined quantitatively by the metric Asymmetric Index. PMID:26818443

  11. First crystal structures of Na+,K+-ATPase: new light on the oldest ion pump.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Chikashi; Kanai, Ryuta; Cornelius, Flemming

    2011-12-01

    Na(+),K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (NKA) is the first P-type ion translocating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) ever identified, and the significance of this class of proteins was highlighted by the 1997 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Jens C. Skou for the discovery in 1957. More than half a century passed between the initial identification and the publication of a high-resolution crystal structure of NKA. Although the new crystal structures provided many surprises and insights, structural biology on this system remains challenging, as NKA is a very difficult protein to crystallize. Here we explain the reasons behind the challenges, introduce a mechanism that governs the function, and summarize current knowledge of NKA structure in comparison with another member of the P-type ATPase family, Ca(2+)-ATPase. PMID:22153495

  12. An α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex in astrocytes triggers non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Barowski, Jessica; Ravits, John; Siddique, Teepu; Lingrel, Jerry B; Robertson, Janice; Steen, Hanno; Bonni, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of astrocytes trigger neurodegeneration in several diseases, but the glial cell–intrinsic mechanisms that induce neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. We found that a protein complex of α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin was enriched in astrocytes expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knockdown of α2-Na/K ATPase or α-adducin in mutant SOD1 astrocytes protected motor neurons from degeneration, including in mutant SOD1 mice in vivo. Heterozygous disruption of the α2-Na/K ATPase gene suppressed degeneration in vivo and increased the lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. The pharmacological agent digoxin, which inhibits Na/K ATPase activity, protected motor neurons from mutant SOD1 astrocyte–induced degeneration. Notably, α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin were upregulated in spinal cord of sporadic and familial ALS patients. Collectively, our findings define chronic activation of the α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex as a critical glial cell–intrinsic mechanism of non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration, with implications for potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25344630

  13. An α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex in astrocytes triggers non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Barowski, Jessica; Ravits, John; Siddique, Teepu; Lingrel, Jerry B; Robertson, Janice; Steen, Hanno; Bonni, Azad

    2014-12-01

    Perturbations of astrocytes trigger neurodegeneration in several diseases, but the glial cell-intrinsic mechanisms that induce neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. We found that a protein complex of α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin was enriched in astrocytes expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knockdown of α2-Na/K ATPase or α-adducin in mutant SOD1 astrocytes protected motor neurons from degeneration, including in mutant SOD1 mice in vivo. Heterozygous disruption of the α2-Na/K ATPase gene suppressed degeneration in vivo and increased the lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. The pharmacological agent digoxin, which inhibits Na/K ATPase activity, protected motor neurons from mutant SOD1 astrocyte-induced degeneration. Notably, α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin were upregulated in spinal cord of sporadic and familial ALS patients. Collectively, our findings define chronic activation of the α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex as a critical glial cell-intrinsic mechanism of non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration, with implications for potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25344630

  14. The structure of the Na+,K+-ATPase and mapping of isoform differences and disease-related mutations

    PubMed Central

    Morth, J. Preben; Poulsen, Hanne; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads S.; Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Egebjerg, Jan; Andersen, Jens Peter; Vilsen, Bente; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The Na+,K+-ATPase transforms the energy of ATP to the maintenance of steep electrochemical gradients for sodium and potassium across the plasma membrane. This activity is tissue specific, in particular due to variations in the expressions of the alpha subunit isoforms one through four. Several mutations in alpha2 and 3 have been identified that link the specific function of the Na+,K+-ATPase to the pathophysiology of neurological diseases such as rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and familial hemiplegic migraine type 2. We show a mapping of the isoform differences and the disease-related mutations on the recently determined crystal structure of the pig renal Na+,K+-ATPase and a structural comparison to Ca2+-ATPase. Furthermore, we present new experimental data that address the role of a stretch of three conserved arginines near the C-terminus of the alpha subunit (Arg1003–Arg1005). PMID:18957371

  15. Regulation of V-ATPase assembly and function of V-ATPases in tumor cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Christina; Cotter, Kristina; Stransky, Laura; Forgac, Michael

    2016-08-01

    V-ATPases are ATP-driven proton pumps that function within both intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane in a wide array of normal physiological and pathophysiological processes. V-ATPases are composed of a peripheral V(1) domain that hydrolyzes ATP and an integral V(0) domain that transports protons. Regulated assembly of the V-ATPase represents an important mechanism of regulating V-ATPase activity in response to a number of environmental cues. Our laboratory has demonstrated that glucose-dependent assembly of the V-ATPase complex in yeast is controlled by the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway. By contrast, increased assembly of the V-ATPase during dendritic cell maturation involves the PI-3 kinase and mTORC1 pathways. Recently, we have shown that amino acids regulate V-ATPase assembly in mammalian cells, possibly as a means to maintain adequate levels of amino acids upon nutrient starvation. V-ATPases have also been implicated in cancer cell survival and invasion. V-ATPases are targeted to different cellular membranes by isoforms of subunit a, with a3 targeting V-ATPases to the plasma membrane of osteoclasts. We have shown that highly invasive human breast cancer cell lines express higher levels of the a3 isoform than poorly invasive lines and that knockdown of a3 reduces both expression of V-ATPases at the plasma membrane and in vitro invasion of breast tumor cells. Moreover, overexpression of a3 in a non-invasive breast epithelial line increases both plasma membrane V-ATPases and in vitro invasion. Finally, specific ablation of plasma membrane V-ATPases in highly invasive human breast cancer cells using either an antibody or small molecule approach inhibits both in vitro invasion and migration. These results suggest that plasma membrane and a3-containing V-ATPases represent a novel and important target in the development of therapeutics to limit breast cancer metastasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics

  16. Is the Paracoccus halodenitrificans ATPase a chimeric enzyme?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.

    1996-01-01

    Membranes from Paracoccus halodenitrificans contain an ATPase that is most active in the absence of NaCl. The most unusual characteristic of the enzyme is its pattern of sensitivity to various inhibitors. Azide and rhodamine 6G, inhibitors of F1F0-ATPases, inhibit ATP hydrolysis as do bafilomycin A1, concanamycin A (folimycin), N-ethylmaleimide, and p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonate which are inhibitors of vacuolar ATPases. This indiscriminate sensitivity suggests that this ATPase may be a hybrid and that caution should be exercised when using inhibition as a diagnostic for distinguishing between F1F0-ATPases and vacuolar ATPases.

  17. MAP-1 and IAP-1, two novel AAA proteases with catalytic sites on opposite membrane surfaces in mitochondrial inner membrane of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Klanner, C; Prokisch, H; Langer, T

    2001-09-01

    Eukaryotic AAA proteases form a conserved family of membrane-embedded ATP-dependent proteases but have been analyzed functionally only in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we have identified two novel members of this protein family in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, which were termed MAP-1 and IAP-1. Both proteins are localized to the inner membrane of mitochondria. They are part of two similar-sized high molecular mass complexes, but expose their catalytic sites to opposite membrane surfaces, namely, the intermembrane and the matrix space. Disruption of iap-1 by repeat-induced point mutation caused a slow growth phenotype at high temperature and stabilization of a misfolded inner membrane protein against degradation. IAP-1 could partially substitute for functions of its yeast homolog Yme1, demonstrating functional conservation. However, respiratory growth at 37 degrees C was not restored. Our results identify two components of the quality control system of the mitochondrial inner membrane in N. crassa and suggest that AAA proteases with catalytic sites exposed to opposite membrane surfaces are present in mitochondria of all eukaryotic cells. PMID:11553723

  18. Anonymous Communication Policies for the Internet: Results and Recommendations of the AAAS Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Al; Frankel, Mark S.; Kling, Rob; Lee, Yaching

    1999-01-01

    Reports the results of a conference on the Internet and anonymous communication organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Discusses how anonymous communications can be shaped by the law, education, and public awareness, and highlights the importance of involving all affected interests in policy development.…

  19. ATPases, ion exchangers and human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Arias, Rubén D; Vívenes, Carmen Y; Camejo, María I; Piñero, Sandy; Proverbio, Teresa; Martínez, Elizabeth; Marín, Reinaldo; Proverbio, Fulgencio

    2015-05-01

    Human sperm has several mechanisms to control its ionic milieu, such as the Na,K-ATPase (NKA), the Ca-ATPase of the plasma membrane (PMCA), the Na(+)/Ca(2) (+)-exchanger (NCX) and the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE). On the other hand, the dynein-ATPase is the intracellular motor for sperm motility. In this work, we evaluated NKA, PMCA, NHE, NCX and dynein-ATPase activities in human sperm and investigated their correlation with sperm motility. Sperm motility was measured by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis. It was found that the NKA activity is inhibited by ouabain with two Ki (7.9 × 10(-9) and 9.8 × 10(-5) M), which is consistent with the presence of two isoforms of α subunit of the NKA in the sperm plasma membranes (α1 and α4), being α4 more sensitive to ouabain. The decrease in NKA activity is associated with a reduction in sperm motility. In addition, sperm motility was evaluated in the presence of known inhibitors of NHE, PMCA and NCX, such as amiloride, eosin, and KB-R7943, respectively, as well as in the presence of nigericin after incubation with ouabain. Amiloride, eosin and KB-R7943 significantly reduced sperm motility. Nigericin reversed the effect of ouabain and amiloride on sperm motility. Dynein-ATPase activity was inhibited by acidic pH and micromolar concentrations of Ca(2) (+). We explain our results in terms of inhibition of the dynein-ATPase in the presence of higher cytosolic H(+) and Ca(2) (+), and therefore inhibition of sperm motility. PMID:25820902

  20. The sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase: design of a perfect chemi-osmotic pump.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jesper V; Olesen, Claus; Winther, Anne-Marie L; Nissen, Poul

    2010-11-01

    The sarcoplasmic (SERCA 1a) Ca2+-ATPase is a membrane protein abundantly present in skeletal muscles where it functions as an indispensable component of the excitation-contraction coupling, being at the expense of ATP hydrolysis involved in Ca2+/H+ exchange with a high thermodynamic efficiency across the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. The transporter serves as a prototype of a whole family of cation transporters, the P-type ATPases, which in addition to Ca2+ transporting proteins count Na+, K+-ATPase and H+, K+-, proton- and heavy metal transporting ATPases as prominent members. The ability in recent years to produce and analyze at atomic (2·3-3 Å) resolution 3D-crystals of Ca2+-transport intermediates of SERCA 1a has meant a breakthrough in our understanding of the structural aspects of the transport mechanism. We describe here the detailed construction of the ATPase in terms of one membraneous and three cytosolic domains held together by a central core that mediates coupling between Ca2+-transport and ATP hydrolysis. During turnover, the pump is present in two different conformational states, E1 and E2, with a preference for the binding of Ca2+ and H+, respectively. We discuss how phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of these conformational states with cytosolic, occluded or luminally exposed cation-binding sites are able to convert the chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into an electrochemical gradient of Ca2+ across the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. In conjunction with these basic reactions which serve as a structural framework for the transport function of other P-type ATPases as well, we also review the role of the lipid phase and the regulatory and thermodynamic aspects of the transport mechanism. PMID:20809990

  1. Aurora kinase A activates the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in kidney carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Bataineh, Mohammad M; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; Ho, Pei-Yin; Marciszyn, Allison L; Gong, Fan; Li, Hui; Hallows, Kenneth R; Pastor-Soler, Núria M

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular proton-secreting transport systems that contribute to extracellular pH include the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). This pump, which mediates ATP-driven transport of H(+) across membranes, is involved in metastasis. We previously showed (Alzamora R, Thali RF, Gong F, Smolak C, Li H, Baty CJ, Bertrand CA, Auchli Y, Brunisholz RA, Neumann D, Hallows KR, Pastor-Soler NM. J Biol Chem 285: 24676-24685, 2010) that V-ATPase A subunit phosphorylation at Ser-175 is important for PKA-induced V-ATPase activity at the membrane of kidney intercalated cells. However, Ser-175 is also located within a larger phosphorylation consensus sequence for Aurora kinases, which are known to phosphorylate proteins that contribute to the pathogenesis of metastatic carcinomas. We thus hypothesized that Aurora kinase A (AURKA), overexpressed in aggressive carcinomas, regulates the V-ATPase in human kidney carcinoma cells (Caki-2) via Ser-175 phosphorylation. We found that AURKA is abnormally expressed in Caki-2 cells, where it binds the V-ATPase A subunit in an AURKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. Treatment with the AURKA activator anacardic acid increased V-ATPase expression and activity at the plasma membrane of Caki-2 cells. In addition, AURKA phosphorylates the V-ATPase A subunit at Ser-175 in vitro and in Caki-2 cells. Immunolabeling revealed that anacardic acid induced marked membrane accumulation of the V-ATPase A subunit in transfected Caki-2 cells. However, anacardic acid failed to induce membrane accumulation of a phosphorylation-deficient Ser-175-to-Ala (S175A) A subunit mutant. Finally, S175A-expressing cells had decreased migration in a wound-healing assay compared with cells expressing wild-type or a phospho-mimetic Ser-175-to-Asp (S175D) mutant A subunit. We conclude that AURKA activates the V-ATPase in kidney carcinoma cells via phosphorylation of Ser-175 in the V-ATPase A subunit. This regulation contributes to kidney carcinoma V-ATPase-mediated extracellular

  2. Sans study of spinach CF 1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmettes, P.; Girault, G.; Berger, G.; Galmiche, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    SANS experiments were performed on solutions of spinach chloroplast CF 1-ATPase in heavy water. Removal of the ɛ subunit partially activates the enzyme and further addition of dithiothreitol fully activates it. Molar masses and gyration radii values are given for these different conditions.

  3. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-sensitive ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    Membranes from Halobacterium saccharovorum contained a cryptic ATPase which required Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) and was activated by Triton X-100. The optimal pH for ATP hydrolysis was 9-10. ATP or GTP were hydrolyzed at the same rate while ITP, CTP, and UTP were hydrolyzed at about half that rate. The products of ATP hydrolysis were ADP and phosphate. The ATPase required high concentrations (3.5 M) of NaCl for maximum activity. ADP was a competitive inhibitor of the activity, with an apparent Ki of 50 micro-M. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) inhibited ATP hydrolysis. The inhibition was marginal at the optimum pH of the enzyme. When the ATPase was preincubated with DCCD at varying pH values, but assayed at the optimal pH for activity, DCCD inhibition was observed to increase with increasing acidity of the preincubation medium. DCCD inhibition was also dependent on time of preincubation, and protein and DCCD concentrations. When preincubated at pH 6.0 for 4 h at a protein:DCCD ratio of 40 (w/w), ATPase activity was inhibited 90 percent.

  4. Structure of Yin Yang 1 Oligomers That Cooperate with RuvBL1-RuvBL2 ATPases*

    PubMed Central

    López-Perrote, Andrés; Alatwi, Hanan E.; Torreira, Eva; Ismail, Amani; Ayora, Silvia; Downs, Jessica A.; Llorca, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a transcription factor regulating proliferation and differentiation and is involved in cancer development. Oligomers of recombinant YY1 have been observed before, but their structure and DNA binding properties are not well understood. Here we find that YY1 assembles several homo-oligomeric species built from the association of a bell-shaped dimer, a process we characterized by electron microscopy. Moreover, we find that YY1 self-association also occurs in vivo using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Unexpectedly, these oligomers recognize several DNA substrates without the consensus sequence for YY1 in vitro, and DNA binding is enhanced in the presence of RuvBL1-RuvBL2, two essential AAA+ ATPases. YY1 oligomers bind RuvBL1-RuvBL2 hetero-oligomeric complexes, but YY1 interacts preferentially with RuvBL1. Collectively, these findings suggest that YY1-RuvBL1-RuvBL2 complexes could contribute to functions beyond transcription, and we show that YY1 and the ATPase activity of RuvBL2 are required for RAD51 foci formation during homologous recombination. PMID:24990942

  5. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases. PMID:20037196

  6. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  7. Multiple sequence signals direct recognition and degradation of protein substrates by the AAA+ protease HslUV.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Shankar; McGinness, Kathleen E; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2010-10-29

    Proteolysis is important for protein quality control and for the proper regulation of many intracellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Discerning substrates from other cellular proteins is a key aspect of proteolytic function. The Escherichia coli HslUV protease is a member of a major family of ATP-dependent AAA+ degradation machines. HslU hexamers recognize and unfold native protein substrates and then translocate the polypeptide into the degradation chamber of the HslV peptidase. Although a wealth of structural information is available for this system, relatively little is known about mechanisms of substrate recognition. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of two model substrates alter HslUV recognition and degradation kinetics, including changes in V(max). By introducing N- or C-terminal sequences that serve as recognition sites for specific peptide-binding proteins, we show that blocking either terminus of the substrate interferes with HslUV degradation, with synergistic effects when both termini are obstructed. These results support a model in which one terminus of the substrate is tethered to the protease and the other terminus is engaged by the translocation/unfolding machinery in the HslU pore. Thus, degradation appears to consist of discrete steps, which involve the interaction of different terminal sequence signals in the substrate with different receptor sites in the HslUV protease. PMID:20837023

  8. Children with ANSD fitted with hearing aids applying the AAA Pediatric Amplification Guideline: Current Practice and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Roush, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 15% of children with permanent hearing loss have auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD), which involves normal outer hair cell function and disordered afferent neural activity in the auditory nerve or brainstem. Given the varying presentations of ANSD in children, there is a need for more evidence-based research on appropriate clinical interventions for this population. Purpose This study compared the speech production, speech perception, and language outcomes of children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) who are hard of hearing and children with similar degrees of mild to moderately-severe sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), all of whom were fitted with bilateral hearing aids based on the American Academy of Audiology (AAA) pediatric amplification guidelines. Research design Speech perception and communication outcomes data were gathered in a prospective accelerated longitudinal design, with entry into the study between six months and seven years of age. Three sites were involved in participant recruitment: Boys Town National Research Hospital, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Iowa. Study sample: The sample consisted of 12 children with ANSD and 22 children with SNHL. The groups were matched based on better-ear pure-tone average, better-ear aided speech intelligibility index, gender, maternal education level, and newborn hearing screening result (i.e., pass or refer). Data collection and analysis Children and their families participated in an initial baseline visit, followed by visits twice a year for children under age 2 years and once a year for children older than 2 years. Paired-sample t-tests were used to compare children with ANSD to children with SNHL. Results Paired t-tests indicated no significant differences between the ANSD and SNHL groups on language and articulation measures. Children with ANSD displayed functional speech perception skills in quiet. Although the number of

  9. A Statistical Comparison of the AAA Asteroids with the other Asteroid Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostolansky, E.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a statistical comparison of the AAA (Apollo-Amor-Aten) asteroids with the other asteroid populations is presented and discussed. For the analysis the database of the osculating orbital elements (Epoch = 2451200.5) of the 47098 asteroids (February 1999) provided at the Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona, U.S.A was used. Two kinds of distributions are presented: (1) The frequency distributions of the orbital elements e, i, omega, OMEGA and absolute magnitude H; (2) The distributions like a vs. e, H vs. i and H vs. r MIN, where r MIN is the minimum distance between the orbits of the Earth and an asteroid. The analysis was aimed to study some special features of the AAA asteroid population like its spatial distribution and size of tile asteroids in it and to compare them with the other groups of asteroids.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the

  11. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara R; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-06-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn(181) and Asn(231) Whereas mutation of Asn(231) seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn(181) disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys(86) and Cys(107) compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys(158) and Cys(172) has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  12. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sara R.; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G.; López-Marqués, Rosa L.

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn181 and Asn231. Whereas mutation of Asn231 seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn181 disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys86 and Cys107 compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys158 and Cys172 has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  13. Vacuolar ATPase depletion affects mitochondrial ATPase function, kinetoplast dependency, and drug sensitivity in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicola; Hamilton, Graham; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Barrett, Michael P; Horn, David

    2015-07-21

    Kinetoplastid parasites cause lethal diseases in humans and animals. The kinetoplast itself contains the mitochondrial genome, comprising a huge, complex DNA network that is also an important drug target. Isometamidium, for example, is a key veterinary drug that accumulates in the kinetoplast in African trypanosomes. Kinetoplast independence and isometamidium resistance are observed where certain mutations in the F1-γ-subunit of the two-sector F1Fo-ATP synthase allow for Fo-independent generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential. To further explore kinetoplast biology and drug resistance, we screened a genome-scale RNA interference library in African trypanosomes for isometamidium resistance mechanisms. Our screen identified 14 V-ATPase subunits and all 4 adaptin-3 subunits, implicating acidic compartment defects in resistance; V-ATPase acidifies lysosomes and related organelles, whereas adaptin-3 is responsible for trafficking among these organelles. Independent strains with depleted V-ATPase or adaptin-3 subunits were isometamidium resistant, and chemical inhibition of the V-ATPase phenocopied this effect. While drug accumulation in the kinetoplast continued after V-ATPase subunit depletion, acriflavine-induced kinetoplast loss was specifically tolerated in these cells and in cells depleted for adaptin-3 or endoplasmic reticulum membrane complex subunits, also identified in our screen. Consistent with kinetoplast dispensability, V-ATPase defective cells were oligomycin resistant, suggesting ATP synthase uncoupling and bypass of the normal Fo-A6-subunit requirement; this subunit is the only kinetoplast-encoded product ultimately required for viability in bloodstream-form trypanosomes. Thus, we describe 30 genes and 3 protein complexes associated with kinetoplast-dependent growth. Mutations affecting these genes could explain natural cases of dyskinetoplasty and multidrug resistance. Our results also reveal potentially conserved communication between the

  14. Indications for and outcome of open AAA repair in the endovascular era.

    PubMed

    Wieker, Carola M; Spazier, Max; Böckler, Dittmar

    2016-04-01

    The benefits, safety and efficacy of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is well documented and intensively reported in multiple randomized trials and meta-analysis. Therefore, EVAR became the first choice of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) treatment in almost 70-100% of patients. Consecutively, open repair (OR) is performed less frequently in morphologically preselected patients. Anatomical condition remains the most important factor for indication for OR. Especially unfavorable intrarenal landing zone based on difficult neck anatomy like very short neck or excessive neck angulation is still the most predictive factor. Furthermore, patients presenting additional iliac aneurysms, aortoiliac occlusive disease or variations of renal arteries are recommended for OR. Randomized trials like EVAR 1, DREAM and OVER from the year 2004/2005 and 2009 showed lower 30-day mortality rates in EVAR compared to OR. However, the late mortality rates after two years became equal in both treatment options. Furthermore, reinterventions after EVAR occur more frequently than after OR. Analysis from our own data showed a higher 30-day mortality in the patients who underwent OR in the endovascular era (15% vs. 2.5%), however the number of emergency open AAA repair because of ruptured aneurysms was much higher in the endovascular era (32.5% vs. 5%). In conclusion, treatment of AAA has changed in the past decade. Nevertheless OR of AAA still remains as a safe and durable method in experienced surgeons, even in the endovascular era. High volume centres are needed to offer the best patients' treatment providing the best postoperative outcome. Therefore OR must remain a part of fellowship training in the future. To decide the best treatment option many facts like patients' fitness and preference or finally the anatomic suitability for endovascular repair have to be considered. PMID:26822580

  15. Mechanochemical basis of protein degradation by a double-ring AAA+ machine.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Adrian O; Nager, Andrew R; Iosefson, Ohad; Sauer, Robert T; Baker, Tania A

    2014-10-01

    Molecular machines containing double or single AAA+ rings power energy-dependent protein degradation and other critical cellular processes, including disaggregation and remodeling of macromolecular complexes. How the mechanical activities of double-ring and single-ring AAA+ enzymes differ is unknown. Using single-molecule optical trapping, we determine how the double-ring ClpA enzyme from Escherichia coli, in complex with the ClpP peptidase, mechanically degrades proteins. We demonstrate that ClpA unfolds some protein substrates substantially faster than does the single-ring ClpX enzyme, which also degrades substrates in collaboration with ClpP. We find that ClpA is a slower polypeptide translocase and that it moves in physical steps that are smaller and more regular than steps taken by ClpX. These direct measurements of protein unfolding and translocation define the core mechanochemical behavior of a double-ring AAA+ machine and provide insight into the degradation of proteins that unfold via metastable intermediates. PMID:25195048

  16. Assaying the kinetics of protein denaturation catalyzed by AAA+ unfolding machines and proteases.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-04-28

    ATP-dependent molecular machines of the AAA+ superfamily unfold or remodel proteins in all cells. For example, AAA+ ClpX and ClpA hexamers collaborate with the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase to unfold and degrade specific proteins in bacteria and some eukaryotic organelles. Although degradation assays are straightforward, robust methods to assay the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding in the absence of proteolysis have been lacking. Here, we describe a FRET-based assay in which enzymatic unfolding converts a mixture of donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled homodimers into heterodimers. In this assay, ClpX is a more efficient protein-unfolding machine than ClpA both kinetically and in terms of ATP consumed. However, ClpP enhances the mechanical activities of ClpA substantially, and ClpAP degrades the dimeric substrate faster than ClpXP. When ClpXP or ClpAP engage the dimeric subunit, one subunit is actively unfolded and degraded, whereas the other subunit is passively unfolded by loss of its partner and released. This assay should be broadly applicable for studying the mechanisms of AAA+ proteases and remodeling chaperones. PMID:25870262

  17. Hypolipidaemic and antioxidant effects of fruits of Musa AAA (Chenkadali) in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kaimal, Smitha; Sujatha, K S; George, Sisilamma

    2010-02-01

    Hypolipidaemic and antioxidant effects of ethanol extract of mature green fruits of Musa AAA (Chenkadali) was evaluated in alloxan induced diabetic rats. The effect of extract at two doses, 500 mg/kg body weight and 1000 mg/kg body weight was analysed and compared with a standard drug, glibenclamide. Rats administered with alloxan showed significantly increased levels of serum triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and alanine amino transferase (ALT) activity. Lipid peroxides increased significantly while reduced glutathione (GSH) decreased considerably in liver and pancreas. Oral administration of the ethanol extract of fruits of Musa AAA (Chenkadali) significantly decreased the levels of serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol and ALT activity. Significant decrease was also observed in the level of lipid peroxides while GSH content increased substantially in liver and pancreas. The effect was dose independent and rats treated with 500 mg/kg body weight showed comparable levels of serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, ALT activity and liver lipid peroxides to that of normal control and glibenclamide treated groups. Although, there was no significant difference, treatment with 500 mg/kg body weight of the extract showed a higher content of GSH and lower level of lipid peroxides in pancreas compared with glibenclamide. Histopathological examination of pancreas and liver revealed regeneration of islet cells and hepatocytes respectively, which correlate with the biochemical findings. The present study shows that ethanol extract of mature green fruits of Musa AAA (Chenkadali) has antioxidant and hypolipidaemic properties and may be used for treating diabetes mellitus. PMID:20455326

  18. The parietal cell gastric H, K-ATPase also functions as the Na, K-ATPase and Ca-ATPase in altered states.

    PubMed

    Ray, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    This article offers an explanation for the apparent lack of Na, K-ATPase activity in parietal cells although ouabain has been known to inhibit gastric acid secretion since 1962. The gastric H, K-ATPase (proton-pump) seems to be acting in altered states, thus behaving like a Na, K-ATPase (Na-pump) and/or Ca-ATPase (Ca-pump) depending on cellular needs.  This conclusion is based on the following findings. First, parietal cell fractions do not exhibit Na, K-ATPase activity at pH 7.0 but do at pH 8.5. Second, the apical plasma membrane (APM) fraction exhibits a (Ca or Mg)-ATPase activity with negligible H, K-ATPase activity. However, when assayed with Mg alone in presence of the 80 k Da cytosolic proton-pump activator (HAF), the APM fraction reveals remarkably high H, K-ATPase activity, suggesting the observed low affinity of Ca (or Mg)-ATPase is an altered state of the latter. Third, calcium (between 1 and 4 µM) shows both stimulation and inhibition of the HAF-stimulated H, K-ATPase depending on its concentration, revealing a close interaction between the  proton-pump activator and local Ca concentration in gastric H, K-ATPase function. Such interactions suggest that Ca is acting as a terminal member of the intracellular signaling system for the HAF-regulated proton-pump. It appears that during resting state, the HAF-associated H, K-ATPase remains inhibited by Ca (>1 µM) and, prior to resumption of acid secretion the gastric H, K-ATPase acts temporarily as a Ca-pump for removing excess Ca from its immediate environment. This conclusion is consistent with the recent reports of immunochemical co-localization of the gastric H, K-ATPase and Ca-ATPase by superimposition in parietal cells, and a transitory efflux of Ca immediately preceding the onset of acid secretion. These new perspectives on proton-pump function would open new avenues for a fuller understanding of the intracellular regulation of the ubiquitous Na-pump. PMID:24555080

  19. The parietal cell gastric H, K-ATPase also functions as the Na, K-ATPase and Ca-ATPase in altered states

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    This article offers an explanation for the apparent lack of Na, K-ATPase activity in parietal cells although ouabain has been known to inhibit gastric acid secretion since 1962. The gastric H, K-ATPase (proton-pump) seems to be acting in altered states, thus behaving like a Na, K-ATPase (Na-pump) and/or Ca-ATPase (Ca-pump) depending on cellular needs.  This conclusion is based on the following findings. First, parietal cell fractions do not exhibit Na, K-ATPase activity at pH 7.0 but do at pH 8.5. Second, the apical plasma membrane (APM) fraction exhibits a (Ca or Mg)-ATPase activity with negligible H, K-ATPase activity. However, when assayed with Mg alone in presence of the 80 k Da cytosolic proton-pump activator (HAF), the APM fraction reveals remarkably high H, K-ATPase activity, suggesting the observed low affinity of Ca (or Mg)-ATPase is an altered state of the latter. Third, calcium (between 1 and 4 µM) shows both stimulation and inhibition of the HAF-stimulated H, K-ATPase depending on its concentration, revealing a close interaction between the  proton-pump activator and local Ca concentration in gastric H, K-ATPase function. Such interactions suggest that Ca is acting as a terminal member of the intracellular signaling system for the HAF-regulated proton-pump. It appears that during resting state, the HAF-associated H, K-ATPase remains inhibited by Ca (>1 µM) and, prior to resumption of acid secretion the gastric H, K-ATPase acts temporarily as a Ca-pump for removing excess Ca from its immediate environment. This conclusion is consistent with the recent reports of immunochemical co-localization of the gastric H, K-ATPase and Ca-ATPase by superimposition in parietal cells, and a transitory efflux of Ca immediately preceding the onset of acid secretion. These new perspectives on proton-pump function would open new avenues for a fuller understanding of the intracellular regulation of the ubiquitous Na-pump. PMID:24555080

  20. Redox Activation of the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF by Thioredoxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Hannemann, Liya; Suppanz, Ida; Ba, Qiaorui; MacInnes, Katherine; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: YchF/Ola1 are unconventional members of the universally conserved GTPase family because they preferentially hydrolyze ATP rather than GTP. These ATPases have been associated with various cellular processes and pathologies, including DNA repair, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. In particular, a possible role in regulating the oxidative stress response has been suggested for both bacterial and human YchF/Ola1. In this study, we analyzed how YchF responds to oxidative stress and how it potentially regulates the antioxidant response. Results: Our data identify a redox-regulated monomer–dimer equilibrium of YchF as a key event in the functional cycle of YchF. Upon oxidative stress, the oxidation of a conserved and surface-exposed cysteine residue promotes YchF dimerization, which is accompanied by inhibition of the ATPase activity. No dimers were observed in a YchF mutant lacking this cysteine. In vitro, the YchF dimer is dissociated by thioredoxin 1 (TrxA) and this stimulates the ATPase activity. The physiological significance of the YchF-thioredoxin 1 interaction was demonstrated by in vivo cross-linking, which validated this interaction in living cells. This approach also revealed that both the ATPase domain and the helical domain of YchF are in contact with TrxA. Innovation: YchF/Ola1 are the first redox-regulated members of the universally conserved GTPase family and are inactivated by oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue within the nucleotide-binding motif. Conclusion: Our data provide novel insights into the regulation of the so far ill-defined YchF/Ola1 family of proteins and stipulate their role as negative regulators of the oxidative stress response. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 141–156. PMID:26160547

  1. Computational Classification of P-Type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Dan; Knudsen, Michael; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of sequence data is inevitable in modern molecular biology, and important information about for example proteins can be inferred efficiently using computational methods. Here, we explain how to use the information in freely available databases together with computational methods for classification and motif detection to assess whether a protein sequence corresponds to a P-type ATPase (and if so, which subtype) or not. PMID:26695056

  2. The Use of Metal Fluoride Compounds as Phosphate Analogs for Understanding the Structural Mechanism in P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Danko, Stefania J; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound protein family, P-type ATPases, couples ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across the membrane and forms an obligatory auto-phosphorylated intermediate in the transport cycle. The metal fluoride compounds, BeF x , AlF x , and MgF x , as phosphate analogs stabilize different enzyme structural states in the phosphoryl transfer/hydrolysis reactions, thereby fixing otherwise short-lived intermediate and transient structural states and enabling their biochemical and atomic-level crystallographic studies. The compounds thus make an essential contribution for understanding of the ATP-driven transport mechanism. Here, with a representative member of P-type ATPase, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), we describe the method for their binding and for structural and functional characterization of the bound states, and their assignments to states occurring in the transport cycle. PMID:26695034

  3. Multiple modes of regulation of the human Ino80 SNF2 ATPase by subunits of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    SNF2 family ATPases are ATP-dependent motors that often function in multisubunit complexes to regulate chromatin structure. Although the central role of SNF2 ATPases in chromatin biology is well established, mechanisms by which their catalytic activities are regulated by additional subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes are less well understood. Here we present evidence that the human Inositol auxotrophy 80 (Ino80) SNF2 ATPase is subject to regulation at multiple levels in the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex. The zinc finger histidine triad domain-containing protein Ies2 (Ino Eighty Subunit 2) functions as a potent activator of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the Ino80 ATPase, whereas the YL-1 family Ies6 (Ino Eighty Subunit 6) and actin-related Arp5 proteins function together to promote binding of the Ino80 ATPase to nucleosomes. These findings support the idea that both substrate recognition and the intrinsic catalytic activities of SNF2 ATPases have evolved as important sites for their regulation. PMID:24297934

  4. The Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain of Ribosome Assembly Factor Ytm1 and Characterization of Its Interaction with the AAA-ATPase Midasin.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of eukaryotic ribosomes is a complex, energetically demanding process requiring the aid of numerous non-ribosomal factors, such as the PeBoW complex. The mammalian PeBoW complex, composed of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12, is essential for the processing of the 32S preribosomal RNA. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that release of the homologous proteins in this complex (Nop7, Erb1, and Ytm1, respectively) from preribosomal particles requires Rea1 (midasin or MDN1 in humans), a large dynein-like protein. Midasin contains a C-terminal metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) domain that interacts with the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Ytm1/WDR12 as well as the UBL domain of Rsa4/Nle1 in a later step in the ribosome maturation pathway. Here we present the crystal structure of the UBL domain of the WDR12 homologue from S. cerevisiae at 1.7 Å resolution and demonstrate that human midasin binds to WDR12 as well as Nle1 through their respective UBL domains. Midasin contains a well conserved extension region upstream of the MIDAS domain required for binding WDR12 and Nle1, and the interaction is dependent upon metal ion coordination because removal of the metal or mutation of residues that coordinate the metal ion diminishes the interaction. Mammalian WDR12 displays prominent nucleolar localization that is dependent upon active ribosomal RNA transcription. Based upon these results, we propose that release of the PeBoW complex and subsequent release of Nle1 by midasin is a well conserved step in the ribosome maturation pathway in both yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:26601951

  5. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  6. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-limiting ADP release

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S.A. Kuznetsov and V.I. Gelfand is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin. The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that P/sub i/ release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (K/sub i/ < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by (/sup 14/C)ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  7. Effects of PKA phosphorylation on the conformation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory protein FXYD1

    PubMed Central

    Teriete, Peter; Thai, Khang; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2009-01-01

    FXYD1 (phospholemman) is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the Na,K-ATPase enzyme complex in specific tissues and specific physiological states. In heart and skeletal muscle sarcolemma, FXYD1 is also the principal substrate of hormone-regulated phosphorylation by c-AMP dependent protein kinase A and by protein kinase C, which phosphorylate the protein at conserved Ser residues in its cytoplasmic domain, altering its Na,K-ATPase regulatory activity. FXYD1 adopts an L-shaped α-helical structure with the transmembrane helix loosely connected to a cytoplasmic amphipathic helix that rests on the membrane surface. In this paper we describe NMR experiments showing that neither PKA phosphorylation at Ser68 nor the physiologically relevant phosphorylation mimicking mutation Ser68Asp induces major changes in the protein conformation. The results, viewed in light of a model of FXYD1 associated with the Na,K-ATPase α and β subunits, indicate that the effects of phosphorylation on the Na,K-ATPase regulatory activity of FXYD1 could be due primarily to changes in electrostatic potential near the membrane surface and near the Na+/K+ ion binding site of the Na,K-ATPase α subunit. PMID:19761758

  8. Mutations in the Proteolipid Subunits of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase Provide Resistance to Indolotryptoline Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Indolotryptoline natural products represent a small family of structurally unique chromopyrrolic acid-derived antiproliferative agents. Like many prospective anticancer agents before them, the exploration of their potential clinical utility has been hindered by the limited information known about their mechanism of action. To study the mode of action of two closely related indolotryptolines (BE-54017, cladoniamide A), we selected for drug resistant mutants using a multidrug resistance-suppressed (MDR-sup) Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain. As fission yeast maintains many of the basic cancer-relevant cellular processes present in human cells, it represents an appealing model to use in determining the potential molecular target of antiproliferative natural products through resistant mutant screening. Full genome sequencing of resistant mutants identified mutations in the c and c′ subunits of the proteolipid substructure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase complex (V-ATPase). This collection of resistance-conferring mutations maps to a site that is distant from the nucleotide-binding sites of V-ATPase and distinct from sites found to confer resistance to known V-ATPase inhibitors. Acid vacuole staining, cross-resistance studies, and direct c/c′ subunit mutagenesis all suggest that indolotryptolines are likely a structurally novel class of V-ATPase inhibitors. This work demonstrates the general utility of resistant mutant selection using MDR-sup S. pombe as a rapid and potentially systematic approach for studying the modes of action of cytotoxic natural products. PMID:25319670

  9. Na+-K+-ATPase, a new class of plasma membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Aperia, Anita; Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Fontana, Jacopo Maria; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-04-01

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) differs from most other ion transporters, not only in its capacity to maintain a steep electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane, but also as a receptor for a family of cardiotonic steroids, to which ouabain belongs. Studies from many groups, performed during the last 15 years, have demonstrated that ouabain, a member of the cardiotonic steroid family, can activate a network of signaling molecules, and that NKA will also serve as a signal transducer that can provide a feedback loop between NKA and the mitochondria. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge and controversies with regard to the understanding of NKA signaling. PMID:26791490

  10. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey F. Harper, Ph.D.

    2004-06-30

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems.

  11. [The effect of tetrandrine on rat myocardial ATPases].

    PubMed

    Chen, N H; Wang, Y L; Ding, J H; Li, D X

    1991-01-01

    The effect of tetrandrine (Tet) on Na+,K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase in rat myocardial microsomes was investigated in vitro. Under optimal condition, Tet did not influence Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity but concentration-dependently inhibited Mg(2+)-ATPase with an IC50 of 179 mumol/L. At 10 or 100 mumol/L, Tet caused the concentration-inhibition curves for ouabain a parallel shift to the right. Tet 100 mumol/L markedly increased the activity of Na+,K(+)-ATPase under suboptimal K+ or excessive Ca2+ condition. However, it did not significantly increase the enzyme activity when the Na+ concentration was lower. A kinetic analysis showed that Tet increased the affinity of Na+,K(+)-ATPase to ATP, but did not change the maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction. PMID:1668215

  12. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  13. Na(+),K (+)-ATPase as a docking station: protein-protein complexes of the Na(+),K (+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Linda; Tidow, Henning; Clausen, Michael J; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, or sodium pump, is well known for its role in ion transport across the plasma membrane of animal cells. It carries out the transport of Na(+) ions out of the cell and of K(+) ions into the cell and thus maintains electrolyte and fluid balance. In addition to the fundamental ion-pumping function of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, recent work has suggested additional roles for Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in signal transduction and biomembrane structure. Several signaling pathways have been found to involve Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which serves as a docking station for a fast-growing number of protein interaction partners. In this review, we focus on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as a signal transducer, but also briefly discuss other Na(+),K(+)-ATPase protein-protein interactions, providing a comprehensive overview of the diverse signaling functions ascribed to this well-known enzyme. PMID:22695678

  14. In Search of a Cure for Proteostasis-Addicted Cancer: A AAA Target Revealed.

    PubMed

    Xia, Di; Ye, Yihong

    2015-11-01

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with an unbalanced protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network, which sensitizes cancer cells to drugs targeting protein quality control (PQC) regulators. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Anderson and colleagues investigated the anti-cancer activity of a new class of inhibitor against a multi-functional ATPase essential for proteostasis maintenance. PMID:26555170

  15. Morphological State as a Predictor for Reintervention and Mortality After EVAR for AAA

    SciTech Connect

    Ohrlander, Tomas; Dencker, Magnus; Acosta, Stefan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess aorto-iliac morphological characteristics in relation to reintervention and all-cause long-term mortality in patients undergoing standard EVAR for infrarenal AAA. Methods: Patients treated with EVAR (Zenith{sup Registered-Sign} Stentgrafts, Cook) between May 1998 and February 2006 were prospectively enrolled in a computerized database where comorbidities and preoperative aneurysm morphology were entered. Reinterventions and mortality were checked until December 1, 2010. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Results: A total of 304 patients were included, of which 86% were men. Median age was 74 years. The reintervention rate was 23.4% (71/304). A greater diameter of the common iliac artery (p = 0.037; hazard ratio (HR) 1.037 [1.002-1.073]) was an independent factor for an increased number of reinterventions. The 30-day mortality rate was 3.0% (9/304). Aneurysm-related deaths due to AAA occurred in 4.9% (15/304). Five patients died due to a concomitant ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm. The mortality until end of follow-up was 54.3% (165/304). The proportion of deaths caused by vascular diseases was 61.6%. The severity of angulation of the iliac arteries (p = 0.014; HR 1.018 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.004-1.033]) and anemia (p = 0.044; HR 2.79 [95% CI 1.029-7.556]) remained as independent factors associated with all-cause long-term mortality. The crude reintervention-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 84.5%, 64.8%, and 51.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The initial aorto-iliac morphological state in patients scheduled for standard EVAR for AAA seems to be strongly related to the need for reinterventions and long-term mortality.

  16. NASA Astrophysics E/PO Impact: NASA SOFIA AAA Program Evaluation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; Backman, Dana E.; Clark, Coral; Inverness Research Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team, Wested Sofia Aaa Evaluation Team

    2015-01-01

    SOFIA is an airborne observatory, studying the universe at infrared wavelengths, capable of making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes. SOFIA also inspires the development of new scientific instrumentation and fosters the education of young scientists and engineers.SOFIA is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), consisting of an extensively modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a reflecting telescope with an effective diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches). The SOFIA aircraft is based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Building 703, in Palmdale, California. The Science Program and Outreach Offices are located at NASA Ames Research center. SOFIA is a program in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division.Data will be collected to study many different kinds of astronomical objects and phenomena, including star cycles, solar system formation, identification of complex molecules in space, our solar system, galactic dust, nebulae and ecosystems.Airborne Astronomy Ambassador (AAA) Program:The SOFIA Education and Communications program exploits the unique attributes of airborne astronomy to contribute to national goals for the reform of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and to elevate public scientific and technical literacy.The AAA effort is a professional development program aspiring to improve teaching, inspire students, and inform the community. To date, 55 educators from 21 states; Cycles 0, 1 and 2; have completed their astronomy professional development and their SOFIA science flight experience. Evaluation has confirmed the program's positive impact on the teacher participants, on their students, and in their communities. The inspirational experience has positively impacted their practice and career trajectory. AAAs have incorporated content knowledge and specific components of their experience into their curricula, and have given

  17. Topography of a vacuolar-type H+-translocating ATPase: chromaffin-granule membrane ATPase I.

    PubMed Central

    Apps, D K; Percy, J M; Perez-Castineira, J R

    1989-01-01

    Proteins exposed on the cytoplasmic face of isolated chromaffin granules were labelled by lactoperoxidase-catalysed radioiodination and by non-enzymic biotinylation. Granule membranes were then prepared, and the H+-translocating ATPase isolated by fractionation with Triton X-114. The labelling of individual ATPase subunits was assessed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, followed by autoradiography or by blotting and decoration with 125I-labelled streptavidin. Subunits of 72, 57 and kDa were strongly labelled, and could be removed from the membrane at pH 11: they are therefore extrinsic proteins. The 120 kDa subunit was also labelled, but it was not solubilized at pH 11. Photolabelling with a hydrophobic probe indicated that this subunit penetrates the bilayer, and enzymic degradation studies showed the presence of N-linked oligosaccharides; this subunit therefore spans the chromaffin-granule membrane. Labelling of the 17 kDa subunit occurred predominantly on the extracytoplasmic (matrix) face of the granule membrane. These results are consistent with this V-type ATPase having a structure that is generally similar to that of mitochondrial (F-type) ATPases, although the attachment of the 120 kDa subunit may be asymmetrical. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:2532503

  18. Rescue EVAR for ruptured AAA: Clinical success does not mean technical success.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Sirignano, Pasqualino; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Setacci, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    We report a clinical evolution of a 85-years old male admitted to our Emergency Department for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA). One month later a huge type I proximal endoleak was detected and corrected by proximal aortic extension. We decided to fix the stent-graft to the aortic wall using EndoAnchors. However, an asymptomatic type III endoleak due to controlateral limb disconnection was detected at the followed schedulated CT angio and corrected by a relining of the endograft. The patient is now in good clinical condition with no evidence of endoleaks at 1-year follow-up. PMID:24347133

  19. SU-E-P-16: A Feasibility Study of Using Eclipse AAA for SRS Treatement

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S; LoSasso, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To commission Varian Eclipse AAA for SRS treatment and compare the accuracy with Brainlab iPlan system for clinical cases measured with radiochromic film. Methods: A 6MV AAA clinical model for a Varian TrueBeam STx is used as baseline. The focal spot and field size of the baseline model(BASE) are (1.75,0.75) and 40×40cm{sup 2} respectively. Maximum field sizes, output factors(S{sub t}), FWHM focal spot and secondary source sizes are systematically adjusted to obtain an optimized model(OPT) by comparing the calculated PDD’s, profiles, and output factors with measurements taken with a stereotactic diode(SD) and, cc01 and cc04 ion chambers in Blue Phantom. In-phantom dose distributions of clinical SRS fields are calculated using the OPT and the clinical Brainlab iPlan pencil-beam. Within the 90% isodose-line(ROI), the average dose difference between the calculations and radiochromic film measurements are assessed. Results: The maximum field, focal spot and secondary source sizes for the OPT are 15×15cm{sup 2}, (0,0), and 32.3mm respectively. The OPT St input at 1.0 and 2.0cm fields are increased by 4.5% and 1.5% from BASE. The calculated output of the BASE and OPT underestimate by 16.1%–3.2% respectively at 0.5×0.5cm{sup 2} field and 3.1%−0.02% respectively at 1.0×1.0cm{sup 2} field. The depth doses at 10cm are within 3.5% and 0.4% of measurements for 0.5×0.5 and 1.0×1.0cm{sup 2}. The ROI dose of OPT and iPlan are within 1.6% and 0.6% of film measurements for 3.0cm clinical fields. For 1.0cm fields, the ROI dose of OPT underestimate 0.0–2.0% and iPlan overestimates 1.7–2.9% relative to measurements. Conclusion: The small field dose calculation of Eclipse AAA algorithm can be significantly improved by carefully adjusting the input parameters. The larger deviation of the OPT for 0.5×0.5cm{sup 2} field from measurements can be attributed to the lowest 1.0cm field size input limit of AAA. The OPT compares reasonably well with the iPlan pencil

  20. Ca2+-Dependent Interaction of S100A1 with F1-ATPase Leads to an Increased ATP Content in Cardiomyocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Boerries, Melanie; Most, Patrick; Gledhill, Jonathan R.; Walker, John E.; Katus, Hugo A.; Koch, Walter J.; Aebi, Ueli; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann

    2007-01-01

    S100A1, a Ca2+-sensing protein of the EF-hand family that is expressed predominantly in cardiac muscle, plays a pivotal role in cardiac contractility in vitro and in vivo. It has recently been demonstrated that by restoring Ca2+ homeostasis, S100A1 was able to rescue contractile dysfunction in failing rat hearts. Myocardial contractility is regulated not only by Ca2+ homeostasis but also by energy metabolism, in particular the production of ATP. Here, we report a novel interaction of S100A1 with mitochondrial F1-ATPase, which affects F1-ATPase activity and cellular ATP production. In particular, cardiomyocytes that overexpress S100A1 exhibited a higher ATP content than control cells, whereas knockdown of S100A1 expression decreased ATP levels. In pull-down experiments, we identified the α- and β-chain of F1-ATPase to interact with S100A1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The interaction was confirmed by colocalization studies of S100A1 and F1-ATPase and the analysis of the S100A1-F1-ATPase complex by gel filtration chromatography. The functional impact of this association is highlighted by an S100A1-mediated increase of F1-ATPase activity. Consistently, ATP synthase activity is reduced in cardiomyocytes from S100A1 knockout mice. Our data indicate that S100A1 might play a key role in cardiac energy metabolism. PMID:17438143

  1. Tonoplast calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 control plant growth and ion homeostasis through regulating V-ATPase activity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ren-Jie; Liu, Hua; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Garcia, Veder J; Luan, Sheng; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Plant responses to developmental and environmental cues are often mediated by calcium (Ca2+) signals that are transmitted by diverse calcium sensors. The calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein family represents calcium sensors that decode calcium signals through specific interactions with a group of CBL-interacting protein kinases. We report functional analysis of Arabidopsis CBL2 and CBL3, two closely related CBL members that are localized to the vacuolar membrane through the N-terminal tonoplast-targeting sequence. While cbl2 or cbl3 single mutant did not show any phenotypic difference from the wild type, the cbl2 cbl3 double mutant was stunted with leaf tip necrosis, underdeveloped roots, shorter siliques and fewer seeds. These defects were reminiscent of those in the vha-a2 vha-a3 double mutant deficient in vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Indeed, the V-ATPase activity was reduced in the cbl2 cbl3 double mutant, connecting tonoplast CBL-type calcium sensors to the regulation of V-ATPase. Furthermore, cbl2 cbl3 double mutant was compromised in ionic tolerance and micronutrient accumulation, consistent with the defect in V-ATPase activity that has been shown to function in ion compartmentalization. Our results suggest that calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 serve as molecular links between calcium signaling and V-ATPase, a central regulator of intracellular ion homeostasis. PMID:23184060

  2. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Marques, M Paula M; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V(10)) ion is a stronger Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V(10) interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the present study, we further explore this subject, and we can now show that the decaniobate ion, [Nb(10) = Nb(10)O(28)](6-), is a useful tool in deducing the interaction and the non-competitive Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition by the decavanadate ion [V(10) = V(10)O(28)](6-). Moreover, decavanadate and vanadate induce protein cysteine oxidation whereas no effects were detected for the decaniobate, tungstate or molybdate ions. The presence of the antioxidant quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation, but not ATPase inhibition, by vanadate or decavanadate. Definitive V(IV) EPR spectra were observed for decavanadate in the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, indicating a vanadate reduction at some stage of the protein interaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly shows that the protein conformation changes that are induced by V(10), Nb(10) and vanadate are different from the ones induced by molybdate and tungstate monomer ions. Here, Mo and W cause changes similar to those by phosphate, yielding changes similar to the E1P protein conformation. The putative reduction of vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) and the non-competitive binding of the V(10) and Nb(10) decametalates may explain the differences in the Raman spectra compared to those seen in the presence of molybdate or tungstate. Putting it all together, we suggest that the ability of V(10) to inhibit the Ca(2+)-ATPase may be at least in part due to the process of vanadate reduction and associated protein cysteine oxidation. These

  3. Purification and Properties of an ATPase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    A sulfite-activated ATPase isolated from Sulfolobus solfataricus had a relative molecular mass of 370,000. It was composed of three subunits whose relative molecular masses were 63,000, 48,000, and 24,000. The enzyme was inhibited by the vacuolar ATPase inhibitors nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-furazan (NBD-Cl) was also inhibitory. N-Ethylmaleimide was predominately bound to the largest subunit while NBD-CL was bound to both subunits. ATPase activity was inhibited by low concentrations of p-chloromercuri-phenyl sulfonate and the inhibition was reversed by cysteine which suggested that thiol groups were essential for activity. While the ATPase from S. solfataricus shared several properties with the ATPase from S. acidocaldarius there were significant differences. The latter enzyme was activated by sulfate and chloride and was unaffected by N-ethylmaleimide, whereas the S. solfataricus ATPase was inhibited by these anions as well as N-ethyimaleimide. These differences as well as differences that occur in other vacuolar-like ATPases isolated from the methanogenic and the extremely halophilic bacteria suggest the existence of several types of archaeal ATPases, none of which have been demonstrated to synthesize ATP.

  4. Characterization of the flexibility of the peripheral stalk of prokaryotic rotary A-ATPases by atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Papachristos, Kostas; Muench, Stephen P; Paci, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    Rotary ATPases are involved in numerous physiological processes, with the three distinct types (F/A/V-ATPases) sharing functional properties and structural features. The basic mechanism involves the counter rotation of two motors, a soluble ATP hydrolyzing/synthesizing domain and a membrane-embedded ion pump connected through a central rotor axle and a stator complex. Within the A/V-ATPase family conformational flexibility of the EG stators has been shown to accommodate catalytic cycling and is considered to be important to function. For the A-ATPase three EG structures have been reported, thought to represent conformational states of the stator during different stages of rotary catalysis. Here we use long, detailed atomistic simulations to show that those structures are conformers explored through thermal fluctuations, but do not represent highly populated states of the EG stator in solution. We show that the coiled coil tail domain has a high persistence length (∼100 nm), but retains the ability to adapt to different conformational states through the presence of two hinge regions. Moreover, the stator network of the related V-ATPase has been suggested to adapt to subunit interactions in the collar region in addition to the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic domain. The MD simulations reported here, reinforce this observation showing that the EG stators have enough flexibility to adapt to significantly different structural re-arrangements and accommodate structural changes in the catalytic domain whilst resisting the large torque generated by catalytic cycling. These results are important to understand the role the stators play in the rotary-ATPase mechanism. Proteins 2016; 84:1203-1212. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177595

  5. Characterization of the flexibility of the peripheral stalk of prokaryotic rotary A‐ATPases by atomistic simulations

    PubMed Central

    Papachristos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotary ATPases are involved in numerous physiological processes, with the three distinct types (F/A/V‐ATPases) sharing functional properties and structural features. The basic mechanism involves the counter rotation of two motors, a soluble ATP hydrolyzing/synthesizing domain and a membrane‐embedded ion pump connected through a central rotor axle and a stator complex. Within the A/V‐ATPase family conformational flexibility of the EG stators has been shown to accommodate catalytic cycling and is considered to be important to function. For the A‐ATPase three EG structures have been reported, thought to represent conformational states of the stator during different stages of rotary catalysis. Here we use long, detailed atomistic simulations to show that those structures are conformers explored through thermal fluctuations, but do not represent highly populated states of the EG stator in solution. We show that the coiled coil tail domain has a high persistence length (∼100 nm), but retains the ability to adapt to different conformational states through the presence of two hinge regions. Moreover, the stator network of the related V‐ATPase has been suggested to adapt to subunit interactions in the collar region in addition to the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic domain. The MD simulations reported here, reinforce this observation showing that the EG stators have enough flexibility to adapt to significantly different structural re‐arrangements and accommodate structural changes in the catalytic domain whilst resisting the large torque generated by catalytic cycling. These results are important to understand the role the stators play in the rotary‐ATPase mechanism. Proteins 2016; 84:1203–1212. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177595

  6. Purification and properties of an ATPase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports properties of a sulfite-activated ATPase from Sulfolobus solfataricus, purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, column chromatography on UltraGel and Sepharose 6B, and SDS-PAGE. The 92-fold purified enzyme had a relative molecular mass of 370,000. It could be dissociated into three subunits with respective molecular masses of 63,000, 48,000, and 24,000. The ATPase activity was found to be inhibitable by nitrate, N-ethylmaleimide (which bound predominantly to the largest subunit), and 4-chloro 7-nitrobenzofurazan, but not by azide, quercetin, or vanadate. While the ATPase from S. solfataricus shared a number of properties with the S. acidocaldarius ATPase, there were also significant differences suggesting the existence of several types of archaeal ATPases.

  7. Quercetin interaction with the chloroplast ATPase complex.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, V; Shahak, Y; Shavit, N

    1980-07-01

    1. Quercetin, a flavonoid which acts as an energy transfer inhibitor in photophosphorylation is shown to inhibit the P-ATP exchange activity of membrane-bound CF1 and the ATPase activity of isolated CF1. Quercetin, affects also the proton uptake in chloroplasts in a manner similar to that of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 2. The light-dependent proton uptake in EDTA-treated chloroplasts is stimulated by quercetin. In untreated chloroplasts quercetin has a dual effect: it enhances at pH above 7.5 while at lower pH values it decreases the extent of H+ uptake. Similar effects were obtained with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 3. Like quercetin, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide was also found to inhibit the ATPase activity of isolated CF1. 4. Quercetin inhibits uncoupled electron transport induced by either EDTA-treatment of chloroplasts or by addition of uncouplers. Quercetin restores H+ uptake in both types of uncoupled chloroplasts. 5. The mode of action of quercetin and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in photophosphorylation is discussed, and interaction with both CF1 and F0 is suggested. PMID:6446936

  8. Characterization of a DEAD box ATPase/RNA helicase protein of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Okanami, M; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1998-06-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding a novel member of the DEAD box RNA helicase family from Arabidopsis. The protein, named AtDRH1, is composed of 619 amino acids and the central portion has high similarity with the helicase core region of a prototypic RNA helicase, the human nuclear protein p68. The N- and C-terminal regions are considerably diverged from the animal and yeast p68 homologs at the amino acid sequence level, but like the p68 subfamily members, an RGG box-like domain is present near the C-terminus. RNA blot analysis showed that the AtDRH1 transcript accumulates at a high level and almost equally in every part of the Arabidopsis plant. The purified, recombinant AtDRH1 was capable of unwinding double-stranded RNA in the presence of ATP or dATP and of hydrolyzing ATP. The ATPase activity was stimulated by some single-stranded RNAs and DNAs, including poly(A) and poly(dT), but not by poly(dA). The ability of the polynucleotides to stimulate the ATPase activity was largely consistent with their affinity for AtDRH1. These results show that AtDRH1 is a novel type of ATP/dATP-dependent RNA helicase and polynucleotide-dependent ATPase. PMID:9592148

  9. Histidine 114 Is Critical for ATP Hydrolysis by the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF.

    PubMed

    Rosler, Kirsten S; Mercier, Evan; Andrews, Ian C; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-24

    GTPases perform a wide range of functions, ranging from protein synthesis to cell signaling. Of all known GTPases, only eight are conserved across all three domains of life. YchF is one of these eight universally conserved GTPases; however, its cellular function and enzymatic properties are poorly understood. YchF differs from the classical GTPases in that it has a higher affinity for ATP than for GTP and is a functional ATPase. As a hydrophobic amino acid-substituted ATPase, YchF does not possess the canonical catalytic Gln required for nucleotide hydrolysis. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by YchF, we have taken a two-pronged approach combining classical biochemical and in silico techniques. The use of molecular dynamics simulations allowed us to complement our biochemical findings with information about the structural dynamics of YchF. We have thereby identified the highly conserved His-114 as critical for the ATPase activity of YchF from Escherichia coli. His-114 is located in a flexible loop of the G-domain, which undergoes nucleotide-dependent conformational changes. The use of a catalytic His is also observed in the hydrophobic amino acid-substituted GTPase RbgA and is an identifier of the translational GTPase family. PMID:26018081

  10. Mutations in vacuolar H+-ATPase subunits lead to biliary developmental defects in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    EauClaire, Steven F.; Cui, Shuang; Ma, Liyuan; Matous, James; Marlow, Florence L.; Gupta, Tripti; Burgess, Harold A.; Abrams, Elliott W.; Kapp, Lee D.; Granato, Michael; Mullins, Mary C.; Matthews, Randolph P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We identified three zebrafish mutants with defects in biliary development. One of these mutants, pekin (pn), also demonstrated generalized hypopigmentation and other defects, including disruption of retinal cell layers, lack of zymogen granules in the pancreas, and dilated Golgi in intestinal epithelial cells. Bile duct cells in pn demonstrated an accumulation of electron dense bodies. We determined that the causative defect in pn was a splice site mutation in the atp6ap2 gene that leads to an inframe stop codon. atp6ap2 encodes a subunit of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-H+-ATPase), which modulates pH in intracellular compartments. The Atp6ap2 subunit has also been shown to function as an intracellular renin receptor that stimulates fibrogenesis. Here we show that mutants and morphants involving other V-H+-ATPase subunits also demonstrated developmental biliary defects, but did not demonstrate the inhibition of fibrogenic genes observed in pn. The defects in pn are reminiscent of those we and others have observed in class C VPS (vacuolar protein sorting) family mutants and morphants, and we report here that knockdown of atp6ap2 and vps33b had an additive negative effect on biliary development. Our findings suggest that pathways important in modulating intracompartmental pH lead to defects in digestive organ development, and support previous studies demonstrating the importance of intracellular sorting pathways in biliary development. PMID:22465374

  11. Inflammatory cell phenotypes in AAAs; their role and potential as targets for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Matthew A; Ruhlman, Melissa K.; Baxter, B. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. AAA is typically an asymptomatic disease and caused approximately 15,000 deaths annually in the U.S. Previous studies have examined both human and murine aortic tissue for the presence of various inflammatory cell types. Studies show that in both human and experimental AAAs, prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, such as CD4+ T cells and macrophages, occurs in the damaged aortic wall. These cells have the ability to undergo phenotypic modulation based on microenvironmental cues, potentially influencing disease progression. Pro-inflammatory CD4+ T cells and classically activated macrophages dominate the landscape of aortic infiltrates. The skew to pro-inflammatory phenotypes alters disease progression and plays a role in causing chronic inflammation. The local cytokine production and presence of inflammatory mediators, such as extracellular matrix breakdown products, influence the uneven balance of the inflammatory infiltrate phenotypes. Understanding and developing new strategies that target the pro-inflammatory phenotype could provide useful therapeutic targets for a disease with no current pharmacological intervention. PMID:26044582

  12. Going the distance: validation of Acuros and AAA at an extended SSD of 400 cm.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Narottam; Patel, Vivek N; Studenski, Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    Accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery is essential for total body irradia-tion (TBI). In an effort to verify the accuracy of TBI dose calculation at our institu-tion, we evaluated both the Varian Eclipse AAA and Acuros algorithms to predict dose distributions at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 400 cm. Measurements were compared to calculated values for a 6 MV beam in physical and virtual phantoms at 400 cm SSD using open beams for both 5 × 5 and 40 × 40cm2 field sizes. Inline and crossline profiles were acquired at equivalent depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm. Depth-dose curves were acquired using EBT2 film and an ion chamber for both field sizes. Finally, a RANDO phantom was used to simulate an actual TBI treatment. At this extended SSD, care must be taken using the planning system as there is good relative agreement between measured and calculated profiles for both algorithms, but there are deviations in terms of the absolute dose. Acuros has better agreement than AAA in the penumbra region. PMID:27074473

  13. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad. PMID:26454172

  14. Cellular function and pathological role of ATP13A2 and related P-type transport ATPases in Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, Sarah; Sørensen, Danny M.; Holemans, Tine; Holen, Henrik W.; Palmgren, Michael G.; Vangheluwe, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in ATP13A2 lead to Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, a parkinsonism with dementia. ATP13A2 belongs to the P-type transport ATPases, a large family of primary active transporters that exert vital cellular functions. However, the cellular function and transported substrate of ATP13A2 remain unknown. To discuss the role of ATP13A2 in neurodegeneration, we first provide a short description of the architecture and transport mechanism of P-type transport ATPases. Then, we briefly highlight key P-type ATPases involved in neuronal disorders such as the copper transporters ATP7A (Menkes disease), ATP7B (Wilson disease), the Na+/K+-ATPases ATP1A2 (familial hemiplegic migraine) and ATP1A3 (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism). Finally, we review the recent literature of ATP13A2 and discuss ATP13A2's putative cellular function in the light of what is known concerning the functions of other, better-studied P-type ATPases. We critically review the available data concerning the role of ATP13A2 in heavy metal transport and propose a possible alternative hypothesis that ATP13A2 might be a flippase. As a flippase, ATP13A2 may transport an organic molecule, such as a lipid or a peptide, from one membrane leaflet to the other. A flippase might control local lipid dynamics during vesicle formation and membrane fusion events. PMID:24904274

  15. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-09-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains-a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:26130467

  16. Vfa1 binds to the N-terminal microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain of Vps4 and stimulates its ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Vild, Cody J; Xu, Zhaohui

    2014-04-11

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) are responsible for multivesicular body biogenesis, membrane abscission during cytokinesis, and retroviral budding. They function as transiently assembled molecular complexes on the membrane, and their disassembly requires the action of the AAA-ATPase Vps4. Vps4 is regulated by a multitude of ESCRT and ESCRT-related proteins. Binding of these proteins to Vps4 is often mediated via the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain of Vps4. Recently, a new Vps4-binding protein Vfa1 was identified in a yeast genetic screen, where overexpression of Vfa1 caused defects in vacuolar morphology. However, the function of Vfa1 and its role in vacuolar biology were largely unknown. Here, we provide the first detailed biochemical and biophysical study of Vps4-Vfa1 interaction. The MIT domain of Vps4 binds to the C-terminal 17 residues of Vfa1. This interaction is of high affinity and greatly stimulates the ATPase activity of Vps4. The crystal structure of the Vps4-Vfa1 complex shows that Vfa1 adopts a canonical MIT-interacting motif 2 structure that has been observed previously in other Vps4-ESCRT interactions. These findings suggest that Vfa1 is a novel positive regulator of Vps4 function. PMID:24567329

  17. The amino-terminal 200 amino acids of the plasma membrane Na+,K+-ATPase alpha subunit confer ouabain sensitivity on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides such as G-strophanthin (ouabain) bind to and inhibit the plasma membrane Na+,K(+)-ATPase but not the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase, whereas thapsigargin specifically blocks the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase. The chimera [n/c]CC, in which the amino-terminal amino acids Met1 to Asp162 of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1) were replaced with the corresponding portion of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit (Met1 to Asp200), retained thapsigargin- and Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity, although the activity was lower than that of the wild-type SR Ca(2+)-ATPase. Moreover, this Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity was inhibited by ouabain. The chimera NCC, in which Met1-Gly354 of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase were replaced with the corresponding portion of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase, lost the thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase activity seen in CCC and [n/c]CC. [3H]Ouabain binding to [n/c]CC and NCC demonstrated that the affinity for this inhibitor seen in the wild-type chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase was restored in these chimeric molecules. Thus, the ouabain-binding domains are distinct from the thapsigargin sites; ouabain binds to the amino-terminal portion (Met1 to Asp200) of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit, whereas thapsigargin interacts with the regions after Asp162 of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. Moreover, the amino-terminal 200 amino acids of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit are sufficient to exert ouabain-dependent inhibition even after incorporation into the corresponding portion of the Ca(2+)-ATPase, and the segment Ile163 to Gly354 of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase is critical for thapsigargin- and Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8415625

  18. Kinetic studies on Na+/K+-ATPase and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase by ATP.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li; Yuwen, Liu; Jie, Li; Huilin, Li; Xi, Yang; Cunxin, Wang; Zhiyong, Wang

    2004-08-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) is an important membrane-bound enzyme. In this paper, kinetic studies on Na+/K+-ATPase were carried out under mimetic physiological conditions. By using microcalorimeter, a thermokinetic method was employed for the first time. Compared with other methods, it provided accurate measurements of not only thermodynamic data (deltarHm) but also the kinetic data (Km and Vmax). At 310.15K and pH 7.4, the molar reaction enthalpy (deltarHm) was measured as -40.514 +/- 0.9kJmol(-1). The Michaelis constant (Km) was determined to be 0.479 +/- 0.020 mM and consistent with literature data. The reliability of the thermokinetic method was further confirmed by colorimetric studies. Furthermore, a simple and reliable kinetic procedure was presented for ascertaining the true substrate for Na+/K+-ATPase and determining the effect of free ATP. Results showed that the MgATP complex was the real substrate with a Km value of about 0.5mM and free ATP was a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.253 mM. PMID:15558949

  19. Capsazepine, a synthetic vanilloid that converts the Na,K-ATPase to Na-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Mahmmoud, Yasser A

    2008-02-01

    Capsazepine (CPZ), a synthetic capsaicin analogue, inhibits ATP hydrolysis by Na,K-ATPase in the presence but not in the absence of K(+). Studies with purified membranes revealed that CPZ reduced Na(+)-dependent phosphorylation by interference with Na(+) binding from the intracellular side of the membrane. Kinetic analyses showed that CPZ stabilized an enzyme species that constitutively occluded K(+). Low-affinity ATP interaction with the enzyme was strongly reduced after CPZ treatment; in contrast, indirectly measured interaction with ADP was much increased, which suggests that composite regulatory communication with nucleotides takes place during turnover. Studies with lipid vesicles revealed that CPZ reduced ATP-dependent digitoxigenin-sensitive (22)Na(+) influx into K(+)-loaded vesicles only at saturating ATP concentrations. The drug apparently abolishes the regulatory effect of ATP on the pump. Drawing on previous homology modeling studies of Na,K-ATPase to atomic models of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase and on kinetic data, we propose that CPZ uncouples an Na(+) cycle from an Na(+)/K(+) cycle in the pump. The Na(+) cycle possibly involves transport through the recently characterized Na(+)-specific site. A shift to such an uncoupled mode is believed to produce pumps mediating uncoupled Na(+) efflux by modifying the transport stoichiometry of single pump units. PMID:18230728

  20. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  1. Inhibition of Simian Virus 40 replication by targeting the molecular chaperone function and ATPase activity of T antigen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Christine M.; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Fewell, Sheara W.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ishwad, Chandra; Vats, Abhay; Lingwood, Cifford A.; Wipf, Peter; Fanning, Ellen; Pipas, James M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Polyomaviruses such as BK virus and JC virus have been linked to several diseases, but treatments that thwart their propagation are limited in part because of slow growth and cumbersome culturing conditions. In contrast, the replication of one member of this family, Simian Virus 40 (SV40), is robust and has been well-characterized. SV40 replication requires two domains within the viral-encoded large tumor antigen (TAg): The ATPase domain and the N-terminal J domain, which stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone. To assess whether inhibitors of polyomavirus replication could be identified, we examined a recently described library of small molecules, some of which inhibit chaperone function. One compound, MAL2-11B, inhibited both TAg’s endogenous ATPase activity and the TAg-mediated activation of Hsp70. MAL2-11B also reduced SV40 propagation in plaque assays and compromised DNA replication in cell culture and in vitro. Furthermore, the compound significantly reduced the growth of BK virus in a human kidney cell line. These data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of TAg’s chaperone and ATPase activities may provide a route to combat polyomavirus-mediated disease. PMID:19200446

  2. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  3. Human myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, H; Kjeldsen, K

    1996-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is of major importance for active ion transport across the sarcolemma and thus for electrical as well as contractile function of the myocardium. Furthermore, it is receptor for digitalis glycosides. In human studies of the regulatory aspects of myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration a major problem has been to obtain tissue samples. Methodological accomplishments in quantification of myocardial Na,K-ATPase using vanadate facilitated 3H-ouabain binding to intact samples have, however, made it possible to obtain reliable measurements on human myocardial necropsies obtained at autopsy as well as on biopsies of a wet weight of only 1-2 mg obtained during heart catheterisation. However, access to the ultimately, normal, vital myocardial tissue has come from the heart transplantation programs, through which myocardial samples from cardiovascular healthy organ donors have become available. In the present paper we evaluate the various values reported for normal human myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration, its regulation in heart disease and the association with digitalization. Normal myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration level is found to be 700 pmol/g wet weight. No major variations were found between or within the walls of the heart ventricles. During the first few years of life a marked decrease in myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration is followed by a stable level obtained in early adulthood and normally maintained throughout life. In patients with enlarged cardiac x-ray silhouette a significant positive, linear correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and Na,K-ATPase concentration was established. A maximum reduction in Na,K-ATPase concentration of 89% was obtained when EF was reduced to 20%. Generally, heart failure associated with heart dilatation, myocardial hypertrophy as well as ischaemic heart disease is associated with reductions in myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration of around 25%. During digoxin treatment of heart failure

  4. Monte Carlo evaluation of the AAA treatment planning algorithm in a heterogeneous multilayer phantom and IMRT clinical treatments for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Tomsej, M.; Smedt, B. de; Reynaert, N.; Vynckier, S.

    2007-05-15

    The Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is a new pencil beam convolution/superposition algorithm proposed by Varian for photon dose calculations. The configuration of AAA depends on linear accelerator design and specifications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of AAA for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator for small fields and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments in inhomogeneous media. The accuracy of AAA was evaluated in two studies. First, AAA was compared both with Monte Carlo (MC) and the measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom simulating lung equivalent tissues and bone ribs. The algorithm was tested under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions, using small fields (2x2 cm{sup 2}). Good agreement was generally achieved for depth dose and profiles, with deviations generally below 3% in lung inhomogeneities and below 5% at interfaces. However, the effects of attenuation and scattering close to the bone ribs were not fully taken into account by AAA, and small inhomogeneities may lead to planning errors. Second, AAA and MC were compared for IMRT plans in clinical conditions, i.e., dose calculations in a computed tomography scan of a patient. One ethmoid tumor, one orophaxynx and two lung tumors are presented in this paper. Small differences were found between the dose volume histograms. For instance, a 1.7% difference for the mean planning target volume dose was obtained for the ethmoid case. Since better agreement was achieved for the same plans but in homogeneous conditions, these differences must be attributed to the handling of inhomogeneities by AAA. Therefore, inherent assumptions of the algorithm, principally the assumption of independent depth and lateral directions in the scaling of the kernels, were slightly influencing AAA's validity in inhomogeneities. However, AAA showed a good accuracy overall and a great ability to handle small fields in inhomogeneous media compared to other pencil beam convolution

  5. C-peptide, Na+,K+-ATPase, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coste, T. C.; Jannot, M. F.; Raccah, D.; Tsimaratos, M.

    2004-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase is an ubiquitous membrane enzyme that allows the extrusion of three sodium ions from the cell and two potassium ions from the extracellular fluid. Its activity is decreased in many tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. This impairment could be at least partly responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Na+,K+-ATPase activity is decreased in the red blood cell membranes of type 1 diabetic individuals, irrespective of the degree of diabetic control. It is less impaired or even normal in those of type 2 diabetic patients. The authors have shown that in the red blood cells of type 2 diabetic patients, Na+,K+-ATPase activity was strongly related to blood C-peptide levels in non–insulin-treated patients (in whom C-peptide concentration reflects that of insulin) as well as in insulin-treated patients. Furthermore, a gene-environment relationship has been observed. The alpha-1 isoform of the enzyme predominant in red blood cells and nerve tissue is encoded by the ATP1A1 gene.Apolymorphism in the intron 1 of this gene is associated with lower enzyme activity in patients with C-peptide deficiency either with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but not in normal individuals. There are several lines of evidence for a low C-peptide level being responsible for low Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the red blood cells. Short-term C-peptide infusion to type 1 diabetic patients restores normal Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Islet transplantation, which restores endogenous C-peptide secretion, enhances Na+,K+-ATPase activity proportionally to the rise in C-peptide. This C-peptide effect is not indirect. In fact, incubation of diabetic red blood cells with C-peptide at physiological concentration leads to an increase of Na+,K+-ATPase activity. In isolated proximal tubules of rats or in the medullary thick ascending limb of the kidney, C-peptide stimulates in a dose-dependent manner Na+,K+-ATPase activity. This impairment in Na+,K+-ATPase activity, mainly

  6. Characterisation of pectins extracted from banana peels (Musa AAA) under different conditions using an experimental design.

    PubMed

    Happi Emaga, Thomas; Ronkart, Sébastien N; Robert, Christelle; Wathelet, Bernard; Paquot, Michel

    2008-05-15

    An experimental design was used to study the influence of pH (1.5 and 2.0), temperature (80 and 90°C) and time (1 and 4h) on extraction of pectin from banana peels (Musa AAA). Yield of extracted pectins, their composition (neutral sugars, galacturonic acid, and degree of esterification) and some macromolecular characteristics (average molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity) were determined. It was found that extraction pH was the most important parameter influencing yield and pectin chemical composition. Lower pH values negatively affected the galacturonic acid content of pectin, but increased the pectin yield. The values of degree of methylation decreased significantly with increasing temperature and time of extraction. The average molecular weight ranged widely from 87 to 248kDa and was mainly influenced by pH and extraction time. PMID:26059123

  7. Student-Athlete Perceptions of a Summer Pre-Enrollment Experience at an NCAA Division I-AAA Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgety, Michael Franklin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to examine student-athlete perceptions of the role of summer pre-enrollment in their adjustment and transition to college. The study focused on student-athletes who received athletically-related financial aid at a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-AAA institution. The…

  8. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, R. O.; Karlsson, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2010-08-01

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are conventionally used for lung treatments. The aim of this study was to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of dynamic IMRT treatment planning for high and low photon energy in order to assess if deviating from the conventional low energy approach could be favorable in some cases. Furthermore, the influence of motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Four non-small cell lung cancer cases were selected for this study. Inverse planning was conducted using Varian Eclipse. A total number of 31 dynamic IMRT plans, distributed amongst the four cases, were created ranging from PTV conformity weighted to normal tissue sparing weighted. All optimized treatment plans were calculated using three different calculation algorithms (PBC, AAA and MC). In order to study the influence of motion, two virtual lung phantoms were created. The idea was to mimic two different situations: one where the GTV is located centrally in the PTV and another where the GTV was close to the edge of the PTV. PBC is in poor agreement with MC and AAA for all cases and treatment plans. AAA overestimates the dose, compared to MC. This effect is more pronounced for 15 than 6 MV. AAA and MC both predict similar perturbations in dose distributions when moving the GTV to the edge of the PTV. PBC, however, predicts results contradicting those of AAA and MC. This study shows that PB-based dose calculation algorithms are clinically insufficient for patient geometries involving large density inhomogeneities. AAA is in much better agreement with MC, but even a small overestimation of the dose level by the algorithm might lead to a large part of the PTV being underdosed. It is advisable to use low energy as a

  9. Pareto front analysis of 6 and 15 MV dynamic IMRT for lung cancer using pencil beam, AAA and Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, R O; Karlsson, A; Behrens, C F

    2010-08-21

    The pencil beam dose calculation method is frequently used in modern radiation therapy treatment planning regardless of the fact that it is documented inaccurately for cases involving large density variations. The inaccuracies are larger for higher beam energies. As a result, low energy beams are conventionally used for lung treatments. The aim of this study was to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of dynamic IMRT treatment planning for high and low photon energy in order to assess if deviating from the conventional low energy approach could be favorable in some cases. Furthermore, the influence of motion on the dose distribution was investigated. Four non-small cell lung cancer cases were selected for this study. Inverse planning was conducted using Varian Eclipse. A total number of 31 dynamic IMRT plans, distributed amongst the four cases, were created ranging from PTV conformity weighted to normal tissue sparing weighted. All optimized treatment plans were calculated using three different calculation algorithms (PBC, AAA and MC). In order to study the influence of motion, two virtual lung phantoms were created. The idea was to mimic two different situations: one where the GTV is located centrally in the PTV and another where the GTV was close to the edge of the PTV. PBC is in poor agreement with MC and AAA for all cases and treatment plans. AAA overestimates the dose, compared to MC. This effect is more pronounced for 15 than 6 MV. AAA and MC both predict similar perturbations in dose distributions when moving the GTV to the edge of the PTV. PBC, however, predicts results contradicting those of AAA and MC. This study shows that PB-based dose calculation algorithms are clinically insufficient for patient geometries involving large density inhomogeneities. AAA is in much better agreement with MC, but even a small overestimation of the dose level by the algorithm might lead to a large part of the PTV being underdosed. It is advisable to use low energy as a

  10. Managing Brain Extracellular K+ during Neuronal Activity: The Physiological Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase Subunit Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    During neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K+ rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K+ is the Na+/K+-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na+/K+-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K+ from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K+ absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K+ from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na+/K+-ATPase isoform combinations in K+ management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K+ in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease. PMID:27148079

  11. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity: The Physiological Role of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Subunit Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    During neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K(+) rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K(+) is the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K(+) from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K(+) absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K(+) from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform combinations in K(+) management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K(+) in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease. PMID:27148079

  12. The role of lysyl oxidase family members in the stabilization of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Remus, Ebony Washington; O'Donnell, Robert E; Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T; Taylor, W Robert

    2012-10-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States today. We employed a model for AAA development using apolipoprotein E knock out mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with ANG II and β-aminopropionitrile (β-APN) for 4 wk. ANG II induces hypertension and atherosclerotic disease, whereas β-APN inhibits the activity of the lysyl oxidase/ lysyl oxidase-like protein (LOX/LOXL) family members. LOX/LOXL family members crosslink collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix and therefore contribute to the integrity and stabilization of a healthy vessel wall. In this model, cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused a 90% AAA incidence and increased atherosclerotic lesion formation from less than 5% to greater than 25% after 4 wk. In more atheroprotected mouse strains (C57BL/6 and BalbC), cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused 50% and 40% AAA incidence, respectively. These data demonstrate the importance of LOX/LOXL to the stability of the vessel wall. Therapeutic strategies to overexpress LOX/LOXL enzymes or to support the crosslinking of soluble matrix proteins in a polymeric scaffold are a promising opportunity to achieve stabilization of AAAs. PMID:22904155

  13. PII signal transduction proteins are ATPases whose activity is regulated by 2-oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha V.; Thornton, Jeremy; Merrick, Mike

    2013-01-01

    PII proteins are one of the most widespread families of signal transduction proteins in nature, being ubiquitous throughout bacteria, archaea, and plants. In all these organisms, PII proteins coordinate many facets of nitrogen metabolism by interacting with and regulating the activities of enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane transport proteins. The primary mode of signal perception by PII proteins derives from their ability to bind the effector molecules 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) and ATP or ADP. The role of 2-OG as an indicator of cellular nitrogen status is well understood, but the function of ATP/ADP binding has remained unresolved. We have now shown that the Escherichia coli PII protein, GlnK, has an ATPase activity that is inhibited by 2-OG. Hence, when a drop in the cellular 2-OG pool signals nitrogen sufficiency, 2-OG depletion of GlnK causes bound ATP to be hydrolyzed to ADP, leading to a conformational change in the protein. We propose that the role of ATP/ADP binding in E. coli GlnK is to effect a 2-OG-dependent molecular switch that drives a conformational change in the T loops of the PII protein. We have further shown that two other PII proteins, Azospirillum brasilense GlnZ and Arabidopsis thaliana PII, have a similar ATPase activity, and we therefore suggest that this switch mechanism is likely to be a general property of most members of the PII protein family. PMID:23818625

  14. Na+-K+-ATPase alpha-subunit containing Q905-V930 of gastric H+-K+-ATPase alpha preferentially assembles with H+-K+-ATPase beta.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Eakle, K A; Levenson, R; Farley, R A

    1997-03-01

    Amino acids N886-A911 of the rat Na+-K+-ATPase alpha3-subunit were replaced by the corresponding region (Q905-V930) of the rat gastric H+-K+-ATPase alpha-subunit. The chimera (NGH26) was expressed in yeast with the rat Na+-K+ -ATPase beta1-subunit (rbeta1), the rat H+-K+-ATPase beta-subunit (HKbeta), the chimeric beta-subunit NHbeta1 (containing the carboxy-terminal ectodomain of HKbeta), or the chimeric beta-subunit HNbeta1 (containing the carboxy-terminal ectodomain of rbeta1). Increased resistance to trypsin digestion indicated that NGH26 preferentially assembled with HKbeta and NHbeta1 rather than with rbeta1 or HNbeta1. Ouabain binding also indicated that more functional complexes were assembled when NGH26 was expressed with HKbeta or NHbeta1. These results suggest that the sequence Q905-V930 interacts with the HKbeta-subunit on the extracellular side of the cell membrane. The NGH26 + HKbeta complex is less stable than alpha3 + HKbeta when heated and also has a lower binding affinity for ouabain [dissociation constant (Kd) = 63 nM] compared with alpha3 + rbeta1 or alpha3 + HKbeta (K(d) = 5-10 nM). In contrast, the NGH26+NHbeta1 complex is thermally as stable as alpha3 + rbeta1 complexes, and its ouabain binding affinity (K(d) = 10 nM) is the same as the wild type. These results indicate that the amino acids Q905-V930 of the rat gastric H+-K+-ATPase alpha-subunit preferentially associate with the extracellular domain of H+-K+-ATPase beta-subunit to form functional pump complexes and that the cytoplasmic and/or transmembrane region of the beta-subunit influences the stability of the alpha beta complexes. PMID:9124528

  15. Reverse genetics studies of attenuation of the ca A/AA/6/60 influenza virus: the role of the matrix gene.

    PubMed

    Sweet, T M; Maassab, H F; Herlocher, M L

    2004-11-01

    The matrix (M) gene of influenza virus has been implicated in the attenuation phenotype of the cold adapted (ca) A/AA/6/60 vaccine. Previous studies have evaluated the ca M from A/AA/6/60 in different wild type (wt) virus backgrounds with varying results. In experiments described here, the ca M gene was transfected into the background of its own wt A/AA/6/60 to eliminate the possibility of confounding gene constellation effects. Comparison of the sequence of the wt and the ca A/AA/6/60 revealed one substitution in the nucleotide sequence of M. The molecular techniques of reverse genetics were used to rescue the ca M gene into the virulent wt A/AA/6/60 virus. The selection system used to identify the desired transfectant virus was amantadine resistance, which was introduced into the M2 gene using mutagenesis. The ca A/AA/6/60, the wt A/AA/6/60, a virus which contained wt M and was wt in the remaining seven genes and amantadine resistant (wt/969), a virus which contained the ca M but wt in the other seven genes (ca/969) were all evaluated in mice determine the effect of the ca M. The ca/969 virus was not attenuated in the mouse model when compared to the wt/969 virus, indicating that the ca A/AA/6/60 M does not independently contribute to the attenuation phenotype attributed to the ca A/AA/6/60 vaccine virus. PMID:15511608

  16. Cadmium inhibits motility, activities of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and axonemal dynein-ATPase of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, R; Botana, D; Piñero, S; Proverbio, F; Marín, R

    2016-05-01

    Cd(2+) has been associated with decreased sperm motility in individuals exposed to this element, such as smokers. Among other factors, this lowered motility could be the result of inhibition exerted by Cd(2+) on the activity of the sperm ATPases associated with sperm motility. In this study, we evaluated the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and the axonemal dynein-ATPase activities as well as sperm motility, in the presence of different free Cd(2+) concentrations in the assay media. It was found that spermatozoa incubated for 5 h in a medium containing 25 nm free Cd(2+) showed a significant inhibition of progressive motility, reaching values even lower at higher Cd(2+) concentrations. In addition, it was found that the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase reached maximal inhibition at 50 nm free Cd(2+), with a K50% inhibition of 18.3 nm free Cd(2+). The dynein-ATPase activity was maximally inhibited by 25 nm free Cd(2+) in the assay medium, with a K50% inhibition of 11.3 nm Cd(2+). Our results indicate that the decreased activity of the sperm ATPases might have a critical importance in the biochemical mechanisms underlying the decreased sperm motility of individuals exposed to Cd(2+). PMID:26259968

  17. Antibodies to mammalian and plant V-ATPases cross react with the V-ATPase of insect cation-transporting plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Russell, V E; Klein, U; Reuveni, M; Spaeth, D D; Wolfersberger, M G; Harvey, W R

    1992-05-01

    In immunobiochemical blots, polyclonal antibodies against subunits of plant and mammalian vacuolar-type ATPases (V-ATPases) cross-react strongly with corresponding subunits of larval Manduca sexta midgut plasma membrane V-ATPase. Thus, rabbit antiserum against Kalanchoe daigremontiana tonoplast V-ATPase holoenzyme cross-reacts with the 67, 56, 40, 28 and 20 kDa subunits of midgut V-ATPase separated by SDS-PAGE. Antisera against bovine chromaffin granule 72 and 39 kDa V-ATPase subunits cross-react with the corresponding 67 and 43 kDa subunits of midgut V-ATPase. Antisera against the 57 kDa subunit of both beet root and oat root V-ATPase cross-react strongly with the midgut 56 kDa V-ATPase subunit. In immunocytochemical light micrographs, antiserum against the beet root 57 kDa V-ATPase subunit labels the goblet cell apical membrane of both posterior and anterior midgut in freeze-substituted and fixed sections. The plant antiserum also labels the apical brush-border plasma membrane of Malpighian tubules. The ability of antibodies against plant V-ATPase to label these insect membranes suggests a high sequence homology between V-ATPases from plants and insects. Both of the antibody-labelled insect membranes transport K+ and both membranes possess F1-like particles, portasomes, on their cytoplasmic surfaces. This immunolabelling by xenic V-ATPase antisera of two insect cation-transporting membranes suggests that the portasomes on these membranes may be V-ATPase particles, similar to those reported on V-ATPase-containing vacuolar membranes from various sources. PMID:1534830

  18. Relative importance of aneurysm diameter and body size for predicting AAA rupture in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Lu, Bing; Fokkema, Margriet T.M.; Conrad, Mark; Patel, Virendra I.; Fillinger, Mark; Matyal, Robina; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Women have been shown to have up to a four-fold higher risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture at any given aneurysm diameter compared to men, leading to recommendations to offer repair to women at lower diameter thresholds. Although this higher risk of rupture may simply reflect greater relative aortic dilatation in women who have smaller aortas to begin with, this has never been quantified. Our objective was therefore to quantify the relationship between rupture and aneurysm diameter relative to body size and to determine whether a differential association between aneurysm diameter, body size, and rupture risk exists for men and women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all patients in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) database who underwent endovascular or open AAA repair. Using each patient’s height and weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) were calculated. Next, indices of each measure of body size (height, weight, BMI, BSA) relative to aneurysm diameter were calculated for each patient. To generate these indices, we divided aneurysm diameter (in cm) by the measure of body size [e.g. aortic size index (ASI) = aneurysm diameter (cm) / BSA (m2)]. Along with other relevant clinical variables, we used these indices to construct different age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models to determine predictors of ruptured repair vs. elective repair. Models for men and women were developed separately and different models were compared using the area under the curve (AUC). Results We identified 4045 patients who underwent AAA repair (78% male, 53% EVAR). Women had significantly smaller diameter aneurysms, lower BSA, and higher BSA indices than men (Table 1). For men, the variable that increased the odds of rupture the most was aneurysm diameter (AUC = 0.82). Men exhibited an increased rupture risk with increasing aneurysm diameter (<5.5cm: OR 1.0; 5.5–6.4cm: OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5–1

  19. Electrostatic interactions in catalytic centers of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnaya, Alexandra F.; Romanovsky, Yury M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2003-10-01

    F1-ATPase is one of the most important enzymes of membrane bioenergetics. F1-ATPase is the constituent complex that provides the ATP formation from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) at the expense of energy of electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions generated across the energy transducing mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial membrane. F1-ATPase is a reversible molecular machine that can work as a proton pump due to energy released in the course of ATP hydrolysis (ATPase reaction). The unusual feature of this enzyme is that it operates as a rotary molecular motor. Recently, using the fluorescence microscopy method for the real time visualization of molecular mobility of individual molecules, it was demonstrated directly that the ATP hydrolysis by F1-ATPase is accompanied by unidirectional rotations of mobile subunits (rotor) of F1F0-ATP synthase. In this work, we calculated the contribution of electrostatic interactions between charged groups of a substrate (MgATP), products molecules (MgADP and Pi), and charged amino acid residuals of ATPase molecule to the energy changes associated with the substrate binding and their chemical transformations in the catalytic centers located at the interface of α and β subunits of the enzyme (oligomer complex α3β3γ of bovine mitochondria ATPase). A catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis considered in our work includes conformational changes of α and β subunits caused by unidirectional rotations of an eccentric γ subunit. The knowledge of energy characteristics and force field in catalytic center of an enzyme in different conformational states may be important for further simulation dynamic properties of ATP synthase complex.

  20. An RNA polymerase II transcription factor has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1989-01-01

    A transcription factor required for synthesis of accurately initiated run-off transcripts by RNA polymerase II has been purified and shown to have an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity that is strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters. This transcription factor, designated delta, was purified more than 3000-fold from extracts of crude rat liver nuclei and has a native molecular mass of approximately 230 kDa. DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) and transcription activities copurify when delta is analyzed by hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange HPLC, arguing that transcription factor delta possesses an ATPase (dATPase) activity. ATPase (dATPase) is specific for adenine nucleotides; ATP and dATP, but not CTP, UTP, or GTP, are hydrolyzed. ATPase (dATPase) is stimulated by both double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs, including pUC18, ssM13, and poly(dT); however, DNA fragments containing the TATA region of either the adenovirus 2 major late or mouse interleukin 3 promoters stimulate ATPase as much as 10-fold more effectively than DNA fragments containing nonpromoter sequences. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that delta plays a critical role in the ATP (dATP)-dependent activation of run-off transcription through a direct interaction with the TATA region of promoters. Images PMID:2552440

  1. H/sup +/-translocating ATPases: advances using membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, two primary active transport systems (H/sup +/ -ATPases) in plant cells are examined using membrane vesicles as a simple experimental tool. One electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPase is vanadate-sensitive and associated with the plasma membrane. Another electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPases is anion-sensitive, and localized on the tonoplast (and perhaps other membranes). According to the working model, the plasma membrane and tonoplast-type H/sup +/ -ATPases are detectable in inside-out plasma membrane and right-side-out tonoplast vesicles. The direction of H/sup +/ pumping into these vesicles would be consistent with the results from intact cells where H/sup +/ are extruded from the cell across the plasma membrane and pumped into the vacuole from the cytoplasm. Understanding the properties of H/sup +/ -pumping ATPases using membrane vesicles has paved the way for studies to identify secondary active transport systems coupled to the proton electrochemical gradient. Redox-driven transport systems can also be studied directly using the isolated vesicles. As transport proteins are identified, the functional activities can be specifically studied after reconstitution of the purified protein(s) into phospholipid membrane vesicles. 154 references.

  2. Hormonal regulation of Na -K -ATPase in cultured epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.P.; Jones, D.; Wiesmann, W.P.

    1986-08-01

    Aldosterone and insulin stimulate Na transport through mechanisms involving protein synthesis. Na -K -ATPase has been implicated in the action of both hormones. The authors examined the effect of aldosterone and insulin on Na -K -ATPase in epithelial cells in culture derived from toad urinary bladder (TB6C) and toad kidney (A6). Aldosterone, but not insulin, increases short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) in TB6C cells. Aldosterone increases Na -K -(TSP)ATPase activity after 18 h of incubation, but no effect can be seen at 3 and 6 h. Amiloride, which inhibits aldosterone-induced increases in I/sub sc/, has no effect on either basal or aldosterone stimulated enzyme activity. Both aldosterone and insulin increase I/sub sc/ in A6 cells and when added together are synergistic. Aldosterone stimulates enzyme activity in A6 cells, but insulin alone has no effect. However, aldosterone and insulin together stimulate enzyme activity more than aldosterone alone. It appears that stimulation of Na -K -ATPase activity is involved in aldosterone action in both cell lines but does not appear to be due to increased Na entry, since enhanced enzyme activity is not inhibited by amiloride. In contrast, insulin alone has no direct effect on Na -K -ATPase, although the increased enzyme activity following both agents in combination may explain their synergism on I/sub sc/.

  3. The mitochondrial ATPase. Evidence for a single essential tyrosine residue.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, S J; Lloyd, W J; Lyons, M H; Radda, G K

    1975-05-01

    1. Evidence is presented which indicates that inactivation of the mitochondrial ATPase from bovine heart by the reagent 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan results from modification of one tyrosine residue per enzyme molecule. Activity can be restored by a variety of sulphydryl reagents. 2. In sodium dodecyl sulphate, the nitrogenzofurazan group on tyrosine is transfered to newly exposed sulphydryl groups on the enzyme. 3. The rate of transfer of the nitrobenzofurazan moiety from theenzyme to sulphydryl compounds is compared with that for transfer from the model compound N-acetyl-tyrosine-0(7-nitrobenzo-furazan) ethyl ester, the synthesis and properties of which are also described. 4. The ligands ATP and ADP exert a protective effect on the rate of reaction between the mitochondrial ATPase and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The variation in rate of this reaction with change in pH has also been examined and a pKa of 9.5 estimated for the tyrosine residue. 5. The modification does not prevent substrate binding as judged by changes in the fluorescence of aurovertin, an antibiotic with specific affinity for mitochondiral ATPases. 6. When the ATPase activity of submitochondrial particles is inhibited by 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-furazan, there is a parallel decrease in the extent of the energy-linked fluorescence enhancement of 1-anilino-naphthalene-8-sulphonate induced by ATP hydrolysis. Both ATPase activity and the fluorescence enhancement are restored by sluphydryl reagents. PMID:238839

  4. A Method to Measure Hydrolytic Activity of Adenosinetriphosphatases (ATPases)

    PubMed Central

    Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The detection of small amounts (nanomoles) of inorganic phosphate has a great interest in biochemistry. In particular, phosphate detection is useful to evaluate the rate of hydrolysis of phosphatases, that are enzymes able to remove phosphate from their substrate by hydrolytic cleavage. The hydrolysis rate is correlated to enzyme activity, an extremely important functional parameter. Among phosphatases there are the cation transporting adenosinetriphosphatases (ATPases), that produce inorganic phosphate by cleavage of the γ-phosphate of ATP. These membrane transporters have many fundamental physiological roles and are emerging as potential drug targets. ATPase hydrolytic activity is measured to test enzyme functionality, but it also provides useful information on possible inhibitory effects of molecules that interfere with the hydrolytic process. We have optimized a molybdenum-based protocol that makes use of potassium antimony (III) oxide tartrate (originally employed for phosphate detection in environmental analysis) to allow its use with phosphatase enzymes. In particular, the method was successfully applied to native and recombinant ATPases to demonstrate its reliability, validity, sensitivity and versatility. Our method introduces significant improvements to well-established experimental assays, which are currently employed for ATPase activity measurements. Therefore, it may be valuable in biochemical and biomedical investigations of ATPase enzymes, in combination with more specific tests, as well as in high throughput drug screening. PMID:23472215

  5. Thermodynamic efficiency and mechanochemical coupling of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Okamoto, Tetsuaki; Kudo, Seishi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2011-01-01

    F1-ATPase is a nanosized biological energy transducer working as part of FoF1-ATP synthase. Its rotary machinery transduces energy between chemical free energy and mechanical work and plays a central role in the cellular energy transduction by synthesizing most ATP in virtually all organisms. However, information about its energetics is limited compared to that of the reaction scheme. Actually, fundamental questions such as how efficiently F1-ATPase transduces free energy remain unanswered. Here, we demonstrated reversible rotations of isolated F1-ATPase in discrete 120° steps by precisely controlling both the external torque and the chemical potential of ATP hydrolysis as a model system of FoF1-ATP synthase. We found that the maximum work performed by F1-ATPase per 120° step is nearly equal to the thermodynamical maximum work that can be extracted from a single ATP hydrolysis under a broad range of conditions. Our results suggested a 100% free-energy transduction efficiency and a tight mechanochemical coupling of F1-ATPase. PMID:21997211

  6. CODAS Syndrome Is Associated with Mutations of LONP1, Encoding Mitochondrial AAA+ Lon Protease

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Kevin A.; Jinks, Robert N.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Singh, Kamalendra; Cheng, Iteen; Mikita, Natalie; Thilagavathi, Jayapalraja; Lee, Jae; Sarafianos, Stefan; Benkert, Abigail; Koehler, Alanna; Zhu, Anni; Trovillion, Victoria; McGlincy, Madeleine; Morlet, Thierry; Deardorff, Matthew; Innes, A. Micheil; Prasad, Chitra; Chudley, Albert E.; Lee, Irene Nga Wing; Suzuki, Carolyn K.

    2015-01-01

    CODAS syndrome is a multi-system developmental disorder characterized by cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, and skeletal anomalies. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, we identified four LONP1 mutations inherited as homozygous or compound-heterozygous combinations among ten individuals with CODAS syndrome. The individuals come from three different ancestral backgrounds (Amish-Swiss from United States, n = 8; Mennonite-German from Canada, n = 1; mixed European from Canada, n = 1). LONP1 encodes Lon protease, a homohexameric enzyme that mediates protein quality control, respiratory-complex assembly, gene expression, and stress responses in mitochondria. All four pathogenic amino acid substitutions cluster within the AAA+ domain at residues near the ATP-binding pocket. In biochemical assays, pathogenic Lon proteins show substrate-specific defects in ATP-dependent proteolysis. When expressed recombinantly in cells, all altered Lon proteins localize to mitochondria. The Old Order Amish Lon variant (LONP1 c.2161C>G[p.Arg721Gly]) homo-oligomerizes poorly in vitro. Lymphoblastoid cell lines generated from affected children have (1) swollen mitochondria with electron-dense inclusions and abnormal inner-membrane morphology; (2) aggregated MT-CO2, the mtDNA-encoded subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase; and (3) reduced spare respiratory capacity, leading to impaired mitochondrial proteostasis and function. CODAS syndrome is a distinct, autosomal-recessive, developmental disorder associated with dysfunction of the mitochondrial Lon protease. PMID:25574826

  7. Proteolytic processing of Atg32 by the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1 regulates mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Jin, Meiyan; Liu, Xu; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy, the autophagic removal of mitochondria, occurs through a highly selective mechanism. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Atg32 confers selectivity for mitochondria sequestration as a cargo by the autophagic machinery through its interaction with Atg11, a scaffold protein for selective types of autophagy. The activity of mitophagy in vivo must be tightly regulated considering that mitochondria are essential organelles that produce most of the cellular energy, but also generate reactive oxygen species that can be harmful to cell physiology. We found that Atg32 was proteolytically processed at its C terminus upon mitophagy induction. Adding an epitope tag to the C terminus of Atg32 interfered with its processing and caused a mitophagy defect, suggesting the processing is required for efficient mitophagy. Furthermore, we determined that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1 mediated Atg32 processing and was required for mitophagy. Finally, we found that the interaction between Atg32 and Atg11 was significantly weakened in yme1∆ cells. We propose that the processing of Atg32 by Yme1 acts as an important regulatory mechanism of cellular mitophagy activity. PMID:24025448

  8. Structural Basis for the Magnesium-Dependent Activation and Hexamerization of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Chu; Tai, Hui-Chung; Chang, Mu-Yueh; Ho, Meng-Ru; Babu, C Satheesan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lim, Carmay; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) plays important roles in protein homeostasis and regulation of diverse biological processes. LonA behaves as a homomeric hexamer in the presence of magnesium (Mg(2+)) and performs ATP-dependent proteolysis. However, it is also found that LonA can carry out Mg(2+)-dependent degradation of unfolded protein substrate in an ATP-independent manner. Here we show that in the presence of Mg(2+) LonA forms a non-secluded hexameric barrel with prominent openings, which explains why Mg(2+)-activated LonA can operate as a diffusion-based chambered protease to degrade unstructured protein and peptide substrates efficiently in the absence of ATP. A 1.85 Å crystal structure of Mg(2+)-activated protease domain reveals Mg(2+)-dependent remodeling of a substrate-binding loop and a potential metal-binding site near the Ser-Lys catalytic dyad, supported by biophysical binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations. Together, these findings reveal the specific roles of Mg(2+) in the molecular assembly and activation of LonA. PMID:27041593

  9. Development and Analysis of Synthetic Composite Materials Emulating Patient AAA Wall Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Christa M.

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture accounts for 14,000 deaths a year in the United States. Since the number of ruptures has not decreased significantly in recent years despite improvements in imaging and surgical procedures, there is a need for an accurate, noninvasive technique capable of establishing rupture risk for specific patients and discriminating lesions at high risk. In this project, synthetic composite materials replicating patient-specific wall stiffness and strength were developed and their material properties evaluated. Composites utilizing various fibers were developed to give a range of stiffness from 1825.75 kPa up through 8187.64 kPa with one base material, Sylgard 170. A range of strength from 631.12 kPa to 1083 kPa with the same base material was also found. By evaluating various base materials and various reinforcing fibers, a catalogue of stiffnesses and strengths was started to allow for adaptation to specific patient properties. Three specific patient properties were well-matched with two composites fabricated: silk thread-reinforced Sylgard 170 and silk thread-reinforced Dragon Skin 20. The composites showed similar stiffnesses to the specific patients while reaching target stresses at particular strains. Not all patients were matched with composites as of yet, but recommendations for future matches are able to be determined. These composites will allow for the future evaluation of flow-induced wall stresses in models replicating patient material properties and geometries.

  10. Design of a low-[beta-2]-gap spoke resonator for the AAA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, F. L.; Garnett, R. W.; La Fave, R. P.; Kelley, J. P.; Schrage, D. L.; Tajima, T.; Roybal, P. L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic and structural design of a low-b superconducting spoke resonator for a beam-test in the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). This test is part of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project. Recently, the use of superconducting resonators for energies greater than 6.7 MeV has been approved. The beam test will use the lowest-b resonator from this accelerator design. The choices of the cavity dimensions are driven by its use immediately downstream of the LEDA Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The frequency is 350 MHz. The length corresponds to a geometric b (bg) of 0.175. Our design approach has been to carry out an integrated RF and mechanical design from the start. The final cavity is well understood in terms of RF and mechanical properties. The RF properties, like Q, R/Q, peak surface fields and acceleration efficiency are very reasonable for such a low-b structure. The design also includes power coupler, vacuum and pick-up ports and their influences. The mechanical design added tuning sensitivities, tuning forces, stiffening schemes and the understanding of stresses under various load conditions.

  11. AAA+ Chaperone ClpX Regulates Dynamics of Prokaryotic Cytoskeletal Protein FtsZ*

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Nishikori, Shingo; Miyagi, Atsushi; Ando, Toshio; Ogura, Teru

    2010-01-01

    AAA+ chaperone ClpX has been suggested to be a modulator of prokaryotic cytoskeletal protein FtsZ, but the details of recognition and remodeling of FtsZ by ClpX are largely unknown. In this study, we have extensively investigated the nature of FtsZ polymers and mechanisms of ClpX-regulated FtsZ polymer dynamics. We found that FtsZ polymerization is inhibited by ClpX in an ATP-independent manner and that the N-terminal domain of ClpX plays a crucial role for the inhibition of FtsZ polymerization. Single molecule analysis with high speed atomic force microscopy directly revealed that FtsZ polymer is in a dynamic equilibrium between polymerization and depolymerization on a time scale of several seconds. ClpX disassembles FtsZ polymers presumably by blocking reassembly of FtsZ. Furthermore, Escherichia coli cells overproducing ClpX and N-terminal domain of ClpX show filamentous morphology with abnormal localization of FtsZ. These data together suggest that ClpX modulates FtsZ polymer dynamics in an ATP-independent fashion, which is achieved by interaction between the N-terminal domain of ClpX and FtsZ monomers or oligomers. PMID:20022957

  12. Critical clamp loader processing by an essential AAA+ protease in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Vass, Robert H.; Chien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome replication relies on sliding clamps that are loaded by energy-dependent complexes. In Escherichia coli, the ATP-binding clamp loader subunit DnaX exists as both long (τ) and short (γ) forms generated through programmed translational frameshifting, but the need for both forms is unclear. Here, we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, DnaX isoforms are unexpectedly generated through partial proteolysis by the AAA+ protease casein lytic proteinase (Clp) XP. We find that the normally processive ClpXP protease partially degrades DnaX to produce stable fragments upon encountering a glycine-rich region adjacent to a structured domain. Increasing the sequence complexity of this region prevents partial proteolysis and generates a τ-only form of DnaX in vivo that is unable to support viability on its own. Growth is restored when γ is provided in trans, but these strains are more sensitive to DNA damage compared with strains that can generate γ through proteolysis. Our work reveals an unexpected mode of partial processing by the ClpXP protease to generate DnaX isoforms, demonstrates that both τ and γ forms of DnaX are required for Caulobacter viability, and identifies a role for clamp loader diversity in responding to DNA damage. The conservation of distinct DnaX isoforms throughout bacteria despite fundamentally different mechanisms for producing them suggests there may be a conserved need for alternate clamp loader complexes during DNA damaging conditions. PMID:24145408

  13. Architecture and Nucleotide-Dependent Conformational Changes of the Rvb1-Rvb2 AAA+ Complex Revealed by Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ewens, Caroline A; Su, Min; Zhao, Liang; Nano, Nardin; Houry, Walid A; Southworth, Daniel R

    2016-05-01

    Rvb1 and Rvb2 are essential AAA+ proteins that interact together during the assembly and activity of diverse macromolecules including chromatin remodelers INO80 and SWR-C, and ribonucleoprotein complexes including telomerase and snoRNPs. ATP hydrolysis by Rvb1/2 is required for function; however, the mechanism that drives substrate remodeling is unknown. Here we determined the architecture of the yeast Rvb1/2 dodecamer using cryoelectron microscopy and identify that the substrate-binding insertion domain undergoes conformational changes in response to nucleotide state. 2D and 3D classification defines the dodecamer flexibility, revealing distinct arrangements and the hexamer-hexamer interaction interface. Reconstructions of the apo, ATP, and ADP states identify that Rvb1/2 undergoes substantial conformational changes that include a twist in the insertion-domain position and a corresponding rotation of the AAA+ ring. These results reveal how the ATP hydrolysis cycle of the AAA+ domains directs insertion-domain movements that could provide mechanical force during remodeling or helicase activities. PMID:27112599

  14. Biochemical and Physical Properties of the Methanococcus jannaschii 20S Proteasome and PAN, a Homolog of the ATPase (Rpt) Subunits of the Eucaryal 26S Proteasome†

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Ou, Mark S.; Aldrich, Henry C.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2000-01-01

    M compared to other proteins of the AAA family. Based on electron micrographs, PAN and PAN(Δ1–73) apparently associate with the ends of the 20S proteasome cylinder. These results suggest that the M. jannaschii as well as related archaeal 20S proteasomes require a nucleotidase complex such as PAN to mediate the energy-dependent hydrolysis of folded-substrate proteins and that the N-terminal 73 amino acid residues of PAN are not absolutely required for this reaction. PMID:10692374

  15. Review: The HSP90 molecular chaperone—an enigmatic ATPase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HSP90 molecular chaperone is involved in the activation and cellular stabilization of a range of ‘client’ proteins, of which oncogenic protein kinases and nuclear steroid hormone receptors are of particular biomedical significance. Work over the last two decades has revealed a conformational cycle critical to the biological function of HSP90, coupled to an inherent ATPase activity that is regulated and manipulated by many of the co‐chaperones proteins with which it collaborates. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 ATPase activity results in degradation of client proteins in vivo, and is a promising target for development of new cancer therapeutics. Despite this, the actual function that HSP90s conformationally‐coupled ATPase activity provides in its biological role as a molecular chaperone remains obscure. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 594–607, 2016. PMID:26991466

  16. Review: The HSP90 molecular chaperone-an enigmatic ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Laurence H

    2016-08-01

    The HSP90 molecular chaperone is involved in the activation and cellular stabilization of a range of 'client' proteins, of which oncogenic protein kinases and nuclear steroid hormone receptors are of particular biomedical significance. Work over the last two decades has revealed a conformational cycle critical to the biological function of HSP90, coupled to an inherent ATPase activity that is regulated and manipulated by many of the co-chaperones proteins with which it collaborates. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 ATPase activity results in degradation of client proteins in vivo, and is a promising target for development of new cancer therapeutics. Despite this, the actual function that HSP90s conformationally-coupled ATPase activity provides in its biological role as a molecular chaperone remains obscure. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 594-607, 2016. PMID:26991466

  17. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the V-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Hideki; Furutani, Yuji; Murata, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    V-ATPase is an ATP-driven rotary motor that vectorially transports ions. Together with F-ATPase, a homologous protein, several models on the ion transport have been proposed, but their molecular mechanisms are yet unknown. V-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae forms a large supramolecular protein complex (total molecular weight: ~700,000) and physiologically transports Na⁺ and Li⁺ across a hydrophobic lipid bilayer. Stabilization of these cations in the binding site has been discussed on the basis of X-ray crystal structures of a membrane-embedded domain, the K-ring (Na⁺ and Li⁺ bound forms). Sodium or lithium ion binding-induced difference FTIR spectra of the intact E. hirae V-ATPase have been measured in aqueous solution at physiological temperature. The results suggest that sodium or lithium ion binding induces the deprotonation of Glu139, a hydrogen-bonding change in the tyrosine residue and rigid α-helical structures. Identical difference FTIR spectra between the entire V-ATPase complex and K-ring strongly suggest that protein interaction with the I subunit does not cause large structural changes in the K-ring. This result supports the previously proposed Na⁺ transport mechanism by V-ATPase stating that a flip-flop movement of a carboxylate group of Glu139 without large conformational changes in the K-ring accelerates the replacement of a Na⁺ ion in the binding site. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25111748

  18. Ouabain triggers preconditioning through activation of the Na+,K+-ATPase signaling cascade in rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Sandrine V.; Yang, Changjun; Yuan, Zhaokan; Seminerio, Jennifer; Mouas, Christian; Garlid, Keith D.; Dos-Santos, Pierre; Xie, Zijian

    2007-01-01

    Objective Because ouabain activates several pathways that are critical to cardioprotective mechanisms such as ischemic preconditioning, we tested if this digitalis compound could protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury through activation of the Na+,K+-ATPase/c-Src receptor complex. Methods and Results In Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, a short (4 min) administration of ouabain 10 μM followed by an 8-minute washout before 30 minutes of global ischemia and reperfusion improved cardiac function, decreased lactate dehydrogenase release and reduced infarct size by 40%. Western blot analysis revealed that ouabain activated the cardioprotective phospholipase Cγ1/protein kinase Cε (PLC-γ1/PKCε) pathway. Pre-treatment of the hearts with the Src kinase family inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolol[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2) blocked not only ouabain-induced activation of PLC-γ1/PKCε pathway, but also cardiac protection. This protection was also blocked by a PKCε translocation inhibitor peptide (PKCε TIP). Conclusion Short exposure to a low concentration of ouabain protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury. This effect of ouabain on the heart is most likely due to the activation of the Na+,K+-ATPase/c-Src receptor complex and subsequent stimulation of key mediators of preconditioning, namely PLC-γ1 and PKCε. PMID:17157283

  19. Ter94 ATPase complex targets k11-linked ubiquitinated ci to proteasomes for partial degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Xiangdong; Yin, Wen-chi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Feng, Jing; Wu, Wenqing; Hui, Chi-chung; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2013-06-24

    The Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli family of transcription factors can be degraded either completely or partially from a full-length form (Ci155/Gli(FL)) to a truncated repressor (Ci75/Gli(R)) by proteasomes to mediate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The mechanism by which proteasomes distinguish ubiquitinated Ci/Gli to carry out complete versus partial degradation is not known. Here, we show that Ter94 ATPase and its mammalian counterpart, p97, are involved in processing Ci and Gli3 into Ci75 and Gli3(R), respectively. Ter94 regulates the partial degradation of ubiquitinated Ci by Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase through its adaptors Ufd1-like and dNpl4. We demonstrate that Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase, but not Cul3-Rdx-based E3 ligase, modifies Ci by efficient addition of K11-linked ubiquitin chains. Ter94(Ufd1-like/dNpl4) complex interacts directly with Cul1-Slimb, and, intriguingly, it prefers K11-linked ubiquitinated Ci. Thus, Ter94 ATPase and K11-linked ubiquitination in Ci contribute to the selectivity by proteasomes for partial degradation. PMID:23747190

  20. Structure of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory protein FXYD1 in micelles†

    PubMed Central

    Teriete, Peter; Franzin, Carla M.; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    FXYD1 is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and the principal substrate of hormone-regulated phosphorylation by c-AMP dependent protein kinases A and C in heart and skeletal muscle sarcolemma. It is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of FXYD1 determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Structure determination was made possible by measuring residual dipolar couplings in weakly oriented micelle samples of the protein. This allowed us to obtain the relative orientations of the helical segments of the protein, and also provided information about the protein dynamics. The structural analysis was further facilitated by the inclusion of distance restraints, obtained from paramagnetic spin label relaxation enhancements, and by refinement with a micelle depth restraint, derived from paramagnetic Mn line broadening effects. The structure of FXYD1 provides the foundation for understanding its intra-membrane association with the Na,K-ATPase α subunit, and suggests a mechanism whereby the phosphorylation of conserved Ser residues, by protein kinases A and C, could induce a conformational change in the cytoplasmic domain of the protein, to modulate its interaction with the α subunit. PMID:17511473

  1. Chemomechanical coupling of F1-ATPase under hydrolysis conditions

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is the smallest rotary motor protein that couples ATP hydrolysis/synthesis to rotary motion in a highly reversible manner. F1 is unique compared with other motor proteins because of its high efficiency and reversibility in converting chemical energy into mechanical work. To determine the energy conversion mechanism of F1-ATPase, we developed a novel single-molecule manipulation technique with magnetic tweezers and determined the timing of Pi release, which was the last unknown piece of the chemomechanical coupling scheme of F1. The established fundamental chemomechanical coupling scheme provides evidence to explain the high reversibility between catalysis and mechanical work.

  2. Regulation of cough by neuronal Na(+)-K(+) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Canning, Brendan J; Farmer, David G S

    2015-06-01

    The Na(+)-K(+) ATPases play an essential role in establishing the sodium gradients in excitable cells. Multiple isoforms of the sodium pumps have been identified, with tissue and cell specific expression patterns. Because the vagal afferent nerves regulating cough must be activated at sustained high frequencies of action potential patterning to achieve cough initiation thresholds, it is a certainty that sodium pump function is essential to maintaining cough reflex sensitivities in health and in disease. The mechanisms by which Na(+)-K(+) ATPases regulate bronchopulmonary vagal afferent nerve excitability are reviewed as are potential therapeutic strategies targeting the sodium pumps in cough. PMID:26048736

  3. Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase-mediated proton transport in the rat parietal cell.

    PubMed

    Kopic, Sascha; Wagner, Maximilian E H; Griessenauer, Christoph; Socrates, Thenral; Ritter, Markus; Geibel, John P

    2012-03-01

    The vacuolar-type H-ATPase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in the active acidification of intracellular organelles. In certain specialized cells, such as the renal intercalated cell, apical V-ATPase can also function as a proton secretion pathway. In the parietal cells of the stomach, it has been thought that acid secretion is controlled solely via the H,K-ATPase. However, recent observations suggest that functional V-ATPase is necessary for acid secretion to take place. This study aimed to investigate and characterize the role of V-ATPase in parietal cell proton transport. Individual rat gastric glands were incubated with the pH-sensitive dye (BCECF) to monitor changes in intracellular pH in real time. Parietal cell V-ATPase activity was measured by quantifying the rate of intracellular alkalinization (ΔpH/minute) following an acid load, while excluding the contribution of non-V-ATPase proton transport mechanisms through pharmacological inhibition or ion substitution. Expression of V-ATPase was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. We observed concanamycin A-sensitive V-ATPase activity in rat parietal cells following intracellular acidification and H,K-ATPase inhibition. Furthermore, V-ATPase-mediated proton transport could be abolished by inhibiting trafficking mechanisms with paclitaxel and by stimulating H,K-ATPase with acid secretagogues. Our results propose that parietal cells contain a functional V-ATPase that can be mobilized using a microtubule network. V-ATPase may function as an auxiliary acid secretion or proton-buffering pathway in parietal cells, which is inactive during H,K-ATPase activity. Our findings may have important implications for patients experiencing acid breakthrough under proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:22146938

  4. The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase confer Ca2+/calmodulin sensitivity on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1995-01-01

    The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the rat brain plasma membrane (PM) Ca(2+)-ATPase II containing the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain was connected to the C-terminus of the ouabain sensitive chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit. Expression of this chimeric molecule in ouabain resistant mouse L cells was assured by the high-affinity binding of [3H]ouabain. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, this chimeric molecule exhibited ouabain inhibitable Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity; the putative chimeric ATPase activity was absent in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and activated by Ca2+/calmodulin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this chimeric molecule could bind monoclonal IgG 5 specific to the chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit only in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, suggesting that the epitope for IgG 5 in this chimera is masked in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and uncovered in their presence. These results propose a direct interaction between the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase and the specific regions of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit that are structurally homologous to the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed several possible regions within the Na+,K(+)-ATPase that might interact with the auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. Images PMID:7828596

  5. Structure determination using poorly diffracting membrane-protein crystals: the H+-ATPase and Na+,K+-ATPase case history.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bjørn P; Morth, J Preben; Nissen, Poul

    2010-03-01

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of membrane proteins on the basis of poorly diffracting crystals which exploits molecular replacement for heavy-atom site identification at 6-9 A maximum resolution and improvement of the heavy-atom-derived phases by multi-crystal averaging using quasi-isomorphous data sets. The multi-crystal averaging procedure allows real-space density averaging followed by phase combination between non-isomorphous native data sets to exploit crystal-to-crystal nonisomorphism despite the crystals belonging to the same space group. This approach has been used in the structure determination of H(+)-ATPase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase using Ca(2+)-ATPase models and its successful application to the Mhp1 symporter using LeuT as a search model is demonstrated. PMID:20179343

  6. Deficiency in Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes alters spatial learning, motor activity, and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Amy E; Williams, Michael T; Schaefer, Tori L; Bohanan, Cynthia S; Neumann, Jon C; Behbehani, Michael M; Vorhees, Charles V; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2007-01-17

    Several disorders have been associated with mutations in Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, familial hemiplegic migraine type-2), as well as reduction in Na,K-ATPase content (depression and Alzheimer's disease), thereby raising the issue of whether haploinsufficiency or altered enzymatic function contribute to disease etiology. Three isoforms are expressed in the brain: the alpha1 isoform is found in many cell types, the alpha2 isoform is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, and the alpha3 isoform is exclusively expressed in neurons. Here we show that mice heterozygous for the alpha2 isoform display increased anxiety-related behavior, reduced locomotor activity, and impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Mice heterozygous for the alpha3 isoform displayed spatial learning and memory deficits unrelated to differences in cued learning in the Morris maze, increased locomotor activity, an increased locomotor response to methamphetamine, and a 40% reduction in hippocampal NMDA receptor expression. In contrast, heterozygous alpha1 isoform mice showed increased locomotor response to methamphetamine and increased basal and stimulated corticosterone in plasma. The learning and memory deficits observed in the alpha2 and alpha3 heterozygous mice reveal the Na,K-ATPase to be an important factor in the functioning of pathways associated with spatial learning. The neurobehavioral changes seen in heterozygous mice suggest that these mouse models may be useful in future investigations of the associated human CNS disorders. PMID:17234593

  7. ALKYTIN INHIBITION OF ATPASE ACTIVITIES IN TISSUE HOMOGENATES AND SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS FROM NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of triethyltin (TET) on ATPase activities in brain and liver homogenates and subcellular fractions were compared in neonatal and adult rats. n 5 day old rats, relative sensitivities to TET inhibition were: brain and liver mitochondrial ATPase >> rain Na+/K+ ATPase > b...

  8. A proteomic study of Corynebacterium glutamicum AAA+ protease FtsH

    PubMed Central

    Lüdke, Alja; Krämer, Reinhard; Burkovski, Andreas; Schluesener, Daniela; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2007-01-01

    Background The influence of the membrane-bound AAA+ protease FtsH on membrane and cytoplasmic proteins of Corynebacterium glutamicum was investigated in this study. For the analysis of the membrane fraction, anion exchange chromatography was combined with SDS-PAGE, while the cytoplasmic protein fraction was studied by conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Results In contrast to the situation in other bacteria, deletion of C. glutamicum ftsH has no significant effect on growth in standard minimal medium or response to heat or osmotic stress. On the proteome level, deletion of the ftsH gene resulted in a strong increase of ten cytoplasmic and membrane proteins, namely biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein (accBC), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap), homocysteine methyltransferase (metE), malate synthase (aceB), isocitrate lyase (aceA), a conserved hypothetical protein (NCgl1985), succinate dehydrogenase A (sdhA), succinate dehydrogenase B (sdhB), succinate dehydrogenase CD (sdhCD), and glutamate binding protein (gluB), while 38 cytoplasmic and membrane-associated proteins showed a decreased abundance. The decreasing amount of succinate dehydrogenase A (sdhA) in the cytoplasmic fraction of the ftsH mutant compared to the wild type and its increasing abundance in the membrane fraction indicates that FtsH might be involved in the cleavage of a membrane anchor of this membrane-associated protein and by this changes its localization. Conclusion The data obtained hint to an involvement of C. glutamicum FtsH protease mainly in regulation of energy and carbon metabolism, while the protease is not involved in stress response, as found in other bacteria. PMID:17254330

  9. Single-molecule denaturation and degradation of proteins by the AAA+ ClpXP protease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yongdae; Davis, Joseph H.; Brau, Ricardo R.; Martin, Andreas; Kenniston, Jon A.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    ClpXP is an ATP-fueled molecular machine that unfolds and degrades target proteins. ClpX, an AAA+ enzyme, recognizes specific proteins, and then uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to denature any native structure and to translocate the unfolded polypeptide into ClpP for degradation. Here, we develop and apply single-molecule fluorescence assays to probe the kinetics of protein denaturation and degradation by ClpXP. These assays employ a single-chain variant of the ClpX hexamer, linked via a single biotin to a streptavidin-coated surface, and fusion substrates with an N-terminal fluorophore and a C-terminal GFP-titin-ssrA module. In the presence of adenosine 5′-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATPγS), ClpXP degrades the titin-ssrA portion of these substrates but stalls when it encounters GFP. Exchange into ATP then allows synchronous resumption of denaturation and degradation of GFP and any downstream domains. GFP unfolding can be monitored directly, because intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by denaturation. The time required for complete degradation coincides with loss of the substrate fluorophore from the protease complex. Fitting single-molecule data for a set of related substrates provides time constants for ClpX unfolding, translocation, and a terminal step that may involve product release. Comparison of these single-molecule results with kinetics measured in bulk solution indicates similar levels of microscopic and macroscopic ClpXP activity. These results support a stochastic engagement/unfolding mechanism that ultimately results in highly processive degradation and set the stage for more detailed single-molecule studies of machine function. PMID:19892734

  10. Prevalence of previously undiagnosed abdominal aortic aneurysms in the area of Como: the ComoCuore "looking for AAA" ultrasonography screening.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Giovanni; Durante, Alessandro; Genchi, Vincenzo; Trabattoni, Loris; Beretta, Sandro; Rovelli, Enza; Foglia-Manzillo, Giovanni; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is poor. Long-term follow-up of population-based randomized trials has demonstrated that ultrasound (US) screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) measuring 3 cm or greater decreases AAA-related mortality rates and is cost-effective. We though to prospectively perform during a 26-month period a limited US examination of the infrarenal aorta in volunteers of both gender aged 60-85 years without history of AAA living in the area of Como, Italy. From September 2010 to November 2013 ComoCuore, a no-profit nongovernmental association, enrolled 1555 people (aged 68.8 ± 6.8 years; 48.6 % males). Clinical data and a US imaging of the aorta were collected for each participant. AAA was found in 22 volunteers (1.4 %) mainly males (2.5 % in males vs. 0.4 % in females p = 0.005). Overall, the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in patients with vs. without AAA (mean 2.9 ± 3.0 vs. 1.4 ± 1.0 respectively, p < 0.0001). Independent predictors of AAA on multivariate analysis were age (OR 1.14, 1.06-1.22; p < 0.0001), male gender (OR 8.23, 1.79-37.91; p = 0.007), and both current (OR 4.98, 1.57-15.79; p = 0.007) and previous smoking (OR 2.76, 1.12-8.94; p = 0.03). Our study confirms the feasibility of one time US screening for AAA in a large cohort of asymptomatic people. Independent predictors of AAA were male sex, older age and a history of smoking. Accordingly to recent data the prevalence of AAA seems to be declining, maybe due to a reduction of smoking in Italy. PMID:27215751

  11. Beneficial Renal and Pancreatic Phenotypes in a Mouse Deficient in FXYD2 Regulatory Subunit of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Arystarkhova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental role of Na,K-ATPase in eukaryotic cells calls for complex and efficient regulation of its activity. Besides alterations in gene expression and trafficking, kinetic properties of the pump are modulated by reversible association with single span membrane proteins, the FXYDs. Seven members of the family are expressed in a tissue-specific manner, affecting pump kinetics in all possible permutations. This mini-review focuses on functional properties of FXYD2 studied in transfected cells, and on noteworthy and unexpected phenotypes discovered in a Fxyd2−∕− mouse. FXYD2, the gamma subunit, reduces activity of Na,K-ATPase either by decreasing affinity for Na+, or reducing Vmax. FXYD2 mRNA splicing and editing provide another layer for regulation of Na,K-ATPase. In kidney of knockouts, there was elevated activity for Na,K-ATPase and for NCC and NKCC2 apical sodium transporters. That should lead to sodium retention and hypertension, however, the mice were in sodium balance and normotensive. Adult Fxyd2−∕− mice also exhibited a mild pancreatic phenotype with enhanced glucose tolerance, elevation of circulating insulin, but no insulin resistance. There was an increase in beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass that correlated with activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. The Fxyd2−∕− mice are thus in a highly desirable state: the animals are resistant to Na+ retention, and showed improved glucose control, i.e., they display favorable metabolic adaptations to protect against development of salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes. Investigation of the mechanisms of these adaptations in the mouse has the potential to unveil a novel therapeutic FXYD2-dependent strategy. PMID:27014088

  12. Lycopene protects against atrazine-induced hepatic ionic homeostasis disturbance by modulating ion-transporting ATPases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia; Zhao, Hua-Shan; Xiang, Li-Run; Xia, Jun; Wang, Li-Li; Li, Xue-Nan; Li, Jin-Long; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible chemoprotective role of lycopene (LYC) against atrazine (ATR)-induced ionic disorder and hepatotoxicity in mice. Male kunming mice were treated with LYC (5mg/kg) and/or ATR (50mg/kg or 200mg/kg) by lavage administration for 21days. Ionic disorder was assessed by determining the Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) content and the alteration in ATP enzymes (ATPases) including Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase and the mRNA levels of ATPase's subunits in liver. ATR caused the increases of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and histological changes. LYC pretreatment significantly protected liver against ATR-caused alternation. The significant effect of ATR and LYC on the K(+) and Mg(2+) content in liver was not observed, but ATR increased hepatic Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and decreased Mg(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. The mRNA expressions of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase subunits were regulated significantly by ATR. A significant increase of Ca(2+) content and seven down-regulated mRNA expressions of Ca(2+)-ATPase subunits and a decrease of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity were observed in the ATR-treated mice. Notably, LYC modulated these ATR-induced alterations of ATPase activity and mRNA expression of their subunits. These results suggest that ATR presents hepatotoxicity via regulating hepatic ATPase's activities and their subunit transcriptions and inducing ionic disorder. LYC protects liver against ATR-induced hepatotoxicity, significantly. LYC modulated hepatic ionic homeostasis disturbance via regulation of ATPase activities and their subunits' (1a1, 1b3, 1b4 and 2b4) transcriptions. In summary, these effects play a critical role of LYC-mediated chemoprevention against ATR-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26476475

  13. The insensitivity to uncouplers of testis mitochondrial ATPase.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Memije, M E; Izquierdo-Reyes, V; Delhumeau-Ongay, G

    1988-01-01

    Albumin-free testis mitochondrial ATPase activity failed to be stimulated by either 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) or carbonyl cyanide rho-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP). DNP scarcely enhanced the state 4 respiration and mitochondria proved to be poorly coupled. When 1% bovine serum albumin was added to the isolation medium, DNP or FCCP stimulated ATPase nearly twofold and the dose-response curves for the uncouplers on the QO2 reached a plateau at five- to sixfold. The DNP coupling index (q) also showed a 30-40% improvement. A dose-response curve for oligomycin on the rate of [gamma-32P]ATP synthesis showed a stimulation of ATP synthase activity by 10-100 ng inhibitor/mg protein, suggesting a possible blockade of "open" F0 channels. In the albumin preparation oligomycin inhibited ATP synthesis in the range 10-100 ng/mg protein. Since testis ATPase is known to be loosely bound to the membrane, an effect of albumin, improving tightness in the interaction of the F1 and the F0 sectors of the ATPase, is suggested. PMID:2449129

  14. A structural pathway for activation of the kinesin motor ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Mikyung; Zhang, Xiaohua; Park, Cheon-Gil; Park, Hee-Won; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors move along actin or microtubules by rapidly hydrolyzing ATP and undergoing changes in filament-binding affinity with steps of the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. It is generally accepted that motor binding to its filament greatly increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis, but the structural changes in the motor associated with ATPase activation are not known. To identify the conformational changes underlying motor movement on its filament, we solved the crystal structures of three kinesin mutants that decouple nucleotide and microtubule binding by the motor, and block microtubule-activated, but not basal, ATPase activity. Conformational changes in the structures include a disordered loop and helices in the switch I region and a visible switch II loop, which is disordered in wild-type structures. Switch I moved closer to the bound nucleotide in two mutant structures, perturbing water-mediated interactions with the Mg2+. This could weaken Mg2+ binding and accelerate ADP release to activate the motor ATPase. The structural changes we observe define a signaling pathway within the motor for ATPase activation that is likely to be essential for motor movement on microtubules. PMID:11387196

  15. Structural changes of CF 1-ATPase in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmettes, P.; Pezennec, S.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.

    1992-06-01

    Small changes in neutron scattering spectra were observed when spinach CF 1-ATPase is activated by dithiothreitol or allowed to bind to a nucleotide. It is shown that activation induces a significant conformation change whereas substrate binding does not. In solution, MgATP or MgAMP mainly modifies the interactions between the solute molecules.

  16. Calcium-ATPases: Gene disorders and dysregulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Donna; Rao, Rajini

    2016-06-01

    Ca(2+)-ATPases belonging to the superfamily of P-type pumps play an important role in maintaining low, nanomolar cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels at rest and priming organellar stores, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and secretory vesicles with high levels of Ca(2+) for a wide range of signaling functions. In this review, we introduce the distinct subtypes of Ca(2+)-ATPases and their isoforms and splice variants and provide an overview of their specific cellular roles as they relate to genetic disorders and cancer, with a particular emphasis on recent findings on the secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPases (SPCA). Mutations in human ATP2A2, ATP2C1 genes, encoding housekeeping isoforms of the endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) and secretory pathway (SPCA1) pumps, respectively, confer autosomal dominant disorders of the skin, whereas mutations in other isoforms underlie various muscular, neurological, or developmental disorders. Emerging evidence points to an important function of dysregulated Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in cancers of the colon, lung, and breast where they may serve as markers of differentiation or novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We review the mechanisms underlying the link between calcium homeostasis and cancer and discuss the potential clinical relevance of these observations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26608610

  17. Fluoride inhibition of proton-translocating ATPases of oral bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S V; Bender, G R; Marquis, R E

    1987-01-01

    The ATPases of isolated membranes of lactic acid bacteria were found to be inhibited by fluoride in a complex manner. Among the enzymes tested, that of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was the most sensitive to fluoride, and the initial rate of hydrolysis of ATP was reduced 50% by approximately 3 mM fluoride. The enzyme of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646 was the most resistant, and about 25 mM fluoride was required for 50% inhibition. The response to fluoride appeared to involve reversible, noncompetitive inhibition during short exposure to low levels of fluoride and nonreversible inhibition at higher fluoride levels. In addition, kinetic studies of the effects of fluoride on the enzymes of membranes of S. mutans and L. casei indicated that reversible inhibition was at least partly overcome at high levels of either ATP or Mg. The effects of pH on fluoride inhibition of ATPases were markedly different from the effects of pH on inhibition of acid/base regulation of intact cells by fluoride. It appeared that formation of HF was not required for inhibition of the ATPases. F1 ATPases isolated from the membranes by washing with buffers of low ionic strength proved to be less sensitive to fluoride than the membrane-associated F1F0 holoenzymes, and it was concluded that the F0 or membrane sector of the holoenzyme is involved in fluoride inhibition. PMID:2889674

  18. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  19. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H; Lin, G; Tang, C; Li, D; Nathan, C; Heran Darwin, K

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved interdomain showed a five stranded double {beta} barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. Structure and mutational analysis indicate a major role of the interdomain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome.

  20. A sulfur-based transport pathway in Cu+-ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, Daniel; Zhang, Limei; Sitsel, Oleg; Pedersen, Lotte Thue; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Gourdon, Pontus; Rees, Douglas C; Nissen, Poul; Meloni, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Cells regulate copper levels tightly to balance the biogenesis and integrity of copper centers in vital enzymes against toxic levels of copper. PIB-type Cu+-ATPases play a central role in copper homeostasis by catalyzing the selective translocation of Cu+ across cellular membranes. Crystal structures of a copper-free Cu+-ATPase are available, but the mechanism of Cu+ recognition, binding, and translocation remains elusive. Through X-ray absorption spectroscopy, ATPase activity assays, and charge transfer measurements on solid-supported membranes using wild-type and mutant forms of the Legionella pneumophila Cu+-ATPase (LpCopA), we identify a sulfur-lined metal transport pathway. Structural analysis indicates that Cu+ is bound at a high-affinity transmembrane-binding site in a trigonal-planar coordination with the Cys residues of the conserved CPC motif of transmembrane segment 4 (C382 and C384) and the conserved Met residue of transmembrane segment 6 (M717 of the MXXXS motif). These residues are also essential for transport. Additionally, the studies indicate essential roles of other conserved intramembranous polar residues in facilitating copper binding to the high-affinity site and subsequent release through the exit pathway. PMID:25956886

  1. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt) membrane potential (Δψm) is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk) and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC). Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells. PMID:25714685

  2. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  3. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases in the nervous system during development and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Ana M; Sepulveda, M Rosario

    2010-01-01

    Calcium signaling is used by neurons to control a variety of functions, including cellular differentiation, synaptic maturation, neurotransmitter release, intracellular signaling and cell death. This review focuses on one of the most important Ca2+ regulators in the cell, the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), which has a high affinity for Ca2+ and is widely expressed in brain. The ontogeny of PMCA isoforms, linked to specific requirements of Ca2+ during development of different brain areas, is addressed, as well as their function in the adult tissue. This is based on the high diversity of variants in the PMCA family in brain, which show particular kinetic differences possibly related to specific localizations and functions of the cell. Conversely, alterations in the activity of PMCAs could lead to changes in Ca2+ homeostasis and, consequently, to neural dysfunction. The involvement of PMCA isoforms in certain neuropathologies and in brain ageing is also discussed. PMID:21537478

  4. Assembly of ATPase protein in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Scales, D; Giuseppeinesi

    1976-01-01

    Three specimen preparation techniques for electron microscopy were used to investigate the incorporation of the ATPase polypeptide chains in the membranes of fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) obtained from rabbit skeletal muscle. Observations were made of both normal vesicles and vesicles exposed to trypsin, which is known to cleave the ATPase protein and to alter the ultrastructure of the vesicles in predictable ways. Freeze-fracture replicas reveal the typical 90-A particles on the concave (PF) faces with a density of 5,730 +/- 520/mum2. On the other hand both negatively stained and deeply etched preparations display outer projections, which are absent on trypsin-incubated vesicles. The etched specimens afford for the first time top views of the vesicles in the absence of any stain. These views reveal outer projections on the PS surface with a density of 21,000 +/- 3,900/mum2, a value nearly approximating the density of the ATPase polypeptide chains (106,000 mol wt) calculated on the basis of protein and membrane area determinations. On the other hand, this value is three to four times higher than that found for the density of the 90-A particles on the concave fracture faces. Since both outer projections and 90-A particles are identified with the ATPase protein, it is suggested that the ATPase polypeptide chains are amphiphilic molecules, with polar ends protruding individually as outer projections on the surface of the vesicles, and hydrophobic ends appearing as 90-A particles on the concave fracture faces. The discrepancy between the densities of the outer projections and the 90-A particles may be attributed either to variable penetration of the polypeptide chains into the membrane bilayer, or to formation of oligomers containing three or four hydrophobic ends and appearing as single 90-A particles. Each ATPase chain forms a complex with 20-30 phospholipid molecules. The remaining phospholipids (approximately 70% of the total SR phospholipids) account for

  5. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  6. Bovine brain kinesin is a microtubule-activated ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, S A; Gelfand, V I

    1986-01-01

    Recently, a protein called kinesin was described, which is capable of inducing movement of inert particles along microtubules. To purify this protein from bovine brain, we used the ability of kinesin to bind to taxol-stabilized microtubules in the presence of inorganic tripolyphosphate. The brain kinesin preparation contained one major polypeptide of 135 kDa and four minor polypeptides of 45-70 kDa. The minor polypeptides were eluted from a gel-permeation chromatography column at the same position as the major component. All the polypeptides of the preparation were capable of binding to the microtubules under identical conditions. The kinesin molecule is most probably a complex of these polypeptides. Brain kinesin had a very low ATPase activity (0.06-0.08 mumol X min-1 X mg-1 in 3 mM Mg2+ at pH 6.7). ATPase activity was strongly stimulated by microtubules (Vmax = 4.6 mumol per min per mg of kinesin). Microtubule-activated kinesin ATPase had a Km for ATP between 10 and 12 X 10(-6) M and a Kapp for microtubules (i.e., polymerized tubulin concentration required for a half-maximal activation) of 12-14 X 10(-6) M. Kinesin had a significant ATPase activity even without microtubules if 2 mM Ca2+ was substituted for Mg2+ (Vmax = 1.6 mumol X min-1 X mg-1; Km = 800 X 10(-6) M). Kinesin is therefore a mechanochemical ATPase that is activated by microtubules. Images PMID:2946042

  7. Models for the a subunits of the Thermus thermophilus V/A-ATPase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae V-ATPase enzymes by cryo-EM and evolutionary covariance.

    PubMed

    Schep, Daniel G; Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-03-22

    Rotary ATPases couple ATP synthesis or hydrolysis to proton translocation across a membrane. However, understanding proton translocation has been hampered by a lack of structural information for the membrane-embedded a subunit. The V/A-ATPase from the eubacteriumThermus thermophilusis similar in structure to the eukaryotic V-ATPase but has a simpler subunit composition and functions in vivo to synthesize ATP rather than pump protons. We determined theT. thermophilusV/A-ATPase structure by cryo-EM at 6.4 Å resolution. Evolutionary covariance analysis allowed tracing of the a subunit sequence within the map, providing a complete model of the rotary ATPase. Comparing the membrane-embedded regions of theT. thermophilusV/A-ATPase and eukaryotic V-ATPase fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeallowed identification of the α-helices that belong to the a subunit and revealed the existence of previously unknown subunits in the eukaryotic enzyme. Subsequent evolutionary covariance analysis enabled construction of a model of the a subunit in theS. cerevisaeV-ATPase that explains numerous biochemical studies of that enzyme. Comparing the two a subunit structures determined here with a structure of the distantly related a subunit from the bovine F-type ATP synthase revealed a conserved pattern of residues, suggesting a common mechanism for proton transport in all rotary ATPases. PMID:26951669

  8. Vacuolar ATPases, like F1,F0-ATPases, show a strong dependence of the reaction velocity on the binding of more than one ATP per enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kasho, V N; Boyer, P D

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies with vacuolar ATPases have shown that multiple copies catalytic subunits are present and that these have definite sequence homology with catalytic subunits of the F1,F0-ATPases. Experiments are reported that assess whether the vacuolar ATPases may have the unusual catalytic cooperativity with sequential catalytic site participation as in the binding change mechanism for the F1,F0-ATPases. The extent of reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis to bound ADP and Pi as medium ATP concentration was lowered was determined by 18O-exchange measurements for yeast and neurospora vacuolar ATPases. The results show a pronounced increase in the extent of water oxygen incorporation into the Pi formed as ATP concentration is decreased to the micromolar range. The F1,F0-ATPase from neurospora mitochondria showed an even more pronounced modulation, similar to that of other F1-type ATPases. The vacuolar ATPases thus appear to have a catalytic mechanism quite analogous to that of the F1,F0-ATPases. PMID:2530585

  9. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Arianna; De Masi, Federico; Vaccari, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vertebrates, TFEB (transcription factor EB) and MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates both lysosomal function and organ development. However, it is not clear whether these 2 processes are interconnected. Here, we show that Mitf, the single TFEB and MITF ortholog in Drosophila, controls expression of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase pump (V-ATPase) subunits. Remarkably, we also find that expression of Vha16-1 and Vha13, encoding 2 key components of V-ATPase, is patterned in the wing imaginal disc. In particular, Vha16-1 expression follows differentiation of proneural regions of the disc. These regions, which will form sensory organs in the adult, appear to possess a distinctive endolysosomal compartment and Notch (N) localization. Modulation of Mitf activity in the disc in vivo alters endolysosomal function and disrupts proneural patterning. Similar to our findings in Drosophila, in human breast epithelial cells we observe that impairment of the Vha16-1 human ortholog ATP6V0C changes the size and function of the endolysosomal compartment and that depletion of TFEB reduces ligand-independent N signaling activity. Our data suggest that lysosomal-associated functions regulated by the TFEB-V-ATPase axis might play a conserved role in shaping cell fate. PMID:26727288

  10. Ordered ATP hydrolysis in the gamma complex clamp loader AAA+ machine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron; O'Donnell, Mike

    2003-04-18

    The gamma complex couples ATP hydrolysis to the loading of beta sliding clamps onto DNA for processive replication. The gamma complex structure shows that the clamp loader subunits are arranged as a circular heteropentamer. The three gamma motor subunits bind ATP, the delta wrench opens the beta ring, and the delta' stator modulates the delta-beta interaction. Neither delta nor delta' bind ATP. This report demonstrates that the delta' stator contributes a catalytic arginine for hydrolysis of ATP bound to the adjacent gamma(1) subunit. Thus, the delta' stator contributes to the motor function of the gamma trimer. Mutation of arginine 169 of gamma, which removes the catalytic arginines from only the gamma(2) and gamma(3) ATP sites, abolishes ATPase activity even though ATP site 1 is intact and all three sites are filled. This result implies that hydrolysis of the three ATP molecules occurs in a particular order, the reverse of ATP binding, where ATP in site 1 is not hydrolyzed until ATP in sites 2 and/or 3 is hydrolyzed. Implications of these results to clamp loaders of other systems are discussed. PMID:12582167

  11. Characterization of the macrocyclic carbon suboxide factors as potent Na,K-ATPase and SR Ca-ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerek, Franz; Stimac, Robert; Apell, Hans-Jürgen; Freudenmann, Frank; Moroder, Luis

    2002-12-23

    Recently discovered macrocyclic carbon suboxide (MCS) factors with the general formula (C(3)O(2))(n) were found to strongly inhibit rabbit and rat Na,K-ATPase as well as SR Ca-ATPase. Highly active MCS factors were obtained by a base/acid treatment of their lipophilic precursor isolated from plants. In the ESI-MS spectra, the dominant molar mass ion of 431 Da corresponds to a 1:1 complex of the carbon suboxide hexamer (n=6; M(r)=408 Da) with a Na(+) ion. Additional mass ions identified in positive and negative ion mode were assigned as complexes of the MCS hexamer (n=6) and octamer (n=8) with Na(+) or with TFA(-) in various ratios. The dominant mass ion values of these active MCS factors from plants are also found in mass spectra of previously described endogenous digitalis-like factors (EDLF) from animals. This would suggest that ubiquitously distributed MCS factors may function as putative endogenous regulatory substances of Na,K-ATPase and possibly of other ATPases. With the symmetric display of several equivalent carbonyl or hydroxy groups, the structure of MCS factors is particularly suited for interactions with proteins and other bio-molecules. This could explain the high biological activity and the unusual properties of the MCS factors. PMID:12488055

  12. Synthesis and assembly of functional mammalian Na,K-ATPase in yeast.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, B; Eakle, K A; Scheiner-Bobis, G; Randolph, G R; Chen, C Y; Hitzeman, R A; Farley, R A

    1990-03-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated as an in vivo protein expression system for mammalian Na,K-ATPase. Unlike animal cells, yeast cells lack endogenous Na,K-ATPase. Expression of high affinity ouabain binding sites, ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity, or ouabain-sensitive p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity in membrane fractions of yeast cells was observed to require the expression of both alpha subunit and beta subunit polypeptides of Na,K-ATPase in the same cell. High affinity ouabain binding sites are also expressed at the cell surface of intact yeast cells containing both the alpha subunit and the beta subunit of Na,K-ATPase. These observations demonstrate that both the alpha subunit and the beta subunit of Na,K-ATPase are required for the expression of functional Na,K-ATPase activity and that yeast cells can correctly assemble this oligomeric membrane protein and transport it to the cell surface. PMID:1689721

  13. A dosimetric evaluation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm and Millennium 120 MLC for cranial intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; José, Sol San; Puertas, Enrique; Fernández, Jaime; Casals, Joan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a convolution-based algorithm (anisotropic analytical algorithm [AAA]) implemented in the Eclipse planning system for intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) planning of small cranial targets by using a 5-mm leaf-width multileaf collimator (MLC). Overall, 24 patient-based IMRS plans for cranial lesions of variable size (0.3 to 15.1 cc) were planned (Eclipse, AAA, version 10.0.28) using fixed field-based IMRS produced by a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a 120 MLC (5-mm width on central leaves). Plan accuracy was evaluated according to phantom-based measurements performed with radiochromic film (EBT2, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Film 2D dose distributions were performed with the FilmQA Pro software (version 2011, Ashland, OH) by using the triple-channel dosimetry method. Comparison between computed and measured 2D dose distributions was performed using the gamma method (3%/1 mm). Performance of the MLC was checked by inspection of the DynaLog files created by the linear accelerator during the delivery of each dynamic field. The absolute difference between the calculated and measured isocenter doses for all the IMRS plans was 2.5% ± 2.1%. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high average passing rates of 98.9% ± 1.4% (red channel) and 98.9% ± 1.5% (blue and green channels). DynaLog file analysis revealed a maximum root mean square error of 0.46 mm. According to our results, we conclude that the Eclipse/AAA algorithm provides accurate cranial IMRS dose distributions that may be accurately delivered by a Varian linac equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC.

  14. Nanomechanical and Thermophoretic Analyses of the Nucleotide-Dependent Interactions between the AAA(+) Subunits of Magnesium Chelatase.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan B P; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil

    2016-05-25

    In chlorophyll biosynthesis, the magnesium chelatase enzyme complex catalyzes the insertion of a Mg(2+) ion into protoporphyrin IX. Prior to this event, two of the three subunits, the AAA(+) proteins ChlI and ChlD, form a ChlID-MgATP complex. We used microscale thermophoresis to directly determine dissociation constants for the I-D subunits from Synechocystis, and to show that the formation of a ChlID-MgADP complex, mediated by the arginine finger and the sensor II domain on ChlD, is necessary for the assembly of the catalytically active ChlHID-MgATP complex. The N-terminal AAA(+) domain of ChlD is essential for complex formation, but some stability is preserved in the absence of the C-terminal integrin domain of ChlD, particularly if the intervening polyproline linker region is retained. Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to determine the factors that stabilize formation of the ChlID-MgADP complex at the single molecule level; ChlD was attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in two different orientations, and the ChlI subunits were tethered to a silica surface; the probability of subunits interacting more than doubled in the presence of MgADP, and we show that the N-terminal AAA(+) domain of ChlD mediates this process, in agreement with the microscale thermophoresis data. Analysis of the unbinding data revealed a most probable interaction force of around 109 pN for formation of single ChlID-MgADP complexes. These experiments provide a quantitative basis for understanding the assembly and function of the Mg chelatase complex. PMID:27133226

  15. Nanomechanical and Thermophoretic Analyses of the Nucleotide-Dependent Interactions between the AAA+ Subunits of Magnesium Chelatase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In chlorophyll biosynthesis, the magnesium chelatase enzyme complex catalyzes the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into protoporphyrin IX. Prior to this event, two of the three subunits, the AAA+ proteins ChlI and ChlD, form a ChlID–MgATP complex. We used microscale thermophoresis to directly determine dissociation constants for the I-D subunits from Synechocystis, and to show that the formation of a ChlID–MgADP complex, mediated by the arginine finger and the sensor II domain on ChlD, is necessary for the assembly of the catalytically active ChlHID–MgATP complex. The N-terminal AAA+ domain of ChlD is essential for complex formation, but some stability is preserved in the absence of the C-terminal integrin domain of ChlD, particularly if the intervening polyproline linker region is retained. Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to determine the factors that stabilize formation of the ChlID–MgADP complex at the single molecule level; ChlD was attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in two different orientations, and the ChlI subunits were tethered to a silica surface; the probability of subunits interacting more than doubled in the presence of MgADP, and we show that the N-terminal AAA+ domain of ChlD mediates this process, in agreement with the microscale thermophoresis data. Analysis of the unbinding data revealed a most probable interaction force of around 109 pN for formation of single ChlID–MgADP complexes. These experiments provide a quantitative basis for understanding the assembly and function of the Mg chelatase complex. PMID:27133226

  16. Regulation of proximal tubule vacuolar H+-ATPase by PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.; Gong, Fan; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Myerburg, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) mediates ATP-driven H+ transport across membranes. This pump is present at the apical membrane of kidney proximal tubule cells and intercalated cells. Defects in the V-ATPase and in proximal tubule function can cause renal tubular acidosis. We examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the V-ATPase in the proximal tubule as these two kinases coregulate the V-ATPase in the collecting duct. As the proximal tubule V-ATPases have different subunit compositions from other nephron segments, we postulated that V-ATPase regulation in the proximal tubule could differ from other kidney tubule segments. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat ex vivo kidney slices revealed that the V-ATPase was present in the proximal tubule both at the apical pole, colocalizing with the brush-border marker wheat germ agglutinin, and in the cytosol when slices were incubated in buffer alone. When slices were incubated with a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the V-ATPase accumulated at the apical pole of S3 segment cells. These PKA activators also increased V-ATPase apical membrane expression as well as the rate of V-ATPase-dependent extracellular acidification in S3 cell monolayers relative to untreated cells. However, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased PKA-induced V-ATPase apical accumulation in proximal tubules of kidney slices and decreased V-ATPase activity in S3 cell monolayers. Our results suggest that in proximal tubule the V-ATPase subcellular localization and activity are acutely coregulated via PKA downstream of hormonal signals and via AMPK downstream of metabolic stress. PMID:24553431

  17. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5*

    PubMed Central

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4. PMID:25637630

  18. p97 Composition Changes Caused by Allosteric Inhibition Are Suppressed by an On-Target Mechanism that Increases the Enzyme's ATPase Activity.

    PubMed

    Her, Nam-Gu; Toth, Julia I; Ma, Chen-Ting; Wei, Yang; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Sergienko, Eduard; Petroski, Matthew D

    2016-04-21

    The AAA ATPase p97/VCP regulates protein homeostasis using a diverse repertoire of cofactors to fulfill its biological functions. Here we use the allosteric p97 inhibitor NMS-873 to analyze its effects on enzyme composition and the ability of cells to adapt to its cytotoxicity. We found that p97 inhibition changes steady state cofactor-p97 composition, leading to the enrichment of a subset of its cofactors and polyubiquitin bound to p97. We isolated cells specifically insensitive to NMS-873 and identified a new mutation (A530T) in p97. A530T is sufficient to overcome the cytotoxicity of NMS-873 and alleviates p97 composition changes caused by the molecule but not other p97 inhibitors. This mutation does not affect NMS-873 binding but increases p97 catalytic efficiency through altered ATP and ADP binding. Collectively, these findings identify cofactor-p97 interactions sensitive to p97 inhibition and reveal a new on-target mechanism to suppress the cytotoxicity of NMS-873. PMID:27105284

  19. "Oxygen Sensing" by Na,K-ATPase: These Miraculous Thiols.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Anna; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Control over the Na,K-ATPase function plays a central role in adaptation of the organisms to hypoxic and anoxic conditions. As the enzyme itself does not possess O2 binding sites its "oxygen-sensitivity" is mediated by a variety of redox-sensitive modifications including S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation. This is an overview of the current knowledge on the plethora of molecular mechanisms tuning the activity of the ATP-consuming Na,K-ATPase to the cellular metabolic activity. Recent findings suggest that oxygen-derived free radicals and H2O2, NO, and oxidized glutathione are the signaling messengers that make the Na,K-ATPase "oxygen-sensitive." This very ancient signaling pathway targeting thiols of all three subunits of the Na,K-ATPase as well as redox-sensitive kinases sustains the enzyme activity at the "optimal" level avoiding terminal ATP depletion and maintaining the transmembrane ion gradients in cells of anoxia-tolerant species. We acknowledge the complexity of the underlying processes as we characterize the sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in hypoxic cells, and identify their targets, the reactive thiol groups which, upon modification, impact the enzyme activity. Structured accordingly, this review presents a summary on (i) the sources of free radical production in hypoxic cells, (ii) localization of regulatory thiols within the Na,K-ATPase and the role reversible thiol modifications play in responses of the enzyme to a variety of stimuli (hypoxia, receptors' activation) (iii) redox-sensitive regulatory phosphorylation, and (iv) the role of fine modulation of the Na,K-ATPase function in survival success under hypoxic conditions. The co-authors attempted to cover all the contradictions and standing hypotheses in the field and propose the possible future developments in this dynamic area of research, the importance of which is hard to overestimate. Better understanding of the processes

  20. The mammalian homologue of yeast Afg1 ATPase (lactation elevated 1) mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits.

    PubMed

    Cesnekova, Jana; Rodinova, Marie; Hansikova, Hana; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri; Stiburek, Lukas

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial protein homeostasis is crucial for cellular function and integrity and is therefore maintained by several classes of proteins possessing chaperone and/or proteolytic activities. In the present study, we focused on characterization of LACE1 (lactation elevated 1) function in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. LACE1 is the human homologue of yeast mitochondrial Afg1 (ATPase family gene 1) ATPase, a member of the SEC18-NSF, PAS1, CDC48-VCP, TBP family. Yeast Afg1 was shown to mediate degradation of mitochondrially encoded complex IV subunits, and, on the basis of its similarity to CDC48 (p97/VCP), it was suggested to facilitate extraction of polytopic membrane proteins. We show that LACE1, which is a mitochondrial integral membrane protein, exists as part of three complexes of approximately 140, 400 and 500 kDa and is essential for maintenance of fused mitochondrial reticulum and lamellar cristae morphology. We demonstrate that LACE1 mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits COX4 (cytochrome c oxidase 4), COX5A and COX6A, and is required for normal activity of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain. Using affinity purification of LACE1-FLAG expressed in a LACE1-knockdown background, we show that the protein interacts physically with COX4 and COX5A subunits of complex IV and with mitochondrial inner-membrane protease YME1L. Finally, we demonstrate by ectopic expression of both K142A Walker A and E214Q Walker B mutants, that an intact ATPase domain is essential for LACE1-mediated degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits. Thus the present study establishes LACE1 as a novel factor with a crucial role in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. PMID:26759378

  1. Single point mutations in various domains of a plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increase H(+)-pumping and permit yeast growth at low pH.

    PubMed Central

    Morsomme, P; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; De Meester, S; Thinès, D; Goffeau, A; Boutry, M

    1996-01-01

    In plants, the proton pump-ATPase (H(+)-ATPase) of the plasma membrane is encoded by a multigene family. The PMA2 (plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase) isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia was previously shown to be capable of functionally replacing the yeast H(+)-ATPase, provided that the external pH was kept above pH 5.5. In this study, we used a positive selection to isolate 19 single point mutations of PMA2 which permit the growth of yeast cells at pH 4.0. Thirteen mutations were restricted to the C-terminus region, but another six mutations were found in four other regions of the enzyme. Kinetic studies determined on nine mutated PMA2 compared with the wild-type PMA2 revealed an activated enzyme characterized by an alkaline shift of the optimum pH and a slightly higher specific ATPase activity. However, the most striking difference was a 2- to 3-fold increase of H(+)-pumping in both reconstituted vesicles and intact cells. These results indicate that point mutations in various domains of the plant H(+)-ATPase improve the coupling between H(+)-pumping and ATP hydrolysis, resulting in better growth at low pH. Moreover, the yeast cells expressing the mutated PMA2 showed a marked reduction in the frequency of internal membrane proliferation seen with the strain expressing the wild-type PMA2, indicating a relationship between H(+)-ATPase activity and perturbations of the secretory pathway. Images PMID:8896445

  2. A monoclonal antibody to the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase from pig stomach smooth muscle inhibits plasmalemmal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Verbist, J; Wuytack, F; Raeymaekers, L; Van Leuven, F; Cassiman, J J; Casteels, R

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (2B3) directed against the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase from pig stomach smooth muscle was prepared. This antibody reacts with a 130,000-Mr protein that co-migrates on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with the calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase purified from smooth muscle by calmodulin affinity chromatography. The antibody causes partial inhibition of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in plasma membranes from pig stomach smooth muscle, in pig erythrocytes and human erythrocytes. It appears to be directed against a specific functionally important site of the plasmalemmal Ca2+-transport ATPase and acts as a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding. Binding of the antibody does not change the Km of the ATPase for Ca2+ and its inhibitory effect is not altered by the presence of calmodulin. No inhibition of (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity or of the oxalate-stimulated Ca2+ uptake was observed in a pig smooth-muscle vesicle preparation enriched in endoplasmic reticulum. These results confirm the existence in smooth muscle of two different types of Ca2+-transport ATPase: a calmodulin-binding (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase located in the plasma membrane and a second one confined to the endoplasmic reticulum. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2950852

  3. A novel multigene cloning method for the production of a motile ATPase.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Su; Song, Woo Chul; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Dong-Ik; Kim, Byung Woo; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-08-10

    With the advent of nanotechnology, new functional modules (e.g., nanomotors, nanoprobes) have become essential in several medical fields. Generally, mechanical modulators systems are the principal components of most cutting-edge technologies in modern biomedical applications. However, the in vivo use of motile probes has raised many concerns due to their low sensitivity and non-biocompatibility. As an alternative, biological enzymatic engines have received increased attention. In particular, ATPases, which belong to a class of motile enzymes that catalyze chemical metabolic reactions, have emerged as a promising motor due to their improved biocompatibility and performance. However, ATPases usually suffer from lower functional activity and are difficult to express recombinantly in bacteria relative to their conventional and synthetic competitors. Here, we report a novel functional modified ATPase with both a simple purification protocol and enhanced motile activity. For this mutant ATPase, a new bacterial subcloning method was established. The ATPase-encoding sequence was redesigned so that the mutant ATPase could be easily produced in an Escherichia coli system. The modified thermophilic F1-ATPase (mTF1-ATPase) demonstrated 17.8unit/mg ATPase activity. We propose that derivatives of our ATPase may enable the development of novel in vitro and in vivo synthetic medical diagnostics, as well as therapeutics. PMID:25956244

  4. Identification of Inhibitors of V-ATPase Pumps in Yeast by HTS Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca M.; Allen, Chris; Melman, Sandra D.; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M.; Sklar, Larry A.; Parra, Karlett J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity of the pH-sensitive carboxyfluorescein derivative BCECF was monitored by high throughput flow cytometry in living yeast cells. We measured fluorescence intensity of BCECF trapped in yeast vacuoles, acidic compartments equivalent to lysosomes where V-ATPases are abundant. Because V-ATPases maintain a low pH in the vacuolar lumen, V-ATPase inhibition by concanamycin A alkalinized the vacuole and increased BCECF fluorescence. Likewise, V-ATPase deficient mutant cells had greater fluorescence intensity than wild-type cells. Thus, we detected an increase of fluorescence intensity after short-term and long-term inhibition of V-ATPase function. We used yeast cells loaded with BCECF to screen a small chemical library of structurally diverse compounds in order to identify V-ATPase inhibitors. One compound, disulfiram, enhanced BCECF fluorescence intensity (although to a degree beyond anticipated for pH changes alone in the mutant cells). Once confirmed by dose response assays (EC50=26 μM), we verified V-ATPase inhibition by disulfiram in secondary assays which measured ATP hydrolysis in vacuolar membranes. The inhibitory action of disulfiram against V-ATPase pumps revealed a novel effect previously unknown for this compound. Because V-ATPases are highly conserved, new inhibitors identified could be used as research and therapeutic tools in cancer, viral infections, and other diseases where V-ATPases are involved. PMID:20018164

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar H+-ATPase regulation by disassembly and reassembly: one structure and multiple signals.

    PubMed

    Parra, Karlett J; Chan, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are highly conserved ATP-driven proton pumps responsible for acidification of intracellular compartments. V-ATPase proton transport energizes secondary transport systems and is essential for lysosomal/vacuolar and endosomal functions. These dynamic molecular motors are composed of multiple subunits regulated in part by reversible disassembly, which reversibly inactivates them. Reversible disassembly is intertwined with glycolysis, the RAS/cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, and phosphoinositides, but the mechanisms involved are elusive. The atomic- and pseudo-atomic-resolution structures of the V-ATPases are shedding light on the molecular dynamics that regulate V-ATPase assembly. Although all eukaryotic V-ATPases may be built with an inherent capacity to reversibly disassemble, not all do so. V-ATPase subunit isoforms and their interactions with membrane lipids and a V-ATPase-exclusive chaperone influence V-ATPase assembly. This minireview reports on the mechanisms governing reversible disassembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, keeping in perspective our present understanding of the V-ATPase architecture and its alignment with the cellular processes and signals involved. PMID:24706019

  6. Dietary selenium increases the antioxidant levels and ATPase activity in the arteries and veins of poultry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changyu; Zhao, Xia; Fan, Ruifeng; Zhao, Jinxin; Luan, Yilin; Zhang, Ziwei; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-07-01

    Selenium (Se) deficiency is associated with the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. It has been shown that oxidative levels and ATPase activity were involved in Se deficiency diseases in humans and mammals; however, the mechanism by how Se influences the oxidative levels and ATPase activity in the poultry vasculature is unclear. We assessed the effects of dietary Se deficiency on the oxidative stress parameters (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and hydroxyl radical) and ATPase (Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, Ca(++)-ATPase, Mg(++)-ATPase, and Ca(++)Mg(++)-ATPase) activity in broiler poultry. A total of 40 broilers (1-day old) were randomly divided into a Se-deficient group (L group, fed a Se-deficient diet containing 0.08 mg/kg Se) and a control group (C group, fed a diet containing sodium selenite at 0.20 mg/kg Se). Then, arteries and veins were collected following euthanasia when typical symptoms of Se deficiency appeared. Antioxidant indexes and ATPase activity were evaluated using standard assays in arteries and veins. The results indicated that superoxide dismutase activity in the artery according to dietary Se deficiency was significantly lower (p < 0.05) compared with the C group. The catalase activity in the veins and hydroxyl radical inhibition in the arteries and veins by dietary Se deficiency were significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with the C group. The Se-deficient group showed a significantly lower (p < 0.05) tendency in Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity, Ca(++)-ATPase activity, and Ca(++)Mg(++)-ATPase activity. There were strong correlations between antioxidant indexes and Ca(++)-ATPase activity. Thus, these results indicate that antioxidant indexes and ATPases may have special roles in broiler artery and vein injuries under Se deficiency. PMID:26637493

  7. Mitochondrial ATPase: a target for paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Parmar, D V; Ahmed, G; Khandkar, M A; Katyare, S S

    1995-10-01

    We examined the effect of paracetamol treatment (650 mg/kg) on the function of ATPase from rat hepatic mitochondria. The drug treatment caused an overall 35% decrease in ATPase activity, with a complete loss of the high affinity component as determined by substrate kinetic studies. The Km for the intermediate and low affinity components decreased by about 30% without change in Vmax, which may represent a compensatory mechanism. The drug treatment also resulted in a dramatic decrease in the phase transition temperature by about 19 degrees C without affecting the energies of activation of the enzyme. Mitochondrial total phospholipid content increased significantly with a reciprocal decrease in the cholesterol content. The total phospholipid/cholesterol molar ration increased by 50% after paracetamol treatment. However, phospholipid composition (as % of total) of the mitochondria was unaltered. PMID:8666039

  8. Systematic Comparison of Molecular Conformations of H+,K+-ATPase Reveals an Important Contribution of the A-M2 Linker for the Luminal Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Gastric H+,K+-ATPase, an ATP-driven proton pump responsible for gastric acidification, is a molecular target for anti-ulcer drugs. Here we show its cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure in an E2P analog state, bound to magnesium fluoride (MgF), and its K+-competitive antagonist SCH28080, determined at 7 Å resolution by electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals. Systematic comparison with other E2P-related cryo-EM structures revealed that the molecular conformation in the (SCH)E2·MgF state is remarkably distinguishable. Although the azimuthal position of the A domain of the (SCH)E2·MgF state is similar to that in the E2·AlF (aluminum fluoride) state, in which the transmembrane luminal gate is closed, the arrangement of transmembrane helices in the (SCH)E2·MgF state shows a luminal-open conformation imposed on by bound SCH28080 at its luminal cavity, based on observations of the structure in the SCH28080-bound E2·BeF (beryllium fluoride) state. The molecular conformation of the (SCH)E2·MgF state thus represents a mixed overall structure in which its cytoplasmic and luminal half appear to be independently modulated by a phosphate analog and an antagonist bound to the respective parts of the enzyme. Comparison of the molecular conformations revealed that the linker region connecting the A domain and the transmembrane helix 2 (A-M2 linker) mediates the regulation of luminal gating. The mechanistic rationale underlying luminal gating observed in H+,K+-ATPase is consistent with that observed in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase and other P-type ATPases and is most likely conserved for the P-type ATPase family in general. PMID:25231997

  9. Systematic comparison of molecular conformations of H+,K+-ATPase reveals an important contribution of the A-M2 linker for the luminal gating.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2014-10-31

    Gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase, an ATP-driven proton pump responsible for gastric acidification, is a molecular target for anti-ulcer drugs. Here we show its cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure in an E2P analog state, bound to magnesium fluoride (MgF), and its K(+)-competitive antagonist SCH28080, determined at 7 Å resolution by electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals. Systematic comparison with other E2P-related cryo-EM structures revealed that the molecular conformation in the (SCH)E2·MgF state is remarkably distinguishable. Although the azimuthal position of the A domain of the (SCH)E2·MgF state is similar to that in the E2·AlF (aluminum fluoride) state, in which the transmembrane luminal gate is closed, the arrangement of transmembrane helices in the (SCH)E2·MgF state shows a luminal-open conformation imposed on by bound SCH28080 at its luminal cavity, based on observations of the structure in the SCH28080-bound E2·BeF (beryllium fluoride) state. The molecular conformation of the (SCH)E2·MgF state thus represents a mixed overall structure in which its cytoplasmic and luminal half appear to be independently modulated by a phosphate analog and an antagonist bound to the respective parts of the enzyme. Comparison of the molecular conformations revealed that the linker region connecting the A domain and the transmembrane helix 2 (A-M2 linker) mediates the regulation of luminal gating. The mechanistic rationale underlying luminal gating observed in H(+),K(+)-ATPase is consistent with that observed in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and other P-type ATPases and is most likely conserved for the P-type ATPase family in general. PMID:25231997

  10. From AAA to Acuros XB-clinical implications of selecting either Acuros XB dose-to-water or dose-to-medium.

    PubMed

    Zifodya, Jackson M; Challens, Cameron H C; Hsieh, Wen-Long

    2016-06-01

    When implementing Acuros XB (AXB) as a substitute for anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System, one is faced with a dilemma of reporting either dose to medium, AXB-Dm or dose to water, AXB-Dw. To assist with decision making on selecting either AXB-Dm or AXB-Dw for dose reporting, a retrospective study of treated patients for head & neck (H&N), prostate, breast and lung is presented. Ten patients, previously treated using AAA plans, were selected for each site and re-planned with AXB-Dm and AXB-Dw. Re-planning was done with fixed monitor units (MU) as well as non-fixed MUs. Dose volume histograms (DVH) of targets and organs at risk (OAR), were analyzed in conjunction with ICRU-83 recommended dose reporting metrics. Additionally, comparisons of plan homogeneity indices (HI) and MUs were done to further highlight the differences between the algorithms. Results showed that, on average AAA overestimated dose to the target volume and OARs by less than 2.0 %. Comparisons between AXB-Dw and AXB-Dm, for all sites, also showed overall dose differences to be small (<1.5 %). However, in non-water biological media, dose differences between AXB-Dw and AXB-Dm, as large as 4.6 % were observed. AXB-Dw also tended to have unexpectedly high 3D maximum dose values (>135 % of prescription dose) for target volumes with high density materials. Homogeneity indices showed that AAA planning and optimization templates would need to be adjusted only for the H&N and Lung sites. MU comparison showed insignificant differences between AXB-Dw relative to AAA and between AXB-Dw relative to AXB-Dm. However AXB-Dm MUs relative to AAA, showed an average difference of about 1.3 % signifying an underdosage by AAA. In conclusion, when dose is reported as AXB-Dw, the effect that high density structures in the PTV has on the dose distribution should be carefully considered. As the results show overall small dose differences between the algorithms, when

  11. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.

  12. Oxidative inhibition of red blood cell ATPases by glyceraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Martinho, F; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1991-11-01

    Glyceraldehyde and other simple monosaccharides autoxidize under physiological conditions, forming dicarbonyl compounds and hydrogen peroxide via intermediate free radicals. These products may have deleterious effects on cell components. In this paper we study the effect of glyceraldehyde autoxidation on red-cell ATPase activities. The autoxidation of glyceraldehyde in imidazole-glycylglycine buffer, measured by oxygen consumption, depends on the buffer concentration and decreases in the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase. The addition of DETAPAC inhibits the autoxidation almost completely. When human red-blood-cell membranes are incubated with glyceraldehyde, the red-blood-cell ATPase activities decrease significantly. The addition of DETAPAC, GSH and DTE (dithioerythritol) protects the enzyme from inactivation, but superoxide dismutase and catalase have no effect. Methylglyoxal (a dicarbonyl which is analogous to hydroxypyruvaldehyde derived from glyceraldehyde autoxidation) proved to have a powerful inhibitory action on ATPase activities. The addition of DTE completely protects the enzyme from inactivation, suggesting that the sulphydryl groups of the active site of the enzyme are the critical targets for dicarbonyl compounds. PMID:1836354

  13. A unique mechanism of curcumin inhibition on F1 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Mizuki; Hisasaka, Ryosuke; Iwamoto-Kihara, Atsuko; Futai, Masamitsu; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi

    2014-10-01

    ATP synthase (F-ATPase) function depends upon catalytic and rotation cycles of the F1 sector. Previously, we found that F1 ATPase activity is inhibited by the dietary polyphenols, curcumin, quercetin, and piceatannol, but that the inhibitory kinetics of curcumin differs from that of the other two polyphenols (Sekiya et al., 2012, 2014). In the present study, we analyzed Escherichia coli F1 ATPase rotational catalysis to identify differences in the inhibitory mechanism of curcumin versus quercetin and piceatannol. These compounds did not affect the 120° rotation step for ATP binding and ADP release, though they significantly increased the catalytic dwell duration for ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of wild-type F1 and a mutant lacking part of the piceatannol binding site (γΔ277-286) indicates that curcumin binds to F1 differently from piceatannol and quercetin. The unique inhibitory mechanism of curcumin is also suggested from its effect on F1 mutants with defective β-γ subunit interactions (γMet23 to Lys) or β conformational changes (βSer174 to Phe). These results confirm that smooth interaction between each β subunit and entire γ subunit in F1 is pertinent for rotational catalysis. PMID:25230139

  14. The Mechanism of Hsp90 ATPase Stimulation by Aha1.

    PubMed

    Wolmarans, Annemarie; Lee, Brian; Spyracopoulos, Leo; LaPointe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 is a dimeric molecular chaperone responsible for the folding, maturation, and activation of hundreds of substrate proteins called 'clients'. Numerous co-chaperone proteins regulate progression through the ATP-dependent client activation cycle. The most potent stimulator of the Hsp90 ATPase activity is the co-chaperone Aha1p. Only one molecule of Aha1p is required to fully stimulate the Hsp90 dimer despite the existence of two, presumably identical, binding sites for this regulator. Using ATPase assays with Hsp90 heterodimers, we find that Aha1p stimulates ATPase activity by a three-step mechanism via the catalytic loop in the middle domain of Hsp90. Binding of the Aha1p N domain to the Hsp90 middle domain exerts a small stimulatory effect but also drives a separate conformational rearrangement in the Hsp90 N domains. This second event drives a rearrangement in the N domain of the opposite subunit and is required for the stimulatory action of the Aha1p C domain. Furthermore, the second event can be blocked by a mutation in one subunit of the Hsp90 dimer but not the other. This work provides a foundation for understanding how post-translational modifications regulate co-chaperone engagement with the Hsp90 dimer. PMID:27615124

  15. V-ATPase as an effective therapeutic target for sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Perut, Francesca; Avnet, Sofia; Fotia, Caterina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Salerno, Manuela; Hosogi, Shigekuni; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Baldini, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors show intense glycolysis and, as a consequence, high lactate production and proton efflux activity. We investigated proton dynamics in osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma, and evaluated the effects of esomeprazole as a therapeutic agent interfering with tumor acidic microenvironment. All sarcomas were able to survive in an acidic microenvironment (up to 5.9–6.0 pH) and abundant acidic lysosomes were found in all sarcoma subtypes. V-ATPase, a proton pump that acidifies intracellular compartments and transports protons across the plasma membrane, was detected in all cell types with a histotype-specific expression pattern. Esomeprazole administration interfered with proton compartmentalization in acidic organelles and induced a significant dose-dependent toxicity. Among the different histotypes, rhabdomyosarcoma, expressing the highest levels of V-ATPase and whose lysosomes are most acidic, was mostly susceptible to ESOM treatment. - Highlights: • Osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma survive in acidic microenvironment. • At acidic extracellular pH, sarcoma survival is dependent on V-ATPase expression. • Esomeprazole administration induce a significant dose-dependent toxicity.

  16. Radiation inactivation analysis of chloroplast CF0-CF1 ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.Y.; Chien, L.F.; Pan, R.L.

    1988-06-25

    Radiation inactivation technique was employed to measure the functional size of adenosine triphosphatase of spinach chloroplasts. The functional size for acid-base-induced ATP synthesis was 450 +/- 24 kilodaltons; for phenazine methosulfate-mediated ATP synthesis, 613 +/- 33 kilodaltons; and for methanol-activated ATP hydrolysis, 280 +/- 14 kilodaltons. The difference (170 +/- 57 kilodaltons) between 450 +/- 24 and 280 +/- 14 kilodaltons is explained to be the molecular mass of proton channel (coupling factor 0) across the thylakoid membrane. Our data suggest that the stoichiometry of subunits I, II, and III of coupling factor 0 is 1:2:15. Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase activated by methanol, heat, and trypsin digestion have a similar functional size. However, anions such as SO/sub 3/(2-) and CO/sub 3/(2-) increased the molecular mass for both ATPase's (except trypsin-activated Mg2+-ATPase) by 12-30%. Soluble coupling factor 1 has a larger target size than that of membrane-bound. This is interpreted as the cold effect during irradiation.

  17. Final Report for DE-FG02-04ER15626: P-type ATPases in Plants – Role of Lipid Flippases in Membrane Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2015-02-24

    The long-range goal of the research is to understand the structure and biological functions of different P-type ATPases (ion pumps) in plant cells, and to use that knowledge to enhance the production of bioenergy from plants, or plant-research inspired technologies. Ptype ATPases include ion pumps that specifically transport H+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, or Na+, as well as at least one unusual subfamily that appears to function as lipid flippases, flipping specific lipids from one side of a membrane bilayer to the other. As a group, P-type ATPases are thought to consume more than 1/3 of the cellular ATP in typical eukaryotic cells. Recent research in the Harper lab focused on understanding the biochemical and biological functions of P-type ATPases that flip lipids. These flippases belong to the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases. The activity of lipid flippases is thought to induce membrane curvature and/or create an asymmetry in which certain lipid head groups are preferential exposed to one surface or the other. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 12 members of this family referred to as Aminophospholipid ATPase (ALA) 1 to ALA12. Using genetic knockouts, the Harper lab has established that this unusual subfamily of P-type ATPases are critical for plants to cope with even modest changes in temperature (e.g., down to 15°C, or up to 30°C). In addition, members of one subclade are critical for cell expansion, and loss of function mutants result in severe dwarfism. Other members of this same sub-clade are critical for pollen tube growth, and loss of function mutants are sterile under conditions of hot days and cold nights. While the cellular processes that depend on lipid flippases are still unclear, the genetic analysis of loss of function mutants clearly show they are of fundamental importance to plant growth and response to the environment.

  18. The Na(+)-translocating ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii is a F1F0-type enzyme as deduced from the primary structure of its beta, gamma and epsilon subunits.

    PubMed

    Forster, A; Daniel, R; Müller, V

    1995-05-10

    A 4.5 kbp EcoRI fragment hybridizing to a fragment of uncD (coding for subunit beta of F1F0-ATPases) was cloned from chromosomal DNA of Acetobacterium woodii. The nucleotide sequence was determined and revealed five open reading frames (ORF), four of which were identified to code for subunits of the Na(+)-ATPase. The deduced amino acid sequences of these ORF's are homologous to subunit alpha (partial coding sequence, C-terminal end), gamma, beta and epsilon of F1F0-ATPases from various organisms; furthermore, the organization of the genes in the order uncA (alpha), uncG (gamma), uncD (beta), uncC (epsilon) is identical to the structure of unc operon as present in most bacteria. Downstream of uncC is an ORF whose deduced amino acid sequence has 53% sequence homology to AlgD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structure and organization of the unc genes are the final proof that the Na(+)-ATPase from A. woodii is a member of the family of F1F0-ATPases. PMID:7748890

  19. Family Preservation & Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Meezan, William

    This book reports a study of the outcomes of home-based family preservation services for abusive and neglectful families in Los Angeles County. Using the Family Assessment Form, the research project evaluated services provided by two voluntary agencies, and focused on changes in family functioning between the opening and closing of services during…

  20. The Chromodomains of the Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Regulate DNA Access to the ATPase Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hauk, G.; McKnight, J; Nodelman, I; Bowman, G

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-driven machines that assemble, slide, and remove nucleosomes from DNA, but how the ATPase motors of remodelers are regulated is poorly understood. Here we show that the double chromodomain unit of the Chd1 remodeler blocks DNA binding and activation of the ATPase motor in the absence of nucleosome substrates. The Chd1 crystal structure reveals that an acidic helix joining the chromodomains can pack against a DNA-binding surface of the ATPase motor. Disruption of the chromodomain-ATPase interface prevents discrimination between nucleosomes and naked DNA and reduces the reliance on the histone H4 tail for nucleosome sliding. We propose that the chromodomains allow Chd1 to distinguish between nucleosomes and naked DNA by physically gating access to the ATPase motor, and we hypothesize that related ATPase motors may employ a similar strategy to discriminate among DNA-containing substrates.

  1. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  2. Crystal structure of yeast V1-ATPase in the autoinhibited state.

    PubMed

    Oot, Rebecca A; Kane, Patricia M; Berry, Edward A; Wilkens, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) are essential proton pumps that acidify the lumen of subcellular organelles in all eukaryotic cells and the extracellular space in some tissues. V-ATPase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism referred to as reversible disassembly, wherein the soluble catalytic sector, V1, is released from the membrane and its MgATPase activity silenced. The crystal structure of yeast V1 presented here shows that activity silencing involves a large conformational change of subunit H, with its C-terminal domain rotating ~150° from a position near the membrane in holo V-ATPase to a position at the bottom of V1 near an open catalytic site. Together with biochemical data, the structure supports a mechanistic model wherein subunit H inhibits ATPase activity by stabilizing an open catalytic site that results in tight binding of inhibitory ADP at another site. PMID:27295975

  3. Brain Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease.

    PubMed

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-06-01

    Na(+)/K(+) pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K(+) with the exit of Na(+) from cells, being the responsible for Na(+)/K(+) equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca(2+) mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na(+), K(+)-ATPase involvement

  4. Brain Na+, K+-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-01-01

    Na+/K+ pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5’-triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K+ with the exit of Na+ from cells, being the responsible for Na+/K+ equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na+, K+-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca2+ mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na+, K+-ATPase involvement in signaling pathways

  5. SU-E-T-137: Dosimetric Validation for Pinnacle, Acuros, AAA, and Brainlab Algorithms with Induced Inhomogenieties

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, P; Tambasco, M; LaFontaine, R; Burns, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric accuracy of the Eclipse 11.0 Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), Pinnacle-3 9.2 Collapsed Cone Convolution, and the iPlan 4.1 Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) algorithms using measurement as the gold standard. Methods: Ion chamber and diode measurements were taken for 6, 10, and 18 MV beams in a phantom made up of slab densities corresponding to solid water, lung, and bone. The phantom was setup at source-to-surface distance of 100 cm, and the field sizes were 3.0 × 3.0, 5.0 × 5.0, and 10.0 × 10.0 cm2. Data from the planning systems were computed along the central axis of the beam. The measurements were taken using a pinpoint chamber and edge diode for interface regions. Results: The best agreement between data from the algorithms and our measurements occurs away from the slab interfaces. For the 6 MV beam, iPlan 4.1 MC software performs the best with 1.7% absolute average percent difference from measurement. For the 10 MV beam, iPlan 4.1 PB performs the best with 2.7% absolute average percent difference from measurement. For the 18 MV beam, Acuros performs the best with 2.0% absolute average percent difference from measurement. It is interesting to note that the steepest drop in dose occurred the at lung heterogeneity-solid water interface of the18 MV, 3.0 × 3.0 cm2 field size setup. In this situation, Acuros and AAA performed best with an average percent difference within −1.1% of measurement, followed by iPlan 4.1 MC, which was within 4.9%. Conclusion: This study shows that all of the algorithms perform reasonably well in computing dose in a heterogeneous slab phantom. Moreover, Acuros and AAA perform particularly well at the lung-solid water interfaces for higher energy beams and small field sizes.

  6. Aluminum regulates oxalate secretion and plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity independently in tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Li; Zhu, Xiao Fang; Peng, You Xiang; Zheng, Cheng; Ming, Feng; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrated that aluminum (Al)-induced oxalate secretion and plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase activity in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum 'Hezuo903') roots were poorly correlated. In addition, vanadate, an inhibitor of PM H(+)-ATPase, had no effect on Al-induced oxalate secretion, but significantly inhibited enzyme activity. An anion channel inhibitor phenylglyoxal inhibited oxalate secretion, but not PM H(+)-ATPase activity. Exposure of tomato roots to 10 μM LaCl(3) also stimulated PM H(+)-ATPase activity; however, La failed to induce oxalate secretion. Furthermore, Al-induced changes of PM H(+)-ATPase activity were not associated with oxalate secretion in two tomato cultivars differing in the ability to secrete oxalate under Al stress. These results indicate that Al independently regulates oxalate secretion and PM H(+)-ATPase activity in tomato roots. Analysis of expression levels of PM H(+)-ATPase genes by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and protein by Western blot and immunodetection revealed that the regulation of PM H(+)-ATPase in response to Al was subjected to transcriptional and posttranscriptional control. However, since neither transcriptional level of genes nor translational level of proteins directly relate to the enzyme activity, posttranslational modification of PM H(+)-ATPase under Al stress likely contributes to changes in activity of this protein. PMID:21424534

  7. Effects of Vanadate on the Plasma Membrane ATPase of Red Beet and Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Sharman D.; Spanswick, Roger M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of vanadate on the plant plasma membrane ATPase were investigated in plasma membrane fractions derived from corn roots (Zea mays L.) and red beets (Beta vulgaris L.). The Ki for vanadate inhibition of the plasma membrane ATPase from corn roots and red beets was between 6 and 15 micromolar vanadate. In both membrane fractions, 80% to 90% of the total ATPase was inhibited at vanadate concentrations below 100 micromolar. Vanadate inhibition was optimal at pH 6.5, enhanced by the presence of K+, and was partially reversed by 1 millimolar EDTA. The Mg:ATP kinetics for the plasma membrane ATPase were hyperbolic in both the absence and presence of vanadate. Vanadate decreased both the Km and Vmax of the red beet plasma membrane ATPase, indicating that vanadate inhibits the ATPase uncompetitively. These results indicate many similarities with respect to vanadate inhibition between the plant plasma membrane ATPase and other major iontranslocating ATPases from fungal and animal cells. The high sensitivity to vanadate reported here, however, differs from other reports of vanadate inhibition of the plant plasma membrane ATPase from corn, beets, and in some instances oats. PMID:16663670

  8. Plasma Membrane ATPase Activity following Reversible and Irreversible Freezing Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Iswari, S.; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane ATPase has been proposed as a site of functional alteration during early stages of freezing injury. To test this, plasma membrane was purified from Solanum leaflets by a single step partitioning of microsomes in a dextran-polyethylene glycol two phase system. Addition of lysolecithin in the ATPase assay produced up to 10-fold increase in ATPase activity. ATPase activity was specific for ATP with a Km around 0.4 millimolar. Presence of the ATPase enzyme was identified by immunoblotting with oat ATPase antibodies. Using the phase partitioning method, plasma membrane was isolated from Solanum commersonii leaflets which had four different degrees of freezing damage, namely, slight (reversible), partial (partially reversible), substantial and total (irreversible). With slight (reversible) damage the plasma membrane ATPase specific activity increased 1.5- to 2-fold and its Km was decreased by about 3-fold, whereas the specific activity of cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase in the microsomes were not different from the control. However, with substantial (lethal, irreversible) damage, there was a loss of membrane protein, decrease in plasma membrane ATPase specific activity and decrease in Km, while cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c reductase were unaffected. These results support the hypothesis that plasma membrane ATPase is altered by slight freeze-thaw stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666856

  9. Thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of red blood cell Ca2+-ATPase activity: interspecies variation.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Kite, J H; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1982-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility to thyroid hormone stimulation of membrane-associated Ca2+-ATPase activity has been examined in red blood cells from rat, rabbit, dog, monkey, and man. Monkey and human red cell Ca2+-ATPase activities responded comparably to 10(-10)M T4 or T3. Basal and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity in rabbit erythrocytes was four-fold higher than in primate red cells. Rat and dog red cell Ca2+-ATPase did not respond to iodothyronines in vitro. PMID:6459228

  10. Sub-chronic effect of neem based pesticide (Vepacide) on acetylcholinesterase and ATPases in rat.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M F; Siddiqui, M K; Jamil, K

    1999-09-01

    Acetylcholinesterases (AChE), Na(+)-K+, Mg2+ and Ca(2+)-ATPases were monitored in rat brain when treated orally with 80, 160 and 320 mg/kg of Vepacide, an active ingredient from neem seed oil, daily for 90 days. Brain AChE, Na(+)-K+ and Ca(2+)-ATPases were inhibited whereas Mg(2+)-ATPase levels were enhanced in both the sexes after 45 and 90 days of treatment. The relative sensitivities of these ATPases to Vepacide indicated that Ca(2+)-ATPase being more sensitive than Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in both the sexes. The magnitude of Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibited by this compound was higher than that of brain AChE. It appears to be sexual dimorphism in the alterations of brain AChE, Na(+)-K+ and Mg(2+)-ATPases by Vepacide with females being significant when compared with males. After 28 days of post treatment the alterations observed were approached to those of controls both in male and female rats showing reversal of the toxicity. These results indicated that the ATPases were potently inhibited by Vepacide and seemed to be its precise target among the enzyme studied. This can be used as biochemical marker of exposure to this neem derived product. PMID:10466107

  11. Do ATP4- and Mg2+ bind stepwise to the F1-ATPase of Halobacterium saccharovorum?

    PubMed

    Schobert, B

    1998-06-01

    It is commonly believed that MgATP2- is the substrate of F1-ATPases and ATP4- acts as a competitive inhibitor. However, the velocity equation for such competitive inhibition is equivalent to that for a rapid equilibrium ordered binding mechanism in which ATP4- adds first and the binding of Mg2+ is dependent on the formation of the E x ATP4- complex. According to this ordered-binding model, solution formed MgATP2- is not recognized by the ATPase as a direct substrate, and the high-affinity binding of Mg2+ to the E x ATP4- complex is the key reaction towards the formation of the ternary complex. These models (and others) were tested with an F1- ATPase, isolated from Halobacterium saccharovorum, by evaluating the rate of ATP hydrolysis as a function of free [ATP4-] or free [Mg2+]. The rates were asymmetrical with respect to increasing [ATP4-] versus increasing [Mg2+]. For the ordered-binding alternative, a series of apparent dissociation constants were obtained for ATP4-(K(A)aPP), which decreased as [Mg2+] increased. From this family of K(A)aPP the true K(A) was retrieved by extrapolation to [Mg2+] = 0 and was found to be 0.2 mM. The dissociation constants for Mg2+, established from these experiments, were also apparent (K(B)aPP) and dependent on [ATP4-] as well as on the pH. The actual K(B) was established from a series of K(B)aPP by extrapolating to [ATP4-] = infinity and to the absence of competing protons, and was found to be 0.0041 mM. The pKa of the protonable group for Mg2+ binding is 8.2. For the competitive inhibition alternative, rearrangement of the constants and fitting to the velocity equation gave an actual binding constant for MgATP2- (K(EAB)) of 0.0016 mM and for ATP4- (K(EA)) of 0.2 mM. Decision between the two models has far-reaching mechanistic implications. In the competitive inhibition model MgATP2- binds with high affinity, but Mg2+ cannot bind once the E x ATP4- complex is formed, while in the ordered-binding model binding of Mg2+ requires that

  12. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

    PubMed

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Mishra, Amarjit; Su, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Ayalew, Sahlu; Hartson, Steven D; Liu, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+) into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+) release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+) mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion. PMID:20169059

  13. Rapid activation of gill Na+,K+-ATPase in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    The rapid activation of gill Na+,K+-ATPase was analyzed in the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) transferred from low salinity (0.1 ppt) to high salinity (25-35 ppt). In parr and presmolt, Salmo salar gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity started to increase 3 days after transfer. Exposure of Fundulus heteroclitus to 35 ppt seawater (SW) induced a rise in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity 3 hr after transfer. After 12 hr, the values dropped to initial levels but showed a second significant increase 3 days after transfer. The absence of detergent in the enzyme assay resulted in lower values of gill Na+,K+-ATPase, and the rapid increase after transfer to SW was not observed. Na+,K+-ATPase activity of gill filaments in vitro for 3 hr increased proportionally to the osmolality of the culture medium (600 mosm/kg > 500 mosm/kg > 300 mosm/kg). Osmolality of 800 mosm/kg resulted in lower gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity relative to 600 mosm/kg. Increasing medium osmolality to 600 mosm/kg with mannitol also increased gill Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity observed in hyperosmotic medium in a dose-dependent manner (10-4 M > 10-5 M > 10-6 M). Actinomycin D or bumetanide in the culture (doses of 10-4 M, 10-5 M, and 10-6 M) did not affect gill Na+,K+-ATPase. Injection of fish with actinomycin D prior to gill organ culture, however, prevented the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity in hyperosmotic media. The results show a very rapid and transitory increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the first hours after the transfer of Fundulus heteroclitus to SW that is dependent on translational and transcriptional processes. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Response of tonoplast H sup + -pump and ATPase to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.; Lin Wang; Wagner, G.J. )

    1991-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that Cd{sup 2+} accumulates in vacuoles of tobacco leaves exposed to 20 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+}, after 4 days of growth in Hoaglands medium. The accumulation of Cd{sup 2+} is also associated with the accumulation of Cd{sup 2+}-peptide (phytocelatin) in the vacuole. The transport of Cd{sup 2+} and/or Cd{sup 2+}-peptide across the tonoplast membrane may be energized by the H{sup +} electrochemical gradient that exists across this membrane and which is generated by an H{sup +}-pumping ATPase. In vitro 2 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+} inhibits oat root tonoplast H{sup +}-pumping ATPase by 50% with a Ki of approximately 4.0 {mu}M. However, exposure to 2- {mu}M Cd{sup 2+} for 4 days during germination and growth of oat seedlings causes a 100% increase in tonoplast H{sup +}-pumping ATPase activity. This increase on exposure to Cd{sup 2+} during growth may represent part of the physiological mechanism whereby plants accumulate Cd{sup 2+} and/or Cd{sup 2+}-peptide within the vacuole. This could also represent an acclimation of H{sup +}-pumping activity to Cd{sup 2+}. Current studies are testing the effects of Cd{sup 2+}-peptide, organic acids and other ligands on H{sup +}-pumping activity and Cd{sup 2+} transport in root derived tonoplast vesicles of oat and tobacco.

  15. Epidermal Growth Factor-induced Vacuolar (H+)-ATPase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanqing; Parmar, Amanda; Roux, Emmanuelle; Balbis, Alejandro; Dumas, Victor; Chevalier, Stephanie; Posner, Barry I.

    2012-01-01

    Using proteomics and immunofluorescence, we demonstrated epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced recruitment of extrinsic V1 subunits of the vacuolar (H+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) to rat liver endosomes. This was accompanied by reduced vacuolar pH. Bafilomycin, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, inhibited EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation as indicated by a decrease in eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) phosphorylation and kinase activity. There was no corresponding inhibition of EGF-induced Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation. Chloroquine, a neutralizer of vacuolar pH, mimicked bafilomycin effects. Bafilomycin did not inhibit the association of mTORC1 with Raptor nor did it affect AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Rather, the intracellular concentrations of essential but not non-essential amino acids were decreased by bafilomycin in EGF-treated primary rat hepatocytes. Cycloheximide, a translation elongation inhibitor known to augment intracellular amino acid levels, prevented the effect of bafilomycin on amino acids levels and completely reversed its inhibition of EGF-induced mTORC1 activation. In vivo administration of EGF stimulated the recruitment of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) but not mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to endosomes and lysosomes. This was inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Our results suggest a role for vacuolar acidification in EGF signaling to mTORC1. PMID:22689575

  16. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded F(o) generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F(1). Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F(1) catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F(1) torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F(1)-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F(1) shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F(1) energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F(1)-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  17. Acid tolerance, proton permeabilities, and membrane ATPases of oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, G R; Sutton, S V; Marquis, R E

    1986-01-01

    Differences in acid tolerance among representative oral streptococci were found to be related more closely to the dynamic permeabilities of the bacteria to protons than to differences in the sensitivities of cell membranes to gross damage caused by environmental acidification. For Streptococcus mutans GS-5, Streptococcus sanguis NCTC 10904, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, gross membrane damage, indicated by the release of magnesium from whole cells, occurred at pH values below about 4 and was rapid and extensive at pH values of about 3 or less. A more aciduric, lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646, was more resistant to environmental acidification, and gross membrane damage was evident only at pH values below 3. Assessments of the movements of protons into S. mutans cells after an acid pulse at various pH values indicated that permeability to protons was minimal at a pH value of about 5, at which the average half time for pH equilibration across the cell membrane was about 12 min. The corresponding values for the less aciduric organism S. sanguis were pH 7 and 8.2 min, and the values for the intermediate organism S. salivarius were pH 6 and 6.6 min. The ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide acted to increase markedly the permeability of each organism to protons, and this action indicated that permeability involved not only the passive inflow of protons but also active outflow through the proton-translocating membrane ATPase. Membranes were isolated from each of the bacteria, and pH profiles for ATPase activities indicated pH optima of about 7.5, 7.0, 6.0, and 5.0 for S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. mutans, and L. casei, respectively. Thus, the pH profiles for the enzymes reflected the acid tolerances of the bacteria and the permeabilities of whole cells to protons. PMID:3015800

  18. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    FoF1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded Fo generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F1. Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F1 catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F1 torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F1-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F1 shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F1 energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F1-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  19. The Gastric H,K ATPase as a Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, George; Shin, Jai Moo; Vagin, Olga; Lambrecht, Nils; Yakubov, Iskandar; Munson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The recent progress in therapy if acid disease has relied heavily on the performance of drugs targeted against the H,K ATPase of the stomach and the H2 receptor antagonists. It has become apparent in the last decade that the proton pump is the target that has the likelihood of being the most sustainable area of therapeutic application in the regulation of acid suppression. The process of activation of acid secretion requires a change in location of the ATPase from cytoplasmic tubules into the microvilli of the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell. Stimulation of the resting parietal cell, with involvement of F-actin and ezrin does not use significant numbers of SNARE proteins, because their message is depleted in the pure parietal cell transcriptome. The cell morphology and gene expression suggest a tubule fusion-eversion event. As the active H,K ATPase requires efflux of KCl for activity we have, using the transcriptome derived from 99% pure parietal cells and immunocytochemistry, provided evidence that the KCl pathway is mediated by a KCQ1/KCNE2 complex for supplying K+ and CLIC6 for supplying the accompanying Cl−. The pump has been modeled on the basis of the structures of different conformations of the sr Ca ATPase related to the catalytic cycle. These models use the effects of site directed mutations and identification of the binding domain of the K competitive acid pump antagonists or the defined site of binding for the covalent class of proton pump inhibitors. The pump undergoes conformational changes associated with phosphorylation to allow the ion binding site to change exposure from cytoplasmic to luminal exposure. We have been able to postulate that the very low gastric pH is achieved by lysine 791 motion extruding the hydronium ion bound to carboxylates in the middle of the membrane domain. These models also allow description of the K+ entry to form the K+ liganded form of the enzyme and the reformation of the ion site inward conformation thus

  20. Purification of Na,K-ATPase from Pig Kidney.

    PubMed

    Fedosova, Natalya U

    2016-01-01

    The method of purification of Na,K-ATPase from pig kidney is based on a differential centrifugation and SDS-treatment of a microsomal preparation. The yield is 0.4 mg protein per 1 g tissue with the specific (ouabain-sensitive) activity of 25-28 μmol Pi/min per mg protein and nucleotide binding capacity of 3 nmol/mg. The protein/lipid ratio is 1/1 (mg/mg) with a protein purity of ~80 %. PMID:26695017

  1. Reconstitution of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Jonas Lindholt; Fedosova, Natalya U; Nissen, Poul; Boesen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiscs are disc-shaped self-assembled lipid bilayers encircled by membrane scaffolding proteins derived from Apolipoprotein A-1 (apo A-1). They constitute a versatile tool for studying membrane proteins since reconstitution into nanodiscs allows studies of the membrane proteins in detergent-free aqueous solutions in a lipid bilayer. Here, we apply the technique to the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) from pig kidney using Membrane Scaffolding Protein 1 D1 (MSP1D1). Contrary to other reports, the nanodiscs obtained by our protocol are built up of the native lipids originally present in the detergent solubilized sample together with the NKA. PMID:26695051

  2. Substrate independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, L W-M

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphate release, [Pi], is often measured in an enzymatic reaction in a high throughput setting. Based on the published mechanism, we designed a protocol for our screening for inhibitors of SAICAR synthetase (PurC), and we found a gradual increase in [Pi] in positive control samples over the course of the day. Further investigation indicated that hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by PurC, rather than substrate-related phosphate release, was responsible for a partial contribution to the signals in the control samples. Thus substrate-independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening. PMID:27430931

  3. Separation of membrane-embedded tryptic peptides of Na,K-ATPase by size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tal, D M; Goldshleger, R; Karlish, S J

    1993-08-27

    Several attempts to separate hydrophobic tryptic and cyanogen bromide-digested short peptides from Na,K-ATPase, using HPLC and different acid-organic solvent gradients, failed because of the insolubility of the peptides in the initial or final solvents of the gradients used for elution. Therefore, we opted to use a detergent-containing mobile phase. For sodium dodecyl sulphate-solubilized tryptic peptides of M(r) 7 x 10(3)-100 x 10(3), elution on a TSK-G3000SW size-exclusion column successfully separates families of peptides with a resolution of M(r) 5 x 10(3)-10 x 10(3). Peptides in these size ranges can then be resolved completely by tricine-sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis, and identified by microsequencing after transfer to polyvinylidene difluoride paper. For separation of smaller peptides a Biosep-SEC-S2000 column, eluted at slow flow-rates, was evaluated. Use of ammonium chloride buffer allows sensitive detection at 214 nm. The separated fractions are resolved and identified on 16.5% tricine gels. Reasonable resolution has been obtained with defined cyanogen bromide fragments of myoglobin. Resolution of small tryptic and cyanogen bromide fragments of Na,K-ATPase is less successful, but the experiments suggest ways of improving the resolution of peptides in the range M(r) 2 x 10(3)-10 x 10(3). PMID:8408423

  4. The medaka mutation tintachina sheds light on the evolution of V-ATPase B subunits in vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Claudia; Maeso, Ignacio; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Martínez-Morales, Juan R.

    2013-11-01

    Vacuolar-type H+ ATPases (V-ATPases) are multimeric protein complexes that play a universal role in the acidification of intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. We have isolated the recessive medaka mutation tintachina (tch), which carries an inactivating modification of the conserved glycine residue (G75R) of the proton pump subunit atp6v1Ba/vatB1. Mutant embryos show penetrant pigmentation defects, massive brain apoptosis and lethality before hatching. Strikingly, an equivalent mutation in atp6v1B1 (G78R) has been reported in a family of patients suffering from distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), a hereditary disease that causes metabolic acidosis due to impaired kidney function. This poses the question as to how molecularly identical mutations result in markedly different phenotypes in two vertebrate species. Our work offers an explanation for this phenomenon. We propose that, after successive rounds of whole-genome duplication, the emergence of paralogous copies allowed the divergence of the atp6v1B cis-regulatory control in different vertebrate groups.

  5. THE ATPase ACTIVITY OF BfpD IS GREATLY ENHANCED BY ZINC AND ALLOSTERIC INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER Bfp PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Lynette J.; Yamagata, Atsushi; Craig, Lisa; Tainer, John A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    Type IV pilus biogenesis, protein secretion, DNA transfer and filamentous phage morphogenesis systems are thought to possess similar architectures and mechanisms. These multiprotein complexes include members of the PulE superfamily of putative NTPases that have extensive sequence similarity and probably similar functions as the energizers of macromolecular transport. We purified the PulE homologue BfpD of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli bundle-forming pilus (BFP) biogenesis machine and characterized its ATPase activity, providing new insights into its mode of action. Numerous techniques revealed that BfpD forms hexamers in the presence of nucleotide. Hexameric BfpD displayed weak ATPase activity. We previously demonstrated that the N-termini of membrane proteins BfpC and BfpE recruit BfpD to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we identified two BfpD-binding sites, BfpE39-76 and BfpE77-114, in the N-terminus of BfpE using a yeast two-hybrid system. Isothermal titration calorimetry and protease sensitivity assays showed that hexameric BfpD-ATP?S binds to BfpE77-114, while hexameric BfpD-ADP binds to BfpE39-76. Interestingly, the N-terminus of BfpC and BfpE77-114 together increased the ATPase activity of hexameric BfpD over 1200-fold to a Vmax of 75.3 μmol Pi min−1 mg−1, which exceeds by over 1200-fold the activity of other PulE family members. This augmented activity occurred only in the presence of Zn2+. We conclude that allosteric interactions between BfpD and BfpC and BfpE dramatically stimulate its ATPase activity. The differential nucleotide-dependent binding of hexameric BfpD to BfpE39-76 and BfpE77-114 suggests a model for the mechanism by which BfpD transduces mechanical energy to the biogenesis machine. PMID:15866879

  6. On the chimerical nature of the membrane-bound ATPase from halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.

    1991-01-01

    A series of experiments are described that were carried out with the goal of determining how the membrane-bound ATPase from H. saccharovorum is related to V- and F-type ATPases. They reflect three approaches: the use of inhibitors; structural studies; and immunological relatedness.

  7. Mitochondrial ATPase in the gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D.; Hentschel, J.; Böttcher, K.; Lucu, C.

    1992-12-01

    Posterior gills (No. 7 and 8) of shore crabs Carcinus maenas were homogenized and fractionated by means of differential and density gradient centrifugation. Employment of marker enzymes Na-K-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase for plasma membranes and cytochrome oxidase for mitochondria showed that these structural elements were separated. Ultramicroscopic investigations of combined fractions confirmed the presence of the respective mitochondrial and vesicular plasma membrane structures. An ATPase which did not depend on the presence of sodium (20 mM) ions in the incubation medium but on the presence of potassium (20 mM) ions only was found in the mitochondrial fractions. The mitochondrial ATPase was tightly bound to cellular particulates and activated approximately threefold by bicarbonate (20 mM) ions. The activity of this ATPase was nearly completely inhibited by oligomycin (1 μg ml-1) and greatly inhibited by low levels (5 mM) of thiocyanate and calcium ions, the Ki for Ca2+ being ca 4 mM. The results obtained confirm literature data on high mitochondrial densities in crab gills and allow the assumption of significant rates of energy metabolism in these organs. Considering its properties the mitochondrial ATPase is clearly distinct from crab gill Na-K-ATPase and can be measured specifically in samples containing Na-K-ATPase. Mitochondrial ATPase is therefore considered a suitable and reliable marker enzyme for mitochondria.

  8. Mammary gland involution is associated with rapid down regulation of major mammary Ca**2+-ATPases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty percent of calcium in milk is transported across the mammary cells apical membrane by the plasma membrane Ca**2+-ATPase 2 (PMCA2). The effect of abrupt cessation of milk production on the Ca**2+-ATPases and mammary calcium transport is unknown. We found that 24 hours after stopping milk prod...

  9. Fluorescence energy transfer as an indicator of Ca2+-ATPase interactions in sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Papp, S; Pikula, S; Martonosi, A

    1987-01-01

    Ca2+-ATPase molecules were labeled in intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, sequentially with a donor fluorophore, fluorescein-5'-isothiocyanate (FITC), and with an acceptor fluorophore, eosin-5'-isothiocyanate (EITC), each at a mole ratio of 0.25-0.5 mol/mol of ATPase. The resonance energy transfer was determined from the effect of acceptor on the intensity and lifetime of donor fluorescence. Due to structural similarities, the two dyes compete for the same site(s) on the Ca2+-ATPase, and under optimal conditions each ATPase molecule is labeled either with donor or acceptor fluorophore, but not with both. There is only slight labeling of phospholipids and other proteins in SR, even at concentrations of FITC or EITC higher than those used in the reported experiments. Efficient energy transfer was observed from the covalently bound FITC to EITC that is assumed to reflect interaction between ATPase molecules. Protein denaturing agents (8 M urea and 4 M guanidine) or nonsolubilizing concentrations of detergents (C12E8 or lysolecithin) abolish the energy transfer. These results are consistent with earlier observations that a large portion of the Ca2+-ATPase is present in oligomeric form in the native membrane. The technique is suitable for kinetic analysis of the effect of various treatments on the monomer-oligomer equilibrium of Ca2+-ATPase. A drawback of the method is that the labeled ATPase, although it retains conformational responses, is enzymatically inactive. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:2950938

  10. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  11. The molecular chaperone calnexin associates with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase from oat seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Su, R T; Hsu, H T; Sze, H

    1998-01-01

    Acidification of endomembrane compartments by the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is central to many cellular processes in eukaryotes, including osmoregulation and protein sorting. The V-ATPase complex consists of a peripheral sector (V1) and a membrane integral sector (V0); however, it is unclear how the multimeric enzyme is assembled. A 64-kD polypeptide that had copurified with oat V-ATPase subunits has been identified as calnexin, an integral protein on the endoplasmic reticulum. To determine whether calnexin interacted physically with the V-ATPase, microsomal membranes were Triton X-100 solubilized, and the protein-protein interaction was analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies against calnexin precipitated both calnexin and V-ATPase subunits, including A and B and those of 44, 42, 36, 16, and 13 kD. A monoclonal antibody against subunit A precipitated the entire V-ATPase complex as well as calnexin and BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum lumen chaperone. The results support our hypothesis that both calnexin and BiP act as molecular chaperones in the folding and assembly of newly synthesized V1V0-ATPases at the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:9477575

  12. Functional Interaction Between Na/K-ATPase and NMDA Receptor in Cerebellar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Lopacheva, Olga M; Kruusmägi, Markus; Lopachev, Alexandr V; Shah, Zahoor A; Boldyrev, Alexander A; Liu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors play a crucial role in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Activation of NMDA receptors changes intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and K(+), which are subsequently restored by Na/K-ATPase. We used immunochemical and biochemical methods to elucidate the potential mechanisms of interaction between these two proteins. We observed that NMDA receptor and Na/K-ATPase interact with each other and this interaction was shown for both isoforms of α subunit (α1 and α3) of Na/K-ATPase expressed in neurons. Using Western blotting, we showed that long-term exposure of the primary culture of cerebellar neurons to nanomolar concentrations of ouabain (a cardiotonic steroid, a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) leads to a decrease in the levels of NMDA receptors which is likely mediated by the α3 subunit of Na/K-ATPase. We also observed a decrease in enzymatic activity of the α1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase caused by NMDA receptor activation. This effect is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Thus, Na/K-ATPase and NMDA receptor can interact functionally by forming a macromolecular complex which can be important for restoring ionic balance after neuronal excitation. Furthermore, this interaction suggests that NMDA receptor function can be regulated by endogenous cardiotonic steroids which recently have been found in cerebrospinal fluid or by pharmacological drugs affecting Na/K-ATPase function. PMID:25381029

  13. Carbonylation Modification Regulates Na/K-ATPase Signaling and Salt Sensitivity: A Review and a Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Preeya T.; Martin, Rebecca; Yan, Yanling; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Na/K-ATPase signaling has been implicated in different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress not only regulates the Na/K-ATPase enzymatic activity, but also regulates its signaling and other functions. While cardiotonic steroids (CTS)-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is an intermediate step in CTS-mediated Na/K-ATPase signaling, increase in ROS alone also stimulates Na/K-ATPase signaling. Based on literature and our observations, we hypothesize that ROS have biphasic effects on Na/K-ATPase signaling, transcellular sodium transport, and urinary sodium excretion. Oxidative modulation, in particular site specific carbonylation of the Na/K-ATPase α1 subunit, is a critical step in proximal tubular Na/K-ATPase signaling and decreased transcellular sodium transport leading to increases in urinary sodium excretion. However, once this system is overstimulated, the signaling, and associated changes in sodium excretion are blunted. This review aims to evaluate ROS-mediated carbonylation of the Na/K-ATPase, and its potential role in the regulation of pump signaling and sodium reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule (RPT). PMID:27445847

  14. Cation Transport Coupled to ATP Hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase: An Integrated, Animated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Francisco A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.; McNamara, John C.; Horisberger, Jean D.; Borin, Ivana A.

    2010-01-01

    An Adobe[R] animation is presented for use in undergraduate Biochemistry courses, illustrating the mechanism of Na[superscript +] and K[superscript +] translocation coupled to ATP hydrolysis by the (Na, K)-ATPase, a P[subscript 2c]-type ATPase, or ATP-powered ion pump that actively translocates cations across plasma membranes. The enzyme is also…

  15. Structural studies of conformational changes of proteins upon phosphorylation: Structures of activated CheY, CheY-N16-FliM complex, and AAA {sup +} ATPase domain of NtrC1 in both inactive and active states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok-Yong

    2003-04-10

    Protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism for signal transduction as well as regulation of cellular function. Unlike phosphorylation in eukaryotic systems that uses Ser/Thr for the sites of modification, two-component signal transduction systems, which are prevalent in bacteria, archea, and lower eukaryotes, use an aspartate as the site of phosphorylation. Two-component systems comprise a histidine kinase and a receiver domain. The conformational change of the receiver domain upon phosphorylation leads to signal transfer to the downstream target, a process that had not been understood well at the molecular level. The transient nature of the phospho-Asp bond had made structural studies difficult. The discovery of an excellent analogue for acylphosphate, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, enabled structural study of activated receiver domains. The structure of activated Chemotaxis protein Y (CheY) was determined both by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These structures revealed the molecular basis of the conformational change that is coupled to phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the conserved Asp residue in the active site allows hydrogen bonding of the T87 O{gamma} to phospho-aspartate, which in turn leads to the rotation of Y106 into the ''in'' position (termed Y-T coupling). The structure of activated CheY complexed with the 16 N-terminal residues of FliM (N16-FliM), its target, was also determined by X-ray crystallography and confirmed the proposed mechanism of activation (Y-T coupling). First, N16-FliM binds to the region on CheY that undergoes a significant conformational change. Second, the ''in'' position of Y106 presents a better binding surface for FliM because the sidechain of Y106 in the inactive form of CheY (''out'' position) sterically interferes with binding of N16-FliM. In addition to confirmation of Y-T coupling, the structure of the activated CheY-N16-FliM complex suggested that the N16-FliM might be sandwiched between CheY and the remainder of FliM to change the direction of flagellar rotation.

  16. Protein Kinase C-α Interaction with F0F1-ATPase Promotes F0F1-ATPase Activity and Reduces Energy Deficits in Injured Renal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Grażyna; Bakajsova, Diana

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that active PKC-α maintains F0F1-ATPase activity, whereas inactive PKC-α mutant (dnPKC-α) blocks recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity after injury in renal proximal tubules (RPTC). This study tested whether mitochondrial PKC-α interacts with and phosphorylates F0F1-ATPase. Wild-type PKC-α (wtPKC-α) and dnPKC-α were overexpressed in RPTC to increase their mitochondrial levels, and RPTC were exposed to oxidant or hypoxia. Mitochondrial levels of the γ-subunit, but not the α- and β-subunits, were decreased by injury, an event associated with 54% inhibition of F0F1-ATPase activity. Overexpressing wtPKC-α blocked decreases in γ-subunit levels, maintained F0F1-ATPase activity, and improved ATP levels after injury. Deletion of PKC-α decreased levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits, decreased F0F1-ATPase activity, and hindered the recovery of ATP content after RPTC injury. Mitochondrial PKC-α co-immunoprecipitated with α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The association of PKC-α with these subunits decreased in injured RPTC overexpressing dnPKC-α. Immunocapture of F0F1-ATPase and immunoblotting with phospho(Ser) PKC substrate antibody identified phosphorylation of serine in the PKC consensus site on the α- or β- and γ-subunits. Overexpressing wtPKC-α increased phosphorylation and protein levels, whereas deletion of PKC-α decreased protein levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase in RPTC. Phosphoproteomics revealed phosphorylation of Ser146 on the γ subunit in response to wtPKC-α overexpression. We concluded that active PKC-α 1) prevents injury-induced decreases in levels of γ subunit of F0F1-ATPase, 2) interacts with α-, β-, and γ-subunits leading to increases in their phosphorylation, and 3) promotes the recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity and ATP content after injury in RPTC. PMID:25627689

  17. The molecular structure of the Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii, as revealed by electron microscopy, resembles that of H(+)-translocating ATPases.

    PubMed

    Reidlinger, J; Mayer, F; Müller, V

    1994-12-12

    The Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii was examined by electron microscopy. After reconstitution into proteoliposomes, knobs typical for the F1 domain were visible on the outside of the membrane. The F1-part of the isolated enzyme showed a hexagonal symmetry suggesting an alpha 3 beta 3 structure, and the F1F0 complex had molecular dimensions very similar to those of H(+)-translocating ATPases of E. coli, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. PMID:7988711

  18. Do Src Kinase and Caveolin Interact Directly with Na,K-ATPase?

    PubMed

    Yosef, Eliyahu; Katz, Adriana; Peleg, Yoav; Mehlman, Tevie; Karlish, Steven J D

    2016-05-27

    Much evidence points to a role of Na,K-ATPase in ouabain-dependent signal transduction. Based on experiments with different cell lines and native tissue membranes, a current hypothesis postulates direct interactions between the Na,K-ATPase and Src kinase (non-receptor tyrosine kinase). Na,K-ATPase is proposed to bind Src kinase and inhibit its activity, whereas ouabain, the specific Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, binds and stabilizes the E2 conformation, thus exposing the Src kinase domain and its active site Tyr-418 for activation. Ouabain-dependent signaling is thought to be mediated within caveolae by a complex consisting of Na,K-ATPase, caveolin, and Src kinase. In the current work, we have looked for direct interactions utilizing purified recombinant Na,K-ATPase (human α1β1FXYD1 or porcine α1D369Nβ1FXYD1) and purified human Src kinase and human caveolin 1 or interactions between these proteins in native membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit kidney. By several independent criteria and techniques, no stable interactions were detected between Na,K-ATPase and purified Src kinase. Na,K-ATPase was found to be a substrate for Src kinase phosphorylation at Tyr-144. Clear evidence for a direct interaction between purified human Na,K-ATPase and human caveolin was obtained, albeit with a low molar stoichiometry (1:15-30 caveolin 1/Na,K-ATPase). In native renal membranes, a specific caveolin 14-5 oligomer (95 kDa) was found to be in direct interaction with Na,K-ATPase. We inferred that a small fraction of the renal Na,K-ATPase molecules is in a ∼1:1 complex with a caveolin 14-5 oligomer. Thus, overall, whereas a direct caveolin 1/Na,K-ATPase interaction is confirmed, the lack of direct Src kinase/Na,K-ATPase binding requires reassessment of the mechanism of ouabain-dependent signaling. PMID:27022017

  19. Spliceosomal DEAH-Box ATPases Remodel Pre-mRNA to Activate Alternative Splice Sites.

    PubMed

    Semlow, Daniel R; Blanco, Mario R; Walter, Nils G; Staley, Jonathan P

    2016-02-25

    During pre-mRNA splicing, a central step in the expression and regulation of eukaryotic genes, the spliceosome selects splice sites for intron excision and exon ligation. In doing so, the spliceosome must distinguish optimal from suboptimal splice sites. At the catalytic stage of splicing, suboptimal splice sites are repressed by the DEAH-box ATPases Prp16 and Prp22. Here, using budding yeast, we show that these ATPases function further by enabling the spliceosome to search for and utilize alternative branch sites and 3' splice sites. The ATPases facilitate this search by remodeling the splicing substrate to disengage candidate splice sites. Our data support a mechanism involving 3' to 5' translocation of the ATPases along substrate RNA and toward a candidate site, but, surprisingly, not across the site. Thus, our data implicate DEAH-box ATPases in acting at a distance by pulling substrate RNA from the catalytic core of the spliceosome. PMID:26919433

  20. Neomycin inhibits the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiuyun; Boss, W.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), have been shown to increase the vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity of plant plasma membranes. In this paper, the authors show the effect of various concentrations of phosphatidyinositol, PIP, and PIP{sub 2} on the plasma membrane vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. PIP and PIP{sub 2} at concentrations at 10 nanomoles per 30 microgram membrane protein per milliliter of reaction mixture caused a twofold and 1.8-fold increase in the ATPase activity, respectively. The effect of these negatively charged phospholipids on the ATPase activity was inhibited by adding the positively charged aminoglycoside, neomycin. Neomycin did not affect the endogenous plasma membrane ATPase activity in the absence of exogenous lipids.

  1. Vacuolar H(+)-pumping ATPase variable transport coupling ratio controlled by pH.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J M; Hunt, I; Sanders, D

    1994-01-01

    The eukaryote endomembrane system contains a class of H(+)-pumping ATPase (H(+)-ATPases) of the vacuolar type (V-ATPases) that are responsible for the acidification of organelles. Their action is critical to numerous physiological processes, but the regulatory mechanisms that may control activity are not yet fully understood. The ratio of H+ transported per ATP hydrolyzed (n) has been determined thermodynamically for the red beet V-ATPase by using patch clamp. The value of n was found to range from 1.75 to 3.28 and was strictly dependent on cytoplasmic and lumenal pH. This suggests a mechanism by which V-ATPases are regulated by and might therefore control cytoplasmic and lumenal pH. Furthermore, the substantial capacity of plant vacuoles for H+ accumulation to pH 3 or lower can only be explained by the finding that n can adopt a value of < 2. PMID:8078920

  2. Regulation of the synthesis and assembly of the plant vacuolar H sup + -ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.

    1992-01-01

    During the past three years we have focused on four main areas: the characterization of the 5{prime}-upstream sequence of the gene for the V-ATPase 70 kDa (A) subunit gene, the generation of V-ATPase-deficient mutants using antisense constructs of the A subunit cDNA, analysis of V-ATPase ultrastructure by negative staining and the characterization of organelle-specific isoforms of the A subunit of carrot. In addition we have extended our studies on the cellular distribution of the V-ATPase and we have continued our investigation of the evolution of the V-ATPases by characterizing the A and B subunits of two species of the archaebacterium, Methanococcus.

  3. Gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase involvement and regulation during salmonid adaptation to salt water.

    PubMed

    Borgatti, A R; Pagliarani, A; Ventrella, V

    1992-08-01

    1. The involvement of gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase in salmonid adaptation to salt water (SW) is discussed. 2. Gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase increase during SW adaptation is mainly related to the increased number and complexity of chloride cells deputed to salt extrusion. 3. The temporal relationships between serum peaks of thyroid hormones, cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin and gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase rise during salmonid smoltification, suggest a hormonal involvement in the enzyme stimulation and thus in the acquirement of SW tolerance. 4. Literature on gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase response to hormonal treatment is reviewed. The effects produced on gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase and chloride cells by exogenous hormones point out a complex inter-relationship between the hormones considered. The mechanisms involved in hormonal regulation of the enzyme remain a matter of debate. PMID:1355028

  4. Effect of hindlimb unweighting on single soleus fiber maximal shortening velocity and ATPase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of hindlimb unweighting (HU) for 1 to 3 wks on the shortening velocity of a soleus fiber, its ATPase content, and the relative contents of the slow and fast myosin was investigated by measuring fiber force, V(0), ATPase activity, and myosin content in SDS protein profiles of a single rat soleus fiber suspended between a motor arm and a transducer. It was found that HU induces a progressive increase in fiber V(0) that is likely caused, at least in part, by an increase in the fiber's myofibrillar ATPase activity. The HU-induced increases in V(0) and ATPase were associated with the presence of a greater percentage of fast type IIa fibers. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 wks of HU showed increases in V(0) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers.

  5. How azide inhibits ATP hydrolysis by the F-ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2006-01-01

    In the structure of bovine F1-ATPase determined at 1.95-Å resolution with crystals grown in the presence of ADP, 5′-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, and azide, the azide anion interacts with the β-phosphate of ADP and with residues in the ADP-binding catalytic subunit, βDP. It occupies a position between the catalytically essential amino acids, β-Lys-162 in the P loop and the “arginine finger” residue, α-Arg-373, similar to the site occupied by the γ-phosphate in the ATP-binding subunit, βTP. Its presence in the βDP-subunit tightens the binding of the side chains to the nucleotide, enhancing its affinity and thereby stabilizing the state with bound ADP. This mechanism of inhibition appears to be common to many other ATPases, including ABC transporters, SecA, and DNA topoisomerase IIα. It also explains the stimulatory effect of azide on ATP-sensitive potassium channels by enhancing the binding of ADP. PMID:16728506

  6. ATPase-Dependent Quality Control of DNA Replication Origin Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Frigola, Jordi; Remus, Dirk; Mehanna, Amina; Diffley, John F. X.

    2013-01-01

    The regulated loading of the Mcm2-7 DNA helicase into pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) at multiple replication origins ensures precise once per cell cycle replication in eukaryotic cells. Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6 and Cdt1 load Mcm2-7 into a double hexamer bound around duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction, but the molecular mechanism of this origin ‘licensing’ is still poorly understood. Here we show that both Mcm2-7 hexamers are recruited to origins by an essential, conserved C-terminal domain of Mcm3 which interacts with and stimulates the ATPase activity of ORC•Cdc6. ATP hydrolysis can promote Mcm2-7 loading, but can also promote Mcm2-7 release if components are missing or if ORC has been inactivated by cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation. Our work provides new insights into how origins are licensed and reveals a novel ATPase-dependent mechanism contributing to precise once per cell cycle replication. PMID:23474987

  7. H/sup +/-ATPase activity from storage tissue of Beta vulgaris. IV. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide binding and inhibition of the plasma membrane H/sup +/-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Oleski, N.A.; Bennett, A.B.

    1987-03-01

    The molecular weight and isoelectric point of the plasma membrane H/sup +/-ATPase from red beet storage tissue were determined using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and a H/sup +/-ATPase antibody. When plasma membrane vesicles were incubated with 20 micromolar (/sup 14/C)-DCCD at 0/sup 0/C, a single 97,000 dalton protein was visualized on a fluorography of a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel. A close correlation between (/sup 14/C)DCCD labeling of the 97,000 dalton protein and the extent of ATPase inhibition over a range of DCCD concentration suggests that this 97,000 dalton protein is a component of the plasma membrane H/sup +/-ATPase. An antibody raised against the plasma membrane H/sup +/-ATPase of Neurospora crassa cross-reacted with the 97,000 dalton DCCD-binding protein, further supporting the identity of this protein. Immunoblots of two-dimensional gels of red beet plasma membrane vesicles indicated the isoelectric point of the H/sup +/-ATPase to be 6.5.

  8. Na+/K+-ATPase resistance and cardenolide sequestration: basal adaptations to host plant toxins in the milkweed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae: Lygaeinae).

    PubMed

    Bramer, Christiane; Dobler, Susanne; Deckert, Jürgen; Stemmer, Michael; Petschenka, Georg

    2015-04-22

    Despite sequestration of toxins being a common coevolutionary response to plant defence in phytophagous insects, the macroevolution of the traits involved is largely unaddressed. Using a phylogenetic approach comprising species from four continents, we analysed the ability to sequester toxic cardenolides in the hemipteran subfamily Lygaeinae, which is widely associated with cardenolide-producing Apocynaceae. In addition, we analysed cardenolide resistance of their Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases, the molecular target of cardenolides. Our data indicate that cardenolide sequestration and cardenolide-resistant Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are basal adaptations in the Lygaeinae. In two species that shifted to non-apocynaceous hosts, the ability to sequester was secondarily reduced, yet Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase resistance was maintained. We suggest that both traits evolved together and represent major coevolutionary adaptations responsible for the evolutionary success of lygaeine bugs. Moreover, specialization on cardenolides was not an evolutionary dead end, but enabled this insect lineage to host shift to cardenolide-producing plants from distantly related families. PMID:25808891

  9. The RING finger ATPase Rad5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes to DNA double-strand break repair in a ubiquitin-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuhua; Davies, Adelina A.; Sagan, Daniel; Ulrich, Helle D.

    2005-01-01

    Tolerance to replication-blocking DNA lesions is achieved by means of ubiquitylation of PCNA, the processivity clamp for replicative DNA polymerases, by components of the RAD6 pathway. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the ubiquitin ligase (E3) responsible for polyubiquitylation of the clamp is the RING finger protein Rad5p. Interestingly, the RING finger, responsible for the protein's E3 activity, is embedded in a conserved DNA-dependent ATPase domain common to helicases and chromatin remodeling factors of the SWI/SNF family. Here, we demonstrate that the Rad5p ATPase domain provides the basis for a function of the protein in DNA double-strand break repair via a RAD52- and Ku-independent pathway mediated by the Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 protein complex. This activity is distinct and separable from the contribution of the RING domain to ubiquitin conjugation to PCNA. Moreover, we show that the Rad5 protein physically associates with the single-stranded DNA regions at a processed double-strand break in vivo. Our observations suggest that Rad5p is a multifunctional protein that—by means of independent enzymatic activities inherent in its RING and ATPase domains—plays a modulating role in the coordination of repair events and replication fork progression in response to various different types of DNA lesions. PMID:16224103

  10. Na+/K+-ATPase resistance and cardenolide sequestration: basal adaptations to host plant toxins in the milkweed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae: Lygaeinae)

    PubMed Central

    Bramer, Christiane; Dobler, Susanne; Deckert, Jürgen; Stemmer, Michael; Petschenka, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite sequestration of toxins being a common coevolutionary response to plant defence in phytophagous insects, the macroevolution of the traits involved is largely unaddressed. Using a phylogenetic approach comprising species from four continents, we analysed the ability to sequester toxic cardenolides in the hemipteran subfamily Lygaeinae, which is widely associated with cardenolide-producing Apocynaceae. In addition, we analysed cardenolide resistance of their Na+/K+-ATPases, the molecular target of cardenolides. Our data indicate that cardenolide sequestration and cardenolide-resistant Na+/K+-ATPase are basal adaptations in the Lygaeinae. In two species that shifted to non-apocynaceous hosts, the ability to sequester was secondarily reduced, yet Na+/K+-ATPase resistance was maintained. We suggest that both traits evolved together and represent major coevolutionary adaptations responsible for the evolutionary success of lygaeine bugs. Moreover, specialization on cardenolides was not an evolutionary dead end, but enabled this insect lineage to host shift to cardenolide-producing plants from distantly related families. PMID:25808891

  11. The Δ14 Mutation of Human Cardiac Troponin T Enhances ATPase Activity and Alters the Cooperative Binding of S1-ADP to Regulated Actin†

    PubMed Central

    Gafurov, Boris; Fredricksen, Scott; Cai, Anmei; Brenner, Bernhard; Chase, P. Bryant; Chalovich, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The complex of tropomyosin and troponin binds to actin and inhibits activation of myosin ATPase activity and force production of striated muscles at low free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2+ stimulates ATP activity, and at subsaturating actin concentrations, the binding of NEM-modified S1 to actin–tropomyosin–troponin increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis even further. We show here that the Δ14 mutation of troponin T, associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, results in an increase in ATPase rate like that seen with wild-type troponin in the presence of NEM-S1. The enhanced ATPase activity was not due to a decreased incorporation of mutant troponin T with troponin I and troponin C to form an active troponin complex. The activating effect was more prominent with a hybrid troponin (skeletal TnI, TnC, and cardiac TnT) than with all cardiac troponin. Thus it appears that changes in the troponin–troponin contacts that result from mutations or from forming hybrids stabilize a more active state of regulated actin. An analysis of the effect of the Δ14 mutation on the equilibrium binding of S1-ADP to actin was consistent with stabilization of an active state of actin. This change in activation may be important in the development of cardiac disease. PMID:15568820

  12. Higher plant Ca(2+)-ATPase: primary structure and regulation of mRNA abundance by salt.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmers, L E; Ewing, N N; Bennett, A B

    1992-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulatory mechanisms participate in diverse developmentally, hormonally, and environmentally regulated processes, with the precise control of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration being critical to such mechanisms. In plant cells, P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases localized in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum are thought to play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity has been identified in isolated plant cell membranes, but the protein has not been characterized at the molecular level. We have isolated a partial-length cDNA (LCA1) and a complete genomic clone (gLCA13) encoding a putative endoplasmic reticulum-localized Ca(2+)-ATPase in tomato. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a protein (Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase) of 1048 amino acids with a molecular mass of 116 kDa, eight probable transmembrane domains, and all of the highly conserved functional domains common to P-type cation-translocating ATPases. In addition, the protein shares approximately 50% amino acid sequence identify with animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases but less than 30% identity with other P-type ATPases. Genomic DNA blot hybridization analysis indicates that the Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase is encoded by a single gene. RNA blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of three transcript sizes in root tissue and a single, much less abundant, transcript in leaves. Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels increase dramatically upon a 1-day exposure to 50 mM NaCl. Thus this report describes the primary structure of a higher-plant Ca(2+)-ATPase and the regulation of its mRNA abundance by salt stress. Images PMID:1384045

  13. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  14. Retrieval of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase from Phagosomes Revealed by Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Margaret; Maddera, Lucinda; Engel, Ulrike; Gerisch, Günther

    2010-01-01

    Background The vacuolar H+-ATPase, or V-ATPase, is a highly-conserved multi-subunit enzyme that transports protons across membranes at the expense of ATP. The resulting proton gradient serves many essential functions, among them energizing transport of small molecules such as neurotransmitters, and acidifying organelles such as endosomes. The enzyme is not present in the plasma membrane from which a phagosome is formed, but is rapidly delivered by fusion with endosomes that already bear the V-ATPase in their membranes. Similarly, the enzyme is thought to be retrieved from phagosome membranes prior to exocytosis of indigestible material, although that process has not been directly visualized. Methodology To monitor trafficking of the V-ATPase in the phagocytic pathway of Dictyostelium discoideum, we fed the cells yeast, large particles that maintain their shape during trafficking. To track pH changes, we conjugated the yeast with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cells were labeled with VatM-GFP, a fluorescently-tagged transmembrane subunit of the V-ATPase, in parallel with stage-specific endosomal markers or in combination with mRFP-tagged cytoskeletal proteins. Principal Findings We find that the V-ATPase is commonly retrieved from the phagosome membrane by vesiculation shortly before exocytosis. However, if the cells are kept in confined spaces, a bulky phagosome may be exocytosed prematurely. In this event, a large V-ATPase-rich vacuole coated with actin typically separates from the acidic phagosome shortly before exocytosis. This vacuole is propelled by an actin tail and soon acquires the properties of an early endosome, revealing an unexpected mechanism for rapid recycling of the V-ATPase. Any V-ATPase that reaches the plasma membrane is also promptly retrieved. Conclusions/Signficance Thus, live cell microscopy has revealed both a usual route and alternative means of recycling the V-ATPase in the endocytic pathway. PMID:20052281

  15. The Nonstructural Protein 2C of a Picorna-Like Virus Displays Nucleic Acid Helix Destabilizing Activity That Can Be Functionally Separated from Its ATPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhenyun; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Han, Yajuan; Xia, Xiaoling; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Picorna-like viruses in the Picornavirales order are a large group of positive-strand RNA viruses that include numerous important pathogens for plants, insects, and humans. In these viruses, nonstructural protein 2C is one of the most conserved proteins and contains ATPase activity and putative RNA helicase activity. Here we expressed 2C protein of Ectropis obliqua picorna-like virus (EoV; genus Iflavirus, family Iflaviridae, order Picornavirales) in a eukaryotic expression system and determined that EoV 2C displays ATP-independent nucleic acid helix destabilizing and strand annealing acceleration activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that this picornaviral 2C is more like an RNA chaperone than like the previously predicted RNA helicase. Our further characterization of EoV 2C revealed that divalent metal ions, such as Mg2+ and Zn2+, inhibit 2C-mediated helix destabilization to different extents. Moreover, we determined that EoV 2C also contains ATPase activity like that of other picornaviral 2C proteins and further assessed the functional relevance between its RNA chaperone-like and ATPase activities using mutational analysis as well as their responses to Mg2+. Our data show that, when one of the two 2C activities was dramatically inhibited or almost abolished, the other activity could remain intact, showing that the RNA chaperone-like and ATPase activities of EoV 2C can be functionally separated. This report reveals that a picorna-like virus 2C protein displays RNA helix destabilizing and strand annealing acceleration activity, which may be critical for picornaviral replication and pathogenesis, and should foster our understanding of picorna-like viruses and viral RNA chaperones. PMID:23449794

  16. Cardenolides from the Apocynaceae family and their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiyuan; Chen, Yanyan; Lu, Yunfang; Wang, Yuefei; Ding, Liqin; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2016-07-01

    Cardenolides, as a group of natural products that can bind to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with an inhibiting activity, are traditionally used to treat congestive heart failure. Recent studies have demonstrated that the strong tumor cytotoxicities of cardenolides are mainly due to inducing the tumor cells apoptosis through different expression and cellular location of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunits. The leaves, flesh, seeds and juices of numerous plants from the genera of Nerium, Thevetia, Cerbera, Apocynum and Strophanthus in Apocynaceae family, are the major sources of natural cardenolides. So far, 109 cardenolides have been isolated and identified from this family, and about a quarter of them are reported to exhibit the capability to regulate cancer cell survival and death through multiple signaling pathways. In this review, we compile the phytochemical characteristics and anticancer activity of the cardenolides from this family. PMID:27167183

  17. Structural frameworks for considering microbial protein and nucleic-acid dependent motor ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Nathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Many fundamental cellular processes depend on enzymes that utilize chemical energy to catalyze unfavourable reactions. Certain classes of ATPases provide a particularly vivid example of the process of energy conversion, employing cycles of nucleotide turnover to move and/or rearrange biological polymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. Four well characterized classes of ATP-dependent protein/nucleic acid translocases and remodelling factors are found in all three domains of life (bacteria, archaea, and eukarya): ASCE P-loop NTPases, GHL proteins, actin-fold enzymes, and chaperonins. These unrelated protein superfamilies have each evolved the ability to couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the generation of motion and force along or within their substrates. The past several years have witnessed the emergence of a wealth of structural data that help explain how such molecular engines couple nucleotide turnover to conformational change. In this review, we highlight several recent advances to illustrate some of the mechanisms by which each family of ATP-dependent motors facilitates the rearrangement and movement of proteins, protein complexes and nucleic acids. PMID:18647240

  18. HMA6 and HMA8 are two chloroplast Cu+-ATPases with different enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sautron, Emeline; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Giustini, Cécile; Pro, Danièle; Crouzy, Serge; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) plays a key role in the photosynthetic process as cofactor of the plastocyanin (PC), an essential component of the chloroplast photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Encoded by the nuclear genome, PC is translocated in its apo-form into the chloroplast and the lumen of thylakoids where it is processed to its mature form and acquires Cu. In Arabidopsis, Cu delivery into the thylakoids involves two transporters of the PIB-1 ATPases family, heavy metal associated protein 6 (HMA6) located at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 at the thylakoid membrane. To gain further insight into the way Cu is delivered to PC, we analysed the enzymatic properties of HMA8 and compared them with HMA6 ones using in vitro phosphorylation assays and phenotypic tests in yeast. These experiments reveal that HMA6 and HMA8 display different enzymatic properties: HMA8 has a higher apparent affinity for Cu+ but a slower dephosphorylation kinetics than HMA6. Modelling experiments suggest that these differences could be explained by the electrostatic properties of the Cu+ releasing cavities of the two transporters and/or by the different nature of their cognate Cu+ acceptors (metallochaperone/PC). PMID:26182363

  19. Coevolution of the ATPase ClpV, the Sheath Proteins TssB and TssC, and the Accessory Protein TagJ/HsiE1 Distinguishes Type VI Secretion Classes*

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Andreas; Planamente, Sara; Manoli, Eleni; Lossi, Nadine S.; Freemont, Paul S.; Filloux, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial nanomachine for the transport of effector molecules into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. It involves the assembly of a tubular structure composed of TssB and TssC that is similar to the tail sheath of bacteriophages. The sheath contracts to provide the energy needed for effector delivery. The AAA+ ATPase ClpV disassembles the contracted sheath, which resets the systems for reassembly of an extended sheath that is ready to fire again. This mechanism is crucial for T6SS function. In Vibrio cholerae, ClpV binds the N terminus of TssC within a hydrophobic groove. In this study, we resolved the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ClpV1 and observed structural alterations in the hydrophobic groove. The modification in the ClpV1 groove is matched by a change in the N terminus of TssC, suggesting the existence of distinct T6SS classes. An accessory T6SS component, TagJ/HsiE, exists predominantly in one of the classes. Using bacterial two-hybrid approaches, we showed that the P. aeruginosa homolog HsiE1 interacts strongly with ClpV1. We then resolved the crystal structure of HsiE1 in complex with the N terminus of HsiB1, a TssB homolog and component of the contractile sheath. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these differences distinguish T6SS classes that resulted from a functional co-evolution between TssB, TssC, TagJ/HsiE, and ClpV. The interaction of TagJ/HsiE with the sheath as well as with ClpV suggests an alternative mode of disassembly in which HsiE recruits the ATPase to the sheath. PMID:25305017

  20. Acid secretion and the H,K ATPase of stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, C.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.; Helander, H.; Shin, J.; Besancon, M.; Bamberg, K.; Hersey, S.; Sachs, G.

    1992-01-01

    The regulation of acid secretion was clarified by the development of H2-receptor antagonists in the 1970s. It appears that gastrin and acetylcholine exert their effects on acid secretion mainly by stimulation of histamine release from the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell of the fundic gastric mucosa. The isolated ECL cell of rat gastric mucosa responds to gastrin/cholecystokinin (CCK), acetylcholine, and epinephrine with histamine release and to somatostatin and R-alpha-methyl histamine by inhibition of histamine release. Histamine and acetylcholine stimulate the parietal cell by elevation of cAMP or [Ca]i by activation of H2 or M3 receptors, respectively. These independent pathways converge to activate the gastric acid pump, the H+,K+ ATPase. Activation is a function of the association of the ATPase with a potassium chloride transport pathway that occurs in the membrane of the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell. Hence the secretory canaliculus is the site of acid secretion, the acid being pumped into the lumen of the canaliculus. The pump is composed of two subunits, a large catalytic and a smaller glycosylated protein. This final step of acid secretion has become the target of drugs also designed to inhibit acid secretion. The target domain of the benzimidazole class of acid pump inhibitors is the extracytoplasmic domain of the pump that is secreting acid, and the target amino acids are the cysteines present in this domain. The secondary structure of the pump can be analyzed by determining trypsin-sensitive bonds in intact, cytoplasmic-side-out vesicles of the ATPase, and it has been shown that the alpha subunit has at least eight membrane-spanning segments. Omeprazole, the first acid pump inhibitor, forms a disulfide bond with cysteines in the extracytoplasmic loop between the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning segment and to a cysteine in the extracytoplasmic loop between the seventh and eight segments, preventing phosphorylation of the pump by ATP. As a

  1. Membrane orientation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory membrane protein CHIF determined by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Franzin, Carla M.; Teriete, Peter; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormone-induced factor (CHIF) is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the structure of CHIF oriented in the membrane, determined by solid-state NMR orientation-dependent restraints. Because CHIF adopts a similar structure in lipid micelles and bilayers, it is possible to assign the solid-state NMR spectrum measured for 15N-labeled CHIF in oriented bilayers from the structure determined in micelles, to obtain the global orientation of the protein in the membrane. PMID:18098352

  2. Specialized Functional Diversity and Interactions of the Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Matchkov, Vladimir V.; Krivoi, Igor I.

    2016-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase is a protein ubiquitously expressed in the plasma membrane of all animal cells and vitally essential for their functions. A specialized functional diversity of the Na,K-ATPase isozymes is provided by molecular heterogeneity, distinct subcellular localizations, and functional interactions with molecular environment. Studies over the last decades clearly demonstrated complex and isoform-specific reciprocal functional interactions between the Na,K-ATPase and neighboring proteins and lipids. These interactions are enabled by a spatially restricted ion homeostasis, direct protein-protein/lipid interactions, and protein kinase signaling pathways. In addition to its “classical” function in ion translocation, the Na,K-ATPase is now considered as one of the most important signaling molecules in neuronal, epithelial, skeletal, cardiac and vascular tissues. Accordingly, the Na,K-ATPase forms specialized sub-cellular multimolecular microdomains which act as receptors to circulating endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS) triggering a number of signaling pathways. Changes in these endogenous cardiotonic steroid levels and initiated signaling responses have significant adaptive values for tissues and whole organisms under numerous physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This review discusses recent progress in the studies of functional interactions between the Na,K-ATPase and molecular microenvironment, the Na,K-ATPase-dependent signaling pathways and their significance for diversity of cell function. PMID:27252653

  3. Regulation of vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase in microglia by RANKL

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Eric M.; Ricofort, Ryan D.; Zuo, Jian; Ochotny, Noelle; Manolson, Morris F.; Holliday, L. Shannon

    2009-11-06

    Vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases (V-ATPases) are large electrogenic proton pumps composed of numerous subunits that play vital housekeeping roles in the acidification of compartments of the endocytic pathway. Additionally, V-ATPases play specialized roles in certain cell types, a capacity that is linked to cell type selective expression of isoforms of some of the subunits. We detected low levels of the a3 isoform of the a-subunit in mouse brain extracts. Examination of various brain-derived cell types by immunoblotting showed a3 was expressed in the N9 microglia cell line and in primary microglia, but not in other cell types. The expression of a3 in osteoclasts requires stimulation by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B-ligand (RANKL). We found that Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (RANK) was expressed by microglia. Stimulation of microglia with RANKL triggered increased expression of a3. V-ATPases in microglia were shown to bind microfilaments, and stimulation with RANKL increased the proportion of V-ATPase associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction and with actin. In summary, microglia express the a3-subunit of V-ATPase. The expression of a3 and the interaction between V-ATPases and microfilaments was modulated by RANKL. These data suggest a novel molecular pathway for regulating microglia.

  4. Tight Coupling of Na+/K+-ATPase with Glycolysis Demonstrated in Permeabilized Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Mervi; Sokolova, Niina; Jugai, Svetlana; Mandel, Merle; Peterson, Pearu; Vendelin, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The effective integrated organization of processes in cardiac cells is achieved, in part, by the functional compartmentation of energy transfer processes. Earlier, using permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated the existence of tight coupling between some of cardiomyocyte ATPases and glycolysis in rat. In this work, we studied contribution of two membrane ATPases and whether they are coupled to glycolysis - sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) and plasmalemma Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA). While SERCA activity was minor in this preparation in the absence of calcium, major role of NKA was revealed accounting to ∼30% of the total ATPase activity which demonstrates that permeabilized cell preparation can be used to study this pump. To elucidate the contribution of NKA in the pool of ATPases, a series of kinetic measurements was performed in cells where NKA had been inhibited by 2 mM ouabain. In these cells, we recorded: ADP- and ATP-kinetics of respiration, competition for ADP between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase (PK), ADP-kinetics of endogenous PK, and ATP-kinetics of total ATPases. The experimental data was analyzed using a series of mathematical models with varying compartmentation levels. The results show that NKA is tightly coupled to glycolysis with undetectable flux of ATP between mitochondria and NKA. Such tight coupling of NKA to PK is in line with its increased importance in the pathological states of the heart when the substrate preference shifts to glucose. PMID:24932585

  5. Evolution of the vacuolar H sup + -ATPase: Implications for the origin of eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Gogarten, J.P.; Kibak, H.; Dittrich, P.; Taiz, L.; Bowman, E.J.; Bowman, B.J. ); Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J. ); Date, Takayasu ); Oshima, Tairo; Konishi, Jin; Denda, Kimitoshi; Yoshida, Masasuke )

    1989-09-01

    Active transport across the vaculoar components of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is energized by a specific vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase. The amino acid sequences of the 70- and 60-kDa subunits of the vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase are {approx}25% identical to the {beta} and {alpha} subunits, respectively, of the eubacterial-type F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPases. The authors now report that the same vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase subunits are {approx}50% identical to the {alpha} and {beta} subunits, respectively, of the sulfur-metabolizing Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, an archaebacterium (Archaeobacterium). Moreover, the homologue of an 88-amino acid stretch near the amino-terminal end of the 70-kDa subunit is absent from the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase {beta} subunit but is present in the {alpha} subunit of Sulfolobus. Since the two types of subunits are homologous to each other, they must have arisen by a gene duplication that occurred prior to the last common ancestor of the eubacteria, eukaryotes, and Sulfolobus. Thus, the phylogenetic tree of the subunits can be rooted at the site where the gene duplication occurred. The inferred evolutionary tree contains two main branches: a eubacterial branch and an eocyte branch that gave rise to Sulfolobus and the eukaryotic host cell. The implication is that the vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase of eukaryotes arose by the internalization of the plasma membrane H{sup +}-ATPase of an archaebacterial-like ancestral cell.

  6. Comparison of developmental gradients for growth, ATPase, and fusicoccin-binding activity in mung bean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basel, L. E.; Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the developmental gradients along a mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) hypocotyl of the growth rate, plasma membrane ATPase, and fusicoccin-binding protein (FCBP) activity to determine whether they are interrelated. The hook and four sequential 7.5 millimeter segments of the hypocotyl below the hook were cut. A plasma membrane-enriched fraction was isolated from each section by aqueous two-phase partitioning and assayed for vanadate-sensitive ATPase and FCBP activity. Each gradient had a distinctive and different pattern. Endogenous growth rate was maximal in the second section and much lower in the others. Vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity was maximal in the third section, but remained high in the older sections. Amounts of ATPase protein, shown by specific antibody binding, did not correlate with the amount of vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in the three youngest sections. FCBP activity was almost absent in the first section, then increased to a maximum in the oldest sections. These data show that the growth rate is not determined by the ATPase activity, and that there are no fixed ratios between the ATPase and FCBP.

  7. Adaptive Changes in ATPase Activity in the Cells of Winter Wheat Seedlings during Cold Hardening

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Ling-Cheng; Sun, Long-Hua; Dong, He-Zhu

    1982-01-01

    A cytochemical study of ATPase activity in the cells of cold hardened and nonhardened winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Nongke No. 1) seedlings was carried out by electron microscopic observation of lead phosphate precipitation. ATPase activity associated with various cellular organelles was altered during cold hardening. (a) At 22°C, high plasmalemma ATPase activity was observed in both cold hardened and nonhardened tissues; at 5°C, high activity of plasmalemma ATPase was observed in hardened tissues, but not in unhardened tissues. (b) In nonhardened tissues, tonoplast and vacuoles did not exhibit high ATPase activity at either 22 or 5°C, while in hardened tissues high activity was observed at both temperatures. (c) At 5°C, ATPase activity of nucleoli and chromatin was decreased in hardened tissues, but not in nonhardened tissues. It is suggested that adaptive changes in ATPase activity associated with a particular cellular organelle or membrane may be associated with the development of frost resistance of winter wheat seedlings. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16662432

  8. Structure of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase Rotary Motor Reveals New Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Shaun; Phillips, Clair; Huss, Markus; Tiburcy, Felix; Wieczorek, Helmut; Trinick, John; Harrison, Michael A.; Muench, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vacuolar H+-ATPases are multisubunit complexes that operate with rotary mechanics and are essential for membrane proton transport throughout eukaryotes. Here we report a ∼1 nm resolution reconstruction of a V-ATPase in a different conformational state from that previously reported for a lower-resolution yeast model. The stator network of the V-ATPase (and by implication that of other rotary ATPases) does not change conformation in different catalytic states, and hence must be relatively rigid. We also demonstrate that a conserved bearing in the catalytic domain is electrostatic, contributing to the extraordinarily high efficiency of rotary ATPases. Analysis of the rotor axle/membrane pump interface suggests how rotary ATPases accommodate different c ring stoichiometries while maintaining high efficiency. The model provides evidence for a half channel in the proton pump, supporting theoretical models of ion translocation. Our refined model therefore provides new insights into the structure and mechanics of the V-ATPases. PMID:25661654

  9. Purification and Characterization of Tonoplast ATPase from Etiolated Mung Bean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May Yun; Lin, Ya Hui; Chou, Wing Ming; Chung, Tsuey Ping; Pan, Rong Long

    1989-01-01

    The tonoplast ATPase from etiolated seedlings of Vigna radiata L. (mung bean) was isolated using a two-step detergent solubilization modified from Mandala and Taiz (S Mandala, L Taiz [1985] Plant Physiol 78: 327-333). After ultracentrifugation on 10 to 28% sucrose gradient, the ATPase showed a 31.6-fold purification over the initial specific activity of the starting tonoplast-enriched membranes. The purified ATPase used Mg2+-ATP as the preferred substrate. The tonoplast ATPase was isolated in a form with characteristics similar to that on its native membrane environment. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed two prominent bands with molecular weights of 78,000 (α subunit) and 64,000 (β subunit). The intensity of Coomassie blue staining showed a 1:1 stoichiometry for α and β subunits. The amino acid composition of α and β subunits also confirmed the suggested stoichiometry of the subunit composition of the tonoplast ATPase. Moreover, radiation inactivation analysis yielded a functional size of 414 ± 24 and 405 ± 25 kilodaltons for soluble and membrane bound tonoplast ATPases, respectively. It is possible that the functioning tonoplast ATPase may be in a form of αβ-heteromultimer. Images Figure 3 PMID:16666796

  10. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings. PMID:25087500

  11. Involvement of V-ATPase in the regulation of cell size in the fly's visual system.

    PubMed

    Pyza, E; Borycz, J; Giebultowicz, J M; Meinertzhagen, I A

    2004-11-01

    In the fly's visual system, two classes of lamina interneuron, L1 and L2, cyclically change both their size and shape in a rhythm that is circadian. Several neurotransmitters and the lamina's glial cells are known to be involved in regulating these rhythms. Moreover, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in the optic lobe is thought also to participate in such regulation. We have detected V-ATPase-like immunoreactivity in the heads of both Drosophilla melanogaster and Musca domestica using antibodies raised against either the B- or H-subunits of V-ATPase from D. melanogaster or against the B-subunit from two other insect species Culex quinquefasciatus and Manduca sexta. In the visual systems of both fly species V-ATPase was localized immunocytochemically to the compound eye photoreceptors. In D. melanogaster immunoreactivity oscillated during the day and night and under constant darkness the signal was stronger during the subjective night than the subjective day. In turn, blocking V-ATPase by injecting a V-ATPase blocker, bafilomycin, in M. domestica increased the axon sizes of L1 and L2, but only when bafilomycin was applied during the night. As a result bafilomycin abolished the day/night difference in axon size in L1 and L2, their sizes being similar during the day and night. PMID:15607501

  12. Characterization and effect of light on the plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase of bean leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnemeyer, P. A.; Van Volkenburgh, E.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Proton excretion from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf cells is increased by bright white light. To test whether this could be due, at least in part, to an increase in plasma membrane (PM) ATPase activity, PM vesicles were isolated from primary leaves by phase partitioning and used to characterize PM ATPase activity and changes in response to light. ATPase activity was characterized as magnesium ion dependent, vanadate sensitive, and slightly stimulated by potassium chloride. The pH optimum was 6.5, the Km was approximately 0.30 millimolar ATP, and the activity was about 60% latent. PM vesicles were prepared from leaves of plants grown for 11 days in dim red light (growing slowly) or grown for 10 days in dim red light and then transferred to bright white-light for 1 day (growing rapidly). For both light treatments, ATPase specific activity was approximately 600 to 700 nanomoles per milligram protein per minute, and the latency, Km, and sensitivity to potassium chloride were also similar. PM vesicles from plants grown in complete darkness, however, exhibited a twofold greater specific activity. We conclude that the promotion of leaf growth and proton excretion by bright white light is not due to an increase in ATPase specific activity. Light does influence ATPase activity, however; both dim red light and bright white light decreased the ATPase specific activity by nearly 50% as compared with dark-grown leaves.

  13. Modulating role of 'Saptarangi' (Casearia esculenta) on membrane bound ATPase in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, A; Sethupathy, S; Pugalendi, K V

    2005-11-01

    We have studied the activities of adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+ATPase, Mg2+ATPase, Ca2+ATPase and Total ATPase) in erythrocyte, liver, kidney and cardiac tissues of control and Casearia esculenta treated streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The activity of Na+/K+ATPase plays a central role in the regulation of intra and extra cellular homeostasis and alteration of this transport system is thought to be linked to several complications of diabetes mellitus. An Mg2+ dependent ATPase activity is responsible for controlling the energy requiring process in cells whereas Ca2+ATPase is responsible for the signal transduction pathways and membrane fluidity. Activities of these enzymes were significantly altered (p < 0.05) in STZ diabetic rats. Oral administration of C. esculenta root extract for a period of 45 days resulted in significant (p < 0.05) reversal of these enzymes' activities to near normal. Thus the results suggest that C. esculenta protects the membrane integrity and functional status in STZ diabetic rats. PMID:16320953

  14. Multiple Roles of the Plasma Membrane H(+)-ATPase and Its Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is the pump that provides the driving force for transport of numerous solutes in plant cells, and plays an essential role for the growth and maintenance of cell homeostasis. Recent investigations using guard cells with respect to blue-light-induced stomatal opening uncovered the regulatory mechanisms of the H(+)-ATPase, and revealed that the phosphorylation status of penultimate threonine in the C-terminus of H(+)-ATPase is key step for the activity regulation. The same regulatory mechanisms for the H(+)-ATPase were evidenced in hypocotyl elongation in response to ABA and auxin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine is a common regulatory mechanism for the H(+)-ATPase. We also present the data that the activity of the H(+)-ATPase limits the plant growth. Typical structure of the H(+)-ATPase in the C-terminus was acquired in the transition of plants from water to the terrestrial land. PMID:25740720

  15. Roles of the N domain of the AAA+ Lon protease in substrate recognition, allosteric regulation and chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Degron binding regulates the activities of the AAA+ Lon protease in addition to targeting proteins for degradation. The sul20 degron from the cell-division inhibitor SulA is shown here to bind to the N domain of Escherichia coli Lon, and the recognition site is identified by cross-linking and scanning for mutations that prevent sul20-peptide binding. These N-domain mutations limit the rates of proteolysis of model sul20-tagged substrates and ATP hydrolysis by an allosteric mechanism. Lon inactivation of SulA in vivo requires binding to the N domain and robust ATP hydrolysis but does not require degradation or translocation into the proteolytic chamber. Lon-mediated relief of proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation in vivo can also occur without degradation but is not dependent on robust ATP hydrolysis. In combination, these results demonstrate that Lon can function as a protease or a chaperone and reveal that some of its ATP-dependent biological activities do not require translocation. PMID:24205897

  16. Spatial distribution of nematodes in three banana ( Musa AAA) root parts considering two root thickness in three farm management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, M.; De Waele, D.

    2004-10-01

    The spatial location of the banana ( Musa AAA) root parasitic nematodes within three root parts considering two root thickness was determined in three commercial farm management systems, which differ in weed and nematode management. Roots in each farm management system were classified in thick (>5 mm-d) and thin (1 ≤ 5 mm-d) roots. From each root type, the epidermis, the cortical parenchyma (CP) and the vascular cylinder (VC) were separated by fingernail, and nematodes were extracted by maceration of each root part. Independent of the farm management system, and for either root thickness, highest numbers of Radopholus similis per gram of root was found in the CP, followed by the epidermis and VC. The highest number of Helicotylencus spp., Pratylenchus spp. and the total nematode population per gram of root was found in the epidermis. Considering the number of nematodes per root part, the highest number of R. similis and total nematodes was located in the CP, while Helicotylenchus spp. and Pratylenchus spp. were concentrated in the epidermis. These patterns were approximately reproduced in the two root thickness and in the three farm management systems. This behavior suggests that injection of systemic nematicides into the plant pseudostem to replace the granular applications on surface soil might be promissory.

  17. Loss of the m-AAA protease subunit AFG₃L₂ causes mitochondrial transport defects and tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kondadi, Arun Kumar; Wang, Shuaiyu; Montagner, Sara; Kladt, Nikolay; Korwitz, Anne; Martinelli, Paola; Herholz, David; Baker, Michael J; Schauss, Astrid C; Langer, Thomas; Rugarli, Elena I

    2014-05-01

    The m-AAA protease subunit AFG₃L₂ is involved in degradation and processing of substrates in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mutations in AFG₃L₂ are associated with spinocerebellar ataxia SCA28 in humans and impair axonal development and neuronal survival in mice. The loss of AFG₃L₂ causes fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. However, the pathogenic mechanism of neurodegeneration in the absence of AFG₃L₂ is still unclear. Here, we show that depletion of AFG₃L₂ leads to a specific defect of anterograde transport of mitochondria in murine cortical neurons. We observe similar transport deficiencies upon loss of AFG₃L₂ in OMA1-deficient neurons, indicating that they are not caused by OMA1-mediated degradation of the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 and inhibition of mitochondrial fusion. Treatment of neurons with antioxidants, such as N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E, or decreasing tau levels in axons restored mitochondrial transport in AFG₃L₂-depleted neurons. Consistently, tau hyperphosphorylation and activation of ERK kinases are detected in mouse neurons postnatally deleted for Afg3l2. We propose that reactive oxygen species signaling leads to cytoskeletal modifications that impair mitochondrial transport in neurons lacking AFG₃L₂. PMID:24681487

  18. In-situ monitoring of blood glucose level for dialysis machine by AAA-battery-size ATR Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Sato, Shun; Ishida, Akane; Suzuki, Yo; Inohara, Daichi; Nogo, Kosuke; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    For blood glucose level measurement of dialysis machines, we proposed AAA-battery-size ATR (Attenuated total reflection) Fourier spectroscopy in middle infrared light region. The proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is a near-common path and spatial phase-shift interferometer with high time resolution. Because numerous number of spectral data that is 60 (= camera frame rare e.g. 60[Hz]) multiplied by pixel number could be obtained in 1[sec.], statistical-averaging improvement realize high-accurate spectral measurement. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of our proposed method for measuring glucose concentration in near-infrared light region with liquid cells. We confirmed that absorbance at 1600[nm] had high correlations with glucose concentrations (correlation coefficient: 0.92). But to measure whole-blood, complex light phenomenon caused from red blood cells, that is scattering and multiple reflection or so, deteriorate spectral data. Thus, we also proposed the ultrasound-assisted spectroscopic imaging that traps particles at standing-wave node. Thus, if ATR prism is oscillated mechanically, anti-node area is generated around evanescent light field on prism surface. By elimination complex light phenomenon of red blood cells, glucose concentration in whole-blood will be quantify with high accuracy. In this report, we successfully trapped red blood cells in normal saline solution with ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]).

  19. Differential immunological cross-reactions with antisera against the V-ATPase of Kalanchoë daigremontiana reveal structural differences of V-ATPase subunits of different plant species.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Schliebs, E; Ball, E; Berndt, E; Besemfelder-Butz, E; Binzel, M L; Drobny, M; Mühlenhoff, D; Müller, M L; Rakowski, K; Ratajczak, R

    1997-10-01

    Two antisera (ATP88 and ATP95) raised against the V-ATPase holoenzyme of Kalanchoë daigremontiana were tested for their cross-reactivity with subunits of V-ATPases from other plant species. V-ATPases from Kalanchoë blossfeldiana, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Nicotiana tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus limon, Lemna gibba, Hordeum vulgare and Zea mays were immunoprecipitated with an antiserum against the catalytic V-ATPase subunit A of M. crystallinum. As shown by silver staining and Western blot analysis with ATP88, subunits A, B, C, D and c were present in all immunoprecipitated V-ATPases. In contrast, ATP95 recognized the whole set of subunits only in K. blossfeldiana, M. crystallinum, H. vulgare and Z. mays. This differential cross reactivity of ATP95 indicates the presence of structural differences of certain V-ATPase subunits. Based on the Bafilomycin A1-sensitive ATPase activity of tonoplast enriched vesicles, and on the amount of V-ATPase solubilized and immunoprecipitated, the specific ATP-hydrolysis activity of the V-ATPases under test was determined. The structural differences correlate with the ability of V-ATPases from different species to hydrolyze ATP at one given assay condition for ATP-hydrolysis measurements. Interestingly V-ATPases showing cross-reactivity of subunits A, B, C, D and c with ATP95 showed higher rates of specific ATP hydrolysis compared to V-ATPases containing subunits which were not labeled by ATP95. Thus, V-ATPases with high turnover rates in our assay conditions may show common structural characteristics which separate them from ATPases with low turnover rates. PMID:9372182

  20. FY05 LDRD Fianl Report Investigation of AAA+ protein machines that participate in DNA replication, recombination, and in response to DNA damage LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-LW-049

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicka, D; de Carvalho-Kavanagh, M S; Barsky, D; Venclovas, C

    2006-12-04

    The AAA+ proteins are remarkable macromolecules that are able to self-assemble into nanoscale machines. These protein machines play critical roles in many cellular processes, including the processes that manage a cell's genetic material, but the mechanism at the molecular level has remained elusive. We applied computational molecular modeling, combined with advanced sequence analysis and available biochemical and genetic data, to structurally characterize eukaryotic AAA+ proteins and the protein machines they form. With these models we have examined intermolecular interactions in three-dimensions (3D), including both interactions between the components of the AAA+ complexes and the interactions of these protein machines with their partners. These computational studies have provided new insights into the molecular structure and the mechanism of action for AAA+ protein machines, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of processes involved in DNA metabolism.

  1. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  2. Is the ATPase from halobacterium saccharovorum an evolutionary relic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Altekar, W.; Kristjansson, H.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP Synthase Complex present in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts or bacteria is composed of 2 sectors: FO, an integral membrane protein consisting of 3 subunits mediating proton translocation across the membrane and F1, the catalytic component composed of 5 non-identical subunits. The apparent early origin of the ATP Synthase Complex, as implied by its ubiquitous distribution, seems inconsistent with its structural and functional complexity and raises the question if simpler versions of the ATP Synthase exist. Such an ATP Synthase has been searched for in various Archaebacteria. A purified halobacterial ATPase activity which possesses certain properties consistent with those of an ATP Synthase but which has a different subunit structure is described.

  3. F(1)-ATPase: a prototypical rotary molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    F(1)-ATPase, the soluble portion of ATP synthase, has been shown to be a rotary molecular motor in which the central γ subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of α(3)β(3) subunits. The rotation is powered by ATP hydrolysis in three catalytic sites, and reverse rotation of the γ subunit by an external force leads to ATP synthesis in the catalytic sites. Here I look back how our lab became involved in the study of this marvelous rotary machine, and discuss some aspects of its rotary mechanism while confessing we are far from understanding. This article is a very personal essay, not a scientific review, for this otherwise viral machines book. PMID:22297508

  4. Modulation of P-glycoprotein ATPase activity by some phytoconstituents.

    PubMed

    Najar, I A; Sachin, B S; Sharma, S C; Satti, N K; Suri, K A; Johri, R K

    2010-03-01

    In the present investigation 16 phytoconstituents, which are active moieties found in several medicinal herbs, have been evaluated for their P-glycoprotein (P-gp) stimulation/inhibition profiles using a P-gp-dependent ATPase assay in rat jejunal membrane (in vitro). Acteoside, agnuside, catechin, chlorogenic acid, picroside -II and santonin showed an inhibitory effect. Negundoside, picroside -I and oleanolic acid caused a stimulatory effect. Andrographolide, apocyanin, berberine, glycyrrhizin, magniferin and piperine produced a biphasic response (stimulation at low concentration and inhibition at high concentration). The results suggested that a possible interaction of these phytoconstituents at the level of P-gp, could be an important parameter in determining their role in several key pharmacodynamic events. PMID:19653312

  5. Substrate trajectory through phospholipid-transporting P4-ATPases.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    A difference in the lipid composition between the two leaflets of the same membrane is a relatively simple instance of lipid compositional heterogeneity. The large activation energy barrier for transbilayer movement for some (but not all) membrane lipids creates a regime governed by active transport processes. An early step in eukaryote evolution was the development of a capacity for generating transbilayer compositional heterogeneity far from equilibrium by directly tapping energy from the ATP pool. The mechanism of the P-type ATPases that create lipid asymmetry is well understood in terms of ATP hydrolysis, but the trajectory taken by the phospholipid substrate through the enzyme is a matter of current active research. There are currently three different models for this trajectory, all with support by mutation/activity measurements and analogies with known atomic structures. PMID:25233416

  6. Do biomolecular ion-motive ATPase work as adiabatic pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astumian, Raymond Dean

    2001-03-01

    Biomolecular ion pumps use chemical energy to pump ions from low to high chemical potential across a biological membrane. Experiments show that the chemical energy can be substituted by an external oscillating or stochastically fluctuating electric field. This result can be interpreted analogously to a mechanism for an adiabatic electron pump originally suggested by Thouless (PRB 27: 6083 (1983)) in which two system parameters are modulated out of phase with one another. In our model, internal relaxations of the protein (at least two with different time scales) provide a mechanism for transforming a single ac or stochastically fluctuating external signal into a two phase shifted outputs. For a sinusoidally oscillating electric field, the frequency response for the Sodium-Potassium ATPase for both sodium and rubidium (an analog of potassium) can be fit using a very simple expression with only one fit parameter. These results show how biomolecular pumps can be modelled at the mesoscopic level of detail.

  7. Mapping the H(+) (V)-ATPase interactome: identification of proteins involved in trafficking, folding, assembly and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Merkulova, Maria; Păunescu, Teodor G; Azroyan, Anie; Marshansky, Vladimir; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    V-ATPases (H(+) ATPases) are multisubunit, ATP-dependent proton pumps that regulate pH homeostasis in virtually all eukaryotes. They are involved in key cell biological processes including vesicle trafficking, endosomal pH sensing, membrane fusion and intracellular signaling. They also have critical systemic roles in renal acid excretion and blood pH balance, male fertility, bone remodeling, synaptic transmission, olfaction and hearing. Furthermore, V-ATPase dysfunction either results in or aggravates various other diseases, but little is known about the complex protein interactions that regulate these varied V-ATPase functions. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to identify V-ATPase associated proteins and construct a V-ATPase interactome. Our analysis using kidney tissue revealed V-ATPase-associated protein clusters involved in protein quality control, complex assembly and intracellular trafficking. ARHGEF7, DMXL1, EZR, NCOA7, OXR1, RPS6KA3, SNX27 and 9 subunits of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex (CCT) were found to interact with V-ATPase for the first time in this study. Knockdown of two interacting proteins, DMXL1 and WDR7, inhibited V-ATPase-mediated intracellular vesicle acidification in a kidney cell line, providing validation for the utility of our interactome as a screen for functionally important novel V-ATPase-regulating proteins. Our data, therefore, provide new insights and directions for the analysis of V-ATPase cell biology and (patho)physiology. PMID:26442671

  8. Mapping the H+ (V)-ATPase interactome: identification of proteins involved in trafficking, folding, assembly and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Merkulova, Maria; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Azroyan, Anie; Marshansky, Vladimir; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    V-ATPases (H+ ATPases) are multisubunit, ATP-dependent proton pumps that regulate pH homeostasis in virtually all eukaryotes. They are involved in key cell biological processes including vesicle trafficking, endosomal pH sensing, membrane fusion and intracellular signaling. They also have critical systemic roles in renal acid excretion and blood pH balance, male fertility, bone remodeling, synaptic transmission, olfaction and hearing. Furthermore, V-ATPase dysfunction either results in or aggravates various other diseases, but little is known about the complex protein interactions that regulate these varied V-ATPase functions. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to identify V-ATPase associated proteins and construct a V-ATPase interactome. Our analysis using kidney tissue revealed V-ATPase-associated protein clusters involved in protein quality control, complex assembly and intracellular trafficking. ARHGEF7, DMXL1, EZR, NCOA7, OXR1, RPS6KA3, SNX27 and 9 subunits of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex (CCT) were found to interact with V-ATPase for the first time in this study. Knockdown of two interacting proteins, DMXL1 and WDR7, inhibited V-ATPase-mediated intracellular vesicle acidification in a kidney cell line, providing validation for the utility of our interactome as a screen for functionally important novel V-ATPase-regulating proteins. Our data, therefore, provide new insights and directions for the analysis of V-ATPase cell biology and (patho)physiology. PMID:26442671

  9. Cloning and characterization of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, B C; Kurtz, M B; Marrinan, J A; Perlin, D S

    1991-01-01

    The Candida albicans PMA1 gene was isolated from a genomic library by using a hybridization probe obtained from the PMA1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene was localized to chromosome III of the Candida genome. An open reading frame of 2,685 nucleotides predicts an amino acid sequence of 895 amino acids that is 83% homologous at both the DNA and protein levels to its S. cerevisiae equivalent. A polyadenylated mRNA transcript of about 4,000 nucleotides contains a highly folded AU-rich leader of 242 nucleotides. The structure of the gene, codon bias, and levels of approximately 100-kDa H(+)-ATPase protein recovered in plasma membranes indicate a highly expressed gene. The plasma membrane ATPase was purified to about 90% homogeneity and appeared to be blocked at the amino terminus. Three hydrophobic membrane sector tryptic fragments from the partially digested ATPase provided internal sequence information for over 50 amino acids, which agrees with the sequence predicted by the cloned gene. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the C. albicans enzyme is about 3 kDa smaller than its Saccharomyces counterpart and was consistent with a predicted Mr of 97,398. Antibodies to the S. cerevisiae whole ATPase or its carboxyl terminus bound to the C. albicans enzyme but with lower avidity. Kinetic analysis showed that the Candida and Saccharomyces ATPases respond to glucose activation-starvation in nonidentical fashions. The amino-terminal domain of the C. albicans ATPase is marked by a net deletion of 23 amino acids in comparison with the S. cerevisiae ATPase. These differences maintain net charge, occur in nonconserved regions of fungal ATPases, and are sufficient to account for the observed difference in electrophoretic mobility between the two yeast ATPases. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:1834633

  10. Alteration of aluminium inhibition of synaptosomal (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase by colestipol administration.

    PubMed

    Silva, V S; Oliveira, L; Gonçalves, P P

    2013-11-01

    The ability of aluminium to inhibit the (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity has been observed by several authors. During chronic dietary exposure to AlCl3, brain (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity drops, even if no alterations of catalytic subunit protein expression and of energy charge potential are observed. The aluminium effect on (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity seems to implicate the reduction of interacting protomers within the oligomeric ensemble of the membrane-bound (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase. The activity of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase is altered by the microviscosity of lipid environment. We studied if aluminium inhibitory effect on (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase is modified by alterations in synaptosomal membrane cholesterol content. Adult male Wistar rats were submitted to chronic dietary AlCl3 exposure (0.03 g/day of AlCl3) and/or to colestipol, a hypolidaemic drug (0.31 g/day) during 4 months. The activity of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase was studied in brain cortex synaptosomes with different cholesterol contents. Additionally, we incubate synaptosomes with methyl-β-cyclodextrin for both enrichment and depletion of membrane cholesterol content, with or without 300 μM AlCl3. This enzyme activity was significantly reduced by micromolar AlCl3 added in vitro and when aluminium was orally administered to rats. The oral administration of colestipol reduced the cholesterol content and concomitantly inhibited the (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase. The aluminium inhibitory effect on synaptosomal (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase was reduced by cholesterol depletion both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23829947

  11. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H+-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha. However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H+-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H+-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H+-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H+-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  12. The RAVE complex is an isoform-specific V-ATPase assembly factor in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Smardon, Anne M.; Diab, Heba I.; Tarsio, Maureen; Diakov, Theodore T.; Nasab, Negin Dehdar; West, Robert W.; Kane, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    The regulator of ATPase of vacuoles and endosomes (RAVE) complex is implicated in vacuolar H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) assembly and activity. In yeast, rav1∆ mutants exhibit a Vma− growth phenotype characteristic of loss of V-ATPase activity only at high temperature. Synthetic genetic analysis identified mutations that exhibit a full, temperature-independent Vma− growth defect when combined with the rav1∆ mutation. These include class E vps mutations, which compromise endosomal sorting. The synthetic Vma− growth defect could not be attributed to loss of vacuolar acidification in the double mutants, as there was no vacuolar acidification in the rav1∆ mutant. The yeast V-ATPase a subunit is present as two isoforms, Stv1p in Golgi and endosomes and Vph1p in vacuoles. Rav1p interacts directly with the N-terminal domain of Vph1p. STV1 overexpression suppressed the growth defects of both rav1∆ and rav1∆vph1∆, and allowed RAVE-independent assembly of active Stv1p-containing V-ATPases in vacuoles. Mutations causing synthetic genetic defects in combination with rav1∆ perturbed the normal localization of Stv1–green fluorescent protein. We propose that RAVE is necessary for assembly of Vph1-containing V-ATPase complexes but not Stv1-containing complexes. Synthetic Vma− phenotypes arise from defects in Vph1p-containing complexes caused by rav1∆, combined with defects in Stv1p-containing V-ATPases caused by the second mutation. Thus RAVE is the first isoform-specific V-ATPase assembly factor. PMID:24307682

  13. Computational approaches for classification and prediction of P-type ATPase substrate specificity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zinati, Zahra; Alemzadeh, Abbas; KayvanJoo, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    As an extended gamut of integral membrane (extrinsic) proteins, and based on their transporting specificities, P-type ATPases include five subfamilies in Arabidopsis, inter alia, P4ATPases (phospholipid-transporting ATPase), P3AATPases (plasma membrane H(+) pumps), P2A and P2BATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) and P1B ATPases (heavy metal pumps). Although, many different computational methods have been developed to predict substrate specificity of unknown proteins, further investigation needs to improve the efficiency and performance of the predicators. In this study, various attribute weighting and supervised clustering algorithms were employed to identify the main amino acid composition attributes, which can influence the substrate specificity of ATPase pumps, classify protein pumps and predict the substrate specificity of uncharacterized ATPase pumps. The results of this study indicate that both non-reduced coefficients pertaining to absorption and Cys extinction within 280 nm, the frequencies of hydrogen, Ala, Val, carbon, hydrophilic residues, the counts of Val, Asn, Ser, Arg, Phe, Tyr, hydrophilic residues, Phe-Phe, Ala-Ile, Phe-Leu, Val-Ala and length are specified as the most important amino acid attributes through applying the whole attribute weighting models. Here, learning algorithms engineered in a predictive machine (Naive Bays) is proposed to foresee the Q9LVV1 and O22180 substrate specificities (P-type ATPase like proteins) with 100 % prediction confidence. For the first time, our analysis demonstrated promising application of bioinformatics algorithms in classifying ATPases pumps. Moreover, we suggest the predictive systems that can assist towards the prediction of the substrate specificity of any new ATPase pumps with the maximum possible prediction confidence. PMID:27186030

  14. Redistribution and characterization of (H+ + K+)-ATPase membranes from resting and stimulated gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, B H; Forte, J G

    1985-01-01

    When isolated from resting parietal cells, the majority of the (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity was recovered in the microsomal fraction. These microsomal vesicles demonstrated a low K+ permeability, such that the addition of valinomycin resulted in marked stimulation of (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity, and proton accumulation. When isolated from stimulated parietal cells, the (H+ + K+)-ATPase was redistributed to larger, denser vesicles: stimulation-associated (s.a.) vesicles. S.a. vesicles showed an increased K+ permeability, such that maximal (H+ + K+)-ATPase and proton accumulation activities were observed in low K+ concentrations and no enhancement of activities occurred on the addition of valinomycin. The change in subcellular distribution of (H+ + K+)-ATPase correlated with morphological changes observed with stimulation of parietal cells, the microsomes and s.a. vesicles derived from the intracellular tubulovesicles and the apical plasma membrane, respectively. Total (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity recoverable from stimulated gastric mucosa was 64% of that from resting tissue. Therefore, we tested for latent activity in s.a. vesicles. Permeabilization of s.a. vesicles with octyl glucoside increased (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity by greater than 2-fold. Latent (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity was resistant to highly tryptic conditions (which inactivated all activity in gastric microsomes). About 20% of the non-latent (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity was also resistant to trypsin digestion. We interpret these results as indicating that, of the s.a. vesicles, approx. 55% have a right-side-out orientation and are impermeable to ATP, 10% right-side-out and permeable to ATP, and 35% have an inside-out orientation. PMID:3000356

  15. Abscisic Acid Induction of Vacuolar H+-ATPase Activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Is Developmentally Regulated1

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Maldonado-Gama, Minerva; Pantoja, Omar

    1999-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:10398716

  16. Isolation and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding the c subunit of a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase from the CAM plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, D M; Rees, D J; Rambaut, A; Smith, J A

    1996-05-01

    We report the sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the c ("16 kDa') subunit of a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) from Kalanchoë daigremontiana, a plant in which the cell vacuole plays a pivotal role in crassulacean acid metabolism. The clone, pKVA211, was isolated from a K. daigremontiana leaf cDNA library constructed in lambda ZAP II using a homologous PCR-generated cDNA probe for the V-ATPase c subunit. The KVA211 cDNA was 839 nucleotides long and included a 20 bp poly(A)+ tail together with a complete 495 bp coding region for a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 16659 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly conserved across the wide range of eukaryotes (vertebrates, invertebrates, fungi, plants and protozoa) in which this gene has now been identified. Sequence comparison of several PCR products and genomic Southern analysis indicated that the V-ATPase c subunit in K. daigremontiana is encoded by a small multi-gene family. Steady-state levels of the KVA211 mRNA were much higher in leaves than in roots or flowers, and expression of this transcript in leaves was shown to be strongly light-dependent. PMID:8756609

  17. Phosphate release coupled to rotary motion of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    F1-ATPase, the catalytic domain of ATP synthase, synthesizes most of the ATP in living organisms. Running in reverse powered by ATP hydrolysis, this hexameric ring-shaped molecular motor formed by three αβ-dimers creates torque on its central γ-subunit. This reverse operation enables detailed explorations of the mechanochemical coupling mechanisms in experiment and simulation. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to construct a first atomistic conformation of the intermediate state following the 40° substep of rotary motion, and to study the timing and molecular mechanism of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release coupled to the rotation. In response to torque-driven rotation of the γ-subunit in the hydrolysis direction, the nucleotide-free αβE interface forming the “empty” E site loosens and singly charged Pi readily escapes to the P loop. By contrast, the interface stays closed with doubly charged Pi. The γ-rotation tightens the ATP-bound αβTP interface, as required for hydrolysis. The calculated rate for the outward release of doubly charged Pi from the αβE interface 120° after ATP hydrolysis closely matches the ∼1-ms functional timescale. Conversely, Pi release from the ADP-bound αβDP interface postulated in earlier models would occur through a kinetically infeasible inward-directed pathway. Our simulations help reconcile conflicting interpretations of single-molecule experiments and crystallographic studies by clarifying the timing of Pi exit, its pathway and kinetics, associated changes in Pi protonation, and changes of the F1-ATPase structure in the 40° substep. Important elements of the molecular mechanism of Pi release emerging from our simulations appear to be conserved in myosin despite the different functional motions. PMID:24062450

  18. Ligand binding sites of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Lingrel, J B; Croyle, M L; Woo, A L; Argüello, J M

    1998-08-01

    Our studies have concentrated on two aspects of the Na,K-ATPase, the first relates to the identification of amino acids involved in binding Na+ and K+ during the catalytic cycle and the second involves defining how cardiac glycosides inhibit the enzyme. To date, three amino acids, Ser775, Asp804 and Asp808, all located in transmembrane regions five and six, have been shown to play a major role in K+ binding. These findings are based on site directed mutagenesis and expression studies. In order to understand how cardiac glycosides interact with the Na,K-ATPase, studies again involving mutagenesis coupled with expression have been used. More specifically, amino acid residues have been substituted in an ouabain sensitive alpha subunit using random mutagenesis, and the ability of the resulting enzyme to confer resistance to ouabain sensitive cells was determined. Interestingly, the amino acids of the alpha subunit which alter ouabain sensitivity cluster in two major regions, one comprised of the first and second transmembrane spanning domains and the extracellular loop joining them, and the second formed by the extracellular halves of transmembrane regions four, five, six and seven. As noted above, transmembrane regions five and six also contain the three amino acid residues Ser775, Asp804 and Asp808 which play a key role in cation transport, possibly binding K+. Thus, it is reasonable to propose that cardiac glycosides bind to two sites, the N- terminal region and the central region which contains the cation binding sites. Cardiac glycoside binding to the center region may lock the cation transport region into a configuration such that the enzyme cannot go through the conformational change required for ion transport. PMID:9789548

  19. Insulin regulation of (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Lytton, J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation into the mechanism of insulin stimulation of (Na/sup +/,K/sup +/)=ATPase in rat adipocytes. Two molecular forms of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme were identified and denoted ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..(+), due to their similarity to those isozymes previously described from rat brain. Insulin specifically stimulated the ..cap alpha..(+) form of the enzyme. The two forms of the enzyme had quite different affinities for intracellular sodium ion; insulin affected only the lower affinity of ..cap alpha..(+), shifting it toward a higher value. However, the sodium affinity of (Na/sup +/,K/sup +/)-ATPase activity in isolated membranes was equally high for both forms of the enzyme. This suggests that the difference in sodium affinity between the two forms observed in the cell is not inherent within the structure of the sodium pump, but must depend upon a selective interaction with another molecule which has been lost upon membrane isolation. Immunoprecipitation of both the catalytic subunits either from extracts of whole cells which had been labelled with (/sup 32/P) orthophosphate, or from membranes which had been labelled with ..gamma..-(/sup 32/P)ATP demonstrated that less than 1 in 100 molecules had a covalently bound phosphate insulin had no influence on this value. The amino terminal sequences of the first 4 amino acids of the catalytic subunits of both ..cap alpha.. (isolated from rat kidney) and ..cap alpha..(+) (from rat brainstem axolemma) were determined. The result shows two highly homologous but clearly different molecules. It can thus be concluded that the insulin sensitive version of the enzyme is not derived from the common ..cap alpha.. form by a post-translational modification.

  20. Kinetics of the actomyosin ATPase in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    Many characteristics expected from the cyclic ATPase mechanism of Scheme 1 are apparent in reactions measured directly in muscle fibers. ATP detaches rigor cross-bridges rapidly. Reattachment and force generation are also rapid compared to the overall cycling rate, but reversibility of many of the reactions allows significant population of detached states during contraction. ATP hydrolysis shows rapid, "burst" kinetics and is also readily reversible. Pi is released before ADP in the cycle. Pi release is slow in relaxed fibers but is promoted by the interaction between myosin and actin during contraction. Actomyosin kinetics differ in fibers from the ATPase reaction in solution in that Pi binds more readily to AM' X ADP in fibers, and complex, Ca2+-dependent kinetics are evident for ADP release. These properties suggest that the mechanical driving stroke of the cross-bridge cycle and events during physiological relaxation are closely linked to the product release steps. All of the reactions, except step 7a, in the main pathway for ATP hydrolysis, indicated in Scheme 1 by heavy arrows, are fast compared to the overall cycling rate in isometric contractions. Based on this finding, we expect step 7a (or isomerizations of the flanking states) to be relatively slow (approximately 3 s-1). But neither the rate-limiting reaction, nor the expected major dependence on mechanical load or shortening that would explain the Fenn effect, have actually been detected. Use of the pulse photolysis and oxygen exchange methods with structural and spectroscopic techniques and with perturbations of mechanical strain promise to reveal these aspects of the mechanism. PMID:2952053

  1. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  2. Fall of blood ionized calcium on watching a provocative TV program and its prevention by active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca).

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Ohgitani, S; Nomura, M

    1999-01-01

    In December 1997, more than 680 children developed convulsive seizures while watching a notorious audiovisually provocative TV program, "Pocket Monster." Emotional stimulation via hyperventilation may cause respiratory alkalosis, fall of blood ionized calcium (Ca), and sensitization of the nervous system to excessive emotional stress. A study was therefore undertaken to follow the changes of blood ionized Ca in eight healthy volunteers after watching the "Pocket Monster" and also a quiet program, "Classical Music," as a control for 20min from 4 P.M. Although neither marked hyperventilation nor convulsions developed in any of these adult volunteers, blood ionized Ca showed a significantly more pronounced fall during and after watching "Pocket Monster," and their plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was significantly higher 120min after the beginning of "Pocket Monster" than the "Classical Music" program. Plasma total Ca, pH, and albumin were free of detectable changes. Ingestion of 600mg Ca as active absorbable algal Ca (AAA Ca) with high bioavailability completely prevented the fall of ionized Ca and suppressed iPTH. Plama osteocalcin was also significantly suppressed after ingestion of AAA Ca. It may be worthwhile to ingest AAA Ca before anticipated emotional stress such as watching a provocative TV program to prevent possible neuromuscular instability. PMID:10340641

  3. Na+,K+-ATPase as the Target Enzyme for Organic and Inorganic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Vasić, Vesna; Momić, Tatjana; Petković, Marijana; Krstić, Danijela

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the literature data concerning specific and non specific inhibitors of Na+,K+-ATPase receptor. The immobilization approaches developed to improve the rather low time and temperature stability of Na+,K+-ATPase, as well to preserve the enzyme properties were overviewed. The functional immobilization of Na+,K+-ATPase receptor as the target, with preservation of the full functional protein activity and access of various substances to an optimum number of binding sites under controlled conditions in the combination with high sensitive technology for the detection of enzyme activity is the basis for application of this enzyme in medical, pharmaceutical and environmental research.

  4. Isolation of H(+),K(+)-ATPase-enriched Membrane Fraction from Pig Stomachs.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase is an ATP-driven proton pump responsible for the acid secretion. Here, we describe the procedure for the isolation of H(+),K(+)-ATPase-enriched membrane vesicle fractions by Ficoll/sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Further purification by SDS treatment of membrane fractions is also introduced. These procedures allow us to obtain purified protein preparations in a quantity of several tens of milligrams, with the specific activity of ~480 μmol/mg/h. High purity and stability of H(+),K(+)-ATPase in the membrane preparation enable us to evaluate its detailed biochemical properties, and also to obtain 2D crystals for structural analysis. PMID:26695019

  5. Induction of Vacuolar ATPase and Mitochondrial ATP Synthase by Aluminum in an Aluminum-Resistant Cultivar of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Christie A.; Good, Allen G.; Taylor, Gregory J.

    2001-01-01

    Two 51-kD aluminum (Al)-induced proteins (RMP51, root membrane proteins of 51 kD) were recently discovered in an aluminum-resistant cultivar of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv PT741 (Basu et al., 1994a). These proteins segregate with the aluminum resistance phenotype in a segregating population arising from a cross between Al-resistant cv PT741 and Al-sensitive cv Katepwa (Taylor et al., 1997). The proteins have been purified by continuous elution electrophoresis and analyzed by peptide microsequencing. Sequence analysis of the purified peptides revealed that they are homologous to the B subunit of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and the α- and β-subunits of the mitochondrial ATP synthase (F1F0-ATPase). To confirm that these ATPases are induced by Al, ATPase activity and transcript levels were analyzed under Al stress. Both V-ATPase and F1F0-ATPase activities were induced by Al and responded in a dose-dependent manner to 0 to 150 μm Al. In contrast, plasma membrane H+-ATPase (P-ATPase) activity decreased to 0.5× control levels, even when plants were exposed to 25 μm Al. Northern analysis showed that the transcript encoding the B subunit of V-ATPase increased by 2.2× in a dose-dependent manner, whereas levels of the transcript encoding the α-subunit of F1F0-ATPase remained constant. The effect of Al on ATPase activity in other cultivars was also examined. The Al-resistant cultivar, cv PT741, was the only cultivar to show induction of V- and F1F0-ATPases. These results suggest that the V-ATPase in cv PT741 is responding specifically to Al stress with the ATP required for its activity supplied by ATP synthase to maintain energy balance within the cell. PMID:11299386

  6. High-affinity ouabain binding by yeast cells expressing Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha subunits and the gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Eakle, K A; Kim, K S; Kabalin, M A; Farley, R A

    1992-01-01

    Recently, a beta subunit for the rat gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase (HK beta), which is structurally similar to the beta subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, has been cloned and characterized. Using heterologous expression in yeast, we have tested the specificity of beta subunit assembly with different isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase. Coexpression in yeast cells of the HK beta with both the sheep alpha 1 subunit and the rat alpha 3 subunit isoforms of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (alpha 1 and alpha 3, respectively) leads to the appearance of high-affinity ouabain-binding sites in yeast membranes. These ouabain-binding sites (alpha 1 plus HK beta, alpha 3 plus HK beta) have a high affinity for ouabain (Kd, 5-10 nM) and are expressed at levels similar to those formed with the rat beta 1 subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (beta 1) (alpha 1 plus beta 1 or alpha 3 plus beta 1). Potassium acts as a specific antagonist of ouabain binding by alpha 1 plus HK beta and alpha 3 plus HK beta just like sodium pumps formed with beta 1. Sodium pumps formed with the HK beta, however, show quantitative differences in their affinity for ouabain and in the antagonism of K+ for ouabain binding. These data suggest that the structure of the beta subunit may play a role in sodium pump function. Images PMID:1313569

  7. High-affinity ouabain binding by yeast cells expressing Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha subunits and the gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Eakle, K A; Kim, K S; Kabalin, M A; Farley, R A

    1992-04-01

    Recently, a beta subunit for the rat gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase (HK beta), which is structurally similar to the beta subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, has been cloned and characterized. Using heterologous expression in yeast, we have tested the specificity of beta subunit assembly with different isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase. Coexpression in yeast cells of the HK beta with both the sheep alpha 1 subunit and the rat alpha 3 subunit isoforms of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (alpha 1 and alpha 3, respectively) leads to the appearance of high-affinity ouabain-binding sites in yeast membranes. These ouabain-binding sites (alpha 1 plus HK beta, alpha 3 plus HK beta) have a high affinity for ouabain (Kd, 5-10 nM) and are expressed at levels similar to those formed with the rat beta 1 subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (beta 1) (alpha 1 plus beta 1 or alpha 3 plus beta 1). Potassium acts as a specific antagonist of ouabain binding by alpha 1 plus HK beta and alpha 3 plus HK beta just like sodium pumps formed with beta 1. Sodium pumps formed with the HK beta, however, show quantitative differences in their affinity for ouabain and in the antagonism of K+ for ouabain binding. These data suggest that the structure of the beta subunit may play a role in sodium pump function. PMID:1313569

  8. Experimental verification of the Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation adjacent to heterogeneous media for IMRT and RapidArc of nasopharygeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W. K.; Leung, Lucullus H. T.; So, Ronald W. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the doses calculated by the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) with experimentally measured data adjacent to and within heterogeneous medium using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} (RA) volumetric arc therapy plans for nasopharygeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Two-dimensional dose distribution immediately adjacent to both air and bone inserts of a rectangular tissue equivalent phantom irradiated using IMRT and RA plans for NPC cases were measured with GafChromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT3 films. Doses near and within the nasopharygeal (NP) region of an anthropomorphic phantom containing heterogeneous medium were also measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and EBT3 films. The measured data were then compared with the data calculated by AAA and AXB. For AXB, dose calculations were performed using both dose-to-medium (AXB{sub Dm}) and dose-to-water (AXB{sub Dw}) options. Furthermore, target dose differences between AAA and AXB were analyzed for the corresponding real patients. The comparison of real patient plans was performed by stratifying the targets into components of different densities, including tissue, bone, and air. Results: For the verification of planar dose distribution adjacent to air and bone using the rectangular phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 98.7%, 99.5%, and 97.7% on the axial plane for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans, while they were 97.6%, 98.2%, and 97.7%, respectively, on the coronal plane. For the verification of planar dose distribution within the NP region of the anthropomorphic phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 95.1%, 91.3%, and 99.0% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans. Within the NP region where

  9. GENERAL: Stochastic Four-State Mechanochemical Model of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Xia; Zhan, Yong; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Han, Ying-Rong; Chen, Ya-Fei

    2010-10-01

    F1-ATPase, a part of ATP synthase, can synthesize and hydrolyze ATP moleculars in which the central γ-subunit rotates inside the α3 β3cylinder. A stochastic four-state mechanochemical coupling model of F1-ATPase is studied with the aid of the master equation. In this model, the ATP hydrolysis and synthesis are dependent on ATP, ADP, and Pi concentrations. The effects of ATP concentration, ADP concentration, and the external torque on the occupation probability of binding-state, the rotation rate and the diffusion coefficient of F1-ATPase are investigated. Moreover, the results from this model are compared with experiments. The mechanochemical mechanism F1-ATPase is qualitatively explained by the model.

  10. The structure of the peripheral stalk of Thermus thermophilus H+-ATPase/synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K; Stewart, Alastair G; Donohoe, Mhairi; Bernal, Ricardo A; Stock, Daniela

    2010-03-22

    Proton-translocating ATPases are ubiquitous protein complexes that couple ATP catalysis with proton translocation via a rotary catalytic mechanism. The peripheral stalks are essential components that counteract torque generated from proton translocation during ATP synthesis or from ATP hydrolysis during proton pumping. Despite their essential role, the peripheral stalks are the least conserved component of the complexes, differing substantially between subtypes in composition and stoichiometry. We have determined the crystal structure of the peripheral stalk of the A-type ATPase/synthase from Thermus thermophilus consisting of subunits E and G. The structure contains a heterodimeric right-handed coiled coil, a protein fold never observed before. We have fitted this structure into the 23 {angstrom} resolution EM density of the intact A-ATPase complex, revealing the precise location of the peripheral stalk and new implications for the function and assembly of proton-translocating ATPases.

  11. Anti-leukemic effects of the V-ATPase inhibitor Archazolid A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siwei; Schneider, Lina S; Vick, Binje; Grunert, Michaela; Jeremias, Irmela; Menche, Dirk; Müller, Rolf; Vollmar, Angelika M; Liebl, Johanna

    2015-12-22

    Prognosis for patients suffering from T-ALL is still very poor and new strategies for T-ALL treatment are urgently needed. Our study shows potent anti-leukemic effects of the myxobacterial V-ATPase inhibitor Archazolid A. Archazolid A reduced growth and potently induced death of leukemic cell lines and human leukemic samples. By inhibiting lysosomal acidification, Archazolid A blocked activation of the Notch pathway, however, this was not the mechanism of V-ATPase inhibition relevant for cell death induction. In fact, V-ATPase inhibition by Archazolid A decreased the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. As underlying mode of action, this work is in line with recent studies from our group demonstrating that Archazolid A induced S-phase cell cycle arrest by interfering with the iron metabolism in leukemic cells. Our study provides evidence for V-ATPase inhibition as a potential new therapeutic option for T-ALL. PMID:26496038

  12. Spatial distribution of Na+-K+-ATPase in dendritic spines dissected by nanoscale superresolution STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Na+,K+-ATPase plays an important role for ion homeostasis in virtually all mammalian cells, including neurons. Despite this, there is as yet little known about the isoform specific distribution in neurons. Results With help of superresolving stimulated emission depletion microscopy the spatial distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase in dendritic spines of cultured striatum neurons have been dissected. The found compartmentalized distribution provides a strong evidence for the confinement of neuronal Na+,K+-ATPase (α3 isoform) in the postsynaptic region of the spine. Conclusions A compartmentalized distribution may have implications for the generation of local sodium gradients within the spine and for the structural and functional interaction between the sodium pump and other synaptic proteins. Superresolution microscopy has thus opened up a new perspective to elucidate the nature of the physiological function, regulation and signaling role of Na+,K+-ATPase from its topological distribution in dendritic spines. PMID:21272290

  13. Anti-leukemic effects of the V-ATPase inhibitor Archazolid A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Schneider, Lina S.; Vick, Binje; Grunert, Michaela; Jeremias, Irmela; Menche, Dirk; Müller, Rolf; Vollmar, Angelika M.; Liebl, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis for patients suffering from T-ALL is still very poor and new strategies for T-ALL treatment are urgently needed. Our study shows potent anti-leukemic effects of the myxobacterial V-ATPase inhibitor Archazolid A. Archazolid A reduced growth and potently induced death of leukemic cell lines and human leukemic samples. By inhibiting lysosomal acidification, Archazolid A blocked activation of the Notch pathway, however, this was not the mechanism of V-ATPase inhibition relevant for cell death induction. In fact, V-ATPase inhibition by Archazolid A decreased the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. As underlying mode of action, this work is in line with recent studies from our group demonstrating that Archazolid A induced S-phase cell cycle arrest by interfering with the iron metabolism in leukemic cells. Our study provides evidence for V-ATPase inhibition as a potential new therapeutic option for T-ALL. PMID:26496038

  14. Plasma Membrane H(+)-ATPase Regulation in the Center of Plant Physiology.

    PubMed

    Falhof, Janus; Pedersen, Jesper Torbøl; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase is an important ion pump in the plant cell membrane. By extruding protons from the cell and generating a membrane potential, this pump energizes the PM, which is a prerequisite for growth. Modification of the autoinhibitory terminal domains activates PM H(+)-ATPase activity, and on this basis it has been hypothesized that these regulatory termini are targets for physiological factors that activate or inhibit proton pumping. In this review, we focus on the posttranslational regulation of the PM H(+)-ATPase and place regulation of the pump in an evolutionary and physiological context. The emerging picture is that multiple signals regulating plant growth interfere with the posttranslational regulation of the PM H(+)-ATPase. PMID:26584714

  15. Yeast V-ATPase Proteolipid Ring Acts as a Large-conductance Transmembrane Protein Pore

    PubMed Central

    Couoh-Cardel, Sergio; Hsueh, Yi-Ching; Wilkens, Stephan; Movileanu, Liviu

    2016-01-01

    The vacuolar H+ -ATPase (V-ATPase) is a rotary motor enzyme that acidifies intracellular organelles and the extracellular milieu in some tissues. Besides its canonical proton-pumping function, V-ATPase’s membrane sector, Vo, has been implicated in non-canonical functions including membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. Here, we report purification and biophysical characterization of yeast V-ATPase c subunit ring (c-ring) using electron microscopy and single-molecule electrophysiology. We find that yeast c-ring forms dimers mediated by the c subunits’ cytoplasmic loops. Electrophysiology measurements of the c-ring reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer revealed a large unitary conductance of ~8.3 nS. Thus, the data support a role of V-ATPase c-ring in membrane fusion and neuronal communication. PMID:27098228

  16. Inhibition of gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase activity by compounds from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cristina Setim; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Mayer, Bárbara; dos Santos, Ana Cristina; Twardowschy, André; Santos, Cid Aimbiré de Moraes; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade

    2011-09-01

    H+, K(+)-ATPase enzyme is a therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric disturbances. Several medicinal plants and isolated compounds inhibit the acid gastric secretion through interaction with the proton pump. In order to add new properties to some natural constituents, five compounds, a benzylated derivative of vincoside, a diterpene (abietic acid) and three alkaloids (cephaeline, vinblastine and vindoline), were tested for their activities on gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase isolated from rabbit stomach. All the compounds inhibited H+, K(+)-ATPase activity with varied potency. The IC50 value for benzylvincoside was 121 (50-293) microM, and for abietic acid 177 (148-211) microM. The alkaloids cephaeline, vinblastine and vindoline inhibited the H+, K(+)-ATPase activity with IC50 values of 194, 761 and 846 microM, respectively. The results suggest that benzylvincoside, abietic acid and cephaeline can be important sources for the development of anti-secretor agents. PMID:21941891

  17. Structural biology of Rad50 ATPase: ATP-driven conformational control in DNA double-strand break repair and the ABC-ATPase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, K P; Karcher, A; Shin, D S; Craig, L; Arthur, L M; Carney, J P; Tainer, J A

    2000-06-23

    To clarify the key role of Rad50 in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), we biochemically and structurally characterized ATP-bound and ATP-free Rad50 catalytic domain (Rad50cd) from Pyrococcus furiosus. Rad50cd displays ATPase activity plus ATP-controlled dimerization and DNA binding activities. Rad50cd crystal structures identify probable protein and DNA interfaces and reveal an ABC-ATPase fold, linking Rad50 molecular mechanisms to ABC transporters, including P glycoprotein and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Binding of ATP gamma-phosphates to conserved signature motifs in two opposing Rad50cd molecules promotes dimerization that likely couples ATP hydrolysis to dimer dissociation and DNA release. These results, validated by mutations, suggest unified molecular mechanisms for ATP-driven cooperativity and allosteric control of ABC-ATPases in DSBR, membrane transport, and chromosome condensation by SMC proteins. PMID:10892749

  18. V-ATPase regulates communication between microvascular endothelial cells and metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Sennoune, S R; Arutunyan, A; del Rosario, C; Castro-Marin, R; Hussain, F; Martinez-Zaguilan, R

    2014-01-01

    To metastasize distant organs, tumor cells and endothelial cells lining the blood vessels must crosstalk. The nature of this communication that allows metastatic cells to intravasate and travel through the circulation and to extravasate to colonize different organs is poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated one of the first steps in this process—the proximity and physical interaction of endothelial and metastatic cells. To do this, we developed a cell separator chamber that allows endothelial and metastatic cells to grow side by side. We have shown in our previous studies that V-ATPases at the cell surface (pmV-ATPase) are involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that the physical proximity/interaction between endothelial and metastatic cells expressing pmV-ATPase will increase its activity in both cell types, and such activity in turn will increase pmV-ATPase expression on the membranes of both cell types. To determine pmV-ATPase activity we measured the proton fluxes (JH+) across the cell membrane. Our data indicated that interaction between endothelial and metastatic cells elicited a significant increase of JH+ via pmV-ATPase in both cell types. Bafilomycin, a V-ATPase inhibitor, significantly decrease JH+. In contrast, JH+ of the non-metastatic cells were not affected by the endothelial cells and vice-versa. Altogether, our data reveal that one of the early consequences of endothelial and metastatic cell interaction is an increase in pmV-ATPase that helps to acidify the extracellular medium and favors protease activity. These data emphasize the significance of the acidic tumor microenvironment enhancing a metastatic and invasive phenotype. PMID:24606724

  19. The role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the hypoxic vasoconstriction in isolated rat basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Liang, Peng; Qiu, Suhua; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yongli; Lv, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is a key factor in the occurrence and the development of cerebral ischemia. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase affects the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and plays an important role in vascular smooth muscle function. However, the potential role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is unknown. In this study, we found that the KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia in rat endothelium-intact basilar arteries is similar to that of denuded arteries, suggesting that hypoxia may cause smooth muscle cell (SMC)-dependent vasoconstriction in the basilar artery. The Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity of the isolated basilar artery with or without endothelium significantly reduced with prolonged hypoxia. Blocking the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger with Ni(2+) (10(-3)M) or the L-type Ca(2+) channel with nimodipine (10(-8)M) dramatically attenuated KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia significantly reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and increased [Ca(2+)]i in cultured rat basilar artery SMCs. Hypoxia reduced the protein and mRNA expression of the α2 isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in SMCs in vitro. We used a low concentration of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain, which possesses a high affinity for the α2 isoform. The contractile response in the rat basilar artery under hypoxia was partly inhibited by ouabain pretreatment. The decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated basilar artery and the increased [Ca(2+)]i in SMCs induced by hypoxia were partly inhibited by pretreatment with a low concentration of ouabain. These results suggest that hypoxia may educe Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in SMCs through the α2 isoform contributing to vasoconstriction in the rat basilar artery. PMID:26924456

  20. Structure and mechanism of Zn2+-transporting P-type ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kaituo; Sitsel, Oleg; Meloni, Gabriele; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Andersson, Magnus; Klymchuk, Tetyana; Nielsen, Anna Marie; Rees, Douglas C.; Nissen, Poul; Gourdon, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms, required for signaling and proper function of a range of proteins involved in e.g. DNA-binding and enzymatic catalysis1. In prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes Zn2+-transporting P-type ATPases of class IB (ZntA) are crucial for cellular redistribution and detoxification of Zn2+ and related elements2,3. Here we present crystal structures representing the phosphoenzyme ground state (E2P) and a dephosphorylation intermediate (E2.Pi) of ZntA from Shigella sonnei, determined at 3.2 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal a similar fold as the Cu+-ATPases with an amphipathic helix at the membrane interface. A conserved electronegative funnel connects this region to the intramembranous high-affinity ion-binding site and may promote specific uptake of cellular Zn2+ ions. The E2P structure displays a wide extracellular release pathway reaching the invariant residues at the high-affinity site, including Cys392, Cys394 and Asp714. The pathway closes in the E2.Pi state where Asp714 interacts with the conserved Lys693, which possibly stimulates Zn2+ release as a built-in counter-ion, as also proposed for H+-ATPases. Indeed, transport studies in liposomes provide experimental support for ZntA activity without counter-transport. These findings suggest a mechanistic link between PIB-type Zn2+-ATPases and PIII-type H+-ATPases, and show at the same time structural features of the extracellular release pathway that resemble the PII-type ATPases such as the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase4,5 (SERCA) and Na+,K+-ATPase6. PMID:25132545

  1. The Long Physiological Reach of the Yeast Vacuolar H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    V-ATPases are structurally conserved and functionally versatile proton pumps found in all eukaryotes. The yeast V-ATPase has emerged as a major model system, in part because yeast mutants lacking V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) are viable and exhibit a distinctive Vma-phenotype. Yeast vma mutants are present in ordered collections of all non-essential yeast deletion mutants, and a number of additional phenotypes of these mutants have emerged in recent years from genomic screens. This review summarizes the many phenotypes that have been associated with vma mutants through genomic screening. The results suggest that V-ATPase activity is important for an unexpectedly wide range of cellular processes. For example, vma mutants are hypersensitive to multiple forms of oxidative stress, suggesting an antioxidant role for the V-ATPase. Consistent with such a role, vma mutants display oxidative protein damage and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, even in the absence of an exogenous oxidant. This endogenous oxidative stress does not originate at the electron transport chain, and may be extra-mitochondrial, perhaps linked to defective metal ion homeostasis in the absence of a functional V-ATPase. Taken together, genomic data indicate that the physiological reach of the V-ATPase is much longer than anticipated. Further biochemical and genetic dissection is necessary to distinguish those physiological effects arising directly from the enzyme’s core functions in proton pumping and organelle acidification from those that reflect broader requirements for cellular pH homeostasis or alternative functions of V-ATPase subunits. PMID:18000744

  2. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  3. Leishmania amazonensis: effects of heat shock on ecto-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Peres-Sampaio, Carlos Eduardo; de Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Giarola, Naira Ligia Lima; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2008-05-01

    In this work we demonstrated that promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis exhibit an Mg-dependent ecto-ATPase activity, which is stimulated by heat shock. The Mg-dependent ATPase activity of cells grown at 22 and 28 degrees C was 41.0+/-5.2 nmol Pi/h x 10(7)cells and 184.2+/-21.0 nmol Pi/h x 10(7)cells, respectively. When both promastigotes were pre-incubated at 37 degrees C for 2h, the ATPase activity of cells grown at 22 degrees C was increased to 136.4+/-10.6 nmol Pi/h x 10(7) whereas that the ATPase activity of cells grown at 28 degrees C was not modified by the heat shock (189.8+/-10.3 nmol Pi/h x 10(7)cells). It was observed that Km of the enzyme from cells grown at 22 degrees C (Km=980.2+/-88.6 microM) was the same to the enzyme from cells grown at 28 degrees C (Km=901.4+/-91.9 microM). In addition, DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene 2,2'-disulfonic acid) and suramin, two inhibitors of ecto-ATPases, also inhibited similarly the ATPase activities from promastigotes grown at 22 and 28 degrees C. We also observed that cells grown at 22 degrees C exhibit the same ecto-phosphatase and ecto 3'- and 5'-nucleotidase activities than cells grown at 28 degrees C. Interestingly, cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, suppressed the heat-shock effect on ecto-ATPase activity of cells grown at 22 degrees C were exposed at 37 degrees C for 2h. A comparison between the stimulation of the Mg-dependent ecto-ATPase activity of virulent and avirulent promastigotes by the heat shock showed that avirulent promastigotes had a higher stimulation than virulent promastigotes after heat stress. PMID:18295760

  4. Bacterial Transition Metal P1B-ATPases, Transport Mechanism and Roles in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Argüello, José M.; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Raimunda, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    P1B-type ATPases are polytopic membrane proteins that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the efflux of cytoplasmic transition metals. This article reviews recent progress in our understanding of the structure and function of these proteins in bacteria. These are members of the P-type superfamily of transport ATPases. Cu+-ATPases are the most frequently observed and best-characterized members of this group of transporters. However, bacterial genomes show diverse arrays of P1B-type ATPases with a range of substrates (Cu+, Zn2+, Co2+). Furthermore, because of the structural similarities among transitions metals, these proteins can also transport non-physiological substrates (Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Au+, Ag+). P1B-type ATPases have six or eight transmembrane segments (TM) with metal coordinating amino acids in three core TMs flanking the cytoplasmic domain responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis. In addition, regulatory cytoplasmic metal binding domains are present in most P1B-type ATPases. Central to the transport mechanism is the binding of the uncomplexed metal to these proteins when cytoplasmic substrates are bound to chaperone and chelating molecules. Metal binding to regulatory sites is through a reversible metal exchange among chaperones and cytoplasmic metal binding domains. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated metal delivery to transport sites appears as a largely irreversible event. P1B-ATPases have two overarching physiological functions: to maintain cytoplasmic metal levels and to provide metals for the periplasmic assembly of metalloproteins. Recent studies have shown that both roles are critical for bacterial virulence, since P1B-ATPases appear key to overcome high phagosomal metal levels and are required for the assembly of periplasmic and secreted metalloproteins that are essential for survival in extreme oxidant environments. PMID:21999638

  5. A study of the yeast plasma membrane proton-translocating ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    Four proteases have been used to assess the topology of the H{sup +} ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Limited proteolysis by trypsin and {alpha}-chymotrypsin inactivates the enzyme and produces stable, membrane-bound fragments. Sequence analyses of these peptides have located the peptide bonds hydrolyzed. The labile bonds are on opposite sides of a central hydrophilic domain containing consensus sequences for the site of phosphorylation and fluorescein isothiocyanate binding of several related ATPases. Limited proteolysis of the ATPase by elastase cuts approximately 50 amino acids from the C-terminus, leaving the remaining membrane-bound fragments active. Proteolysis by carboxy-peptidase Y suggests that the C-terminus is on the inside of the vesicle. A model for the transmembrane arrangement of the polypeptide is proposed. In this model, the C-terminus is on the inside of the vesicle, the ATP binding region is on the outside, and the polypeptide passes through the membrane a minimum of five times. Photoaffinity labeling of the active site of the enzyme has been studied with 2-azido-AMP and 2-azido-ATP. The incorporation of ({alpha}{sup {minus}32}P)-2-azido-AMP-into the enzyme and the in inhibition of ATPase activity have comparable time courses. ATP protects the ATPase from incorporation of and photoinactivation by 2-azido-ATP or 2-azido-AMP. In the dark, 2-azido-ATP inhibits the ATPase at concentrations comparable to the apparent Michaelis constant for MgATP. Purification and sequence analysis of labeled peptides indicates that both nucleotide analogues modify a highly conserved region of the ATPase including aspartate 560 through lysine 566. These residues conform to a consensus sequence for ATP binding derived from phosphofructokinase. The hydrophilic domain of the ATPase has been cloned and expressed in E. coli.

  6. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H+ ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:25981168

  7. Active Detergent-solubilized H+,K+-ATPase Is a Monomer*

    PubMed Central

    Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Signor, Luca; Nissen, Poul; le Maire, Marc; Møller, Jesper V.; Ebel, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The H+,K+-ATPase pumps protons or hydronium ions and is responsible for the acidification of the gastric fluid. It is made up of an α-catalytic and a β-glycosylated subunit. The relation between cation translocation and the organization of the protein in the membrane are not well understood. We describe here how pure and functionally active pig gastric H+,K+-ATPase with an apparent Stokes radius of 6.3 nm can be obtained after solubilization with the non-ionic detergent C12E8, followed by exchange of C12E8 with Tween 20 on a Superose 6 column. Mass spectroscopy indicates that the β-subunit bears an excess mass of 9 kDa attributable to glycosylation. From chemical analysis, there are 0.25 g of phospholipids and around 0.024 g of cholesterol bound per g of protein. Analytical ultracentrifugation shows one main complex, sedimenting at s20,w = 7.2 ± 0.1 S, together with minor amounts of irreversibly aggregated material. From these data, a buoyant molecular mass is calculated, corresponding to an H+,K+-ATPase α,β-protomer of 147.3 kDa. Complementary sedimentation velocity with deuterated water gives a picture of an α,β-protomer with 0.9–1.4 g/g of bound detergent and lipids and a reasonable frictional ratio of 1.5, corresponding to a Stokes radius of 7.1 nm. An α2,β2 dimer is rejected by the data. Light scattering coupled to gel filtration confirms the monomeric state of solubilized H+,K+-ATPase. Thus, α,β H+,K+-ATPase is active at least in detergent and may plausibly function as a monomer, as has been established for other P-type ATPases, Ca2+-ATPase and Na+,K+-ATPase. PMID:23055529

  8. Interaction between V-ATPase B2 and (Pro) renin Receptors in Promoting the progression of Renal Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Zuo, Sujun; Li, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jinjin; Cao, Xueqin; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Qiongqiong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the levels of (Pro) renin receptor [(P) RR], α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), fibronectin (FN), and vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) subunits (B2, E, and c) in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) models and rat proximal tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E) treated with prorenin to elucidate the role of V-ATPase in these processes by activating the (P) RR. UUO significantly upregulated (P) RR, V-ATPase subunits, α-SMA and FN expression in tubulointerstitium or tubular epithelial cells. A marked colocalization of (P) RR and the B2 subunit was also observed. Prorenin treatment upregulated α-SMA, FN, (P) RR, and V-ATPase subunits and activity in NRK52E cell in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 partially blocked prorenin-induced (P) RR, FN, and α-SMA expression. Co-immunoprecipitate and immunofluorescence results demonstrated that the V-ATPase B2 subunit bound to the (P) RR, which was upregulated after prorenin stimulation. Either siRNA-mediated (P) RR or B2 subunit knockdown partially reduced V-ATPase activity and attenuated prorenin-induced FN and α-SMA expression. From the data we can assume that activation of (P) RR and V-ATPase may play an important role in tubulointerstitial fibrosis with possible involvement of interaction of V-ATPase B2 subunit and (P)RR. PMID:27121029

  9. Influence of a protein hydrolysate from green algae on the activity of some ATPase systems in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, R; Georgieva, B; Naumova, P; Mileva, K; Radicheva, N

    1999-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of a protein hydrolysate from green algae cultured in the Bulgarian region of Rupy, on the enzyme activity of frog skeletal muscle. The activity of pure Mg(2+)-ATPase, Mg2+,Ca(2+)-ATPase, NaHCO3-stimulated Mg(2+)-ATPase and the latter in the presence of the inhibitors NaSCN and NaN3 in mitochondrial (B-3) and membrane (B-12) fractions were determined before and after treatment with the protein hydrolysate from green algae (30 and 300 micrograms/ml). The differences between ATPase activity of mitochondrial and membrane fractions were described and it was established that in the B-3 fraction, the activity of the NaHCO3-stimulated Mg(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-dependent Mg(2+)-ATPase were accelerated by increasing concentrations of the algae protein hydrolysate. Irrespective of the different (equal or inverse) dose-dependent effects, the protein hydrolysate stimulated Mg(2+)-ATPase and that inhibited by NaSCN an NaN3 bicarbonate-stimulated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. In most of the probes, the protein hydrolysate produced some increase in enzyme activity of NaHCO3-stimulated Mg(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-dependent Mg(2+)-ATPase in B-12 fractions. The observed properties of the algae protein hydrolysate suggest that it is capable of stimulating enzyme processes in addition to having some antitoxic effect in skeletal muscle. PMID:10420389

  10. Protonation-dependent inactivation of Na,K-ATPase by hydrostatic pressure developed at high-speed centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Esmann, M; Fedosova, N U; Maunsbach, A B

    2000-09-29

    Irreversible inactivation of membranous Na,K-ATPase by high-speed centrifugation in dilute aqueous solutions depends markedly on the protonation state of the protein. Pig kidney Na,K-ATPase is irreversibly inactivated at pH 5 but is fully protected at pH 7 and above. Shark rectal gland Na,K-ATPase is irreversibly inactivated at neutral or acidic pH and partially protected at an alkaline pH. The overall Na,K-ATPase activity and the K-dependent pNPPase activity were denatured in parallel. Cryoprotectants such as glycerol or sucrose at concentrations of 25-30% fully protect both enzymes against inactivation. The specific ligands NaCl and KCl protect the Na,K-ATPase activity partially and the pNPPase activity fully at concentrations of 0.2-0.3 M. Electron microscope analysis of the centrifuged Na,K-ATPase membranes revealed that the ultrastructure of the native membranes is preserved upon inactivation. It was also observed that the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase and hog gastric H, K-ATPase are susceptible to inactivation by high-speed centrifugation in a pH-dependent fashion. H,K-ATPase is protected at alkaline pH, whereas Ca-ATPase is protected only in the neutral pH range. PMID:11018676

  11. Perturbation of the Vacuolar ATPase: A NOVEL CONSEQUENCE OF INOSITOL DEPLETION.

    PubMed

    Deranieh, Rania M; Shi, Yihui; Tarsio, Maureen; Chen, Yan; McCaffery, J Michael; Kane, Patricia M; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2015-11-13

    Depletion of inositol has profound effects on cell function and has been implicated in the therapeutic effects of drugs used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. We have previously shown that the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VPA) depletes inositol by inhibiting myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of inositol biosynthesis. To elucidate the cellular consequences of inositol depletion, we screened the yeast deletion collection for VPA-sensitive mutants and identified mutants in vacuolar sorting and the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). Inositol depletion caused by starvation of ino1Δ cells perturbed the vacuolar structure and decreased V-ATPase activity and proton pumping in isolated vacuolar vesicles. VPA compromised the dynamics of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI3,5P2) and greatly reduced V-ATPase proton transport in inositol-deprived wild-type cells. Osmotic stress, known to increase PI3,5P2 levels, did not restore PI3,5P2 homeostasis nor did it induce vacuolar fragmentation in VPA-treated cells, suggesting that perturbation of the V-ATPase is a consequence of altered PI3,5P2 homeostasis under inositol-limiting conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that inositol depletion caused by starvation of an inositol synthesis mutant or by the inositol-depleting drug VPA leads to perturbation of the V-ATPase. PMID:26324718

  12. Nucleotide recognition by CopA, a Cu+-transporting P-type ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takeo; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal pumps constitute a large subgroup in P-type ion-transporting ATPases. One of the outstanding features is that the nucleotide binding N-domain lacks residues critical for ATP binding in other well-studied P-type ATPases. Instead, they possess an HP-motif and a Gly-rich sequence in the N-domain, and their mutations impair ATP binding. Here, we describe 1.85 Å resolution crystal structures of the P- and N-domains of CopA, an archaeal Cu+-transporting ATPase, with bound nucleotides. These crystal structures show that CopA recognises the adenine ring completely differently from other P-type ATPases. The crystal structure of the His462Gln mutant, in the HP-motif, a disease-causing mutation in human Cu+-ATPases, shows that the Gln side chain mimics the imidazole ring, but only partially, explaining the reduction in ATPase activity. These crystal structures lead us to propose a role of the His and a mechanism for removing Mg2+ from ATP before phosphoryl transfer. PMID:19478797

  13. A propagating ATPase gradient drives transport of surface-confined cellular cargo

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Neuman, Keir C.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The faithful segregation of duplicated genetic material into daughter cells is critical to all organisms. In many bacteria, the segregation of chromosomes involves transport of “centromere-like” loci over the main body of the chromosome, the nucleoid, mediated by a two-protein partition system: a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and an ATPase stimulator, ParB, which binds to the centromere-like loci. These systems have previously been proposed to function through a filament-based mechanism, analogous to actin- or microtubule-based movement. Here, we reconstituted the F-plasmid partition system using a DNA-carpeted flow cell as an artificial nucleoid surface and magnetic beads coated with plasmid partition complexes as surface-confined cargo. This minimal system recapitulated directed cargo motion driven by a surface ATPase gradient that propagated with the cargo. The dynamics are consistent with a diffusion-ratchet model, whereby the cargo dynamically establishes, and interacts with, a concentration gradient of the ATPase. A chemophoresis force ensues as the cargo perpetually chases the ATPase gradient, allowing the cargo to essentially “surf” the nucleoid on a continuously traveling wave of the ATPase. Demonstration of this non–filament-based motility mechanism in a biological context establishes a distinct class of motor system used for the transport and positioning of large cellular cargo. PMID:24567408

  14. Mechanisms of Rose Bengal inhibition on SecA ATPase and ion channel activities.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Huang, Ying-Ju; Jin, Jin-Shan; Yu, Liyan; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2014-11-14

    SecA is an essential protein possessing ATPase activity in bacterial protein translocation for which Rose Bengal (RB) is the first reported sub-micromolar inhibitor in ATPase activity and protein translocation. Here, we examined the mechanisms of inhibition on various forms of SecA ATPase by conventional enzymatic assays, and by monitoring the SecA-dependent channel activity in the semi-physiological system in cells. We build on the previous observation that SecA with liposomes form active protein-conducting channels in the oocytes. Such ion channel activity is enhanced by purified Escherichia coli SecYEG-SecDF·YajC liposome complexes. Inhibition by RB could be monitored, providing correlation of in vitro activity and intact cell functionality. In this work, we found the intrinsic SecA ATPase is inhibited by RB competitively at low ATP concentration, and non-competitively at high ATP concentrations while the translocation ATPase with precursors and SecYEG is inhibited non-competitively by RB. The Inhibition by RB on SecA channel activity in the oocytes with exogenous ATP-Mg(2+), mimicking translocation ATPase activity, is also non-competitive. The non-competitive inhibition on channel activity has also been observed with SecA from other bacteria which otherwise would be difficult to examine without the cognate precursors and membranes. PMID:25450394

  15. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    PubMed

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. PMID:25743085

  16. Purification, characterization and crystallization of the F-ATPase from Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Rios, Edgar; Watt, Ian N.; Zhang, Qifeng; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of F-ATPases have been determined predominantly with mitochondrial enzymes, but hitherto no F-ATPase has been crystallized intact. A high-resolution model of the bovine enzyme built up from separate sub-structures determined by X-ray crystallography contains about 85% of the entire complex, but it lacks a crucial region that provides a transmembrane proton pathway involved in the generation of the rotary mechanism that drives the synthesis of ATP. Here the isolation, characterization and crystallization of an integral F-ATPase complex from the α-proteobacterium Paracoccus denitrificans are described. Unlike many eubacterial F-ATPases, which can both synthesize and hydrolyse ATP, the P. denitrificans enzyme can only carry out the synthetic reaction. The mechanism of inhibition of its ATP hydrolytic activity involves a ζ inhibitor protein, which binds to the catalytic F1-domain of the enzyme. The complex that has been crystallized, and the crystals themselves, contain the nine core proteins of the complete F-ATPase complex plus the ζ inhibitor protein. The formation of crystals depends upon the presence of bound bacterial cardiolipin and phospholipid molecules; when they were removed, the complex failed to crystallize. The experiments open the way to an atomic structure of an F-ATPase complex. PMID:26423580

  17. Mechanistic Basis for Differential Inhibition of the F1Fo-ATPase by Aurovertin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathryn M.; Swenson, Lara; Opipari, Anthony W.; Reuter, Rolf; Zarrabi, Nawid; Fierke, Carol A.; Börsch, Michael; Glick, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial F1Fo-ATPase performs the terminal step of oxidative phosphorylation. Small molecules that modulate this enzyme have been invaluable in helping decipher F1Fo-ATPase structure, function, and mechanism. Aurovertin is an antibiotic that binds to the β subunits in the F1 domain and inhibits F1Fo-ATPase-catalyzed ATP synthesis in preference to ATP hydrolysis. Despite extensive study and the existence of crystallographic data, the molecular basis of the differential inhibition and kinetic mechanism of inhibition of ATP synthesis by aurovertin has not been resolved. To address these questions, we conducted a series of experiments in both bovine heart mitochondria and E. coli membrane F1Fo-ATPase. Aurovertin is a mixed, noncompetitive inhibitor of both ATP hydrolysis and synthesis with lower Ki values for synthesis. At low substrate concentrations, inhibition is cooperative suggesting a stoichiometry of two aurovertin per F1F0-ATPase. Furthermore, aurovertin does not completely inhibit the ATP hydrolytic activity at saturating concentrations. Single-molecule experiments provide evidence that the residual rate of ATP hydrolysis seen in the presence of saturating concentrations of aurovertin results from a decrease in the binding change mechanism by hindering catalytic site interactions. The results from these studies should further the understanding of how the F1Fo-ATPase catalyzes ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. PMID:19462418

  18. Stimulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity as a Possible Driving Force in Cholesterol Evolution.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas; Garcia, Alvaro; Clarke, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is exclusively produced by animals and is present in the plasma membrane of all animal cells. In contrast, the membranes of fungi and plants contain other sterols. To explain the exclusive preference of animal cells for cholesterol, we propose that cholesterol may have evolved to optimize the activity of a crucial protein found in the plasma membrane of all multicellular animals, namely the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. To test this hypothesis, mirror tree and phylogenetic distribution analyses have been conducted of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(24)-reductase (DHCR24), the last enzyme in the Bloch cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a co-evolution of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and DHCR24. The evolutionary correlation between DHCR24 and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was found to be stronger than between DHCR24 and any other membrane protein investigated. The results obtained, thus, also support the hypothesis that cholesterol evolved together with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in multicellular animals to support Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. PMID:26715509

  19. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen)

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na+/K+ ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na+/K+ ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na+/K+ ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na+/K+ ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na+/K+ ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na+/K+ ATPase. PMID:25743085

  20. Nonproteolytic Roles of 19S ATPases in Transcription of CIITApIV Genes

    PubMed Central

    Maganti, Nagini; Moody, Tomika D.; Truax, Agnieszka D.; Thakkar, Meghna; Spring, Alexander M.; Germann, Markus W.; Greer, Susanna F.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows the 26S proteasome is involved in the regulation of gene expression. We and others have demonstrated that proteasome components bind to sites of gene transcription, regulate covalent modifications to histones, and are involved in the assembly of activator complexes in mammalian cells. The mechanisms by which the proteasome influences transcription remain unclear, although prior observations suggest both proteolytic and non-proteolytic activities. Here, we define novel, non-proteolytic, roles for each of the three 19S heterodimers, represented by the 19S ATPases Sug1, S7, and S6a, in mammalian gene expression using the inflammatory gene CIITApIV. These 19S ATPases are recruited to induced CIITApIV promoters and also associate with CIITA coding regions. Additionally, these ATPases interact with elongation factor PTEFb complex members CDK9 and Hexim-1 and with Ser5 phosphorylated RNA Pol II. Both the generation of transcripts from CIITApIV and efficient recruitment of RNA Pol II to CIITApIV are negatively impacted by siRNA mediated knockdown of these 19S ATPases. Together, these results define novel roles for 19S ATPases in mammalian gene expression and indicate roles for these ATPases in promoting transcription processes. PMID:24625964

  1. ATPase activity and its temperature compensation of the cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Reiko; Miyake, Ayumi; Iwase, Ryo; Hayashi, Fumio; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2008-04-01

    KaiA, KaiB and KaiC constitute the circadian clock machinery in cyanobacteria. KaiC is a homohexamer; its subunit contains duplicated halves, each with a set of ATPase motifs. Here, using highly purified KaiC preparations of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 produced in Escherichia coli, we found that the N- and C-terminal domains of KaiC had extremely weak ATPase activity. ATPase activity showed temperature compensation in wild-type KaiC, but not in KaiC(S431A/T432A), a mutant that lacks two phosphorylation sites. We concluded that KaiC phosphorylation is involved in the ATPase temperature-compensation mechanism-which is probably critical to the stability of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria-and we hypothesized the following temperature-compensation mechanism: (i) The C-terminal phosphorylation sites of a KaiC hexamer subunit are phosphorylated by the C-terminal domain of an adjacent KaiC subunit; (ii) the phosphorylation suppresses the ATPase activity of the C-term