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Sample records for aastaks silicon valleysse

  1. Gluing silicon with silicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Fox, H.; Moshous, B.; Richter, R. H.; Riechmann, K.; Rietz, M.; Riedl, J.; Denis, R. St; Wagner, W.

    1998-02-01

    Problems and solutions concerning the gluing of silicon detectors are discussed. The R & D work for the HERA- B vertex detector system led to gluing studies with epoxy and silicone-based adhesives used on ceramics and carbon fibre. The HERA- B solution using a silicone glue is presented.

  2. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter [Pleasanton, CA; Hamilton, Julie [Tracy, CA

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  3. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  4. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  5. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  6. Silicon Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of amore » single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.« less

  7. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  8. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  9. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Carleton, K.L.

    1982-06-10

    A process of producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  10. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Carleton, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  11. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  12. EPITAXIAL GROWTH OF SILICON

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Epitaxial growth of silicon on a silicon substrate by hydrogen reduction of SiCl4 was investigated. The chemical and physical processes involved in...silicon layers were produced at temperatures between 1100 and 1300 C. The effects of the concentration of SiCl4 in H2, the flow rate of the gas, the

  13. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  14. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M [Livermore, CA

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  15. A silicon Brillouin laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterstrom, Nils T.; Behunin, Ryan O.; Kittlaus, Eric A.; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2018-06-01

    Brillouin laser oscillators offer powerful and flexible dynamics as the basis for mode-locked lasers, microwave oscillators, and optical gyroscopes in a variety of optical systems. However, Brillouin interactions are markedly weak in conventional silicon photonic waveguides, stifling progress toward silicon-based Brillouin lasers. The recent advent of hybrid photonic-phononic waveguides has revealed Brillouin interactions to be one of the strongest and most tailorable nonlinearities in silicon. In this study, we have harnessed these engineered nonlinearities to demonstrate Brillouin lasing in silicon. Moreover, we show that this silicon-based Brillouin laser enters a regime of dynamics in which optical self-oscillation produces phonon linewidth narrowing. Our results provide a platform to develop a range of applications for monolithic integration within silicon photonic circuits.

  16. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  17. Compounding with Silicones.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1940s, methylchlorosilanes have been used to treat glassware to prevent blood from clotting. The use of silicones in pharmaceutical and medical applications has grown to where today they are used in many life-saving devices (pacemakers, hydrocephalic shunts) and pharmaceutical applications from tubing, to excipients in topical formulations, to adhesives to affix transdermal drug delivery systems, and are also being used in products as active pharmaceutical ingredients, such as antiflatulents. About 60% of today's skin-care products now contain some type of silicone where they are considered safe and are known to provide a pleasant "silky-touch," non-greasy, and non-staining feel. Silicones exhibit many useful characteristics, and the safety of these agents supports their numerous applications; their biocompatibility is partially due to their low-chemical reactivity displayed by silicones, low-surface energy, and their hydrophobicity. Silicones are used both as active ingredients and as excipients. In addition is their use for "siliconization," or surface treatment, of many parenteral packaging components. Dimethicone and silicone oil are used as lubricants on stoppers to aid machineability, in syringes to aid piston movement, or on syringe needles to reduce pain upon injection. Silicones are also useful in pharmaceutical compounding as is discussed in this artiele included with this article are in developing formulations with silicones.

  18. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  19. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  20. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  1. Method and apparatus for stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon grown in silicon nitride ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. A.; Wheeler, R. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for thermally growing stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon is disclosed. A previously etched and baked silicon nitride tube placed in a furnace is used to grow the silicon dioxide. First, pure oxygen is allowed to flow through the tube to initially coat the inside surface of the tube with a thin layer of silicon dioxide. After the tube is coated with the thin layer of silicon dioxide, the silicon is oxidized thermally in a normal fashion. If the tube becomes contaminated, the silicon dioxide is etched off thereby exposing clean silicon nitride and then the inside of the tube is recoated with silicon dioxide. As is disclosed, the silicon nitride tube can also be used as the ambient for the pyrolytic decomposition of silane and ammonia to form thin layers of clean silicon nitride.

  2. Silicon nitride sintered body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    The sintering of silicon carbide and it production are described. The method of production is by calcination in which molding is followed by sintering without compression. The invention improves the composition of the silicon carbide ceramic. Six examples of the invention are illustrated and discussed.

  3. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  4. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  5. Cleaning up Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A development program that started in 1975 between Union Carbide and JPL, led to Advanced Silicon Materials LLC's, formerly ASiMI, commercial process for producing silane in viable quantities. The process was expanded to include the production of high-purity polysilicon for electronic devices. The technology came out of JPL's Low Cost Silicon Array Project.

  6. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  7. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  8. Cleanroom Garment Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, Wayne; Lepage, Colette

    2006-01-01

    The slide presentation reviews actions taken at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to eliminate contamination by silicone in clean rooms. Background information includes facilities and hardware affected by silicon contamination, a discussion of the negative aspects of silicone contamination, clean room garments, and how the problem was identified at GSFC. Actions taken by the GSFC Contamination Engineering Group and lessons learned are detailed. Results include: awareness of the silicone issue in laundry, increase in infrastructure and support of the testing lab, establishment of protocols for garment verification, closer relationship established with laundry and converter, specifications for laundry services and garments were strengthened, all consumables are tested before use in clean rooms, and established procedures were used to identify and treat silicone found on face masks.

  9. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selectedmore » from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.« less

  10. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  11. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  12. Process for making silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  13. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  14. Silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Ralf

    1997-09-01

    This work gives an overview of silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes. Market perspectives and fields of application are pointed out. The advantage of using silicon micromachining is discussed and estimations of the desired performance, especially for automobiles are given. The general principle of vibrating gyroscopes is explained. Vibrating silicon gyroscopes can be divided into seven classes. for each class the characteristic principle is presented and examples are given. Finally a specific sensor, based on a tuning fork for automotive applications with a sensitivity of 250(mu) V/degrees is described in detail.

  15. Microstructured silicon radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Derzon, Mark S.; Draper, Bruce L.

    2017-03-14

    A radiation detector comprises a silicon body in which are defined vertical pores filled with a converter material and situated within silicon depletion regions. One or more charge-collection electrodes are arranged to collect current generated when secondary particles enter the silicon body through walls of the pores. The pores are disposed in low-density clusters, have a majority pore thickness of 5 .mu.m or less, and have a majority aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of pore depth to pore thickness, of at least 10.

  16. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  17. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  18. Silicon MOS inductor

    DOEpatents

    Balberg, Isaac

    1981-01-01

    A device made of amorphous silicon which exhibits inductive properties at certain voltage biases and in certain frequency ranges in described. Devices of the type described can be made in integrated circuit form.

  19. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  20. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  1. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  2. Silicon microengineering for accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchell, D. W.

    Silicon microengineering enables the excellent mechanical properties of silicon to be combined with electronic ones to produce accelerometers of good performance, small size and low cost. The design and fabrication of two types of analogue accelerometer, using this technique, are described. One employs implanted strain gauges to give a dc output, while the other has a strain-sensitive resonant structure which gives a varying frequency signal.

  3. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  4. Dynamic Silicon Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    sensitive to fabrication imperfections and small temperature changes, therefore they are challenging to integrate into high yield mass production ... Cocoa Beach, Florida, September 2012. 15. Ali Wanis Elshaari, “Photon Manipulation in Silicon Nanophotonic Circuits,” Ph.D. Dissertation, Rochester...1.5-micron Light using Silicon Nanocrystals,” 2012 IEEE Avionics, Fiber Optics and Photonics Conference (AVFOP 2012), ThB3, Cocoa Beach, Florida

  5. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  6. SPS silicon reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design analysis of a silicon power conversion system for the solar power satellite (SPS) is summarized. The solar array, consisting of glass encapsulated 50 micrometer silicon solar cells, is described. The general scheme for power distribution to the array/antenna interface is described. Degradation by proton irradiation is considered. The interface between the solar array and the klystron equipped power transmitter is described.

  7. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  8. Study on Silicon Microstructure Processing Technology Based on Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yingqi; Zhang, Linchao; Qi, Hong; Wu, Yalin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at the heterogeneity of micro - sealed cavity in silicon microstructure processing technology, the technique of preparing micro - sealed cavity of porous silicon is proposed. The effects of different solutions, different substrate doping concentrations, different current densities, and different etching times on the rate, porosity, thickness and morphology of the prepared porous silicon were studied. The porous silicon was prepared by different process parameters and the prepared porous silicon was tested and analyzed. For the test results, optimize the process parameters and experiments. The experimental results show that the porous silicon can be controlled by optimizing the parameters of the etching solution and the doping concentration of the substrate, and the preparation of porous silicon with different porosity can be realized by different doping concentration, so as to realize the preparation of silicon micro-sealed cavity, to solve the sensor sensitive micro-sealed cavity structure heterogeneous problem, greatly increasing the application of the sensor.

  9. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  10. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  11. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  12. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  13. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  14. Athermal Annealing of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. P.; Grun, J.; Ting, A.; Felix, C.; Peckerar, M.; Fatemi, M.; Manka, C. K.

    1999-11-01

    Current semiconductor annealing methods are based on thermal processes which are accompanied by diffusion that degrades the definition of device features or causes other problems. This will be a serious obstacle for the production of next-generation ultra-high density, low power semiconductor devices. Experiments underway at NRL utilize a new annealing method which is much faster than thermal annealing and does not depend upon thermal energy (J. Grun, et al)., Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 1584 (1997).. A 10 J, 30 nsec, 1.053 nm wavelength laser pulse is focussed to approximately 1 mm diameter on a silicon sample. Acoustic and shock waves propagate from the impact region, which deposit mechanical energy into the material and anneal the silicon. Experimental results will be presented on annealing neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD) and ion implanted silicon samples with impurity concentrations from 1 × 10^15-3 × 10^20/cm^3.

  15. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  16. Removal of inclusions from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Arjan; Engh, Thorvald Abel; Tangstad, Merete; Kvithyld, Anne; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes

    2009-11-01

    The removal of inclusions from molten silicon is necessary to satisfy the purity requirements for solar grade silicon. This paper summarizes two methods that are investigated: (i) settling of the inclusions followed by subsequent directional solidification and (infiltration by ceramic foam filters. Settling of inclusions followed by directional solidification is of industrial importance for production of low-cost solar grade silicon. Filtration is reported as the most efficient method for removal of inclusions from the top-cut silicon scrap.

  17. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  18. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  19. Short Shot Tower for Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Drop length necessary to convert molten silicon to shot reduced by proposed new process. Conversion of silicon from powder or chunks to shot often simplifies processing. Shot is more easily handled in most processing equipment. Drops of liquid silicon fall through protective cloud of argon, then through rapidly cooling bath of methanol, where they quickly turn into solid shot.

  20. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  1. Workshop summary: New silicon cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Iles, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The workshop on new silicon cells held during SPRAT12 is summarized. A smaller than average group attended this workshop reflecting the reduction in research dollars available to this portion of the photovoltaics community. Despite the maturity of the silicon technology, a core of the group maintained an excitement about new developments and potential opportunities. The group addressed both the implications and the applications of recent developments. Topics discussed include: light trapping and ultrathin silicon cells; different uses for silicon cells; new silicon cell developments; and radiation tolerant high efficiency cells.

  2. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  3. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  4. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  5. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  6. Black thin film silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koynov, Svetoslav; Brandt, Martin S.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2011-08-01

    "Black etching" has been proposed previously as a method for the nanoscale texturing of silicon surfaces, which results in an almost complete suppression of reflectivity in the spectral range of absorption relevant for photovoltaics. The method modifies the topmost 150 to 300 nm of the material and thus also is applicable for thin films of silicon. The present work is focused on the optical effects induced by the black-etching treatment on hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin films, in particular with respect to their application in solar cells. In addition to a strong reduction of the reflectivity, efficient light trapping within the modified thin films is found. The enhancement of the optical absorption due to the light trapping is investigated via photometric measurements and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The correlation of the texture morphology (characterized via atomic force microscopy) with the optical effects is discussed in terms of an effective medium with gradually varying optical density and in the framework of the theory of statistical light trapping. Photoconductivity spectra directly show that the light trapping causes a significant prolongation of the light path within the black silicon films by up to 15 μm for ˜1 μm thick films, leading to a significant increase of the absorption in the red.

  7. Silicon graphene Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-03-10

    We propose the use of interleaved graphene sections on top of a silicon waveguide to implement tunable Bragg gratings. The filter central wavelength and bandwidth can be controlled changing the chemical potential of the graphene sections. Apodization techniques are also presented.

  8. Silicon Carbide Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescoat, F.; Tanguy, F.; Durand, P.

    2016-05-01

    A study has been done to assess the feasibility of metallization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) in order to simplify design and mounting of one or more ground reference rail needed to provide an electrical reference for electronics mounted on an SiC structure.

  9. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  10. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  11. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  12. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  13. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  14. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  15. Silicon microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ying; Dai, Daoxin

    2018-05-01

    Silicon microring resonators (MRRs) are very popular for many applications because of the advantages of footprint compactness, easy scalability, and functional versatility. Ultra-compact silicon MRRs with box-like spectral responses are realized with a very large free-spectral range (FSR) by introducing bent directional couplers. The measured box-like spectral response has an FSR of >30 nm. The permanent wavelength-alignment techniques for MRRs are also presented, including the laser-induced local-oxidation technique as well as the local-etching technique. With these techniques, one can control finely the permanent wavelength shift, which is also large enough to compensate the random wavelength variation due to the random fabrication errors.

  16. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  17. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  18. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  19. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-03-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  20. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  1. Electrometallurgy of Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    wind, plants, and water impounded in elevated reservoirs. Photovoltaic or solar cells, which convert sunlight directly to electricity, belongs tc, the...on record is that of St. Claire DeVille, who claimed that silicon was produced by electrolysing an impure melt of NaAlC14, but his material did not...this composition and purified melts were electrolysed at about 14500C in graphite crucible and using graphite electrodes. Applied potentials were

  2. Silicon Solar Cell Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    from the surface. (b) Oxide mask formation Etching grooves into the silicon requires an effective alkaline-resistant mask which will withstand the...face. This technique employs a very viscous photoresist, Furt #206, in conjunction with multiple spin-applications and bake periods, to effectively ...175 80 125 78 75 74 To compare the effects of groove depth, substrate thick- ness and bulk resistivity, an experiment was conducted. Using identical

  3. Silicon and Civilization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-04

    less form, or so-called amorphous, as strata of diatomaceous earth , or also in the form of the precious stone--opal. As mentioned, silicon dioxide...skeletons and those of water creatures, which after mortification fall to the bottom of the waters creating strata of diatomaceous earth are also built of...reactions. Likewise, diatomaceous earth has a well developed surface and great adsorptive capa- bility, among others it can absorb a triple excess of

  4. Silicon Carbide Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide based semiconductor electronic devices and circuits are presently being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot adequately perform. Silicon carbide's ability to function under such extreme conditions is expected to enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from greatly improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric motor drives to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the particular area of power devices, theoretical appraisals have indicated that SiC power MOSFET's and diode rectifiers would operate over higher voltage and temperature ranges, have superior switching characteristics, and yet have die sizes nearly 20 times smaller than correspondingly rated silicon-based devices [8]. However, these tremendous theoretical advantages have yet to be widely realized in commercially available SiC devices, primarily owing to the fact that SiC's relatively immature crystal growth and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for reliable incorporation into most electronic systems. This chapter briefly surveys the SiC semiconductor electronics technology. In particular, the differences (both good and bad) between SiC electronics technology and the well-known silicon VLSI technology are highlighted. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are highlighted for several large-scale applications. Key crystal growth and device-fabrication issues that presently limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and high-power SiC electronics are identified.

  5. Thermometry of Silicon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zutter, Brian; Regan, B. C.

    2018-01-01

    Current thermometry techniques lack the spatial resolution required to see the temperature gradients in typical, highly scaled modern transistors. As a step toward addressing this problem, we measure the temperature dependence of the volume plasmon energy in silicon nanoparticles from room temperature to 1250 °C , using a chip-style heating sample holder in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The plasmon energy changes as expected for an electron gas subject to the thermal expansion of silicon. Reversing this reasoning, we find that measurements of the plasmon energy provide an independent measure of the nanoparticle temperature consistent with that of the heater chip's macroscopic, dual-function heater-and-thermometer to within the 5% accuracy of the thermometer's calibration. Thus, silicon has the potential to provide its own high-spatial-resolution thermometric readout signal via measurements of its volume plasmon energy. Furthermore, nanoparticles can, in general, serve as convenient nanothermometers for in situ electron-microscopy experiments.

  6. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  7. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  8. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  9. Silicon-graphene photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanlong; Li, Jiang; Xu, Yang; Tsang, Hon Ki; Dai, Daoxin

    2018-06-01

    Silicon photonics has attracted much attention because of the advantages of CMOS (complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor) compatibility, ultra-high integrated density, etc. Great progress has been achieved in the past decades. However, it is still not easy to realize active silicon photonic devices and circuits by utilizing the material system of pure silicon due to the limitation of the intrinsic properties of silicon. Graphene has been regarded as a promising material for optoelectronics due to its unique properties and thus provides a potential option for realizing active photonic integrated devices on silicon. In this paper, we present a review on recent progress of some silicon-graphene photonic devices for photodetection, all-optical modulation, as well as thermal-tuning. Project supported by the National Major Research and Development Program (No. 2016YFB0402502), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11374263, 61422510, 61431166001, 61474099, 61674127), and the National Key Research and Development Program (No. 2016YFA0200200).

  10. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  11. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Description: Silicone gel-filled breast implants have a silicone outer ...

  12. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  13. Electrical leakage phenomenon in heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepkumar, Aiswarya; Zielinski, Marcin; Bosi, Matteo; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Iacopi, Francesca

    2018-06-01

    Heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films on silicon substrates are of technological interest as enablers to integrate the excellent electrical, electronic, mechanical, thermal, and epitaxial properties of bulk silicon carbide into well-established silicon technologies. One critical bottleneck of this integration is the establishment of a stable and reliable electronic junction at the heteroepitaxial interface of the n-type SiC with the silicon substrate. We have thus investigated in detail the electrical and transport properties of heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide films grown via different methods on low-doped and high-resistivity silicon substrates by using van der Pauw Hall and transfer length measurements as test vehicles. We have found that Si and C intermixing upon or after growth, particularly by the diffusion of carbon into the silicon matrix, creates extensive interstitial carbon traps and hampers the formation of a stable rectifying or insulating junction at the SiC/Si interface. Although a reliable p-n junction may not be realistic in the SiC/Si system, we can achieve, from a point of view of the electrical isolation of in-plane SiC structures, leakage suppression through the substrate by using a high-resistivity silicon substrate coupled with deep recess etching in between the SiC structures.

  14. Hall mobility in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, F.; Geilker, J.; Kwapil, W.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of the carrier mobility in silicon is of utmost importance for photovoltaic applications, as it directly influences the diffusion length and thereby the cell efficiency. Moreover, its value is needed for a correct quantitative evaluation of a variety of lifetime measurements. However, models that describe the carrier mobility in silicon are based on theoretical calculations or fits to experimental data in monocrystalline silicon. Multicrystalline (mc) silicon features crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries, with the latter possibly leading to potential barriers through the trapping of charge carriers and thereby influencing the mobility, as shown, for example, by Maruska et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 36, 381 (1980)]. To quantify the mobilities in multicrystalline silicon, we performed Hall measurements in p-type mc-Si samples of various resistivities and different crystal structures and compared the data to majority carrier Hall mobilities in p-type monocrystalline floatzone (FZ) silicon. For lack of a model that provides reliable values of the Hall mobility in silicon, an empirical fit similar to existing models for conductivity mobilities is proposed based on Hall measurements of monocrystalline p-type FZ silicon. By comparing the measured Hall mobilities obtained from mc silicon with the corresponding Hall mobilities in monocrystalline silicon of the same resistivity, we found that the mobility reduction due to the presence of crystal defects in mc-Si ranges between 0% and 5% only. Mobility decreases of up to 30% as reported by Peter et al. [Proceedings of the 23rd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 1-5 September 2008], or even of a factor of 2 to 3 as detected by Palais et al. [Mater. Sci. Eng. B 102, 184 (2003)], in multicrystalline silicon were not observed.

  15. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  16. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  17. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  18. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  19. Photodegradation in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. W.; Jaworowski, A.; Kleinhenz, R. L.; Pierce, C. B.; Wilsey, N. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of knowledge concerning the following defects in silicon is briefly surveyed: substitutional impurities; vacancy-related defects; interstitial-related defects; defect pairs. Although a great deal is known, it is argued that not enough is yet known to model radiation damage production in the bulk or in the vicinity of the junction of a solar cell. The results on photon degradation (and enhancement) of solar cells are then reviewed, and it is suggested that defect pairs may be the defects responsible. Mechanisms for photon-induced dissociation of pairs are discussed but a more detailed understanding awaits the identification of the actual defects.

  20. Solar abundance of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holweger, H.

    1973-07-01

    An analysis of 19 photospheric Si I lines whose oscillator strengths have recently been detertmined by Garz (1973) leads to a solar abundance of silicon, log epsilon /sub Si/ = 7.65 plus or minus 0.07, on the scale where log epsilon /sub H/ = 12. Together with the sodium abundance determained earlier by the same method, a solar abundance ratio /sup epsilon /Na//sup epsilon /Si = 0.045 ( plus or minus 10%) results. Within the error limits this a grees wtth the meteoritic ratio found in carbonaceous chondrites. Results concerning line-broadening by hydrogen are discussed. (auth)

  1. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  2. Luneburg lens in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Di Falco, Andrea; Kehr, Susanne C; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-03-14

    The Luneburg lens is an aberration-free lens that focuses light from all directions equally well. We fabricated and tested a Luneburg lens in silicon photonics. Such fully-integrated lenses may become the building blocks of compact Fourier optics on chips. Furthermore, our fabrication technique is sufficiently versatile for making perfect imaging devices on silicon platforms.

  3. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  4. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... sticky fluid that closely mimics the feel of human fat. Most women feel that silicone breast implants look and feel more like natural breast tissue. Silicone breast implants are available to women 22 and older for breast augmentation and to women of any age for breast ...

  5. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  6. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  7. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy without silicone stent.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Je Yeob; Shim, Woo Sub

    2012-06-01

    In nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction patients that undergo endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR), creation of a patent rhinostomy with adequate epithelialization can be accomplished without a stent. However, in common canalicular obstruction patients, a silicone stent seems to have a beneficial role and to bear more favorable results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcome of endoscopic DCR without the use of a silicone stent. In all, 36 patients (41 eyes) who underwent endoscopic DCR were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified into a DCR with silicone stent group and a DCR without silicone stent group. Then each of the groups was subdivided into common canalicular obstruction group and NLD obstruction group. Surgical outcomes were evaluated by postoperative symptom improvement and patency of the rhinostomy under nasal endoscopic exam. The epiphora was improved in 84.2% of the silicone stent group and 81.8% of the non-silicone stent group. Categorized by the level of obstruction, in common canalicular obstruction, the success rate was 84.5% (11/13) in the silicone stent group and 57.1% (4/7) in the no stent group. In NLD obstruction, the success rate was 83.0% (5/6) in the silicone stent group and 93.3% (14/15) in the no stent group.

  8. Silicon Carbide Integrated Circuit Chip

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-17

    A multilevel interconnect silicon carbide integrated circuit chip with co-fired ceramic package and circuit board recently developed at the NASA GRC Smart Sensors and Electronics Systems Branch for high temperature applications. High temperature silicon carbide electronics and compatible packaging technologies are elements of instrumentation for aerospace engine control and long term inner-solar planet explorations.

  9. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  10. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  11. Silicon nanowire Esaki diodes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Heinz; Bessire, Cedric; Björk, Mikael T; Schenk, Andreas; Riel, Heike

    2012-02-08

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire tunnel diodes. The silicon nanowires were grown on p-type Si substrates using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth and in situ n-type doping. Electrical measurements reveal Esaki diode characteristics with peak current densities of 3.6 kA/cm(2), peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 4.3, and reverse current densities of up to 300 kA/cm(2) at 0.5 V reverse bias. Strain-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a decrease of the peak tunnel current with uniaxial tensile stress and an increase of 48% for 1.3 GPa compressive stress along the <111> growth direction, revealing the strain dependence of the Si band structure and thus the tunnel barrier. The contributions of phonons to the indirect tunneling process were probed by conductance measurements at 4.2 K. These measurements show phonon peaks at energies corresponding to the transverse acoustical and transverse optical phonons. In addition, the low-temperature conductance measurements were extended to higher biases to identify potential impurity states in the band gap. The results demonstrate that the most likely impurity, namely, Au from the catalyst particle, is not detectable, a finding that is also supported by the excellent device properties of the Esaki diodes reported here. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Multimode Silicon Nanowire Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 104 is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 107 whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  13. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis was continued for the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) in which solar cell silicon is produced in a 1,000 MT/yr plant. Progress and status are reported for the primary engineering activities involved in the preliminary process engineering design of the plant base case conditions (96%), reaction chemistry (96%), process flow diagram (85%), material balance (85%), energy balance (60%), property data (60%), equipment design (40%), major equipment list (30%) and labor requirements (10%). Engineering design of the second distillation column (D-02, TCS column) in the process was completed. The design is based on a 97% recovery of the light key (TCS, trichlorosilane) in the distillate and a 97% recovery of the heavy key (TET, silicon tetrachloride) in the bottoms. At a reflux ratio of 2, the specified recovery of TCS and TET is achieved with 20 trays (equilibrium stages, N=20). Respective feed tray locations are 9, 12 and 15 (NF sub 1 = 9, NF sub 2 = 12,, and NF sub 3 = 15). A total condenser is used for the distillation which is conducted at a pressure of 90 psia.

  14. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  15. Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun; Dalba, G.; Rocca, F.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2013-02-01

    The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 °C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

  16. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  17. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  18. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  19. Extracting Silicon From Sodium-Process Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapur, V.; Sanjurjo, A.; Sancier, K. M.; Nanis, L.

    1982-01-01

    New acid leaching process purifies silicon produced in reaction between silicon fluoride and sodium. Concentration of sodium fluoride and other impurities and byproducts remaining in silicon are within acceptable ranges for semi-conductor devices. Leaching process makes sodium reduction process more attractive for making large quantities of silicon for solar cells.

  20. Ultrasonic Measurement Of Silicon-Growth Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    Position of interface between silicon melt and growing ribbon of silicon measured with aid of reflected ultrasound, according to proposal. Reflections reveal characteristics of ribbon and melt. Ultrasound pulses travel through rods to silicon ribbon growing by dendritic-web process. Rods return reflections of pulses to sonic transducers. Isolate transducers thermally, but not acoustically, from hot silicon melt.

  1. Adjustable Lid Aids Silicon-Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, J. P.; Steidensticker, R. G.; Duncan, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Closely-spaced crucible cover speeds up solidification. Growth rate of dendritic-web silicon ribbon from molten silicon increased by controlling distance between crucible susceptor lid and liquid/solid interface. Lid held in relatively high position when crucible newly filled with chunks of polycrystalline silicon. As silicon melts and forms pool of liquid at lower level, lid gradually lowered.

  2. Mitotic trafficking of silicon microparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Serda, Rita E.; Ferrati, Silvia; Godin, Biana; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, XueWu

    2010-01-01

    Multistage carriers were recently introduced by our laboratory, with the concurrent objectives of co-localized delivery of multiple therapeutic agents, the “theranostic” integration of bioactive moieties with imaging contrast, and the selective, potentially personalized bypassing of the multiplicity of biological barriers that adversely impact biodistribution of vascularly injected particulates. Mesoporous (“nanoporous”) silicon microparticles were selected as primary carriers in multi-stage devices, with targets including vascular endothelia at pathological lesions. The objective of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility of mesoporous silicon microparticles with endothelial cells using in vitro assays with an emphasis on microparticle compatibility with mitotic events. We observed that vascular endothelial cells, following internalization of silicon microparticles, maintain cellular integrity, as demonstrated by cellular morphology, viability and intact mitotic trafficking of vesicles bearing silicon microparticles. The presence of gold or iron oxide nanoparticles within the porous matrix did not alter the cellular uptake of particles or the viability of endothelial cells subsequent to engulfment of microparticles. Endothelial cells maintained basal levels of IL-6 and IL-8 release in the presence of silicon microparticles. This is the first study that demonstrates polarized, ordered partitioning of endosomes based on tracking microparticles. The finding that mitotic sorting of endosomes is unencumbered by the presence of nanoporous silicon microparticles advocates the use of silicon microparticles for biomedical applications. PMID:20644846

  3. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  4. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  5. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  6. Silicon-on-Insulator Pin Diodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Thin (0.5 Micron) Silicon-on-Oxidized Silicon Fig. 2.8 SEM Photographs of CVD Silicon Dioxide on Aluminum 28 After 1500 0 C Anneal in Oxygen...silicon nitride over the silicon dioxide encapsu- -9- lation layer and by depositing the silicon dioxide with a plasma CVD process which uses N20 as...relief via thermal expansion matching varies lin- -27- A B Figure 2.8: SEM Photographs of CVD Silicon Dioxide on Aluminum after 15000 C Anneal in Oxygen

  7. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  8. Predicting silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacanti, Giuseppe; Barriére, Nicolas; Bavdaz, Marcos; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Collon, Maximilien; Dekker, Danielle; Girou, David; Günther, Ramses; van der Hoeven, Roy; Landgraf, Boris; Sforzini, Jessica; Vervest, Mark; Wille, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Continuing improvement of Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) calls for regular extension and validation of the tools used to model and predict their X-ray performance. In this paper we present an updated geometrical model for the SPO optics and describe how we make use of the surface metrology collected during each of the SPO manufacturing runs. The new geometrical model affords the user a finer degree of control on the mechanical details of the SPO stacks, while a standard interface has been developed to make use of any type of metrology that can return changes in the local surface normal of the reflecting surfaces. Comparisons between the predicted and actual performance of samples optics will be shown and discussed.

  9. Measuring silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacanti, Giuseppe; Barrière, Nicolas; Bavdaz, Marcos; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Collon, Maximilien; Dekker, Daniëlle; Girou, David; Günther, Ramses; van der Hoeven, Roy; Krumrey, Michael; Landgraf, Boris; Müller, Peter; Schreiber, Swenja; Vervest, Mark; Wille, Eric

    2017-09-01

    While predictions based on the metrology (local slope errors and detailed geometrical details) play an essential role in controlling the development of the manufacturing processes, X-ray characterization remains the ultimate indication of the actual performance of Silicon Pore Optics (SPO). For this reason SPO stacks and mirror modules are routinely characterized at PTB's X-ray Pencil Beam Facility at BESSY II. Obtaining standard X-ray results quickly, right after the production of X-ray optics is essential to making sure that X-ray results can inform decisions taken in the lab. We describe the data analysis pipeline in operations at cosine, and how it allows us to go from stack production to full X-ray characterization in 24 hours.

  10. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) for producing silicon from dichlorosilane in a 1,000 MT/yr plant was continued. Progress and status for the chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process are reported for the primary process design engineering activities: base case conditions (85%), reaction chemistry (85%), process flow diagram (60%), material balance (60%), energy balance (30%), property data (30%), equipment design (20%) and major equipment list (10%). Engineering design of the initial distillation column (D-01, stripper column) in the process was initiated. The function of the distillation column is to remove volatile gases (such as hydrogen and nitrogen) which are dissolved in liquid chlorosilanes. Initial specifications and results for the distillation column design are reported including the variation of tray requirements (equilibrium stages) with reflux ratio for the distillation.

  11. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  12. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  13. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C. (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fluidized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  14. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  15. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  16. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  17. Corrosion Characteristics of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Munro, R. G.; Dapkunas, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The present work is a review of the substantial effort that has been made to measure and understand the effects of corrosion with respect to the properties, performance, and durability of various forms of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The review encompasses corrosion in diverse environments, usually at temperatures of 1000 °C or higher. The environments include dry and moist oxygen, mixtures of hot gaseous vapors, molten salts, molten metals, and complex environments pertaining to coal ashes and slags. PMID:28053489

  18. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent.

  19. Martian Rocks Rich in Silicon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-11

    Data from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer APXS instrument on NASA Mars rover Curiosity show an unusual enrichment of silicon in the rocks dubbed Wildrose and Bonanza King, relative to other rocks studied at Gale Crater on Mars.

  20. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  1. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  2. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  3. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor); Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  4. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  5. Low cost solar silicon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mede, Matt

    2009-08-01

    The worldwide demand for solar grade silicon reached an all time high between 2007 and 2008. Although growth in the solar industry is slowing due to the current economic downturn, demand is expected to rebound in 2011 based on current cost models. However, demand will increase even more than currently anticipated if costs are reduced. This situation creates an opportunity for new and innovative approaches to the production of photovoltaic grade silicon, especially methods which can demonstrate cost reductions over currently utilized processes.

  6. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  7. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  8. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  9. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  10. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  11. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  12. Review Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jian; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Yingchun; Li, Shibin

    2018-04-01

    As a widely used semiconductor material, silicon has been extensively used in many areas, such as photodiode, photodetector, and photovoltaic devices. However, the high surface reflectance and large bandgap of traditional bulk silicon restrict the full use of the spectrum. To solve this problem, many methods have been developed. Among them, the surface nanostructured silicon, namely black silicon, is the most efficient and widely used. Due to its high absorption in the wide range from UV-visible to infrared, black silicon is very attractive for using as sensitive layer of photodiodes, photodetector, solar cells, field emission, luminescence, and other photoelectric devices. Intensive study has been performed to understand the enhanced absorption of black silicon as well as the response extended to infrared spectrum range. In this paper, the application of black silicon is systematically reviewed. The limitations and challenges of black silicon material are also discussed. This article will provide a meaningful introduction to black silicon and its unique properties.

  13. Silicon carbide ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanmethanond, Varaporn

    This dissertation focuses on the preparation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic membranes on SiC substrates. An original technique of SiC porous substrate preparation using sintering methods was developed during the work for the completion of the dissertation. The resulting SiC substrates have demonstrated high porosity, high internal surface area, well interconnected surface pore network and, at the same time, good thermal, chemical and mechanical stability. In a further development, sol-gel techniques were used to deposit micro-porous SiC membranes on these SiC porous substrates. The SiC membranes were characterized by a variety of techniques: ideal gas selectivity (He and N2), XRD, BET, SEM, XPS, and AFM. The characterization results confirmed that the asymmetric sol-gel SiC membranes were of high quality, with no cracks or pinholes, and exhibiting high resistance to corrosion and high hydro-thermal stability. In conclusion, the SiC ceramic membrane work was successfully completed. Two publications in international peer reviewed journals resulted out of this work.

  14. Silicon force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload uponmore » the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.« less

  15. Containerless crystallization of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, K.; Aoyama, T.

    2002-04-01

    Crystallization from undercooled melt of silicon was carried out by means of electro-magnetic levitation method under controlled undercooling. The measured growth rate vs. undercooling was categorized into three regions, I, II and III, respectively, from the point of the interface morphology. Thin plate crystals whose interface consisted of both faceted (1 1 1) plane and wavy edge plane like saw-tooth were observed in the region I where the undercooling is less than 100 K. The growth rate of the wavy edge plane was well described by the dendrite growth model. The morphology of growing crystals was abruptly changed to faceted dendrite in the region II, though there was no abrupt change in the growth rate. Seeding at temperatures in the region I changes the drop to a mono-crystalline sphere, if the growth rate along the normal direction of the thin plate crystal is controlled by step-wise growth on the faceted plane. Actually, the sample of 5 mm in diameter seeded at undercooling of 26 K was a quasi-single crystal with large grain, except for a small area where twinning and cracking are observed. The result suggests that the single crystal could be grown, if a smaller sample, 1 or 2 mm in diameter, that is difficult to be levitated by electro-magnetic force were processed with other methods such as free fall in a drop tube.

  16. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  17. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  18. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  19. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  20. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  1. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  2. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  3. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  4. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  5. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  6. Gas Atmospheres Improve Silicon-Ribbon Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, F. V.; Kalejs, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Growing crystal surrounded by gas containing carbon or oxygen. Ribbon of solid silicon, edgewise, grows from pool of molten silicon in die. Gases flowing through orifice ensure longer diffusion length and less contaminiation by carbide particles in product.

  7. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  8. Analysis of silicon stress/strain relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, O.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for work on stress-strain relationships in silicon ribbon. Calculations of stress fields, dislocation desities, and buckling were made; uniaxial tensile tests were made on silicon at 1150 C; and dislocation motion studies were performed.

  9. Sublid Speeds Growth Of Silicon Ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Heat shield permits enhancement of exit cooling without formation of unwanted crystals. Thermal barrier between molten silicon and lid of susceptor and crucible allows solidifying ribbon of silicon to be withdrawn faster. Barrier, or sublid, increases production rate.

  10. A continuous silicon-coating facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butter, C.; Heaps, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Automatic continuous silicon-coating facility is used to process 100 by 10 cm graphite-coated ceramic substrates for silicon solar cells. Process reduces contamination associated with conventional dip-coating processes, improving material service life.

  11. Solid structures with bioorganic films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutov, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    The electrophysical parameters of ovalbumin/silicon and propolis/silicon heterostructures are studied using impedance spectroscopy and high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics under water vapor sorption conditions.

  12. Porous Silicon as Antireflecting Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosoglu, Gulsen; Yumak, Mehmet; Okmen, Selim; Ozatay, Ozhan; Skarlatos, Yani; Garcia, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    The main aim in photovoltaic industry is to produce efficient and energy competitive solar cell modules at low cost. Efficient AntiReflection Coatings (ARC) improve light collection and thereby increase the current output of solar cells. Broadband ARCs are desirable for efficient application over the entire solar spectrum and porous silicon layers as antireflective coating layers provide successful light collection. In the study the most critical physical parameters of porous silicon are examined, homogeneous and uniform porous layers are produced. The photoluminescence spectrum and optical parameters of porous layers have been investigated, and we are now in the process of improving the efficiency of the device by modulating the structure of the porous silicon layers and studying its photovoltaic characteristics. We would like to thank to Mr. Aziz U. Caliskan and his group for their valuable support from TUBITAK YITAL. This Project is supported by Bogazici University Research Funding: 5782, TUBITAK Grant : 209T099, and Bogazici University Infrared Funding: 6121.

  13. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  14. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.; Belle II SVD Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  15. Microdistribution of oxygen in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgai, A.; Chi, J. Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The microdistribution of oxygen in Czochralskii-grown, p-type silicon crystals was determined by using the SEM in the EBIC mode in conjunction with spreading resistance measurements. When the conductivity remained p-type, bands of contrast were observed in the EBIC image which corresponded to maxima in resistivity. When at the oxygen concentration maxima the oxygen donor concentration exceeded the p-type dopant concentration, an inversion of the conductivity occurred. It resulted in the formation of p-n junctions in a striated configuration and the local inversion of the EBIC image contrast. By heat-treating silicon at 1000 C prior to the activation of oxygen donors, some silicon-oxygen micro-precipitates were observed in the EBIC image within the striated oxygen concentration maxima.

  16. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  17. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOEpatents

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2013-05-28

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  18. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOEpatents

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2014-06-03

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  19. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurfacemore » damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.« less

  20. Vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into silicon-on-insulator platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Eftekhar, Ali A; Sodagar, Majid; Xia, Zhixuan; Atabaki, Amir H; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into the silicon-on-insulator platform for applications at the telecommunication wavelengths. Low-loss silicon nitride films with a thickness of 400 nm are successfully grown, enabling compact silicon nitride microresonators with ultra-high intrinsic Qs (~ 6 × 10(6) for 60 μm radius and ~ 2 × 10(7) for 240 μm radius). The coupling between the silicon nitride microresonator and the underneath silicon waveguide is based on evanescent coupling with silicon dioxide as buffer. Selective coupling to a desired radial mode of the silicon nitride microresonator is also achievable using a pulley coupling scheme. In this work, a 60-μm-radius silicon nitride microresonator has been successfully integrated into the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing a single-mode operation with an intrinsic Q of 2 × 10(6).

  1. Advancements in silicon web technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Easoz, J.; Mchugh, J. P.; Piotrowski, P.; Hundal, R.

    1987-01-01

    Low defect density silicon web crystals up to 7 cm wide are produced from systems whose thermal environments are designed for low stress conditions using computer techniques. During growth, the average silicon melt temperature, the lateral melt temperature distribution, and the melt level are each controlled by digital closed loop systems to maintain thermal steady state and to minimize the labor content of the process. Web solar cell efficiencies of 17.2 pct AM1 have been obtained in the laboratory while 15 pct efficiencies are common in pilot production.

  2. Preventing Freezeup in Silicon Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B.

    1983-01-01

    Carefully-shaped heat conductor helps control thermal gradients crucial to growth of single-crystal silicon sheets for solar cells. Ends of die through which silicon sheet is drawn as ribbon from molten silicon. Profiled heat extractor prevents ribbon ends from solidifying prematurely and breaking.

  3. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  4. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing

    1997-01-01

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  5. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  6. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Garneau, Alexandre P.; Carpentier, Gabriel A.; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F.; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J.; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates. PMID:26313002

  7. Aquaporins Mediate Silicon Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Alexandre P; Carpentier, Gabriel A; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Simard, Charles F; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Caron, Luc; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Noël, Micheline; Powell, Jonathan J; Bélanger, Richard; Côté, François; Isenring, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In animals, silicon is an abundant and differentially distributed trace element that is believed to play important biological functions. One would thus expect silicon concentrations in body fluids to be regulated by silicon transporters at the surface of many cell types. Curiously, however, and even though they exist in plants and algae, no such transporters have been identified to date in vertebrates. Here, we show for the first time that the human aquaglyceroporins, i.e., AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 can act as silicon transporters in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. In particular, heterologously expressed AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 are all able to induce robust, saturable, phloretin-sensitive silicon transport activity in the range that was observed for low silicon rice 1 (lsi1), a silicon transporter in plant. Furthermore, we show that the aquaglyceroporins appear as relevant silicon permeation pathways in both mice and humans based on 1) the kinetics of substrate transport, 2) their presence in tissues where silicon is presumed to play key roles and 3) their transcriptional responses to changes in dietary silicon. Taken together, our data provide new evidence that silicon is a potentially important biological element in animals and that its body distribution is regulated. They should open up original areas of investigations aimed at deciphering the true physiological role of silicon in vertebrates.

  8. Computational Silicon Nanophotonic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    impossible. A nonlinear optimization algorithm is used to find the best permittivity distribution and a focused ion beam is used to define the fine nanostructures. Our future work lies in demonstrating active nanophotonic devices with compact footprint and high efficiency. Broadband and efficient silicon modulators, and all-optical and high-efficiency switches are envisioned with our design algorithm.

  9. Fibers based on polyethylene with silicon and silicon carbide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Krutikova, A. A.; Kovaleva, A. N.; Rychagov, O. V.; Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the paper, fibrous materials based on polyethylene with nanosized silicon and silicon carbide obtained by the plasma chemical method have been obtained. The concentration of nanosilicon nanoparticles was 0.1-1.5%. Fibers absorb UV radiation in the range 200-400 nm. The size of silicon nanoparticles and dispersion in fibers are estimated by X-ray diffraction. It is shown that silicon nanoparticles exert no effect on the formation of the internal structure of the PE matrix. The degree of crystallinity, melting and crystallization temperatures remain constant. The surface properties of films are investigated by triboelectric methods and by determining the wetting angle. The surface properties of composite films do not differ from the properties of PE films with the concentration of nanoparticles from 0.1 to 1.0%. At a 1.5% content of n-SiC, the microrelief of the surface changes, and the friction coefficient of the films increases. The resulting films are recommended for application as a UV protective coating.

  10. 1366 Project Silicon: Reclaiming US Silicon PV Leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Adam

    1366 Technologies’ Project Silicon addresses two of the major goals of the DOE’s PV Manufacturing Initiative Part 2 program: 1) How to reclaim a strong silicon PV manufacturing presence and; 2) How to lower the levelized cost of electricity (“LCOE”) for solar to $0.05-$0.07/kWh, enabling wide-scale U.S. market adoption. To achieve these two goals, US companies must commercialize disruptive, high-value technologies that are capable of rapid scaling, defensible from foreign competition, and suited for US manufacturing. These are the aims of 1366 Technologies Direct Wafer ™ process. The research conducted during Project Silicon led to the first industrial scaling ofmore » 1366’s Direct Wafer™ process – an innovative, US-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that destroys the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions: the 35-year-old grand challenge of making quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. The SunPath program made it possible for 1366 Technologies to build its demonstration factory, a key and critical step in the Company’s evolution. The demonstration factory allowed 1366 to build every step of the process flow at production size, eliminating potential risk and ensuring the success of the Company’s subsequent scaling for a 1 GW factory to be constructed in Western New York in 2016 and 2017. Moreover, the commercial viability of the Direct Wafer process and its resulting wafers were established as 1366 formed key strategic partnerships, gained entry into the $8B/year multi-Si wafer market, and installed modules featuring Direct Wafer products – the veritable proving grounds for the technology. The program also contributed to the development of three Generation 3 Direct Wafer furnaces. These furnaces are the platform for copying intelligently and preparing our supply chain – large-scale expansion will not require a bigger machine but more machines. Sun

  11. Plasma Enabled Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Aramesh, Morteza; Rider, Amanda E.; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    Silicon carbide is one of the promising materials for the fabrication of various one- and two-dimensional nanostructures. In this chapter, we discuss experimental and theoretical studies of the plasma-enabled fabrication of silicon carbide quantum dots, nanowires, and nanorods. The discussed fabrication methods include plasma-assisted growth with and without anodic aluminium oxide membranes and with or without silane as a source of silicon. In the silane-free experiments, quartz was used as a source of silicon to synthesize the silicon carbide nanostructures in an environmentally friendly process. The mechanism of the formation of nanowires and nanorods is also discussed.

  12. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  13. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  14. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Landry, Marc D.; Pitts, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  15. Silicon Technologies Adjust to RF Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke Taub, Susan; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon (Si), although not traditionally the material of choice for RF and microwave applications, has become a serious challenger to other semiconductor technologies for high-frequency applications. Fine-line electron- beam and photolithographic techniques are now capable of fabricating silicon gate sizes as small as 0.1 micron while commonly-available high-resistivity silicon wafers support low-loss microwave transmission lines. These advances, coupled with the recent development of silicon-germanium (SiGe), arm silicon integrated circuits (ICs) with the speed required for increasingly higher-frequency applications.

  16. Solar silicon via the Dow Corning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technical feasibility for high volume production of solar cell-grade silicon is investigated. The process consists of producing silicon from pure raw materials via the carbothermic reduction of quartz. This silicon was then purified to solar grade by impurity segregation during Czochralski crystal growth. Commercially available raw materials were used to produce 100 kg quantities of silicon during 60 hour periods in a direct arc reactor. This silicon produced single crystalline ingot, during a second Czochralski pull, that was fabricated into solar cells having efficiencies ranging from 8.2 percent to greater than 14 percent. An energy analysis of the entire process indicated a 5 month payback time.

  17. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  18. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  19. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  20. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  1. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  2. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance limiting mechanisms in polycrystalline silicon are investigated by fabricating a matrix of solar cells of various thicknesses from polycrystalline silicon wafers of several bulk resistivities. The analysis of the results for the entire matrix indicates that bulk recombination is the dominant factor limiting the short circuit current in large grain (greater than 1 to 2 mm diameter) polycrystalline silicon, the same mechanism that limits the short circuit current in single crystal silicon. An experiment to investigate the limiting mechanisms of open circuit voltage and fill factor for large grain polycrystalline silicon is designed. Two process sequences to fabricate small cells are investigated.

  3. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  4. Silicone Coating on Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Silicone coatings applied to polyimide sheeting for variety of space-related applications. Coatings intended to protect flexible substrates of solar-cell blankets from degradation by oxygen atoms, electrons, plasmas, and ultraviolet light in low Earth orbit and outer space. Since coatings are flexible, generally useful in forming flexible laminates or protective layers on polyimide-sheet products.

  5. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-11

    A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

  6. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Basore, Paul A.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-08-11

    A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

  7. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  8. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Lantz, Jeffrey W [Albuquerque, NM; Stalford, Harold L [Norman, OK

    2011-07-19

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  9. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  10. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic impurities, both singly and in combinations, affect the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski silicon web crystals were grown with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The primary electrical dopants were boron and phosphorus. The silicon test ingots were grown under controlled and carefully monitored conditions from high-purity charge and dopant material to minimize unintentional contamination. Following growth, each crystal was characterized by chemical, microstructural, electrical, and solar cell tests to provide a detailed and internally consistent description of the relationships between silicon impurity concentration and solar cell performance. Deep-level spectroscopy measurements were used to measure impurity concentrations at levels below the detectability of other techniques and to study thermally-induced changes in impurity activity. For the majority of contaminants, impurity-induced performance loss is due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. From these observations, a semi-empirical model which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity concentration was formulated. The model was then used successfully to predict the behavior of solar cells bearing as many as 11 different impurities.

  11. Surface property modification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The main emphasis of this work has been to determine the wear rate of silicon in fluid environments and the parameters that influence wear. Three tests were carried out on single crystal Czochralski silicon wafers: circular and linear multiple-scratch tests in fluids by a pyramidal diamond simulated fixed-particle abrasion; microhardness and three-point bend tests were used to determine the hardness and fracture toughness of abraded silicon and the extent of damage induced by abrasion. The wear rate of (100) and (111) n and p-type single crystal Cz silicon abraded by a pyramidal diamond in ethanol, methanol, acetone and de-ionized water was determined by measuring the cross-sectional areas of grooves of the circular and linear multiple-scratch tests. The wear rate depends on the loads on the diamond and is highest for ethanol and lowest for de-ionized water. The surface morphology of the grooves showed lateral and median cracks as well as a plastically deformed region. The hardness and fracture toughness are critical parameters that influence the wear rate. Microhardness tests were conducted to determine the hardness as influenced by fluids. Median cracks and the damage zone surrounding the indentations were also related to the fluid properties.

  12. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  13. High purity silane and silicon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen and metallurgical silicon are reacted at about 400.degree.-600.degree. C. and at pressures in excess of 100 psi, and specifically from about 300 up to about 600 psi to form di- and trichlorosilane that is subjected to disproportionation in the presence of an anion exchange resin to form high purity silane. By-product and unreacted materials are recycled, with metallurgical silicon and hydrogen being essentially the only consumed feed materials. The silane product may be further purified, as by means of activated carbon or cryogenic distillation, and decomposed in a fluid bed or free space reactor to form high purity polycrystalline silicon and by-product hydrogen which can be recycled for further use. The process results in simplified waste disposal operations and enhances the overall conversion of metallurgical grade silicon to silane and high purity silicon for solar cell and semiconductor silicon applications.

  14. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  15. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  16. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad.

  17. Growth of silicon nanoclusters in thermal silicon dioxide under annealing in an atmosphere of nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. V., E-mail: Ivanova@mail.ioffe.ru; Sitnikova, A. A.; Aleksandrov, O. V.

    2016-06-15

    It is found for the first time that silicon nanoclusters are formed in the surface layer of thermal silicon dioxide under high-temperature annealing (T = 1150°C) in dried nitrogen. Analysis of the cathodoluminescence spectra shows that an imperfect surface layer appears upon such annealing of silicon dioxide, with silicon nanoclusters formed in this layer upon prolonged annealing. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the silicon clusters are 3–5.5 nm in size and lie at a depth of about 10 nm from the surface. Silicon from the thermal film of silicon dioxide serves as the material from which the silicon nanoclusters aremore » formed. This method of silicon-nanocluster formation is suggested for the first time.« less

  18. Silicon-Based Anode and Method for Manufacturing the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yushin, Gleb Nikolayevich (Inventor); Zdyrko, Bogdan (Inventor); Magasinski, Alexandre (Inventor); Luzinov, Igor (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A silicon-based anode comprising silicon, a carbon coating that coats the surface of the silicon, a polyvinyl acid that binds to at least a portion of the silicon, and vinylene carbonate that seals the interface between the silicon and the polyvinyl acid. Because of its properties, polyvinyl acid binders offer improved anode stability, tunable properties, and many other attractive attributes for silicon-based anodes, which enable the anode to withstand silicon cycles of expansion and contraction during charging and discharging.

  19. Silicon quantum dots for energetic material applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Sarah K.; Piekiel, Nicholas W.; Ervin, Matthew H.; Morris, Christopher J.

    2018-06-01

    In its history as an energetic material, porous silicon has demonstrated flame speeds in excess of 3 km s-1, tunable combustion behavior, and high energy output, which in theory makes it a very attractive energetic system. In practice, its application within the field is limited by porous silicon's typical substrate-adhered form and caustic chemical processing requirements that limit how and when porous silicon is made. In this work, we have relieved porous silicon of these constraints by creating reactive silicon quantum dots from free-standing porous silicon films. The resulting material is composed of crystalline silicon nanoparticles with diameters as small as 2 nm that retain the chemical properties of the original films including the SiH2 termination layer. The fabricated silicon particles were characterized using FTIR Spectroscopy, TEM, and EDS for determining the size and the chemical composition. For testing as an energetic material fuel, porous silicon was mixed with an oft used oxidizer, sodium perchlorate. During open-channel combustion tests, silicon quantum dots mixed with sodium perchlorate demonstrated flame speeds over 2.5 km s-1, while bomb calorimetry tests showed an average heat of combustion of 7.4 kJ g-1. These results demonstrate the ability to retain the porous silicon material properties that allow for highly energetic material reactions to occur, despite the additional processing steps to create silicon quantum dots. This opens the door for the use of porous silicon in the bulk of the energetic material application space, much of which was previously limited due to the substrate-attached nature of typical porous silicon.

  20. Quantum Properties of Dichroic Silicon Vacancies in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Roland; Widmann, Matthias; Niethammer, Matthias; Dasari, Durga B. R.; Gerhardt, Ilja; Soykal, Öney O.; Radulaski, Marina; Ohshima, Takeshi; Vučković, Jelena; Son, Nguyen Tien; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Bonato, Cristian; Lee, Sang-Yun; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2018-03-01

    Although various defect centers have displayed promise as either quantum sensors, single photon emitters, or light-matter interfaces, the search for an ideal defect with multifunctional ability remains open. In this spirit, we study the dichroic silicon vacancies in silicon carbide that feature two well-distinguishable zero-phonon lines and analyze the quantum properties in their optical emission and spin control. We demonstrate that this center combines 40% optical emission into the zero-phonon lines showing the contrasting difference in optical properties with varying temperature and polarization, and a 100% increase in the fluorescence intensity upon the spin resonance, and long spin coherence time of their spin-3 /2 ground states up to 0.6 ms. These results single out this defect center as a promising system for spin-based quantum technologies.

  1. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  2. Solar silicon via improved and expanded metallurgical silicon technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. P.; Dosaj, V. D.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A completed preliminary survey of silica sources indicates that sufficient quantities of high-purity quartz are available in the U.S. and Canada to meet goals. Supply can easily meet demand for this little-sought commodity. Charcoal, as a reductant for silica, can be purified to a sufficient level by high-temperature fluorocarbon treatment and vacuum processing. High-temperature treatment causes partial graphitization which can lead to difficulty in smelting. Smelting of Arkansas quartz and purified charcoal produced kilogram quantities of silicon having impurity levels generally much lower than in MG-Si. Half of the goal was met of increasing the boron resistivity from 0.03 ohm-cm in metallurgical silicon to 0.3 ohm-cm in solar silicon. A cost analysis of the solidification process indicate $3.50-7.25/kg Si for the Czochralski-type process and $1.50-4.25/kg Si for the Bridgman-type technique.

  3. A general classification of silicon utilizing organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon utilizing organisms may be defined as organisms with high silicon content (≥ 1% dry weight) and they can metabolize silicon with or without demonstrable silicon transporter genes (SIT) in them(Das,2010). Silicon is the second most abundant element in the lithosphere (27.70%) and it is as important as phosphorus and magnesium (0.03%) in the biota. Hydrated silica represents the second most abundant biogenic mineral after carbonate minerals. Silicon is accumulated and metabolized by some prokaryotes, and Si compounds can stimulate the growth of a range of fungi. It is well known that Si is essential for diatoms. In mammals, Si is considered an essential trace element, required in bone, cartilage and connective tissue formation, enzymatic activities and other metabolic processes. Silicon was suggested to act as a phosphoprotein effector in bone. In mammals, Si is also reported to positively influence the immune system and to be required for lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous chemistry of Si is dominated by silicic acid at biological pH ranges. Monosilicic acid can form stable complexes with organic hydroxy-containing molecules . Biosilica also has been identified associated with various biomolecules including proteins and carbohydrates. There are main seven groups of silicon utilizing organisms belonging to Gram positive bacteria, algae, protozoa, sponges, fungi, lichens, and monocotyledon plants. In each group again all the members are not silicon utilizing organisms, thus selective members in each group are further classified depending their degree of silicon utilization. Important silicon utilizing bacteria are Mycobacteria, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus spp. etc., Important silicon utilizing algae are Centrobacillariophyceae, Pennatibacillariophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Many protozoa belonging to Heterokonta, Choanoflagellida, Actinopoda are well known silicon utilizing microorganisms. Hexactinellida ( glass sponges

  4. Choosing a Silicone Encapsulant for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velderrain, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Growth in the solar industry has resulted in newer technologies, specifically concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules, to explore using new types of materials such as silicone encapsulants. CPV and LCPV module designs are to achieve the most efficient energy conversion possible however it is equally important to demonstrate long term reliability. Silicone is a material of interest due to its thermal stability and ability to absorb stresses incurred during thermal cycling. The refractive index of clear silicone adhesives is advantageous because it can be optimized using phenyl groups to match BK7 glass and other substrates to minimize light loss at the interfaces but it is relatively unknown how the optical properties change over time possibly yellowing in such a harsh environment. A 1.41 silicone encapsulant is compared to a 1.52 refractive index silicone. Optical Absorption (300 nm-1300 nm), Water Vapor Permeability, Moisture Absorption and effects of oxidation at elevated temperatures will be compared of these materials to aid the engineer in choosing a silicone for their CPV application. Non-phenyl containing 1.41 RI silicones have been used for several years for bonding solar arrays in the satellite industry. Phenyl groups on the siloxane polymer can change various properties of the silicone. Understanding how phenyl affects these properties allows the engineer to understand the benefits and risks when using a RI matching silicone to minimize light loss versus a non-phenyl containing silicone.

  5. Creep analysis of silicone for podiatry applications.

    PubMed

    Janeiro-Arocas, Julia; Tarrío-Saavedra, Javier; López-Beceiro, Jorge; Naya, Salvador; López-Canosa, Adrián; Heredia-García, Nicolás; Artiaga, Ramón

    2016-10-01

    This work shows an effective methodology to characterize the creep-recovery behavior of silicones before their application in podiatry. The aim is to characterize, model and compare the creep-recovery properties of different types of silicone used in podiatry orthotics. Creep-recovery phenomena of silicones used in podiatry orthotics is characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Silicones provided by Herbitas are compared by observing their viscoelastic properties by Functional Data Analysis (FDA) and nonlinear regression. The relationship between strain and time is modeled by fixed and mixed effects nonlinear regression to compare easily and intuitively podiatry silicones. Functional ANOVA and Kohlrausch-Willians-Watts (KWW) model with fixed and mixed effects allows us to compare different silicones observing the values of fitting parameters and their physical meaning. The differences between silicones are related to the variations of breadth of creep-recovery time distribution and instantaneous deformation-permanent strain. Nevertheless, the mean creep-relaxation time is the same for all the studied silicones. Silicones used in palliative orthoses have higher instantaneous deformation-permanent strain and narrower creep-recovery distribution. The proposed methodology based on DMA, FDA and nonlinear regression is an useful tool to characterize and choose the proper silicone for each podiatry application according to their viscoelastic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  7. Metamaterial-inspired silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staude, Isabelle; Schilling, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The prospect of creating metamaterials with optical properties greatly exceeding the parameter space accessible with natural materials has been inspiring intense research efforts in nanophotonics for more than a decade. Following an era of plasmonic metamaterials, low-loss dielectric nanostructures have recently moved into the focus of metamaterial-related research. This development was mainly triggered by the experimental observation of electric and magnetic multipolar Mie-type resonances in high-refractive-index dielectric nanoparticles. Silicon in particular has emerged as a popular material choice, due to not only its high refractive index and very low absorption losses in the telecom spectral range, but also its paramount technological relevance. This Review overviews recent progress on metamaterial-inspired silicon nanostructures, including Mie-resonant and off-resonant regimes.

  8. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  9. Silicon Biomineralization on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, D.; Das, S.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon biomineralization in nature occurs as either ‘biologically controlled biomineralization’; where silicon is precipitated to serve some physiological purpose; or as ‘biologically induced biomineralization’; where mineralization occurs as a byproduct of cell’s metabolic activity or through its interactions with the environment. In biologically controlled mineralization, there is an overwhelming control of the microorganism on nucleation and mineral growth stage. There is delineation of space (as intracellular silica deposition vesicle (SDV)) for the locus of mineralization, which is sealed off from the external environment. Then silicate is sequestered and transferred to the mineralization site by energy driven (energy may be derived from photosynthesis or from glucose metabolism) pump mechanism in presence of specific transporter protein. In biologically induced biomineralization, first, there is silicon nucleation, which leads to the spontaneous growth of some critical nuclei which are resistant to rapid dissolution. Then growth of these silicon nuclei (if the ions are same) or precipitation over the nuclei (if the ions are different) occurs. Ultimately the initial amorphous phase is converted into a crystalline phase. Silicon deposition may also occur due to Ostwald ripening. If silica concentration is more than the solubility of amorphous silica (at 100oC ~ 380 mg L-1), monomeric silica [Si(OH)4] is formed which is converted into oligomers (dimers, trimers and tetramers) by polymerization. Ultimately large polymers of silanol (-Si-OH-) and siloxane (-Si-O-Si-) are formed. Silicification then occurs by hydrogen bonding with neutrally charged polysaccharides, by cation bridging with the cell wall or by direct electrostatic interactions with cationic amino groups present in protein-rich biofilms. Diatoms are the world’s largest contributor to biomineralization of silicon. Diatom silicon transporters (SITs) are membrane associated proteins that

  10. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; ...

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  11. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  12. Dry etch method for texturing silicon and device

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, Talia S.; Haight, Richard A.; Kim, Jeehwan

    2017-07-25

    A method for texturing silicon includes loading a silicon wafer into a vacuum chamber, heating the silicon wafer and thermal cracking a gas to generate cracked sulfur species. The silicon wafer is exposed to the cracked sulfur species for a time duration in accordance with a texture characteristic needed for a surface of the silicon wafer.

  13. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  14. Strengthening silicon carbide by quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruver, R. M.; Platts, D. R.; Kirchner, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Quenching was used to form compressive surface layers in hot-pressed silicon carbide. The presence of the compressive stresses was verified by slotted rod tests. The slotted rod tip deflection was retained at temperatures to at least 1380 C, showing that the stresses are not relieved immediately at elevated temperatures. The flexural strength and impact resistance of specimens quenched from moderate temperatures (2000 C) were increased. Frequently, specimens quenched from higher temperatures were weakened by thermal shock damage.

  15. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar SiO was discovered shortly after CO but it has been detected mainly in high density and high temperature regions associated with outflow sources. A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds is presented which contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine structure levels of the silicon atom. This effect was originally pointed out in the context of neutral reactions of carbon and oxygen by Graff, who noted that the leading term in neutral atom-molecule interactions involves the quadrupole moment of the atom. Similar to the case of carbon, the requirement that Si has a quadrupole moment requires population of the J = 1 level, which lies 111K above the J = 0 ground state and has a critical density n(cr) equal to or greater than 10(6)/cu cm. The SiO abundance then has a temperature dependence proportional to exp(-111/T) and a quadratic density dependence for n less than n(cr). As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, this model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundances of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  16. Silicon nanocrystals as handy biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Tilley, Richard; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have brighter and longer fluorescence than organic dyes. Therefore, QDs can be applied to biotechnology, and have capability to be applied to medical technology. Currently, among the several types of QDs, CdSe with a ZnS shell is one of the most popular QDs to be used in biological experiments. However, when the CdSe QDs were applied to clinical technology, potential toxicological problems due to CdSe core should be considered. To eliminate the problem, silicon nanocrystals, which have the potential of biocompatibility, could be a candidate of alternate probes. Silicon nanocrystals have been synthesized using several techniques such as aerosol, electrochemical etching, laser pyrolysis, plasma deposition, and colloids. Recently, the silicon nanocrystals were reported to be synthesized in inverse micelles and also stabilized with 1-heptene or allylamine capping. Blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was observed when excited with a UV light. The nanocrystals covered with 1-heptene are hydrophobic, whereas the ones covered with allylamine are hydrophilic. To test the stability in cytosol, the water-soluble nanocrystals covered with allylamine were examined with a Hela cell incorporation experiment. Bright blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was detected in the cytosol when excited with a UV light, implying that the nanocrystals were able to be applied to biological imaging. In order to expand the application range, we synthesized and compared a series of silicon nanocrystals, which have variable surface modification, such as alkyl group, alcohol group, and odorant molecules. This study will provide a wider range of optoelectronic applications and bioimaging technology.

  17. Alkylation of Silicon(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivillon, S.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2006-03-01

    Methylation of chlorine-terminated silicon (111) (Si-Cl) is investigated by Infra Red Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS). Starting from an atomically flat H-terminated Si(111), the surface is first chlorinated by a gas phase process, then methylated using a Grignard reagent. Methyl groups completely replace Cl, and are oriented normal to the surface. The surface remains atomically flat with no evidence of etching.

  18. Noise-Optimized Silicon Radiometers

    PubMed Central

    Eppeldauer, George P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new, experimentally verified, noise analysis and the design considerations of the dynamic characteristics of silicon radiometers. Transimpedance gain, loop gain, and voltage gain were optimized versus frequency for photodiode current meters measuring ac and dc optical radiation. Silicon radiometers with improved dynamic characteristics were built and tested. The frequency-dependent photocurrent gains were measured. The noise floor was optimized in an ac measurement mode using photodiodes of different shunt resistance and operational amplifiers with low 1/f voltage and current noise. In the dark (without any signal), the noise floor of the optimized silicon radiometers was dominated by the Johnson noise of the source resistance. The Johnson noise was decreased and equalized to the amplified 1/f input noise at a 9 Hz chopping frequency and 30 s integration time constant, resulting in an equivalent root-mean-square (rms) photocurrent noise of 8 × 10−17 A. The lowest noise floor of 5 × 10−17 A, equal to a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 1.4 × 10−16 W at the 730 nm peak responsivity, was obtained at a 100 s integration time constant. The radiometers, optimized for ac measurements, were tested in a dc measurement mode as well. Performances in ac and dc measurement modes were compared. In the ac mode, a ten times shorter (40 s) overall measurement time was needed than in the dc mode (400 s) to obtain the same 10−16 A noise floor. PMID:27551606

  19. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-05-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.

  20. Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm. PMID:27174890

  1. Single-Event Effects in Silicon and Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Electronics Parts and Packaging program-funded activities over the past year on single-event effects in silicon and silicon carbide power devices are presented, with focus on SiC device failure signatures.

  2. Silicon entering through silicon utilizing organisms has biological effects in human beings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shraddhamayananda, S.

    2012-12-01

    Except in the lungs, there is no evidence that silicon can do any harm in our body and Silicon is as essential as magnesium and calcium for us. It helps in proper activities of the bone tissues and all of the components in the human skeletal system. It can prevent osteoporosis in bones and also helps in lowering of blood pressure. Silicon can also inhibit fungal disease by physically inhibiting fungal germ tube penetration of the epidermis. Many of our foods which are associated with silicon utilizing organisms like rice, vegetables, wheat etc, contain plenty silicon, however, during processing most silicon get lost. In alternative medicine silicon is used to promote expulsion of foreign bodies from tissue, in formation of suppuration and finally expulsion of pus from abscesses. Silicon is also used to remove fibrotic lesions and scar tissue and in this way it can prevent formation of keloids. Sometimes it is also used to treat chronic otitis media, and chronic fistula,

  3. Formation of multiple levels of porous silicon for buried insulators and conductors in silicon device technologies

    DOEpatents

    Blewer, Robert S.; Gullinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A method of forming a multiple level porous silicon substrate for semiconductor integrated circuits including anodizing non-porous silicon layers of a multi-layer silicon substrate to form multiple levels of porous silicon. At least one porous silicon layer is then oxidized to form an insulating layer and at least one other layer of porous silicon beneath the insulating layer is metallized to form a buried conductive layer. Preferably the insulating layer and conductive layer are separated by an anodization barrier formed of non-porous silicon. By etching through the anodization barrier and subsequently forming a metallized conductive layer, a fully or partially insulated buried conductor may be fabricated under single crystal silicon.

  4. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sonia; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-08-17

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications.

  5. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  6. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The performance limiting mechanisms in large grain (greater than 1-2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon was investigated by measuring the illuminated current voltage (I-V) characteristics of the minicell wafer set. The average short circuit current on different wafers is 3 to 14 percent lower than that of single crystal Czochralski silicon. The scatter was typically less than 3 percent. The average open circuit voltage is 20 to 60 mV less than that of single crystal silicon. The scatter in the open circuit voltage of most of the polycrystalline silicon wafers was 15 to 20 mV, although two wafers had significantly greater scatter than this value. The fill factor of both polycrystalline and single crystal silicon cells was typically in the range of 60 to 70 percent; however several polycrystalline silicon wafers have fill factor averages which are somewhat lower and have a significantly larger degree of scatter.

  7. Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ernest; Kegley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) has been performing cryogenic testing to 20 Kelvin since 1999. Two configurations for acquiring data from silicon diode temperature sensors have been implemented at the facility. The facility's environment is recorded via a data acquisition system capable of reading up to 60 silicon diodes. Test article temperature is recorded by a second data acquisition system capable of reading 150+ silicon diodes. The specifications and architecture of both systems will be presented.

  8. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  9. Electron Beam "Writes" Silicon On Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    Method of growing silicon on sapphire substrate uses beam of electrons to aid growth of semiconductor material. Silicon forms as epitaxial film in precisely localized areas in micron-wide lines. Promising fabrication method for fast, densely-packed integrated circuits. Silicon deposited preferentially in contaminated substrate zones and in clean zone irradiated by electron beam. Electron beam, like surface contamination, appears to stimulate decomposition of silane atmosphere.

  10. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  11. Finishing Techniques for Silicon Nitride Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    finishing procedures. Rolling contact fatigue lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order...grinding. Rolling contact fatigue lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order of magnitude...lives of silicon nitride with selected smoother finishes tested at 800 ksi Hertz stress were an order of magnitude longer than those

  12. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  13. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-04-06

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  14. Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) has been performing cryogenic testing to 20 Kelvin since 1999. Two configurations for acquiring data from silicon diode temperature sensors have been implemented at the facility. The facility's environment is recorded via a data acquisition system capable of reading up to 60 silicon diodes. Test article temperature is recorded by a second data acquisition system capable of reading 150+ silicon diodes. The specifications and architecture of both systems will be presented.

  15. Method for fabricating pixelated silicon device cells

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2015-08-18

    A method, apparatus and system for flexible, ultra-thin, and high efficiency pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array fabrication is disclosed. A structure and method of creation for a pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array with interconnects is described using a manufacturing method that is simplified compared to previous versions of pixelated silicon photovoltaic cells that require more microfabrication steps.

  16. Numerical Simulation Of Silicon-Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woda, Ben K.; Kuo, Chin-Po; Utku, Senol; Ray, Sujit Kumar

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical model includes nonlinear effects. In development simulates growth of silicon ribbon from melt. Takes account of entire temperature and stress history of ribbon. Numerical simulations performed with new model helps in search for temperature distribution, pulling speed, and other conditions favoring growth of wide, flat, relatively defect-free silicon ribbons for solar photovoltaic cells at economically attractive, high production rates. Also applicable to materials other than silicon.

  17. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  18. Sources and transport of silicone NVR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1992-01-01

    The retrieved LDEF had varying amounts of visible contamination films (brown stains) at many locations. FTIR spectra of heavy film deposits at vents and of optical windows from tray E5 indicated methyl silicone and silica in the contaminant films. Two possible sources of the methyl silicone are DC-710 phenyl methyl silicone in the shuttle-bay-liner beta cloth, and the shuttle tile waterproofing silane. It is concluded that much of the silicon and silica contamination came from ground operations and the orbiter.

  19. [Silicone in autoimmune diseases and cancer].

    PubMed

    Elejabeitia, J

    1999-01-01

    In 1992 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the restriction of silicone gel-filled breast implants until research protocol studies evaluate the relationship of silicone to connective tissue diseases, and the association of the silicone implants with breast carcinoma. Since them comprehensive epidemiologic studies have concluded that there is no connection between breast implants and the known connective tissue diseases or between the implants and breast carcinoma. During the same year, The American College of Rheumatology said that it have not been demonstrated the relationship between silicone gel breast implants and any systemic disease. Although this, the FDA restriction continues.

  20. Pentosanpolysulfate coating of silicone reduces encrustation.

    PubMed

    Zupkas, P; Parsons, C L; Percival, C; Monga, M

    2000-08-01

    A significant problem associated with catheterization in the urinary tract is the encrustation of the catheter materials. One approach to reducing encrustation is to alter the surface properties of the catheters. We evaluated the effectiveness of coating with pentosanpolysulfate (PPS), a semisynthetic polysaccharide similar to heparin, in reducing encrustation and the foreign-body inflammatory response to silicone stents in the bladders of male New Zealand White rabbits. Sixteen rabbits were divided into three groups to receive placement in their bladders of uncoated (N = 7), PPS-coated (N = 7), or sham matrix-processed silicone rings (N = 2) via open cystotomy. After 50 days of maintenance on normal food and water, all rabbits were sacrificed, and the air-dried, unfixed silicone ring surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Bladders and remaining silicone rings were removed and preserved separately. Silicone rings, cleaned of all encrustation, were stained with toluidene blue to determine the presence or absence of PPS coating on the surface. Histologic examination revealed normal tissue in bladder sections exposed to coated silicone rings and an inflammatory response in sections from bladders having uncoated silicone rings. Coating with PPS was associated with an eightfold reduction in the amount of encrustation of silicone and a marked reduction in the inflammatory response of the bladder wall to the foreign body. A PPS coating may be useful in reducing the encrustation of long-term indwelling silicone stents or catheters in the human urinary tract.

  1. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  2. Process for Polycrystalline film silicon growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing polycrystalline silicon on substrates, including foreign substrates, occurs in a chamber at about atmospheric pressure, wherein a temperature gradient is formed, and both the atmospheric pressure and the temperature gradient are maintained throughout the process. Formation of a vapor barrier within the chamber that precludes exit of the constituent chemicals, which include silicon, iodine, silicon diiodide, and silicon tetraiodide. The deposition occurs beneath the vapor barrier. One embodiment of the process also includes the use of a blanketing gas that precludes the entrance of oxygen or other impurities. The process is capable of repetition without the need to reset the deposition zone conditions.

  3. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    DOEpatents

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  4. Apparatus for obtaining silicon from fluosilicic acid

    DOEpatents

    Sanjurjo, Angel

    1986-05-20

    Apparatus for producing low cost, high purity solar grade silicon ingots in single crystal or quasi single crystal ingot form in a substantially continuous operation in a two stage reactor starting with sodium fluosilicate and a metal more electropositive than silicon (preferably sodium) in separate compartments having easy vapor transport therebetween and thermally decomposing the sodium fluosilicate to cause formation of substantially pure silicon and a metal fluoride which may be continuously separated in the melt and silicon may be directly and continuously cast from the melt.

  5. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  6. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  7. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  8. Improved process for epitaxial deposition of silicon on prediffused substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. G.; Halsor, J. L.; Word, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Process for fabricating integrated circuits uniformly deposits silicon epitaxially on prediffused substrates without affecting the sublayer diffusion pattern. Two silicon deposits from different sources, and deposited at different temperatures, protect the sublayer pattern from the silicon tetrachloride reaction.

  9. Polycrystalline silicon study: Low-cost silicon refining technology prospects and semiconductor-grade polycrystalline silicon availability through 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Ferber, R.; Lutwack, R.; Lorenz, J. H.; Pellin, R.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays that convert solar energy into electrical energy can become a cost effective bulk energy generation alternative, provided that an adequate supply of low cost materials is available. One of the key requirements for economic photovoltaic cells is reasonably priced silicon. At present, the photovoltaic industry is dependent upon polycrystalline silicon refined by the Siemens process primarily for integrated circuits, power devices, and discrete semiconductor devices. This dependency is expected to continue until the DOE sponsored low cost silicon refining technology developments have matured to the point where they are in commercial use. The photovoltaic industry can then develop its own source of supply. Silicon material availability and market pricing projections through 1988 are updated based on data collected early in 1984. The silicon refining industry plans to meet the increasing demands of the semiconductor device and photovoltaic product industries are overviewed. In addition, the DOE sponsored technology research for producing low cost polycrystalline silicon, probabilistic cost analysis for the two most promising production processes for achieving the DOE cost goals, and the impacts of the DOE photovoltaics program silicon refining research upon the commercial polycrystalline silicon refining industry are addressed.

  10. Silicon-on-ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. B.; Zook, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F.; Schuldt, S. B.; Chapman, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon to meet the DOE 1986 cost goal of 70 cents/watt was investigated. The silicon on ceramic approach is to coat a low cost ceramic substrate with large grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. Results and accomplishments are summarized.

  11. Hot Electron Injection into Uniaxially Strained Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    In semiconductor spintronics, silicon attracts great attention due to the long electron spin lifetime. Silicon is also one of the most commonly used semiconductor in microelectronics industry. The spin relaxation process of diamond crystal structure such as silicon is dominant by Elliot-Yafet mechanism. Yafet shows that intravalley scattering process is dominant. The conduction electron spin lifetime measured by electron spin resonance measurement and electronic measurement using ballistic hot electron method well agrees with Yafet's theory. However, the recent theory predicts a strong contribution of intervalley scattering process such as f-process in silicon. The conduction band minimum is close the Brillouin zone edge, X point which causes strong spin mixing at the conduction band. A recent experiment of electric field-induced hot electron spin relaxation also shows the strong effect of f-process in silicon. In uniaxially strained silicon along crystal axis [100], the suppression of f-process is predicted which leads to enhance electron spin lifetime. By inducing a change in crystal structure due to uniaxial strain, the six fold degeneracy becomes two fold degeneracy, which is valley splitting. As the valley splitting increases, intervalley scattering is reduced. A recent theory predicts 4 times longer electron spin lifetime in 0.5% uniaxially strained silicon. In this thesis, we demonstrate ballistic hot electron injection into silicon under various uniaxial strain. Spin polarized hot electron injection under strain is experimentally one of the most challenging part to measure conduction electron spin lifetime in silicon. Hot electron injection adopts tunnel junction which is a thin oxide layer between two conducting materials. Tunnel barrier, which is an oxide layer, is only 4 ˜ 5 nm thick. Also, two conducting materials are only tens of nanometer. Therefore, under high pressure to apply 0.5% strain on silicon, thin films on silicon substrate can be easily

  12. Laser-induced amorphization of silicon during pulsed-laser irradiation of TiN/Ti/polycrystalline silicon/SiO2/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. F.; Pey, K. L.; Wee, A. T. S.; Thompson, M. O.; Tung, C. H.; See, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the complex solidification structures formed during laser irradiation of a titanium nitride/titanium/polycrystalline silicon/silicon dioxide/silicon film stack. Due to enhanced optical coupling, the titanium nitride/titanium capping layer increases the melt depth of polycrystalline silicon by more than a factor of 2. It is found that the titanium atoms diffuse through the entire polycrystalline silicon layer during irradiation. Contrary to the expected polycrystalline silicon growth, distinct regions of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon are formed instead. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these microstructures are proposed.

  13. Amorphous Silicon Nanowires Grown on Silicon Oxide Film by Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, amorphous silicon nanowires (α-SiNWs) were synthesized on (100) Si substrate with silicon oxide film by Cu catalyst-driven solid-liquid-solid mechanism (SLS) during annealing process (1080 °C for 30 min under Ar/H2 atmosphere). Micro size Cu pattern fabrication decided whether α-SiNWs can grow or not. Meanwhile, those micro size Cu patterns also controlled the position and density of wires. During the annealing process, Cu pattern reacted with SiO2 to form Cu silicide. More important, a diffusion channel was opened for Si atoms to synthesis α-SiNWs. What is more, the size of α-SiNWs was simply controlled by the annealing time. The length of wire was increased with annealing time. However, the diameter showed the opposite tendency. The room temperature resistivity of the nanowire was about 2.1 × 103 Ω·cm (84 nm diameter and 21 μm length). This simple fabrication method makes application of α-SiNWs become possible.

  14. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  15. Silicon Carbide Diodes Performance Characterization and Comparison With Silicon Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Trapp, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky diodes from different manufacturers were electrically tested and characterized at room temperature. Performed electrical tests include steady state forward and reverse I-V curves, as well as switching transient tests performed with the diodes operating in a hard switch dc-to-dc buck converter. The same tests were performed in current state of the art silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) Schottky and pn junction devices for evaluation and comparison purposes. The SiC devices tested have a voltage rating of 200, 300, and 600 V. The comparison parameters are forward voltage drop at rated current, reverse current at rated voltage and peak reverse recovery currents in the dc to dc converter. Test results show that steady state characteristics of the tested SiC devices are not superior to the best available Si Schottky and ultra fast pn junction devices. Transient tests reveal that the tested SiC Schottky devices exhibit superior transient behavior. This is more evident at the 300 and 600 V rating where SiC Schottky devices showed drastically lower reverse recovery currents than Si ultra fast pn diodes of similar rating.

  16. Amorphous Silicon Nanowires Grown on Silicon Oxide Film by Annealing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhishan; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Ke; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-10

    In this paper, amorphous silicon nanowires (α-SiNWs) were synthesized on (100) Si substrate with silicon oxide film by Cu catalyst-driven solid-liquid-solid mechanism (SLS) during annealing process (1080 °C for 30 min under Ar/H 2 atmosphere). Micro size Cu pattern fabrication decided whether α-SiNWs can grow or not. Meanwhile, those micro size Cu patterns also controlled the position and density of wires. During the annealing process, Cu pattern reacted with SiO 2 to form Cu silicide. More important, a diffusion channel was opened for Si atoms to synthesis α-SiNWs. What is more, the size of α-SiNWs was simply controlled by the annealing time. The length of wire was increased with annealing time. However, the diameter showed the opposite tendency. The room temperature resistivity of the nanowire was about 2.1 × 10 3  Ω·cm (84 nm diameter and 21 μm length). This simple fabrication method makes application of α-SiNWs become possible.

  17. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  18. Microfabricated silicon biosensors for microphysiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousse, L. J.; Libby, J. M.; Parce, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Microphysiometers are biosensor devices that measure the metabolic rate of living cells by detecting the rate of extracellular acidification caused by a small number of cells. The cells are entrapped in a microvolume chamber, whose bottom surface is a silicon sensor chip. In a further miniaturization step, we have recently fabricated multichannel flow-through chips that will allow greater throughput and multiplicity. Microphysiometer technology can be applied to the detection of microorganisms. We describe the sensitive detection of bacteria and yeast. Further applications of microphysiometry to the characterization of microorganisms can be anticipated.

  19. Qualification of silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Eric; Bavdaz, Marcos; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Collon, Maximilien; Ackermann, Marcelo; Guenther, Ramses; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Vervest, Mark; van Baren, Coen; Haneveld, Jeroen; Riekerink, Mark Olde; Koelewijn, Arenda; Kampf, Dirk; Zuknik, Karl-Heinz; Reutlinger, Arnd

    2014-07-01

    Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) are the enabling technology for ESA's second large class mission in the Cosmic Vision programme. As for every space hardware, a critical qualification process is required to verify the suitability of the SPO mirror modules surviving the launch loads and maintaining their performance in the space environment. We present recent design modifications to further strengthen the mounting system (brackets and dowel pins) against mechanical loads. The progress of a formal qualification test campaign with the new mirror module design is shown. We discuss mechanical and thermal limitations of the SPO technology and provide recommendations for the mission design of the next X-ray Space Observatory.

  20. Nanodevices based on silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yuting; Sha, Jian; Chen, Bo; Fang, Yanjun; Wang, Zongli; Wang, Yewu

    2009-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been demonstrated as one of the promising building blocks for future nanodevices such as field effect transistors, solar cells, sensors and lithium battery; much progress has been made in this field during last decades. In this review paper, the synthesis and physical properties of SiNWs are introduced briefly. Significant advances of SiNWs-related nanodevices reported in recent literature and registered patents are reviewed. The latest development and prospects of SiNWs-related nanodevices are also discussed.

  1. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide beingmore » shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  2. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  3. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  4. Growth of silicon carbide crystals on a seed while pulling silicon crystals from a melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A saturated solution of silicon and an element such as carbon having a segregation coefficient less than unity is formed by placing a solid piece of carbon in a body of molten silicon having a temperature differential decreasing toward the surface. A silicon carbide seed crystal is disposed on a holder beneath the surface of the molten silicon. As a rod or ribbon of silicon is slowly pulled from the melt, a supersaturated solution of carbon in silicon is formed in the vicinity of the seed crystal. Excess carbon is emitted from the solution in the form of silicon carbide which crystallizes on the seed crystal held in the cool region of the melt.

  5. Feasibility study of silicon nitride regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rao, V. D. N.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride as a regenerator matrix material for applications requiring inlet temperatures above 1000 C is examined. The present generation oxide ceramics are used as a reference to examine silicon nitride from a material characteristics, manufacturing, thermal stress and aerothermodynamic viewpoint.

  6. A low cost adaptive silicone membrane lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Müller, C.; Wallrabe, U.

    2008-04-01

    This article introduces adaptive liquid lenses with thick silicone membranes of 5 mm diameter. These membranes are produced by means of casting in a batch process. The lenses feature an integrated piezo-bending actuator, which is also embedded in silicone. The lenses presented comprise areas of application which are not covered by the electrowetting lenses (diameter <3 mm) already established on the market.

  7. Silicon ribbon stress/strain workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Highlights of the Flat Plate Solar Array Project sponsored Silicon Ribbon Stress/Strain Workshop that was held 23 to 24 January 1985 are reported. The presentations and discussions were aimed at acquiring a generic understanding of the sources of stress, deformation, and structural characteristics occurring during the growth of silicon ribbon.

  8. Asymmetric Die Grows Purer Silicon Ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalejs, J. P.; Chalmers, B.; Surek, T.

    1983-01-01

    Concentration of carbide impurities in silicon ribbon is reduced by growing crystalline ribbon with die one wall higher than other. Height difference controls shape of meniscus at liquid/crystal interface and concentrates silicon carbide impurity near one of broad faces. Opposite face is left with above-average purity. Significantly improves efficiency of solar cells made from ribbon.

  9. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Butter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon was investigated. The sheets were made by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in all areas of the program.

  10. New Polymeric Precursors of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, M.; Kumar, K.

    1987-01-01

    Silicon carbide made by pyrolizing polymers. Method conceived for preparation of poly(decamethylcyclohexasilanes) as precursors for preparation of silicon carbide at high yield. Technical potential of polysilanes as precursors of SiC ceramics being explored. Potential limited by intractability of some polysilanes; formation of small, cyclic polycarbosilane fragments during pyrolysis; and overall low char yield and large shrinkage in conversion to ceramics.

  11. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. Silicone sheeting is intended for use in the management of closed hyperproliferative...

  12. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce Burckel, D.; Finnegan, Patrick S.; David Henry, M.; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicon topography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  13. Silicon micromechanical sensors model of piezoresistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysko, Jan M.

    2001-08-01

    Application of the piezo resistivity model to estimate valence and conduction bands shifts induced by the mechanical stress is presented. Parameters of the silicon pressure and acceleration sensor, which are under development in the ITE, Warsaw, were used. Geometrical and technological data were used in calculations of the silicon energy band structure and longitudinal coefficient of the piezo resistivity.(pi) L.

  14. Silicon production in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Part of the development effort of the JPL in-house technology involved in the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the investigation of a low-cost process to produce semiconductor-grade silicon for terrestrial photovoltaic cell applications. The process selected was based on pyrolysis of silane in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Following initial investigations involving 1- and 2-in. diameter reactors, a 6-in. diameter, engineering-scale FBR was constructed to establish reactor performance, mechanism of silicon deposition, product morphology, and product purity. The overall mass balance for all experiments indicates that more than 90% of the total silicon fed into the reactor is deposited on silicon seed particles and the remaining 10% becomes elutriated fines. Silicon production rates were demonstrated of 1.5 kg/h at 30% silane concentration and 3.5 kg/h at 80% silane concentration. The mechanism of silicon deposition is described by a six-path process: heterogeneous deposition, homogeneous decomposition, coalescence, coagulation, scavenging, and heterogeneous growth on fines. The bulk of the growth silicon layer appears to be made up of small diameter particles. This product morphology lends support to the concept of the scavenging of homogeneously nucleated silicon.

  15. Treating "cauliflower ear" with silicone mold.

    PubMed

    Gross, C G

    1978-01-01

    Acute hematoma of the ear (cauliflower ear) can be satisfactorily treated with aspiration and the use of the silicone mold to prevent reaccumulation of the blood or serum in the ear. Advantages of the silicone mold over other dressings appears to be ease of application, patient acceptance, and prevention of reoccurrence of reaccumulation of the hematoma.

  16. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  17. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting. (a...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting. (a...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting. (a...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4025 - Silicone sheeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicone sheeting. 878.4025 Section 878.4025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4025 Silicone sheeting. (a...

  1. MITLL Silicon Integrated Photonics Process: Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-31

    Silicon Integrated Photonics Process Comprehensive Design Guide 16  Deep Etch for Fiber Coupling (DEEP_ETCH...facets for fiber coupling. Standard design layers for each process are defined in Section 3, but other options can be made available. Notes on...a silicon thinning process that can create very low loss waveguides (and which better suppresses back scatter and, therefore, resonance splitting in

  2. Organosilicon compounds. XVIII - Silicon-containing dianhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; Thames, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    Description of four new silicon-containing dianhydrides synthetized in an attempt to provide useful silicon-containing polyimide precursors. They were prepared by aqueous potassium permanganate-pyridine oxidations of corresponding tetramethyl intermediates to form tetracarboxylic acids, which were dehydrated to the dianhydrides.

  3. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by vapor phase hydrolysis or...

  4. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by vapor phase hydrolysis or...

  5. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by vapor phase hydrolysis or...

  6. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by vapor phase hydrolysis or...

  7. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by vapor phase hydrolysis or...

  8. Axillary silicone lymphadenopathy secondary to augmentation mammaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dragoumis, Dimitrios M.; Assimaki, Anthoula S.; Vrizas, Triantafyllos I.; Tsiftsoglou, Aris P.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case involving a 45-year-old woman, who presented with an axillary mass 10 years after bilateral cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty. A lump was detected in the left axilla, and subsequent mammography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated intracapsular rupture of the left breast prosthesis. An excisional biopsy of the left axillary lesion and replacement of the ruptured implant was performed. Histological analysis showed that the axillary lump was lymph nodes containing large amounts of silicone. Silicone lymphadenopathy is an obscure complication of procedures involving the use of silicone. It is thought to occur following the transit of silicone droplets from breast implants to lymph nodes by macrophages and should always be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients in whom silicone prostheses are present. PMID:21217983

  9. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  10. Silicon photonics and challenges for fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilchenfeld, N. B.; Nummy, K.; Barwicz, T.; Gill, D.; Kiewra, E.; Leidy, R.; Orcutt, J. S.; Rosenberg, J.; Stricker, A. D.; Whiting, C.; Ayala, J.; Cucci, B.; Dang, D.; Doan, T.; Ghosal, M.; Khater, M.; McLean, K.; Porth, B.; Sowinski, Z.; Willets, C.; Xiong, C.; Yu, C.; Yum, S.; Giewont, K.; Green, W. M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon photonics is rapidly becoming the key enabler for meeting the future data speed and volume required by the Internet of Things. A stable manufacturing process is needed to deliver cost and yield expectations to the technology marketplace. We present the key challenges and technical results from both 200mm and 300mm facilities for a silicon photonics fabrication process which includes monolithic integration with CMOS. This includes waveguide patterning, optical proximity correction for photonic devices, silicon thickness uniformity and thick material patterning for passive fiber to waveguide alignment. The device and process metrics show that the transfer of the silicon photonics process from 200mm to 300mm will provide a stable high volume manufacturing platform for silicon photonics designs.

  11. Roll up nanowire battery from silicon chips

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Alexandru; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Ajayan, Anakha; Singh, Neelam; Gohy, Jean-François; Melinte, Sorin; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report an approach to roll out Li-ion battery components from silicon chips by a continuous and repeatable etch-infiltrate-peel cycle. Vertically aligned silicon nanowires etched from recycled silicon wafers are captured in a polymer matrix that operates as Li+ gel-electrolyte and electrode separator and peeled off to make multiple battery devices out of a single wafer. Porous, electrically interconnected copper nanoshells are conformally deposited around the silicon nanowires to stabilize the electrodes over extended cycles and provide efficient current collection. Using the above developed process we demonstrate an operational full cell 3.4 V lithium-polymer silicon nanowire (LIPOSIL) battery which is mechanically flexible and scalable to large dimensions. PMID:22949696

  12. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  13. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  14. Silicone oil migration into the orbit.

    PubMed

    Ali Bautista, Sana; Wladis, Edward J; Farber, Martha; Falk, Naomi S; Phelps, Paul O

    2018-01-04

    To report a case in of intravitreal silicone oil migration into the inferior orbit. Silicone oil tamponade is commonly used in retinal detachment repair and extrusion into the orbital tissues is very rare. A 70-year-old male with a remote history of repair of a right ruptured globe and retinal detachment surgery presented with progressive right lower eyelid edema. There was a known history of intravitreal silicone oil instillation and removal. An elective right inferior orbitotomy with excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology confirmed the presence of silicone oil intermixed with necrotic fat. The patient had excellent cosmetic and functional outcome. The presence of silicone oil within the orbital fat may be a result of increased intraocular pressure and extrusion through presumably water-tight sclerotomy sites.

  15. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. A CMOS silicon spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Maurand, R; Jehl, X; Kotekar-Patil, D; Corna, A; Bohuslavskyi, H; Laviéville, R; Hutin, L; Barraud, S; Vinet, M; Sanquer, M; De Franceschi, S

    2016-11-24

    Silicon, the main constituent of microprocessor chips, is emerging as a promising material for the realization of future quantum processors. Leveraging its well-established complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology would be a clear asset to the development of scalable quantum computing architectures and to their co-integration with classical control hardware. Here we report a silicon quantum bit (qubit) device made with an industry-standard fabrication process. The device consists of a two-gate, p-type transistor with an undoped channel. At low temperature, the first gate defines a quantum dot encoding a hole spin qubit, the second one a quantum dot used for the qubit read-out. All electrical, two-axis control of the spin qubit is achieved by applying a phase-tunable microwave modulation to the first gate. The demonstrated qubit functionality in a basic transistor-like device constitutes a promising step towards the elaboration of scalable spin qubit geometries in a readily exploitable CMOS platform.

  17. A CMOS silicon spin qubit

    PubMed Central

    Maurand, R.; Jehl, X.; Kotekar-Patil, D.; Corna, A.; Bohuslavskyi, H.; Laviéville, R.; Hutin, L.; Barraud, S.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; De Franceschi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon, the main constituent of microprocessor chips, is emerging as a promising material for the realization of future quantum processors. Leveraging its well-established complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) technology would be a clear asset to the development of scalable quantum computing architectures and to their co-integration with classical control hardware. Here we report a silicon quantum bit (qubit) device made with an industry-standard fabrication process. The device consists of a two-gate, p-type transistor with an undoped channel. At low temperature, the first gate defines a quantum dot encoding a hole spin qubit, the second one a quantum dot used for the qubit read-out. All electrical, two-axis control of the spin qubit is achieved by applying a phase-tunable microwave modulation to the first gate. The demonstrated qubit functionality in a basic transistor-like device constitutes a promising step towards the elaboration of scalable spin qubit geometries in a readily exploitable CMOS platform. PMID:27882926

  18. A CMOS silicon spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurand, R.; Jehl, X.; Kotekar-Patil, D.; Corna, A.; Bohuslavskyi, H.; Laviéville, R.; Hutin, L.; Barraud, S.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; de Franceschi, S.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon, the main constituent of microprocessor chips, is emerging as a promising material for the realization of future quantum processors. Leveraging its well-established complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology would be a clear asset to the development of scalable quantum computing architectures and to their co-integration with classical control hardware. Here we report a silicon quantum bit (qubit) device made with an industry-standard fabrication process. The device consists of a two-gate, p-type transistor with an undoped channel. At low temperature, the first gate defines a quantum dot encoding a hole spin qubit, the second one a quantum dot used for the qubit read-out. All electrical, two-axis control of the spin qubit is achieved by applying a phase-tunable microwave modulation to the first gate. The demonstrated qubit functionality in a basic transistor-like device constitutes a promising step towards the elaboration of scalable spin qubit geometries in a readily exploitable CMOS platform.

  19. A cascaded silicon Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Haisheng; Xu, Shengbo; Cohen, Oded; Raday, Omri; Lee, Mindy; Sih, Vanessa; Paniccia, Mario

    2008-03-01

    One of the major advantages of Raman lasers is their ability to generate coherent light in wavelength regions that are not easily accessible with other conventional types of lasers. Recently, efficient Raman lasing in silicon in the near-infrared region has been demonstrated, showing great potential for realizing low-cost, compact, room-temperature lasers in the mid-infrared region. Such lasers are highly desirable for many applications, ranging from trace-gas sensing, environmental monitoring and biomedical analysis, to industrial process control, and free-space communications. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of cascaded Raman lasing in silicon, opening the path to extending the lasing wavelength from the near- to mid-infrared region. Using a 1,550-nm pump source, we achieve stable, continuous-wave, second-order cascaded lasing at 1,848 nm with an output power exceeding 5 mW. The laser operates in single mode, and the laser linewidth is measured to be <2.5 MHz.

  20. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  1. Low cost silicon solar array project large area silicon sheet task: Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Growth configurations were developed which produced crystals having low residual stress levels. The properties of a 106 mm diameter round crucible were evaluated and it was found that this design had greatly enhanced temperature fluctuations arising from convection in the melt. Thermal modeling efforts were directed to developing finite element models of the 106 mm round crucible and an elongated susceptor/crucible configuration. Also, the thermal model for the heat loss modes from the dendritic web was examined for guidance in reducing the thermal stress in the web. An economic analysis was prepared to evaluate the silicon web process in relation to price goals.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of silicon quantum dots in Si-rich silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-Rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan; Xu, Kewei

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films were prepared by magnetron co-sputtering and subsequently annealed at 900-1100 degrees C. After annealing at 1100 degrees C, this configuration of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide formed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the chemical modulation of the films. The formation and orientation of silicon quantum dots were characterized by glancing angle X-ray diffraction, which shows that the ratio of silicon and carbon significantly influences the species of quantum dots. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations directly demonstrated that the formation of silicon quantum dots is heavily dependent on the annealing temperatures and the ratio of silicon and carbide. Only the temperature of about 1100 degrees C is enough for the formation of high-density and small-size silicon quantum dots due to phase separation and thermal crystallization. Deconvolution of the first order Raman spectra shows the existence of a lower frequency peak in the range 500-505 cm(-1) corresponding to silicon quantum dots with different atom ratio of silicon and carbon.

  3. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  4. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. Silicon Micro- and Nanofabrication for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel; Goodall, Randy; Bansal, Shyam S.; Chiappini, Ciro; Hosali, Sharath; van de Ven, Anne L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenkashi; Liu, Xuewu; Godin, Biana; Brousseau, Louis; Yazdi, Iman K.; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Tasciotti, Ennio; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hu, Ye; Klemm, Steve; Ferrari, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript constitutes a review of several innovative biomedical technologies fabricated using the precision and accuracy of silicon micro- and nanofabrication. The technologies to be reviewed are subcutaneous nanochannel drug delivery implants for the continuous tunable zero-order release of therapeutics, multi-stage logic embedded vectors for the targeted systemic distribution of both therapeutic and imaging contrast agents, silicon and porous silicon nanowires for investigating cellular interactions and processes as well as for molecular and drug delivery applications, porous silicon (pSi) as inclusions into biocomposites for tissue engineering, especially as it applies to bone repair and regrowth, and porous silica chips for proteomic profiling. In the case of the biocomposites, the specifically designed pSi inclusions not only add to the structural robustness, but can also promote tissue and bone regrowth, fight infection, and reduce pain by releasing stimulating factors and other therapeutic agents stored within their porous network. The common material thread throughout all of these constructs, silicon and its associated dielectrics (silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, etc.), can be precisely and accurately machined using the same scalable micro- and nanofabrication protocols that are ubiquitous within the semiconductor industry. These techniques lend themselves to the high throughput production of exquisitely defined and monodispersed nanoscale features that should eliminate architectural randomness as a source of experimental variation thereby potentially leading to more rapid clinical translation. PMID:23584841

  6. Silicon nanopillars for field enhanced surface spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Sabrina M; Merkulov, Igor A; Kravchenko, Ivan I

    Silicon nanowire and nanopillar structures have continued to draw increased attention in recent years due in part to their unique optical properties. Herein, electron beam lithography combined with reactive-ion etching is used to reproducibly create individual silicon nanopillars of various sizes, shapes, and heights. Finite difference time domain numerical analysis predicts enhancements in localized fields in the vicinity of appropriately-sized and coaxially-illuminated silicon nanopillars of approximately two orders of magnitude. By analyzing experimentally measured strength of the silicon Raman phonon line (500 cm-1), it was determined that nanopillars produced field enhancement that are consistent with these predictions. Additionally, we demonstratemore » that a thin layer of Zn phthalocyanine deposited on the nanopillar surface produced prominent Raman spectra yielding enhancement factors (EFs) better than 300. Finally, silicon nanopillars of cylindrical and elliptical shapes were labeled with different fluorophors and evaluated for their surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) capability. The EF derived from analysis of the acquired fluorescence microscopy images indicate that silicon nanopillar structures can provide enhancement comparable or even stronger than those typically achieved using plasmonic SEF structures without the drawbacks of the metal-based substrates. It is anticipated that scaled up arrays of silicon nanopillars will enable SEF assays with extremely high sensitivity, while a broader impact of the reported phenomena are anticipated in photovoltaics, subwavelength light focusing, and fundamental nanophotonics.« less

  7. Porous silicon technology for integrated microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Jin Zheng

    With the development of micro systems, there is an increasing demand for integrable porous materials. In addition to those conventional applications, such as filtration, wicking, and insulating, many new micro devices, including micro reactors, sensors, actuators, and optical components, can benefit from porous materials. Conventional porous materials, such as ceramics and polymers, however, cannot meet the challenges posed by micro systems, due to their incompatibility with standard micro-fabrication processes. In an effort to produce porous materials that can be used in micro systems, porous silicon (PS) generated by anodization of single crystalline silicon has been investigated. In this work, the PS formation process has been extensively studied and characterized as a function of substrate type, crystal orientation, doping concentration, current density and surfactant concentration and type. Anodization conditions have been optimized for producing very thick porous silicon layers with uniform pore size, and for obtaining ideal pore morphologies. Three different types of porous silicon materials: meso porous silicon, macro porous silicon with straight pores, and macro porous silicon with tortuous pores, have been successfully produced. Regular pore arrays with controllable pore size in the range of 2mum to 6mum have been demonstrated as well. Localized PS formation has been achieved by using oxide/nitride/polysilicon stack as masking materials, which can withstand anodization in hydrofluoric acid up to twenty hours. A special etching cell with electrolytic liquid backside contact along with two process flows has been developed to enable the fabrication of thick macro porous silicon membranes with though wafer pores. For device assembly, Si-Au and In-Au bonding technologies have been developed. Very low bonding temperature (˜200°C) and thick/soft bonding layers (˜6mum) have been achieved by In-Au bonding technology, which is able to compensate the potentially

  8. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  9. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, A.V.; Balooch, M.; Moalem, M.

    1999-01-19

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.

  10. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Balooch, Mehdi; Moalem, Mehran

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  11. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  12. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  13. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  14. Improved consolidation of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. R.; Millard, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha silicon carbide powder was consolidated by both dry and wet methods. Dry pressing in a double acting steel die yielded sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 235.6 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 100 micro m. An aqueous slurry pressing technique produced sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 440.8 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 25 micro m. Image analysis revealed a reduction in both pore area and pore size distribution in the slurry pressed sintered test bars. The improvements in the slurry pressed material properties are discussed in terms of reduced agglomeration and improved particle packing during consolidation.

  15. Schematic driven silicon photonics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flückiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Li, Sarah; Tai, Wei; Hsu, En Yao; Kim, Chan; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is very common for the design to begin at the physical component level. In order to build large integrated photonic systems, it is crucial to design using a schematic-driven approach. This includes simulations based on schematics, schematic-driven layout, layout versus schematic verification, and post-layout simulations. This paper describes such a design framework implemented using Mentor Graphics and Lumerical Solutions design tools. In addition, we describe challenges in silicon photonics related to manufacturing, and how these can be taken into account in simulations and how these impact circuit performance.

  16. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  17. Silicon Heterojunction System Field Performance

    DOE PAGES

    Jordan, Dirk C.; Deline, Chris; Johnston, Steve; ...

    2017-11-17

    A silicon heterostructure photovoltaic system fielded for 10 years has been investigated in detail. The system has shown degradation, but at a rate similar to an average Si system, and still within the module warranty level. The power decline is dominated by a nonlinear Voc loss rather than more typical changes in Isc or Fill Factor. Modules have been evaluated using multiple techniques including: dark and light I-V measurement, Suns-Voc, thermal imaging, and quantitative electroluminescence. All techniques indicate that recombination and series resistance in the cells have increased along with a decrease of factor 2 in minority carrier lifetime. Performancemore » changes are fairly uniform across the module, indicating changes occur primarily within the cells.« less

  18. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecheva, E.; Laquerriere, P.; Bouthors, Sylvie; Fingarova, D.; Pramatarova, L.; Hikov, T.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Montgomery, P.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  19. Ultrasonic Emission from Nanocrystalline Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Koshida, Nobuyoshi

    A simple layer structure composed of a metal thin film and a porous silicon layer on a silicon substrate generates intense and wide-band airborne ultrasounds. The large-bandwidth and the fidelity of the sound reproduction are leveraged in applications varying from sound-based measurement to a scientific study of animal ecology. This chapter describes the basic principle of the ultrasound generation. The macroscopic properties of the low thermal conductivity and the small heat capacity of nanocrystalline porous silicon thermally induce ultrasonic emission. The state-of-the-art of the achievable sound pressure and sound signal properties is introduced, with the technological and scientific applications of the devices.

  20. Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  1. Fluidized-Bed Cleaning of Silicon Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Hsu, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chemical cleaning process developed to remove metallic impurities from small silicon particles. Particles (250 micrometer in size) utilized as seed material in silane pyrolysis process for production of 1-mm-size silicon. Product silicon (1 mm in size) used as raw material for fabrication of solar cells and other semiconductor devices. Principal cleaning step is wash in mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids, leaching out metals and carrying them away as soluble chlorides. Particles fluidized by cleaning solution to assure good mixing and uniform wetting.

  2. Bond Testing for Effects of Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaia, James; Evans, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 ATK Thiokol discovered that the smocks and coveralls worn by its operations personnel for safety and contamination control were themselves contaminated with a silicone defoamer and a silicone oil. As a growing list of items have been identified as having this form of contamination, it was desirable to devise a test method to determine if the contamination level detected could cause subsequent processing concerns. The smocks and coveralls could potentially contact bonding surfaces during processing so the test method focused on dry transfer of the silicone from the clothing to the bonding surface.

  3. Transistors using crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating transistors using single-crystal silicon devices on glass. This method overcomes the potential damage that may be caused to the device during high voltage bonding and employs a metal layer which may be incorporated as part of the transistor. This is accomplished such that when the bonding of the silicon wafer or substrate to the glass substrate is performed, the voltage and current pass through areas where transistors will not be fabricated. After removal of the silicon substrate, further metal may be deposited to form electrical contact or add functionality to the devices. By this method both single and gate-all-around devices may be formed.

  4. Refining of metallurgical-grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietl, J.

    1986-01-01

    A basic requirement of large scale solar cell fabrication is to provide low cost base material. Unconventional refining of metallurical grade silicon represents one of the most promising ways of silicon meltstock processing. The refining concept is based on an optimized combination of metallurgical treatments. Commercially available crude silicon, in this sequence, requires a first pyrometallurgical step by slagging, or, alternatively, solvent extraction by aluminum. After grinding and leaching, high purity qualtiy is gained as an advanced stage of refinement. To reach solar grade quality a final pyrometallurgical step is needed: liquid-gas extraction.

  5. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  6. Comparison of the surface charge behavior of commercial silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of protons from aqueous solution onto the surfaces of a variety of commercial silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders has been examined using a surface titration methodology. This method provides information on some colloidal characteristics, such as the point of zero charge (pzc) and the variation of proton adsorption with dispersion pH, useful for the prediction of optimal ceramic-processing conditions. Qualitatively, the magnitude of the proton adsorption from solution reveals small differences among all of the materials studied. However, the results show that the pzc for the various silicon nitride powders is affected by the powder synthesis route. Complementary investigations have shown that milling can also act to shift the pzc exhibited by silicon nitride powder. Also, studies of the role of the electrolyte in the development of surface charge have indicated no evidence of specific adsorption of ammonium ion on either silicon nitride or silicon carbide powders.

  7. Studies on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-molybdenum alloys in porous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-1.7 and 3.2 at percent molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms have been carried out by process modeling, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and melt infiltration experiments. These results indicate that the initial pore volume fraction of the porous carbon preform is a critical parameter in determining the final composition of the raction-formed silicon carbide and other residual phases. The pore size of the carbon preform is very detrimental to the exotherm temperatures due to liquid silicon-carbon reactions encountered during the reactive melt infiltration process. A possible mechanism for the liquid silicon-porous (glassy) carbon reaction has been proposed. The composition and microstructure of the reaction-formed silicon carbide has been discussed in terms of carbon preform microstructures, infiltration materials, and temperatures.

  8. Quantum Optomechanics with Silicon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    Mechanical resonators are the most basic and ubiquitous physical systems known. In on-chip form, they are used to process high frequency signals in every cell phone, television, and laptop. They have also been in the last few decades in different shapes and forms, a critical part of progress in quantum information sciences with kilogram scale mirrors for gravitational wave detection measuring motion at its quantum limits, and the motion of single ions being used to link qubits for quantum computation. Optomechanics is a field primarily concerned with coupling light to the motion of mechanical structures. This thesis contains descriptions of recent work with mechanical systems in the megahertz to gigahertz frequency range, formed by nanofabricating novel photonic/phononic structures on a silicon chip. These structures are designed to have both optical and mechanical resonances, and laser light is used to address and manipulate their motional degrees of freedom through radiation pressure forces. We laser cool these mechanical resonators to their ground states, and observe for the first time the quantum zero-point motion of a nanomechanical resonator. Conversely, we show that engineered mechanical resonances drastically modify the optical response of our structures, creating large effective optical nonlinearities not present in bulk silicon. We experimentally demonstrate aspects of these nonlinearities by proposing and observing ``electromagnetically induced transparency'' and light slowed down to 6 m/s, as well as wavelength conversion, and generation of nonclassical optical radiation. Finally, the application of optomechanics to longstanding problems in quantum and classical communications are proposed and investigated.

  9. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  10. Micromachining of silicon carbide on silicon fabricated by low-pressure chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Ingo; Peiner, Erwin; Bakin, Andrey S.; Schlachetzki, Andreas

    2002-07-01

    We describe the fabrication of silicon carbide layers for micromechanical applications using low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition at temperatures below 1000 °C. The layers can be structured by lift-off using silicon dioxide as a sacrificial layer. A large selectivity with respect to silicon can be exploited for bulk micromachining. Thin membranes are fabricated which exhibit high mechanical quality, as necessary for applications in harsh environments.

  11. Consequences of Atomic Oxygen Interaction With Silicone and Silicone Contamination on Surfaces in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure of silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit causes oxidation of the surface, resulting in conversion of silicone to silica. This chemical conversion increases the elastic modulus of the surface and initiates the development of a tensile strain. Ultimately, with sufficient exposure, tensile strain leads to cracking of the surface enabling the underlying unexposed silicone to be converted to silica resulting in additional depth and extent of cracking. The use of silicone coatings for the protection of materials from atomic oxygen attack is limited because of the eventual exposure of underlying unprotected polymeric material due to deep tensile stress cracking of the oxidized silicone. The use of moderate to high volatility silicones in low Earth orbit has resulted in a silicone contamination arrival at surfaces which are simultaneously being bombarded with atomic oxygen, thus leading to conversion of the silicone contaminant to silica. As a result of these processes, a gradual accumulation of contamination occurs leading to deposits which at times have been up to several microns thick (as in the case of a Mir solar array after 10 years in space). The contamination species typically consist of silicon, oxygen and carbon. which in the synergistic environment of atomic oxygen and UV radiation leads to increased solar absorptance and reduced solar transmittance. A comparison of the results of atomic oxygen interaction with silicones and silicone contamination will be presented based on the LDEF, EOIM-111, Offeq-3 spacecraft and Mir solar array in-space results. The design of a contamination pin-hole camera space experiment which uses atomic oxygen to produce an image of the sources of silicone contamination will also be presented.

  12. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  13. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  14. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, H.

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink highmore » efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.« less

  15. Rough SERS substrate based on gold coated porous silicon layer prepared on the silicon backside surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dridi, H.; Haji, L.; Moadhen, A.

    2017-04-01

    We report in this paper a novel method to elaborate rough Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate. A single layer of porous silicon was formed on the silicon backside surface. Morphological characteristics of the porous silicon layer before and after gold deposition were influenced by the rough character (gold size). The reflectance measurements showed a dependence of the gold nano-grains size on the surface nature, through the Localized Surface Plasmon (LSP) band properties. SERS signal of Rhodamine 6G used as a model analyte, adsorbed on the rough porous silicon layer revealed a marked enhancement of its vibrational modes intensities.

  16. Synthesis and devolatilization of M-97 NVB silicone gum compounded into silica reinforced silicone base

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    Silica reinforced silicon bases having 0.31 weight percent vinyl content were prepared by using a blend of low and high vinyl content devolatilized M-97 NVB silicone gum. The M-97 NVB is a custom dimethyl-, diphenyl-, methylvinylsiloxane gum. The silicon gum was devolatilized to evaluate the anticipated improved handling characteristics. Previous procured batches of M-97 NVB had not been devolatilized and difficult handling problems were encountered. The synthesis, devolatilization, and compound processes for the M-97 NVB silicone gum are discussed.

  17. Method for one-to-one polishing of silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babu, Suryadevara V. (Inventor); Natarajan, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of removing silicon nitride at about the same removal rate as silicon dioxide by CMP. The method utilizes a polishing slurry that includes colloidal silica abrasive particles dispersed in water and additives that modulate the silicon dioxide and silicon nitride removal rates such that they are about the same. In one embodiment of the invention, the additive is lysine or lysine mono hydrochloride in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 8. In another embodiment of the invention, the additive is arginine in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 10.

  18. Silicone Migration From Baked-on Silicone Layers. Particle Characterization in Placebo and Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    A significant number of therapeutic proteins are marketed as pre-filled syringes or other drug/device combination products and have been safely used in these formats for years. Silicone oil, which is used as lubricant, can migrate into the drug product and may interact with therapeutic proteins. In this study, particles in the size range of 0.2-5 μm and ≥1 μm as determined by resonant mass measurement and micro-flow imaging/light obscuration, respectively, resulted from silicone sloughing off the container barrel after agitation. The degree of droplet formation correlated well with the applied baked-on silicone levels of 13 μg and 94 μg per cartridge. Silicone migration was comparable in placebo, 2 mg/mL and 33 mg/mL IgG1 formulations containing 0.04% (w/v) polysorbate 20. Headspace substantially increased the formation of silicone droplets during agitation. The highest particle concentrations reached, however, were still very low compared to numbers described for spray-on siliconized containers. When applying adequate baked-on silicone levels below 100 μg, bake-on siliconization efficiently limits silicone migration into the drug product without compromising device functionality. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Porous Silicon Oxide on Silicon Microcantilevers for Sensitive Detection of Gaseous HF.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ryan A; Sepaniak, Michael J; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G

    2017-06-06

    Sensitive detection of harmful chemicals in industrial applications is pertinent to safety. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a sensitive silicon microcantilever (MC) system with a porous silicon oxide layer deposited on the active side of the MCs that have been mechanically manipulated to increase sensitivity. Included is the evaluation of porous silicon oxide present on different geometries of MCs and exposed to varying concentrations of hydrogen fluoride in humid air. Profilometry and the signal generated by the stress-induced porous silicon oxide (PSO) coating and bending of the MC were used as methods of evaluation.

  20. Evaluation of Porous Silicon Oxide on Silicon Microcantilevers for Sensitive Detection of Gaseous HF

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Sepaniak, Michael J.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; ...

    2017-05-10

    Sensitive detection of harmful chemicals in industrial applications is pertinent to safety. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a sensitive silicon microcantilever (MC) system with a porous silicon oxide layer deposited on the active side of the MCs that have been mechanically manipulated to increase sensitivity. Included is the evaluation of porous silicon oxide present on different geometries of MCs and exposed to varying concentrations of hydrogen fluoride in humid air. Finally, profilometry and the signal generated by the stress-induced porous silicon oxide (PSO) coating and bending of the MC were used as methods of evaluation.

  1. Photo-EMF sensitivity of porous silicon thin layer-crystalline silicon heterojunction to ammonia adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vashpanov, Yuriy; Jung, Jae Il; Kwack, Kae Dal

    2011-01-01

    A new method of using photo-electromotive force in detecting gas and controlling sensitivity is proposed. Photo-electromotive force on the heterojunction between porous silicon thin layer and crystalline silicon wafer depends on the concentration of ammonia in the measurement chamber. A porous silicon thin layer was formed by electrochemical etching on p-type silicon wafer. A gas and light transparent electrical contact was manufactured to this porous layer. Photo-EMF sensitivity corresponding to ammonia concentration in the range from 10 ppm to 1,000 ppm can be maximized by controlling the intensity of illumination light.

  2. Photo-EMF Sensitivity of Porous Silicon Thin Layer–Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction to Ammonia Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Vashpanov, Yuriy; Jung, Jae Il; Kwack, Kae Dal

    2011-01-01

    A new method of using photo-electromotive force in detecting gas and controlling sensitivity is proposed. Photo-electromotive force on the heterojunction between porous silicon thin layer and crystalline silicon wafer depends on the concentration of ammonia in the measurement chamber. A porous silicon thin layer was formed by electrochemical etching on p-type silicon wafer. A gas and light transparent electrical contact was manufactured to this porous layer. Photo-EMF sensitivity corresponding to ammonia concentration in the range from 10 ppm to 1,000 ppm can be maximized by controlling the intensity of illumination light. PMID:22319353

  3. Evaluation of Porous Silicon Oxide on Silicon Microcantilevers for Sensitive Detection of Gaseous HF

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Sepaniak, Michael J.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    Sensitive detection of harmful chemicals in industrial applications is pertinent to safety. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a sensitive silicon microcantilever (MC) system with a porous silicon oxide layer deposited on the active side of the MCs that have been mechanically manipulated to increase sensitivity. Included is the evaluation of porous silicon oxide present on different geometries of MCs and exposed to varying concentrations of hydrogen fluoride in humid air. Finally, profilometry and the signal generated by the stress-induced porous silicon oxide (PSO) coating and bending of the MC were used as methods of evaluation.

  4. A novel preparation method for silicone oil nanoemulsions and its application for coating hair with silicone

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Liao, Meiling; Chen, Yinghui; Cai, Yunpeng; Meng, Lele; Liu, Yajun; Lv, Nan; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2012-01-01

    Background Silicone oil, as a major component in conditioner, is beneficial in the moisture preservation and lubrication of hair. However, it is difficult for silicone oil to directly absorb on the hair surface because of its hydrophobicity. Stable nanoemulsions containing silicone oil may present as a potential solution to this problem. Methods Silicone oil nanoemulsions were prepared using the oil-in-water method with nonionic surfactants. Emulsion particle size and distribution were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The kinetic stability of this nanoemulsion system was investigated under accelerated stability tests and long-term storage. The effect of silicone oil deposition on hair was examined by analyzing the element of hair after treatment of silicone oil nanoemulsions. Results Nonionic surfactants such as Span 80 and Tween 80 are suitable emulsifiers to prepare oil-in-water nanoemulsions that are both thermodynamically stable and can enhance the absorption of silicone oil on hair surface. Conclusion The silicone oil-in-water nanoemulsions containing nonionic surfactants present as a promising solution to improve the silicone oil deposition on the hair surface for hair care applications. PMID:23166436

  5. Tribological properties of sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Srinivasan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Tribological studies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were conducted with sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the friction properties and the surface chemistry of silicon carbide. The main contaminants on the as received sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide surfaces are adsorbed carbon, oxygen, graphite, and silicon dioxide. The surface revealed a low coefficient of friction. This is due to the presence of the graphite on the surface. At temperatures of 400 to 600 C graphite and copious amount of silicon dioxide were observed on the polycrystalline silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon carbide. At 800 C, the amount of the silicon dioxide decreased rapidly and the silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. The coefficients of friction were high in the temperature range 400 to 800 C. Small amounts of carbon and oxygen contaminants were observed on the as received single crystal silicon carbide surface below 250 C. Silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were seen on the silicon carbide in addition to very small amount of graphite and silicon dioxide at temperatures of 450 to 800 C.

  6. Easy access to silicon(0) and silicon(II) compounds.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Tretiakov, Mykyta; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Stückl, A Claudia; Niepötter, Benedikt; Carl, Elena; Wolf, Hilke; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Stalke, Dietmar

    2013-04-15

    Two different synthetic methodologies of silicon dihalide bridged biradicals of the general formula (L(n)•)2SiX2 (n = 1, 2) have been developed. First, the metathesis reaction between NHC:SiX2 and L(n): (L(n): = cyclic akyl(amino) carbene in a 1:3 molar ratio leads to the products 2 (n = 1, X = Cl), 4 (n = 2, X = Cl), 6 (n = 1, X = Br), and 7 (n = 2, X = Br). These reactions also produce coupled NHCs (3, 5) under C-C bond formation. The formation of the coupled NHCs (L(m) = cyclic alkyl(amino) carbene substituted N-heterocyclic carbene; m = 3, n = 1 (3) and m = 4, n =2 (5)) is faster during the metathesis reaction between NHC:SiBr2 and L(n): when compared with that of NHC:SiCl2. Second, the reaction of L(1):SiCl4 (8) (L(1): =:C(CH2)(CMe2)2N-2,6-iPr2C6H3) with a non-nucleophilic base LiN(iPr)2 in a 1:1 molar ratio shows an unprecedented methodology for the synthesis of the biradical (L(1)•)2SiCl2 (2). The blue blocks of silicon dichloride bridged biradicals (2, 4) are stable for more than six months under an inert atmosphere and in air for one week. Compounds 2 and 4 melt in the temperature range of 185 to 195 °C. The dibromide (6, 7) analogue is more prone to decomposition in the solution but comparatively more stable in the solid state than in the solution. Decomposition of the products has been observed in the UV-vis spectra. Moreover, compounds 2 and 4 were further converted to stable singlet biradicaloid dicarbene-coordinated (L(n):)2Si(0) (n = 1 (9), 2 (10)) under KC8 reduction. Compounds 2 and 4 were also reduced to dehalogenated products 9 and 10, respectively when treated with RLi (R = Ph, Me, tBu). Cyclic voltametry measurements show that 10 can irreversibly undergo both one electron oxidation and reduction.

  7. Spin coherence in silicon/silicon-germanium nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truitt, James L.

    This thesis investigates the spin coherence of electrons in silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) quantum wells. With a long spin coherence time, an electron trapped in a quantum dot in Si/SiGe is a prime candidate for a quantum bit (qubit) in a solid state implementation of a quantum computer. In particular, the mechanisms responsible for decoherence are examined in a variety of Si/SiGe quantum wells, and it is seen that their behavior does not correspond to published theories of decoherence in these structures. Transport data are analyzed for all samples to determine the electrical properties of each, taking into account a parallel conduction path seen in all samples. Furthermore, the effect of confining the electrons into nanostructures of varying size in one of the samples is studied. All but one of the samples examined are grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The nanostructures are patterned on a sample provided by IBM using the Nabity Pattern Generation Software (NPGS) on a LEO1530 Scanning Electron Microscope, and etched using SF6 in an STS reactive ion etcher. Continuous-wave electron spin resonance studies are done using a Bruker ESP300E spectrometer, with a 4.2K continuous flow cryostat and X-band cavity. In order to fully characterize the sample, electrical measurements were done. Hall bars are etched into the 2DEGs, and Ohmic contacts are annealed in to provide a current path through the 2DEG. Measurements are made both from room temperature down to 2K in a Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS), and at 300mK using a custom built probe in a one shot 3He cryostat made by Oxford Instruments. The custom built probe also allows high frequency excitations, facilitating electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) experiments. In many of the samples, an orientationally dependent electron spin resonance linewidth is seen whose anisotropy is much larger at small angles than that predicted by

  8. Silicon Valley Smart Corridor : draft evaluation strategy

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-06-05

    This document outlines the strategy for evaluating the integrated freeway, arterial, and incident management system known as the Silicon Valley Smart Corridor (SVSC). Centered in San Jose, California, the SVSC is one of approximately 65 deployments o...

  9. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  10. Multilayer hexagonal silicon forming in slit nanopore

    PubMed Central

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Zheng; Dong, Jichen; Li, Xiongying

    2015-01-01

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid silicon confined to a slit nanopore has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the system undergoes an obvious transition from liquid to multilayer hexagonal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy, atomic volume, coordination number and lateral radial distribution function. During the cooling process, some hexagonal islands randomly appear in the liquid first, then grow up to grain nuclei, and finally connect together to form a complete polycrystalline film. Moreover, it is found that the quenching rate and slit size are of vital importance to the freezing structure of silicon film. The results also indicate that the slit nanopore induces the layering of liquid silicon, which further induces the slit size dependent solidification behavior of silicon film with different electrical properties. PMID:26435518

  11. Monolithically interconnected silicon-film™ module technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelleDonne, E. J.; Ford, D. H.; Hall, R. B.; Ingram, A. E.; Rand, J. A.; Barnett, A. M.

    1999-03-01

    AstroPower is developing an advanced thin-silicon-based, photovoltaic module product. A low-cost monolithic interconnected device is being integrated into a module that combines the design and process features of advanced light trapped, thin-silicon solar cells. This advanced product incorporates a low-cost substrate, a nominally 50-μm thick grown silicon layer with minority carrier diffusion lengths exceeding the active layer thickness, light trapping due to back-surface reflection, and back-surface passivation. The thin silicon layer enables high solar cell performance and can lead to a module conversion efficiency as high as 19%. These performance design features, combined with low-cost manufacturing using relatively low-cost capital equipment, continuous processing and a low-cost substrate, will lead to high-performance, low-cost photovoltaic panels.

  12. A probabilistic analysis of silicon cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon materials costs represent both a cost driver and an area where improvement can be made in the manufacture of photovoltaic modules. The cost from three processes for the production of low-cost silicon being developed under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Photovoltaic Program is analyzed. The approach is based on probabilistic inputs and makes use of two models developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory: SIMRAND (SIMulation of Research ANd Development) and IPEG (Improved Price Estimating Guidelines). The approach, assumptions, and limitations are detailed along with a verification of the cost analyses methodology. Results, presented in the form of cumulative probability distributions for silicon cost, indicate that there is a 55% chance of reaching the DOE target of $16/kg for silicon material. This is a technically achievable cost based on expert forecasts of the results of ongoing research and development and do not imply any market prices for a given year.

  13. Apparatus for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1995-04-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  14. Method for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  15. Formation of copper precipitates in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flink, Christoph; Feick, Henning; McHugo, Scott A.; Mohammed, Amna; Seifert, Winfried; Hieslmair, Henry; Heiser, Thomas; Istratov, Andrei A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of copper precipitates in silicon was studied after high-temperature intentional contamination of p- and n-type FZ and Cz-grown silicon and quench to room temperature. With the Transient Ion Drift (TID) technique on p-type silicon a critical Fermi level position at EC-0.2 eV was found. Only if the Fermi level position, which is determined by the concentrations of the acceptors and the copper donors, surpasses this critical value precipitation takes place. If the Fermi level is below this level the supersaturated interstitial copper diffuses out. An electrostatic precipitation model is introduced that correlates the observed precipitation behavior with the electrical activity of the copper precipitates as detected with Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) on n-type and with Minority Carrier Transient Spectroscopy (MCTS) on p-type silicon.

  16. Lithium insertion in carbonaceous materials containing silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alfred Macdonald

    Three different series of silicon-containing carbonaceous materials were synthesized for use as anodes in lithium ion cells. Disordered (or pregraphitic) carbons containing nanodispersed silicon were prepared by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of various chlorosilanes (SiClsb4, (CHsb3)sb2Clsb2Si, and (CHsb3)sb3ClSi) with benzene in two different apparatuses. Silicon oxycarbide glasses were synthesized by the pyrolysis of over 50 silicon-containing polymers at various temperatures, although the principal materials in the study were prepared at 1000sp°C. Finally, materials which we believe to be similar to disordered carbons containing nanodispersed silicon were prepared by the pyrolysis of various blends of pitches with polysilanes. Powder X-ray diffraction was used to learn about the structure of all the materials made. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to determine the silicon content in the CVD materials and, when coupled to a residual gas analyzer, to study the decomposition process of the polymers. Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of the silicon L- and K-edges of CVD materials and the silicon K-edges of silicon oxycarbides were used to learn about local chemical environments of the silicon atoms. Lithium metal electrochemical test cells of the silicon-containing CVD materials showed larger capacities (up to 500 mAh/g) than pure carbons prepared in the same way (˜300 mAh/g). The additional capacity was observed to be centered near 0.4 V on charge, the average voltage observed for the removal of lithium from a silicon-lithium alloy. Chemical analysis showed that the stoichiometries of materials made by polymer pyrolysis were distributed over a well-defined region in the Si-O-C Gibbs phase diagram. An interesting series of materials is found near the line in the Si-O-C Gibbs triangle connecting carbon to SiOsb{1.3}. Lithium metal electrochemical test cells made using all the silicon oxycarbides synthesized showed that a stoichiometry

  17. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  18. Silicon Valley Smart Corridor : final evaluation report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    This document summarizes the findings from the evaluation of the integrated freeway, arterial, and incident management system known as the Silicon Valley Smart Corridor (SVSC). Centered along the Highway 17/Interstate 880 corridor in San Jose, Califo...

  19. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye. PMID:23955156

  20. Protective Coating For Laser Drilling Of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium silicate prevents spattered silicon from fusing with surrounding material. Sodium silicate solution applied to wafer by dipping and draining or by spinning; application by spraying also works. When dried in oven, solution leaves thin coating of sodium silicate glass.

  1. Chemical bonding in silicon-carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z

    2009-06-04

    The bonding situations in the newly synthesized silicon-carbene complexes with formulas L:SiCl4, L:(Cl)Si-Si(Cl):L, and L:Si=Si:L (where L: is an N-heterocyclic carbene), are reported using density functional theory at the BP86/TZ2P level. The bonding analysis clearly shows that the bonding situation in the silicon-carbene complexes cannot be described in terms of donor-acceptor interactions depicted in the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model. The energy decomposition analysis (EDA) shows that the electrostatic attraction plays an important or even dominant role for the Si-C(carbene) binding interactions in the silicon-carbene complexes. That the molecular orbitals of the silicon-carbene complexes are lower in energy than the parent orbitals of carbenes indicates that these complexes are better described as stabilized carbene complexes.

  2. Silicon-gate CMOS/SOS processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramondetta, P.

    1979-01-01

    Major silicon-gate CMOS/SOS processes are described. Sapphire substrate preparation is also discussed, as well as the following process variations: (1) the double epi process; and (2) ion implantation.

  3. High-efficiency crystalline silicon technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    The rationale for pursuing high efficiency crystalline silicon technology research is discussed. Photovoltaic energy systems are reviewed as to their cost effectiveness and their competitiveness with other energy systems. The parameters of energy system life are listed and briefly reviewed.

  4. Porous silicon for drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, E. N.; Khort, A. M.; Yakovenko, A. G.; Kornilova, D. S.; Slipchenko, E. A.; Prokhorov, D. I.; Shvets, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with main principles of the formation of porous silicon (por-Si) to produce containers for drug delivery systems. Most important por-Si characteristics to produce nanocontainers with required parameters are determined.

  5. Lithium ion batteries based on nanoporous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Tolbert, Sarah H.; Nemanick, Eric J.; Kang, Chris Byung-Hwa

    2015-09-22

    A lithium ion battery that incorporates an anode formed from a Group IV semiconductor material such as porous silicon is disclosed. The battery includes a cathode, and an anode comprising porous silicon. In some embodiments, the anode is present in the form of a nanowire, a film, or a powder, the porous silicon having a pore diameters within the range between 2 nm and 100 nm and an average wall thickness of within the range between 1 nm and 100 nm. The lithium ion battery further includes, in some embodiments, a non-aqueous lithium containing electrolyte. Lithium ion batteries incorporating a porous silicon anode demonstrate have high, stable lithium alloying capacity over many cycles.

  6. Modified Withdrawal Slot Increases Silicon Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowsky, P. A.; Duncan, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    New shape reduces ribbon breakage and resulting idle time. Shape for slot through which single-crystal silicon ribbon pulled from melt increases productivity. Reduces tendency of emerging ribbon to grow thin and break.

  7. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  8. Limits on silicon nanoelectronics for terascale integration.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D; Chen, Q; Davis, J A

    2001-09-14

    Throughout the past four decades, silicon semiconductor technology has advanced at exponential rates in both performance and productivity. Concerns have been raised, however, that the limits of silicon technology may soon be reached. Analysis of fundamental, material, device, circuit, and system limits reveals that silicon technology has an enormous remaining potential to achieve terascale integration (TSI) of more than 1 trillion transistors per chip. Such massive-scale integration is feasible assuming the development and economical mass production of double-gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors with gate oxide thickness of about 1 nanometer, silicon channel thickness of about 3 nanometers, and channel length of about 10 nanometers. The development of interconnecting wires for these transistors presents a major challenge to the achievement of nanoelectronics for TSI.

  9. Ion beam figuring of silicon aspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmler, Marcel; Zeuner, Michael; Luca, Alfonz; Dunger, Thoralf; Rost, Dirk; Kiontke, Sven; Krüger, Marcus

    2011-03-01

    Silicon lenses are widely used for infrared applications. Especially for portable devices the size and weight of the optical system are very important factors. The use of aspherical silicon lenses instead of spherical silicon lenses results in a significant reduction of weight and size. The manufacture of silicon lenses is more challenging than the manufacture of standard glass lenses. Typically conventional methods like diamond turning, grinding and polishing are used. However, due to the high hardness of silicon, diamond turning is very difficult and requires a lot of experience. To achieve surfaces of a high quality a polishing step is mandatory within the manufacturing process. Nevertheless, the required surface form accuracy cannot be achieved through the use of conventional polishing methods because of the unpredictable behavior of the polishing tools, which leads to an unstable removal rate. To overcome these disadvantages a method called Ion Beam Figuring can be used to manufacture silicon lenses with high surface form accuracies. The general advantage of the Ion Beam Figuring technology is a contactless polishing process without any aging effects of the tool. Due to this an excellent stability of the removal rate without any mechanical surface damage is achieved. The related physical process - called sputtering - can be applied to any material and is therefore also applicable to materials of high hardness like Silicon (SiC, WC). The process is realized through the commercially available ion beam figuring system IonScan 3D. During the process, the substrate is moved in front of a focused broad ion beam. The local milling rate is controlled via a modulated velocity profile, which is calculated specifically for each surface topology in order to mill the material at the associated positions to the target geometry. The authors will present aspherical silicon lenses with very high surface form accuracies compared to conventionally manufactured lenses.

  10. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  11. Nonlinear optical interactions in silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyken, B.; Leo, F.; Clemmen, S.; Dave, U.; Van Laer, R.; Ideguchi, T.; Zhao, H.; Liu, X.; Safioui, J.; Coen, S.; Gorza, S. P.; Selvaraja, S. K.; Massar, S.; Osgood, R. M.; Verheyen, P.; Van Campenhout, J.; Baets, R.; Green, W. M. J.; Roelkens, G.

    2017-03-01

    The strong nonlinear response of silicon photonic nanowire waveguides allows for the integration of nonlinear optical functions on a chip. However, the detrimental nonlinear optical absorption in silicon at telecom wavelengths limits the efficiency of many such experiments. In this review, several approaches are proposed and demonstrated to overcome this fundamental issue. By using the proposed methods, we demonstrate amongst others supercontinuum generation, frequency comb generation, a parametric optical amplifier, and a parametric optical oscillator.

  12. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  13. Removing Chlorides From Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, W. C.; Coleman, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Process for making low-cost silicon for solar cells is further improved. Silane product recycled to feed stripper column converts some of heavy impurities to volatile ones that pass off at top of column with light wastes. Impurities--chlorides of arsenic, phosphorus, and boron-would otherwise be carried to subsequent distillations where they would be difficult to remove. Since only a small amount of silane is recycled, silicon production efficiency remains high.

  14. All silicon waveguide spherical microcavity coupler device.

    PubMed

    Xifré-Pérez, E; Domenech, J D; Fenollosa, R; Muñoz, P; Capmany, J; Meseguer, F

    2011-02-14

    A coupler based on silicon spherical microcavities coupled to silicon waveguides for telecom wavelengths is presented. The light scattered by the microcavity is detected and analyzed as a function of the wavelength. The transmittance signal through the waveguide is strongly attenuated (up to 25 dB) at wavelengths corresponding to the Mie resonances of the microcavity. The coupling between the microcavity and the waveguide is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically modeled with the help of FDTD calculations.

  15. High-purity silicon crystal growth investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Hurd, J. L.; Schuyler, T.

    1985-01-01

    The study of silicon sheet material requirements for high efficiency solar cells is reported. Research continued on obtaining long lifetime single crystal float zone silicon and on understanding and reducing the mechanisms that limit the achievement of long lifetimes. The mechanisms studied are impurities, thermal history, point defects, and surface effect. The lifetime related crystallographic defects are characterized by X-ray topography and electron beam induced current.

  16. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  17. Analyzing Noise for the Muon Silicon Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Marchan, Miguelangel; Utes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The development of a silicon muon tomography detector is a joint project between Fermilab and National Security Technologies, LLC. The goal of this detector is to detect nuclear materials better than technology in the past. Using silicon strip detectors and readout chips used by experiments at CERN we have been developing the detector. This summer we have been testing components of the detector and have been analyzing noise characteristics.

  18. Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Ren, J.; Zaghi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments in chemical-vapor deposition of silicon carbide by pyrolysis of dimethyldichlorosilane in hydrogen and argon carrier gases. Directed toward understanding chemical-kinetic and mass-transport phenomena affecting infiltration of reactants into, and deposition of SiC upon, fabrics. Part of continuing effort to develop method of efficient and more nearly uniform deposition of silicon carbide matrix throughout fabric piles to make improved fabric/SiC-matrix composite materials.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of nanostructured porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, R. J.; Cabrera, H.; Martín-Adrados, B.; Korte, D.; Pérez-Cappe, E.; Mosqueda, Y.; Frutis, M. A.; Danguillecourt, E.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we report on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) layers grown onto silicon substrates. More specifically, nanoPS layers of different porosity, nanocrystal size, and thickness were fabricated and their electrical conductivities, Seebeck coefficients, and thermal conductivities were subsequently measured. It was found that these parameters show a strong dependence on the characteristics of the nanoPS layers and thus can be controlled.

  20. Silicon Oxycarbide Waveguides for Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, Faisal Ahmed; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Silicon oxycarbide thin films deposited with rf reactive magnetron sputtering a SiC target are exploited to demonstrate photonic waveguides with a high refractive index of 1.82 yielding an index contrast of 18% with silica glass. The propagation losses of the photonic waveguides are measured at the telecom wavelength of 1.55 μm by cut-back technique. The results demonstrate the potential of silicon oxycarbide for photonic applications.

  1. Analog optical computing primitives in silicon photonics

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Yunshan; DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Optical computing accelerators help alleviate bandwidth and power consumption bottlenecks in electronics. In this paper, we show an approach to implementing logarithmic-type analog co-processors in silicon photonics and use it to perform the exponentiation operation and the recovery of a signal in the presence of multiplicative distortion. Finally, the function is realized by exploiting nonlinear-absorption-enhanced Raman amplification saturation in a silicon waveguide.

  2. Methods To Determine the Silicone Oil Layer Thickness in Sprayed-On Siliconized Syringes.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Viviane; Germershaus, Oliver; Steinberg, Henrik; Dreher, Sascha; Grauschopf, Ulla; Funke, Stefanie

    2018-01-01

    The silicone lubricant layer in prefilled syringes has been investigated with regards to siliconization process performance, prefilled syringe functionality, and drug product attributes, such as subvisible particle levels, in several studies in the past. However, adequate methods to characterize the silicone oil layer thickness and distribution are limited, and systematic evaluation is missing. In this study, white light interferometry was evaluated to close this gap in method understanding. White light interferometry demonstrated a good accuracy of 93-99% for MgF 2 coated, curved standards covering a thickness range of 115-473 nm. Thickness measurements for sprayed-on siliconized prefilled syringes with different representative silicone oil distribution patterns (homogeneous, pronounced siliconization at flange or needle side, respectively) showed high instrument (0.5%) and analyst precision (4.1%). Different white light interferometry instrument parameters (autofocus, protective shield, syringe barrel dimensions input, type of non-siliconized syringe used as base reference) had no significant impact on the measured average layer thickness. The obtained values from white light interferometry applying a fully developed method (12 radial lines, 50 mm measurement distance, 50 measurements points) were in agreement with orthogonal results from combined white and laser interferometry and 3D-laser scanning microscopy. The investigated syringe batches (lot A and B) exhibited comparable longitudinal silicone oil layer thicknesses ranging from 170-190 nm to 90-100 nm from flange to tip and homogeneously distributed silicone layers over the syringe barrel circumference (110- 135 nm). Empty break-loose (4-4.5 N) and gliding forces (2-2.5 N) were comparably low for both analyzed syringe lots. A silicone oil layer thickness of 100-200 nm was thus sufficient for adequate functionality in this particular study. Filling the syringe with a surrogate solution including short

  3. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  4. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosolmore » mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.« less

  5. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  7. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes.

  8. Intravitreal properties of porous silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L; Anglin, E; Cunin, F; Kim, D; Sailor, M J; Falkenstein, I; Tammewar, A; Freeman, W R

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the suitability of porous silicon photonic crystals for intraocular drug-delivery. Methods A rugate structure was electrochemically etched into a highly doped p-type silicon substrate to create a porous silicon film that was subsequently removed and ultrasonically fractured into particles. To stabilise the particles in aqueous media, the silicon particles were modified by surface alkylation (using thermal hydrosilylation) or by thermal oxidation. Unmodified particles, hydrosilylated particles and oxidised particles were injected into rabbit vitreous. The stability and toxicity of each type of particle were studied by indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy, tonometry, electroretinography (ERG) and histology. Results No toxicity was observed with any type of the particles during a period of >4 months. Surface alkylation led to dramatically increased intravitreal stability and slow degradation. The estimated vitreous half-life increased from 1 week (fresh particles) to 5 weeks (oxidised particles) and to 16 weeks (hydrosilylated particles). Conclusion The porous silicon photonic crystals showed good biocompatibility and may be used as an intraocular drug-delivery system. The intravitreal injectable porous silicon photonic crystals may be engineered to host a variety of therapeutics and achieve controlled drug release over long periods of time to treat chronic vitreoretinal diseases. PMID:18441177

  9. Prokaryotic silicon utilizing microorganisms in the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although a little study has been done to determine the silicon utilizing prokaryotes, our previous experiments indicated that almost all Gram-positive bacteria are silicon utilizing; one of them, Streptococci survived exposure on the lunar surface for a long period in experiment done by others. Our initial experiments with these Gram positive microorganisms showed that there were limited growths of these microorganisms on carbon free silicate medium probably with the help of some carry over carbon and nitrogen during cultivation procedures. However, increase in growth rate after repeated subcultures could not be explained at present. The main groups of prokaryotes which were found silicon utilizing microorganisms were Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium. In a another previous study by us when silicon level was studied in such grown up cells on carbon "free" silicate medium by electron prove microanalyser, it was found that silicon in cells grown on carbon "free" silicate medium was much higher (24.9%) than those grown on conventional carbon based medium (0.84%). However, these initial findings are encouraging for our future application of this group of organisms on extraterrestrial surfaces for artificial micro-ecosystem formation. It was found that when electropositive elements are less in extraterrestrial situation, then polymerization of silicon-oxygen profusion may occur easily, particularly in carbon and nitrogen paucity in the rocky worlds of the Universe.

  10. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    PubMed Central

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes. PMID:26926602

  11. An analog silicon retina with multichip configuration.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Seiji; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    The neuromorphic silicon retina is a novel analog very large scale integrated circuit that emulates the structure and the function of the retinal neuronal circuit. We fabricated a neuromorphic silicon retina, in which sample/hold circuits were embedded to generate fluctuation-suppressed outputs in the previous study [1]. The applications of this silicon retina, however, are limited because of a low spatial resolution and computational variability. In this paper, we have fabricated a multichip silicon retina in which the functional network circuits are divided into two chips: the photoreceptor network chip (P chip) and the horizontal cell network chip (H chip). The output images of the P chip are transferred to the H chip with analog voltages through the line-parallel transfer bus. The sample/hold circuits embedded in the P and H chips compensate for the pattern noise generated on the circuits, including the analog communication pathway. Using the multichip silicon retina together with an off-chip differential amplifier, spatial filtering of the image with an odd- and an even-symmetric orientation selective receptive fields was carried out in real time. The analog data transfer method in the present multichip silicon retina is useful to design analog neuromorphic multichip systems that mimic the hierarchical structure of neuronal networks in the visual system.

  12. EDITORIAL: Special issue on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Graham; Paniccia, Mario; Wada, Kazumi; Mashanovich, Goran

    2008-06-01

    The technology now known as silicon photonics can be traced back to the pioneering work of Soref in the mid-1980s (see, for example, Soref R A and Lorenzo J P 1985 Electron. Lett. 21 953). However, the nature of the research conducted today, whilst it builds upon that early work, is unrecognizable in terms of technology metrics such as device efficiency, device data rate and device dimensions, and even in targeted applications areas. Today silicon photonics is still evolving, and is enjoying a period of unprecedented attention in terms of research focus. This has resulted in orders-of-magnitude improvement in device performance over the last few years to levels many thought were impossible. However, despite the existence of the research field for more than two decades, silicon is still regarded as a 'new' optical material, one that is being manipulated and modified to satisfy the requirements of a range of applications. This is somewhat ironic since silicon is one of the best known and most thoroughly studied materials, thanks to the electronics industry that has made silicon its material of choice. The principal reasons for the lack of study of this 'late developer' are that (i) silicon is an indirect bandgap material and (ii) it does not exhibit a linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect. The former condition means that it is difficult to make a laser in silicon based on the intrinsic performance of the material, and consequently, in recent years, researchers have attempted to modify the material to artificially engineer the conditions for lasing to be viable (see, for example, the review text, Jalali B et al 2008 Silicon Lasers in Silicon Photonics: The State of the Art ed G T Reed (New York: Wiley)). The latter condition means that optical modulators are intrinsically less efficient in silicon than in some other materials, particularly when targeting the popular telecommunications wavelengths around 1.55 μm. Therefore researchers have sought alternative

  13. Silicon Satellites: Picosats, Nanosats, and Microsats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Siegfried W.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon, the most abundant solid element in the Earth's lithosphere, is a useful material for spacecraft construction. Silicon is stronger than stainless steel, has a thermal conductivity about half that of aluminum, is transparent to much of the infrared radiation spectrum, and can form a stable oxide. These unique properties enable silicon to become most of the mass of a satellite, it can simultaneously function as structure, heat transfer system, radiation shield, optics, and semiconductor substrate. Semiconductor batch-fabrication techniques can produce low-power digital circuits, low-power analog circuits, silicon-based radio frequency circuits, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) such as thrusters and acceleration sensors on silicon substrates. By exploiting these fabrication techniques, it is possible to produce highly-integrated satellites for a number of applications. This paper analyzes the limitations of silicon satellites due to size. Picosatellites (approximately 1 gram mass), nanosatellites (about 1 kg mass), and highly capable microsatellites (about 10 kg mass) can perform various missions with lifetimes of a few days to greater than a decade.

  14. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunovic, M.; Ishihara, R., E-mail: r.ishihara@tudelft.nl; Shimoda, T.

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on organic and metal-oxide ink materials due to their printability, while these materials lack in the electronic performance when compared to silicon electronics. Silicon electronics, on the other hand, has only recently found their way in solution processes. Printing of cyclopentasilane as the silicon ink has been conducted and devices with far superior electric performance have been mademore » when compared to other ink materials. A thermal annealing step of this material, however, was necessary, which prevented its usage on inexpensive substrates with a limited thermal budget. In this work, we introduce a method that allows polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) production directly from the same liquid silicon ink using excimer laser irradiation. In this way, poly-Si could be formed directly on top of paper even with a single laser pulse. Using this method, poly-Si transistors were created at a maximum temperature of only 150 °C. This method allows silicon device formation on inexpensive, temperature sensitive substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate or paper, which leads to applications that require low-cost but high-speed electronics.« less

  15. Release of low molecular weight silicones and platinum from silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Lykissa, E D; Kala, S V; Hurley, J B; Lebovitz, R M

    1997-12-01

    We have conducted a series of studies addressing the chemical composition of silicone gels from breast implants as well as the diffusion of low molecular weight silicones (LM-silicones) and heavy metals from intact implants into various surrounding media, namely, lipid-rich medium (soy oil), aqueous tissue culture medium (modified Dulbecco's medium, DMEM), or an emulsion consisting of DMEM plus 10% soy oil. LM-silicones in both implants and surrounding media were detected and quantitated using gas chromatography (GC) coupled with atomic emission (GC-AED) as well as mass spectrometric (GC/MS) detectors, which can detect silicones in the nanogram range. Platinum, a catalyst used in the preparation of silicone gels, was detected and quantitated using inductive argon-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which can detect platinum in the parts per trillion range. Our results indicate that GC-detectable low molecular weight silicones contribute approximately 1-2% to the total gel mass and consist predominantly of cyclic and linear poly-(dimethylsiloxanes) ranging from 3 to 20 siloxane [(CH3)2-Si-O] units (molecular weight 200-1500). Platinum can be detected in implant gels at levels of approximately 700 micrograms/kg by ICP-MS. The major component of implant gels appears to be high molecular weight silicone polymers (HM-silicones) too large to be detected by GC. However, these HM-silicones can be converted almost quantitatively (80% by mass) to LM-silicones by heating implant gels at 150-180 degrees C for several hours. We also studied the rates at which LM-silicones and platinum leak through the intact implant outer shell into the surrounding media under a variety of conditions. Leakage of silicones was greatest when the surrounding medium was lipid-rich, and up to 10 mg/day LM-silicones was observed to diffuse into a lipid-rich medium per 250 g of implant at 37 degrees C. This rate of leakage was maintained over a 7-day experimental period. Similarly, platinum was

  16. Femtosecond laser fabricating black silicon in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jiao; Song, Haiying; Li, Xiaoli; Liu, Shibing

    2015-03-01

    An efficient approach for enhancing the surface antireflection is proposed, in which a black silicon is fabricated by a femtosecond laser in alkaline solution. In the experiment, 2 wt% NaOH solution is formulated at room temperature (22 ± 1 °C). Then, a polished silicon is scanned via femtosecond laser irradiation in 2 wt% NaOH solution. Jungle-like microstructures on the black silicon surface are characterized using an atomic force microscopy. The reflectance of the black silicon is measured at the wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. Compared to the polished silicon, the black silicon can significantly suppress the optical reflection throughout the visible region (<5 %). Meanwhile, we also investigated the factors of the black silicon, including the femtosecond laser pulse energy and the scanning speed. This method is simple and effective to acquire the black silicon, which probably has a large advantage in fast and cost-effective black silicon fabrication.

  17. Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  18. Silicon material technology status. [assessment for electronic and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon has been the basic element for the electronic and photovoltaic industries. The use of silicon as the primary element for terrestrial photovoltaic solar arrays is projected to continue. The reasons for this projection are related to the maturity of silicon technology, the ready availability of extremely pure silicon, the performance of silicon solar cells, and the considerable present investment in technology and manufacturing facilities. The technologies for producing semiconductor grade silicon and, to a lesser extent, refined metallurgical grade silicon are considered. It is pointed out that nearly all of the semiconductor grade silicon is produced by processes based on the Siemens deposition reactor, a technology developed 26 years ago. The state-of-the-art for producing silicon by this process is discussed. It is expected that efforts to reduce polysilicon process costs will continue.

  19. Silica substrate or portion formed from oxidation of monocrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Ellis, Robert V.

    2003-07-15

    A method is disclosed for forming an inclusion-free silica substrate using a monocrystalline silicon substrate as the starting material and oxidizing the silicon substrate to convert it entirely to silica. The oxidation process is performed from both major surfaces of the silicon substrate using a conventional high-pressure oxidation system. The resulting product is an amorphous silica substrate which is expected to have superior etching characteristics for microfabrication than conventional fused silica substrates. The present invention can also be used to convert only a portion of a monocrystalline silicon substrate to silica by masking the silicon substrate and locally thinning a portion the silicon substrate prior to converting the silicon portion entirely to silica. In this case, the silica formed by oxidizing the thinned portion of the silicon substrate can be used, for example, as a window to provide optical access through the silicon substrate.

  20. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G [Gettysburg, PA

    2011-11-01

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  1. Reprogramming hMSCs morphology with silicon/porous silicon geometric micro-patterns.

    PubMed

    Ynsa, M D; Dang, Z Y; Manso-Silvan, M; Song, J; Azimi, S; Wu, J F; Liang, H D; Torres-Costa, V; Punzon-Quijorna, E; Breese, M B H; Garcia-Ruiz, J P

    2014-04-01

    Geometric micro-patterned surfaces of silicon combined with porous silicon (Si/PSi) have been manufactured to study the behaviour of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). These micro-patterns consist of regular silicon hexagons surrounded by spaced columns of silicon equilateral triangles separated by PSi. The results show that, at an early culture stage, the hMSCs resemble quiescent cells on the central hexagons with centered nuclei and actin/β-catenin and a microtubules network denoting cell adhesion. After 2 days, hMSCs adapted their morphology and cytoskeleton proteins from cell-cell dominant interactions at the center of the hexagonal surface. This was followed by an intermediate zone with some external actin fibres/β-catenin interactions and an outer zone where the dominant interactions are cell-silicon. Cells move into silicon columns to divide, migrate and communicate. Furthermore, results show that Runx2 and vitamin D receptors, both specific transcription factors for skeleton-derived cells, are expressed in cells grown on micropatterned silicon under all observed circumstances. On the other hand, non-phenotypic alterations are under cell growth and migration on Si/PSi substrates. The former consideration strongly supports the use of micro-patterned silicon surfaces to address pending questions about the mechanisms of human bone biogenesis/pathogenesis and the study of bone scaffolds.

  2. Development of a continuous spinning process for producing silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for the continuous production of silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers. The precursor polymer can be fiberized, crosslined and pyrolyzed. The product is a metallic black fiber with the composition of the type C sub x Si sub y n sub z. Little, other than the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, is known of the physical properties.

  3. Modulation Doping of Silicon using Aluminium-induced Acceptor States in Silicon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    König, Dirk; Hiller, Daniel; Gutsch, Sebastian; Zacharias, Margit; Smith, Sean

    2017-01-01

    All electronic, optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications of silicon depend on controlling majority charge carriers via doping with impurity atoms. Nanoscale silicon is omnipresent in fundamental research (quantum dots, nanowires) but also approached in future technology nodes of the microelectronics industry. In general, silicon nanovolumes, irrespective of their intended purpose, suffer from effects that impede conventional doping due to fundamental physical principles such as out-diffusion, statistics of small numbers, quantum- or dielectric confinement. In analogy to the concept of modulation doping, originally invented for III-V semiconductors, we demonstrate a heterostructure modulation doping method for silicon. Our approach utilizes a specific acceptor state of aluminium atoms in silicon dioxide to generate holes as majority carriers in adjacent silicon. By relocating the dopants from silicon to silicon dioxide, Si nanoscale doping problems are circumvented. In addition, the concept of aluminium-induced acceptor states for passivating hole selective tunnelling contacts as required for high-efficiency photovoltaics is presented and corroborated by first carrier lifetime and tunnelling current measurements. PMID:28425460

  4. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  5. Silicon Integrated Cavity Optomechanical Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie; Miao, Houxun; Michels, Thomas; Liu, Yuxiang; Srinivasan, Kartik; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Cavity optomechanics enables measurements of mechanical motion at the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. However, the need to align and couple devices to off-chip optical components hinders development, miniaturization and broader application of ultrahigh sensitivity chip-scale optomechanical transducers. Here we demonstrate a fully integrated and optical fiber pigtailed optomechanical transducer with a high Q silicon micro-disk cavity near-field coupled to a nanoscale cantilever. We detect the motion of the cantilever by measuring the resonant frequency shift of the whispering gallery mode of the micro-disk. The sensitivity near the standard quantum limit can be reached with sub-uW optical power. Our on-chip approach combines compactness and stability with great design flexibility: the geometry of the micro-disk and cantilever can be tailored to optimize the mechanical/optical Q factors and tune the mechanical frequency over two orders of magnitudes. Electrical transduction in addition to optical transduction was also demonstrated and both can be used to effectively cool the cantilever. Moreover, cantilevers with sharp tips overhanging the chip edge were fabricated to potentially allow the mechanical cantilever to be coupled to a wide range of off-chip systems, such as spins, DNA, nanostructures and atoms on clean surfaces.

  6. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  7. Sintered silicon nitrode recuperator fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, A.; Chiu, W. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary design and a demonstration of the feasibility of fabricating submodules of an automotive Stirling engine recuperator for waste heat recovery at 370 C are described. Sinterable silicon nitride (Sialon) tubing and plates were fabricated by extrusion and hydrostatic pressing, respectively, suitable for demonstrating a potential method of constructing ceramic recuperator-type heat exchangers. These components were fired in nitrogen atmosphere to 1800 C without significant scale formation so that they can be used in the as-fired condition. A refractory glass composition (Al2O3 x 4.5 CaO.MgO x 11SiO2) was used to join and seal component parts by a brazing technique which formed strong recuperator submodules capable of withstanding repeated thermal cycling to 1370 C. The corrosion resistance of these materials to Na2SO4 + NaCl carbon mixtures was also assessed in atmospheres of air, hydrogen and CO2-N2-H2O mixtures at both 870 C and 1370 C for times to 1000 hours. No significant reaction was observed under any of these test conditions.

  8. Simulation of Silicon Photomultiplier Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Stefan; van Dam, Herman T.; Huizenga, Jan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Lohner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2009-12-01

    In a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), also referred to as multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), many Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) are connected in parallel so as to combine the photon counting capabilities of each of these so-called microcells into a proportional light sensor. The discharge of a single microcell is relatively well understood and electronic models exist to simulate this process. In this paper we introduce an extended model that is able to simulate the simultaneous discharge of multiple cells. This model is used to predict the SiPM signal in response to fast light pulses as a function of the number of fired cells, taking into account the influence of the input impedance of the SiPM preamplifier. The model predicts that the electronic signal is not proportional to the number of fired cells if the preamplifier input impedance is not zero. This effect becomes more important for SiPMs with lower parasitic capacitance (which otherwise is a favorable property). The model is validated by comparing its predictions to experimental data obtained with two different SiPMs (Hamamatsu S10362-11-25u and Hamamatsu S10362-33-25c) illuminated with ps laser pulses. The experimental results are in good agreement with the model predictions.

  9. "Silicon millefeuille": From a silicon wafer to multiple thin crystalline films in a single step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, David; Trifonov, Trifon; Garín, Moisés; Alcubilla, Ramon

    2013-04-01

    During the last years, many techniques have been developed to obtain thin crystalline films from commercial silicon ingots. Large market applications are foreseen in the photovoltaic field, where important cost reductions are predicted, and also in advanced microelectronics technologies as three-dimensional integration, system on foil, or silicon interposers [Dross et al., Prog. Photovoltaics 20, 770-784 (2012); R. Brendel, Thin Film Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells (Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany 2003); J. N. Burghartz, Ultra-Thin Chip Technology and Applications (Springer Science + Business Media, NY, USA, 2010)]. Existing methods produce "one at a time" silicon layers, once one thin film is obtained, the complete process is repeated to obtain the next layer. Here, we describe a technology that, from a single crystalline silicon wafer, produces a large number of crystalline films with controlled thickness in a single technological step.

  10. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J [Idaho Falls, ID; Hyde, Timothy A [Idaho Falls, ID; Fincke, James R [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  11. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V.; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Ranjbar Kermany, Atieh; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  12. High-Temperature Annealing as a Method for the Silicon Nanoclusters Growth in Stoichiometric Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. V.; Dementev, P. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Aleksandrov, O. V.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2018-07-01

    A method for the growth of nanocomposite layers in stoichiometric amorphous silicon dioxide is proposed. It is shown that, after annealing at a temperature of 1150°C in nitrogen atmosphere, a layer containing silicon nanoclusters is formed. Silicon nanoclusters have a crystal structure and a size of 3-6 nm. In a film grown on a n-type substrate, a layer of silicon nanoclusters with a thickness of about 10 nm is observed. In the case of a film grown on a p-type substrate, a nanocomposite layer with a thickness of about 100 nm is observed. The difference in the formation of a nanocomposite layer in films on various substrates is associated with the doping of silicon dioxide with impurities from the substrate during the growth of the film. The formation of the nanocomposite layer was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, XPS and local cathodoluminescence studies.

  13. Theoretical considerations for Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) formation by molten silicon infiltration into slurry-derived preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Singh, M.

    1993-01-01

    For reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics produced by silicon melt infiltration of porous carbon preforms, equations are developed to relate the amount of residual silicon to the initial carbon density. Also, for a slurry derived preform containing both carbon and silicon powder, equations are derived which relate the amount of residual silicon in the RFSC to the relative density of the carbon in the preform and to the amount of silicon powder added to the slurry. For a porous carbon preform that does not have enough porosity to prevent choking-off of the silicon infiltration, these results show that complete silicon infiltration can occur by adding silicon powder to the slurry mixture used to produce these preforms.

  14. Rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguide with improved nonlinear performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zengzhi; Huang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yi; Xia, Jinsong

    2018-04-01

    Silicon slot waveguides have great potential in hybrid silicon integration to realize nonlinear optical applications. We propose a rectangular-cladding hybrid silicon slot waveguide. Simulation result shows that, with a rectangular-cladding, the slot waveguide can be formed by narrower silicon strips, so the two-photon absorption (TPA) loss in silicon is decreased. When the cladding material is a nonlinear polymer, the calculated TPA figure of merit (FOMTPA) is 4.4, close to the value of bulk nonlinear polymer of 5.0. This value confirms the good nonlinear performance of rectangular-cladding silicon slot waveguides.

  15. Iron and its complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article is the first in a series of two reviews on the properties of iron in silicon. It offers a comprehensive of the current state of understanding of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon. The first section of this review discusses the position of iron in the silicon lattice and the electrical properties of interstitial iron. Updated expressions for the solubility and the diffusivity of iron in silicon are presented, and possible explanations for conflicting experimental data obtained by different groups are discussed. The second section of the article considers the electrical and the structural properties of complexes of interstitial iron with shallow acceptors (boron, aluminum, indium, gallium, and thallium), shallow donors (phosphorus and arsenic) and other impurities (gold, silver, platinum, palladium, zinc, sulfur, oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen). Special attention is paid to the kinetics of iron pairing with shallow acceptors, the dissociation of these pairs, and the metastability of iron-acceptor pairs. The parameters of iron-related defects in silicon are summarized in tables that include more than 30 complexes of iron as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and almost 20 energy levels in the band gap associated with iron. The data presented in this review illustrate the enormous complexing activity of iron, which is attributed to the partial or complete (depending on the temperature and the conductivity type) ionization of iron as well as the high diffusivity of iron in silicon. It is shown that studies of iron in silicon require exceptional cleanliness of experimental facilities and highly reproducible diffusion and temperature ramping (quenching) procedures. Properties of iron that are not yet completely understood and need further research are outlined.

  16. Mechanically flexible optically transparent silicon fabric with high thermal budget devices from bulk silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Muhammad M.; Rojas, Jhonathan P.; Torres Sevilla, Galo A.

    2013-05-01

    Today's information age is driven by silicon based electronics. For nearly four decades semiconductor industry has perfected the fabrication process of continuingly scaled transistor - heart of modern day electronics. In future, silicon industry will be more pervasive, whose application will range from ultra-mobile computation to bio-integrated medical electronics. Emergence of flexible electronics opens up interesting opportunities to expand the horizon of electronics industry. However, silicon - industry's darling material is rigid and brittle. Therefore, we report a generic batch fabrication process to convert nearly any silicon electronics into a flexible one without compromising its (i) performance; (ii) ultra-large-scale-integration complexity to integrate billions of transistors within small areas; (iii) state-of-the-art process compatibility, (iv) advanced materials used in modern semiconductor technology; (v) the most widely used and well-studied low-cost substrate mono-crystalline bulk silicon (100). In our process, we make trenches using anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE) in the inactive areas (in between the devices) of a silicon substrate (after the devices have been fabricated following the regular CMOS process), followed by a dielectric based spacer formation to protect the sidewall of the trench and then performing an isotropic etch to create caves in silicon. When these caves meet with each other the top portion of the silicon with the devices is ready to be peeled off from the bottom silicon substrate. Release process does not need to use any external support. Released silicon fabric (25 μm thick) is mechanically flexible (5 mm bending radius) and the trenches make it semi-transparent (transparency of 7%).

  17. Silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over a life cycle: Laboratory studies at different external silicon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Lianghuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Li; Gao, Jianfei; Ding, Tiping

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the variations of silicon isotopes in terrestrial higher plants can be helpful toward elucidating the global biogeochemical silicon cycle. We studied silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over their entire life cycles. These two different silicon-absorbing plants were grown hydroponically at different external silicon concentrations. The ranges of δ30Si values in rice were -1.89‰ to 1.69‰, -1.81‰ to 1.96‰, and -2.08‰ to 2.02‰ at 0.17 mM, 1.70 mM, and 8.50 mM silicon concentrations, respectively. The ranges of δ30Si values in cucumber were -1.38‰ to 1.21‰, -1.33‰ to 1.26‰, and -1.62‰ to 1.40‰ at 0.085 mM, 0.17 mM, and 1.70 mM external silicon concentrations, respectively. A general increasing trend in δ30Si values from lower to upper plant parts reflected the preferential incorporation of lighter silicon isotopes from transpired water to biogenic opal. Furthermore, the active uptake mechanism regulated by several transporters might have also played an important role in the preferential transport of heavy silicon isotopes into aboveground plant parts. This suggested that silicon isotope fractionation in both rice and cucumber was a Rayleigh-like process. The data on δ30Si values for the whole plants and nutrient solutions indicated that biologically mediated silicon isotope fractionation occurred during silicon uptake by roots. At lower external silicon concentrations, heavy silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than light silicon isotopes. Conversely, at higher external silicon concentrations, light silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than heavy silicon isotopes.

  18. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  19. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  20. Mode-converting coupler for silicon-on-sapphire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatanovic, S.; Offord, B. W.; Owen, M.; Shimabukuro, R.; Jacobs, E. W.

    2015-02-01

    Silicon-on-sapphire devices are attractive for the mid-infrared optical applications up to 5 microns due to the low loss of both silicon and sapphire in this wavelength band. Designing efficient couplers for silicon-on-sapphire devices presents a challenge due to a highly confined mode in silicon and large values of refractive index of both silicon and sapphire. Here, we present design, fabrication, and measurements of a mode-converting coupler for silicon-on-sapphire waveguides. We utilize a mode converter layout that consists of a large waveguide that is overlays a silicon inverse tapered waveguide. While this geometry was previously utilized for silicon-on-oxide devices, the novelty is in using materials that are compatible with the silicon-on-sapphire platform. In the current coupler the overlaying waveguide is made of silicon nitride. Silicon nitride is the material of choice because of the large index of refraction and low absorption from near-infrared to mid-infrared. The couplers were fabricated using a 0.25 micron silicon-on-sapphire process. The measured coupling loss from tapered lensed silica fibers to the silicon was 4.8dB/coupler. We will describe some challenges in fabrication process and discuss ways to overcome them.

  1. Influence of Silicone Sheets on Microvascular Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kloeppel, Marcus; Hoehnke, Christoph; Staudenmaier, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The use of silicone products combined with free flap transfer is well established in reconstructive surgery. We determined the risk of thrombosis as a result of direct contact between the silicone sheet and the point of microanastomosis. We performed microvascular surgery in 24 female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits weighing 3500 to 4000 g using two groups: Group 1 (n = 12), microanastomosis directly in contact with silicone sheets; and Group 2 (n = 12), microanastomosis protected by a 2 × 3 × 1-cm muscle cuff before being placed in contact with the silicone. We assessed flow-through of the microanastomosis by selective microangiography and histology at 1 and 3 weeks. All microanastomoses in Group 1 were occluded by postoperative thromboses, whereas all microanastomoses in Group 2 had adequate flow-through. Histologic analysis revealed thromboses in Group 1 formed from collagenous bundles of fiber securely attached to the intraluminal wall of the vessel. Three weeks after the procedure, these thromboses were canalized by varying small vessels. In Group 2, a slight luminal stenosis with evidence of infiltration of inflammatory cells at the microanastomosis line was observed histologically in all cases. Prefabricated flaps using silicone sheets and muscular cuffs placed around the anastomoses appear to reduce the risk of thrombosis and enhance neovascularization. PMID:18636304

  2. Influence of silicone sheets on microvascular anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hoang Nguyen, The; Kloeppel, Marcus; Hoehnke, Christoph; Staudenmaier, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    The use of silicone products combined with free flap transfer is well established in reconstructive surgery. We determined the risk of thrombosis as a result of direct contact between the silicone sheet and the point of microanastomosis. We performed microvascular surgery in 24 female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits weighing 3500 to 4000 g using two groups: Group 1 (n = 12), microanastomosis directly in contact with silicone sheets; and Group 2 (n = 12), microanastomosis protected by a 2 x 3 x 1-cm muscle cuff before being placed in contact with the silicone. We assessed flow-through of the microanastomosis by selective microangiography and histology at 1 and 3 weeks. All microanastomoses in Group 1 were occluded by postoperative thromboses, whereas all microanastomoses in Group 2 had adequate flow-through. Histologic analysis revealed thromboses in Group 1 formed from collagenous bundles of fiber securely attached to the intraluminal wall of the vessel. Three weeks after the procedure, these thromboses were canalized by varying small vessels. In Group 2, a slight luminal stenosis with evidence of infiltration of inflammatory cells at the microanastomosis line was observed histologically in all cases. Prefabricated flaps using silicone sheets and muscular cuffs placed around the anastomoses appear to reduce the risk of thrombosis and enhance neovascularization.

  3. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro-chemo-mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  4. Tailored porous silicon microparticles: fabrication and properties

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Ciro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Fakhoury, Jean R.; Fine, Daniel; Pullan, Lee; Wang, Young-Chung; Fu, Lianfeng

    2010-01-01

    The use of mesoporous silicon particles for drug delivery has been widely explored thanks to their biodegradability and biocompatibility. The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of porous silicon at the micro and nano scale confers versatility to this material. We present a method for the fabrication of highly reproducible, monodisperse mesoporous silicon particles with controlled physical characteristics through electrochemical etch of patterned silicon trenches. We tailored particle size in the micrometer range and pore size in the nanometer range, shape from tubular to discoidal to hemispherical, and porosity from 46% to over 80%. In addition, we correlated the properties of the porous matrix with the loading of model nanoparticles (Q-dots) and observed their three-dimensional arrangement within the matrix by transmission electron microscopy tomography. The methods developed in this study provide effective means to fabricate mesoporous silicon particles according to the principles of rational design for therapeutic vectors and to characterize the distribution of nanoparticles within the porous matrix PMID:20162656

  5. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    DOE PAGES

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lackmore » the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner« less

  6. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  7. Periodic silicon nanostructures for spectroscopic microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrspohn, Ralf B.; Gesemann, Benjamin; Pergande, Daniel; Geppert, Torsten M.; Schweizer, Stefan L.; Moretton, Susanne; Lambrecht, Armin

    2011-09-01

    Periodic silicon nanostructures can be used for different kinds of gas sensors depending on the analyte concentration. First we present an optical gas sensor based on the classical non-dispersive infrared technique for ppm-concentration using ultra-compact photonic crystal gas cells. It is conceptually based on low group velocities inside a photonic crystal gas cell and anti-reflection layers coupling light into the device. Experimentally, an enhancement of the CO2 infrared absorption by a factor of 2.6 to 3.5 as compared to an empty cell, due to slow light inside a 2D silicon photonic crystal gas cell, was observed; this is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. In addition we report on silicon nanotip arrays, suitable for gas ionization in ion mobility microspectrometers (micro-IMS) having detection ranges in principle down to the ppt-range. Such instruments allow the detection of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and illicit drugs, e.g., at airports. We describe the fabrication process of large-scale-ordered nanotips with different tip shapes. Both silicon microstructures have been fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching of silicon.

  8. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  9. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; ...

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  10. Biocompatibility evaluation of 3 facial silicone elastomers.

    PubMed

    França, Diurianne Caroline Campos; de Castro, Alvimar Lima; Soubhia, Ana Maria Pires; Tucci, Renata; de Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Ávila; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2011-05-01

    The failure of facial prostheses is caused by limitations in the properties of existing materials, especially the biocompatibility. This study aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility of maxillofacial silicones in subcutaneous tissue of rats. Thirty Wistar rats received subcutaneous implants of 3 maxillofacial silicone elastomers (LIM 6050, MDX 4-4210, and industrial Silastic 732 RTV). A histomorphometric evaluation was conducted to analyze the biocompatibility of the implants. Eight areas of 60.11 mm(2) from the surgical pieces were analyzed. Mesenchymal cells, eosinophils, and foreign-body giant cells were counted. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey test. Initially, all implanted materials exhibited an acceptable tissue inflammatory response, with tissue reactions varying from light to moderate. Afterward, a fibrous capsule around the silicone was observed. The silicones used in the current study presented biocompatibility and can be used for implantation in both medical and dental areas. Their prosthetic indication is conditioned to their physical properties. Solid silicone is easier to adapt and does not suffer apparent modifications inside the tissues.

  11. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  12. Continuous coating of silicon-on-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Schuldt, S. B.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Butter, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    Growth of sheet silicon on low-cost substrates has been demonstrated by the silicon coating with inverted meniscus (SCIM) technique. A mullite-based ceramic substrate is coated with carbon and then passed over a trough of molten silicon with a raised meniscus. Solidification occurs at the trailing edge of the downstream meniscus, producing a silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) layer. Meniscus shape and stability are controlled by varying the level of molten silicon in a reservoir connected to the trough. The thermal conditions for growth and the crystallographic texture of the SOC layers are similar to those produced by dip-coating, the original technique of meniscus-controlled growth. The thermal conditions for growth have been analyzed in some detail. The analysis correctly predicts the velocity-thickness relationship and the liquid-solid interface shape for dip-coating, and appears to be equally applicable to SCIM-coating. Solar cells made from dip-coated SOC material have demonstrated efficiencies of 10% on 4-sq cm cells and 9.9% on 10-sq cm cells.

  13. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  14. Failure rates for accelerated acceptance testing of silicon transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toye, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    Extrapolation tables for the control of silicon transistor product reliability have been compiled. The tables are based on a version of the Arrhenius statistical relation and are intended to be used for low- and medium-power silicon transistors.

  15. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  16. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  17. Process for manufacture of semipermeable silicon nitride membranes

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul Charles; Shul, Randy J.; Willison, Christi Gober

    2003-12-09

    A new class of semipermeable membranes, and techniques for their fabrication, have been developed. These membranes, formed by appropriate etching of a deposited silicon nitride layer, are robust, easily manufacturable, and compatible with a wide range of silicon micromachining techniques.

  18. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  19. Polycrystalline silicon semiconducting material by nuclear transmutation doping

    DOEpatents

    Cleland, John W.; Westbrook, Russell D.; Wood, Richard F.; Young, Rosa T.

    1978-01-01

    A NTD semiconductor material comprising polycrystalline silicon having a mean grain size less than 1000 microns and containing phosphorus dispersed uniformly throughout the silicon rather than at the grain boundaries.

  20. Curvature Control of Silicon Microlens for THz Dielectric Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cooper, Ken; Mehdi, Imran

    2012-01-01

    We have controlled the curvature of silicon microlens by changing the amount of photoresist in order to microfabricate hemispherical silicon microlens which can improve the directivity and reduce substrate mode losses.

  1. JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Silicon Containing Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos; Poulos, William; Pincay, Jack

    2007-06-01

    Improved relationships for the thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid silicon and silicon oxide for use with JAGUAR thermo-chemical equation of state routines were developed in this study. Analyses of experimental melting temperature curves for silicon and silicon oxide indicated complex phase behavior and that improved coefficients were required for solid and liquid thermodynamic properties. Advanced optimization routines were utilized in conjunction with the experimental melting point data to establish volumetric coefficients for these substances. The new property libraries resulted in agreement with available experimental values, including Hugoniot data at elevated pressures. Detonation properties were calculated with JAGUAR using the revised property libraries for silicon containing explosives. Constants of the JWLB equation of state were established for varying extent of silicon reaction. Supporting thermal heat transfer analyses were conducted for varying silicon particle sizes to establish characteristic times for melting and silicon reaction.

  2. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  3. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  4. Near white light emission of silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soojin; Han, Il-Ki; Cho, Woon-Jo

    2003-11-01

    Silicon nanoparticles in the range from 2 nm to 5 nm was prepared from Zintl salt, soldium silicide (NaSi) by sonochemical method. This synthesis permits the reaction completed as fast as in a few hours and the easy alkyl-modification of nanocrystals surface at room temperature and ambient pressure. The average size of nanoparticles measured by the dynamic light scattering analysis was 2.7 nm. The high-resolution transmission electron micrograph cofirmed the material identity of nanoparticles as crystalline silicon. FT-IR spectra are consistent with the surface states of nanocrystals that is chlorine- or butyl-capped. The emission peak center moved to longer wavelength (up to 430 nm) with the reaction time, under a 325 nm excitation. The luminescence of silicon colloids looks bright bluish-white under excitation using a commercial low-intensity UV lamp.

  5. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Salama, Amal M.

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  6. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  7. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kherani, N.P.; Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S.

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in themore » visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.« less

  8. Silicone rubber band for laparoscopic tubal sterilization.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A H; Sealey, R M; Gay, J W; Kang, I

    1977-12-01

    In 1974, Yoon and associates (Am J Obstet Gynecol 120:132, 1974) described a new approach in which laparoscopic tubal occlusion was accomplished by utilizing the silicone rubber band technique. Recognizing the great advantages of the new technique in eliminating potential thermal injury associated with electrocoagulation, the authors have utilized the Yoon silicone rubber band technique in these institutions over the past 20 months. Thus far the procedure has been performed in 304 patients without any major complications. In the hope of eliminating and/or reducing possible pregnancy-failure rates, in 110 cases. In addition to application of the silicone band, the tube within the band was transected with non-electrical Seigler biopsy forceps. This, we believe, should provide an interesting long-term comparative study.

  9. Silicon Carbide Etching Using Chlorine Trifluoride Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Oda, Satoko; Fukai, Yasushi; Fukae, Katsuya; Takeuchi, Takashi; Aihara, Masahiko

    2005-03-01

    The etch rate, chemical reactions and etched surface of β-silicon carbide are studied in detail using chlorine trifluoride gas. The etch rate is greater than 10 μm min-1 at 723 K with a flow rate of 0.1 \\ell min-1 at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal reactor. The maximum etch rate at a substrate temperature of 773 K is 40 μm min-1 with a flow rate of 0.25 \\ell min-1. The step-like pattern that initially exists on the β-silicon carbide surface tends to be smoothed; the root-mean-square surface roughness decreases from its initial value of 5 μm to 1 μm within 15 min; this minimum value is maintained for more than 15 min. Therefore, chlorine trifluoride gas is considered to have a large etch rate for β-silicon carbide associated with making a rough surface smooth.

  10. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso

    2016-02-01

    Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si3N4 layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si3N4 layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  11. Fabrication and Modification of Nanoporous Silicon Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Mauro; Liu, Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-based nanoporous particles as biodegradable drug carriers are advantageous in permeation, controlled release, and targeting. The use of biodegradable nanoporous silicon and silicon dioxide, with proper surface treatments, allows sustained drug release within the target site over a period of days, or even weeks, due to selective surface coating. A variety of surface treatment protocols are available for silicon-based particles to be stabilized, functionalized, or modified as required. Coated polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains showed the effective depression of both plasma protein adsorption and cell attachment to the modified surfaces, as well as the advantage of long circulating. Porous silicon particles are micromachined by lithography. Compared to the synthesis route of the nanomaterials, the advantages include: (1) the capability to make different shapes, not only spherical particles but also square, rectangular, or ellipse cross sections, etc.; (2) the capability for very precise dimension control; (3) the capacity for porosity and pore profile control; and (4) allowance of complex surface modification. The particle patterns as small as 60 nm can be fabricated using the state-of-the-art photolithography. The pores in silicon can be fabricated by exposing the silicon in an HF/ethanol solution and then subjecting the pores to an electrical current. The size and shape of the pores inside silicon can be adjusted by the doping of the silicon, electrical current application, the composition of the electrolyte solution, and etching time. The surface of the silicon particles can be modified by many means to provide targeted delivery and on-site permanence for extended release. Multiple active agents can be co-loaded into the particles. Because the surface modification of particles can be done on wafers before the mechanical release, asymmetrical surface modification is feasible. Starting from silicon wafers, a treatment, such as KOH dipping or reactive ion

  12. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  13. Silicon Micromachining for Terahertz Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile; Siles, Jose V.; Lee, Choonsup; Lin, Robert; Mehdi, Imran

    2013-01-01

    Waveguide component technology at terahertz frequencies has come of age in recent years. Essential components such as ortho-mode transducers (OMT), quadrature hybrids, filters, and others for high performance system development were either impossible to build or too difficult to fabricate with traditional machining techniques. With micromachining of silicon wafers coated with sputtered gold it is now possible to fabricate and test these waveguide components. Using a highly optimized Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process, we are now able to fabricate silicon micromachined waveguide structures working beyond 1 THz. In this paper, we describe in detail our approach of design, fabrication, and measurement of silicon micromachined waveguide components and report the results of a 1 THz canonical E-plane filter.

  14. Fused silicon-rich coatings for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Various compositions of nickel-silicon and aluminum-silicon slurries were sprayed on IN 100 specimens and fusion-sintered to form fully dense coatings. Cyclic furnace oxidation tests in 1 atm air at 1100 C showed all the coatings to be protective for at least 600 hours, and one slurry, Al-60Si, was protective for 1000 hours. This coating also protected NASA TAZ 8A and NASA-TRW VIA for 1000 hours in the same furnace test. Alloys B 1900, TD-NiCr, and Mar-M200 were protected for lesser times, while NX 188 and NASA WAZ 20 were scarcely protected at all. Limited stress-rupture testing on 0.64-cm-diam IN 100 specimens detected no degradation of mechanical properties due to silicon diffusion.

  15. Instability in radiatively melted silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, K. A.; Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1985-04-01

    Bosch and Lemons [Phys. Rev. Letters 47 (1981) 1151] were first to report that on heating of silicon with a laser, the heated area can break up into small regions of solid and liquid. Thus phenomenon produces undesirable surface roughness on silicon which has been melted using irradiation from a laser or heat lamps. It is due to the higher reflectivity of liquid silicon so that radiative heating produces small regions of superheated solid in contact with small regions of supercooled liquid. In this paper, the instabilities resulting from this unusual thermal situation have been analyzed. It is shown that a stable pattern can develop provided that the spacing between the solid and liquid is small enough. For a 1/2 μm thick layer of polysilicon on silica, the calculated stable spacing is less than about 10 μm, in accord with experiment.

  16. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  17. Full-color OLED on silicon microdisplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amalkumar P.

    2002-02-01

    eMagin has developed numerous enhancements to organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology, including a unique, up- emitting structure for OLED-on-silicon microdisplay devices. Recently, eMagin has fabricated full color SVGA+ resolution OLED microdisplays on silicon, with over 1.5 million color elements. The display is based on white light emission from OLED followed by LCD-type red, green and blue color filters. The color filters are patterned directly on OLED devices following suitable thin film encapsulation and the drive circuits are built directly on single crystal silicon. The resultant color OLED technology, with hits high efficiency, high brightness, and low power consumption, is ideally suited for near to the eye applications such as wearable PCS, wireless Internet applications and mobile phone, portable DVD viewers, digital cameras and other emerging applications.

  18. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  19. Kinetics of thermal donor generation in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, B.-Y.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The generation kinetics of thermal donors at 450 C in Czochralski-grown silicon was found to be altered by high-temperature preannealing (e.g., 1100 C for 30 min). Thus, when compared with as-grown Si, high-temperature preannealed material exhibits a smaller concentration of generated thermal donors and a faster thermal donor saturation. A unified mechanism of nucleation and oxygen diffusion-controlled growth (based on solid-state plate transformation theory) is proposed to account for generation kinetics of thermal donors at 450 C, in as-grown and high-temperature preannealed Czochralski silicon crystals. This mechanism is consistent with the main features of the models which have been proposed to explain the formation of oxygen thermal donors in silicon.

  20. Transistors using crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1995-05-09

    A method is disclosed for fabricating transistors using single-crystal silicon devices on glass. This method overcomes the potential damage that may be caused to the device during high voltage bonding and employs a metal layer which may be incorporated as part of the transistor. This is accomplished such that when the bonding of the silicon wafer or substrate to the glass substrate is performed, the voltage and current pass through areas where transistors will not be fabricated. After removal of the silicon substrate, further metal may be deposited to form electrical contact or add functionality to the devices. By this method both single and gate-all-around devices may be formed. 13 figs.

  1. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  2. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  3. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  4. Single crystal functional oxides on silicon

    PubMed Central

    Bakaul, Saidur Rahman; Serrao, Claudy Rayan; Lee, Michelle; Yeung, Chun Wing; Sarker, Asis; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Dedon, Liv; You, Long; Khan, Asif Islam; Clarkson, James David; Hu, Chenming; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystalline thin films of complex oxides show a rich variety of functional properties such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, ferro and antiferromagnetism and so on that have the potential for completely new electronic applications. Direct synthesis of such oxides on silicon remains challenging because of the fundamental crystal chemistry and mechanical incompatibility of dissimilar interfaces. Here we report integration of thin (down to one unit cell) single crystalline, complex oxide films onto silicon substrates, by epitaxial transfer at room temperature. In a field-effect transistor using a transferred lead zirconate titanate layer as the gate insulator, we demonstrate direct reversible control of the semiconductor channel charge with polarization state. These results represent the realization of long pursued but yet to be demonstrated single-crystal functional oxides on-demand on silicon. PMID:26853112

  5. Silicon dioxide space coatings studied ellipsometrically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Bhola N.; Zhao, Yong; Hruska, Jane; Peterkin, Jane; Woollam, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanisms of initial oxidation of silicon for the formation of silicon dioxide have been investigated. The oxidation of silicon in an atomic oxigen plasma environment is found to exhibit two distinct and linear oxide growth curves for each of the plasma powers used in ashing (25, 50, and 100 watts). Data obtained indicate that the exponent to the pressure in the oxide growth rate formula changes from 1.4 + or - 0.1 to 0.7 + or - 0.1 as one crosses the critical thickness. These data contradict the theory predicting that this exponent should be 1 for both regimes. The activation energy for oxidation in the zone reaction regime is found to be 0.17 eV, in contrast to the published value of 1-2 eV for thermally grown oxides.

  6. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  7. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  8. Application of porous silicon in solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Ashokan, Jibinlal; Srivastava, Divesh N.

    2018-05-01

    Silicon is widely used in solar cell applications with over 95% of all solar cells produced worldwide composed of silicon. Nanostructured thin porous silicon (PSi) layer acting as anti-reflecting coating is used in photovoltaic solar cells due to its advantages including simple and low cost fabrication, highly textured surfaces enabling lowering of reflectance, controllability of thickness and porosity of layer, and high surface area. PSi layers have previously been reported to reduce the reflection of light and replaced the conventional anti-reflective coating layers on solar cells. This can essentially improve the efficiency and decrease the cost of silicon solar cells. Here, we investigate the reflectance of different PSi layers formed by varying current density and etching time. PSi layers were formed by a combination of current density including 60 and 80 mA/cm2 and time for fabrication as 2, 4, 6, and 8 seconds. The fabricated PSi layers were characterized using reflectance spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Thickness and pore size of PSi layer were increased with increase in etching time and current density, respectively. The reflectance of PSi layers was decreased with increase in etching time until 6 seconds and increased again after 6 seconds, which was observed across both the current density. Reduction in reflectance indicates the increase of absorption of light by silicon due to the thin PSi layer. In comparison with the reflectance of silicon wafer, PSi layer fabricated at 80 mA/cm2 for 6 seconds gave the best result with reduction in reflectance up to 57%. Thus, the application of PSi layer as an effective anti-reflecting coating for the fabrication of solar cell has been demonstrated.

  9. Fluorination of silicone rubber by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Jennifer Chase

    Plasma polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC) films were deposited onto various silicone rubber substrates, including O-rings, to decrease oil uptake. Depositions were performed using a radio frequency (rf)-powered plasma reactor and various fluorocarbon monomers, such as C2F6, C2F 5H, C3F6, and 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene. PPFC films which were most promising for inhibiting oil uptake were deposited with 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene, and were composed predominantly of perfluoromethylene (CF2) species. These films displayed low critical surface energies (as low as 2.7 mJ/m2), and high contact angles with oil (84°), which were correlated with the amount of CF2 species present in the film. For the films with the highest degree of CF2 (up to 67%), CF2 chains may have been oriented slightly perpendicular to the substrate and terminated by CF3 species. Adhesion of the PPFC films directly to silicone rubber was found to be poor. However, when a plasma polymerized hydrocarbon interlayer was deposited on the silicone rubber prior to the fluorocarbon films, adhesion was excellent. O-rings coated with multilayer fluorocarbon films showed 2.6% oil uptake after soaking in oil for 100 hrs at 100°C. Due to variability in data, and the low quality of the industrial grade silicone rubber, the oil uptake mechanism was determined to be from oil flowing through flaws in the film due to defects within the substrate, not from generalized diffusion through the film. This mechanism was confirmed using higher quality silicone rubber, which showed little or no oil diffusion. Therefore, this film may perform well as an oil-repelling barrier when deposited on a high quality silicone rubber.

  10. Silicon and Germanium (111) Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, You Gong

    Silicon (111) surface (7 x 7) reconstruction has been a long standing puzzle. For the last twenty years, various models were put forward to explain this reconstruction, but so far the problem still remains unsolved. Recent ion scattering and channeling (ISC), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) experiments reveal some new results about the surface which greatly help investigators to establish better models. This work proposes a silicon (111) surface reconstruction mechanism, the raising and lowering mechanism which leads to benzene -like ring and flower (raised atom) building units. Based on these building units a (7 x 7) model is proposed, which is capable of explaining the STM and ISC experiment and several others. Furthermore the building units of the model can be used naturally to account for the germanium (111) surface c(2 x 8) reconstruction and other observed structures including (2 x 2), (5 x 5) and (7 x 7) for germanium as well as the (/3 x /3)R30 and (/19 x /19)R23.5 impurity induced structures for silicon, and the higher temperature disordered (1 x 1) structure for silicon. The model is closely related to the silicon (111) surface (2 x 1) reconstruction pi-bonded chain model, which is the most successful model for the reconstruction now. This provides an explanation for the rather low conversion temperature (560K) of the (2 x 1) to the (7 x 7). The model seems to meet some problems in the explanation of the TED result, which is explained very well by the dimer, adatom and stacking fault (DAS) model proposed by Takayanagi. In order to explain the TED result, a variation of the atomic scattering factor is proposed. Comparing the benzene-like ring model with the DAS model, the former needs more work to explain the TED result and the later has to find a way to explain the silicon (111) surface (1 x 1) disorder experiment.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of silicon nanorod on n-type porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Kasra; Mat Yunus, Wan Mahmood; Bahrami, Afarin; Kharazmi, Alireza; Soltani, Nayereh

    2016-03-20

    This work reports a new method for growing semiconductor nanorods on a porous silicon substrate. After preparation of n-type porous silicon samples, a thin layer of gold was deposited on them. Gold deposited samples were annealed at different temperatures. The structural, thermal, and optical properties of the samples were studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), photoacoustic spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, respectively. FESEM analysis revealed that silicon nanorods of different sizes grew on the annealed samples. Thermal behavior of the samples was studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectroscopy showed that the emission peaks were degraded by gold deposition and attenuated for all samples by annealing.

  12. Low loss poly-silicon for high performance capacitive silicon modulators.

    PubMed

    Douix, Maurin; Baudot, Charles; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Valéry, Alexia; Fowler, Daivid; Acosta-Alba, Pablo; Kerdilès, Sébastien; Euvrard, Catherine; Blanc, Romuald; Beneyton, Rémi; Souhaité, Aurélie; Crémer, Sébastien; Vulliet, Nathalie; Vivien, Laurent; Boeuf, Frédéric

    2018-03-05

    Optical properties of poly-silicon material are investigated to be integrated in new silicon photonics devices, such as capacitive modulators. Test structure fabrication is done on 300 mm wafer using LPCVD deposition: 300 nm thick amorphous silicon layers are deposited on thermal oxide, followed by solid phase crystallization anneal. Rib waveguides are fabricated and optical propagation losses measured at 1.31 µm. Physical analysis (TEM ASTAR, AFM and SIMS) are used to assess the origin of losses. Optimal deposition and annealing conditions have been defined, resulting in 400 nm-wide rib waveguides with only 9.2-10 dB/cm losses.

  13. Dephosphorization of Levitated Silicon-Iron Droplets for Production of Solar-Grade Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Katherine; Yang, Yindong; Barati, Mansoor; McLean, Alexander

    2018-05-01

    The treatment of relatively inexpensive silicon-iron alloys is a potential refining route in order to generate solar-grade silicon. Phosphorus is one of the more difficult impurity elements to remove by conventional processing. In this study, electromagnetic levitation was used to investigate phosphorus behavior in silicon-iron alloy droplets exposed to H2-Ar gas mixtures under various experimental conditions including, refining time, temperature (1723 K to 1993 K), gas flow rate, iron content, and initial phosphorus concentration in the alloy. Thermodynamic modeling of the dephosphorization reaction permitted prediction of the various gaseous products and indicated that diatomic phosphorus is the dominant species formed.

  14. Soliton propagation in tapered silicon core fibers.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Anna C

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations are used to investigate soliton-like propagation in tapered silicon core optical fibers. The simulations are based on a realistic tapered structure with nanoscale core dimensions and a decreasing anomalous dispersion profile to compensate for the effects of linear and nonlinear loss. An intensity misfit parameter is used to establish the optimum taper dimensions that preserve the pulse shape while reducing temporal broadening. Soliton formation from Gaussian input pulses is also observed--further evidence of the potential for tapered silicon fibers to find use in a range of signal processing applications.

  15. Proton Straggling in Thick Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Straggling functions for protons in thick silicon radiation detectors are computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Mean energy loss is constrained by the silicon stopping power, providing higher straggling at low energy and probabilities for stopping within the detector volume. By matching the first four moments of simulated energy-loss distributions, straggling functions are approximated by a log-normal distribution that is accurate for Vavilov k is greater than or equal to 0:3. They are verified by comparison to experimental proton data from a charged particle telescope.

  16. Silicon concentrations in UK surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Reynolds, Brian; Maberly, Stephen C.; May, Linda; Ferrier, Robert C.; Smith, Jennifer; Parker, Julie E.

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the variations in silicon concentrations in UK waters for a wide range of catchment systems (near pristine, rural, and agricultural and urban impacted systems). The paper largely concerns silicon levels in streams, rivers and lakes based on extensive data collected as part of several research and monitoring initiatives of national and international standing. For a detailed study of an upland catchment in mid-Wales, information on atmospheric inputs and groundwater chemistries is provided to supply background information to cross link to the surface water chemistry. Several hundred streams/rivers and lakes are dealt with within the study, dealing with the main types of freshwater riverine and lacustrine environments. The streams/rivers vary from small ephemeral runoff to the major rivers of the UK. The geographical location of sites vary from local sites in mid-Wales, to regional studies across Scotland, to the major eastern UK rivers entering the North Sea and to acid sensitive upland sites across Wales, the English Lake District, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The surface waters range in silicon concentration from 0 to 19 mg-Si l -1 (average for individual sites vary between 0.7 and 7.6 mg-Si l -1) and there are some clear variations which link to two primary processes (1) the relative inputs of groundwaters enriched in silicon and near surface waters more depleted in silicon and (2) plankton uptake of silicon during the summer months under baseflow conditions. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that the waters are approximately saturated with respect to either quartz or chalcedony except for two circumstances when undersaturation occurs. Firstly, undersaturation occurs at pH less than 5.5 in the upland areas and this is because the waters are mainly sourced from the acidic organic soils which are depleted in inorganic minerals. Secondly, undersaturation occurs in the lowland rivers when biological activity is at its highest and this leads to

  17. Silicon vertical microstructure fabrication by catalytic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mao-Jung; Yang, Chii-Rong; Chang, Chun-Ming; Chu, Nien-Nan; Shiao, Ming-Hua

    2012-08-01

    This study presents an effective, simple and inexpensive process for forming micro-scale vertical structures on a (1 0 0) silicon wafer. Several modified etchants and micro-patterns including rectangular, snake-like, circular and comb patterns were employed to determine the optimum etching process. We found that an etchant solution consisting of 4.6 M hydrofluoric acid, 0.44 M hydrogen peroxide and isopropyl alcohol produces microstructures at an etching rate of 0.47 µm min-1 and surface roughness of 17.4 nm. All the patterns were transferred faithfully to the silicon substrate.

  18. Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Brueck, Steven R. J.; Myers, David R.; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

  19. Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Brueck, Steven R. J.; Myers, David R.; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

  20. Doping profile measurement on textured silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, Zahi; Taleb, Nadjib; Sermage, Bernard; Broussillou, Cédric; Bazer-Bachi, Barbara; Quillec, Maurice

    2018-04-01

    In crystalline silicon solar cells, the front surface is textured in order to lower the reflection of the incident light and increase the efficiency of the cell. This texturing whose dimensions are a few micrometers wide and high, often makes it difficult to determine the doping profile measurement. We have measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrochemical capacitance voltage profiling the doping profile of implanted phosphorus in alkaline textured and in polished monocrystalline silicon wafers. The paper shows that SIMS gives accurate results provided the primary ion impact angle is small enough. Moreover, the comparison between these two techniques gives an estimation of the concentration of electrically inactive phosphorus atoms.