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Sample records for aav rep protein

  1. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference inmore » the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.« less

  2. Structural Insights into the Assembly of the Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Rep68 Protein on the Integration Site AAVS1*

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bishop, Clayton; Burgner, John W.; Escalante, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only eukaryotic virus with the property of establishing latency by integrating site-specifically into the human genome. The integration site known as AAVS1 is located in chromosome 19 and contains multiple GCTC repeats that are recognized by the AAV non-structural Rep proteins. These proteins are multifunctional, with an N-terminal origin-binding domain (OBD) and a helicase domain joined together by a short linker. As a first step to understand the process of site-specific integration, we proceeded to characterize the recognition and assembly of Rep68 onto the AAVS1 site. We first determined the x-ray structure of AAV-2 Rep68 OBD in complex with the AAVS1 DNA site. Specificity is achieved through the interaction of a glycine-rich loop that binds the major groove and an α-helix that interacts with a downstream minor groove on the same face of the DNA. Although the structure shows a complex with three OBD molecules bound to the AAVS1 site, we show by using analytical centrifugation and electron microscopy that the full-length Rep68 forms a heptameric complex. Moreover, we determined that a minimum of two direct repeats is required to form a stable complex and to melt DNA. Finally, we show that although the individual domains bind DNA poorly, complex assembly requires oligomerization and cooperation between its OBD, helicase, and the linker domains. PMID:26370092

  3. Adeno-associated virus rep protein synthesis during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Redemann, B.E.; Mendelson, E.; Carter, B.J.

    1989-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate viral DNA replication and can regulate expression from AAV genes. The authors studied the kinetics of synthesis of the four Rep proteins, Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40, during infection of human 293 or KB cells with AAV and helper adenovirus by in vivo labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting analyses. Rep78 and Rep52 were readily detected concomitantly with detection of viral monomer duplex DNA replicating about 10 to 12 h after infection, and Rep68 and Rep40 were detected 2 h later. Rep78 and Rep52 were more abundant than Rep68 and Rep40 owing tomore » a higher synthesis rate throughout the infectious cycle. In some experiments, very low levels of Rep78 could be detected as early as 4 h after infection. The synthesis rates of Rep proteins were maximal between 14 and 24 h and then decreased later after infection. Isotopic pulse-chase experiments showed that each of the Rep proteins was synthesized independently and was stable for at least 15 h. A slower-migrating, modified form of Rep78 was identified late after infection. AAV capsid protein synthesis was detected at 10 to 12 h after infection and also exhibited synthesis kinetics similar to those of the Rep proteins. AAV DNA replication showed at least two clearly defined stages. Bulk duplex replicating DNA accumulation began around 10 to 12 h and reached a maximum level at about 20 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis was maximal. Progeny single-stranded DNA accumulation began about 12 to 13 h, but most of this DNA accumulated after 24 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis had decreased.« less

  4. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Adeno-Associated Virus 2 (AAV2) Rep in Coinfections with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Gives Rise to a Mosaic of Cells Replicating either AAV2 or HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Franzoso, Francesca D.; Seyffert, Michael; Vogel, Rebecca; Yakimovich, Artur; de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Meier, Anita F.; Sutter, Sereina O.; Tobler, Kurt; Vogt, Bernd; Greber, Urs F.; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    -controlled windows for HSV-1 replication. High Rep protein levels in S/G2 phase support AAV2 replication and inhibit HSV-1 replication. Conversely, low Rep protein levels in G1 phase permit HSV-1 replication but are insufficient for AAV2 replication. This allows both viruses to productively replicate in distinct sets of dividing cells. PMID:28515305

  5. AAVS1-Targeted Plasmid Integration in AAV Producer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuxia; Frederick, Amy; Martin, John M; Scaria, Abraham; Cheng, Seng H; Armentano, Donna; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Vincent, Karen A

    2017-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) producer cell lines are created via transfection of HeLaS3 cells with a single plasmid containing three components (the vector sequence, the AAV rep and cap genes, and a selectable marker gene). As this plasmid contains both the cis (Rep binding sites) and trans (Rep protein encoded by the rep gene) elements required for site-specific integration, it was predicted that plasmid integration might occur within the AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19 (chr19). The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration in AAVS1 might be correlated with vector yield. Plasmid integration sites within several independent cell lines were assessed via Southern, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR analyses. In the Southern analyses, the presence of fragments detected by both rep- and AAVS1-specific probes suggested that for several mid- and high-producing lines, plasmid DNA had integrated into the AAVS1 locus. Analysis with puroR and AAVS1-specific probes suggested that integration in AAVS1 was a more widespread phenomenon. High-producing AAV2-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) lines (masterwell 82 [MW82] and MW278) were evaluated via FISH using probes specific for the plasmid, AAVS1, and a chr19 marker. FISH analysis detected two plasmid integration sites in MW278 (neither in AAVS1), while a total of three sites were identified in MW82 (two in AAVS1). An inverse PCR assay confirmed integration within AAVS1 for several mid- and high-producing lines. In summary, the FISH, Southern, and PCR data provide evidence of site-specific integration of the plasmid within AAVS1 in several AAV producer cell lines. The data also suggest that integration in AAVS1 is a general phenomenon that is not necessarily restricted to high producers. The results also suggest that plasmid integration within the AAVS1 locus is not an absolute requirement for a high vector yield.

  6. Intracellular route and biological activity of exogenously delivered Rep proteins from the adeno-associated virus type 2

    SciTech Connect

    Awedikian, Rafi; Francois, Achille; Guilbaud, Mickael

    2005-05-10

    The two large Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, from the adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) are required for AAV-2 DNA replication, site-specific integration, and for the regulation of viral gene expression. The study of their activities is dependent on the ability to deliver these proteins to the cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. We evaluated the ability of a protein transduction domain (PTD) derived from the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) TAT protein to drive the cellular internalization of exogenously delivered PTD-fused Rep68 proteins. This analysis unexpectedly revealed that recombinant Rep68 alone, in the absence of any PTD, couldmore » be endocytosed by the cells. Rep68 as the chimeric TAT-Rep68 proteins were internalized through endocytosis in clathrin-coated vesicles and retained in late endosomes/lysosomes with no detectable nuclear localization. In the presence of adenovirus, the Rep proteins could translocate into the nucleus where they displayed a biological activity. These findings support recent reports on the mechanism of entry of TAT-fused proteins and also revealed a new property of Rep68.« less

  7. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Assembly-Activating Protein Is Not an Essential Requirement for Capsid Assembly of AAV Serotypes 4, 5, and 11.

    PubMed

    Earley, Lauriel F; Powers, John M; Adachi, Kei; Baumgart, Joshua T; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have made great progress in their use for gene therapy; however, fundamental aspects of AAV's capsid assembly remain poorly characterized. In this regard, the discovery of assembly-activating protein (AAP) sheds new light on this crucial part of AAV biology and vector production. Previous studies have shown that AAP is essential for assembly; however, how its mechanistic roles in assembly might differ among AAV serotypes remains uncharacterized. Here, we show that biological properties of AAPs and capsid assembly processes are surprisingly distinct among AAV serotypes 1 to 12. In the study, we investigated subcellular localizations and assembly-promoting functions of AAP1 to -12 (i.e., AAPs derived from AAV1 to -12, respectively) and examined the AAP dependence of capsid assembly processes of these 12 serotypes using combinatorial approaches that involved immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, barcode-Seq (i. e., a high-throughput quantitative method using DNA barcodes and a next-generation sequencing technology), and quantitative dot blot assays. This study revealed that AAP1 to -12 are all localized in the nucleus with serotype-specific differential patterns of nucleolar association; AAPs and assembled capsids do not necessarily colocalize; AAPs are promiscuous in promoting capsid assembly of other serotypes, with the exception of AAP4, -5, -11, and -12; assembled AAV5, -8, and -9 capsids are excluded from the nucleolus, in contrast to the nucleolar enrichment of assembled AAV2 capsids; and, surprisingly, AAV4, -5, and -11 capsids are not dependent on AAP for assembly. These observations highlight the serotype-dependent heterogeneity of the capsid assembly process and challenge current notions about the role of AAP and the nucleolus in capsid assembly. Assembly-activating protein (AAP) is a recently discovered adeno-associated virus (AAV) protein that promotes capsid assembly and provides new opportunities

  8. Adeno-Associated Virus Type 6 (AAV6) Vectors Mediate Efficient Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells in Mouse Lungs Compared to That of AAV2 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Christine L.; Allen, James M.; Miller, A. Dusty

    2001-01-01

    Although vectors derived from adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) promote gene transfer and expression in many somatic tissues, studies with animal models and cultured cells show that the apical surface of airway epithelia is resistant to transduction by AAV2 vectors. Approaches to increase transduction rates include increasing the amount of vector and perturbing the integrity of the epithelia. In this study, we explored the use of vectors based on AAV6 to increase transduction rates in airways. AAV vectors were made using combinations of rep, cap, and packaged genomes from AAV2 or AAV6. The packaged genomes encoded human placental alkaline phosphatase and contained terminal repeat sequences from AAV2 or AAV6. We found that transduction efficiency was primarily dependent on the source of Cap protein, defined here as the vector pseudotype. The AAV6 and AAV2 pseudotype vectors exhibited different tropisms in tissue-cultured cells, and cell transduction by AAV6 vectors was not inhibited by heparin, nor did they compete for entry in a transduction assay, indicating that AAV6 and AAV2 capsid bind different receptors. In vivo analysis of vectors showed that AAV2 pseudotype vectors gave high transduction rates in alveolar cells but much lower rates in the airway epithelium. In contrast, the AAV6 pseudotype vectors exhibited much more efficient transduction of epithelial cells in large and small airways, showing up to 80% transduction in some airways. These results, combined with our previous results showing lower immunogenicity of AAV6 than of AAV2 vectors, indicate that AAV6 vectors may provide significant advantages over AAV2 for gene therapy of lung diseases like cystic fibrosis. PMID:11413329

  9. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus of the adeno-associated virus Rep68/78 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, Geoffrey D.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replicates in the nucleus of infected cells, and therefore multiple nuclear import events are required for productive infection. We analyzed nuclear import of the viral Rep proteins and characterized a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminus. We demonstrate that basic residues in this region constitute an NLS that is transferable and mediates interaction with the nuclear import receptor importin {alpha} in vitro. Mutant Rep proteins are predominantly cytoplasmic and are severely compromised for interactions with importin {alpha}, but retain their enzymatic functions in vitro. Interestingly, mutations of the NLS had significantly less effect on importin {alpha}more » interaction and replication in the context of Rep78 than when incorporated into the Rep68 protein. Together, our results demonstrate that a bipartite NLS exists in the shared part of Rep68 and Rep78, and suggest that an alternate entry mechanism may also contribute to nuclear localization of the Rep78 protein.« less

  10. Novel cis-acting replication element in the adeno-associated virus type 2 genome is involved in amplification of integrated rep-cap sequences.

    PubMed

    Nony, P; Tessier, J; Chadeuf, G; Ward, P; Giraud, A; Dugast, M; Linden, R M; Moullier, P; Salvetti, A

    2001-10-01

    This study identifies a region of the adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) rep gene (nucleotides 190 to 540 of wild-type AAV-2) as a cis-acting Rep-dependent element able to promote the replication of transiently transfected plasmids. This viral element is also shown to be involved in the amplification of integrated sequences in the presence of adenovirus and Rep proteins.

  11. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  12. Expression, purification and antibody preparation of PCV2 Rep and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyuan; Ma, Teng; Pang, Daxin; Su, Dan; Chen, Fuwang; Chen, Xinrong; Guo, Ning; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rep and ORF3 proteins are important functional proteins of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). Here, Rep and ORF3 genes were cloned, expressed and used to raise polyclonal antibodies. The result showed the recombinant plasmids of Rep and ORF3 genes constructed in this study were expressed efficiently in the prokaryotic system, and the recombinant proteins had antigenicity and immunogenicity. Furthermore, reactivity and specificity of the antiserums were characterized by western blot and indirect immunofluorescent assays. The results elucidated that polyclonal antiserum prepared with Rep or ORF3 had good reactivity and specificity against PCV2, or the Rep and ORF3 expressed in PK-15 cells, respectively. The Rep protein is promising for PCV2 antibody and vaccine development. These results will be helpful for further studies focusing on pathogenesis of PCV2 and serology diagnostic test or vaccine development against PCV2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Identification of rep-associated factors in herpes simplex virus type 1-induced adeno-associated virus type 2 replication compartments.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Armel; Alazard-Dany, Nathalie; Biollay, Coline; Arata, Loredana; Jolinon, Nelly; Kuhn, Lauriane; Ferro, Myriam; Weller, Sandra K; Epstein, Alberto L; Salvetti, Anna; Greco, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a human parvovirus that replicates only in cells coinfected with a helper virus, such as adenovirus or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). We previously showed that nine HSV-1 factors are able to support AAV rep gene expression and genome replication. To elucidate the strategy of AAV replication in the presence of HSV-1, we undertook a proteomic analysis of cellular and HSV-1 factors associated with Rep proteins and thus potentially recruited within AAV replication compartments (AAV RCs). This study resulted in the identification of approximately 60 cellular proteins, among which factors involved in DNA and RNA metabolism represented the largest functional categories. Validation analyses indicated that the cellular DNA replication enzymes RPA, RFC, and PCNA were recruited within HSV-1-induced AAV RCs. Polymerase delta was not identified but subsequently was shown to colocalize with Rep within AAV RCs even in the presence of the HSV-1 polymerase complex. In addition, we found that AAV replication is associated with the recruitment of components of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, Ku70 and -86, and the mismatch repair proteins MSH2, -3, and -6. Finally, several HSV-1 factors were also found to be associated with Rep, including UL12. We demonstrated for the first time that this protein plays a role during AAV replication by enhancing the resolution of AAV replicative forms and AAV particle production. Altogether, these analyses provide the basis to understand how AAV adapts its replication strategy to the nuclear environment induced by the helper virus.

  15. The Assembly-Activating Protein Promotes Stability and Interactions between AAV's Viral Proteins to Nucleate Capsid Assembly.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Anna C; Pacouret, Simon; Cepeda Diaz, Ana Karla; Blake, Jessica; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2018-05-08

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector is a preferred delivery platform for in vivo gene therapy. Natural and engineered variations of the AAV capsid affect a plurality of phenotypes relevant to gene therapy, including vector production and host tropism. Fundamental to these aspects is the mechanism of AAV capsid assembly. Here, the role of the viral co-factor assembly-activating protein (AAP) was evaluated in 12 naturally occurring AAVs and 9 putative ancestral capsid intermediates. The results demonstrate increased capsid protein stability and VP-VP interactions in the presence of AAP. The capsid's dependence on AAP can be partly overcome by strengthening interactions between monomers within the assembly, as illustrated by the transfer of a minimal motif defined by a phenotype-to-phylogeny mapping method. These findings suggest that the emergence of AAP within the Dependovirus genus relaxes structural constraints on AAV assembly in favor of increasing the degrees of freedom for the capsid to evolve. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression, purification, characterization and subcellular localization of the goose parvovirus rep1 protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Peng, Gaojing; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-07-01

    The goose parvovirus (GPV) Rep1 protein is both essential for viral replication and a potential target for GPV diagnosis, but its protein characterization and intracellular localization is not clear. We constructed a recombinant plasmid, pET28a/GPV-Rep1, and expressed the Rep1 gene in BL21 (DE3) Escherichia coli. A protein approximately 75 kDa in size was obtained from lysates of E. coli cells expressing the recombinant plasmid. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that after induction with 0.6 mM isopropyl β-D-thiogalactosidase (IPTG) at 30°C for 5 h, the Rep1 protein was highly overexpressed. Two methods used to purify proteins, a salinity-gradient elution and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, were performed. The amount of Rep1 protein obtained by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was 41.23 mg, while 119.9 mg of Rep1 protein was obtained by a salinity-gradient elution from a 1 L E. coli BL21 (DE3) culture. An immunogenicity analysis showed that the protein could significantly elicit a specific antibody response in immunized goslings compared to control groups. Antibody titers peaked to 1:5120 (optical density (OD) 450 = 3.9) on day 28 after immunization but had mean titers of 1:10,240 (OD450 = 4.2) in gosling groups immunized with a commercially available GPV-attenuated vaccine strain. Experiments examining subcellular localization showed that the Rep1 protein appeared to associate predominantly with the nuclear membrane, especially during later times of infection. This work provides a basis for biochemical and structural studies on the GPV Rep1 protein.

  17. Replication initiator protein RepE of mini-F plasmid: functional differentiation between monomers (initiator) and dimers (autogenous repressor).

    PubMed Central

    Ishiai, M; Wada, C; Kawasaki, Y; Yura, T

    1994-01-01

    Replication of mini-F plasmid requires the plasmid-encoded RepE initiator protein and several host factors including DnaJ, DnaK, and GrpE, heat shock proteins of Escherichia coli. The RepE protein plays a crucial role in replication and exhibits two major functions: initiation of replication from the origin, ori2, and autogenous repression of repE transcription. One of the mini-F plasmid mutants that can replicate in the dnaJ-defective host produces an altered RepE (RepE54) with a markedly enhanced initiator activity but little or no repressor activity. RepE54 has been purified from cell extracts primarily in monomeric form, unlike the wild-type RepE that is recovered in dimeric form. Gel-retardation assays revealed that RepE54 monomers bind to ori2 (direct repeats) with a very high efficiency but hardly bind to the repE operator (inverted repeat), in accordance with the properties of RepE54 in vivo. Furthermore, the treatment of wild-type RepE dimers with protein denaturants enhanced their binding to ori2 but reduced binding to the operator: RepE dimers were partially converted to monomers, and the ori2 binding activity was uniquely associated with monomers. These results strongly suggest that RepE monomers represent an active form by binding to ori2 to initiate replication, whereas dimers act as an autogenous repressor by binding to the operator. We propose that RepE is structurally and functionally differentiated and that monomerization of RepE dimers, presumably mediated by heat shock protein(s), activates the initiator function and participates in regulation of mini-F DNA replication. Images PMID:8170998

  18. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors,more » therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.« less

  19. Oligomeric Properties of Adeno-Associated Virus Rep68 Reflect Its Multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Bardelli, Martino; Burgner, John W.; Villamil-Jarauta, Maria; Kekilli, Demet; Samso, Monserrat

    2013-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) encodes four regulatory proteins called Rep. The large AAV Rep proteins Rep68 and Rep78 are essential factors required in almost every step of the viral life cycle. Structurally, they share two domains: a modified version of the AAA+ domain that characterizes the SF3 family of helicases and an N-terminal domain that binds DNA specifically. The combination of these two domains imparts extraordinary multifunctionality to work as initiators of DNA replication and regulators of transcription, in addition to their essential role during site-specific integration. Although most members of the SF3 family form hexameric rings in vitro, the oligomeric nature of Rep68 is unclear due to its propensity to aggregate in solution. We report here a comprehensive study to determine the oligomeric character of Rep68 using a combination of methods that includes sedimentation velocity ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy, and hydrodynamic modeling. We have determined that residue Cys151 induces Rep68 to aggregate in vitro. We show that Rep68 displays a concentration-dependent dynamic oligomeric behavior characterized by the presence of two populations: one with monomers and dimers in slow equilibrium and a second one consisting of a mixture of multiple-ring structures of seven and eight members. The presence of either ATP or ADP induces formation of larger complexes formed by the stacking of multiple rings. Taken together, our results support the idea of a Rep68 molecule that exhibits the flexible oligomeric behavior needed to perform the wide range of functions occurring during the AAV life cycle. PMID:23152528

  20. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  1. Binding of sulphonated indigo derivatives to RepA-WH1 inhibits DNA-induced protein amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Maté, María Jesús; Dávila-Fajardo, Cristina; Bravo, Jerónimo; Giraldo, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quest for inducers and inhibitors of protein amyloidogenesis is of utmost interest, since they are key tools to understand the molecular bases of proteinopathies such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington and Creutzfeldt–Jakob diseases. It is also expected that such molecules could lead to valid therapeutic agents. In common with the mammalian prion protein (PrP), the N-terminal Winged-Helix (WH1) domain of the pPS10 plasmid replication protein (RepA) assembles in vitro into a variety of amyloid nanostructures upon binding to different specific dsDNA sequences. Here we show that di- (S2) and tetra-sulphonated (S4) derivatives of indigo stain dock at the DNA recognition interface in the RepA-WH1 dimer. They compete binding of RepA to its natural target dsDNA repeats, found at the repA operator and at the origin of replication of the plasmid. Calorimetry points to the existence of a major site, with micromolar affinity, for S4-indigo in RepA-WH1 dimers. As revealed by electron microscopy, in the presence of inducer dsDNA, both S2/S4 stains inhibit the assembly of RepA-WH1 into fibres. These results validate the concept that DNA can promote protein assembly into amyloids and reveal that the binding sites of effector molecules can be targeted to inhibit amyloidogenesis. PMID:18285361

  2. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-3-based vectors transduce haematopoietic cells not susceptible to transduction with AAV-2-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Handa, A; Muramatsu, S; Qiu, J; Mizukami, H; Brown, K E

    2000-08-01

    Although adeno-associated virus (AAV)-2 has a broad tissue-host range and can transduce a wide variety of tissue types, some cells, such as erythro-megakaryoblastoid cells, are non-permissive and appear to lack the AAV-2 receptor. However, limited studies have been reported with the related dependovirus AAV-3. We have previously cloned this virus, characterized its genome and produced an infectious clone. In this study, the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into AAV-2- and AAV-3-based plasmids and recombinant viruses were produced. These viruses were then used to transduce haematopoietic cells and the transduction efficiencies were compared. In contrast to recombinant (r) AAV-2, rAAV-3 successfully transduced erythroid and megakaryoblastoid cells, although rAAV-2 was superior in transduction of lymphocyte-derived cell lines. Recently, it was reported that heparan sulphate can act as a receptor of AAV-2. The infectivity of rAAV-2 and rAAV-3 was tested with mutant cell lines of Chinese hamster ovary cells that were defective for heparin or heparan sulphate expression on the cell surface. There was no correlation between the ability of rAAV-2 or rAAV-3 to infect cells and the cell surface expression of heparan sulphate and, although heparin blocked both rAAV-2 and rAAV-3 transduction, the ID(50) of rAAV-3 was higher than that of rAAV-2. In addition, virus-binding overlay assays indicated that AAV-2 and AAV-3 bound different membrane proteins. These results suggest not only that there are different cellular receptors for AAV-2 and AAV-3, but that rAAV-3 vectors may be preferred for transduction of some haematopoietic cell types.

  3. Specific GFP-binding artificial proteinsRep): a new tool for in vitro to live cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Urvoas, Agathe; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Moutel, Sandrine; Desmadril, Michel; Perez, Franck; Gautreau, Alexis; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie

    2015-01-01

    A family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on a natural family of helical repeat was previously designed. αRep members are efficiently expressed, folded and extremely stable proteins. A large αRep library was constructed creating proteins with a randomized interaction surface. In the present study, we show that the αRep library is an efficient source of tailor-made specific proteins with direct applications in biochemistry and cell biology. From this library, we selected by phage display αRep binders with nanomolar dissociation constants against the GFP. The structures of two independent αRep binders in complex with the GFP target were solved by X-ray crystallography revealing two totally different binding modes. The affinity of the selected αReps for GFP proved sufficient for practically useful applications such as pull-down experiments. αReps are disulfide free proteins and are efficiently and functionally expressed in eukaryotic cells: GFP-specific αReps are clearly sequestrated by their cognate target protein addressed to various cell compartments. These results suggest that αRep proteins with tailor-made specificity can be selected and used in living cells to track, modulate or interfere with intracellular processes. PMID:26182430

  4. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4−/− mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5′-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4−/− mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1. PMID:26420842

  5. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L; Polishchuk, Roman S; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4-/- mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5'-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4-/- mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clonesmore » prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.« less

  7. Sustained AAV9-mediated expression of a non-self protein in the CNS of non-human primates after immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramsingh, Arlene I.; Gray, Steven J.; Reilly, Andrew; Koday, Michael; Bratt, Debbie; Koday, Merika Treants; Murnane, Robert; Hu, Yuhui; Messer, Anne

    2018-01-01

    A critical issue in transgene delivery studies is immune reactivity to the transgene- encoded protein and its impact on sustained gene expression. Here, we test the hypothesis that immunomodulation by rapamycin can decrease immune reactivity after intrathecal AAV9 delivery of a transgene (GFP) in non-human primates, resulting in sustained GFP expression in the CNS. We show that rapamycin treatment clearly reduced the overall immunogenicity of the AAV9/GFP vector by lowering GFP- and AAV9-specific antibody responses, and decreasing T cell responses including cytokine and cytolytic effector responses. Spinal cord GFP protein expression was sustained for twelve weeks, with no toxicity. Immune correlates of robust transgene expression include negligible GFP-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, absence of GFP-specific IFN-γ producing T cells, and absence of GFP-specific cytotoxic T cells, which support the hypothesis that decreased T cell reactivity results in sustained transgene expression. These data strongly support the use of modest doses of rapamycin to modulate immune responses for intrathecal gene therapies, and potentially a much wider range of viral vector-based therapeutics. PMID:29874260

  8. Selection of specific protein binders for pre-defined targets from an optimized library of artificial helicoidal repeat proteins (alphaRep).

    PubMed

    Guellouz, Asma; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a "filtration" procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×10(9) independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties.

  9. Selection of Specific Protein Binders for Pre-Defined Targets from an Optimized Library of Artificial Helicoidal Repeat Proteins (alphaRep)

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a “filtration” procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×109 independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties. PMID:24014183

  10. Variation in a surface-exposed region of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae P40 protein as a consequence of homologous DNA recombination between RepMP5 elements.

    PubMed

    Spuesens, Emiel B M; van de Kreeke, Nick; Estevão, Silvia; Hoogenboezem, Theo; Sluijter, Marcel; Hartwig, Nico G; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Vink, Cornelis

    2011-02-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen that causes a range of respiratory tract infections. The first step in infection is adherence of the bacteria to the respiratory epithelium. This step is mediated by a specialized organelle, which contains several proteins (cytadhesins) that have an important function in adherence. Two of these cytadhesins, P40 and P90, represent the proteolytic products from a single 130 kDa protein precursor, which is encoded by the MPN142 gene. Interestingly, MPN142 contains a repetitive DNA element, termed RepMP5, of which homologues are found at seven other loci within the M. pneumoniae genome. It has been hypothesized that these RepMP5 elements, which are similar but not identical in sequence, recombine with their counterpart within MPN142 and thereby provide a source of sequence variation for this gene. As this variation may give rise to amino acid changes within P40 and P90, the recombination between RepMP5 elements may constitute the basis of antigenic variation and, possibly, immune evasion by M. pneumoniae. To investigate the sequence variation of MPN142 in relation to inter-RepMP5 recombination, we determined the sequences of all RepMP5 elements in a collection of 25 strains. The results indicate that: (i) inter-RepMP5 recombination events have occurred in seven of the strains, and (ii) putative RepMP5 recombination events involving MPN142 have induced amino acid changes in a surface-exposed part of the P40 protein in two of the strains. We conclude that recombination between RepMP5 elements is a common phenomenon that may lead to sequence variation of MPN142-encoded proteins.

  11. Conformational plasticity of RepB, the replication initiator protein of promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D. Roeland; Ruiz-Masó, José Angel; Rueda, Manuel; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Machón, Cristina; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Orozco, Modesto; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication initiation is a vital and tightly regulated step in all replicons and requires an initiator factor that specifically recognizes the DNA replication origin and starts replication. RepB from the promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is a hexameric ring protein evolutionary related to viral initiators. Here we explore the conformational plasticity of the RepB hexamer by i) SAXS, ii) sedimentation experiments, iii) molecular simulations and iv) X-ray crystallography. Combining these techniques, we derive an estimate of the conformational ensemble in solution showing that the C-terminal oligomerisation domains of the protein form a rigid cylindrical scaffold to which the N-terminal DNA-binding/catalytic domains are attached as highly flexible appendages, featuring multiple orientations. In addition, we show that the hinge region connecting both domains plays a pivotal role in the observed plasticity. Sequence comparisons and a literature survey show that this hinge region could exists in other initiators, suggesting that it is a common, crucial structural element for DNA binding and manipulation. PMID:26875695

  12. Design and construction of functional AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Gray, John T; Zolotukhin, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Using the basic principles of molecular biology and laboratory techniques presented in this chapter, researchers should be able to create a wide variety of AAV vectors for both clinical and basic research applications. Basic vector design concepts are covered for both protein coding gene expression and small non-coding RNA gene expression cassettes. AAV plasmid vector backbones (available via AddGene) are described, along with critical sequence details for a variety of modular expression components that can be inserted as needed for specific applications. Protocols are provided for assembling the various DNA components into AAV vector plasmids in Escherichia coli, as well as for transferring these vector sequences into baculovirus genomes for large-scale production of AAV in the insect cell production system.

  13. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. A comprehensive computational study on pathogenic mis-sense mutations spanning the RING2 and REP domains of Parkin protein.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ria; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-04-30

    Various mutations in PARK2 gene, which encodes the protein parkin, are significantly associated with the onset of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson (ARJP) in neuronal cells. Parkin is a multi domain protein, the N-terminal part contains the Ubl and the C-terminal part consists of four zinc coordinating domains, viz., RING0, RING1, in between ring (IBR) and RING2. Disease mutations are spread over all the domains of Parkin, although mutations in some regions may affect the functionality of Parkin more adversely. The mutations in the RING2 domain are seen to abolish the neuroprotective E3 ligase activity of Parkin. In this current work, we carried out detailed in silico analysis to study the extent of pathogenicity of mutations spanning the Parkin RING2 domain and the adjoining REP region by SIFT, Mutation Accessor, PolyPhen2, SNPs and GO, GV/GD and I-mutant. To study the structural and functional implications of these mutations on RING2-REP domain of Parkin, we studied the solvent accessibility (SASA/RSA), hydrophobicity, intra-molecular hydrogen bonding profile and domain analysis by various computational tools. Finally, we analysed the interaction energy profiles of the mutants and compared them to the wild type protein using Discovery studio 2.5. By comparing the various analyses it could be safely concluded that except P437L and A379V mutations, all other mutations were potentially deleterious affecting various structural aspects of RING2 domain architecture. This study is based purely on computational approach which has the potential to identify disease mutations and the information could further be used in treatment of diseases and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  16. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway.

  17. Intracellular localization of adeno-associated viral proteins expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí E; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2011-01-01

    Production of vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAVv) in insect cells represents a feasible option for large-scale applications. However, transducing particles yields obtained in this system are low compared with total capsid yields, suggesting the presence of genome encapsidation bottlenecks. Three components are required for AAVv production: viral capsid proteins (VP), the recombinant AAV genome, and Rep proteins for AAV genome replication and encapsidation. Little is known about the interaction between the three components in insect cells, which have intracellular conditions different to those in mammalian cells. In this work, the localization of AAV proteins in insect cells was assessed for the first time with the purpose of finding potential limiting factors. Unassembled VP were located either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Their transport into the nucleus was dependent on protein concentration. Empty capsids were located in defined subnuclear compartments. Rep proteins expressed individually were efficiently translocated into the nucleus. Their intranuclear distribution was not uniform and differed from VP distribution. While Rep52 distribution and expression levels were not affected by AAV genomes or VP, Rep78 distribution and stability changed during coexpression. Expression of all AAV components modified capsid intranuclear distribution, and assembled VP were found in vesicles located in the nuclear periphery. Such vesicles were related to baculovirus infection, highlighting its role in AAVv production in insect cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that the intracellular distribution of AAV proteins allows their interaction and does not limit vector production in insect cells. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  18. Role of the Adenovirus DNA-Binding Protein in In Vitro Adeno-Associated Virus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Peter; Dean, Frank B.; O’Donnell, Michael E.; Berns, Kenneth I.

    1998-01-01

    A basic question in adeno-associated virus (AAV) biology has been whether adenovirus (Ad) infection provided any function which directly promoted replication of AAV DNA. Previously in vitro assays for AAV DNA replication, using linear duplex AAV DNA as the template, uninfected or Ad-infected HeLa cell extracts, and exogenous AAV Rep protein, demonstrated that Ad infection provides a direct helper effect for AAV DNA replication. It was shown that the nature of this helper effect was to increase the processivity of AAV DNA replication. Left unanswered was the question of whether this effect was the result of cellular factors whose activity was enhanced by Ad infection or was the result of direct participation of Ad proteins in AAV DNA replication. In this report, we show that in the in vitro assay, enhancement of processivity occurs with the addition of either the Ad DNA-binding protein (Ad-DBP) or the human single-stranded DNA-binding protein (replication protein A [RPA]). Clearly Ad-DBP is present after Ad infection but not before, whereas the cellular level of RPA is not apparently affected by Ad infection. However, we have not measured possible modifications of RPA which might occur after Ad infection and affect AAV DNA replication. When the substrate for replication was an AAV genome inserted into a plasmid vector, RPA was not an effective substitute for Ad-DBP. Extracts supplemented with Ad-DBP preferentially replicated AAV sequences rather than adjacent vector sequences; in contrast, extracts supplemented with RPA preferentially replicated vector sequences. PMID:9420241

  19. Cellular selectivity of AAV serotypes for gene delivery in neurons and astrocytes by neonatal intracerebroventricular injection

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Sean L.; Leek, Ashley N.; Richman, Evan H.

    2017-01-01

    The non-pathogenic parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is an efficient vector for transgene expression in vivo and shows promise for treatment of brain disorders in clinical trials. Currently, there are more than 100 AAV serotypes identified that differ in the binding capacity of capsid proteins to specific cell surface receptors that can transduce different cell types and brain regions in the CNS. In the current study, multiple AAV serotypes expressing a GFP reporter (AAV1, AAV2/1, AAVDJ, AAV8, AAVDJ8, AAV9, AAVDJ9) were screened for their infectivity in both primary murine astrocyte and neuronal cell cultures. AAV2/1, AAVDJ8 and AAV9 were selected for further investigation of their tropism throughout different brain regions and cell types. Each AAV was administered to P0-neonatal mice via intracerebroventricular injections (ICV). Brains were then systematically analyzed for GFP expression at 3 or 6 weeks post-infection in various regions, including the olfactory bulb, striatum, cortex, hippocampus, substantia nigra (SN) and cerebellum. Cell counting data revealed that AAV2/1 infections were more prevalent in the cortical layers but penetrated to the midbrain less than AAVDJ8 and AAV9. Additionally, there were differences in the persistence of viral transgene expression amongst the three serotypes examined in vivo at 3 and 6 weeks post-infection. Because AAV-mediated transgene expression is of interest in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s Disease, we examined the SN with microscopy techniques, such as CLARITY tissue transmutation, to identify AAV serotypes that resulted in optimal transgene expression in either astrocytes or dopaminergic neurons. AAVDJ8 displayed more tropism in astrocytes compared to AAV9 in the SN region. We conclude that ICV injection results in lasting expression of virally encoded transgene when using AAV vectors and that specific AAV serotypes are required to selectively deliver transgenes of interest to different brain

  20. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Li; Powell Gene Therapy Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL; Genetics Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL

    2008-11-25

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, theirmore » transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by {approx} 68% and {approx} 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.« less

  1. Efficient mouse airway transduction following recombination between AAV vectors carrying parts of a larger gene.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Christine L; Allen, James M; Miller, A Dusty

    2002-07-01

    The small packaging capacity of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors limits the utility of this promising vector system for transfer of large genes. We explored the possibility that larger genes could be reconstituted following homologous recombination between AAV vectors carrying overlapping gene fragments. An alkaline phosphatase (AP) gene was split between two such AAV vectors (rec vectors) and packaged using AAV2 or AAV6 capsid proteins. Rec vectors having either capsid protein recombined to express AP in cultured cells at about 1-2% of the rate observed for an intact vector. Surprisingly, the AAV6 rec vectors transduced lung cells in mice almost as efficiently as did an intact vector, with 10% of airway epithelial cells, the target for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), being positive. Thus AAV rec vectors may be useful for diseases such as CF that require transfer of large genes.

  2. Rep. Bill Nelson prepares to photograph samples of protein crystal growth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-01-12

    61C-05-036 (12-18 Jan. 1986) --- U.S. Representative Bill Nelson (Democrat - Florida), STS-61C payload specialist, prepares to photograph individual samples in the Handheld Protein Crystal Growth Experiment (HPCG) on Columbia's middeck. The operations involve the use of four pieces of equipment to attempt the growth of 60 different types of crystals -- 12 by means of dialysis and 48 via the vapor diffusion method. The photo was used by members of the STS-61C crew at their Jan. 23, 1986, Post-Flight Press Conference.

  3. Differential effects of two MRI contrast agents on the integrity and distribution of rAAV2 and rAAV5 in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Osting, Sue; Bennett, Antonette; Power, Shelby; Wackett, Jordan; Hurley, Samuel A; Alexander, Andrew L; Agbandje-Mckena, Mavis; Burger, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as a method to optimize intracerebral targeting and for tracking infusate distribution in gene therapy trials for nervous system disorders. We thus investigated possible effects of two MRI contrast agents, gadoteridol (Gd) and galbumin (Gab), on the distribution and levels of transgene expression in the rat striatum and their effect on integrity and stability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) particles. MRI studies showed that contrast agent distribution did not predict rAAV distribution. However, green fluorescent protein (GFP) immunoreactivity revealed an increase in distribution of rAAV5-GFP, but not rAAV2-GFP, in the presence of Gd when compared with viral vector injected alone. In contrast, Gab increased the distribution of rAAV2-GFP not rAAV5-GFP. These observations pointed to a direct effect of infused contrast agent on the rAAV particles. Negative-stain electron microscopy (EM), DNAase treatment, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to monitor rAAV2 and rAAV5 particle integrity and stability following contrast agent incubation. EMs of rAAV2-GFP and rAAV5-GFP particles pretreated with Gd appear morphologically similar to the untreated sample; however, Gab treatment resulted in surface morphology changes and aggregation. A compromise of particle integrity was suggested by sensitivity of the packaged genome to DNAase treatment following Gab incubation but not Gd for both vectors. However, neither agent significantly affected particle stability when analyzed by DSC. An increase in Tm was observed for AAV2 in lactated Ringer’s buffer. These results thus highlight potential interactions between MRI contrast agents and AAV that might affect vector distribution and stability, as well as the stabilizing effect of lactated Ringer’s solution on AAV2. PMID:26015943

  4. Packaging of Human Chromosome 19-Specific Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Integration Sites in AAV Virions during AAV Wild-Type and Recombinant AAV Vector Production

    PubMed Central

    Hüser, Daniela; Weger, Stefan; Heilbronn, Regine

    2003-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) establishes latency by site-specific integration into a unique locus on human chromosome 19, called AAVS1. During the development of a sensitive real-time PCR assay for site-specific integration, AAV-AAVS1 junctions were reproducibly detected in highly purified AAV wild-type and recombinant AAV vector stocks. A series of controls documented that the junctions were packaged in AAV capsids and were newly generated during a single round of AAV production. Cloned junctions displayed variable AAV sequences fused to AAVS1. These data suggest that packaged junctions represent footprints of AAV integration during productive infection. Apparently, AAV latency established by site-specific integration and the helper virus-dependent, productive AAV cycle are more closely related than previously thought. PMID:12663794

  5. Novel RepA-MCM proteins encoded in plasmids pTAU4, pORA1 and pTIK4 from Sulfolobus neozealandicus

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Bo; Jensen, Susanne; Phan, Hoa; Brügger, Kim; Zillig, Wolfram; She, Qunxin; Garrett, Roger A.

    2005-01-01

    Three plasmids isolated from the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus neozealandicus were characterized. Plasmids pTAU4 (7,192 bp), pORA1 (9,689 bp) and pTIK4 (13,638 bp) show unusual properties that distinguish them from previously characterized cryptic plasmids of the genus Sulfolobus. Plasmids pORA1 and pTIK4 encode RepA proteins, only the former of which carries the novel polymerase–primase domain of other known Sulfolobus plasmids. Plasmid pTAU4 encodes a mini-chromosome maintenance protein homolog and no RepA protein; the implications for DNA replication are considered. Plasmid pORA1 is the first Sulfolobus plasmid to be characterized that does not encode the otherwise highly conserved DNA-binding PlrA protein. Another encoded protein appears to be specific for the New Zealand plasmids. The three plasmids should provide useful model systems for functional studies of these important crenarchaeal proteins. PMID:15876565

  6. Tyrosine Mutation in AAV9 Capsid Improves Gene Transfer to the Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Martini, Sabrina V; Silva, Adriana L; Ferreira, Debora; Rabelo, Rafael; Ornellas, Felipe M; Gomes, Karina; Rocco, Patricia R M; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Morales, Marcelo M

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are being increasingly used as the vector of choice for in vivo gene delivery and gene therapy for many pulmonary diseases. Recently, it was shown that phosphorylation of surface-exposed tyrosine residues from AAV capsid targets the viral particles for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and mutations of these tyrosine residues lead to highly efficient vector transduction in vitro and in vivo in different organs. In this study, we evaluated the pulmonary transgene expression efficacy of AAV9 vectors containing point mutations in surface-exposed capsid tyrosine residues. Eighteen C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups: (1) a control group (CTRL) animals underwent intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of saline, (2) the wild-type AAV9 group (WT-AAV9, 1010 vg), and (3) the tyrosine-mutant Y731F AAV9 group (M-AAV9, 1010 vg), which received (i.t.) self-complementary AAV9 vectors containing the DNA sequence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Four weeks after instillation, lung mechanics, morphometry, tissue cellularity, gene expression, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factor expression were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in lung mechanics and morphometry among the experimental groups. However, the number of polymorphonuclear cells was higher in the WT-AAV9 group than in the CTRL and M-AAV9 groups, suggesting that the administration of tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors was better tolerated. Tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors significantly improved transgene delivery to the lung (30%) compared with their wild-type counterparts, without eliciting an inflammatory response. Our results provide the impetus for further studies to exploit the use of AAV9 vectors as a tool for pulmonary gene therapy. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Design, production and molecular structure of a new family of artificial alpha-helicoidal repeat proteinsRep) based on thermostable HEAT-like repeats.

    PubMed

    Urvoas, Agathe; Guellouz, Asma; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Graille, Marc; Durand, Dominique; Desravines, Danielle C; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Desmadril, Michel; Minard, Philippe

    2010-11-26

    Repeat proteins have a modular organization and a regular architecture that make them attractive models for design and directed evolution experiments. HEAT repeat proteins, although very common, have not been used as a scaffold for artificial proteins, probably because they are made of long and irregular repeats. Here, we present and validate a consensus sequence for artificial HEAT repeat proteins. The sequence was defined from the structure-based sequence analysis of a thermostable HEAT-like repeat protein. Appropriate sequences were identified for the N- and C-caps. A library of genes coding for artificial proteins based on this sequence design, named αRep, was assembled using new and versatile methodology based on circular amplification. Proteins picked randomly from this library are expressed as soluble proteins. The biophysical properties of proteins with different numbers of repeats and different combinations of side chains in hypervariable positions were characterized. Circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that all these proteins are folded cooperatively and are very stable (T(m) >70 °C). Stability of these proteins increases with the number of repeats. Detailed gel filtration and small-angle X-ray scattering studies showed that the purified proteins form either monomers or dimers. The X-ray structure of a stable dimeric variant structure was solved. The protein is folded with a highly regular topology and the repeat structure is organized, as expected, as pairs of alpha helices. In this protein variant, the dimerization interface results directly from the variable surface enriched in aromatic residues located in the randomized positions of the repeats. The dimer was crystallized both in an apo and in a PEG-bound form, revealing a very well defined binding crevice and some structure flexibility at the interface. This fortuitous binding site could later prove to be a useful binding site for other low molecular mass

  8. Comparison of Serum rAAV Serotype-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Becker Muscular Dystrophy, Inclusion Body Myositis, or GNE Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Deborah A; Crowe, Kelly E; Flanigan, Kevin M; Martin, Paul T

    2017-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a commonly used gene therapy vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes in a variety of human diseases, but pre-existing serum antibodies to viral capsid proteins can greatly inhibit rAAV transduction of tissues. Serum was assayed from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), inclusion body myositis (IBM), and GNE myopathy (GNE). These were compared to serum from otherwise normal human subjects to determine the extent of pre-existing serum antibodies to rAAVrh74, rAAV1, rAAV2, rAAV6, rAAV8, and rAAV9. In almost all cases, patients with measurable titers to one rAAV serotype showed titers to all other serotypes tested, with average titers to rAAV2 being highest in all instances. Twenty-six percent of all young normal subjects (<18 years old) had measurable rAAV titers to all serotypes tested, and this percentage increased to almost 50% in adult normal subjects (>18 years old). Fifty percent of all IBM and GNE patients also had antibody titers to all rAAV serotypes, while only 18% of DMD and 0% of BMD patients did. In addition, serum-naïve macaques treated systemically with rAAVrh74 could develop cross-reactive antibodies to all other serotypes tested at 24 weeks post treatment. These data demonstrate that most DMD and BMD patients should be amenable to vascular rAAV-mediated treatment without the concern of treatment blockage by pre-existing serum rAAV antibodies, and that serum antibodies to rAAVrh74 are no more common than those for rAAV6, rAAV8, or rAAV9.

  9. AAV-CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Depletion of VEGFR2 Blocks Angiogenesis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenyi; Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Zhou, Guohong; Park-Windhol, Cindy; D'Amore, Patricia A; Lei, Hetian

    2017-12-01

    Pathologic angiogenesis is a component of many diseases, including neovascular age-related macular degeneration, proliferation diabetic retinopathy, as well as tumor growth and metastasis. The purpose of this project was to examine whether the system of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated endonuclease (Cas)9 can be used to deplete expression of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in human vascular endothelial cells in vitro and thus suppress its downstream signaling events. The dual AAV system of CRISPR/Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (AAV-SpGuide and -SpCas9) was adapted to edit genomic VEGFR2 in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). In this system, the endothelial-specific promoter for intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (ICAM2) was cloned into the dual AAV vectors of SpGuide and SpCas9 for driving expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and SpCas9, respectively. These two AAV vectors were applied to production of recombinant AAV serotype 5 (rAAV5), which were used to infect HRECs for depletion of VEGFR2. Protein expression was determined by Western blot; and cell proliferation, migration, as well as tube formation were examined. AAV5 effectively infected vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells; the ICAM2 promoter drove expression of GFP and SpCas9 in HRECs, but not in RPE cells. The results showed that the rAAV5-CRISPR/Cas9 depleted VEGFR2 by 80% and completely blocked VEGF-induced activation of Akt, and proliferation, migration as well as tube formation of HRECs. AAV-CRISRP/Cas9-mediated depletion of VEGFR2 is a potential therapeutic strategy for pathologic angiogenesis.

  10. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  11. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-particles potentiate gene transduction of AAV vectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) have emerged as safe and efficient therapeutic platform for numerous diseases. Excessive empty particles were generated as impurities during AAV vector production, but their effects on clinical outcome of AAV gene therapy are unclear. Here,...

  13. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L.; Dayton, Robert D.; Deverman, Benjamin E.; Klein, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats. PMID:27867348

  14. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Deverman, Benjamin E; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  15. Dual AAV Vectors for Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1), due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene, is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. Attempts at developing gene therapy approaches for treatment of STGD1 are currently ongoing. Among all the vectors available for gene therapy of inherited retinal diseases, those based on adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are the most promising given the efficacy shown in various animal models and their excellent safety profile in humans, as confirmed in many ongoing clinical trials. However, one of the main obstacles for the use of AAV is their limited effective packaging capacity of about 5 kb. Taking advantage of the AAV genome's ability to concatemerize , others and we have recently developed dual AAV vectors to overcome this limit. We tested dual AAV vectors for ABCA4 delivery, and found that they transduce efficiently both mouse and pig photoreceptors , and rescue the Abca4-/- mouse retinal phenotype, indicating their potential for gene therapy of STGD1. This chapter details how we designed dual AAV vectors for the delivery of the ABCA4 gene and describes the techniques that can be explored to evaluate dual AAV transduction efficiency in vitro and in the retina, and their efficacy in the mouse model of STGD1.

  16. Direct comparison of administration routes for AAV8-mediated ocular gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Miyake, Koichi; Asakawa, Nagisa; Miyake, Noriko; Shimada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that direct subretinal (SR) injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 8 (AAV8) into photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a highly efficient model of gene delivery. The current study compared transduction efficiency and expression patterns associated with various routes of vector administration. The efficacy of intravitreal (VT), SR and subconjunctival (SC) injections for delivery of AAV8-derived vectors, i.e. those expressing luciferase (Luc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) - AAV8/Luc and AAV8/GFP, respectively - were compared in an animal (mouse) model (n = 8 mice/group). Transduction efficiency and expression patterns were examined at post-injection weeks 1 and 2, and months 1, 3, 6 and 12 via in vivo imaging. One year after AAV injection, AAV8/Luc-treated mice exhibited stable and sustained high expression of vector in the VT and SR groups, but not in the SC group (VT:SR:SC = 3,218:2,923:115; 1 × 10(5 )photons/s). Histological analysis showed that GFP expression was observed in the inner retina of VT group mice, and in photoreceptor cells and RPE of SR group mice, whereas no GFP expression was noted in the SC group. Electroretinography (ERG) revealed adverse effects following SR delivery. Results suggest that both SR and VT injections of AAV8 vectors are useful routes for administering ocular gene therapy, and stress the importance of selecting an appropriate administration route, i.e. one that targets specific cells, for treating ocular disorders.

  17. Development of Intrathecal AAV9 Gene Therapy for Giant Axonal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rachel M; Armao, Diane; Nagabhushan Kalburgi, Sahana; Gray, Steven J

    2018-06-15

    An NIH-sponsored phase I clinical trial is underway to test a potential treatment for giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) using viral-mediated GAN gene replacement (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02362438). This trial marks the first instance of intrathecal (IT) adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer in humans. GAN is a rare pediatric neurodegenerative disorder caused by autosomal recessive loss-of-function mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes the gigaxonin protein. Gigaxonin is involved in the regulation, turnover, and degradation of intermediate filaments (IFs). The pathologic signature of GAN is giant axonal swellings filled with disorganized accumulations of IFs. Herein, we describe the development and characterization of the AAV vector carrying a normal copy of the human GAN transgene (AAV9/JeT-GAN) currently employed in the clinical trial. Treatment with AAV/JeT-GAN restored the normal configuration of IFs in patient fibroblasts within days in cell culture and by 4 weeks in GAN KO mice. IT delivery of AAV9/JeT-GAN in aged GAN KO mice preserved sciatic nerve ultrastructure, reduced neuronal IF accumulations and attenuated rotarod dysfunction. This strategy conferred sustained wild-type gigaxonin expression across the PNS and CNS for at least 1 year in mice. These results support the clinical evaluation of AAV9/JeT-GAN for potential therapeutic outcomes and treatment for GAN patients.

  18. Evaluation of cell-mediated immune responses against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap and Rep proteins after vaccination with a commercial PCV2 sub-unit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fort, Maria; Sibila, Marina; Nofrarías, Miquel; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Olvera, Alex; Mateu, Enric; Segalés, Joaquim

    2012-11-15

    This study investigated the development of cellular immunity to Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap and Rep proteins in pigs vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 genotype a (PCV2a) based sub-unit vaccine, before and after a heterologous challenge with a PCV2b isolate. At three weeks of age, 20 pigs were inoculated intramuscularly with either the vaccine product (V group, n=9) or phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) (NV group, n=11). Three weeks after vaccination, pigs were challenged intranasally with PCV2b (V-C and NV-C groups) or PBS (V-NC and NV-NC groups). None of the pigs developed clinical signs during the whole experiment, but all NV-C and 3/5 V-C pigs developed viraemia. Vaccination induced the development IFN-γ-secreting cells in response to the Cap protein of PCV2, which appeared three weeks post-vaccination and increased after challenge. By that time, no significant differences were detected on PCV2 antibody titres between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs, although there were significant differences on day 7 post-challenge. PCV2-inoculation induced a cellular response against the Rep protein. Such response was significantly reduced or even absent in PCV2-inoculated pigs that were previously vaccinated (V-C group), presumably as a result of a lower PCV2 replication in vaccinated animals compared to non-vaccinated ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  20. Sequence variations in RepMP2/3 and RepMP4 elements reveal intragenomic homologous DNA recombination events in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Spuesens, Emiel B M; Oduber, Minoushka; Hoogenboezem, Theo; Sluijter, Marcel; Hartwig, Nico G; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Vink, Cornelis

    2009-07-01

    The gene encoding major adhesin protein P1 of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, MPN141, contains two DNA sequence stretches, designated RepMP2/3 and RepMP4, which display variation among strains. This variation allows strains to be differentiated into two major P1 genotypes (1 and 2) and several variants. Interestingly, multiple versions of the RepMP2/3 and RepMP4 elements exist at other sites within the bacterial genome. Because these versions are closely related in sequence, but not identical, it has been hypothesized that they have the capacity to recombine with their counterparts within MPN141, and thereby serve as a source of sequence variation of the P1 protein. In order to determine the variation within the RepMP2/3 and RepMP4 elements, both within the bacterial genome and among strains, we analysed the DNA sequences of all RepMP2/3 and RepMP4 elements within the genomes of 23 M. pneumoniae strains. Our data demonstrate that: (i) recombination is likely to have occurred between two RepMP2/3 elements in four of the strains, and (ii) all previously described P1 genotypes can be explained by inter-RepMP recombination events. Moreover, the difference between the two major P1 genotypes was reflected in all RepMP elements, such that subtype 1 and 2 strains can be differentiated on the basis of sequence variation in each RepMP element. This implies that subtype 1 and subtype 2 strains represent evolutionarily diverged strain lineages. Finally, a classification scheme is proposed in which the P1 genotype of M. pneumoniae isolates can be described in a sequence-based, universal fashion.

  1. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene-mediated inhibition of basal gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves its negative regulatory functions.

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, I; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2), a human parvovirus which is apathogenic in adults, inhibits replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. The rep gene of AAV-2, which was shown earlier to be sufficient for this negative interference, also down-regulated the expression of heterologous sequences driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1. This effect was observed in the absence of the HIV-1 transactivator Tat, i.e., at basal levels of LTR-driven transcription. In this work, we studied the involvement of functional subsequences of the HIV-1 LTR in rep-mediated inhibition in the absence of Tat. Mutated LTRs driving an indicator gene (cat) were cointroduced into human SW480 cells together with rep alone or with double-stranded DNA fragments or RNA containing sequences of the HIV-1 LTR. The results indicate that rep strongly enhances the function of negative regulatory elements of the LTR. In addition, the experiments revealed a transcribed sequence element located within the TAR-coding sequence termed AHHH (AAV-HIV homology element derived from HIV-1) which is involved in rep-mediated inhibition. The AHHH element is also involved in down-regulation of basal expression levels in the absence of rep, suggesting that AHHH also contributes to negative regulatory functions of the LTR of HIV-1. In contrast, positive regulatory elements of the HIV-1 LTR such as the NF kappa B and SP1 binding sites have no significant influence on the rep-mediated inhibition. Images PMID:8289357

  2. AAV vector-mediated secretion of chondroitinase provides a sensitive tracer for axonal arborisations.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Nuno; Muir, Elizabeth M; Andrews, Melissa R; Ward, Anneliese; Michelmore, Nicholas; Dasgupta, Debayan; Verhaagen, Joost; Moloney, Elizabeth B; Keynes, Roger J; Fawcett, James W; Rogers, John H

    2014-04-30

    As part of a project to express chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in neurons of the central nervous system, we have inserted a modified ChABC gene into an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector and injected it into the vibrissal motor cortex in adult rats to determine the extent and distribution of expression of the enzyme. A similar vector for expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the same location. For each vector, two versions with minor differences were used, giving similar results. After 4 weeks, the brains were stained to show GFP and products of chondroitinase digestion. Chondroitinase was widely expressed, and the AAV-ChABC and AAV-GFP vectors gave similar expression patterns in many respects, consistent with the known projections from the directly transduced neurons in vibrissal motor cortex and adjacent cingulate cortex. In addition, diffusion of vector to deeper neuronal populations led to labelling of remote projection fields which was much more extensive with AAV-ChABC than with AAV-GFP. The most notable of these populations are inferred to be neurons of cortical layer 6, projecting widely in the thalamus, and neurons of the anterior pole of the hippocampus, projecting through most of the hippocampus. We conclude that, whereas GFP does not label the thinnest axonal branches of some neuronal types, chondroitinase is efficiently secreted from these arborisations and enables their extent to be sensitively visualised. After 12 weeks, chondroitinase expression was undiminished. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene Delivery to Adipose Tissue Using Transcriptionally Targeted rAAV8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Uhrig-Schmidt, Silke; Geiger, Matthias; Luippold, Gerd; Birk, Gerald; Mennerich, Detlev; Neubauer, Heike; Grimm, Dirk; Wolfrum, Christian; Kreuz, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities fostered intensive research in the field of adipose tissue biology. To further unravel molecular mechanisms of adipose tissue function, genetic tools enabling functional studies in vitro and in vivo are essential. While the use of transgenic animals is well established, attempts using viral and non-viral vectors to genetically modify adipocytes in vivo are rare. Therefore, we here characterized recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors regarding their potency as gene transfer vehicles for adipose tissue. Our results demonstrate that a single dose of systemically applied rAAV8-CMV-eGFP can give rise to remarkable transgene expression in murine adipose tissues. Upon transcriptional targeting of the rAAV8 vector to adipocytes using a 2.2 kb fragment of the murine adiponectin (mAP2.2) promoter, eGFP expression was significantly decreased in off-target tissues while efficient transduction was maintained in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. Moreover, rAAV8-mAP2.2-mediated expression of perilipin A – a lipid-droplet-associated protein – resulted in significant changes in metabolic parameters only three weeks post vector administration. Taken together, our findings indicate that rAAV vector technology is applicable as a flexible tool to genetically modify adipocytes for functional proof-of-concept studies and the assessment of putative therapeutic targets in vivo. PMID:25551639

  4. Establishment of an AAV Reverse Infection-Based Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Dong, Zheyue; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Gang; Wu, Xiaobing; Xue, Jinglun; Wang, Yue; Chen, Jinzhong

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of a convenient high-throughput gene transduction approach is critical for biological screening. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are broadly used in gene therapy studies, yet their applications in in vitro high-throughput gene transduction are limited. Principal Findings We established an AAV reverse infection (RI)-based method in which cells were transduced by quantified recombinant AAVs (rAAVs) pre-coated onto 96-well plates. The number of pre-coated rAAV particles and number of cells loaded per well, as well as the temperature stability of the rAAVs on the plates, were evaluated. As the first application of this method, six serotypes or hybrid serotypes of rAAVs (AAV1, AAV2, AAV5/5, AAV8, AAV25 m, AAV28 m) were compared for their transduction efficiencies using various cell lines, including BHK21, HEK293, BEAS-2BS, HeLaS3, Huh7, Hepa1-6, and A549. AAV2 and AAV1 displayed high transduction efficiency; thus, they were deemed to be suitable candidate vectors for the RI-based array. We next evaluated the impact of sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment on rAAV vector-mediated reporter gene expression and found it was significantly enhanced, suggesting that our system reflected the biological response of target cells to specific treatments. Conclusions/Significance Our study provides a novel method for establishing a highly efficient gene transduction array that may be developed into a platform for cell biological assays. PMID:20976058

  5. Pathology Associated with AAV Mediated Expression of Beta Amyloid or C100 in Adult Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Eleanor S.; Muhling, Jill; Martins, Ralph N.; Wijaya, Linda K.; Ehlert, Erich M.; Harvey, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of beta amyloid (Aβ) in the brain is a primary feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but the exact molecular mechanisms by which Aβ exerts its toxic actions are not yet entirely clear. We documented pathological changes 3 and 6 months after localised injection of recombinant, bi-cistronic adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV2) expressing human Aβ40-GFP, Aβ42-GFP, C100-GFP or C100V717F-GFP into the hippocampus and cerebellum of 8 week old male mice. Injection of all rAAV2 vectors resulted in wide-spread transduction within the hippocampus and cerebellum, as shown by expression of transgene mRNA and GFP protein. Despite the lack of accumulation of Aβ protein after injection with AAV vectors, injection of rAAV2-Aβ42-GFP and rAAV2- C100V717F-GFP into the hippocampus resulted in significantly increased microgliosis and altered permeability of the blood brain barrier, the latter revealed by high levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) around the injection site and the presence of IgG positive cells. In comparison, injection of rAAV2-Aβ40-GFP and rAAV2-C100-GFP into the hippocampus resulted in substantially less neuropathology. Injection of rAAV2 vectors into the cerebellum resulted in similar types of pathological changes, but to a lesser degree. The use of viral vectors to express different types of Aβ and C100 is a powerful technique with which to examine the direct in vivo consequences of Aβ expression in different regions of the mature nervous system and will allow experimentation and analysis of pathological AD-like changes in a broader range of species other than mouse. PMID:23516609

  6. Efficient CNS targeting in adult mice by intrathecal infusion of single-stranded AAV9-GFP for gene therapy of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Bey, K; Ciron, C; Dubreil, L; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Cristini, J; Blouin, V; Aubourg, P; Colle, M-A

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy constitutes a powerful tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. While AAVs are generally administered systemically to newborns in preclinical studies of neurological disorders, in adults the maturity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) must be considered when selecting the route of administration. Delivery of AAVs into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents an attractive approach to target the central nervous system (CNS) and bypass the BBB. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of intra-CSF delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9-CAG-GFP vector in adult mice via intracisternal (iCist) or intralumbar (it-Lumb) administration. It-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery resulted in greater diffusion throughout the entire spinal cord and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression mainly in the cerebellum, cortex and olfactory bulb. By contrast, iCist delivery led to strong GFP expression throughout the entire brain. Comparison of the transduction efficiency of ssAAV9-CAG-GFP versus ssAAV9-SYN1-GFP following it-Lumb administration revealed widespread and specific GFP expression in neurons and motoneurons of the spinal cord and brain when the neuron-specific synapsin 1 (SYN1) promoter was used. Our findings demonstrate that it-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery is a safe and highly efficient means of targeting the CNS in adult mice.

  7. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  8. AAV9-mediated engineering of autotransplanted kidney of non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Tomasoni, S; Trionfini, P; Azzollini, N; Zentilin, L; Giacca, M; Aiello, S; Longaretti, L; Cozzi, E; Baldan, N; Remuzzi, G; Benigni, A

    2017-05-01

    Ex vivo gene transfer to the graft before transplantation is an attractive option for circumventing systemic side effects of chronic antirejection therapy. Gene delivery of the immunomodulatory protein cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4-Ig) prevented chronic kidney rejection in a rat model of allotransplantation without the need for systemic immunosuppression. Here we generated adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) and AAV9 vectors encoding for LEA29Y, an optimized version of CTLA4-Ig. Both LEA29Y vectors were equally efficient for reducing T-cell proliferation in vitro. Serotype 9 was chosen for in vivo experiments owing to a lower frequency of preformed antibodies against the AAV9 capsid in 16 non-human primate tested sera. AAV9-LEA29Y was able to transduce the kidney of non-human primates in an autotransplantation model. Expression of LEA29Y mRNA by renal cells translated into the production of the corresponding protein, which was confined to the graft but not detected in serum. Results in non-human primates represent a step forward in maintaining the portability of this strategy into clinics.

  9. Copackaged AAV9 Vectors Promote Simultaneous Immune Tolerance and Phenotypic Correction of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Todd, Adrian G.; Clément, Nathalie; Falk, Darin J.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by lysosomal accumulation of glycogen from a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Replacement of the missing enzyme is available by repeated protein infusions; however, efficacy is limited by immune response and inability to restore enzymatic function in the central nervous system. An alternative therapeutic option is adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, which results in widespread gene transfer and prolonged transgene expression. Both enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy can elicit anti-GAA immune reactions that dampen their effectiveness and pose life-threatening risks to patient safety. To modulate the immune responses related to gene therapy, we show that a human codon-optimized GAA (coGAA) driven by a liver-specific promoter (LSP) using AAV9 is capable of promoting immune tolerance in a Gaa−/− mouse model. Copackaging AAV9-LSP-coGAA with the tissue-restricted desmin promoter (AAV9-DES-coGAA) demonstrates the necessary cell autonomous expression in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, peripheral nerve, and the spinal cord. Simultaneous high-level expression in liver led to the expansion of GAA-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and induction of immune tolerance. Transfer of Tregs into naïve recipients prevented pathogenic allergic reactions after repeated ERT challenges. Copackaged AAV9 also attenuated preexisting humoral and cellular immune responses, which enhanced the biochemical correction. Our data present a therapeutic design in which simultaneous administration of two copackaged AAV constructs may provide therapeutic benefit and resolve immune reactions in the treatment of multisystem disorders. PMID:26603344

  10. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (∼174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-κB subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reversal of blindness in animal models of leber congenital amaurosis using optimized AAV2-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Bennicelli, Jeannette; Wright, John Fraser; Komaromy, Andras; Jacobs, Jonathan B; Hauck, Bernd; Zelenaia, Olga; Mingozzi, Federico; Hui, Daniel; Chung, Daniel; Rex, Tonia S; Wei, Zhangyong; Qu, Guang; Zhou, Shangzhen; Zeiss, Caroline; Arruda, Valder R; Acland, Gregory M; Dell'Osso, Lou F; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2008-03-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV; AAV2.RPE65) in animal models of the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Protein expression was optimized by addition of a modified Kozak sequence at the translational start site of hRPE65. Modifications in AAV production and delivery included use of a long stuffer sequence to prevent reverse packaging from the AAV inverted-terminal repeats, and co-injection with a surfactant. The latter allows consistent and predictable delivery of a given dose of vector. We observed improved electroretinograms (ERGs) and visual acuity in Rpe65 mutant mice. This has not been reported previously using AAV2 vectors. Subretinal delivery of 8.25 x 10(10) vector genomes in affected dogs was well tolerated both locally and systemically, and treated animals showed improved visual behavior and pupillary responses, and reduced nystagmus within 2 weeks of injection. ERG responses confirmed the reversal of visual deficit. Immunohistochemistry confirmed transduction of retinal pigment epithelium cells and there was minimal toxicity to the retina as judged by histopathologic analysis. The data demonstrate that AAV2.RPE65 delivers the RPE65 transgene efficiently and quickly to the appropriate target cells in vivo in animal models. This vector holds great promise for treatment of LCA due to RPE65 mutations.

  12. Reversal of Blindness in Animal Models of Leber Congenital Amaurosis Using Optimized AAV2-mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bennicelli, Jeannette; Wright, John Fraser; Komaromy, Andras; Jacobs, Jonathan B; Hauck, Bernd; Zelenaia, Olga; Mingozzi, Federico; Hui, Daniel; Chung, Daniel; Rex, Tonia S; Wei, Zhangyong; Qu, Guang; Zhou, Shangzhen; Zeiss, Caroline; Arruda, Valder R; Acland, Gregory M; Dell’Osso, Lou F; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV; AAV2.RPE65) in animal models of the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Protein expression was optimized by addition of a modified Kozak sequence at the translational start site of hRPE65. Modifications in AAV production and delivery included use of a long stuffer sequence to prevent reverse packaging from the AAV inverted-terminal repeats, and co-injection with a surfactant. The latter allows consistent and predictable delivery of a given dose of vector. We observed improved electroretinograms (ERGs) and visual acuity in Rpe65 mutant mice. This has not been reported previously using AAV2 vectors. Subretinal delivery of 8.25 × 1010 vector genomes in affected dogs was well tolerated both locally and systemically, and treated animals showed improved visual behavior and pupillary responses, and reduced nystagmus within 2 weeks of injection. ERG responses confirmed the reversal of visual deficit. Immunohistochemistry confirmed transduction of retinal pigment epithelium cells and there was minimal toxicity to the retina as judged by histopathologic analysis. The data demonstrate that AAV2.RPE65 delivers the RPE65 transgene efficiently and quickly to the appropriate target cells in vivo in animal models. This vector holds great promise for treatment of LCA due to RPE65 mutations. PMID:18209734

  13. Intraspinal AAV Injections Immediately Rostral to a Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury Site Efficiently Transduces Neurons in Spinal Cord and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Klaw, Michelle C; Xu, Chen; Tom, Veronica J

    2013-01-01

    In the vast majority of studies utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV) in central nervous system applications, including those published with spinal cord injury (SCI) models, AAV has been administered at the level of the cell body of neurons targeted for genetic modification, resulting in transduction of neurons in the vicinity of the injection site. However, as SCI interrupts many axon tracts, it may be more beneficial to transduce a diverse pool of supraspinal neurons. We determined if descending axons severed by SCI are capable of retrogradely transporting AAV to remotely transduce a variety of brain regions. Different AAV serotypes encoding the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected into gray and white matter immediately rostral to a spinal transection site. This resulted in the transduction of thousands of neurons within the spinal cord and in multiple regions within the brainstem that project to spinal cord. In addition, we established that different serotypes had disparate regional specificity and that AAV5 transduced the most brain and spinal cord neurons. This is the first demonstration that retrograde transport of AAV by axons severed by SCI is an effective means to transduce a collection of supraspinal neurons. Thus, we identify a novel, minimally invasive means to transduce a variety of neuronal populations within both the spinal cord and the brain following SCI. This paradigm to broadly distribute viral vectors has the potential to be an important component of a combinatorial strategy to promote functional axonal regeneration. PMID:23881451

  14. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  15. Application of a haematopoetic progenitor cell-targeted adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector established by selection of an AAV random peptide library on a leukaemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Stiefelhagen, Marius; Sellner, Leopold; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Jauch, Anna; Laufs, Stephanie; Wenz, Frederik; Zeller, W Jens; Fruehauf, Stefan; Veldwijk, Marlon R

    2008-01-01

    Background For many promising target cells (e.g.: haematopoeitic progenitors), the susceptibility to standard adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is low. Advancements in vector development now allows the generation of target cell-selected AAV capsid mutants. Methods To determine its suitability, the method was applied on a chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) cell line (K562) to obtain a CML-targeted vector and the resulting vectors tested on leukaemia, non-leukaemia, primary human CML and CD34+ peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC); standard AAV2 and a random capsid mutant vector served as controls. Results Transduction of CML (BV173, EM3, K562 and Lama84) and AML (HL60 and KG1a) cell lines with the capsid mutants resulted in an up to 36-fold increase in CML transduction efficiency (K562: 2-fold, 60% ± 2% green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ cells; BV173: 9-fold, 37% ± 2% GFP+ cells; Lama84: 36-fold, 29% ± 2% GFP+ cells) compared to controls. For AML (KG1a, HL60) and one CML cell line (EM3), no significant transduction (<1% GFP+ cells) was observed for any vector. Although the capsid mutant clone was established on a cell line, proof-of-principle experiments using primary human cells were performed. For CML (3.2-fold, mutant: 1.75% ± 0.45% GFP+ cells, p = 0.03) and PBPC (3.5-fold, mutant: 4.21% ± 3.40% GFP+ cells) a moderate increase in gene transfer of the capsid mutant compared to control vectors was observed. Conclusion Using an AAV random peptide library on a CML cell line, we were able to generate a capsid mutant, which transduced CML cell lines and primary human haematopoietic progenitor cells with higher efficiency than standard recombinant AAV vectors. PMID:18789140

  16. Polymers for Improving the In Vivo Transduction Efficiency of AAV2 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Boutin, Sylvie; Masurier, Carole; Scherman, Daniel; Kichler, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Background Adeno-associated virus has attracted great attention as vehicle for body-wide gene delivery. However, for the successful treatment of a disease such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy infusion of very large amounts of vectors is required. This not only raises questions about the technical feasibility of the large scale production but also about the overall safety of the approach. One way to overcome these problems would be to find strategies able to increase the in vivo efficiency. Methodology Here, we investigated whether polymers can act as adjuvants to increase the in vivo efficiency of AAV2. Our strategy consisted in the pre-injection of polymers before intravenous administration of mice with AAV2 encoding a murine secreted alkaline phosphatase (mSeAP). The transgene expression, vector biodistribution and tissue transduction were studied by quantification of the mSeAP protein and real time PCR. The injection of polyinosinic acid and polylysine resulted in an increase of plasmatic mSeAP of 2- and 12-fold, respectively. Interestingly, polyinosinic acid pre-injection significantly reduced the neutralizing antibody titer raised against AAV2. Conclusions Our results show that the pre-injection of polymers can improve the overall transduction efficiency of systemically administered AAV2 and reduce the humoral response against the capsid proteins. PMID:21203395

  17. Rational plasmid design and bioprocess optimization to enhance recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) productivity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Emmerling, Verena V; Pegel, Antje; Milian, Ernest G; Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Kunz, Marion; Wegele, Jessica; Kamen, Amine A; Kochanek, Stefan; Hoerer, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Viral vectors used for gene and oncolytic therapy belong to the most promising biological products for future therapeutics. Clinical success of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) based therapies raises considerable demand for viral vectors, which cannot be met by current manufacturing strategies. Addressing existing bottlenecks, we improved a plasmid system termed rep/cap split packaging and designed a minimal plasmid encoding adenoviral helper function. Plasmid modifications led to a 12-fold increase in rAAV vector titers compared to the widely used pDG standard system. Evaluation of different production approaches revealed superiority of processes based on anchorage- and serum-dependent HEK293T cells, exhibiting about 15-fold higher specific and volumetric productivity compared to well-established suspension cells cultivated in serum-free medium. As for most other viral vectors, classical stirred-tank bioreactor production is thus still not capable of providing drug product of sufficient amount. We show that manufacturing strategies employing classical surface-providing culture systems can be successfully transferred to the new fully-controlled, single-use bioreactor system Integrity(TM) iCELLis(TM) . In summary, we demonstrate substantial bioprocess optimizations leading to more efficient and scalable production processes suggesting a promising way for flexible large-scale rAAV manufacturing. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Product-Related Impurities in Clinical-Grade Recombinant AAV Vectors: Characterization and Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors expressing therapeutic genes continue to demonstrate great promise for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases and together with other gene transfer vectors represent an emerging new therapeutic paradigm comparable in potential impact on human health to that achieved by recombinant proteins and vaccines. A challenge for the current pipeline of AAV-based investigational products as they advance through clinical development is the identification, characterization and lot-to-lot control of the process- and product-related impurities present in even highly purified preparations. Especially challenging are AAV vector product-related impurities that closely resemble the vector itself and are, in some cases, without clear precedent in established biotherapeutic products. The determination of acceptable levels of these impurities in vectors prepared for human clinical product development, with the goal of new product licensure, requires careful risk and feasibility assessment. This review focuses primarily on the AAV product-related impurities that have been described in vectors prepared for clinical development. PMID:28548061

  19. The complete genomic sequence of egg drop syndrome virus strain AAV-2.

    PubMed

    Jin, Q; Zeng, L; Yang, F; Li, M; Hou, Y

    1999-12-01

    In the search for the genome of egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV-76) Chinese strain AAV-2, part of restriction endonuclease physical map is analyzed, the complete genomic library is organized. On basis of this, the complete genome nucleotide sequences (32 838 bp in length, including terminal structures) are determined. The data analysis shows: compared with the other Adenoviruses, strain AAV-2 has more disparity on genomic structure and the distribution of open reading frame (ORF). There are no clear E1, E3 and E4 regions in AAV-2 genome. Two segments located at both ends of genome (1.1 kb and 8.3 kb in length respectively) have no homology with the other adenovirus genomes. In addition, strain AAV-2 genome lacks ORFs encoding ElA, pV and pIX, which are common ORFs encoding early, lately proteins in Adenovirus. This reveals differences between EDSA-76, the sole standard strain of group III Avian Adenoviruses, and the other Avian Adenoviruses for the first time. It will help the search for Avian Adenovirus and will also help the search of all Adenoviruses.

  20. A phase1 study of stereotactic gene delivery of AAV2-NGF for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Michael S; Baumann, Tiffany L; Bakay, Roy A E; Ostrove, Jeffrey M; Siffert, Joao; Fleisher, Adam S; Herzog, Christopher D; Barba, David; Pay, Mary; Salmon, David P; Chu, Yaping; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Bishop, Kathie; Keator, David; Potkin, Steven; Bartus, Raymond T

    2014-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an endogenous neurotrophic-factor protein with the potential to restore function and to protect degenerating cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but safe and effective delivery has proved unsuccessful. Gene transfer, combined with stereotactic surgery, offers a potential means to solve the long-standing delivery obstacles. An open-label clinical trial evaluated the safety and tolerability, and initial efficacy of three ascending doses of the genetically engineered gene-therapy vector adeno-associated virus serotype 2 delivering NGF (AAV2-NGF [CERE-110]). Ten subjects with AD received bilateral AAV2-NGF stereotactically into the nucleus basalis of Meynert. AAV2-NGF was safe and well-tolerated for 2 years. Positron emission tomographic imaging and neuropsychological testing showed no evidence of accelerated decline. Brain autopsy tissue confirmed long-term, targeted, gene-mediated NGF expression and bioactivity. This trial provides important evidence that bilateral stereotactic administration of AAV2-NGF to the nucleus basalis of Meynert is feasible, well-tolerated, and able to produce long-term, biologically active NGF expression, supporting the initiation of an ongoing multicenter, double-blind, sham-surgery-controlled trial. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Restoration of visual response in aged dystrophic RCS rats using AAV-mediated channelopsin-2 gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Yawo, Hiromu; Ishizuka, Toru; Isago, Hitomi; Narikawa, Satoko; Kügler, Sebastian; Tamai, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    To investigate whether the channelopsin-2 (Chop2) gene would restore visual responses in 10-month-old dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (aged RCS; rdy/rdy) rats, the authors transferred the Chop2 gene into the retinal cells of aged RCS rats using the adenoassociated virus (AAV) vector. The N-terminal fragment (residues 1-315) of Chop2 was fused to a fluorescent protein, Venus, in frame at the end of the Chop2 coding fragment. The viral vector construct (AAV-Chop2V) for the expression of the Chop2V in the retina was made by subcloning into an adenoassociated virus vector, including the CAG promoter. To evaluate the expression profile of Chop2V in the retina, the rats were killed and the eyes were removed and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline. Retinal wholemount specimens and cryosections were made. Under anesthetized conditions, electrodes for the recording of visually evoked potentials (VEPs) were implanted onto the visual cortex in aged-RCS (rdy/rdy) rats. AAV-Chop2V vectors were then injected into the vitreous cavity of the left eyes. As a control, AAV-Venus vectors were applied to the right eyes. VEPs were evoked by the flash of a blue, white, or red light-emitting diode (LED) and were recorded from the visual cortex of the rats at various time points after the AAV vector injection. Chop2V fluorescence was predominantly observed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Some fluorescence was observed in the inner nuclear layer and the inner plexiform layer neurites. A tendency of recovery was observed in the VEPs of aged RCS (rdy/rdy) rats after the AAV-Chop2V injection but not after the AAV-Venus injection. The visual response of AAV-Chop2V-injected aged RCS (rdy/rdy) rats was less sensitive to the blue LED flash than that of nondystrophic RCS (+/+) rats. The AAV-Chop2V-injected aged RCS (rdy/rdy) rats were insensitive to the red LED flash, which evoked a robust VEP in the RCS (+/+) rats. The visual response of aged RCS (rdy/rdy) rats

  2. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  3. Concomitant Intravenous Nitroglycerin With Intracoronary Delivery of AAV1.SERCA2a Enhances Gene Transfer in Porcine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Hadri, Lahouaria; Rapti, Kleopatra; Ladage, Dennis; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Tilemann, Lisa; Yi, Geng-Hua; Morel, Charlotte; Gwathmey, Judith K; Zsebo, Krisztina; Weber, Thomas; Kawase, Yoshiaki; Hajjar, Roger J

    2012-01-01

    SERCA2a gene therapy improves contractile and energetic function of failing hearts and has been shown to be associated with benefits in clinical outcomes, symptoms, functional status, biomarkers, and cardiac structure in a phase 2 clinical trial. In an effort to enhance the efficiency and homogeneity of gene uptake in cardiac tissue, we examined the effects of nitroglycerin (NTG) in a porcine model following AAV1.SERCA2a gene delivery. Three groups of Göttingen minipigs were assessed: (i) group A: control intracoronary (IC) AAV1.SERCA2a (n = 6); (ii) group B: a single bolus IC injection of NTG (50 µg) immediately before administration of intravenous (IV) AAV1.SERCA2a (n = 6); and (iii) group C: continuous IV NTG (1 µg/kg/minute) during the 10 minutes of AAV1.SERCA2a infusion (n = 6). We found that simultaneous IV infusion of NTG and AAV1.SERCA2a resulted in increased viral transduction efficiency, both in terms of messenger RNA (mRNA) as well as SERCA2a protein levels in the whole left ventricle (LV) compared to control animals. On the other hand, IC NTG pretreatment did not result in enhanced gene transfer efficiency, mRNA or protein levels when compared to control animals. Importantly, the transgene expression was restricted to the heart tissue. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that IV infusion of NTG significantly improves cardiac gene transfer efficiency in porcine hearts. PMID:22215018

  4. Assaying the Stability and Inactivation of AAV Serotype 1 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Douglas B.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are a commonplace tool for gene delivery ranging from cell culture to human gene therapy. One feature that makes AAV a desirable vector is its stability, in regard to both the duration of transgene expression and retention of infectivity as a viral particle. This study examined the stability of AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vectors under different conditions. First, transducibility after storage at 4°C decreased 20% over 7 weeks. Over 10 freeze–thaw cycles, the resulting transduction efficiency became variable at 60–120% of a single thaw. Using small stainless steel slugs to mimic a biosafety cabinet or metal lab bench surface, it was found that an AAV1 vector can be reconstituted after 6 days of storage at room temperature. The stability of AAV is a desired feature, but effective decontamination procedures must be available for safety and experimental integrity. Multiple disinfectants commonly used in the laboratory for ability to inactivate an AAV1 vector were tested, and it was found that autoclaving, 0.25% peracetic acid, iodine, or 10% Clorox bleach completely prevented AAV-mediated transgene expression. These data suggest that peracetic acid should be used for inactivating AAV1 vectors on metal-based surfaces or instruments in order to avoid inadvertent transgene expression in human cells or cross-contamination of instruments. PMID:28192678

  5. GEMINI RENDEZVOUS EVALUATION POD (REP) - ARTIST CONCEPT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-01

    S65-28653 (August 1965) --- Rendezvous Evaluation Pod (REP) in orbit is approached by Gemini spacecraft as seen in this artist's concept using an actual photograph taken on the Gemini-4 mission. The REP is superimposed over a Gemini-4 Earth-sky picture of cloud formations over an ocean. The REP will be used by the crew of the Gemini-5 spacecraft to practice rendezvous techniques.

  6. Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies against Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Types 2, 5, and 6 in Cystic Fibrosis and Normal Populations: Implications for Gene Therapy using AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Christine L.; Miller, A. Dusty; McNamara, Sharon; Emerson, Julia; Gibson, Ronald L.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Aitken, Moira L.

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are promising candidates for gene therapy directed to the lungs, in particular for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). In animal models of lung gene transfer, neutralizing antibodies in serum made in response to vector exposure have been associated with a partial to complete block to repeat transduction by vectors with the same capsid type, thus transduction by AAV vectors might be inefficient in humans previously exposed to the same AAV type. AAV type 2 (AAV2) has been used in clinical trials of lung gene transfer, but AAV5 and AAV6 have been shown to mediate more efficient transduction in rodent lungs and in cultured human airway epithelia compared to that of AAV2. Here we have measured neutralizing antibodies against AAV type 2, 5, and 6 vectors in serum from children and adults with CF, and from normal adults. About 30% of adults were seropositive for AAV2, 20–30% were seropositive for AAV6, and 10–20% were seropositive for AAV5. CF children were seropositive for AAV types 2, 5, or 6 at rates of 4–15%. All individuals seropositive for AAV6 were also seropositive for AAV2, and the AAV6 titer was low compared to the AAV2 titer. AAV5-positive sera were lower both in titers and rates than those seen for AAV6. The results indicate that AAV type 2, 5 or 6 exposure is low in CF and control populations and even lower in CF children. PMID:16610931

  7. Undetectable Transcription of cap in a Clinical AAV Vector: Implications for Preformed Capsid in Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Bernd; Murphy, Samuel L; Smith, Peter H; Qu, Guang; Liu, Xingge; Zelenaia, Olga; Mingozzi, Federico; Sommer, Jürg M; High, Katherine A; Wright, J. Fraser

    2008-01-01

    In a gene therapy clinical trial for hemophilia B, adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) capsid–specific CD8+ T cells were previously implicated in the elimination of vector-transduced hepatocytes, resulting in loss of human factor IX (hFIX) transgene expression. To test the hypothesis that expression of AAV2 cap DNA impurities in the AAV2-hFIX vector was the source of epitopes presented on transduced cells, transcription of cap was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (Q-RT-PCR) following transduction of target cells with the vector used in the clinical trial. Transcriptional profiling was also performed for residual AmpR, and adenovirus E2A and E4. Although trace amounts of DNA impurities were present in the clinical vector, transcription of these sequences was not detected after transduction of human hepatocytes, nor in mice administered a dose 26-fold above the highest dose administered in the clinical study. Two methods used to minimize encapsidated DNA impurities in the clinical vector were: (i) a vector (cis) production plasmid with a backbone exceeding the packaging limit of AAV; and (ii) a vector purification step that achieved separation of the vector from vector-related impurities (e.g., empty capsids). In conclusion, residual cap expression was undetectable following transduction with AAV2-hFIX clinical vectors. Preformed capsid protein is implicated as the source of epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells that eliminated vector-transduced cells in the clinical study. PMID:18941440

  8. Subpial Adeno-associated Virus 9 (AAV9) Vector Delivery in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takahiro; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Navarro, Michael; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Marsala, Silvia; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Lukacova, Nada; Bimbova, Katarina; Marsala, Martin

    2017-07-13

    The successful development of a subpial adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) vector delivery technique in adult rats and pigs has been reported on previously. Using subpially-placed polyethylene catheters (PE-10 or PE-5) for AAV9 delivery, potent transgene expression through the spinal parenchyma (white and gray matter) in subpially-injected spinal segments has been demonstrated. Because of the wide range of transgenic mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases, there is a strong desire for the development of a potent central nervous system (CNS)-targeted vector delivery technique in adult mice. Accordingly, the present study describes the development of a spinal subpial vector delivery device and technique to permit safe and effective spinal AAV9 delivery in adult C57BL/6J mice. In spinally immobilized and anesthetized mice, the pia mater (cervical 1 and lumbar 1-2 spinal segmental level) was incised with a sharp 34 G needle using an XYZ manipulator. A second XYZ manipulator was then used to advance a blunt 36G needle into the lumbar and/or cervical subpial space. The AAV9 vector (3-5 µL; 1.2 x 10 13 genome copies (gc)) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was then injected subpially. After injections, neurological function (motor and sensory) was assessed periodically, and animals were perfusion-fixed 14 days after AAV9 delivery with 4% paraformaldehyde. Analysis of horizontal or transverse spinal cord sections showed transgene expression throughout the entire spinal cord, in both gray and white matter. In addition, intense retrogradely-mediated GFP expression was seen in the descending motor axons and neurons in the motor cortex, nucleus ruber, and formatio reticularis. No neurological dysfunction was noted in any animals. These data show that the subpial vector delivery technique can successfully be used in adult mice, without causing procedure-related spinal cord injury, and is associated with highly potent transgene expression throughout the spinal neuraxis.

  9. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  10. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M; Flake, Alan W; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A

    2012-03-29

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX-encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier who died of causes unrelated to gene transfer. Using Western blot, IHC, and immunofluorescent staining, we show persistent factor IX expression in injected muscle tissue. F.IX transcripts were detected in injected skeletal muscle using RT-PCR, and isolated whole genomic DNA tested positive for the presence of the transferred AAV vector sequence. This is the longest reported transgene expression to date from a parenterally administered AAV vector, with broad implications for the future of muscle-directed gene transfer.

  11. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M.; Flake, Alan W.; Mingozzi, Federico

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX–encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier who died of causes unrelated to gene transfer. Using Western blot, IHC, and immunofluorescent staining, we show persistent factor IX expression in injected muscle tissue. F.IX transcripts were detected in injected skeletal muscle using RT-PCR, and isolated whole genomic DNA tested positive for the presence of the transferred AAV vector sequence. This is the longest reported transgene expression to date from a parenterally administered AAV vector, with broad implications for the future of muscle-directed gene transfer. PMID:22271447

  12. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site

  13. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  14. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  15. Widespread spinal cord transduction by intrathecal injection of rAAV delivers efficacious RNAi therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Yang, Bin; Qiu, Linghua; Yang, Chunxing; Kramer, Joshua; Su, Qin; Guo, Yansu; Brown, Robert H; Gao, Guangping; Xu, Zuoshang

    2014-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes motor neuron degeneration and paralysis. No treatment can significantly slow or arrest the disease progression. Mutations in the SOD1 gene cause a subset of familial ALS by a gain of toxicity. In principle, these cases could be treated with RNAi that destroys the mutant mRNA, thereby abolishing the toxic protein. However, no system is available to efficiently deliver the RNAi therapy. Recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV) is a promising vehicle due to its long-lasting gene expression and low toxicity. However, ALS afflicts broad areas of the central nervous system (CNS). A lack of practical means to spread rAAV broadly has hindered its application in treatment of ALS. To overcome this barrier, we injected several rAAV serotypes into the cerebrospinal fluid. We found that some rAAV serotypes such as rAAVrh10 and rAAV9 transduced cells throughout the length of the spinal cord following a single intrathecal injection and in the broad forebrain following a single injection into the third ventricle. Furthermore, a single intrathecal injection of rAAVrh10 robustly transduced motor neurons throughout the spinal cord in a non-human primate. These results suggested a therapeutic potential of this vector for ALS. To test this, we injected a rAAVrh10 vector that expressed an artificial miRNA targeting SOD1 into the SOD1G93A mice. This treatment knocked down the mutant SOD1 expression and slowed the disease progression. Our results demonstrate the potential of rAAVs for delivering gene therapy to treat ALS and other diseases that afflict broad areas of the CNS.

  16. AAV capsid CD8+ T-cell epitopes are highly conserved across AAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Daniel J; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Pien, Gary C; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Camire, Rodney M; Ertl, Hildegund; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become one of the most promising vectors in gene transfer in the last 10 years with successful translation to clinical trials in humans and even market approval for a first gene therapy product in Europe. Administration to humans, however, revealed that adaptive immune responses against the vector capsid can present an obstacle to sustained transgene expression due to the activation and expansion of capsid-specific T cells. The limited number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from samples within clinical trials allows for little more than monitoring of T-cell responses. We were able to identify immunodominant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes for common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types by using spleens isolated from subjects undergoing splenectomy for non-malignant indications as a source of large numbers of lymphocytes and restimulating them with single AAV capsid peptides in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that these epitopes are naturally processed and functionally relevant. The design of more effective and less immunogenic AAV vectors, and precise immune monitoring of vector-infused subjects, are facilitated by these findings. PMID:26445723

  17. AAV capsid CD8+ T-cell epitopes are highly conserved across AAV serotypes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Daniel J; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Pien, Gary C; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Camire, Rodney M; Ertl, Hildegund; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become one of the most promising vectors in gene transfer in the last 10 years with successful translation to clinical trials in humans and even market approval for a first gene therapy product in Europe. Administration to humans, however, revealed that adaptive immune responses against the vector capsid can present an obstacle to sustained transgene expression due to the activation and expansion of capsid-specific T cells. The limited number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from samples within clinical trials allows for little more than monitoring of T-cell responses. We were able to identify immunodominant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes for common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types by using spleens isolated from subjects undergoing splenectomy for non-malignant indications as a source of large numbers of lymphocytes and restimulating them with single AAV capsid peptides in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that these epitopes are naturally processed and functionally relevant. The design of more effective and less immunogenic AAV vectors, and precise immune monitoring of vector-infused subjects, are facilitated by these findings.

  18. Synergistic cardioprotective effects of rAAV9-CyclinA2 combined with fibrin glue in rats after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wen; Chang, Ya-Fei; Zhao, Ai-Chao; Chen, Bang-Dang; Liu, Fen; Ma, Yi-Tong; Ma, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of rAAV9-CyclinA2 combined with fibrin glue (FG) in vivo in rats after myocardial infarction (MI). Ninety male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 groups (15 in each group): sham, MI, rAAV9-green fluorescent protein (GFP) + MI, rAAV9-CyclinA2 + MI, FG + MI, and rAAV9-CyclinA2 + FG + MI. Packed virus (5 × 10 11 vg/ml) in 150 µl of normal saline or FG was injected into the infarcted myocardium at five locations in rAAV9-GFP + MI, rAAV9-CyclinA2 + MI, and rAAV9-CyclinA2 + FG + MI groups. The sham, MI, and FG + MI groups were injected with an equal volume of normal saline or FG at the same sites. Five weeks after injection, echocardiography was performed to evaluate the left ventricular function. The expressions of CyclinA2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and phospho-histone-H3 (H3P), vascular density, and infarct area were assessed by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Masson staining. As a result, the combination of rAAV9-CyclinA2 and FG increased ejection fraction and fractional shortening compared with FG or rAAV9-CyclinA2 alone. The expression level of CyclinA2 was significantly higher in the rAAV9-CyclinA2 + FG + MI group compared with the rAAV9-CyclinA2 + MI and FG + MI groups (70.1 ± 1.86% vs. 14.74 ± 2.02%, P < 0.01; or vs. 50.13 ± 3.80%; P < 0.01). A higher expression level of PCNA and H3P was found in the rAAV9-CyclinA2 + FG + MI group compared with other groups. Comparing with other experiment groups, collagen deposition and the infarct size significantly decreased in rAAV9-CyclinA2 + Fibrin + MI group. The vascular density was much higher in the rAAV9-CyclinA2 + FG + MI group compared with the rAAV9-CyclinA2 + MI group. We concluded that fibrin glue combined with rAAV9-CyclinA2 was found to be effective in cardiac remodeling and improving

  19. AAV-Mediated Clarin-1 Expression in the Mouse Retina: Implications for USH3A Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Stupay, Rachel M; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok-Hong; Boye, Sanford L; Chiodo, Vince A; Abrahan, Carolina E; Zhu, Ping; Li, Qiuhong; Strettoi, Enrica; Novelli, Elena; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W Clay; Hauswirth, William W

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3A) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and sensorineural deafness. Efforts to develop therapies for preventing photoreceptor cell loss are hampered by the lack of a retinal phenotype in the existing USH3 mouse models and by conflicting reports regarding the endogenous retinal localization of clarin-1, a transmembrane protein of unknown function. In this study, we used an AAV-based approach to express CLRN1 in the mouse retina in order to determine the pattern of its subcellular localization in different cell types. We found that all major classes of retinal cells express AAV-delivered CLRN1 driven by the ubiquitous, constitutive small chicken β-actin promoter, which has important implications for the design of future USH3 gene therapy studies. Within photoreceptor cells, AAV-expressed CLRN1 is mainly localized at the inner segment region and outer plexiform layer, similar to the endogenous expression of other usher proteins. Subretinal delivery using a full strength viral titer led to significant loss of retinal function as evidenced by ERG analysis, suggesting that there is a critical limit for CLRN1 expression in photoreceptor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CLRN1 expression is potentially supported by a variety of retinal cells, and the right combination of AAV vector dose, promoter, and delivery method needs to be selected to develop safe therapies for USH3 disorder.

  20. Neonatal Systemic AAV Induces Tolerance to CNS Gene Therapy in MPS I Dogs and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Gurda, Brittney L; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Sikora, Tracey; Ruane, Therese; Wang, Ping; Tarantal, Alice F; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2015-01-01

    The potential host immune response to a nonself protein poses a fundamental challenge for gene therapies targeting recessive diseases. We demonstrate in both dogs and nonhuman primates that liver-directed gene transfer using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in neonates induces a persistent state of immunological tolerance to the transgene product, substantially improving the efficacy of subsequent vector administration targeting the central nervous system (CNS). We applied this approach to a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a progressive neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I dogs treated systemically in the first week of life with a vector expressing canine IDUA did not develop antibodies against the enzyme and exhibited robust expression in the CNS upon intrathecal AAV delivery at 1 month of age, resulting in complete correction of brain storage lesions. Newborn rhesus monkeys treated systemically with AAV vector expressing human IDUA developed tolerance to the transgene, resulting in high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IDUA expression and no antibody induction after subsequent CNS gene therapy. These findings suggest that inducing tolerance to the transgene product during a critical period in immunological development can improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy. PMID:26022732

  1. Neonatal Systemic AAV Induces Tolerance to CNS Gene Therapy in MPS I Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Gurda, Brittney L; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Sikora, Tracey; Ruane, Therese; Wang, Ping; Tarantal, Alice F; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2015-08-01

    The potential host immune response to a nonself protein poses a fundamental challenge for gene therapies targeting recessive diseases. We demonstrate in both dogs and nonhuman primates that liver-directed gene transfer using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in neonates induces a persistent state of immunological tolerance to the transgene product, substantially improving the efficacy of subsequent vector administration targeting the central nervous system (CNS). We applied this approach to a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a progressive neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I dogs treated systemically in the first week of life with a vector expressing canine IDUA did not develop antibodies against the enzyme and exhibited robust expression in the CNS upon intrathecal AAV delivery at 1 month of age, resulting in complete correction of brain storage lesions. Newborn rhesus monkeys treated systemically with AAV vector expressing human IDUA developed tolerance to the transgene, resulting in high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IDUA expression and no antibody induction after subsequent CNS gene therapy. These findings suggest that inducing tolerance to the transgene product during a critical period in immunological development can improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy.

  2. Overcoming preexisting humoral immunity to AAV using capsid decoys.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Anguela, Xavier M; Pavani, Giulia; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J; Hui, Daniel J; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Elkouby, Liron; Hinderer, Christian J; Faella, Armida; Howard, Carolann; Tai, Alex; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Wright, John Fraser; High, Katherine A

    2013-07-17

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivered through the systemic circulation successfully transduce various target tissues in animal models. However, similar attempts in humans have been hampered by the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to AAV, which completely block vector transduction. We show in both mouse and nonhuman primate models that addition of empty capsid to the final vector formulation can, in a dose-dependent manner, adsorb these antibodies, even at high titers, thus overcoming their inhibitory effect. To further enhance the safety of the approach, we mutated the receptor binding site of AAV2 to generate an empty capsid mutant that can adsorb antibodies but cannot enter a target cell. Our work suggests that optimizing the ratio of full/empty capsids in the final formulation of vector, based on a patient's anti-AAV titers, will maximize the efficacy of gene transfer after systemic vector delivery.

  3. Overcoming Preexisting Humoral Immunity to AAV Using Capsid Decoys

    PubMed Central

    Anguela, Xavier M.; Pavani, Giulia; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J.; Hui, Daniel J.; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Elkouby, Liron; Hinderer, Christian J.; Faella, Armida; Howard, Carolann; Tai, Alex; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Wright, John Fraser

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivered through the systemic circulation successfully transduce various target tissues in animal models. However, similar attempts in humans have been hampered by the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to AAV, which completely block vector transduction. We show in both mouse and nonhuman primate models that addition of empty capsid to the final vector formulation can, in a dose-dependent manner, adsorb these antibodies, even at high titers, thus overcoming their inhibitory effect. To further enhance the safety of the approach, we mutated the receptor binding site of AAV2 to generate an empty capsid mutant that can adsorb antibodies but cannot enter a target cell. Our work suggests that optimizing the ratio of full/empty capsids in the final formulation of vector, based on a patient's anti-AAV titers, will maximize the efficacy of gene transfer after systemic vector delivery. PMID:23863832

  4. Comparative biology of rAAV transduction in ferret, pig and human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Luo, M; Guo, C; Yan, Z; Wang, Y; Engelhardt, J F

    2007-11-01

    Differences between rodent and human airway cell biology have made it difficult to translate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapies to the lung for cystic fibrosis (CF). As new ferret and pig models for CF become available, knowledge about host cell/vector interactions in these species will become increasingly important for testing potential gene therapies. To this end, we have compared the transduction biology of three rAAV serotypes (AAV1, 2 and 5) in human, ferret, pig and mouse-polarized airway epithelia. Our results indicate that apical transduction of ferret and pig airway epithelia with these rAAV serotypes closely mirrors that observed in human epithelia (rAAV1>rAAV2 congruent withrAAV5), while transduction of mouse epithelia was significantly different (rAAV1>rAAV5>rAAV2). Similarly, ferret, pig and human epithelia also shared serotype-specific differences in the polarity (apical vs basolateral) and proteasome dependence of rAAV transduction. Despite these parallels, N-linked sialic acid receptors were required for rAAV1 and rAAV5 transduction of human and mouse airway epithelia, but not ferret or pig airway epithelia. Hence, although the airway tropisms of rAAV serotypes 1, 2 and 5 are conserved better among ferret, pig and human as compared to mouse, viral receptors/co-receptors appear to maintain considerable species diversity.

  5. Intrajugular Vein Delivery of AAV9-RNAi Prevents Neuropathological Changes and Weight Loss in Huntington's Disease Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Brett D; Smith, Catherine A; Clark, Randall L; Walker, Timothy R; McBride, Jodi L

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurological disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which encodes a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). The mutation confers a toxic gain of function on huntingtin, leading to widespread neurodegeneration and inclusion formation in many brain regions. Although the hallmark symptom of HD is hyperkinesia stemming from striatal degeneration, several other brain regions are affected which cause psychiatric, cognitive, and metabolic symptoms. Additionally, mHTT expression in peripheral tissue is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy, cardiac failure, weight loss, and diabetes. We, and others, have demonstrated a prevention of motor symptoms in HD mice following direct striatal injection of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) serotype 1 encoding an RNA interference (RNAi) construct targeting mutant HTT mRNA (mHTT). Here, we expand these efforts and demonstrate that an intrajugular vein injection of AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) expressing a mutant HTT-specific RNAi construct significantly reduced mHTT expression in multiple brain regions and peripheral tissues affected in HD. Correspondingly, this approach prevented atrophy and inclusion formation in key brain regions as well as the severe weight loss germane to HD transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that systemic delivery of AAV9-RNAi may provide more widespread clinical benefit for patients suffering from HD. PMID:24390280

  6. Cardiac AAV9-S100A1 gene therapy rescues postischemic heart failure in a preclinical large animal model

    PubMed Central

    Pleger, Sven T.; Shan, Changguang; Ksienzyk, Jan; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Boekstegers, Peter; Hinkel, Rabea; Schinkel, Stefanie; Leuchs, Barbara; Ludwig, Jochen; Qiu, Gang; Weber, Christophe; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Raake, Philip; Koch, Walter J.; Katus, Hugo A.; Müller, Oliver J.; Most, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    As a prerequisite to clinical application, we determined the long-term therapeutic effectiveness and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV) S100A1 gene therapy in a preclinical, large animal model of heart failure. S100A1, a positive inotropic regulator of myocardial contractility, becomes depleted in failing cardiomyocytes in humans and various animal models, and myocardial-targeted S100A1 gene transfer rescues cardiac contractile function by restoring sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium Ca2+ handling in acutely and chronically failing hearts in small animal models. We induced heart failure in domestic pigs by balloon-occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery, resulting in myocardial infarction. After 2 weeks, when the pigs displayed significant left ventricular contractile dysfunction, we administered through retrograde coronary venous delivery, AAV9-S100A1 to the left ventricular non-infarcted myocardium. AAV9-luciferase and saline treatment served as control. At 14 weeks, both control groups showed significantly decreased myocardial S100A1 protein expression along with progressive deterioration of cardiac performance and left ventricular remodeling. AAV9-S100A1 treatment prevented and reversed this phenotype by restoring cardiac S100A1 protein levels. S100A1 treatment normalized cardiomyocyte Ca2+ cycling, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium handling and energy homeostasis. Transgene expression was restricted to cardiac tissue and extra-cardiac organ function was uncompromised indicating a favorable safety profile. This translational study shows the pre-clinical feasibility, long-term therapeutic effectiveness and a favorable safety profile of cardiac AAV9-S100A1 gene therapy in a preclinical model of heart failure. Our study presents a strong rational for a clinical trial of S100A1 gene therapy for human heart failure that could potentially complement current strategies to treat end-stage heart failure. PMID:21775667

  7. Creating an arsenal of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery stealth vehicles.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Kennon; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2018-05-01

    The Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system is ushering in a new and exciting era in the United States; following the first approved gene therapy (Glybera) in Europe, the FDA has approved a second therapy, Luxturna [1]. However, challenges to this system remain. In viral gene therapy, the surface of the capsid is an important determinant of tissue tropism, impacts gene transfer efficiency, and is targeted by the human immune system. Preexisting immunity is a significant challenge to this approach, and the ability to visualize areas of antibody binding ("footprints") can inform efforts to improve the efficacy of viral vectors. Atomic resolution, smaller proteins, and asymmetric structures are the goals to attain in cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction (cryo-EM) as of late. The versatility of the technique and the ability to vitrify a wide range of heterogeneous molecules in solution allow structural biologists to characterize a variety of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions at lower resolution. Cryo-EM has served as an important means to study key surface areas of the AAV gene delivery vehicle-specifically, those involved with binding neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) [2-4]. This method offers a unique opportunity for visualizing antibody binding "hotspots" on the surface of these and other viral vectors. When combined with mutagenesis, one can eliminate these hotspots to create viral vectors with the ability to avoid preexisting host immune recognition during gene delivery and genetic defect correction in disease treatment. Here, we discuss the use of structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create "stealth" AAV vectors with modified surface amino acid sequences that allow NAb avoidance while maintaining natural capsid functions or gaining desired novel tropisms.

  8. Gene therapy using self-complementary Y733F capsid mutant AAV2/8 restores vision in a model of early onset Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Ku, Cristy A; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Goldberg, Andrew F X; Li, Tiansen; Hauswirth, William W; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2011-12-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (Aipl1) are associated with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a childhood blinding disease with early-onset retinal degeneration and vision loss. Furthermore, Aipl1 defects are characterized at the most severe end of the LCA spectrum. The rapid photoreceptor degeneration and vision loss observed in the LCA patient population are mimicked in a mouse model lacking AIPL1. Using this model, we evaluated if gene replacement therapy using recent advancements in adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) provides advantages in preventing rapid retinal degeneration. Specifically, we demonstrated that the novel self-complementary Y733F capsid mutant AAV2/8 (sc-Y733F-AAV) provided greater preservation of photoreceptors and functional vision in Aipl1 null mice compared with single-stranded AAV2/8. The benefits of sc-Y733F-AAV were evident following viral administration during the active phase of retinal degeneration, where only sc-Y733F-AAV treatment achieved functional vision rescue. This result was likely due to higher and earlier onset of Aipl1 expression. Based on our studies, we conclude that the sc-Y733F-AAV2/8 viral vector, to date, achieves the best rescue for rapid retinal degeneration in Aipl1 null mice. Our results provide important considerations for viral vectors to be used in future gene therapy clinical trials targeting a wider severity spectrum of inherited retinal dystrophies.

  9. Data on publications, structural analyses, and queries used to build and utilize the AlloRep database.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Parente, Daniel J; Hessman, Jacob A; Chazelle, Allen; Teichmann, Sarah A; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2016-09-01

    The AlloRep database (www.AlloRep.org) (Sousa et al., 2016) [1] compiles extensive sequence, mutagenesis, and structural information for the LacI/GalR family of transcription regulators. Sequence alignments are presented for >3000 proteins in 45 paralog subfamilies and as a subsampled alignment of the whole family. Phenotypic and biochemical data on almost 6000 mutants have been compiled from an exhaustive search of the literature; citations for these data are included herein. These data include information about oligomerization state, stability, DNA binding and allosteric regulation. Protein structural data for 65 proteins are presented as easily-accessible, residue-contact networks. Finally, this article includes example queries to enable the use of the AlloRep database. See the related article, "AlloRep: a repository of sequence, structural and mutagenesis data for the LacI/GalR transcription regulators" (Sousa et al., 2016) [1].

  10. Phase 1 Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Using a Translational Optimized AAV Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Dawn E; McPhee, Scott WJ; Li, Chengwen; Gray, Steven J; Samulski, Jade J; Camp, Angelique S; Li, Juan; Wang, Bing; Monahan, Paul E; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Grieger, Joshua C; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Xiao, Xiao; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Efficient and widespread gene transfer is required for successful treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we performed the first clinical trial using a chimeric adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid variant (designated AAV2.5) derived from a rational design strategy. AAV2.5 was generated from the AAV2 capsid with five mutations from AAV1. The novel chimeric vector combines the improved muscle transduction capacity of AAV1 with reduced antigenic crossreactivity against both parental serotypes, while keeping the AAV2 receptor binding. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled phase I clinical study in DMD boys, AAV2.5 vector was injected into the bicep muscle in one arm, with saline control in the contralateral arm. A subset of patients received AAV empty capsid instead of saline in an effort to distinguish an immune response to vector versus minidystrophin transgene. Recombinant AAV genomes were detected in all patients with up to 2.56 vector copies per diploid genome. There was no cellular immune response to AAV2.5 capsid. This trial established that rationally designed AAV2.5 vector was safe and well tolerated, lays the foundation of customizing AAV vectors that best suit the clinical objective (e.g., limb infusion gene delivery) and should usher in the next generation of viral delivery systems for human gene transfer. PMID:22068425

  11. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-02-22

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness.

  12. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R. Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  13. Relevance of Assembly-Activating Protein for Adeno-associated Virus Vector Production and Capsid Protein Stability in Mammalian and Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Stefanie; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Börner, Kathleen; Fakhiri, Julia; Laketa, Vibor; Krämer, Chiara; Wiedtke, Ellen; Gunkel, Manuel; Ménard, Lucie; Ayuso, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) encodes an eighth protein, called assembly-activating protein (AAP), transformed our understanding of wild-type AAV biology. Concurrently, it raised questions about the role of AAP during production of recombinant vectors based on natural or molecularly engineered AAV capsids. Here, we show that AAP is indeed essential for generation of functional recombinant AAV2 vectors in both mammalian and insect cell-based vector production systems. Surprisingly, we observed that AAV2 capsid proteins VP1 to -3 are unstable in the absence of AAP2, likely due to rapid proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of the proteasome led to an increase of intracellular VP1 to -3 but neither triggered assembly of functional capsids nor promoted nuclear localization of the capsid proteins. Together, this underscores the crucial and unique role of AAP in the AAV life cycle, where it rapidly chaperones capsid assembly, thus preventing degradation of free capsid proteins. An expanded analysis comprising nine alternative AAV serotypes (1, 3 to 9, and rh10) showed that vector production always depends on the presence of AAP, with the exceptions of AAV4 and AAV5, which exhibited AAP-independent, albeit low-level, particle assembly. Interestingly, AAPs from all 10 serotypes could cross-complement AAP-depleted helper plasmids during vector production, despite there being distinct intracellular AAP localization patterns. These were most pronounced for AAP4 and AAP5, congruent with their inability to rescue an AAV2/AAP2 knockout. We conclude that AAP is key for assembly of genuine capsids from at least 10 different AAV serotypes, which has implications for vectors derived from wild-type or synthetic AAV capsids. IMPORTANCE Assembly of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is regulated by the assembly-activating protein (AAP), whose open reading frame overlaps with that of the viral capsid proteins. As the majority of evidence was obtained using virus

  14. Systemic delivery of shRNA by AAV9 provides highly efficient knockdown of ubiquitously expressed GFP in mouse heart, but not liver.

    PubMed

    Piras, Bryan A; O'Connor, Daniel M; French, Brent A

    2013-01-01

    AAV9 is a powerful gene delivery vehicle capable of providing long-term gene expression in a variety of cell types, particularly cardiomyocytes. The use of AAV-delivery for RNA interference is an intense area of research, but a comprehensive analysis of knockdown in cardiac and liver tissues after systemic delivery of AAV9 has yet to be reported. We sought to address this question by using AAV9 to deliver a short-hairpin RNA targeting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic mice that constitutively overexpress GFP in all tissues. The expression cassette was initially tested in vitro and we demonstrated a 61% reduction in mRNA and a 90% reduction in GFP protein in dual-transfected 293 cells. Next, the expression cassette was packaged as single-stranded genomes in AAV9 capsids to test cardiac GFP knockdown with several doses ranging from 1.8×10(10) to 1.8×10(11) viral genomes per mouse and a dose-dependent response was obtained. We then analyzed GFP expression in both heart and liver after delivery of 4.4×10(11) viral genomes per mouse. We found that while cardiac knockdown was highly efficient, with a 77% reduction in GFP mRNA and a 71% reduction in protein versus control-treated mice, there was no change in liver expression. This was despite a 4.5-fold greater number of viral genomes in the liver than in the heart. This study demonstrates that single-stranded AAV9 vectors expressing shRNA can be used to achieve highly efficient cardiac-selective knockdown of GFP expression that is sustained for at least 7 weeks after the systemic injection of 8 day old mice, with no change in liver expression and no evidence of liver damage despite high viral genome presence in the liver.

  15. Systemic injection of AAV9 carrying a periostin promoter targets gene expression to a myofibroblast-like lineage in mouse hearts after reperfused myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Piras, B A; Tian, Y; Xu, Y; Thomas, N A; O'Connor, D M; French, B A

    2016-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been used to direct gene transfer to a variety of tissues, including heart, liver, skeletal muscle, brain, kidney and lung, but it has not previously been shown to effectively target fibroblasts in vivo, including cardiac fibroblasts. We constructed expression cassettes using a modified periostin promoter to drive gene expression in a cardiac myofibroblast-like lineage, with only occasional spillover into cardiomyocyte-like cells. We compared AAV serotypes 6 and 9 and found robust gene expression when the vectors were delivered by systemic injection after myocardial infarction (MI), with little expression in healthy, non-infarcted mice. AAV9 provided expression in a greater number of cells than AAV6, with reporter gene expression visible in the cardiac infarct and border zones from 5 to 62 days post MI, as assessed by luciferase and Cre-activated green fluorescent protein expression. Although common myofibroblast markers were expressed in low abundance, most of the targeted cells expressed myosin IIb, an embryonic form of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain that has previously been associated with myofibroblasts after reperfused MI. This study is the first to demonstrate AAV-mediated expression in a potentially novel myofibroblast-like lineage in mouse hearts post MI and may open new avenues of gene therapy to treat patients surviving MI.

  16. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-01-01

    Transferring genetic molecules into the peripheral sensory nervous system to manipulate nociceptive pathophysiology is a powerful approach for experimental modulation of sensory signaling and potentially for translation into therapy for chronic pain. This can be efficiently achieved by the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in conjunction with nociceptor-specific regulatory transgene cassettes. Among different routes of delivery, direct injection into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the most efficient AAV-mediated gene transfer selectively into the peripheral sensory nervous system. Here, we briefly discuss the advantages and applications of intraganglionic microinjection, and then provide a detailed approach for DRG injection, including a list of the necessary materials and description of a method for performing DRG microinjection experiments. We also discuss our experience with several adeno-associated virus (AAV) options for in vivo transgene expression in DRG neurons.

  17. Creating an arsenal of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery stealth vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2018-01-01

    The Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system is ushering in a new and exciting era in the United States; following the first approved gene therapy (Glybera) in Europe, the FDA has approved a second therapy, Luxturna [1]. However, challenges to this system remain. In viral gene therapy, the surface of the capsid is an important determinant of tissue tropism, impacts gene transfer efficiency, and is targeted by the human immune system. Preexisting immunity is a significant challenge to this approach, and the ability to visualize areas of antibody binding (“footprints”) can inform efforts to improve the efficacy of viral vectors. Atomic resolution, smaller proteins, and asymmetric structures are the goals to attain in cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction (cryo-EM) as of late. The versatility of the technique and the ability to vitrify a wide range of heterogeneous molecules in solution allow structural biologists to characterize a variety of protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions at lower resolution. Cryo-EM has served as an important means to study key surface areas of the AAV gene delivery vehicle—specifically, those involved with binding neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) [2–4]. This method offers a unique opportunity for visualizing antibody binding “hotspots” on the surface of these and other viral vectors. When combined with mutagenesis, one can eliminate these hotspots to create viral vectors with the ability to avoid preexisting host immune recognition during gene delivery and genetic defect correction in disease treatment. Here, we discuss the use of structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create “stealth” AAV vectors with modified surface amino acid sequences that allow NAb avoidance while maintaining natural capsid functions or gaining desired novel tropisms. PMID:29723270

  18. AAV Gene Therapy for Alcoholism: Inhibition of Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzyme Expression in Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Anamaria C; Li, Chengwen; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A; Samulski, R Jude

    2017-09-01

    Most ethanol is broken down in the liver in two steps by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) enzymes, which metabolize down ethanol into acetaldehyde and then acetate. Some individuals from the Asian population who carry a mutation in the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH2*2) cannot metabolize acetaldehyde as efficiently, producing strong effects, including facial flushing, dizziness, hypotension, and palpitations. This results in an aversion to alcohol intake and protection against alcoholism. The large prevalence of this mutation in the human population strongly suggests that modulation of ALDH2 expression by genetic technologies could result in a similar phenotype. scAAV2 vectors encoding ALDH2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) were utilized to validate this hypothesis by silencing ALDH2 gene expression in human cell lines. Human cell lines HEK-293 and HepG2 were transduced with scAAV2/shRNA, showing a reduction in ALDH2 RNA and protein expression with the two viral concentration assayed (1 × 10 4 and 1 × 10 5 vg/cell) at two different time points. In both cell lines, ALDH2 RNA levels were reduced by 90% and protein expression was inhibited by 90% and 52%, respectively, 5 days post infection. Transduced HepG2 VL17A cells (ADH+) exposed to ethanol resulted in a 50% increase in acetaldehyde levels. These results suggest that gene therapy could be a useful tool for the treatment of alcoholism by knocking down ALDH2 expression using shRNA technology delivered by AAV vectors.

  19. A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin Vector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    minidystrophin gene (a gift from Dr Jeffrey Chamberlain at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA) and the bovine growth hormone polyadenylation...full-length micro-dystrophin protein. Dys-2 is a short peptide in the wild-type full-length dystrophin. It can be recognized by the Dys-2...muscle. In one approach, a muscle homing peptide is inserted on the surface of the capsid to facilitate the entry of AAV into muscle cells. In the

  20. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4,000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV. Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector. PMID:24917028

  1. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in "humanized" mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer.

  2. αRep A3: A Versatile Artificial Scaffold for Metalloenzyme Design.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Thibault; Ghattas, Wadih; Herrero, Christian; Velours, Christophe; Minard, Philippe; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Ricoux, Rémy; Urvoas, Agathe

    2017-07-26

    αRep refers to a new family of artificial proteins based on a thermostable α-helical repeated motif. One of its members, αRep A3, forms a stable homo-dimer with a wide cleft that is able to accommodate metal complexes and thus appears to be suitable for generating new artificial biocatalysts. Based on the crystal structure of αRep A3, two positions (F119 and Y26) were chosen, and independently changed into cysteine residues. A phenanthroline ligand was covalently attached to the unique cysteine residue of each protein variant, and the corresponding biohybrids were purified and characterized. Once mutated and coupled to phenanthroline, the protein remained folded and dimeric. Copper(II) was specifically bound by the two biohybrids with two different binding modes. Furthermore, the holo-biohybrid A3F119NPH was found to be capable of enantioselectively catalyzing Diels-Alder (D-A) cycloadditions with up to 62 % ee. This study validates the choice of the αRep A3 dimer as a protein scaffold and provides a promising new route for the design and production of new enantioselective biohybrids based on entirely artificial proteins obtained from a highly diverse library. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. [Construction of rAAV2-GPIIb/IIIa vector and test of its expression and function in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the possibility of rAAV2 vector-mediating gene therapy for Glanzmann' s thrombasthenia. The rAAV2-GPIIb/IIIa vector was constructed. The GPIIb/IIIa gene expression in mammal cell were examined by different methods, such as: detection of mRNA expression in BHK-21 cells after 24 hours of infection (MOI = 1 x 10(5) v.g/cell) was performed by RT-PCR; the relation between MOI and quantity of GPII6/IIIa gene expression was detected by FACS after 48 hours of infection; GPIIb/IIIa protein expression in BHK-21 cells after 48 hours of infection (MOI = 10(5) v x g/cell) was assayed by Western blot, GPIIb/IIIa protein expression on cell surface was detected by immunofluorescence, and the biological function of expressing product was determined by PAC-1 conjunct experiments. The results showed that GPIIb/IIIa gene expression in mRNA level could be detected in BHK-21 cells after 24 hours of infection at MOI = 1 x 10(5) v x g/cell and the GPIIb/IIIa gene expression in protein level could be detected in BHK-21 cells after 48 hours of infection at MOI = 1 x 10(5) v x g/cell. In certain range, quantity of GPIIb/IIIa gene expression increased with MOI, but overdose of MOI decreased quantity of GPIIb/IIIa gene expression. Activated product of GPIIb/IIIa gene expression could combined with PAC-I, and possesed normal biological function. In conclusion, rAAV2 vactor can effectively mediate GPIIb and GPIIIa gene expressing in mammal cells, and the products of these genes exhibit biological function. This result may provide a basis for application of rAAV2 vector in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia gene therapy in furture.

  4. AAV-mediated targeting of gene expression to the peri-infarct region in rat cortical stroke model.

    PubMed

    Mätlik, Kert; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Harvey, Brandon K; Arumäe, Urmas; Airavaara, Mikko

    2014-10-30

    For stroke patients the recovery of cognitive and behavioral functions is often incomplete. Functional recovery is thought to be mediated largely by connectivity rearrangements in the peri-infarct region. A method for manipulating gene expression in this region would be useful for identifying new recovery-enhancing treatments. We have characterized a way of targeting adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to the peri-infarct region of cortical ischemic lesion in rats 2days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to show that the altered properties of post-ischemic brain tissue facilitate the spreading of intrastriatally injected nanoparticles toward the infarct. We show that subcortical injection of green fluorescent protein-encoding dsAAV7-GFP resulted in transduction of cells in and around the white matter tract underlying the lesion, and in the cortex proximal to the lesion. A similar result was achieved with dsAAV7 vector encoding the cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), a protein with therapeutic potential. Viral vector-mediated intracerebral gene delivery has been used before in rodent models of ischemic injury. However, the method of targeting gene expression to the peri-infarct region, after the initial phase of ischemic cell death, has not been described before. We demonstrate a straightforward and robust way to target AAV vector-mediated over-expression of genes to the peri-infarct region in a rat stroke model. This method will be useful for studying the action of specific proteins in peri-infarct region during the recovery process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Small But Increasingly Mighty: Latest Advances in AAV Vector Research, Design, and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Dirk; Büning, Hildegard

    2017-11-01

    Recombinant gene delivery vectors derived from naturally occurring or genetically engineered adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have taken center stage in human gene therapy, fueled by rapidly accumulating and highly encouraging clinical data. Nonetheless, it has also become evident that the current generation of AAV vectors will require improvements in transduction potency, antibody evasion, and cell specificity in order to realize their full potential and to widen applicability in larger patient cohorts. Fortunately, in the recent past, the field has seen a flurry of exciting new developments that enhance our understanding of AAV vector biology, including virus-host interactions, and/or that expand our arsenal of technologies for AAV capsid design and evolution. This review highlights a collection of latest advances in these areas, which, in the authors' opinion, hold particular promise to propel the AAV vector field forward in the near future, especially when applied in combination. These include fundamental novel insights into the AAV life cycle, from an unexpected role of autophagy and interactions with other viruses to the (re-)discovery of a universal AAV receptor and the function of AAV-AAP for capsid assembly. Concurrently, recent successes in the rational design of next-generation synthetic AAV capsids are pointed out, exemplified by the structure-guided derivation of AAV mutants displaying robust in vivo immune evasion. Finally, a variety of new and innovative strategies for high-throughput generation and screening of AAV capsid libraries are briefly reviewed, including Cre recombinase-based selection, ancestral AAV capsid reconstruction, and DNA barcoding of AAV genomes. All of these examples showcase the present momentum in the AAV field and, together with work by many other academic or industrial entities, raise substantial optimism that the remaining hurdles for human gene therapy with AAV vectors will (soon) be overcome.

  6. Construction of a series of congenic mice with recombinant chromosome 1 regions surrounding the genetic loci for resistance to intracellular parasites (Ity, Lsh, and Bcg), DNA repair responses (Rep-1), and the cytoskeletal protein villin (Vil).

    PubMed

    Mock, B A; Holiday, D L; Cerretti, D P; Darnell, S C; O'Brien, A D; Potter, M

    1994-01-01

    The interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 harbors the natural resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg; it controls the outcome of infection with Salmonella typhimurium, Leishmania donovani, and several Mycobacterium species. This region also contains a DNA repair gene, Rep-1, which determines the rapidity with which double-strand breaks in chromatin are repaired. BALB/cAnPt and DBA/2N mice differ in their phenotypic expression of these genes. To generate appropriate strains of mice for the study of these genes, a series of 10 C.D2 congenic strains recombinant across a 28-centimorgan interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 were derived from crosses of the C.D2-Idh-1 Pep-3 congenic strain back to BALB/cAn. Analyses of these recombinant strains will allow the correlation of biological-immunological phenotypes with defined genetic regions.

  7. Construction of a series of congenic mice with recombinant chromosome 1 regions surrounding the genetic loci for resistance to intracellular parasites (Ity, Lsh, and Bcg), DNA repair responses (Rep-1), and the cytoskeletal protein villin (Vil).

    PubMed Central

    Mock, B A; Holiday, D L; Cerretti, D P; Darnell, S C; O'Brien, A D; Potter, M

    1994-01-01

    The interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 harbors the natural resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg; it controls the outcome of infection with Salmonella typhimurium, Leishmania donovani, and several Mycobacterium species. This region also contains a DNA repair gene, Rep-1, which determines the rapidity with which double-strand breaks in chromatin are repaired. BALB/cAnPt and DBA/2N mice differ in their phenotypic expression of these genes. To generate appropriate strains of mice for the study of these genes, a series of 10 C.D2 congenic strains recombinant across a 28-centimorgan interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 were derived from crosses of the C.D2-Idh-1 Pep-3 congenic strain back to BALB/cAn. Analyses of these recombinant strains will allow the correlation of biological-immunological phenotypes with defined genetic regions. PMID:8262646

  8. Muscle function recovery in golden retriever muscular dystrophy after AAV1-U7 exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Barthélémy, Inès; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Beley, Cyriaque; Griffith, Graziella; Benchaouir, Rachid; le Hir, Maëva; Unterfinger, Yves; Lorain, Stéphanie; Dreyfus, Patrick; Voit, Thomas; Carlier, Pierre; Blot, Stéphane; Garcia, Luis

    2012-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from lesions of the gene encoding dystrophin. These usually consist of large genomic deletions, the extents of which are not correlated with the severity of the phenotype. Out-of-frame deletions give rise to dystrophin deficiency and severe DMD phenotypes, while internal deletions that produce in-frame mRNAs encoding truncated proteins can lead to a milder myopathy known as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Widespread restoration of dystrophin expression via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated exon skipping has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse model and in cardiac muscle after percutaneous transendocardial delivery in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) model. Here, a set of optimized U7snRNAs carrying antisense sequences designed to rescue dystrophin were delivered into GRMD skeletal muscles by AAV1 gene transfer using intramuscular injection or forelimb perfusion. We show sustained correction of the dystrophic phenotype in extended muscle areas and partial recovery of muscle strength. Muscle architecture was improved and fibers displayed the hallmarks of mature and functional units. A 5-year follow-up ruled out immune rejection drawbacks but showed a progressive decline in the number of corrected muscle fibers, likely due to the persistence of a mild dystrophic process such as occurs in BMD phenotypes. Although AAV-mediated exon skipping was shown safe and efficient to rescue a truncated dystrophin, it appears that recurrent treatments would be required to maintain therapeutic benefit ahead of the progression of the disease.

  9. Targeted gene knock-in by homology-directed genome editing using Cas9 ribonucleoprotein and AAV donor delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaj, Thomas; Staahl, Brett T; Rodrigues, Gonçalo M C; Limsirichai, Prajit; Ekman, Freja K; Doudna, Jennifer A; Schaffer, David V

    2017-06-20

    Realizing the full potential of genome editing requires the development of efficient and broadly applicable methods for delivering programmable nucleases and donor templates for homology-directed repair (HDR). The RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease can be introduced into cells as a purified protein in complex with a single guide RNA (sgRNA). Such ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) can facilitate the high-fidelity introduction of single-base substitutions via HDR following co-delivery with a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide. However, combining RNPs with transgene-containing donor templates for targeted gene addition has proven challenging, which in turn has limited the capabilities of the RNP-mediated genome editing toolbox. Here, we demonstrate that combining RNP delivery with naturally recombinogenic adeno-associated virus (AAV) donor vectors enables site-specific gene insertion by homology-directed genome editing. Compared to conventional plasmid-based expression vectors and donor templates, we show that combining RNP and AAV donor delivery increases the efficiency of gene addition by up to 12-fold, enabling the creation of lineage reporters that can be used to track the conversion of striatal neurons from human fibroblasts in real time. These results thus illustrate the potential for unifying nuclease protein delivery with AAV donor vectors for homology-directed genome editing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Blood-brain barrier shuttle peptides enhance AAV transduction in the brain after systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xintao; He, Ting; Chai, Zheng; Samulski, R Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2018-09-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has been used in preclinical and clinical trials of gene therapy for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. One of the biggest challenges of effectively delivering AAV to the brain is to surmount the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Herein, we identified several potential BBB shuttle peptides that significantly enhanced AAV8 transduction in the brain after a systemic administration, the best of which was the THR peptide. The enhancement of AAV8 brain transduction by THR is dose-dependent, and neurons are the primary THR targets. Mechanism studies revealed that THR directly bound to the AAV8 virion, increasing its ability to cross the endothelial cell barrier. Further experiments showed that binding of THR to the AAV virion did not interfere with AAV8 infection biology, and that THR competitively blocked transferrin from binding to AAV8. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that BBB shuttle peptides are able to directly interact with AAV and increase the ability of the AAV vectors to cross the BBB for transduction enhancement in the brain. These results will shed important light on the potential applications of BBB shuttle peptides for enhancing brain transduction with systemic administration of AAV vectors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nephron segment-specific gene expression using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Asico, Laureano D; Cuevas, Santiago; Ma, Xiaobo; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines; Konkalmatt, Prasad R

    2018-02-26

    AAV9 vector provides efficient gene transfer in all segments of the renal nephron, with minimum expression in non-renal cells, when administered retrogradely via the ureter. It is important to restrict the transgene expression to the desired cell type within the kidney, so that the physiological endpoints represent the function of the transgene expressed in that specific cell type within kidney. We hypothesized that segment-specific gene expression within the kidney can be accomplished using the highly efficient AAV9 vectors carrying the promoters of genes that are expressed exclusively in the desired segment of the nephron in combination with administration by retrograde infusion into the kidney via the ureter. We constructed AAV vectors carrying eGFP under the control of: kidney-specific cadherin (KSPC) gene promoter for expression in the entire nephron; Na + /glucose co-transporter (SGLT2) gene promoter for expression in the S1 and S2 segments of the proximal tubule; sodium, potassium, 2 chloride co-transporter (NKCC2) gene promoter for expression in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH); E-cadherin (ECAD) gene promoter for expression in the collecting duct (CD); and cytomegalovirus (CMV) early promoter that provides expression in most of the mammalian cells, as control. We tested the specificity of the promoter constructs in vitro for cell type-specific expression in mouse kidney cells in primary culture, followed by retrograde infusion of the AAV vectors via the ureter in the mouse. Our data show that AAV9 vector, in combination with the segment-specific promoters administered by retrograde infusion via the ureter, provides renal nephron segment-specific gene expression. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential Effects of AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3 in the Deafened Adult Guinea Pig Ear

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Cameron L.; Wong, Hiu Tung; Swiderski, Donald L.; Shibata, Seiji B.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear hair cell loss results in secondary regression of peripheral auditory fibers (PAFs) and loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). The performance of cochlear implants (CI) in rehabilitating hearing depends on survival of SGNs. Here we compare the effects of adeno-associated virus vectors with neurotrophin gene inserts, AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3, on guinea pig ears deafened systemically (kanamycin and furosemide) or locally (neomycin). AAV.BDNF or AAV.Ntf3 was delivered to the guinea pig cochlea one week following deafening and ears were assessed morphologically 3 months later. At that time, neurotrophins levels were not significantly elevated in the cochlear fluids, even though in vitro and shorter term in vivo experiments demonstrate robust elevation of neurotrophins with these viral vectors. Nevertheless, animals receiving these vectors exhibited considerable re-growth of PAFs in the basilar membrane area. In systemically deafened animals there was a negative correlation between the presence of differentiated supporting cells and PAFs, suggesting that supporting cells influence the outcome of neurotrophin over-expression aimed at enhancing the cochlear neural substrate. Counts of SGN in Rosenthal's canal indicate that BDNF was more effective than NT-3 in preserving SGNs. The results demonstrate that a transient elevation in neurotrophin levels can sustain the cochlear neural substrate in the long term. PMID:25726967

  13. The Use of HepRep in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Joseph

    2003-07-10

    HepRep is a generic, hierarchical format for description of graphics representables that can be augmented by physics information and relational properties. It was developed for high energy physics event display applications and is especially suited to client/server or component frameworks. The GLAST experiment, an international effort led by NASA for a gamma-ray telescope to launch in 2006, chose HepRep to provide a flexible, extensible and maintainable framework for their event display without tying their users to any one graphics application. To support HepRep in their GUADI infrastructure, GLAST developed a HepRep filler and builder architecture. The architecture hides the detailsmore » of XML and CORBA in a set of base and helper classes allowing physics experts to focus on what data they want to represent. GLAST has two GAUDI services: HepRepSvc, which registers HepRep fillers in a global registry and allows the HepRep to be exported to XML, and CorbaSvc, which allows the HepRep to be published through a CORBA interface and which allows the client application to feed commands back to GAUDI (such as start next event, or run some GAUDI algorithm). GLAST's HepRep solution gives users a choice of client applications, WIRED (written in Java) or FRED (written in C++ and Ruby), and leaves them free to move to any future HepRep-compliant event display.« less

  14. Rescue of Pompe disease in mice by AAV-mediated liver delivery of secretable acid α-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Francesco; Colella, Pasqualina; Biferi, Maria G.; Bali, Deeksha; Paulk, Nicole K.; Vidal, Patrice; Collaud, Fanny; Simon-Sola, Marcelo; Charles, Severine; Hardet, Romain; Leborgne, Christian; Meliani, Amine; Cohen-Tannoudji, Mathilde; Astord, Stephanie; Gjata, Bernard; Sellier, Pauline; van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Vignaud, Alban; Boisgerault, Florence; Barkats, Martine; Laforet, Pascal; Kay, Mark A.; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Mingozzi, Federico

    2018-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II or Pompe disease is a severe neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the lysosomal enzyme, acid α-glucosidase (GAA), which result in pathological accumulation of glycogen throughout the body. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for Pompe disease; however, it has limited efficacy, has high immunogenicity, and fails to correct pathological glycogen accumulation in nervous tissue and skeletal muscle. Using bioinformatics analysis and protein engineering, we developed transgenes encoding GAA that could be expressed and secreted by hepatocytes. Then, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors optimized for hepatic expression to deliver the GAA transgenes to Gaa knockout (Gaa−/−) mice, a model of Pompe disease. Therapeutic gene transfer to the liver rescued glycogen accumulation in muscle and the central nervous system, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy as well as muscle and respiratory dysfunction in the Gaa−/− mice; mouse survival was also increased. Secretable GAA showed improved therapeutic efficacy and lower immunogenicity compared to nonengineered GAA. Scale-up to nonhuman primates, and modeling of GAA expression in primary human hepatocytes using hepatotropic AAV vectors, demonstrated the therapeutic potential of AAV vector–mediated liver expression of secretable GAA for treating pathological glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues in Pompe disease. PMID:29187643

  15. AAV9-based gene therapy partially ameliorates the clinical phenotype of a mouse model of Leigh syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Di Meo, I; Marchet, S; Lamperti, C; Zeviani, M; Viscomi, C

    2017-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is the most common infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy. No treatment is currently available for this condition. Mice lacking Ndufs4, encoding NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase iron-sulfur protein 4 (NDUFS4) recapitulates the main findings of complex I (cI)-related LS, including severe multisystemic cI deficiency and progressive neurodegeneration. In order to develop a gene therapy approach for LS, we used here an AAV2/9 vector carrying the human NDUFS4 coding sequence (hNDUFS4). We administered AAV2/9-hNDUFS4 by intravenous (IV) and/or intracerebroventricular (ICV) routes to either newborn or young Ndufs4−/− mice. We found that IV administration alone was only able to correct the cI deficiency in peripheral organs, whereas ICV administration partially corrected the deficiency in the brain. However, both treatments failed to improve the clinical phenotype or to prolong the lifespan of Ndufs4−/− mice. In contrast, combined IV and ICV treatments resulted, along with increased cI activity, in the amelioration of the rotarod performance and in a significant prolongation of the lifespan. Our results indicate that extraneurological organs have an important role in LS pathogenesis and provide an insight into current limitations of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy in multisystem disorders. These findings warrant future investigations to develop new vectors able to efficiently target multiple organs. PMID:28753212

  16. AAV9-based gene therapy partially ameliorates the clinical phenotype of a mouse model of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, I; Marchet, S; Lamperti, C; Zeviani, M; Viscomi, C

    2017-10-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is the most common infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy. No treatment is currently available for this condition. Mice lacking Ndufs4, encoding NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase iron-sulfur protein 4 (NDUFS4) recapitulates the main findings of complex I (cI)-related LS, including severe multisystemic cI deficiency and progressive neurodegeneration. In order to develop a gene therapy approach for LS, we used here an AAV2/9 vector carrying the human NDUFS4 coding sequence (hNDUFS4). We administered AAV2/9-hNDUFS4 by intravenous (IV) and/or intracerebroventricular (ICV) routes to either newborn or young Ndufs4 -/- mice. We found that IV administration alone was only able to correct the cI deficiency in peripheral organs, whereas ICV administration partially corrected the deficiency in the brain. However, both treatments failed to improve the clinical phenotype or to prolong the lifespan of Ndufs4 -/- mice. In contrast, combined IV and ICV treatments resulted, along with increased cI activity, in the amelioration of the rotarod performance and in a significant prolongation of the lifespan. Our results indicate that extraneurological organs have an important role in LS pathogenesis and provide an insight into current limitations of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy in multisystem disorders. These findings warrant future investigations to develop new vectors able to efficiently target multiple organs.

  17. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Deverman, Benjamin E.; Pravdo, Piers L.; Simpson, Bryan P.; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y.; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P.; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer1-6. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics7-13. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre-recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV914-17, and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications. PMID:26829320

  18. Humoral Immunity to AAV-6, 8, and 9 in Normal and Dystrophic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Smith, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-6, 8, and 9 are promising gene-delivery vectors for testing novel Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model. Humoral immunity greatly influences in vivo AAV transduction. However, neutralizing antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9 have not been systemically examined in normal and dystrophic dogs. To gain information on the seroprevalence of antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9, we measured neutralizing antibody titers using an in vitro transduction inhibition assay. We examined 72 naive serum samples and 26 serum samples obtained from dogs that had received AAV gene transfer. Our data demonstrated that AAV-6 neutralizing antibody was the most prevalent antibody in dogs irrespective of age, gender, disease status (dystrophic or not), and prior parvovirus vaccination history. Surprisingly, high-level anti-AAV-6 antibody was detected at birth in newborn puppies. Further, a robust antibody response was induced in affected, but not normal newborn dogs following systemic AAV gene transfer. Taken together, our data have provided an important baseline on the seroprevalence of AAV-6, 8, and 9 neutralizing antibodies in normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs. These results will help guide translational AAV gene-therapy studies in dog models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:22040468

  19. Humoral immunity to AAV-6, 8, and 9 in normal and dystrophic dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Smith, Bruce; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-6, 8, and 9 are promising gene-delivery vectors for testing novel Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model. Humoral immunity greatly influences in vivo AAV transduction. However, neutralizing antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9 have not been systemically examined in normal and dystrophic dogs. To gain information on the seroprevalence of antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9, we measured neutralizing antibody titers using an in vitro transduction inhibition assay. We examined 72 naive serum samples and 26 serum samples obtained from dogs that had received AAV gene transfer. Our data demonstrated that AAV-6 neutralizing antibody was the most prevalent antibody in dogs irrespective of age, gender, disease status (dystrophic or not), and prior parvovirus vaccination history. Surprisingly, high-level anti-AAV-6 antibody was detected at birth in newborn puppies. Further, a robust antibody response was induced in affected, but not normal newborn dogs following systemic AAV gene transfer. Taken together, our data have provided an important baseline on the seroprevalence of AAV-6, 8, and 9 neutralizing antibodies in normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs. These results will help guide translational AAV gene-therapy studies in dog models of muscular dystrophy.

  20. Tyrosine-mutant AAV8 delivery of human MERTK provides long-term retinal preservation in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dinculescu, Astra; Li, Qiuhong; Boye, Sanford L; Li, Jie; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Pang, Jijing; Chiodo, Vince A; Matthes, Michael T; Yasumura, Douglas; Liu, Li; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Zhang, Kang; Vollrath, Douglas; LaVail, Matthew M; Hauswirth, William W

    2012-04-06

    The absence of Mertk in RCS rats results in defective RPE phagocytosis, accumulation of outer segment (OS) debris in the subretinal space, and subsequent death of photoreceptors. Previous research utilizing Mertk gene replacement therapy in RCS rats provided proof of concept for treatment of this form of recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the beneficial effects on retinal function were transient. In the present study, we evaluated whether delivery of a MERTK transgene using a tyrosine-mutant AAV8 capsid could lead to more robust and longer-term therapeutic outcomes than previously reported. An AAV8 Y733F vector expressing a human MERTK cDNA driven by a RPE-selective promoter was administrated subretinally at postnatal day 2. Functional and morphological analyses were performed at 4 months and 8 months post-treatment. Retinal vasculature and Müller cell activation were analyzed by quantifying acellular capillaries and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining, respectively. Electroretinographic responses from treated eyes were more than one-third of wild-type levels and OS were well preserved in the injection area even at 8 months. Rescue of RPE phagocytosis, prevention of retinal vasculature degeneration, and inhibition of Müller cell activation were demonstrated in the treated eyes for at least 8 months. This research describes a longer and much more robust functional and morphological rescue than previous studies. We also demonstrate for the first time that an AAV8 mutant capsid serotype vector has a substantial therapeutic potential for RPE-specific gene delivery. These results suggest that tyrosine-mutant AAV8 vectors hold promise for the treatment of individuals with MERTK-associated RP.

  1. Tyrosine-Mutant AAV8 Delivery of Human MERTK Provides Long-Term Retinal Preservation in RCS Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dinculescu, Astra; Li, Qiuhong; Boye, Sanford L.; Li, Jie; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.; Pang, Jijing; Chiodo, Vince A.; Matthes, Michael T.; Yasumura, Douglas; Liu, Li; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Zhang, Kang; Vollrath, Douglas; LaVail, Matthew M.; Hauswirth, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The absence of Mertk in RCS rats results in defective RPE phagocytosis, accumulation of outer segment (OS) debris in the subretinal space, and subsequent death of photoreceptors. Previous research utilizing Mertk gene replacement therapy in RCS rats provided proof of concept for treatment of this form of recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the beneficial effects on retinal function were transient. In the present study, we evaluated whether delivery of a MERTK transgene using a tyrosine-mutant AAV8 capsid could lead to more robust and longer-term therapeutic outcomes than previously reported. Methods. An AAV8 Y733F vector expressing a human MERTK cDNA driven by a RPE-selective promoter was administrated subretinally at postnatal day 2. Functional and morphological analyses were performed at 4 months and 8 months post-treatment. Retinal vasculature and Müller cell activation were analyzed by quantifying acellular capillaries and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining, respectively. Results. Electroretinographic responses from treated eyes were more than one-third of wild-type levels and OS were well preserved in the injection area even at 8 months. Rescue of RPE phagocytosis, prevention of retinal vasculature degeneration, and inhibition of Müller cell activation were demonstrated in the treated eyes for at least 8 months. Conclusions. This research describes a longer and much more robust functional and morphological rescue than previous studies. We also demonstrate for the first time that an AAV8 mutant capsid serotype vector has a substantial therapeutic potential for RPE-specific gene delivery. These results suggest that tyrosine-mutant AAV8 vectors hold promise for the treatment of individuals with MERTK-associated RP. PMID:22408006

  2. High-Throughput Dissection of AAV-Host Interactions: The Fast and the Curious.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Grimm, Dirk

    2018-05-18

    Over fifty years after its initial description, Adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains a most exciting but also most elusive study object in basic or applied virology. On the one hand, its simple structure not only facilitates investigations into virus biology, but combined with the availability of numerous natural AAV variants with distinct infection efficiency and specificity also makes AAV a preferred substrate for engineering of gene delivery vectors. On the other hand, it is striking to witness a recent flurry of reports that highlight and partially close persistent gaps in our understanding of AAV virus and vector biology. This is all the more perplexing considering that recombinant AAVs have already been used in >160 clinical trials and recently been commercialized as gene therapeutics. Here, we discuss a reason for these advances in AAV research, namely, the advent and application of powerful high-throughput technology for dissection of AAV-host interactions and optimization of AAV gene therapy vectors. As relevant examples, we focus on the discovery of (i) a "new" cellular AAV receptor, AAVR, (ii) host restriction factors for AAV entry, and (iii) AAV capsid determinants that mediate trafficking through the blood-brain barrier. While (i)/(ii) are prototypes of extra- or intracellular AAV host factors that were identified via high-throughput screenings, (iii) exemplifies the power of molecular evolution to investigate the virus itself. In the future, we anticipate that these and other key technologies will continue to accelerate the dissection of AAV biology and will yield a wealth of new designer viruses for clinical use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Lack of Humoral Immune Response to the Tetracycline (Tet) Activator in Rats Injected Intracranially with Tet-off rAAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Chang, Qin A.; Virag, Tamas; West, Neva C.; George, David; Castro, Maria G.; Bohn, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to safely control transgene expression from viral vectors is a long-term goal in the gene therapy field. We have previously reported tight regulation of GFP expression in rat brain using a self-regulating tet-off rAAV vector. The immune responses against tet regulatory elements observed by other groups in nonhuman primates after intramuscular injection of tet-on encoding vectors raise concerns about the clinical value of tet-regulated vectors. However, previous studies have not examined immune responses following injection of AAV vectors into brain. Therefore, rat striatum was injected with tet-off rAAV harboring a therapeutic gene for Parkinson's disease, either hAADC or hGDNF. The expression of each gene was tightly controlled by the tet-off regulatory system. Using an ELISA developed with purified GST-tTA protein, no detectable immunogenicity against tTA was observed in sera of rats that received an intrastriatal injection of either vector. In contrast, sera from rats intradermally injected with an adenovirus containing either tTA or rtTA, as positive controls, had readily detectable antibodies. These observations suggest that tet-off rAAV vectors do not elicit an immune response when injected into rat brain and that these may offer safer vectors for Parkinson's disease than vectors with constitutive expression. PMID:20164859

  4. Intraganglionic AAV6 results in efficient and long-term gene transfer to peripheral sensory nervous system in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Fan, Fan; Light, Alan R; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Sapunar, Damir; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Park, Frank; Hogan, Quinn H

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated safe and reliable gene transfer to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using a direct microinjection procedure to deliver recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. In this study, we proceed to compare the in vivo transduction patterns of self-complementary (sc) AAV6 and AAV8 in the peripheral sensory pathway. A single, direct microinjection of either AAV6 or AAV8 expressing EGFP, at the adjusted titer of 2×10(9) viral particle per DRG, into the lumbar (L) 4 and L5 DRGs of adult rats resulted in efficient EGFP expression (48±20% for AAV6 and 25±4% for AAV8, mean ± SD) selectively in sensory neurons and their axonal projections 3 weeks after injection, which remained stable for up to 3 months. AAV6 efficiently transfers EGFP to all neuronal size groups without differential neurotropism, while AAV8 predominantly targets large-sized neurons. Neurons transduced with AAV6 penetrate into the spinal dorsal horn (DH) and terminate predominantly in superficial DH laminae, as well as in the dorsal columns and deeper laminae III-V. Only few AAV8-transduced afferents were evident in the superficial laminae, and spinal EGFP was mostly present in the deeper dorsal horn (lamina III-V) and dorsal columns, with substantial projections to the ventral horn. AAV6-mediated EGFP-positive nerve fibers were widely observed in the medial plantar skin of ipsilateral hindpaws. No apparent inflammation, tissue damage, or major pain behaviors were observed for either AAV serotype. Taken together, both AAV6 and AAV8 are efficient and safe vectors for transgene delivery to primary sensory neurons, but they exhibit distinct functional features. Intraganglionic delivery of AAV6 is more uniform and efficient compared to AAV8 in gene transfer to peripheral sensory neurons and their axonal processes.

  5. AAV delivery of GRP78/BiP promotes adaptation of human RPE cell to ER stress.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Shima; Ahmadian, Shahin; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Samiei, Shahram; Kheitan, Samira; Pirmardan, Ehsan R

    2018-02-01

    Adeno associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery of GRP78 (78 kDa glucose-regulated protein) attenuates the condition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and prevents apoptotic loss of photoreceptors in Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) rats. In the current study we overexpressed Grp78 with the help of AAV-2 in primary human retinal pigmented epithelium (hRPE) cell cultures and examined its effect on cell response to ER stress. The purpose of this work was studying potential stimulating effect of GRP78 on adaptation/pro-survival of hRPE cells under ER stress, as an in vitro model for RPE degeneration. To investigate the effect of Grp78 overexpression on unfolded protein response (UPR) markers under ER stress, hRPE primary cultures were transduced by recombinant virus rAAV/Grp78, and treated with ER stressor drug, tunicamycin. Expression changes of four UPR markers including GRP78, PERK, ATF6α, and GADD153/CHOP, were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting. We found that GRP78 has a great contribution in modulation of UPR markers to favor adaptive response in ER-stressed hRPE cells. In fact, GRP78 overexpression affected adaptation and apoptotic phases of early UPR, through enhancement of two master regulators/ER stress sensors (PERK and ATF6α) and down-regulation of a key pro-apoptotic cascade activator (GADD153/CHOP). Together these findings demonstrate the promoting effect of GRP78 on adaptation/pro-survival of hRPE cells under ER stress. This protein with anti-apoptotic actions in the early UPR and important role in cell fate regulation, can be recruited as a useful candidate for future investigations of RPE degenerative diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (rAAV2/6)-mediated gene transfer to nociceptive neurons through different routes of delivery

    PubMed Central

    Towne, Chris; Pertin, Marie; Beggah, Ahmed T; Aebischer, Patrick; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene transfer to nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is a promising approach to dissect mechanisms of pain in rodents and is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of persistent pain disorders such as neuropathic pain. A number of studies have demonstrated transduction of DRG neurons using herpes simplex virus, adenovirus and more recently, adeno-associated virus (AAV). Recombinant AAV are currently the gene transfer vehicles of choice for the nervous system and have several advantages over other vectors, including stable and safe gene expression. We have explored the capacity of recombinant AAV serotype 6 (rAAV2/6) to deliver genes to DRG neurons and characterized the transduction of nociceptors through five different routes of administration in mice. Results Direct injection of rAAV2/6 expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the sciatic nerve resulted in transduction of up to 30% eGFP-positive cells of L4 DRG neurons in a dose dependant manner. More than 90% of transduced cells were small and medium sized neurons (< 700 μm2), predominantly colocalized with markers of nociceptive neurons, and had eGFP-positive central terminal fibers in the superficial lamina of the spinal cord dorsal horn. The efficiency and profile of transduction was independent of mouse genetic background. Intrathecal administration of rAAV2/6 gave the highest level of transduction (≈ 60%) and had a similar size profile and colocalization with nociceptive neurons. Intrathecal administration also transduced DRG neurons at cervical and thoracic levels and resulted in comparable levels of transduction in a mouse model for neuropathic pain. Subcutaneous and intramuscular delivery resulted in low levels of transduction in the L4 DRG. Likewise, delivery via tail vein injection resulted in relatively few eGFP-positive cells within the DRG, however, this transduction was observed at all vertebral levels and corresponded to large non-nociceptive cell

  7. Building to be Named for Former Rep. Dan Schaefer

    Science.gov Websites

    Building to be Named for Former Rep. Dan Schaefer For more information contact: e:mail: Public Renewable Energy Laboratory will be renamed to honor retired U.S. Rep. Dan Schaefer on Monday, Jan. 11. In ceremonies beginning at 11 a.m., the center formally will become the Dan Schaefer Federal Building. Congress

  8. Induction of Immune Tolerance to Foreign Protein via Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Gene Transfer in Mid-Gestation Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Marcus G.; Riley, John S.; Andrews, Abigail; Tyminski, Alec; Limberis, Maria; Pogoriler, Jennifer E.; Partridge, Emily; Olive, Aliza; Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan W.; Peranteau, William H.

    2017-01-01

    A major limitation to adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy is the generation of host immune responses to viral vector antigens and the transgene product. The ability to induce immune tolerance to foreign protein has the potential to overcome this host immunity. Acquisition and maintenance of tolerance to viral vector antigens and transgene products may also permit repeat administration thereby enhancing therapeutic efficacy. In utero gene transfer (IUGT) takes advantage of the immunologic immaturity of the fetus to induce immune tolerance to foreign antigens. In this large animal study, in utero administration of AAV6.2, AAV8 and AAV9 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to ~60 day fetal sheep (term: ~150 days) was performed. Transgene expression and postnatal immune tolerance to GFP and viral antigens were assessed. We demonstrate 1) hepatic expression of GFP 1 month following in utero administration of AAV6.2.GFP and AAV8.GFP, 2) in utero recipients of either AAV6.2.GFP or AAV8.GFP fail to mount an anti-GFP antibody response following postnatal GFP challenge and lack inflammatory cellular infiltrates at the intramuscular site of immunization, 3) a serotype specific anti-AAV neutralizing antibody response is elicited following postnatal challenge of in utero recipients of AAV6.2 or AAV8 with the corresponding AAV serotype, and 4) durable hepatic GFP expression was observed up to 6 months after birth in recipients of AAV8.GFP but expression was lost between 1 and 6 months of age in recipients of AAV6.2.GFP. The current study demonstrates, in a preclinical large animal model, the potential of IUGT to achieve host immune tolerance to the viral vector transgene product but also suggests that a single exposure to the vector capsid proteins at the time of IUGT is inadequate to induce tolerance to viral vector antigens. PMID:28141818

  9. Intraperitoneal AAV9-shRNA inhibits target expression in neonatal skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Mayra, Azat; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Kubodera, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Piao, Wenying; Sunaga, Fumiko; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2011-02-11

    Systemic injections of AAV vectors generally transduce to the liver more effectively than to cardiac and skeletal muscles. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing AAV9 (shRNA-AAV9) can also reduce target gene expression in the liver, but not enough in cardiac or skeletal muscles. Higher doses of shRNA-AAV9 required for inhibiting target genes in cardiac and skeletal muscles often results in shRNA-related toxicity including microRNA oversaturation that can induce fetal liver failure. In this study, we injected high-dose shRNA-AAV9 to neonates and efficiently silenced genes in cardiac and skeletal muscles without inducing liver toxicity. This is because AAV is most likely diluted or degraded in the liver than in cardiac or skeletal muscle during cell division after birth. We report that this systemically injected shRNA-AAV method does not induce any major side effects, such as liver dysfunction, and the dose of shRNA-AAV is sufficient for gene silencing in skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues. This novel method may be useful for generating gene knockdown in skeletal and cardiac mouse tissues, thus providing mouse models useful for analyzing diseases caused by loss-of-function of target genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High density recombinant AAV particles are competent vectors for in vivo transduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have recently achieved clinical successes in human gene therapy. However, the commonly observed heavier particles found in AAV preparations have traditionally been ignored due to its low in vitro infectivity. In this study, we systemically compared t...

  11. Assessing the potential for AAV vector genotoxicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hojun; Malani, Nirav; Hamilton, Shari R.; Schlachterman, Alexander; Bussadori, Giulio; Edmonson, Shyrie E.; Shah, Rachel; Arruda, Valder R.; Mingozzi, Federico; Fraser Wright, J.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2011-01-01

    Gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has great potential for treating human disease. Recently, questions have arisen about the safety of AAV vectors, specifically, whether integration of vector DNA in transduced cell genomes promotes tumor formation. This study addresses these questions with high-dose liver-directed AAV-mediated gene transfer in the adult mouse as a model (80 AAV-injected mice and 52 controls). After 18 months of follow-up, AAV-injected mice did not show a significantly higher rate of hepatocellular carcinoma compared with controls. Tumors in mice treated with AAV vectors did not have significantly different amounts of vector DNA compared with adjacent normal tissue. A novel high-throughput method for identifying AAV vector integration sites was developed and used to clone 1029 integrants. Integration patterns in tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue were similar to each other, showing preferences for active genes, cytosine-phosphate-guanosine islands, and guanosine/cysteine-rich regions. Gene expression data showed that genes near integration sites did not show significant changes in expression patterns compared with genes more distal to integration sites. No integration events were identified as causing increased oncogene expression. Thus, we did not find evidence that AAV vectors cause insertional activation of oncogenes and subsequent tumor formation. PMID:21106988

  12. Molecular design for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector production.

    PubMed

    Aponte-Ubillus, Juan Jose; Barajas, Daniel; Peltier, Joseph; Bardliving, Cameron; Shamlou, Parviz; Gold, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are increasingly popular tools for gene therapy applications. Their non-pathogenic status, low inflammatory potential, availability of viral serotypes with different tissue tropisms, and prospective long-lasting gene expression are important attributes that make rAAVs safe and efficient therapeutic options. Over the last three decades, several groups have engineered recombinant AAV-producing platforms, yielding high titers of transducing vector particles. Current specific productivity yields from different platforms range from 10 3 to 10 5 vector genomes (vg) per cell, and there is an ongoing effort to improve vector yields in order to satisfy high product demands required for clinical trials and future commercialization.Crucial aspects of vector production include the molecular design of the rAAV-producing host cell line along with the design of AAV genes, promoters, and regulatory elements. Appropriately, configuring and balancing the expression of these elements not only contributes toward high productivity, it also improves process robustness and product quality. In this mini-review, the rational design of rAAV-producing expression systems is discussed, with special attention to molecular strategies that contribute to high-yielding, biomanufacturing-amenable rAAV production processes. Details on molecular optimization from four rAAV expression systems are covered: adenovirus, herpesvirus, and baculovirus complementation systems, as well as a recently explored yeast expression system.

  13. 75 FR 55808 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of AAV5 Based Therapeutics To Treat Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    .... Patent 6, 855, 314 entitled ``AAV5 Vector for Transducing Brain Cells and Lung Cells'' [HHS Ref. No. E... sale of AAV5 based therapeutic products to be delivered to the brain, eyes and liver for treatment of... vectors and particles. The specific brain cells that are targeted by AAV5 belong to both non-neuronal...

  14. Direct and Retrograde Transduction of Nigral Neurons with AAV6, 8, and 9 and Intraneuronal Persistence of Viral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors of serotypes 6, 8, and 9 were characterized as tools for gene delivery to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra for future gene therapeutic applications in Parkinson's disease. While vectors of all three serotypes transduced nigral dopaminergic neurons with equal efficiency when directly injected to the substantia nigra, AAV6 was clearly superior to AAV8 and AAV9 for retrograde transduction of nigral neurons after striatal delivery. For sequential transduction of nigral dopaminergic neurons, the combination of AAV9 with AAV6 proved to be more powerful than AAV8 with AAV6 or repeated AAV6 administration. Surprisingly, single-stranded viral genomes persisted in nigral dopaminergic neurons within cell bodies and axon terminals in the striatum, and intact assembled AAV capsid was enriched in nuclei of nigral neurons, 4 weeks after virus injections to the substantia nigra. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)–induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra reduced the number of viral genomes in the striatum, in line with viral genome persistence in axon terminals. However, 6-OHDA–induced axonal degeneration did not induce any transsynaptic spread of AAV infection in the striatum. Therefore, the potential presence of viral particles in axons may not represent an important safety issue for AAV gene therapy applications in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23600720

  15. AAV1/2-induced overexpression of A53T-α-synuclein in the substantia nigra results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal system with Lewy-like pathology and motor impairment: a new mouse model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ip, Chi Wang; Klaus, Laura-Christin; Karikari, Akua A; Visanji, Naomi P; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Lang, Anthony E; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B

    2017-02-01

    α-Synuclein is a protein implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). AAV1/2-driven overexpression of human mutated A53T-α-synuclein in rat and monkey substantia nigra (SN) induces degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons and decreases striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Given certain advantages of the mouse, especially it being amendable to genetic manipulation, translating the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein model to mice would be of significant value. AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein or AAV1/2 empty vector (EV) at a concentration of 5.16 x 10 12 gp/ml were unilaterally injected into the right SN of male adult C57BL/6 mice. Post-mortem examinations included immunohistochemistry to analyze nigral α-synuclein, Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein and TH expression, striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) levels by autoradiography and dopamine levels by high performance liquid chromatography. At 10 weeks, in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice there was a 33% reduction in TH+ dopaminergic nigral neurons (P < 0.001), 29% deficit in striatal DAT binding (P < 0.05), 38% and 33% reductions in dopamine (P < 0.001) and DOPAC (P < 0.01) levels and a 60% increase in dopamine turnover (homovanilic acid/dopamine ratio; P < 0.001). Immunofluorescence showed that the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein injected mice had widespread nigral and striatal expression of vector-delivered A53T-α-synuclein. Concurrent staining with human PD SN samples using gold standard histological methodology for Lewy pathology detection by proteinase K digestion and application of specific antibody raised against human Lewy body α-synuclein (LB509) and Ser129 phosphorylated α-synuclein (81A) revealed insoluble α-synuclein aggregates in AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein mice resembling Lewy-like neurites and bodies. In the cylinder test, we observed significant paw use asymmetry in the AAV1/2-A53T α-synuclein group when compared to EV controls at 5 and 9 weeks post injection (P

  16. RepSox improves viability and regulates gene expression in rhesus monkey-pig interspecies cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Bo; Li, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Xing, Xiao-Xu; Xuan, Mei-Fu; Zhang, Guang-Lei; Luo, Qi-Rong; Wang, Jun-Xia; Cui, Cheng-Du; Li, Wen-Xue; Cui, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Xi-Jun; Kang, Jin-Dan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the small molecule, RepSox, on the expression of developmentally important genes and the pre-implantation development of rhesus monkey-pig interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos. Rhesus monkey cells expressing the monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 which have a normal (42) chromosome complement, were used as donor cells to generate iSCNT embryos. RepSox increased the expression levels of the pluripotency-related genes, Oct4 and Nanog (p < 0.05), but not of Sox2 compared with untreated embryos at the 2-4-cell stage. Expression of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl2, and the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was also affected at the 2-4-cell stage. RepSox treatment also increased the immunostaining intensity of Oct4 at the blastocyst stage (p < 0.05). Although the blastocyst developmental rate was higher in the group treated with 25 µM RepSox for 24 h than in the untreated control group (2.4 vs. 1.2%, p > 0.05), this was not significant. RepSox can improve the developmental potential of rhesus monkey-pig iSCNT embryos by regulating the expression of pluripotency-related genes.

  17. Strategies to optimize capsid protein expression and single-stranded DNA formation of adeno-associated virus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Galli, A; Della Latta, V; Bologna, C; Pucciarelli, D; Cipriani, F; Backovic, A; Cervelli, T

    2017-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a nonpathogenic parvovirus that is a promising tool for gene therapy. We aimed to construct plasmids for optimal expression and assembly of capsid proteins and evaluate adenovirus (Ad) protein effect on AAV single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast expression plasmids have been developed in which the transcription of AAV capsid proteins (VP1,2,3) is driven by the constitutive ADH1 promoter or galactose-inducible promoters. Optimal VP1,2,3 expression was obtained from GAL1/10 bidirectional promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that AAP is expressed in yeast and virus-like particles (VLPs) assembled inside the cell. Finally, the expression of two Ad proteins, E4orf6 and E1b55k, had no effect on AAV ssDNA formation. This study confirms that yeast is able to form AAV VLPs; however, capsid assembly and ssDNA formation are less efficient in yeast than in human cells. Moreover, the expression of Ad proteins did not affect AAV ssDNA formation. New manufacturing strategies for AAV-based gene therapy vectors (rAAV) are needed to reduce costs and time of production. Our study explores the feasibility of yeast as alternative system for rAAV production. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Bacterial rep- mutations that block development of small DNA bacteriophages late in infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Peterson, P K

    1976-01-01

    Several related mutants of Escherichia coli C have been isolated that block the growth of the small icosahedral DNA phages phiX174 and S13 late in infection. Phage G6 is also blocked, at a stage not yet known. Growth of the filamentous phage M13, though not blocked, is affected in these strains. These host mutations co-transduce with ilv at high frequency, as do rep- mutations. However, the new mutants, designated groL-, differ from previously studied rep- mutants in that they permit synthesis of progeny replicative-form DNA. The groL- mutants are blocked in synthesis of stable single-stranded DNA of phiX174 and related phages. They are gro+ for P2. Evidence that groL- mutations and rep- mutations are in the same gene is presented. Spontaneous mutants (ogr) of phiX174, S13, and the G phages can grow on groL- strains. The ogr mutations are located in the phage's major capsid gene, F, as determined by complementation tests. There are numerous sites for mutation to ogr. Some mutations in genes A and F interfere with the ogr property when combined with an ogr mutation on the same genome. The ogr mutations are cis acting in a groL- cell; i.e., an ogr mutant gives very poor rescue of a non-ogr mutant. The wild-type form of each G phage appears to be naturally in the ogr mutant state for one or more groL- strains. It is suggested that a complex between F and rep proteins is involved in phage maturation. The A protein appears to interact with this complex. PMID:789914

  19. The AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system for gene therapy of DMD and BMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Wu, Peng; Shi, Zhi-Min; Xu, Yan-Li; Liu, Zhi-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (Dmd) result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), which afflict many newborn boys. In 2016, Brain and Development published several interesting articles on DMD treatment with antisense oligonucleotide, kinase inhibitor, and prednisolone. Even more strikingly, three articles in the issue 6271 of Science in 2016 provide new insights into gene therapy of DMD and BMD via the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9). In brief, adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors transport guided RNAs (gRNAs) and Cas9 into mdx mouse model, gRNAs recognize the mutated Dmd exon 23 (having a stop codon), and Cas9 cut the mutated exon 23 off the Dmd gene. These manipulations restored expression of truncated but partially functional dystrophin, improved skeletal and cardiac muscle function, and increased survival of mdx mice significantly. This review concisely summarized the related advancements and discussed their primary implications in the future gene therapy of DMD, including AAV-vector selection, gRNA designing, Cas9 optimization, dystrophin-restoration efficiency, administration routes, and systemic and long-term therapeutic efficacy. Future orientations, including off-target effects, safety concerns, immune responses, precision medicine, and Dmd-editing in the brain (potentially blocked by the blood-brain barrier) were also elucidated briefly. Collectively, the AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has major superiorities compared with traditional gene therapy, and might contribute to the treatment of DMD and BMD substantially in the near future. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification of AAV particle titers by infrared fluorescence scanning of coomassie-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Erik; Henckaerts, Els; Rapti, Kleopatra; Gordon, Ronald E; Linden, R Michael; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors have gained increasing attention as gene delivery vehicles in basic and preclinical studies as well as in human gene therapy trials. Especially for the latter two-for both safety and therapeutic efficacy reasons-a detailed characterization of all relevant parameters of the vector preparation is essential. Two important parameters that are routinely used to analyze recombinant AAV vectors are (1) the titer of viral particles containing a (recombinant) viral genome and (2) the purity of the vector preparation, most commonly assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by silver staining. An important, third parameter, the titer of total viral particles, that is, the combined titer of both genome-containing and empty viral capsids, is rarely determined. Here, we describe a simple and inexpensive method that allows the simultaneous assessment of both vector purity and the determination of the total viral particle titer. This method, which was validated by comparison with established methods to determine viral particle titers, is based on the fact that Coomassie Brilliant Blue, when bound to proteins, fluoresces in the infrared spectrum. Viral samples are separated by SDS-PAGE followed by Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and gel analysis with an infrared laser-scanning device. In combination with a protein standard, our method allows the rapid and accurate determination of viral particle titers simultaneously with the assessment of vector purity.

  1. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) for Selected Interplanetary Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, David; Bonfiglio, Eugene; Cupples, Mike; Belcher, Jeremy; Witzberger, Kevin; Fiehler, Douglas; Artis, Gwen

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation analyzes small body targets (Trojan Asteroids), Medium Outer Planet Class (Jupiter Polar Orbiter with Probes), and Main Belt Asteroids and Comets (Comet Surface Sample Return), for Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP).

  2. Effective delivery of large genes to the retina by dual AAV vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Colella, Pasqualina; Sommella, Andrea; Iodice, Carolina; Cesi, Giulia; de Simone, Sonia; Marrocco, Elena; Rossi, Settimio; Giunti, Massimo; Palfi, Arpad; Farrar, Gwyneth J; Polishchuk, Roman; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, AAV's limited cargo capacity prevents its application to therapies of inherited retinal diseases due to mutations of genes over 5 kb, like Stargardt's disease (STGD) and Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B). Previous methods based on ‘forced’ packaging of large genes into AAV capsids may not be easily translated to the clinic due to the generation of genomes of heterogeneous size which raise safety concerns. Taking advantage of AAV's ability to concatemerize, we generated dual AAV vectors which reconstitute a large gene by either splicing (trans-splicing), homologous recombination (overlapping), or a combination of the two (hybrid). We found that dual trans-splicing and hybrid vectors transduce efficiently mouse and pig photoreceptors to levels that, albeit lower than those achieved with a single AAV, resulted in significant improvement of the retinal phenotype of mouse models of STGD and USH1B. Thus, dual AAV trans-splicing or hybrid vectors are an attractive strategy for gene therapy of retinal diseases that require delivery of large genes. PMID:24150896

  3. Next-generation AAV vectors for clinical use: an ever-accelerating race.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Jonas; Grimm, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    During the past five decades, it has become evident that Adeno-associated virus (AAV) represents one of the most potent, most versatile, and thus most auspicious platforms available for gene delivery into cells, animals and, ultimately, humans. Particularly attractive is the ease with which the viral capsid-the major determinant of virus-host interaction including cell specificity and antibody recognition-can be modified and optimized at will. This has motivated countless researchers to develop high-throughput technologies in which genetically engineered AAV capsid libraries are subjected to a vastly hastened emulation of natural evolution, with the aim to enrich novel synthetic AAV capsids displaying superior features for clinical application. While the power and potential of these forward genetics approaches is undisputed, they are also inherently challenging as success depends on a combination of library quality, fidelity, and complexity. Here, we will describe and discuss two original, very exciting strategies that have emerged over the last three years and that promise to alleviate at least some of these concerns, namely, (i) a reverse genetics approach termed "ancestral AAV sequence reconstruction," and (ii) AAV genome barcoding as a technology that can advance both, forward and reverse genetics stratagems. Notably, despite the conceptual differences of these two technologies, they pursue the same goal which is tailored acceleration of AAV evolution and thus winning the race for the next-generation AAV vectors for clinical use.

  4. Engineered AAVs for efficient noninvasive gene delivery to the central and peripheral nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ken Y; Jang, Min J; Yoo, Bryan B; Greenbaum, Alon; Ravi, Namita; Wu, Wei-Li; Sánchez-Guardado, Luis; Lois, Carlos; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Deverman, Benjamin E; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are commonly used for in vivo gene transfer. Nevertheless, AAVs that provide efficient transduction across specific organs or cell populations are needed. Here, we describe AAV-PHP.eB and AAV-PHP.S, capsids that efficiently transduce the central and peripheral nervous systems, respectively. In the adult mouse, intravenous administration of 1×1011 vector genomes (vg) of AAV-PHP.eB transduced 69% of cortical and 55% of striatal neurons, while 1×1012 vg AAV-PHP.S transduced 82% of dorsal root ganglion neurons, as well as cardiac and enteric neurons. The efficiency of these vectors facilitates robust co-transduction and stochastic, multicolor labeling for individual cell morphology studies. To support such efforts, we provide methods for labeling a tunable fraction of cells without compromising color diversity. Furthermore, when used with cell type-specific promoters, these AAVs provide targeted gene expression across the nervous system and enable efficient and versatile gene manipulation throughout the nervous system of transgenic and non-transgenic animals. PMID:28671695

  5. Safety and Efficacy of AAV Retrograde Pancreatic Ductal Gene Delivery in Normal and Pancreatic Cancer Mice.

    PubMed

    Quirin, Kayla A; Kwon, Jason J; Alioufi, Arafat; Factora, Tricia; Temm, Constance J; Jacobsen, Max; Sandusky, George E; Shontz, Kim; Chicoine, Louis G; Clark, K Reed; Mendell, Joshua T; Korc, Murray; Kota, Janaiah

    2018-03-16

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery shows promise to transduce the pancreas, but safety/efficacy in a neoplastic context is not well established. To identify an ideal AAV serotype, route, and vector dose and assess safety, we have investigated the use of three AAV serotypes (6, 8, and 9) expressing GFP in a self-complementary (sc) AAV vector under an EF1α promoter (scAAV.GFP) following systemic or retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery. Systemic delivery of scAAV9.GFP transduced the pancreas with high efficiency, but gene expression did not exceed >45% with the highest dose, 5 × 10 12 viral genomes (vg). Intraductal delivery of 1 × 10 11 vg scAAV6.GFP transduced acini, ductal cells, and islet cells with >50%, ∼48%, and >80% efficiency, respectively, and >80% pancreatic transduction was achieved with 5 × 10 11 vg. In a Kras G12D -driven pancreatic cancer mouse model, intraductal delivery of scAAV6.GFP targeted acini, epithelial, and stromal cells and exhibited persistent gene expression 5 months post-delivery. In normal mice, intraductal delivery induced a transient increase in serum amylase/lipase that resolved within a day of infusion with no sustained pancreatic inflammation or fibrosis. Similarly, in PDAC mice, intraductal delivery did not increase pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progression/fibrosis. Our study demonstrates that scAAV6 targets the pancreas/neoplasm efficiently and safely via retrograde pancreatic intraductal delivery.

  6. Systemic Correction of Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV by an AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Zhang, Quan; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yang, Chunyu; Thurberg, Beth L; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-03-01

    Deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) causes glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV), which is characterized by the accumulation of a less branched, poorly soluble form of glycogen called polyglucosan (PG) in multiple tissues. This study evaluates the efficacy of gene therapy with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector in a mouse model of adult form of GSD IV (Gbe1 ys/ys ). An AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vector containing a human GBE expression cassette (AAV-GBE) was intravenously injected into 14-day-old Gbe1 ys/ys mice at a dose of 5 × 10 11 vector genomes per mouse. Mice were euthanized at 3 and 9 months of age. In the AAV-treated mice at 3 months of age, GBE enzyme activity was highly elevated in heart, which is consistent with the high copy number of the viral vector genome detected. GBE activity also increased significantly in skeletal muscles and the brain, but not in the liver. The glycogen content was reduced to wild-type levels in muscles and significantly reduced in the liver and brain. At 9 months of age, though GBE activity was only significantly elevated in the heart, glycogen levels were significantly reduced in the liver, brain, and skeletal muscles of the AAV-treated mice. In addition, the AAV treatment resulted in an overall decrease in plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatine kinase, and a significant increase in fasting plasma glucose concentration at 9 months of age. This suggests an alleviation of damage and improvement of function in the liver and muscles by the AAV treatment. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of a systemic injection of an AAV-GBE vector in Gbe1 ys/ys mice.

  7. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  8. Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Is a Cell-Intrinsic Factor Inhibiting Parvovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Angela M.; Hirsch, Matthew L.; Li, Chengwen

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif proteins are important viral restriction factors and affect processes ranging from uncoating to transcription to immune signaling. Specifically, the promyelocytic leukemia protein (TRIM19; also called PML) is a viral restriction factor inhibiting processes from uncoating to transcription to cell survival. Here we investigated PML's effect on adeno-associated virus (AAV), a parvovirus used for gene delivery. Although dependovirus (AAV) and autonomous parvovirus (minute virus of mice) replication centers can colocalize with PML, PML's functional effect on parvoviruses is unknown. Using PML knockout mice, we determined that PML knockout enhances recombinant AAV2 (rAAV2) transduction at a range of vector doses in both male and female mice. In fact, male and female PML knockout mice exhibited up to 56-fold and 28-fold increases in transduction, respectively. PML inhibited several rAAV serotypes, suggesting a conserved mechanism, and organ specificity correlated with PML expression. Mechanistically, PML inhibited rAAV second-strand DNA synthesis, precluding inhibition of self-complementary rAAV, and did not affect the prior steps in transduction. Furthermore, we confirmed the effect of human PML on rAAV transduction through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown in HuH7 cells and determined that the highest level of inhibition was due to effects of PML isoform II (PMLII). Overexpression of PMLII resulted in inhibition of second-strand synthesis, vector production, and genome replication. Moreover, wild-type AAV2 production and infectivity were also inhibited by PMLII, demonstrating a PML interaction with wild-type AAV. These data have important implications for AAV-mediated gene therapy. Additionally, PMLII inhibition of AAV second-strand synthesis and replication, which are processes necessary for all parvoviruses, suggests implications for replication of other parvoviruses. PMID:24198403

  9. Promyelocytic leukemia protein is a cell-intrinsic factor inhibiting parvovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Angela M; Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R Jude

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif proteins are important viral restriction factors and affect processes ranging from uncoating to transcription to immune signaling. Specifically, the promyelocytic leukemia protein (TRIM19; also called PML) is a viral restriction factor inhibiting processes from uncoating to transcription to cell survival. Here we investigated PML's effect on adeno-associated virus (AAV), a parvovirus used for gene delivery. Although dependovirus (AAV) and autonomous parvovirus (minute virus of mice) replication centers can colocalize with PML, PML's functional effect on parvoviruses is unknown. Using PML knockout mice, we determined that PML knockout enhances recombinant AAV2 (rAAV2) transduction at a range of vector doses in both male and female mice. In fact, male and female PML knockout mice exhibited up to 56-fold and 28-fold increases in transduction, respectively. PML inhibited several rAAV serotypes, suggesting a conserved mechanism, and organ specificity correlated with PML expression. Mechanistically, PML inhibited rAAV second-strand DNA synthesis, precluding inhibition of self-complementary rAAV, and did not affect the prior steps in transduction. Furthermore, we confirmed the effect of human PML on rAAV transduction through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown in HuH7 cells and determined that the highest level of inhibition was due to effects of PML isoform II (PMLII). Overexpression of PMLII resulted in inhibition of second-strand synthesis, vector production, and genome replication. Moreover, wild-type AAV2 production and infectivity were also inhibited by PMLII, demonstrating a PML interaction with wild-type AAV. These data have important implications for AAV-mediated gene therapy. Additionally, PMLII inhibition of AAV second-strand synthesis and replication, which are processes necessary for all parvoviruses, suggests implications for replication of other parvoviruses.

  10. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of tropism and effectiveness of new primate-derived hybrid recombinant AAV serotypes in the mouse and primate retina.

    PubMed

    Charbel Issa, Peter; De Silva, Samantha R; Lipinski, Daniel M; Singh, Mandeep S; Mouravlev, Alexandre; You, Qisheng; Barnard, Alun R; Hankins, Mark W; During, Matthew J; Maclaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have been shown to be safe in the treatment of retinal degenerations in clinical trials. Thus, improving the efficiency of viral gene delivery has become increasingly important to increase the success of clinical trials. In this study, structural domains of different rAAV serotypes isolated from primate brain were combined to create novel hybrid recombinant AAV serotypes, rAAV2/rec2 and rAAV2/rec3. The efficacy of these novel serotypes were assessed in wild type mice and in two models of retinal degeneration (the Abca4(-/-) mouse which is a model for Stargardt disease and in the Pde6b(rd1/rd1) mouse) in vivo, in primate tissue ex-vivo, and in the human-derived SH-SY5Y cell line, using an identical AAV2 expression cassette. We show that these novel hybrid serotypes can transduce retinal tissue in mice and primates efficiently, although no more than AAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 serotypes. Transduction efficiency appeared lower in the Abca4(-/-) mouse compared to wild type with all vectors tested, suggesting an effect of specific retinal diseases on the efficiency of gene delivery. Shuffling of AAV capsid domains may have clinical applications for patients who develop T-cell immune responses following AAV gene therapy, as specific peptide antigen sequences could be substituted using this technique prior to vector re-treatments.

  12. Plectin-1 Targeted AAV Vector for the Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Deng, Defeng; Thomas, Stephanie; Wu, Michael T.; Logsdon, Craig D.; French, Brent A.; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is highly malignant disease that is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Gene therapy using AAV vectors to selectively deliver genes to PDAC cells is an attractive treatment option for pancreatic cancer. However, most AAV serotypes display a broad spectrum of tissue tropism and none of the existing serotypes specifically target PDAC cells. This study tests the hypothesis that AAV2 can be genetically re-engineered to specifically target PDAC cells by modifying the capsid surface to display a peptide that has previously been shown to bind plectin-1. Toward this end, a Plectin-1 Targeting Peptide (PTP) was inserted into the loop IV region of the AAV2 capsid, and the resulting capsid (AAV-PTP) was used in a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, AAV-PTP was found to target all five human PDAC cell lines tested (PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, HPAC, MPanc-96, and BxPC-3) preferentially over two non-neoplastic human pancreatic cell lines (human pancreatic ductal epithelial and human pancreatic stellate cells). In vivo, mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts were generated using the PANC-1 cell line. Once tumors reached a size of ∼1–2 mm in diameter, the mice were injected intravenously with luciferase reporter vectors packaged in the either AAV-PTP or wild type AAV2 capsids. Luciferase expression was then monitored by bioluminescence imaging on days 3, 7, and 14 after vector injection. The results indicate that the AAV-PTP capsid displays a 37-fold preference for PANC-1 tumor xenographs over liver and other tissues; whereas the wild type AAV2 capsid displays a complementary preference for liver over tumors and other tissues. Together, these results establish proof-of-principle for the ability of PTP-modified AAV capsids to selectively target gene delivery to PDAC cells in vivo, which opens promising new avenues for the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23616947

  13. Glymphatic fluid transport controls paravascular clearance of AAV vectors from the brain

    PubMed Central

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Crowther, Andrew; Reardon, Rebecca A.; Song, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for gene therapy of CNS disorders. However, host factors that influence the spread, clearance, and transduction efficiency of AAV vectors in the brain are not well understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that fluid flow mediated by aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels located on astroglial end feet is essential for exchange of solutes between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. This phenomenon, which is essential for interstitial clearance of solutes from the CNS, has been termed glial-associated lymphatic transport or glymphatic transport. In the current study, we demonstrate that glymphatic transport profoundly affects various aspects of AAV gene transfer in the CNS. Altered localization of AQP4 in aged mouse brains correlated with significantly increased retention of AAV vectors in the parenchyma and reduced systemic leakage following ventricular administration. We observed a similar increase in AAV retention and transgene expression upon i.c.v. administration in AQP4–/– mice. Consistent with this observation, fluorophore-labeled AAV vectors showed markedly reduced flux from the ventricles of AQP4–/– mice compared with WT mice. These results were further corroborated by reduced AAV clearance from the AQP4-null brain, as demonstrated by reduced transgene expression and vector genome accumulation in systemic organs. We postulate that deregulation of glymphatic transport in aged and diseased brains could markedly affect the parenchymal spread, clearance, and gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors. Assessment of biomarkers that report the kinetics of CSF flux in prospective gene therapy patients might inform variable treatment outcomes and guide future clinical trial design. PMID:27699236

  14. A methodology for extending domain coverage in SemRep.

    PubMed

    Rosemblat, Graciela; Shin, Dongwook; Kilicoglu, Halil; Sneiderman, Charles; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2013-12-01

    We describe a domain-independent methodology to extend SemRep coverage beyond the biomedical domain. SemRep, a natural language processing application originally designed for biomedical texts, uses the knowledge sources provided by the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS©). Ontological and terminological extensions to the system are needed in order to support other areas of knowledge. We extended SemRep's application by developing a semantic representation of a previously unsupported domain. This was achieved by adapting well-known ontology engineering phases and integrating them with the UMLS knowledge sources on which SemRep crucially depends. While the process to extend SemRep coverage has been successfully applied in earlier projects, this paper presents in detail the step-wise approach we followed and the mechanisms implemented. A case study in the field of medical informatics illustrates how the ontology engineering phases have been adapted for optimal integration with the UMLS. We provide qualitative and quantitative results, which indicate the validity and usefulness of our methodology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies host restriction factors critical for in vivo AAV transduction

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Miguel; Ippodrino, Rudy; Zentilin, Lorena; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Viral vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) hold great promise for in vivo gene transfer; several unknowns, however, still limit the vectors’ broader and more efficient application. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput, whole-genome siRNA screening aimed at identifying cellular factors regulating AAV transduction. We identified 1,483 genes affecting vector efficiency more than 4-fold and up to 50-fold, either negatively or positively. Most of these factors have not previously been associated to AAV infection. The most effective siRNAs were independent from the virus serotype or analyzed cell type and were equally evident for single-stranded and self-complementary AAV vectors. A common characteristic of the most effective siRNAs was the induction of cellular DNA damage and activation of a cell cycle checkpoint. This information can be exploited for the development of more efficient AAV-based gene delivery procedures. Administration of the most effective siRNAs identified by the screening to the liver significantly improved in vivo AAV transduction efficiency. PMID:26305933

  16. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  17. U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson of Florida during medical tests at JSC's Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson of Florida during medical tests at JSC's Clinic. Photos include Rep. Nelson talking to Sharon Briceno (center) and Betty Lord before the tests begin. The congressman's torso bears a number of sensors for the testing (40835); Portrait view of Rep. Nelson with sensors attached to his chest (40836); Rep. Nelson gets some assistance from nurses at the clinic as he prepares to participate in medical tests. Help is provided by Betty Lord, right, and Sharon Briceno (40837); Rep. Nelson is being assisted to don 'halo' device for tests (40838); Rep. Nelson runs in place on a treadmill device (40839).

  18. Deformable M-Reps for 3D Medical Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pizer, Stephen M; Fletcher, P Thomas; Joshi, Sarang; Thall, Andrew; Chen, James Z; Fridman, Yonatan; Fritsch, Daniel S; Gash, Graham; Glotzer, John M; Jiroutek, Michael R; Lu, Conglin; Muller, Keith E; Tracton, Gregg; Yushkevich, Paul; Chaney, Edward L

    2003-11-01

    M-reps (formerly called DSLs) are a multiscale medial means for modeling and rendering 3D solid geometry. They are particularly well suited to model anatomic objects and in particular to capture prior geometric information effectively in deformable models segmentation approaches. The representation is based on figural models , which define objects at coarse scale by a hierarchy of figures - each figure generally a slab representing a solid region and its boundary simultaneously. This paper focuses on the use of single figure models to segment objects of relatively simple structure. A single figure is a sheet of medial atoms, which is interpolated from the model formed by a net, i.e., a mesh or chain, of medial atoms (hence the name m-reps ), each atom modeling a solid region via not only a position and a width but also a local figural frame giving figural directions and an object angle between opposing, corresponding positions on the boundary implied by the m-rep. The special capability of an m-rep is to provide spatial and orientational correspondence between an object in two different states of deformation. This ability is central to effective measurement of both geometric typicality and geometry to image match, the two terms of the objective function optimized in segmentation by deformable models. The other ability of m-reps central to effective segmentation is their ability to support segmentation at multiple levels of scale, with successively finer precision. Objects modeled by single figures are segmented first by a similarity transform augmented by object elongation, then by adjustment of each medial atom, and finally by displacing a dense sampling of the m-rep implied boundary. While these models and approaches also exist in 2D, we focus on 3D objects. The segmentation of the kidney from CT and the hippocampus from MRI serve as the major examples in this paper. The accuracy of segmentation as compared to manual, slice-by-slice segmentation is reported.

  19. A microRNA embedded AAV alpha-synuclein gene silencing vector for dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Khodr, Christina E.; Sapru, Mohan K.; Pedapati, Jyothi; Bohn, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA), an abundantly expressed presynaptic protein, is implicated in Parkinson disease (PD). Since over-expression of human SNCA (hSNCA) leads to death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in human, rodent and fly brain, hSNCA gene silencing may reduce levels of toxic forms of SNCA and ameliorate degeneration of DA neurons in PD. To begin to develop a gene therapy for PD based on hSNCA gene silencing, two AAV gene silencing vectors were designed, and tested for efficiency and specificity of silencing, as well as toxicity in vitro. The same hSNCA silencing sequence (shRNA) was used in both vectors, but in one vector, the shRNA was embedded in a microRNA backbone and driven by a pol II promoter, and in the other the shRNA was not embedded in a microRNA and was driven by a pol III promoter. Both vectors silenced hSNCA to the same extent in 293T cells transfected with hSNCA. In DA PC12 cells, neither vector decreased expression of rat SNCA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT) or the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT). However, the mir30 embedded vector was significantly less toxic to both PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Our in vitro data suggest that this miRNA-embedded silencing vector may be ideal for chronic in vivo SNCA gene silencing in DA neurons. PMID:21338582

  20. Relevance of Assembly-Activating Protein for Adeno-associated Virus Vector Production and Capsid Protein Stability in Mammalian and Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Stefanie; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Börner, Kathleen; Fakhiri, Julia; Laketa, Vibor; Krämer, Chiara; Wiedtke, Ellen; Gunkel, Manuel; Ménard, Lucie; Ayuso, Eduard; Grimm, Dirk

    2017-10-15

    The discovery that adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) encodes an eighth protein, called assembly-activating protein (AAP), transformed our understanding of wild-type AAV biology. Concurrently, it raised questions about the role of AAP during production of recombinant vectors based on natural or molecularly engineered AAV capsids. Here, we show that AAP is indeed essential for generation of functional recombinant AAV2 vectors in both mammalian and insect cell-based vector production systems. Surprisingly, we observed that AAV2 capsid proteins VP1 to -3 are unstable in the absence of AAP2, likely due to rapid proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of the proteasome led to an increase of intracellular VP1 to -3 but neither triggered assembly of functional capsids nor promoted nuclear localization of the capsid proteins. Together, this underscores the crucial and unique role of AAP in the AAV life cycle, where it rapidly chaperones capsid assembly, thus preventing degradation of free capsid proteins. An expanded analysis comprising nine alternative AAV serotypes (1, 3 to 9, and rh10) showed that vector production always depends on the presence of AAP, with the exceptions of AAV4 and AAV5, which exhibited AAP-independent, albeit low-level, particle assembly. Interestingly, AAPs from all 10 serotypes could cross-complement AAP-depleted helper plasmids during vector production, despite there being distinct intracellular AAP localization patterns. These were most pronounced for AAP4 and AAP5, congruent with their inability to rescue an AAV2/AAP2 knockout. We conclude that AAP is key for assembly of genuine capsids from at least 10 different AAV serotypes, which has implications for vectors derived from wild-type or synthetic AAV capsids. IMPORTANCE Assembly of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is regulated by the assembly-activating protein (AAP), whose open reading frame overlaps with that of the viral capsid proteins. As the majority of evidence was obtained using virus

  1. 75 FR 78694 - Proposed Residential Exchange Program Settlement Agreement Proceeding (REP-12); Public Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration [BPA File No.: REP-12] Proposed Residential... Review and Comment AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Residential Exchange Program Settlement Agreement Proceeding (REP-12). SUMMARY: BPA is...

  2. Rehabilitation Education Program for Stroke (REPS): Learning and Practice Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Sara; Szurek, Kristina; Polatajko, Helene J.; Rappolt, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: New research knowledge acquired from Web-based sources may have a better chance of being translated into practice when accompanied by additional educational strategies. This study was undertaken to investigate that hypothesis. Methods: The Rehabilitation Education Program for Stroke (REPS) combines a self-directed online learning…

  3. Injection of AAV2-BMP2 and AAV2-TIMP1 into the nucleus pulposus slows the course of intervertebral disc degeneration in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Steven K; Bechara, Bernard P; Hartman, Robert A; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Woods, Barrett I; Coelho, Joao P; Witt, William T; Dong, Qing D; Bowman, Brent W; Bell, Kevin M; Vo, Nam V; Wang, Bing; Kang, James D

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common cause of back pain. Patients who fail conservative management may face the morbidity of surgery. Alternative treatment modalities could have a significant impact on disease progression and patients' quality of life. To determine if the injection of a virus vector carrying a therapeutic gene directly into the nucleus pulposus improves the course of IDD. Prospective randomized controlled animal study. Thirty-four skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits were used. In the treatment group, L2-L3, L3-L4, and L4-L5 discs were punctured in accordance with a previously validated rabbit annulotomy model for IDD and then subsequently treated with adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector carrying genes for either bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1). A nonoperative control group, nonpunctured sham surgical group, and punctured control group were also evaluated. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies at 0, 6, and 12 weeks were obtained, and a validated MRI analysis program was used to quantify degeneration. The rabbits were sacrificed at 12 weeks, and L4-L5 discs were analyzed histologically. Viscoelastic properties of the L3-L4 discs were analyzed using uniaxial load-normalized displacement testing. Creep curves were mathematically modeled according to a previously validated two-phase exponential model. Serum samples obtained at 0, 6, and 12 weeks were assayed for biochemical evidence of degeneration. The punctured group demonstrated MRI and histologic evidence of degeneration as expected. The treatment groups demonstrated less MRI and histologic evidence of degeneration than the punctured group. The serum biochemical marker C-telopeptide of collagen type II increased rapidly in the punctured group, but the treated groups returned to control values by 12 weeks. The treatment groups demonstrated several viscoelastic properties that were distinct from control

  4. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV2)-mediated apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme: a self-complementary AAV2 vector improves the gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shumei; Sun, Shihua; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2004-01-01

    Background In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. To reduce the levels of apoB mRNA, we have designed an apoB mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme targeted at nucleotide sequences GUA6679 (RB15) mediated by adenovirus, which efficiently cleaves and decreases apoB mRNA by 80% in mouse liver and attenuates the hyperlipidemic condition. In the current study, we used an adeno-associated virus vector, serotype 2 (AAV2) and a self-complementary AAV2 vector (scAAV2) to demonstrate the effect of long-term tissue-specific gene expression of RB15 on the regulation apoB mRNA in vivo. Methods We constructed a hammerhead ribozyme RB15 driven by a liver-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoter using an AAV2 vector (rAAV2-TTR-RB15). HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic mice deficient in both the low density lipoprotein receptor and the apoB mRNA editing enzyme genes (LDLR-/-Apobec1-/-; LDb) were transduced with rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and a control vector rAAV-TTR-RB15-mutant (inactive ribozyme). The effects of ribozyme RB15 on apoB metabolism and atherosclerosis development were determined in LDb mice at 5-month after transduction. A self-complementary AAV2 vector expressing ribozyme RB15 (scAAV2-TTR-RB15) was also engineered and used to transduce HepG2 cells. Studies were designed to compare the gene expression efficiency between rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and scAAV2-TTR-RB15. Results The effect of ribozyme RB15 RNA on reducing apoB mRNA levels in HepG2 cells was observed only on day-7 after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 transduction. And, at 5-month after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 treatment, the apoB mRNA levels in LDb mice were significantly decreased by 43%, compared to LDb mice treated with control vector rAAV2-TTR-RB15-mutant. Moreover, both the rAAV2-TTR-RB15 viral DNA and ribozyme RB15 RNA were still detectable in mice livers at 5-month after treatment. However, this rAAV2-TTR-RB15 vector mediated a prolonged but low level of ribozyme RB15 gene

  5. Preparation of rAAV9 to Overexpress or Knockdown Genes in Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Lin, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Pu, William T.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the expression or activity of specific genes through the myocardial delivery of genetic materials in murine models permits the investigation of gene functions. Their therapeutic potential in the heart can also be determined. There are limited approaches for in vivo molecular intervention in the mouse heart. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-based genome engineering has been utilized as an essential tool for in vivo cardiac gene manipulation. The specific advantages of this technology include high efficiency, high specificity, low genomic integration rate, minimalimmunogenicity, and minimal pathogenicity. Here, a detailed procedure to construct, package, and purify the rAAV9 vectors is described. Subcutaneous injection of rAAV9 into neonatal pups results in robust expression or efficient knockdown of the gene(s) of interest in the mouse heart, but not in the liver and other tissues. Using the cardiac-specific TnnT2 promoter, high expression of GFP gene in the heart was obtained. Additionally, target mRNA was inhibited in the heart when a rAAV9-U6-shRNA was utilized. Working knowledge of rAAV9 technology may be useful for cardiovascular investigations. PMID:28060283

  6. Preparation of rAAV9 to Overexpress or Knockdown Genes in Mouse Hearts.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Lin, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Pu, William T; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-12-17

    Controlling the expression or activity of specific genes through the myocardial delivery of genetic materials in murine models permits the investigation of gene functions. Their therapeutic potential in the heart can also be determined. There are limited approaches for in vivo molecular intervention in the mouse heart. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-based genome engineering has been utilized as an essential tool for in vivo cardiac gene manipulation. The specific advantages of this technology include high efficiency, high specificity, low genomic integration rate, minimal immunogenicity, and minimal pathogenicity. Here, a detailed procedure to construct, package, and purify the rAAV9 vectors is described. Subcutaneous injection of rAAV9 into neonatal pups results in robust expression or efficient knockdown of the gene(s) of interest in the mouse heart, but not in the liver and other tissues. Using the cardiac-specific TnnT2 promoter, high expression of GFP gene in the heart was obtained. Additionally, target mRNA was inhibited in the heart when a rAAV9-U6-shRNA was utilized. Working knowledge of rAAV9 technology may be useful for cardiovascular investigations.

  7. Ribosomal DNA Integrating rAAV-rDNA Vectors Allow for Stable Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lisowski, Leszek; Lau, Ashley; Wang, Zhongya; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Feijie; Grompe, Markus; Kay, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are proving to be efficacious in clinical trials, the episomal character of the delivered transgene restricts their effectiveness to use in quiescent tissues, and may not provide lifelong expression. In contrast, integrating vectors enhance the risk of insertional mutagenesis. In an attempt to overcome both of these limitations, we created new rAAV-rDNA vectors, with an expression cassette flanked by ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences capable of homologous recombination into genomic rDNA. We show that after in vivo delivery the rAAV-rDNA vectors integrated into the genomic rDNA locus 8–13 times more frequently than control vectors, providing an estimate that 23–39% of the integrations were specific to the rDNA locus. Moreover, a rAAV-rDNA vector containing a human factor IX (hFIX) expression cassette resulted in sustained therapeutic levels of serum hFIX even after repeated manipulations to induce liver regeneration. Because of the relative safety of integration in the rDNA locus, these vectors expand the usage of rAAV for therapeutics requiring long-term gene transfer into dividing cells. PMID:22990671

  8. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weihong; Wu Jianqing; Zhong Li

    2006-09-30

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency ofmore » conventional AAV vectors by {approx}25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency {approx}23-fold in WT MEFs, but only {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, {approx}59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only {approx}28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of

  9. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  10. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Andrea L H; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice.

  11. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Andrea L. H.; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice. PMID:22065964

  12. Deformable M-Reps for 3D Medical Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Stephen M.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Joshi, Sarang; Thall, Andrew; Chen, James Z.; Fridman, Yonatan; Fritsch, Daniel S.; Gash, Graham; Glotzer, John M.; Jiroutek, Michael R.; Lu, Conglin; Muller, Keith E.; Tracton, Gregg; Yushkevich, Paul; Chaney, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    M-reps (formerly called DSLs) are a multiscale medial means for modeling and rendering 3D solid geometry. They are particularly well suited to model anatomic objects and in particular to capture prior geometric information effectively in deformable models segmentation approaches. The representation is based on figural models, which define objects at coarse scale by a hierarchy of figures – each figure generally a slab representing a solid region and its boundary simultaneously. This paper focuses on the use of single figure models to segment objects of relatively simple structure. A single figure is a sheet of medial atoms, which is interpolated from the model formed by a net, i.e., a mesh or chain, of medial atoms (hence the name m-reps), each atom modeling a solid region via not only a position and a width but also a local figural frame giving figural directions and an object angle between opposing, corresponding positions on the boundary implied by the m-rep. The special capability of an m-rep is to provide spatial and orientational correspondence between an object in two different states of deformation. This ability is central to effective measurement of both geometric typicality and geometry to image match, the two terms of the objective function optimized in segmentation by deformable models. The other ability of m-reps central to effective segmentation is their ability to support segmentation at multiple levels of scale, with successively finer precision. Objects modeled by single figures are segmented first by a similarity transform augmented by object elongation, then by adjustment of each medial atom, and finally by displacing a dense sampling of the m-rep implied boundary. While these models and approaches also exist in 2D, we focus on 3D objects. The segmentation of the kidney from CT and the hippocampus from MRI serve as the major examples in this paper. The accuracy of segmentation as compared to manual, slice-by-slice segmentation is reported. PMID

  13. Intramuscular injection of AAV8 in mice and macaques is associated with substantial hepatic targeting and transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Peng, Hui; Ohlstein, Jason; Medina-Jaszek, C Angelica; Ahonkhai, Omua; Mentzinger, Anne; Grant, Rebecca L; Roy, Soumitra; Chen, Shu-Jen; Bell, Peter; Tretiakova, Anna P; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular (IM) administration of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has entered the early stages of clinical development with some success, including the first approved gene therapy product in the West called Glybera. In preparation for broader clinical development of IM AAV vector gene therapy, we conducted detailed pre-clinical studies in mice and macaques evaluating aspects of delivery that could affect performance. We found that following IM administration of AAV8 vectors in mice, a portion of the vector reached the liver and hepatic gene expression contributed significantly to total expression of secreted transgenes. The contribution from liver could be controlled by altering injection volume and by the use of traditional (promoter) and non-traditional (tissue-specific microRNA target sites) expression control elements. Hepatic distribution of vector following IM injection was also noted in rhesus macaques. These pre-clinical data on AAV delivery should inform safe and efficient development of future AAV products.

  14. [Construction of a general AAV vector regulated by minimal and artificial hypoxic-responsive element].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiao-wei; Sun, Li-jun; Hao, Yue-wen; Yang, Guang-xiao; Wang, Quan-ying

    2011-03-01

    To synthesize the minimal and artificial HRE, and to insert it into the anterior extremity of CMV promoter of a AAV plasmid, and then to construct the AAV regulated by hypoxic-responsive element which was introduced into 293 cell by method of Ca3(PO4)2 using three plasmids. Thus obtaining the adenoassociated virus vector regulated by hypoxic-responsive element was possibly used for gene therapy in ischemia angiocardiopathy and cerebrovascular disease. Artificially synthesize the 36 bp nucleotide sequences of four connection in series HIF-binding sites A/GCGTG(4×HBS)and a 35 bp nucleotide sequences spacing inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter TATA Box, then amplified by PCR. The cDNA fragment was confirmed to be right by DNA sequencing. Molecular biology routine method was used to construct a AAV vector regulated by minimal hypoxic-responsive element after the normal CMV promoter in AAV vector was replaced by the CMV promoter included minimal hypoxic-responsive element. Then, NT4-6His-PR39 fusogenic peptide was inserted into MCS of the plasmid, the recombinant AAV vector was obtained by three plasmid co-transfection in 293 cells, in which we can also investigate the expression of 6×His using immunochemistry in hypoxia environment. Artificial HRE was inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter and there was a correct spacing between the HRE and the TATA-box. The DNA sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion results indicated that the AAV regulated by hypoxic-responsive element was successfully constructed. Compared to the control group, the expressions of 6×His was significantly increased in the experimental groups in hypoxia environment, which confirmed that the AAV effectually regulated by the minimal HRE was inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter. The HRE is inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter to lack incision enzyme recognition site by PCR. And eukaryotic expression vector regulated by hypoxic-responsive is constructed

  15. Gene delivery to skeletal muscle results in sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Kessler, P D; Podsakoff, G M; Chen, X; McQuiston, S A; Colosi, P C; Matelis, L A; Kurtzman, G J; Byrne, B J

    1996-11-26

    Somatic gene therapy has been proposed as a means to achieve systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, there is limited evidence that current methods of gene delivery can practically achieve this goal. In this study, we demonstrate that, following a single intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector containing the beta-galactosidase (AAV-lacZ) gene into adult BALB/c mice, protein expression was detected in myofibers for at least 32 weeks. A single intramuscular administration of an AAV vector containing a gene for human erythropoietin (AAV-Epo) into mice resulted in dose-dependent secretion of erythropoietin and corresponding increases in red blood cell production that persisted for up to 40 weeks. Primary human myotubes transduced in vitro with the AAV-Epo vector also showed dose-dependent production of Epo. These results demonstrate that rAAV vectors are able to transduce skeletal muscle and are capable of achieving sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein following a single intramuscular administration. Gene therapy using AAV vectors may provide a practical strategy for the treatment of inherited and acquired protein deficiencies.

  16. Conversations with Rep. Ken Calvert. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Rep. Calvert, chair of the House aeronautics and space subcommittee of the Science Committee, answers questions related to priorities for space in the current congressional session: the Vision for Space Exploration, development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and other heavy-lift launch vehicles, entrepreneurial alliances in the space transportation industry, the U.S. aerospace industry, space tourism, entrepreneurs and NASA, U.S. aeronautics research, a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, and priority military space programs.

  17. Ultra Fast, High Rep Rate, High Voltage Spark Gap Pulser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    current rise time. The spark gap was designed to have a coaxial geometry reducing its inductance. Provisions were made to pass flowing gas between the...ULTRA FAST, HIGH REP RATE, HIGH VOLTAGE SPARK GAP PULSER Robert A. Pastore Jr., Lawrence E. Kingsley, Kevin Fonda, Erik Lenzing Electrophysics and...Modeling Branch AMSRL-PS-EA Tel.: (908)-532-0271 FAX: (908)-542-3348 U.S. Army Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Directorate Ft. Monmouth

  18. Intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a phase 1, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Heier, Jeffrey S; Kherani, Saleema; Desai, Shilpa; Dugel, Pravin; Kaushal, Shalesh; Cheng, Seng H; Delacono, Cheryl; Purvis, Annie; Richards, Susan; Le-Halpere, Annaig; Connelly, John; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Varona, Rafael; Buggage, Ronald; Scaria, Abraham; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Long-term intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralising proteins can preserve central vision in many patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. We tested the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of an AAV2 vector expressing the VEGF-neutralising protein sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This was a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalating study done at four outpatient retina clinics in the USA. Patients were assigned to each cohort in order of enrolment, with the first three patients being assigned to and completing the first cohort before filling positions in the following treatment groups. Patients aged 50 years or older with neovascular age-related macular degeneration and a baseline best-corrected visual acuity score of 20/100 or less in the study eye were enrolled in four dose-ranging cohorts (cohort 1, 2 × 10 8 vector genomes (vg); cohort 2, 2 × 10 9 vg; cohort 3, 6 × 10 9 vg; and cohort 4, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=3 per cohort) and one maximum tolerated dose cohort (cohort 5, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=7) and followed up for 52 weeks. The primary objective of the study was to assess the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01, through the measurement of eye-related adverse events. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01024998. 19 patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration were enrolled in the study between May 18, 2010, and July 14, 2014. All patients completed the 52-week trial period. Two patients in cohort 4 (2 × 10 10 vg) experienced adverse events that were possibly study-drug related: pyrexia and intraocular inflammation that resolved with a topical steroid. Five of ten patients who received 2 × 10 10 vg had aqueous humour concentrations of sFLT01 that peaked at 32·7-112·0 ng/mL (mean 73·7 ng/mL, SD 30·5) by week 26 with a slight decrease to

  19. Distribution of AAV-TK following intracranial convection-enhanced delivery into rats.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J; Oiwa, Y; Nagy, D; Podsakoff, G; Colosi, P; Bankiewicz, K S

    2000-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are being tested in animal models as viable treatments for glioma and neurodegenerative disease and could potentially be employed to target a variety of central nervous system disorders. The relationship between dose of injected vector and its resulting distribution in brain tissue has not been previously reported nor has the most efficient method of delivery been determined. Here we report that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of 2.5 x 10(8), 2.5 x 10(9), or 2.5 x 10(10) particles of AAV-thymidine kinase (AAV-TK) into rat brain revealed a clear dose response. In the high-dose group, a volume of 300 mm3 of brain tissue was partially transduced. Results showed that infusion pump and subcutaneous osmotic pumps were both capable of delivering vector via CED and that total particle number was the most important determining factor in obtaining efficient expression. Results further showed differences in histopathology between the delivery groups. While administration of vector using infusion pump had relatively benign effects, the use of osmotic pumps resulted in notable toxicity to the surrounding brain tissue. To determine tissue distribution of vector following intracranial delivery, PCR analysis was performed on tissues from rats that received high doses of AAV-TK. Three weeks following CED, vector could be detected in both hemispheres of the brain, spinal cord, spleen, and kidney.

  20. Recent progress and considerations for AAV gene therapies targeting the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lykken, Erik Allen; Shyng, Charles; Edwards, Reginald James; Rozenberg, Alejandra; Gray, Steven James

    2018-05-18

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, as a class of diseases, have been particularly difficult to treat even when the underlying cause(s), such as genetic alterations, are understood. What treatments do exist are generally not curative and instead seek to improve quality of life for affected individuals. The advent of gene therapy via gene replacement offers the potential for transformative therapies to slow or even stop disease progression for current patients and perhaps minimize or prevent the appearance of symptoms in future patients. This review focuses on adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapies for diseases of the central nervous system. An overview of advances in AAV vector design for therapy is provided, along with a description of current strategies to develop AAV vectors with tailored tropism. Next, progress towards treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is presented at both the pre-clinical and clinical stages, focusing on a few select diseases to highlight broad categories of therapeutic parameters. Special considerations for more challenging cases are then discussed in addition to the immunological aspects of gene therapy. With the promising clinical trial results that have been observed for the latest AAV gene therapies and continued pre-clinical successes, the question is no longer whether a therapy can be developed for certain neurodevelopmental disorders, but rather, how quickly.

  1. Plasmid replication initiator RepB forms a hexamer reminiscent of ring helicases and has mobile nuclease domains

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D Roeland; Ruíz-Masó, José A; López-Blanco, José R; Blanco, Alexander G; Vives-Llàcer, Mireia; Chacón, Pablo; Usón, Isabel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Espinosa, Manuel; Llorca, Oscar; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    RepB initiates plasmid rolling-circle replication by binding to a triple 11-bp direct repeat (bind locus) and cleaving the DNA at a specific distant site located in a hairpin loop within the nic locus of the origin. The structure of native full-length RepB reveals a hexameric ring molecule, where each protomer has two domains. The origin-binding and catalytic domains show a three-layer α–β–α sandwich fold. The active site is positioned at one of the faces of the β-sheet and coordinates a Mn2+ ion at short distance from the essential nucleophilic Y99. The oligomerization domains (ODs), each consisting of four α-helices, together define a compact ring with a central channel, a feature found in ring helicases. The toroidal arrangement of RepB suggests that, similar to ring helicases, it encircles one of the DNA strands during replication to confer processivity to the replisome complex. The catalytic domains appear to be highly mobile with respect to ODs. This mobility may account for the adaptation of the protein to two distinct DNA recognition sites. PMID:19440202

  2. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIJUN; HAO, YUEWEN; NIE, XIAOWEI; ZHANG, XUEXIN; YANG, GUANGXIAO; WANG, QUANYING

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  3. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  4. Intracranial AAV-IFN-β gene therapy eliminates invasive xenograft glioblastoma and improves survival in orthotopic syngeneic murine model.

    PubMed

    GuhaSarkar, Dwijit; Neiswender, James; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The highly invasive property of glioblastoma (GBM) cells and genetic heterogeneity are largely responsible for tumor recurrence after the current standard-of-care treatment and thus a direct cause of death. Previously, we have shown that intracranial interferon-beta (IFN-β) gene therapy by locally administered adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) successfully treats noninvasive orthotopic glioblastoma models. Here, we extend these findings by testing this approach in invasive human GBM xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. First, we show that a single intracranial injection of AAV encoding human IFN-β eliminates invasive human GBM8 tumors and promotes long-term survival. Next, we screened five AAV-IFN-β vectors with different promoters to drive safe expression of mouse IFN-β in the brain in the context of syngeneic GL261 tumors. Two AAV-IFN-β vectors were excluded due to safety concerns, but therapeutic studies with the other three vectors showed extensive tumor cell death, activation of microglia surrounding the tumors, and a 56% increase in median survival of the animals treated with AAV/P2-Int-mIFN-β vector. We also assessed the therapeutic effect of combining AAV-IFN-β therapy with temozolomide (TMZ). As TMZ affects DNA replication, an event that is crucial for second-strand DNA synthesis of single-stranded AAV vectors before active transcription, we tested two TMZ treatment regimens. Treatment with TMZ prior to AAV-IFN-β abrogated any benefit from the latter, while the reverse order of treatment doubled the median survival compared to controls. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of intracranial AAV-IFN-β therapy in a highly migratory GBM model as well as in a syngeneic mouse model and that combination with TMZ is likely to enhance its antitumor potency. © 2016 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Gene delivery to skeletal muscle results in sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Paul D.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Chen, Xiaojuan; McQuiston, Susan A.; Colosi, Peter C.; Matelis, Laura A.; Kurtzman, Gary J.; Byrne, Barry J.

    1996-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy has been proposed as a means to achieve systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, there is limited evidence that current methods of gene delivery can practically achieve this goal. In this study, we demonstrate that, following a single intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector containing the β-galactosidase (AAV-lacZ) gene into adult BALB/c mice, protein expression was detected in myofibers for at least 32 weeks. A single intramuscular administration of an AAV vector containing a gene for human erythropoietin (AAV-Epo) into mice resulted in dose-dependent secretion of erythropoietin and corresponding increases in red blood cell production that persisted for up to 40 weeks. Primary human myotubes transduced in vitro with the AAV-Epo vector also showed dose-dependent production of Epo. These results demonstrate that rAAV vectors are able to transduce skeletal muscle and are capable of achieving sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein following a single intramuscular administration. Gene therapy using AAV vectors may provide a practical strategy for the treatment of inherited and acquired protein deficiencies. PMID:8943064

  6. Adeno-associated-virus-mediated transduction of the mammary gland enables sustained production of recombinant proteins in milk

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefan; Thresher, Rosemary; Bland, Ross; Laible, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Biopharming for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary gland of transgenic animals is an attractive but laborious alternative compared to mammalian cell fermentation. The disadvantage of the lengthy process of genetically modifying an entire animal could be circumvented with somatic transduction of only the mammary epithelium with recombinant, replication-defective viruses. While other viral vectors offer very limited scope for this approach, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) appear to be ideal candidates because AAV is helper-dependent, does not induce a strong immune response and has no association with disease. Here, we sought to test the suitability of recombinant AAV (rAAV) for biopharming. Using reporter genes, we showed that injected rAAV efficiently transduced mouse mammary cells. When rAAV encoding human myelin basic protein (hMBP) was injected into the mammary glands of mice and rabbits, this resulted in the expression of readily detectable protein levels of up to 0.5 g/L in the milk. Furthermore we demonstrated that production of hMBP persisted over extended periods and that protein expression could be renewed in a subsequent lactation by re-injection of rAAV into a previously injected mouse gland. PMID:26463440

  7. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    DOE PAGES

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; ...

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from thosemore » coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.« less

  8. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from thosemore » coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.« less

  9. Analysis of Chemical, REP, and SEP missions to the Trojan asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonfiglio, Eugene P.; Oh, David; Yen, Chen-Wan

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies suggest significant benefits from using 1st and 2nd generation Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) as a power source for electric propulsion (EP) missions to the outer planets. This study focuses on trajectories to the Trojan asteroids. A high level analysis is performed with chemical trajectories to determine potential canidates for REP trajectory optimization. Extensive analysis of direct trajectories using REP is performed on these candidates. Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) trajectories are also considered for comparison against REP trajectories.

  10. AAV serotype 2/1-mediated gene delivery of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 enhances neurogenesis and cognitive function in APP+PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, T; Ingraham, K L; Swan, R J; Jacobsen, M T; Andrews, S J; Ikezu, T

    2012-07-01

    Brain inflammation is a double-edged sword. It is required for brain repair in acute damage, whereas chronic inflammation and autoimmune disorders are neuropathogenic. Certain proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are closely related to cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Representative anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-10, can suppress neuroinflammation and have significant therapeutic potentials in ameliorating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2/1 hybrid-mediated neuronal expression of the mouse IL-10 gene ameliorates cognitive dysfunction in amyloid precursor protein+ presenilin-1 bigenic mice. AAV2/1 infection of hippocampal neurons resulted in sustained expression of IL-10 without its leakage into the blood, reduced astro/microgliosis, enhanced plasma amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) levels and enhanced neurogenesis. Moreover, increased levels of IL-10 improved spatial learning, as determined by the radial arm water maze. Finally, IL-10-stimulated microglia enhanced proliferation but not differentiation of primary neural stem cells in the co-culture system, whereas IL-10 itself had no effect. Our data suggest that IL-10 gene delivery has a therapeutic potential for a non-Aβ-targeted treatment of AD.

  11. Crystal structure of the SF3 helicase from adeno-associated virus type 2.

    PubMed

    James, J Anson; Escalante, Carlos R; Yoon-Robarts, Miran; Edwards, Thomas A; Linden, R Michael; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2003-08-01

    We report here the crystal structure of an SF3 DNA helicase, Rep40, from adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2). We show that AAV2 Rep40 is structurally more similar to the AAA(+) class of cellular proteins than to DNA helicases from other superfamilies. The structure delineates the expected Walker A and B motifs, but also reveals an unexpected "arginine finger" that directly implies the requirement of Rep40 oligomerization for ATP hydrolysis and helicase activity. Further, the Rep40 AAA(+) domain is novel in that it is unimodular as opposed to bimodular. Altogether, the structural connection to AAA(+) proteins defines the general architecture of SF3 DNA helicases, a family that includes simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen, as well as provides a conceptual framework for understanding the role of Rep proteins during AAV DNA replication, packaging, and site-specific integration.

  12. Caspase Inhibition with XIAP as an Adjunct to AAV Vector Gene-Replacement Therapy: Improving Efficacy and Prolonging the Treatment Window

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Khan, Naheed; Zheng, Qiong-Duan; Moncrief, Ashley; Hauswirth, William W.; Thompson, Debra A.; Zacks, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose AAV-mediated gene therapy in the rd10 mouse, with retinal degeneration caused by mutation in the rod cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase β-subunit (PDEβ) gene, produces significant, but transient, rescue of photoreceptor structure and function. This study evaluates the ability of AAV-mediated delivery of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) to enhance and prolong the efficacy of PDEβ gene-replacement therapy. Methods Rd10 mice were bred and housed in darkness. Two groups of animals were generated: Group 1 received sub-retinal AAV5-XIAP or AAV5-GFP at postnatal age (P) 4 or 21 days; Group 2 received sub-retinal AAV5-XIAP plus AAV5- PDEβ, AAV5-GFP plus AAV5- PDEβ, or AAV- PDEβ alone at age P4 or P21. Animals were maintained for an additional 4 weeks in darkness before being moved to a cyclic-light environment. A subset of animals from Group 1 received a second sub-retinal injection of AAV8-733-PDEβ two weeks after being moved to the light. Histology, immunohistochemistry, Western blots, and electroretinograms were performed at different times after moving to the light. Results Injection of AAV5-XIAP alone at P4 and 21 resulted in significant slowing of light-induced retinal degeneration, as measured by outer nuclear thickness and cell counts, but did not result in improved outer segment structure and rhodopsin localization. In contrast, co-injection of AAV5-XIAP and AAV5-PDEβ resulted in increased levels of rescue and decreased rates of retinal degeneration compared to treatment with AAV5-PDEβ alone. Mice treated with AAV5-XIAP at P4, but not P21, remained responsive to subsequent rescue by AAV8-733-PDEβ when injected two weeks after moving to a light-cycling environment. Conclusions Adjunctive treatment with the anti-apoptotic gene XIAP confers additive protective effect to gene-replacement therapy with AAV5-PDEβ in the rd10 mouse. In addition, AAV5-XIAP, when given early, can increase the age at which gene-replacement therapy

  13. Novel AAV-based rat model of forebrain synucleinopathy shows extensive pathologies and progressive loss of cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Davidsson, Marcus; Holmqvist, Staffan; Li, Jia-Yi; Björklund, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Synucleinopathies, characterized by intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein protein, share a number of features in pathology and disease progression. However, the vulnerable cell population differs significantly between the disorders, despite being caused by the same protein. While the vulnerability of dopamine cells in the substantia nigra to α-synuclein over-expression, and its link to Parkinson's disease, is well studied, animal models recapitulating the cortical degeneration in dementia with Lewy-bodies (DLB) are much less mature. The aim of this study was to develop a first rat model of widespread progressive synucleinopathy throughout the forebrain using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated gene delivery. Through bilateral injection of an AAV6 vector expressing human wild-type α-synuclein into the forebrain of neonatal rats, we were able to achieve widespread, robust α-synuclein expression with preferential expression in the frontal cortex. These animals displayed a progressive emergence of hyper-locomotion and dysregulated response to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. The animals receiving the α-synuclein vector displayed significant α-synuclein pathology including intra-cellular inclusion bodies, axonal pathology and elevated levels of phosphorylated α-synuclein, accompanied by significant loss of cortical neurons and a progressive reduction in both cortical and striatal ChAT positive interneurons. Furthermore, we found evidence of α-synuclein sequestered by IBA-1 positive microglia, which was coupled with a distinct change in morphology. In areas of most prominent pathology, the total α-synuclein levels were increased to, on average, two-fold, which is similar to the levels observed in patients with SNCA gene triplication, associated with cortical Lewy body pathology. This study provides a novel rat model of progressive cortical synucleinopathy, showing for the first time that cholinergic interneurons are vulnerable to

  14. Widespread transduction of astrocytes and neurons in the mouse central nervous system after systemic delivery of a self-complementary AAV-PHP.B vector.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Melvin Y; de Vin, Filip; Duqué, Sandra I; Fripont, Shelly; Castaldo, Stephanie A; Bouhuijzen-Wenger, Jessica; Holt, Matthew G

    2018-04-01

    Until recently, adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) was considered the AAV serotype most effective in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and transducing cells of the central nervous system (CNS), following systemic injection. However, a newly engineered capsid, AAV-PHP.B, is reported to cross the BBB at even higher efficiency. We investigated how much we could boost CNS transgene expression by using AAV-PHP.B carrying a self-complementary (sc) genome. To allow comparison, 6 weeks old C57BL/6 mice received intravenous injections of scAAV2/9-GFP or scAAV2/PHP.B-GFP at equivalent doses. Three weeks postinjection, transgene expression was assessed in brain and spinal cord. We consistently observed more widespread CNS transduction and higher levels of transgene expression when using the scAAV2/PHP.B-GFP vector. In particular, we observed an unprecedented level of astrocyte transduction in the cortex, when using a ubiquitous CBA promoter. In comparison, neuronal transduction was much lower than previously reported. However, strong neuronal expression (including spinal motor neurons) was observed when the human synapsin promoter was used. These findings constitute the first reported use of an AAV-PHP.B capsid, encapsulating a scAAV genome, for gene transfer in adult mice. Our results underscore the potential of this AAV construct as a platform for safer and more efficacious gene therapy vectors for the CNS.

  15. A 5′ Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A.; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5′ UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo. PMID:27903072

  16. AAV-mediated pancreatic overexpression of Igf1 counteracts progression to autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Cristina; Casana, Estefania; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Haurigot, Virginia; Jambrina, Claudia; Sacristan, Victor; Morró, Meritxell; Agudo, Judith; Vilà, Laia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β-cells leading to severe insulin deficiency. Although many improvements have been made in recent years, exogenous insulin therapy is still imperfect; new therapeutic approaches, focusing on preserving/expanding β-cell mass and/or blocking the autoimmune process that destroys islets, should be developed. The main objective of this work was to test in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, the effects of local expression of Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a potent mitogenic and pro-survival factor for β-cells with immunomodulatory properties. Transgenic NOD mice overexpressing IGF1 specifically in β-cells (NOD-IGF1) were generated and phenotyped. In addition, miRT-containing, IGF1-encoding adeno-associated viruses (AAV) of serotype 8 (AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT) were produced and administered to 4- or 11-week-old non-transgenic NOD females through intraductal delivery. Several histological, immunological, and metabolic parameters were measured to monitor disease over a period of 28-30 weeks. In transgenic mice, local IGF1 expression led to long-term suppression of diabetes onset and robust protection of β-cell mass from the autoimmune insult. AAV-mediated pancreatic-specific overexpression of IGF1 in adult animals also dramatically reduced diabetes incidence, both when vectors were delivered before pathology onset or once insulitis was established. Transgenic NOD-IGF1 and AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT-treated NOD animals had much less islet infiltration than controls, preserved β-cell mass, and normal insulinemia. Transgenic and AAV-treated islets showed less expression of antigen-presenting molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines important for tissue-specific homing of effector T cells, suggesting IGF1 modulated islet autoimmunity in NOD mice. Local expression of Igf1 by AAV-mediated gene transfer counteracts progression to diabetes in NOD mice. This study suggests a

  17. A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin Vector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    injection. We also showed that systemic delivery of a canine micro-dystrophin AAV vector is safe in young adult affected dogs. These results...In addition, we have performed a comprehensive review on the current status of DMD gene therapy in the canine model. We also contributed another...micro-dystrophin, adeno-associated virus, AAV, muscle, gene therapy, systemic gene delivery, canine model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  18. High-rep-rate Thomson scattering for LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Holly, D. J.; Schmitz, O.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Osakabe, M.; Morisaki, T.

    2017-10-01

    A high-rep-rate pulse-burst laser system is being built for the LHD Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. This laser will have two operating scenarios, a fast-burst sequence of 15 kHz rep rate for at least 15 ms, and a slow-burst sequence of 1 kHz for at least 50 ms. There will be substantial flexibility in burst sequences for tailoring to experimental requirements. This new laser system will operate alongside the existing lasers in the LHD TS diagnostic, and will use the same beamline. This increase in temporal resolution capability complements the high spatial resolution (144 points) of the LHD TS diagnostic, providing unique measurement capability unmatched on any other fusion experiment. The new pulse-burst laser is a straightforward application of technology developed at UW-Madison, consisting of a Nd:YAG laser head with modular flashlamp drive units and a customized control system. Variable pulse-width drive of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, producing >1.5 J q-switched pulses with 20 ns FWHM. Burst operation of this laser system will be used to capture fast time evolution of the electron temperature and density profiles during events such as ELMs, RMP perturbations, and various MHD modes. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy and the National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan).

  19. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zuleta, Amparo; Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago; Vidal, Rene L.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptationmore » to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.« less

  20. Development and validation of novel AAV2 random libraries displaying peptides of diverse lengths and at diverse capsid positions.

    PubMed

    Naumer, Matthias; Ying, Ying; Michelfelder, Stefan; Reuter, Antje; Trepel, Martin; Müller, Oliver J; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A

    2012-05-01

    Libraries based on the insertion of random peptide ligands into the capsid of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) have been widely used to improve the efficiency and selectivity of the AAV vector system. However, so far only libraries of 7-mer peptide ligands have been inserted at one well-characterized capsid position. Here, we expanded the combinatorial AAV2 display system to a panel of novel AAV libraries, displaying peptides of 5, 7, 12, 19, or 26 amino acids in length at capsid position 588 or displaying 7-mer peptides at position 453, the most prominently exposed region of the viral capsid. Library selections on two unrelated cell types-human coronary artery endothelial cells and rat cardiomyoblasts-revealed the isolation of cell type-characteristic peptides of different lengths mediating strongly improved target-cell transduction, except for the 26-mer peptide ligands. Characterization of vector selectivity by transduction of nontarget cells and comparative gene-transduction analysis using a panel of 44 human tumor cell lines revealed that insertion of different-length peptides allows targeting of distinct cellular receptors for cell entry with similar efficiency, but with different selectivity. The application of such novel AAV2 libraries broadens the spectrum of targetable receptors by capsid-modified AAV vectors and provides the opportunity to choose the best suited targeting ligand for a certain application from a number of different candidates.

  1. In vivo genome editing in animals using AAV-CRISPR system: applications to translational research of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Cia-Hin; Suh, Yousin

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has shown promising therapeutic efficacy with a good safety profile in a wide range of animal models and human clinical trials. With the advent of clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based genome-editing technologies, AAV provides one of the most suitable viral vectors to package, deliver, and express CRISPR components for targeted gene editing. Recent discoveries of smaller Cas9 orthologues have enabled the packaging of Cas9 nuclease and its chimeric guide RNA into a single AAV delivery vehicle for robust in vivo genome editing. Here, we discuss how the combined use of small Cas9 orthologues, tissue-specific minimal promoters, AAV serotypes, and different routes of administration has advanced the development of efficient and precise in vivo genome editing and comprehensively review the various AAV-CRISPR systems that have been effectively used in animals. We then discuss the clinical implications and potential strategies to overcome off-target effects, immunogenicity, and toxicity associated with CRISPR components and AAV delivery vehicles. Finally, we discuss ongoing non-viral-based ex vivo gene therapy clinical trials to underscore the current challenges and future prospects of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery for human therapeutics. PMID:29333255

  2. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  3. Therapeutic in vivo gene transfer for genetic disease using AAV: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A

    2011-05-01

    In vivo gene replacement for the treatment of inherited disease is one of the most compelling concepts in modern medicine. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used for this purpose and have shown therapeutic efficacy in a range of animal models. Successful translation to the clinic was initially slow, but long-term expression of donated genes at therapeutic levels has now been achieved in patients with inherited retinal disorders and haemophilia B. Recent exciting results have raised hopes for the treatment of many other diseases. As we discuss here, the prospects and challenges for AAV gene therapy are to a large extent dependent on the target tissue and the specific disease.

  4. A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro Dystrophin Vector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    future experimental therapeutic studies in the canine model such as CRISPR -mediated gene editing, stem cell therapy, dystrophin-independent disease...There is no scientific/budget overlap with the current proposal.) CRISPR /Cas9-based gene editing for the correction of Duchenne muscular dystrophy...lab will perform in vivo gene delivery and functional outcome measurements in mice treated by AAV- CRISPR gene repair vectors and if needed will also

  5. A Model-Averaging Approach to Replication : The Case of "p[subscript rep]"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Geoffrey J.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Lee, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the recently proposed "p[subscript rep]" statistic is to estimate the probability of concurrence, that is, the probability that a replicate experiment yields an effect of the same sign (Killeen, 2005a). The influential journal "Psychological Science" endorses "p[subscript rep]" and recommends its use…

  6. 76 FR 16859 - Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance-REPS); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... (Certification of School Attendance--REPS); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department... approved school. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of information.... Title: Certification of School Attendance--REPS, VA Form 21-8926. OMB Control Number: 2900-0394. Type of...

  7. Disease correction by AAV-mediated gene therapy in a new mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIID.

    PubMed

    Roca, Carles; Motas, Sandra; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Sánchez, Víctor; Sánchez, Xavier; Bertolin, Joan; León, Xavier; Pérez, Jennifer; Garcia, Miguel; Villacampa, Pilar; Ruberte, Jesús; Pujol, Anna; Haurigot, Virginia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-04-15

    Gene therapy is a promising therapeutic alternative for Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSD), as it is not necessary to correct the genetic defect in all cells of an organ to achieve therapeutically significant levels of enzyme in body fluids, from which non-transduced cells can uptake the protein correcting their enzymatic deficiency. Animal models are instrumental in the development of new treatments for LSD. Here we report the generation of the first mouse model of the LSD Muccopolysaccharidosis Type IIID (MPSIIID), also known as Sanfilippo syndrome type D. This autosomic recessive, heparan sulphate storage disease is caused by deficiency in N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase (GNS). Mice deficient in GNS showed lysosomal storage pathology and loss of lysosomal homeostasis in the CNS and peripheral tissues, chronic widespread neuroinflammation, reduced locomotor and exploratory activity and shortened lifespan, a phenotype that closely resembled human MPSIIID. Moreover, treatment of the GNS-deficient animals with GNS-encoding adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors of serotype 9 delivered to the cerebrospinal fluid completely corrected pathological storage, improved lysosomal functionality in the CNS and somatic tissues, resolved neuroinflammation, restored normal behaviour and extended lifespan of treated mice. Hence, this work represents the first step towards the development of a treatment for MPSIIID. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. AlloRep: A Repository of Sequence, Structural and Mutagenesis Data for the LacI/GalR Transcription Regulators.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Parente, Daniel J; Shis, David L; Hessman, Jacob A; Chazelle, Allen; Bennett, Matthew R; Teichmann, Sarah A; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2016-02-22

    Protein families evolve functional variation by accumulating point mutations at functionally important amino acid positions. Homologs in the LacI/GalR family of transcription regulators have evolved to bind diverse DNA sequences and allosteric regulatory molecules. In addition to playing key roles in bacterial metabolism, these proteins have been widely used as a model family for benchmarking structural and functional prediction algorithms. We have collected manually curated sequence alignments for >3000 sequences, in vivo phenotypic and biochemical data for >5750 LacI/GalR mutational variants, and noncovalent residue contact networks for 65 LacI/GalR homolog structures. Using this rich data resource, we compared the noncovalent residue contact networks of the LacI/GalR subfamilies to design and experimentally validate an allosteric mutant of a synthetic LacI/GalR repressor for use in biotechnology. The AlloRep database (freely available at www.AlloRep.org) is a key resource for future evolutionary studies of LacI/GalR homologs and for benchmarking computational predictions of functional change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 75 FR 27840 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0080] NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3...: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for General... the existing guidance contained in Supplement 3 to NUREG- 0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, ``Criteria for...

  10. 78 FR 53774 - Guide for the Evaluation of Alert and Notification Systems for Nuclear Power Plants, FEMA-REP-10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...] Guide for the Evaluation of Alert and Notification Systems for Nuclear Power Plants, FEMA-REP-10, Rev. 1... the Guide for the Evaluation of Alert and Notification Systems for Nuclear Power Plants, FEMA-REP-10... Agency (FEMA) issued FEMA-REP-10, Guide for the Evaluation of Alert and Notification Systems for Nuclear...

  11. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S., E-mail: chapmami@ohsu.edu

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites ofmore » AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.« less

  12. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites ofmore » AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.« less

  13. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Matthew R.; Kattenhorn, Lisa M.; Kondur, Hema R.; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Decker, Julie M.; Alpert, Michael D.; Bailey, Charles C.; Neale, Ernest S.; Fellinger, Christoph H.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, Jose M.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Yao, Annie Y.; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Burton, Dennis R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Evans, David T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs)1,2. However even the best bNAbs neutralize 10–50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (IC80 > 5 μg/ml), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection3–6. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean IC50 < 0.05 μg/ml). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46, and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17 to 77 μg/ml of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from multiple infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25707797

  14. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Selot, Ruchita; Arumugam, Sathyathithan; Mary, Bertin; Cheemadan, Sabna; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2017-01-01

    Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAV)rh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold), migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors) in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27–64 fold) in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans. PMID:28769791

  15. The Neurotropic Properties of AAV-PHP.B Are Limited to C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Hordeaux, Juliette; Wang, Qiang; Katz, Nathan; Buza, Elizabeth L; Bell, Peter; Wilson, James M

    2018-03-07

    Improved delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to the CNS will greatly enhance their clinical utility. Selection of AAV9 variants in a mouse model led to the isolation of a capsid called PHP.B, which resulted in remarkable transduction of the CNS following intravenous infusion. However, we now show here that this enhanced CNS tropism is restricted to the model in which it was selected, i.e., a Cre transgenic mouse in a C57BL/6J background, and was not found in nonhuman primates or the other commonly used mouse strain BALB/cJ. We also report the potential for serious acute toxicity in NHP after systemic administration of high dose of AAV. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. AAV Delivery of Endothelin-1 shRNA Attenuates Cold-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter Gin-Fu; Sun, Zhongjie

    2017-02-01

    Cold temperatures are associated with increased prevalence of hypertension. Cold exposure increases endothelin-1 (ET1) production. The purpose of this study is to determine whether upregulation of ET1 contributes to cold-induced hypertension (CIH). In vivo RNAi silencing of the ET1 gene was achieved by adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) delivery of ET1 short-hairpin small interfering RNA (ET1-shRNA). Four groups of male rats were used. Three groups were given AAV.ET1-shRNA, AAV.SC-shRNA (scrambled shRNA), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), respectively, before exposure to a moderately cold environment (6.7 ± 2°C), while the last group was given PBS and kept at room temperature (warm, 24 ± 2°C) and served as a control. We found that systolic blood pressure of the PBS-treated and SC-shRNA-treated groups increased significantly within 2 weeks of exposure to cold, reached a peak level (145 ± 4.8 mmHg) by 6 weeks, and remained elevated thereafter. By contrast, blood pressure of the ET1-shRNA-treated group did not increase, suggesting that silencing of ET1 prevented the development of CIH. Animals were euthanized after 10 weeks of exposure to cold. Cold exposure significantly increased the left ventricle (LV) surface area and LV weight in cold-exposed rats, suggesting LV hypertrophy. Superoxide production in the heart was increased by cold exposure. Interestingly, ET1-shRNA prevented cold-induced superoxide production and cardiac hypertrophy. ELISA assay indicated that ET1-shRNA abolished the cold-induced upregulation of ET1 levels, indicating effective silencing of ET1. In conclusion, upregulation of ET1 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of CIH and cardiac hypertrophy. AAV delivery of ET1-shRNA is an effective therapeutic strategy for cold-related cardiovascular disease.

  17. Serum proteins reflecting inflammation, injury and repair as biomarkers of disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Warner, Roscoe L; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Iklé, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Krischer, Jeffrey; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St. Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Johnson, Kent J; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify circulating proteins that distinguish between active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner complementary to markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Twenty-eight serum proteins representing diverse aspects of the biology of AAV were measured before and 6 months after treatment in a large clinical trial of AAV. Subjects (n=186) enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were available for comparison. The primary outcome was the ability of markers to distinguish severe AAV (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)≥3 at screening) from remission (BVAS/WG=0 at month 6), using areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (median BVAS/WG=8) at screening. In the 137 subjects in remission at month 6, 24 of the 28 markers showed significant declines. ROC analysis indicated that levels of CXCL13 (BCA-1), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) best discriminated active AAV from remission (AUC>0.8) and from healthy controls (AUC>0.9). Correlations among these markers and with ESR or CRP were low. Conclusions Many markers are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but CXCL13, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied, including ESR and CRP. These proteins are particularly promising candidates for future studies to address unmet needs in the assessment of patients with AAV. PMID:22975753

  18. Long-Term Correction of Sandhoff Disease Following Intravenous Delivery of rAAV9 to Mouse Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Altaleb, Naderah; Bello, Alexander; Kruck, Christa; LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hurlbut, David; Hemming, Richard; Kobinger, Gary P; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses are severe neurodegenerative disorders resulting from a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase A activity and lacking effective therapies. Using a Sandhoff disease (SD) mouse model (Hexb−/−) of the GM2 gangliosidoses, we tested the potential of systemically delivered adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) expressing Hexb cDNA to correct the neurological phenotype. Neonatal or adult SD and normal mice were intravenously injected with AAV9-HexB or –LacZ and monitored for serum β-hexosaminidase activity, motor function, and survival. Brain GM2 ganglioside, β-hexosaminidase activity, and inflammation were assessed at experimental week 43, or an earlier humane end point. SD mice injected with AAV9-LacZ died by 17 weeks of age, whereas all neonatal AAV9-HexB–treated SD mice survived until 43 weeks (P < 0.0001) with only three exhibiting neurological dysfunction. SD mice treated as adults with AAV9-HexB died between 17 and 35 weeks. Neonatal SD-HexB–treated mice had a significant increase in brain β-hexosaminidase activity, and a reduction in GM2 ganglioside storage and neuroinflammation compared to adult SD-HexB– and SD-LacZ–treated groups. However, at 43 weeks, 8 of 10 neonatal-HexB injected control and SD mice exhibited liver or lung tumors. This study demonstrates the potential for long-term correction of SD and other GM2 gangliosidoses through early rAAV9 based systemic gene therapy. PMID:25515709

  19. Practical utilization of recombinant AAV vector reference standards: focus on vector genomes titration by free ITR qPCR.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Susan; Blouin, Veronique; Broucque, Frederic; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; François, Achille; Perez, Irene C; Le Bec, Christine; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O; Ayuso, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have demonstrated efficacy and a good safety profile. Although the field is advancing quickly, vector analytics and harmonization of dosage units are still a limitation for commercialization. AAV reference standard materials (RSMs) can help ensure product safety by controlling the consistency of assays used to characterize rAAV stocks. The most widely utilized unit of vector dosing is based on the encapsidated vector genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is now the most common method to titer vector genomes (vg); however, significant inter- and intralaboratory variations have been documented using this technique. Here, RSMs and rAAV stocks were titered on the basis of an inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequence-specific qPCR and we found an artificial increase in vg titers using a widely utilized approach. The PCR error was introduced by using single-cut linearized plasmid as the standard curve. This bias was eliminated using plasmid standards linearized just outside the ITR region on each end to facilitate the melting of the palindromic ITR sequences during PCR. This new "Free-ITR" qPCR delivers vg titers that are consistent with titers obtained with transgene-specific qPCR and could be used to normalize in-house product-specific AAV vector standards and controls to the rAAV RSMs. The free-ITR method, including well-characterized controls, will help to calibrate doses to compare preclinical and clinical data in the field.

  20. The 2002 PhRMA Code and Pharmaceutical Marketing: did anybody bother to ask the reps?

    PubMed

    Sillup, George P; Trombetta, Bill; Klimberg, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    After marketing tactics resulted in $1.2 billion fines, the 2002 PhRMA Code attempted to standardize marketing and sales practices. Self-regulation had varied success by other industries and by pharmaceutical industries in other countries. Similarly, the Code addressed negative responses about pharmaceutical's practices but had no provisions for monitoring violations. Representative's (reps) perspectives were assessed using an 18-item instrument with 72 reps from 25 companies. Analyses indicated that reps from bigger companies, PhRMA and non-PhRMA, adhered better. The way reps adhered was split between adhering reluctantly and following faithfully. Two thirds felt it was more difficult to do their jobs, resulting from prior entertainment-based relationships with physicians.

  1. COMPASS Final Report: Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) Centaur Orbiter New Frontiers Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) has been shown in past studies to enable missions to outer planetary bodies including the orbiting of Centaur asteroids. Key to the feasibility for REP missions are long life, low power electric propulsion (EP) devices, low mass Radioisotope Power System (RPS) and light spacecraft (S/C) components. In order to determine the key parameters for EP devices to perform these REP missions a design study was completed to design an REP S/C to orbit a Centaur in a New Frontiers (NF) cost cap. The design shows that an orbiter using several long lived (approx.200 kg xenon (Xe) throughput), low power (approx.700 W) Hall thrusters teamed with six (150 W each) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG) can deliver 60 kg of science instruments to a Centaur in 10 yr within the NF cost cap. Optimal specific impulses (Isp) for the Hall thrusters were found to be around 2000 s with thruster efficiencies over 40 percent. Not only can the REP S/C enable orbiting a Centaur (when compared to an all chemical mission only capable of flybys) but the additional power from the REP system can be used to enhance science and simplify communications. The mission design detailed in this report is a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) powered EP science orbiter to the Centaur Thereus with arrival 10 yr after launch, ending in a 1 yr science mapping mission. Along the trajectory, approximately 1.5 yr into the mission, the REP S/C does a flyby of the Trojan asteroid Tlepolemus. The total (Delta)V of the trajectory is 8.9 km/s. The REP S/C is delivered to orbit on an Atlas 551 class launch vehicle with a Star 48 B solid rocket stage

  2. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Keith E; Kwong, Stephen M; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-03-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multiresistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families.

  3. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Keith E.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multi-resistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families. PMID:19100285

  4. In Situ Gene Therapy via AAV-CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Targeted Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana M; Fu, Xin; Zhu, Jie; Katrekar, Dhruva; Shih, Yu-Ru V; Marlett, John; Cabotaje, Jessica; Tat, Jasmine; Naughton, John; Lisowski, Leszek; Varghese, Shyni; Zhang, Kang; Mali, Prashant

    2018-04-25

    Development of efficacious in vivo delivery platforms for CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenome engineering will be critical to enable the ability to target human diseases without permanent modification of the genome. Toward this, we utilized split-Cas9 systems to develop a modular adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector platform for CRISPR-Cas9 delivery to enable the full spectrum of targeted in situ gene regulation functionalities, demonstrating robust transcriptional repression (up to 80%) and activation (up to 6-fold) of target genes in cell culture and mice. We also applied our platform for targeted in vivo gene-repression-mediated gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa. Specifically, we engineered targeted repression of Nrl, a master regulator of rod photoreceptor determination, and demonstrated Nrl knockdown mediates in situ reprogramming of rod cells into cone-like cells that are resistant to retinitis pigmentosa-specific mutations, with concomitant prevention of secondary cone loss. Furthermore, we benchmarked our results from Nrl knockdown with those from in vivo Nrl knockout via gene editing. Taken together, our AAV-CRISPR-Cas9 platform for in vivo epigenome engineering enables a robust approach to target disease in a genomically scarless and potentially reversible manner. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic AAV8-Mediated Gene Therapy Drives Whole-Body Correction of Myotubular Myopathy in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Mack, David L; Poulard, Karine; Goddard, Melissa A; Latournerie, Virginie; Snyder, Jessica M; Grange, Robert W; Elverman, Matthew R; Denard, Jérôme; Veron, Philippe; Buscara, Laurine; Le Bec, Christine; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Brezovec, Annie G; Meng, Hui; Yang, Lin; Liu, Fujun; O'Callaghan, Michael; Gopal, Nikhil; Kelly, Valerie E; Smith, Barbara K; Strande, Jennifer L; Mavilio, Fulvio; Beggs, Alan H; Mingozzi, Federico; Lawlor, Michael W; Buj-Bello, Ana; Childers, Martin K

    2017-04-05

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) results from MTM1 gene mutations and myotubularin deficiency. Most XLMTM patients develop severe muscle weakness leading to respiratory failure and death, typically within 2 years of age. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of systemic gene therapy in the p.N155K canine model of XLMTM by performing a dose escalation study. A recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (rAAV8) vector expressing canine myotubularin (cMTM1) under the muscle-specific desmin promoter (rAAV8-cMTM1) was administered by simple peripheral venous infusion in XLMTM dogs at 10 weeks of age, when signs of the disease are already present. A comprehensive analysis of survival, limb strength, gait, respiratory function, neurological assessment, histology, vector biodistribution, transgene expression, and immune response was performed over a 9-month study period. Results indicate that systemic gene therapy was well tolerated, prolonged lifespan, and corrected the skeletal musculature throughout the body in a dose-dependent manner, defining an efficacious dose in this large-animal model of the disease. These results support the development of gene therapy clinical trials for XLMTM. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII

    PubMed Central

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII. PMID:26447927

  7. AAV viral vector delivery to the brain by shape-conforming MR-guided infusions.

    PubMed

    Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; San Sebastian, Waldy; Bringas, John; Forsayeth, John

    2016-10-28

    Gene transfer technology offers great promise as a potential therapeutic approach to the brain but has to be viewed as a very complex technology. Success of ongoing clinical gene therapy trials depends on many factors such as selection of the correct genetic and anatomical target in the brain. In addition, selection of the viral vector capable of transfer of therapeutic gene into target cells, along with long-term expression that avoids immunotoxicity has to be established. As with any drug development strategy, delivery of gene therapy has to be consistent and predictable in each study subject. Failed drug and vector delivery will lead to failed clinical trials. In this article, we describe our experience with AAV viral vector delivery system, that allows us to optimize and monitor in real time viral vector administration into affected regions of the brain. In addition to discussing MRI-guided technology for administration of AAV vectors we have developed and now employ in current clinical trials, we also describe ways in which infusion cannula design and stereotactic trajectory may be used to maximize the anatomical coverage by using fluid backflow. This innovative approach enables more precise coverage by fitting the shape of the infusion to the shape of the anatomical target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII.

  9. Generation of infectious recombinant Adeno-associated virus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barajas, Daniel; Aponte-Ubillus, Juan Jose; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Cinek, Tomas; Peltier, Joseph; Gold, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been successfully employed to establish model systems for a number of viruses. Such model systems are powerful tools to study the virus biology and in particular for the identification and characterization of host factors playing a role in the viral infection cycle. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are heavily studied due to their use as gene delivery vectors. AAV relies on other helper viruses for successful replication and on host factors for several aspects of the viral life cycle. However the role of host and helper viral factors is only partially known. Production of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors for gene delivery applications depends on knowledge of AAV biology and the limited understanding of host and helper viral factors may be precluding efficient production, particularly in heterologous systems. Model systems in simpler eukaryotes like the yeast S. cerevisiae would be useful tools to identify and study the role of host factors in AAV biology. Here we show that expression of AAV2 viral proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, AAP, Rep78, Rep52 and an ITR-flanked DNA in yeast leads to capsid formation, DNA replication and encapsidation, resulting in formation of infectious particles. Many of the AAV characteristics observed in yeast resemble those in other systems, making it a suitable model system. Future findings in the yeast system could be translatable to other AAV host systems and aid in more efficient production of rAAV vectors.

  10. AAV-mediated gene therapy in Dystrophin-Dp71 deficient mouse leads to blood-retinal barrier restoration and oedema reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Ophélie; Charles-Messance, Hugo; El Mathari, Brahim; Sene, Abdoulaye; Barbe, Peggy; Fouquet, Stéphane; Aragón, Jorge; Darche, Marie; Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Tadayoni, Ramin; Montañez, Cecilia; Dalkara, Deniz; Rendon, Alvaro

    2016-07-15

    Dystrophin-Dp71 being a key membrane cytoskeletal protein, expressed mainly in Müller cells that provide a mechanical link at the Müller cell membrane by direct binding to actin and a transmembrane protein complex. Its absence has been related to blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability through delocalization and down-regulation of the AQP4 and Kir4.1 channels (1). We have previously shown that the adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant, ShH10, transduces Müller cells in the Dp71-null mouse retina efficiently and specifically (2,3). Here, we use ShH10 to restore Dp71 expression in Müller cells of Dp71 deficient mouse to study molecular and functional effects of this restoration in an adult mouse displaying retinal permeability. We show that strong and specific expression of exogenous Dp71 in Müller cells leads to correct localization of Dp71 protein restoring all protein interactions in order to re-establish a proper functional BRB and retina homeostasis thus preventing retina from oedema. This study is the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in dealing with diseases with BRB breakdown and macular oedema such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Intravitreal delivery of AAV-NDI1 provides functional benefit in a murine model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chadderton, Naomi; Palfi, Arpad; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Gobbo, Oliverio; Overlack, Nora; Carrigan, Matthew; O'Reilly, Mary; Campbell, Matthew; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Wolfrum, Uwe; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2013-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited form of visual dysfunction caused by mutations in several genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I). Development of gene therapies for LHON has been impeded by genetic heterogeneity and the need to deliver therapies to the mitochondria of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the cells primarily affected in LHON. The therapy under development entails intraocular injection of a nuclear yeast gene NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) that encodes a single subunit complex I equivalent and as such is mutation independent. NDI1 is imported into mitochondria due to an endogenous mitochondrial localisation signal. Intravitreal injection represents a clinically relevant route of delivery to RGCs not previously used for NDI1. In this study, recombinant adenoassociated virus (AAV) serotype 2 expressing NDI1 (AAV-NDI1) was shown to protect RGCs in a rotenone-induced murine model of LHON. AAV-NDI1 significantly reduced RGC death by 1.5-fold and optic nerve atrophy by 1.4-fold. This led to a significant preservation of retinal function as assessed by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and optokinetic responses. Intraocular injection of AAV-NDI1 overcomes many barriers previously associated with developing therapies for LHON and holds great therapeutic promise for a mitochondrial disorder for which there are no effective therapies.

  12. The Skeletal Muscle Environment and Its Role in Immunity and Tolerance to AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Boisgérault, Florence; Mingozzi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of gene therapy, muscle has been one the most studied tissue targets for the correction of enzyme deficiencies and myopathies. Several preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Exciting progress has been made in the gene delivery technologies, from the identification of novel AAV serotypes to the development of novel vector delivery techniques. In parallel, significant knowledge has been generated on the host immune system and its interaction with both the vector and the transgene at the muscle level. In particular, the role of underlying muscle inflammation, characteristic of several diseases affecting the muscle, has been defined in terms of its potential detrimental impact on gene transfer with AAV vectors. At the same time, feedback immunomodulatory mechanisms peculiar of skeletal muscle involving resident regulatory T cells have been identified, which seem to play an important role in maintaining, at least to some extent, muscle homeostasis during inflammation and regenerative processes. Devising strategies to tip this balance towards unresponsiveness may represent an avenue to improve the safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer with AAV vectors. PMID:26122097

  13. Successful transduction of liver in hemophilia by AAV-Factor IX and limitations imposed by the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Manno, Catherine S; Pierce, Glenn F; Arruda, Valder R; Glader, Bertil; Ragni, Margaret; Rasko, John J; Rasko, John; Ozelo, Margareth C; Hoots, Keith; Blatt, Philip; Konkle, Barbara; Dake, Michael; Kaye, Robin; Razavi, Mahmood; Zajko, Albert; Zehnder, James; Rustagi, Pradip K; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Chew, Amy; Leonard, Debra; Wright, J Fraser; Lessard, Ruth R; Sommer, Jürg M; Tigges, Michael; Sabatino, Denise; Luk, Alvin; Jiang, Haiyan; Mingozzi, Federico; Couto, Linda; Ertl, Hildegund C; High, Katherine A; Kay, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    We have previously shown that a single portal vein infusion of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) expressing canine Factor IX (F.IX) resulted in long-term expression of therapeutic levels of F.IX in dogs with severe hemophilia B. We carried out a phase 1/2 dose-escalation clinical study to extend this approach to humans with severe hemophilia B. rAAV-2 vector expressing human F.IX was infused through the hepatic artery into seven subjects. The data show that: (i) vector infusion at doses up to 2 x 10(12) vg/kg was not associated with acute or long-lasting toxicity; (ii) therapeutic levels of F.IX were achieved at the highest dose tested; (iii) duration of expression at therapeutic levels was limited to a period of approximately 8 weeks; (iv) a gradual decline in F.IX was accompanied by a transient asymptomatic elevation of liver transaminases that resolved without treatment. Further studies suggested that destruction of transduced hepatocytes by cell-mediated immunity targeting antigens of the AAV capsid caused both the decline in F.IX and the transient transaminitis. We conclude that rAAV-2 vectors can transduce human hepatocytes in vivo to result in therapeutically relevant levels of F.IX, but that future studies in humans may require immunomodulation to achieve long-term expression.

  14. Convection-enhanced delivery of AAV2 in white matter--a novel method for gene delivery to cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Barua, N U; Woolley, M; Bienemann, A S; Johnson, D; Wyatt, M J; Irving, C; Lewis, O; Castrique, E; Gill, S S

    2013-10-30

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is currently under investigation for delivering therapeutic agents to subcortical targets in the brain. Direct delivery of therapies to the cerebral cortex, however, remains a significant challenge. We describe a novel method of targeting adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated gene therapies to specific cerebral cortical regions by performing high volume, high flow rate infusions into underlying white matter in a large animal (porcine) model. Infusion volumes of up to 700 μl at flow rates as high as 10 μl/min were successfully performed in white matter without adverse neurological sequelae. Co-infusion of AAV2/5-GFP with 0.2% Gadolinium in artificial CSF confirmed transgene expression in the deep layers of cerebral cortex overlying the infused areas of white matter. AAV-mediated gene therapies have been previously targeted to the cerebral cortex by performing intrathalamic CED and exploiting axonal transport. The novel method described in this study facilitates delivery of gene therapies to specific regions of the cerebral cortex without targeting deep brain structures. AAV-mediated gene therapies can be targeted to specific cortical regions by performing CED into underlying white matter. This technique could be applied to the treatment of neurological disorders characterised by cerebral cortical degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-06-20

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer's disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain.

  16. Single residue AAV capsid mutation improves transduction of photoreceptors in the Abca4-/- mouse and bipolar cells in the rd1 mouse and human retina ex vivo.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Samantha R; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnea-Cramer, Alona O; Walker, Nathan J; Barnard, Alun R; Hankins, Mark W; MacLaren, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for the treatment of retinal degenerations has shown safety and efficacy in clinical trials. However, very high levels of vector expression may be necessary for the treatment of conditions such as Stargardt disease where a dual vector approach is potentially needed, or in optogenetic strategies for end-stage degeneration in order to achieve maximal light sensitivity. In this study, we assessed two vectors with single capsid mutations, rAAV2/2(Y444F) and rAAV2/8(Y733F) in their ability to transduce retina in the Abca4 -/- and rd1 mouse models of retinal degeneration. We noted significantly increased photoreceptor transduction using rAAV2/8(Y733F) in the Abca4 -/- mouse, in contrast to previous work where vectors tested in this model have shown low levels of photoreceptor transduction. Bipolar cell transduction was achieved following subretinal delivery of both vectors in the rd1 mouse, and via intravitreal delivery of rAAV2/2(Y444F). The successful use of rAAV2/8(Y733F) to target bipolar cells was further validated on human tissue using an ex vivo culture system of retinal explants. Capsid mutant AAV vectors transduce human retinal cells and may be particularly suited to treat retinal degenerations in which high levels of transgene expression are required.

  17. Zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene correction using single AAV vector transduction and enhancement by Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, BL; Hirsch, ML; Porter, SN; Samulski, RJ; Porteus, MH

    2016-01-01

    An emerging strategy for the treatment of monogenic diseases uses genetic engineering to precisely correct the mutation(s) at the genome level. Recent advancements in this technology have demonstrated therapeutic levels of gene correction using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced DNA double-strand break in conjunction with an exogenous DNA donor substrate. This strategy requires efficient nucleic acid delivery and among viral vectors, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has demonstrated clinical success without pathology. However, a major limitation of rAAV is the small DNA packaging capacity and to date, the use of rAAV for ZFN gene delivery has yet to be reported. Theoretically, an ideal situation is to deliver both ZFNs and the repair substrate in a single vector to avoid inefficient gene targeting and unwanted mutagenesis, both complications of a rAAV co-transduction strategy. Therefore, a rAAV format was generated in which a single polypeptide encodes the ZFN monomers connected by a ribosome skipping 2A peptide and furin cleavage sequence. On the basis of this arrangement, a DNA repair substrate of 750 nucleotides was also included in this vector. Efficient polypeptide processing to discrete ZFNs is demonstrated, as well as the ability of this single vector format to stimulate efficient gene targeting in a human cell line and mouse model derived fibroblasts. Additionally, we increased rAAV-mediated gene correction up to sixfold using a combination of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, which act at the level of AAV vector transduction. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the ability to deliver ZFNs and a repair substrate by a single AAV vector and offer insights for the optimization of rAAV-mediated gene correction using drug therapy. PMID:22257934

  18. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  19. Promise and problems associated with the use of recombinant AAV for the delivery of anti-HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to elicit antibodies with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates have so far proven unsuccessful. Long-term delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with such activity is a creative alternative that circumvents the need for an immune response and has the potential for creating a long-lasting sterilizing barrier against HIV. This approach is made possible by an incredible array of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that have been identified over the last several years. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are ideally suited for long-term delivery for a variety of reasons. The only products made from rAAV are derived from the transgenes that are put into it; as long as those products are not viewed as foreign, expression from muscle tissue may continue for decades. Thus, use of rAAV to achieve long-term delivery of anti-HIV mAbs with potent neutralizing activity against a broad range of HIV-1 isolates is emerging as a promising concept for the prevention or treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. Experiments in mice and monkeys that have demonstrated protective efficacy against AIDS virus infection have raised hopes for the promise of this approach. However, all published experiments in monkeys have encountered unwanted immune responses to the AAV-delivered antibody, and these immune responses appear to limit the levels of delivered antibody that can be achieved. In this review, we highlight the promise of rAAV-mediated antibody delivery for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection in humans, but we also discuss the obstacles that will need to be understood and solved in order for the promise of this approach to be realized. PMID:28197421

  20. Long-term safety and efficacy of AAV gene therapy in the canine model of glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mok; Conlon, Thomas J; Specht, Andrew; Coleman, Kirsten E; Brown, Laurie M; Estrella, Ana M; Dambska, Monika; Dahlberg, Kathryn R; Weinstein, David A

    2018-05-25

    Viral mediated gene therapy has progressed after overcoming early failures, and gene therapy has now been approved for several conditions in Europe and the USA. Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia, caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α, has been viewed as an outstanding candidate for gene therapy. This follow-up report describes the long-term outcome for the naturally occurring GSD-Ia dogs treated with rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-mediated gene therapy. A total of seven dogs were treated with rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-mediated gene therapy. The first four dogs were treated at birth, and three dogs were treated between 2 and 6 months of age to assess the efficacy and safety in animals with mature livers. Blood and urine samples, radiographic studies, histological evaluation, and biodistribution were assessed. Gene therapy improved survival in the GSD-Ia dogs. With treatment, the biochemical studies normalized for the duration of the study (up to 7 years). None of the rAAV-GPE-hG6PC-treated dogs had focal hepatic lesions or renal abnormalities. Dogs treated at birth required a second dose of rAAV after 2-4 months; gene therapy after hepatic maturation resulted in improved efficacy after a single dose. rAAV-GPE-hG6PC treatment in GSD-Ia dogs was found to be safe and efficacious. GSD-Ia is an attractive target for human gene therapy since it is a monogenic disorder with limited tissue involvement. Blood glucose and lactate monitoring can be used to assess effectiveness and as a biomarker of success. GSD-Ia can also serve as a model for other hepatic monogenic disorders.

  1. rep-PCR-Mediated Genomic Fingerprinting: A Rapid and Effective Method to Identify Clavibacter michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Louws, F J; Bell, J; Medina-Mora, C M; Smart, C D; Opgenorth, D; Ishimaru, C A; Hausbeck, M K; de Bruijn, F J; Fulbright, D W

    1998-08-01

    ABSTRACT The genomic DNA fingerprinting technique known as repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) was evaluated as a tool to differentiate subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis, with special emphasis on C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, the pathogen responsible for bacterial canker of tomato. DNA primers (REP, ERIC, and BOX), corresponding to conserved repetitive element motifs in the genomes of diverse bacterial species, were used to generate genomic fingerprints of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, C. michiganensis subsp. tessellarius, and C. michiganensis subsp. insidiosum. The rep-PCR-generated patterns of DNA fragments observed after agarose gel electrophoresis support the current division of C. michiganensis into five subspecies. In addition, the rep-PCR fingerprints identified at least four types (A, B, C, and D) within C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis based on limited DNA polymorphisms; the ability to differentiate individual strains may be of potential use in studies on the epidemiology and host-pathogen interactions of this organism. In addition, we have recovered from diseased tomato plants a relatively large number of naturally occurring avirulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains with rep-PCR fingerprints identical to those of virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains.

  2. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/submore » 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.« less

  3. Humoral Immune Response After Intravitreal But Not After Subretinal AAV8 in Primates and Patients.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Felix F; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Biel, Martin; Ueffing, Marius; Wissinger, Bernd; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Klein, Reinhild; Michalakis, Stylianos; Fischer, M Dominik

    2018-04-01

    To study longitudinal changes of anti-drug antibody (ADA) titers to recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (rAAV8) capsid epitopes in nonhuman primates (NHP) and patients. Three groups of six NHP each received subretinal injections (high dose: 1 × 1012 vector genomes [vg], low dose: 1 × 1011 vg, or vehicle only). Four additional animals received intravitreal injections of the high dose (1 × 1012 vg). Three patients received 1 × 1010 vg as subretinal injections. ELISA quantified ADA levels at baseline and 1, 2, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days after surgery in NHP and at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery in patients. Two out of 22 animals lacked ADA titers at baseline and developed low ADA titers toward the end of the study. Titers in the low-dose group stayed constant, while two of six animals from the high-dose group developed titers that rose beyond the range of the assay. All animals from the intravitreal control group showed a rise in ADA titer by day 7 that peaked at day 28. Preliminary data from the clinical trial (NCT02610582) show no humoral immune response in patients following subretinal delivery of 1 × 1010 vg. No significant induction of ADA occurred in NHP when mimicking the clinical scenario of subretinal delivery with a clinical-grade rAAV8 and concomitant immunosuppression. Likewise, clinical data showed no humoral immune response in patients. In contrast, intravitreal delivery was associated with a substantial humoral immune response. Subretinal delivery might be superior to an intravitreal application regarding immunologic aspects.

  4. rAAV-compatible MiniPromoters for restricted expression in the brain and eye.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Charles N; Korecki, Andrea J; Berry, Garrett E; Hickmott, Jack W; Lam, Siu Ling; Lengyell, Tess C; Bonaguro, Russell J; Borretta, Lisa J; Chopra, Vikramjit; Chou, Alice Y; D'Souza, Cletus A; Kaspieva, Olga; Laprise, Stéphanie; McInerny, Simone C; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Swanson-Newman, Magdalena I; Wong, Kaelan; Yang, George S; Zhou, Michelle; Jones, Steven J M; Holt, Robert A; Asokan, Aravind; Goldowitz, Daniel; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-10

    Small promoters that recapitulate endogenous gene expression patterns are important for basic, preclinical, and now clinical research. Recently, there has been a promising revival of gene therapy for diseases with unmet therapeutic needs. To date, most gene therapies have used viral-based ubiquitous promoters-however, promoters that restrict expression to target cells will minimize off-target side effects, broaden the palette of deliverable therapeutics, and thereby improve safety and efficacy. Here, we take steps towards filling the need for such promoters by developing a high-throughput pipeline that goes from genome-based bioinformatic design to rapid testing in vivo. For much of this work, therapeutically interesting Pleiades MiniPromoters (MiniPs; ~4 kb human DNA regulatory elements), previously tested in knock-in mice, were "cut down" to ~2.5 kb and tested in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), the virus of choice for gene therapy of the central nervous system. To evaluate our methods, we generated 29 experimental rAAV2/9 viruses carrying 19 different MiniPs, which were injected intravenously into neonatal mice to allow broad unbiased distribution, and characterized in neural tissues by X-gal immunohistochemistry for icre, or immunofluorescent detection of GFP. The data showed that 16 of the 19 (84 %) MiniPs recapitulated the expression pattern of their design source. This included expression of: Ple67 in brain raphe nuclei; Ple155 in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, and retinal bipolar ON cells; Ple261 in endothelial cells of brain blood vessels; and Ple264 in retinal Müller glia. Overall, the methodology and MiniPs presented here represent important advances for basic and preclinical research, and may enable a paradigm shift in gene therapy.

  5. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP): A Near-Term Approach to Nuclear Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.; Manzella, David H.; Kamhawi, Hani; Kremic, Tibor; Oleson, Steven R.; Dankanich, John W.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies over the last decade have shown radioisotope-based nuclear electric propulsion to be enhancing and, in some cases, enabling for many potential robotic science missions. Also known as radioisotope electric propulsion (REP), the technology offers the performance advantages of traditional reactor-powered electric propulsion (i.e., high specific impulse propulsion at large distances from the Sun), but with much smaller, affordable spacecraft. Future use of REP requires development of radioisotope power sources with system specific powers well above that of current systems. The US Department of Energy and NASA have developed an advanced Stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG) engineering unit, which was subjected to rigorous flight qualification-level tests in 2008, and began extended lifetime testing later that year. This advancement, along with recent work on small ion thrusters and life extension technology for Hall thrusters, could enable missions using REP sometime during the next decade.

  6. Integration of gel-based proteome data with pProRep.

    PubMed

    Laukens, Kris; Matthiesen, Rune; Lemière, Filip; Esmans, Eddy; Onckelen, Harry Van; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Witters, Erwin

    2006-11-15

    pProRep is a web application integrating electrophoretic and mass spectral data from proteome analyses into a relational database. The graphical web-interface allows users to upload, analyse and share experimental proteome data. It offers researchers the possibility to query all previously analysed datasets and can visualize selected features, such as the presence of a certain set of ions in a peptide mass spectrum, on the level of the two-dimensional gel. The pProRep package and instructions for its use can be downloaded from http://www.ptools.ua.ac.be/pProRep. The application requires a web server that runs PHP 5 (http://www.php.net) and MySQL. Some (non-essential) extensions need additional freely available libraries: details are described in the installation instructions.

  7. AAV delivery of tumor necrosis factor-α short hairpin RNA attenuates cold-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Chen, Kai; Sun, Zhongjie

    2014-11-01

    Cold temperatures are associated with increased mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Cold exposure causes lung inflammation, pulmonary hypertension (PH), and right ventricle hypertrophy, but there is no effective therapy because of unknown mechanism. Here, we investigated whether RNA interference silencing of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α decreases cold-induced macrophage infiltration, PH, and pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling. We found for the first time that continuous cold exposure (5.0°C) increased TNF-α expression and macrophage infiltration in the lungs and PAs right before elevation of right ventricle systolic pressure. The in vivo RNA interference silencing of TNF-α was achieved by intravenous delivery of recombinant AAV-2 carrying TNF-α short hairpin small-interfering RNA 24 hours before cold exposure. Cold exposure for 8 weeks significantly increased right ventricle pressure compared with the warm controls (40.19±4.9 versus 22.9±1.1 mm Hg), indicating that cold exposure caused PH. Cold exposure increased TNF-α, interleukin-6, and phosphodiesterase-1C protein expression in the lungs and PAs and increased lung macrophage infiltration. Notably, TNF-α short hairpin small-interfering RNA prevented the cold-induced increases in TNF-α, interleukin-6, and phosphodiesterase-1C protein expression, abolished lung macrophage infiltration, and attenuated PH (26.28±1.6 mm Hg), PA remodeling, and right ventricle hypertrophy. PA smooth muscle cells isolated from cold-exposed animals showed increased intracellular superoxide levels and cell proliferation along with decreased intracellular cGMP. These cold-induced changes were prevented by TNF-α short hairpin small-interfering RNA. In conclusions, upregulation of TNF-α played a critical role in the pathogenesis of cold-induced PH by promoting pulmonary macrophage infiltration and inflammation. AAV delivery of TNF-α short hairpin small-interfering RNA may be an effective

  8. Prolonged Expression of an Anti-HIV-1 gp120 Minibody to the Female Rhesus Macaque Lower Genital Tract by AAV Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Motal, Ussama M.; Harbison, Carole; Han, Thomas; Pudney, Jeffrey; Anderson, Deborah J.; Zhu, Quan; Westmoreland, Susan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women, however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally-related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various GFP-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intra-vaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intra-vaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79 day study period. These data provide proof-of-principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection. PMID:24965083

  9. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection I: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Wu, Wen-Jian; Ou, Qinghui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Chen, Ning; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; O'Brien, Erin; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    The ultimate goal of prophylactic gene therapy is to confer permanent protection against ischemia. Although gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to protect against myocardial infarction at 3 days and up to 2 months, the long-term effects on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the iNOS gene (rAAV/iNOS), which enables long-lasting transgene expression. The ability of rAAV/iNOS to direct the expression of functional iNOS protein was confirmed in COS-7 cells before in vivo gene transfer. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ or rAAV/iNOS; 1 year later, they underwent a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). iNOS gene transfer resulted in elevated iNOS protein expression (+3-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) and iNOS activity (+4.4-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) 1 year later. Infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after iNOS gene transfer (13.5 ± 2.2%, n = 12, vs. 41.7 ± 2.9%, n = 10, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effect of iNOS gene therapy at 1 year was as powerful as that observed 24 h after ischemic preconditioning (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (19.3 ± 2.3%, n = 11; P < 0.05). Importantly, compared with the LacZ group (n = 11), iNOS gene transfer (n = 10) had no effect on LV dimensions or function for up to 1 year (at 1 year: FS 34.5 ± 2.0 vs. 34.6 ± 2.6%, EF 57.0 ± 2.0 vs. 59.7 ± 2.9%, LVEDD 4.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.2 mm, LVESD 2.8 ± 0.1 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2 mm) (echocardiography). These data demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated iNOS gene transfer affords long-term, probably permanent (1 year), cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing a strong rationale for further preclinical testing of prophylactic gene therapy.

  10. Intra-Amniotic rAAV-Mediated Microdystrophin Gene Transfer Improves Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy and May Induce Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25586688

  11. Modified UMS, Modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Cancer.gov

    Modified UMLS, modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH – these are resources (UMLS, SemMedDB-UT) and tools (SemRep) created and maintained by National Library of Medicine that we have modified for personalized cancer therapy and returned to the NLM.

  12. Modular adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors used for cellular virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Sven; Baumann, Tobias; Wagner, Hanna J.; Morath, Volker; Kaufmann, Beate; Fischer, Adrian; Bergmann, Stefan; Schindler, Patrick; Arndt, Katja M.; Müller, Kristian M.

    2014-01-01

    The pre-clinical and clinical development of viral vehicles for gene transfer increased in recent years, and a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) drug took center stage upon approval in the European Union. However, lack of standardization, inefficient purification methods and complicated retargeting limit general usability. We address these obstacles by fusing rAAV-2 capsids with two modular targeting molecules (DARPin or Affibody) specific for a cancer cell-surface marker (EGFR) while simultaneously including an affinity tag (His-tag) in a surface-exposed loop. Equipping these particles with genes coding for prodrug converting enzymes (thymidine kinase or cytosine deaminase) we demonstrate tumor marker specific transduction and prodrug-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells. Coding terminal and loop modifications in one gene enabled specific and scalable purification. Our genetic parts for viral production adhere to a standardized cloning strategy facilitating rapid prototyping of virus directed enzyme prodrug therapy (VDEPT). PMID:24457557

  13. The 5′-tail of antisense RNAII of pMV158 plays a critical role in binding to the target mRNA and in translation inhibition of repB

    PubMed Central

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Romero-López, Cristina; Espinosa, Manuel; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; del Solar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication of streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is controlled by the concerted action of two trans-acting elements, namely transcriptional repressor CopG and antisense RNAII, which inhibit expression of the repB gene encoding the replication initiator protein. The pMV158-encoded antisense RNAII exerts its activity of replication control by inhibiting translation of the essential repB gene. RNAII is the smallest and simplest among the characterized antisense RNAs involved in control of plasmid replication. Structure analysis of RNAII revealed that it folds into an 8-bp-long stem containing a 1-nt bulge and closed by a 6-nt apical loop. This hairpin is flanked by a 17-nt-long single-stranded 5′-tail and an 8-nt-long 3′-terminal U-rich stretch. Here, the 3′ and 5′ regions of the 5′-tail of RNAII are shown to play a critical role in the binding to the target mRNA and in the inhibition of repB translation, respectively. In contrast, the apical loop of the single hairpin of RNAII plays a rather secondary role and the upper stem region hardly contributes to the binding or inhibition processes. The entire 5′-tail is required for efficient inhibition of repB translation, though only the 8-nt-long region adjacent to the hairpin seems to be essential for rapid binding to the mRNA. These results show that a “kissing” interaction involving base-pairing between complementary hairpin loops in RNAII and mRNA is not critical for efficient RNA/RNA binding or repB translation inhibition. A singular binding mechanism is envisaged whereby initial pairing between complementary single-stranded regions in the antisense and sense RNAs progresses upwards into the corresponding hairpin stems to form the intermolecular duplex. PMID:26175752

  14. repRNA: a web server for generating various feature vectors of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Fule; Fang, Longyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid growth of RNA sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop a flexible method that can generate various kinds of vectors to represent these sequences by focusing on their different features. This is because nearly all the existing machine-learning methods, such as SVM (support vector machine) and KNN (k-nearest neighbor), can only handle vectors but not sequences. To meet the increasing demands and speed up the genome analyses, we have developed a new web server, called "representations of RNA sequences" (repRNA). Compared with the existing methods, repRNA is much more comprehensive, flexible and powerful, as reflected by the following facts: (1) it can generate 11 different modes of feature vectors for users to choose according to their investigation purposes; (2) it allows users to select the features from 22 built-in physicochemical properties and even those defined by users' own; (3) the resultant feature vectors and the secondary structures of the corresponding RNA sequences can be visualized. The repRNA web server is freely accessible to the public at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/repRNA/ .

  15. Use of a rep-PCR system to predict species in the Aspergillus section Nigri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Aspergillus niger aggregate within the A. section Nigri, is a group of black-spored aspergilli which taxonomy has been elusive. REP-PCR has become a rapid and cost-effective method for genotyping fungi and bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a semi-automate...

  16. Development of Weighted Distributions of REPs for Dioxin-Like Compounds: Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    In their recent reevaluation of the TEF methodology, the WHO expert panel indicated that consideration should be given to developing weighted distributions of REP values to establish TEFs for each dioxin-like compound (DLC). As such, we developed a consensus-based weighting frame...

  17. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  18. How Often Is p[subscript rep] Close to the True Replication Probability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David; MacDonald, Justin A.; Rice, Stephen; Clason, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Largely due to dissatisfaction with the standard null hypothesis significance testing procedure, researchers have begun to consider alternatives. For example, Killeen (2005a) has argued that researchers should calculate p[subscript rep] that is purported to indicate the probability that, if the experiment in question were replicated, the obtained…

  19. Applications of the rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting technique to study microbial diversity, ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    A large number of repetitive DNA sequences are found in multiple sites in the genomes of numerous bacteria, archaea and eukarya. While the functions of many of these repetitive sequence elements are unknown, they have proven to be useful as the basis of several powerful tools for use in molecular diagnostics, medical microbiology, epidemiological analyses and environmental microbiology. The repetitive sequence-based PCR or rep-PCR DNA fingerprint technique uses primers targeting several of these repetitive elements and PCR to generate unique DNA profiles or 'fingerprints' of individual microbial strains. Although this technique has been extensively used to examine diversity among variety of prokaryotic microorganisms, rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting can also be applied to microbial ecology and microbial evolution studies since it has the power to distinguish microbes at the strain or isolate level. Recent advancement in rep-PCR methodology has resulted in increased accuracy, reproducibility and throughput. In this minireview, we summarize recent improvements in rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting methodology, and discuss its applications to address fundamentally important questions in microbial ecology and evolution.

  20. U.S. Rep. William Nelson drinking tea from shuttle beverage container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    U.S. Rep. William Nelson of Florida tries drinking tea from a straw-equipped beverage dispenser in JSC's life sciences laboratory during a space food orientation session. The congressman is in early stages of training for a position on the STS 61-C mission.

  1. Birmingham Rep, Youth and Community, and the Products and Possibilities of Precarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Birmingham Rep, a leading producing theatre based in the UK's "second city", has historically had a complex relationship with the cultural priorities of its home city. In recent years, Birmingham City Council has faced multiple challenges represented by debt burden, government-imposed cuts in public funding, scandals linked to failing…

  2. Tile Patterns with LOGO--Part II: Tile Patterns from Rep Tiles Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clason, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    Described is a recursive LOGO method for dissecting polygons into congruent parts (rep tiles) similar to the original polygon, thereby producing unexpected patterns. A list of descriptions for such dissections is included along with suggestions for modifications that allow extended student explorations into tile patterns. (JJK)

  3. Structure-function Analysis of Receptor-binding in Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6 (AAV-6)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Lerch, Thomas F.; Meyer, Nancy L.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Crystal structures of the AAV-6 capsid at 3 Å reveal a subunit fold homologous to other parvoviruses with greatest differences in two external loops. The electrostatic potential suggests that receptor-attachment is mediated by four residues: Arg576, Lys493, Lys459 and Lys531, defining a positively charged region curving up from the valley between adjacent spikes. It overlaps only partially with the receptor-binding site of AAV-2, and the residues endowing the electrostatic character are not homologous. Mutational substitution of each residue decreases heparin affinity, particularly Lys531 and Lys459. Neither is conserved among heparin-binding serotypes, indicating that diverse modes of receptor attachment have been selected in different serotypes. Surface topology and charge are also distinct at the shoulder of the spike, where linear epitopes for AAV-2’s neutralizing monoclonal antibody A20 come together. Evolutionarily, selection of changed side-chain charge may have offered a conservative means to evade immune neutralization while preserving other essential functionality. PMID:21917284

  4. Improved methods of AAV-mediated gene targeting for human cell lines using ribosome-skipping 2A peptide

    PubMed Central

    Karnan, Sivasundaram; Ota, Akinobu; Konishi, Yuko; Wahiduzzaman, Md; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based targeting vector has been one of the tools commonly used for genome modification in human cell lines. It allows for relatively efficient gene targeting associated with 1–4-log higher ratios of homologous-to-random integration of targeting vectors (H/R ratios) than plasmid-based targeting vectors, without actively introducing DNA double-strand breaks. In this study, we sought to improve the efficiency of AAV-mediated gene targeting by introducing a 2A-based promoter-trap system into targeting constructs. We generated three distinct AAV-based targeting vectors carrying 2A for promoter trapping, each targeting a GFP-based reporter module incorporated into the genome, PIGA exon 6 or PIGA intron 5. The absolute gene targeting efficiencies and H/R ratios attained using these vectors were assessed in multiple human cell lines and compared with those attained using targeting vectors carrying internal ribosome entry site (IRES) for promoter trapping. We found that the use of 2A for promoter trapping increased absolute gene targeting efficiencies by 3.4–28-fold and H/R ratios by 2–5-fold compared to values obtained with IRES. In CRISPR-Cas9-assisted gene targeting using plasmid-based targeting vectors, the use of 2A did not enhance the H/R ratios but did upregulate the absolute gene targeting efficiencies compared to the use of IRES. PMID:26657635

  5. AAV9 intracerebroventricular gene therapy improves lifespan, locomotor function and pathology in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael P; Smith, Dave A; Morris, Lauren; Fletcher, Claire; Colaco, Alexandria; Huebecker, Mylene; Tordo, Julie; Palomar, Nuria; Massaro, Giulia; Henckaerts, Els; Waddington, Simon N; Platt, Frances M; Rahim, Ahad A

    2018-06-05

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NP-C) is a fatal neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. It is caused in 95% of cases by a mutation in the NPC1 gene that encodes NPC1, an integral transmembrane protein localised to the limiting membrane of the lysosome. There is no cure for NP-C but there is a disease-modifying drug (miglustat) that slows disease progression but with associated side effects. Here, we demonstrate in a well-characterised mouse model of NP-C that a single administration of AAV-mediated gene therapy to the brain can significantly extend lifespan, improve quality of life, prevent or ameliorate neurodegeneration, reduce biochemical pathology and normalize or improve various indices of motor function. Over-expression of human NPC1 does not cause adverse effects in the brain and correctly localises to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments. Furthermore, we directly compare gene therapy to licensed miglustat. Even at a low dose, gene therapy has all the benefits of miglustat but without adverse effects. On the basis of these findings and on-going ascendency of the field, we propose intracerebroventricular gene therapy as a potential therapeutic option for clinical use in NP-C.

  6. Genetic Diversity and Evidence for Transmission of Streptococcus mutans by DiversiLab rep-PCR.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Stephanie S; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Ghazal, Tariq; Moser, Stephen A; Childers, Noel K

    2016-09-01

    This two-part study investigated the genetic diversity and transmission of Streptococcus mutans using the DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) approach. For children with S. mutans and participating household members, analysis for evidence of unrelated child-to-child as well as intra-familial transmission was evaluated based on commonality of genotypes. A total of 169 index children and 425 household family members from Uniontown, Alabama were evaluated for genetic diversity using rep-PCR. Thirty-four unique rep-PCR genotypes were observed for 13,906 S. mutans isolates. For transmission, 117 child and household isolates were evaluated for shared genotype (by child and by genotype cases, multiple matches possible for each child). Overall, children had 1-9 genotypes and those with multiple genotypes were 2.3 times more likely to have caries experience (decayed, missing and filled teeth/surfaces>0). Only 28% of children shared all genotypes within the household, while 72% had at least 1 genotype not shared with anyone in the household. Children had genotype(s) not shared with any household members in 157 cases. In 158 cases children and household members shared a genotype in which 55% (87/158 cases) were shared with more than one family member. Children most frequently shared genotypes with their mothers (54%; 85/158), siblings (46%; 72/158) and cousins (23%; 37/158). A reference library for S. mutans for epidemiological surveillance using the DiversiLab rep-PCR approach is detailed. The genetic diversity of S. mutans in this population demonstrated frequent commonality of genotypes. Evidence for both child-to-child and intra-familial transmission of S. mutans was observed by rep-PCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Diversity and Evidence for Transmission of Streptococcus mutans by DiversiLab rep-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Stephanie S.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Ghazal, Tariq; Moser, Stephen A.; Childers, Noel K.

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study investigated the genetic diversity and transmission of Streptococcus mutans using the DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) approach. For children with S. mutans and participating household members, analysis for evidence of unrelated child-to-child as well as intra-familial transmission was evaluated based on commonality of genotypes. A total of 169 index children and 425 household family members from Uniontown, Alabama were evaluated for genetic diversity using rep-PCR. Thirty-four unique rep-PCR genotypes were observed for 13,906 S. mutans isolates. For transmission, 117 child and household isolates were evaluated for shared genotype (by child and by genotype cases, multiple matches possible for each child). Overall, children had 1–9 genotypes and those with multiple genotypes were 2.3 times more likely to have caries experience (decayed, missing and filled teeth/surfaces>0). Only 28% of children shared all genotypes within the household, while 72% had at least 1 genotype not shared with anyone in the household. Children had genotype(s) not shared with any household members in 155 cases. In 158 cases children and household members shared a genotype in which 55% (87/158 cases) were shared with more than one family member. Children most frequently shared genotypes with their mothers (54%; 85/158), siblings (46%; 72/158) and cousins (23%; 37/158). A reference library for S. mutans for epidemiological surveillance using the DiversiLab rep-PCR approach is detailed. The genetic diversity of S. mutans in this population demonstrated frequent commonality of genotypes. Evidence for both child-to-child and intra-familial transmission of S. mutans was observed by rep-PCR. PMID:27432341

  8. Mapping and Engineering Functional Domains of the Assembly Activating Protein of Adeno-Associated Viruses.

    PubMed

    Tse, Longping V; Moller-Tank, Sven; Meganck, Rita M; Asokan, Aravind

    2018-04-25

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) encode a unique assembly activating protein (AAP) within their genome that is essential for capsid assembly. Studies to date have focused on establishing the role of AAP as a chaperone that mediates stability, nucleolar transport, and assembly of AAV capsid proteins. Here, we map structure-function correlates of AAP using secondary structure analysis followed by deletion and substitutional mutagenesis of specific domains, namely, the hydrophobic N-terminal domain (HR), conserved core (CC), proline-rich region (PRR), threonine/serine rich region (T/S) and basic region (BR). First, we establish that the centrally located PRR and T/S regions are flexible linker domains that can either be deleted completely or replaced by heterologous functional domains that enable ancillary functions such as fluorescent imaging or increased AAP stability. We also demonstrate that the C-terminal BR domains can be substituted with heterologous nuclear or nucleolar localization sequences that display varying ability to support AAV capsid assembly. Further, by replacing the BR domain with immunoglobulin (IgG) Fc domains, we assessed AAP complexation with AAV capsid subunits and demonstrate that the hydrophobic region (HR) and the conserved core (CC) in the AAP N-terminus are the sole determinants for viral protein (VP) recognition. However, VP recognition alone is not sufficient for capsid assembly. Our study sheds light on the modular structure-function correlates of AAP and provides multiple approaches to engineer AAP that might prove useful towards understanding and controlling AAV capsid assembly. Importance: Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) encode a unique assembly activating protein (AAP) within their genome that is essential for capsid assembly. Understanding how AAP acts as a chaperone for viral assembly could help improve efficiency and potentially control this process. Our studies reveal that AAP has a modular architecture, with each module playing a

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. AAV-mediated Gene Therapy Halts Retinal Degeneration in PDE6β-deficient Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Virginie; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Hulin, Philippe; Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Biget, Marine; Ameline, Baptiste; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that subretinal injection of AAV2/5 RK.cpde6β allowed long-term preservation of photoreceptor function and vision in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency. The present study builds on these earlier findings to provide a detailed assessment of the long-term effects of gene therapy on the spatiotemporal pattern of retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs treated at 20 days of age. We analyzed the density distribution of the retinal layers and of particular photoreceptor cells in 3.5-year-old treated and untreated rcd1 dogs. Whereas no rods were observed outside the bleb or in untreated eyes, gene transfer halted rod degeneration in all vector-exposed regions. Moreover, while gene therapy resulted in the preservation of cones, glial cells and both the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, no cells remained in vector-unexposed retinas, except in the visual streak. Finally, the retinal structure of treated 3.5-year-old rcd1 dogs was identical to that of unaffected 4-month-old rcd1 dogs, indicating near complete preservation. Our findings indicate that gene therapy arrests the degenerative process even if intervention is initiated after the onset of photoreceptor degeneration, and point to significant potential of this therapeutic approach in future clinical trials. PMID:26857842

  11. AAV-mediated Gene Therapy Halts Retinal Degeneration in PDE6β-deficient Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Hulin, Philippe; Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Biget, Marine; Ameline, Baptiste; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that subretinal injection of AAV2/5 RK.cpde6β allowed long-term preservation of photoreceptor function and vision in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency. The present study builds on these earlier findings to provide a detailed assessment of the long-term effects of gene therapy on the spatiotemporal pattern of retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs treated at 20 days of age. We analyzed the density distribution of the retinal layers and of particular photoreceptor cells in 3.5-year-old treated and untreated rcd1 dogs. Whereas no rods were observed outside the bleb or in untreated eyes, gene transfer halted rod degeneration in all vector-exposed regions. Moreover, while gene therapy resulted in the preservation of cones, glial cells and both the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, no cells remained in vector-unexposed retinas, except in the visual streak. Finally, the retinal structure of treated 3.5-year-old rcd1 dogs was identical to that of unaffected 4-month-old rcd1 dogs, indicating near complete preservation. Our findings indicate that gene therapy arrests the degenerative process even if intervention is initiated after the onset of photoreceptor degeneration, and point to significant potential of this therapeutic approach in future clinical trials.

  12. Longevity of rAAV vector and plasmid DNA in blood after intramuscular injection in nonhuman primates: implications for gene doping.

    PubMed

    Ni, W; Le Guiner, C; Gernoux, G; Penaud-Budloo, M; Moullier, P; Snyder, R O

    2011-07-01

    Legitimate uses of gene transfer technology can benefit from sensitive detection methods to determine vector biodistribution in pre-clinical studies and in human clinical trials, and similar methods can detect illegitimate gene transfer to provide sports-governing bodies with the ability to maintain fairness. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect a performance-enhancing transgene (erythropoietin, EPO) and backbone sequences in the presence of endogenous cellular sequences. In addition to developing real-time PCR assays, the steps involved in DNA extraction, storage and transport were investigated. By real-time PCR, the vector transgene is distinguishable from the genomic DNA sequence because of the absence of introns, and the vector backbone can be identified by heterologous gene expression control elements. After performance of the assays was optimized, cynomolgus macaques received a single dose by intramuscular (IM) injection of plasmid DNA, a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (rAAV1) or a rAAV8 vector expressing cynomolgus macaque EPO. Macaques received a high plasmid dose intended to achieve a significant, but not life-threatening, increase in hematocrit. rAAV vectors were used at low doses to achieve a small increase in hematocrit and to determine the limit of sensitivity for detecting rAAV sequences by single-step PCR. DNA extracted from white blood cells (WBCs) was tested to determine whether WBCs can be collaterally transfected by plasmid or transduced by rAAV vectors in this context, and can be used as a surrogate marker for gene doping. We demonstrate that IM injection of a conventional plasmid and rAAV vectors results in the presence of DNA that can be detected at high levels in blood before rapid elimination, and that rAAV genomes can persist for several months in WBCs.

  13. Gene Therapy for Osteoarthritis: Pharmacokinetics of Intra-articular scAAV.IL-1Ra Delivery in an Equine Model.

    PubMed

    Watson Levings, Rachael; Broome, Ted A; Smith, Andrew D; Rice, Brett L; Gibbs, Eric P; Myara, D Alex; Hyddmark, E Viktoria; Nasri, Elham; Zarezadeh, Ali; Levings, Padraic P; Lu, Yuan; Dacanay, E Anthony; Foremny, Gregory B; Evans, Christopher H; Morton, Alison J; Winter, Mathew; Dark, Michael J; Nickerson, David M; Colahan, Patrick T; Ghivizzani, Steven Craig

    2018-06-05

    142: Toward the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), we have been investigating self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) for intra-articular delivery of gene products with therapeutic potential. As OA frequently affects weight-bearing joints, we performed pharmacokinetic studies in the equine forelimb to identify parameters of scAAV gene delivery relevant to clinical translation. Using the coding sequence for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) as a secreted therapeutic reporter we first generated an scAAV vector containing an optimized cDNA for equine IL-1Ra. In dosing studies in vivo we identified a putative ceiling dose of 5 x 1012 viral genomes (vg) which elevated the steady-state eqIL-1Ra in synovial fluids >50-fold for over 6 months. No adverse effects of treatment were seen, and eqIL-1Ra in serum and urine remained at background. Using 5 x 1012 vg and GFP as a cytologic marker, we compared the local and systemic distribution of vector and transduced cells in healthy joints and those with late stage, naturally-occurring OA. Strikingly, a substantial increase in transgenic expression was associated with the articular pathologies characteristic of OA, including synovitis, osteophyte formation and damaged cartilage. Nonetheless, in both the healthy and OA environments the vector and transgene expression were effectively contained within the injected joint. 143: We are investigating self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) as a vector for intra-articular gene-delivery of IL-1Ra, and its therapeutic capacity in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). To model gene-transfer on a scale proportional to the human knee, a frequent site of OA incidence, we focused our studies on the joints of the equine forelimb. Using AAV2.5 capsid and equine IL-1Ra as a homologous transgene, we previously identified a functional ceiling dose of ~5 x 1012 viral genomes, which elevated the steady state levels of eqIL-1Ra in synovial fluids by more than 40-fold over

  14. Regulation of adeno-associated virus DNA replication by the cellular TAF-I/set complex.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Marcello, Alessandro; Myers, Michael P; Giacca, Mauro

    2006-07-01

    The Rep proteins of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are required for viral replication in the presence of adenovirus helper functions and as yet poorly characterized cellular factors. In an attempt to identify such factors, we purified Flag-Rep68-interacting proteins from human cell lysates. Several polypeptides were identified by mass spectrometry, among which was ANP32B, a member of the acidic nuclear protein 32 family which takes part in the formation of the template-activating factor I/Set oncoprotein (TAF-I/Set) complex. The N terminus of Rep was found to specifically bind the acidic domain of ANP32B; through this interaction, Rep was also able to recruit other members of the TAF-I/Set complex, including the ANP32A protein and the histone chaperone TAF-I/Set. Further experiments revealed that silencing of ANP32A and ANP32B inhibited AAV replication, while overexpression of all of the components of the TAF-I/Set complex increased de novo AAV DNA synthesis in permissive cells. Besides being the first indication that the TAF-I/Set complex participates in wild-type AAV replication, these findings have important implications for the generation of recombinant AAV vectors since overexpression of the TAF-I/Set components was found to markedly increase viral vector production.

  15. AAV-mediated netrin-1 overexpression increases peri-infarct blood vessel density and improves motor function recovery after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Le, Thang; Chang, Tiffany T J; Habib, Aisha; Wu, Steven; Shen, Fanxia; Young, William L; Su, Hua; Liu, Jialing

    2011-10-01

    Apart from its role in axon guidance, netrin-1 is also known to be pro-angiogenic. The aim of this study is to determine whether adeno-associated viral (AAV) mediated overexpression of netrin-1 improves post-stroke neurovascular structure and recovery of function. AAV-Netrin-1 or AAV-LacZ of 1×10(10) genome copies each was injected medial and posterior to ischemic lesion at one hour following reperfusion using the distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of netrin-1 transgene began as early as one day and increased dramatically about 3 weeks following vector injection. Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy suggested that both the endogenous and transduced netrin-1 were expressed in the neurons of the peri-infarct cortex after MCAO. AAV-mediated netrin-1 overexpression significantly increased vascular density in the peri-infarct cortex and promoted the migration of immature neurons into the peri-infarct white matter, but it did not significantly reduce infarct size. Netrin-1 overexpression also enhanced post-stroke locomotor activity, improved exploratory behavior, and reduced ischemia-induced motor asymmetry in forelimb usage. However, it had little effect on post-stroke spatial learning and memory. Our results suggest that AAV mediated netrin-1 overexpression improves peri-infarct vascular density and post stroke motor function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A Single Intravenous rAAV Injection as Late as P20 Achieves Efficacious and Sustained CNS Gene Therapy in Canavan Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Li, Huapeng; Cao, Chunyan; Sikoglu, Elif M; Denninger, Andrew R; Su, Qin; Eaton, Samuel; Liso Navarro, Ana A; Xie, Jun; Szucs, Sylvia; Zhang, Hongwei; Moore, Constance; Kirschner, Daniel A; Seyfried, Thomas N; Flotte, Terence R; Matalon, Reuben; Gao, Guangping

    2013-01-01

    Canavan's disease (CD) is a fatal pediatric leukodystrophy caused by mutations in aspartoacylase (AspA) gene. Currently, there is no effective treatment for CD; however, gene therapy is an attractive approach to ameliorate the disease. Here, we studied progressive neuropathology and gene therapy in short-lived (≤1 month) AspA−/− mice, a bona-fide animal model for the severest form of CD. Single intravenous (IV) injections of several primate-derived recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) as late as postnatal day 20 (P20) completely rescued their early lethality and alleviated the major disease symptoms, extending survival in P0-injected rAAV9 and rAAVrh8 groups to as long as 2 years thus far. We successfully used microRNA (miRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional detargeting for the first time to restrict therapeutic rAAV expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and minimize potentially deleterious effects of transgene overexpression in peripheral tissues. rAAV treatment globally improved CNS myelination, although some abnormalities persisted in the content and distribution of myelin-specific and -enriched lipids. We demonstrate that systemically delivered and CNS-restricted rAAVs can serve as efficacious and sustained gene therapeutics in a model of a severe neurodegenerative disorder even when administered as late as P20. PMID:23817205

  17. Combination therapy utilizing shRNA knockdown and an optimized resistant transgene for rescue of diseases caused by misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengwen; Xiao, Pingjie; Gray, Steven James; Weinberg, Marc Scott; Samulski, R Jude

    2011-08-23

    Molecular knockdown of disease proteins and restoration of wild-type activity represent a promising but challenging strategy for the treatment of diseases that result from the accumulation of misfolded proteins (i.e., Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and α-1 antitrypsin deficiency). In this study we used alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency with the piZZ mutant phenotype as a model system to evaluate the efficiency of gene-delivery approaches that both silence the piZZ transcript (e.g., shRNA) and restore circulating wild-type AAT expression from resistant codon-optimized AAT (AAT-opt) transgene cassette using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivery. After systemic injection of a self-complimentary AAV serotype 8 (scAAV8) vector encoding shRNA in piZZ transgenic mice, both mutant AAT mRNA in the liver and defected serum protein level were inhibited by 95%, whereas liver pathology, as monitored by dPAS and fibrosis staining, reversed. To restore blood AAT levels in AAV8/shRNA-treated mice, several strategies to restore functional AAT levels were tested, including using AAV AAT-opt transgene cassettes targeted to muscle and liver, or combination vectors carrying piZZ shRNA and AAT-opt transgenes separately, or a single bicistronic AAV vector. With these molecular approaches, we observed over 90% knockdown of mutant AAT with a 13- to 30-fold increase of circulating wild-type AAT protein from the shRNA-resistant AAT-opt cassette. The molecular approaches applied in this study can simultaneously prevent liver pathology and restore blood AAT concentration in AAT deficiencies. Based on these observations, similar gene-therapy strategies could be considered for any diseases caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  18. An experimental and computational evolution-based method to study a mode of co-evolution of overlapping open reading frames in the AAV2 viral genome.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yasuhiro; Neeley, Shane; Adachi, Kei; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) in viral genomes undergo co-evolution; however, how individual amino acids coded by overlapping ORFs are structurally, functionally, and co-evolutionarily constrained remains difficult to address by conventional homologous sequence alignment approaches. We report here a new experimental and computational evolution-based methodology to address this question and report its preliminary application to elucidating a mode of co-evolution of the frame-shifted overlapping ORFs in the adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2 viral genome. These ORFs encode both capsid VP protein and non-structural assembly-activating protein (AAP). To show proof of principle of the new method, we focused on the evolutionarily conserved QVKEVTQ and KSKRSRR motifs, a pair of overlapping heptapeptides in VP and AAP, respectively. In the new method, we first identified a large number of capsid-forming VP3 mutants and functionally competent AAP mutants of these motifs from mutant libraries by experimental directed evolution under no co-evolutionary constraints. We used Illumina sequencing to obtain a large dataset and then statistically assessed the viability of VP and AAP heptapeptide mutants. The obtained heptapeptide information was then integrated into an evolutionary algorithm, with which VP and AAP were co-evolved from random or native nucleotide sequences in silico. As a result, we demonstrate that these two heptapeptide motifs could exhibit high degeneracy if coded by separate nucleotide sequences, and elucidate how overlap-evoked co-evolutionary constraints play a role in making the VP and AAP heptapeptide sequences into the present shape. Specifically, we demonstrate that two valine (V) residues and β-strand propensity in QVKEVTQ are structurally important, the strongly negative and hydrophilic nature of KSKRSRR is functionally important, and overlap-evoked co-evolution imposes strong constraints on serine (S) residues in KSKRSRR, despite high

  19. Intracranial AAV-sTRAIL combined with lanatoside C prolongs survival in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of invasive glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Crommentuijn, Matheus H W; Maguire, Casey A; Niers, Johanna M; Vandertop, W Peter; Badr, Christian E; Würdinger, Thomas; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. We designed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector for intracranial delivery of secreted, soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) to GBM tumors in mice and combined it with the TRAIL-sensitizing cardiac glycoside, lanatoside C (lan C). We applied this combined therapy to two different GBM models using human U87 glioma cells and primary patient-derived GBM neural spheres in culture and in orthotopic GBM xenograft models in mice. In U87 cells, conditioned medium from AAV2-sTRAIL expressing cells combined with lan C induced 80% cell death. Similarly, lan C sensitized primary GBM spheres to sTRAIL causing over 90% cell death. In mice bearing intracranial U87 tumors treated with AAVrh.8-sTRAIL, administration of lan C caused a decrease in tumor-associated Fluc signal, while tumor size increased within days of stopping the treatment. Another round of lan C treatment re-sensitized GBM tumor to sTRAIL-induced cell death. AAVrh.8-sTRAIL treatment alone and combined with lanatoside C resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth and longer survival of mice bearing orthotopic invasive GBM brain tumors. In summary, AAV-sTRAIL combined with lanatoside C induced cell death in U87 glioma cells and patient-derived GBM neural spheres in culture and in vivo leading to an increased in overall mice survival. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Junqueira, Ana Maria R; Aragão, Francisco JL; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) by expressing a mutated REP protein, which is essential for virus replication. Biosafety studies were performed for a period of three years under field conditions. The abundance of some species was significantly higher in specific treatments in a particular year, but not consistently different in other years. A regular pattern was not observed in the distribution of insects between genetically modified and conventional treatments. Data analyses showed that minor differences observed can be attributed to random variation and were not consistent enough to conclude that the treatments were different. Therefore the present study indicates that the relative abundance of species are similar in transgenic and non-transgenic fields. PMID:24922280

  1. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Junqueira, Ana Maria R; Aragão, Francisco J L; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) by expressing a mutated REP protein, which is essential for virus replication. Biosafety studies were performed for a period of three years under field conditions. The abundance of some species was significantly higher in specific treatments in a particular year, but not consistently different in other years. A regular pattern was not observed in the distribution of insects between genetically modified and conventional treatments. Data analyses showed that minor differences observed can be attributed to random variation and were not consistent enough to conclude that the treatments were different. Therefore the present study indicates that the relative abundance of species are similar in transgenic and non-transgenic fields.

  2. Successful Establishment of Plasmids R1 and pMV158 in a New Host Requires the Relief of the Transcriptional Repression of Their Essential rep Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José Á.; Luengo, Luis M.; Moreno-Córdoba, Inmaculada; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; del Solar, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Although differing in size, encoded traits, host range, and replication mechanism, both narrow-host-range theta-type conjugative enterobacterial plasmid R1 and promiscuous rolling-circle-type mobilizable streptococcal plasmid pMV158 encode a transcriptional repressor protein, namely CopB in R1 and CopG in pMV158, involved in replication control. The gene encoding CopB or CopG is cotranscribed with a downstream gene that encodes the replication initiator Rep protein of the corresponding plasmid. However, whereas CopG is an auto-repressor that inhibits transcription of the entire copG-repB operon, CopB is expressed constitutively and represses a second, downstream promoter that directs transcription of repA. As a consequence of the distinct regulatory pathways implied by CopB and CopG, these repressor proteins play a different role in control of plasmid replication during the steady state: while CopB has an auxiliary role by keeping repressed the regulated promoter whenever the plasmid copy number is above a low threshold, CopG plays a primary role by acting coordinately with RNAII. Here, we have studied the role of the regulatory circuit mediated by these transcriptional repressors during the establishment of these two plasmids in a new host cell, and found that excess Cop repressor molecules in the recipient cell result in a severe decrease in the frequency and/or the velocity of appearance of transformant colonies for the cognate plasmid but not for unrelated plasmids. Using the pMV158 replicon as a model system, together with highly sensitive real-time qPCR and inverse PCR methods, we have also analyzed the effect of CopG on the kinetics of repopulation of the plasmid in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that, whereas in the absence of CopG pMV158 repopulation occurs mainly during the first 45 min following plasmid transfer, the presence of the transcriptional repressor in the recipient cell severely impairs the replicon repopulation and makes the plasmid

  3. Therapeutic effect of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated ADNF-9 expression on cochlea of kanamycin-deafened guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoxi; Zhu, Zhu; Zhu, Kang; Wei, Junrong; Jing, Yang; Duan, Maoli

    2013-10-01

    rAAV-NT4-ADNF-9 could ameliorate the damage to auditory function and repair previous impairment of cochlear hair cell loss induced by kanamycin. To investigate the therapeutic effect of ADNF-9 on cochlear hair cells using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying fusion gene NT4-ADNF-9 and the kanamycin-deafened guinea pig model. Forty white guinea pigs with normal auricle reflex and normal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were randomly divided into four groups. Kanamycin was administered to the animals in groups A, B, and C to establish the deafened guinea pig model. rAAV-NT4-ADNF-9, vector only, and artificial perilymph were then delivered to the cochlear tissue of animals in groups A, B, and C, respectively, through the round window membrane. Animals in group D did not receive any treatment and acted as normal controls. The hearing thresholds on the surgery side were recorded before and after the transfection treatment. Fourteen days after treatment, cochleae were removed for paraffin slide preparation and cochlear surface preparation. A phase contrast microscope was used to observe the protective effect of ADNF-9 on hair cells. Significant reduction of the ABR threshold was observed after rAAV-NT4-ADNF-9 treatment (p < 0.05). After 14 days of treatment, the ABR threshold was also significantly different between the rAAV-NT4-ADNF-9-infected group and the non-infected group. Moreover, phase contrast microscopy showed significantly less hair cell damage or hair cell loss in the group treated with rAAV-NT4-ADNF-9 than in the groups treated with vector only or artificial perilymph (p < 0.05).

  4. Cryo-electron Microscopy Reconstruction and Stability Studies of the Wild Type and the R432A Variant of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Reveal that Capsid Structural Stability Is a Major Factor in Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Lauren M.; Lins, Bridget; Janssen, Maria; Bennett, Antonette; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Cardone, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising therapeutic gene delivery vectors and better understanding of their capsid assembly and genome packaging mechanism is needed for improved vector production. Empty AAV capsids assemble in the nucleus prior to genome packaging by virally encoded Rep proteins. To elucidate the capsid determinants of this process, structural differences between wild-type (wt) AAV2 and a packaging deficient variant, AAV2-R432A, were examined using cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction both at an ∼5.0-Å resolution (medium) and also at 3.8- and 3.7-Å resolutions (high), respectively. The high resolution structures showed that removal of the arginine side chain in AAV2-R432A eliminated hydrogen bonding interactions, resulting in altered intramolecular and intermolecular interactions propagated from under the 3-fold axis toward the 5-fold channel. Consistent with these observations, differential scanning calorimetry showed an ∼10°C decrease in thermal stability for AAV2-R432A compared to wt-AAV2. In addition, the medium resolution structures revealed differences in the juxtaposition of the less ordered, N-terminal region of their capsid proteins, VP1/2/3. A structural rearrangement in AAV2-R432A repositioned the βA strand region under the icosahedral 2-fold axis rather than antiparallel to the βB strand, eliminating many intramolecular interactions. Thus, a single amino acid substitution can significantly alter the AAV capsid integrity to the extent of reducing its stability and possibly rendering it unable to tolerate the stress of genome packaging. Furthermore, the data show that the 2-, 3-, and 5-fold regions of the capsid contributed to producing the packaging defect and highlight a tight connection between the entire capsid in maintaining packaging efficiency. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of AAV genome packaging is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the capsid determinants

  5. Cryo-electron Microscopy Reconstruction and Stability Studies of the Wild Type and the R432A Variant of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Reveal that Capsid Structural Stability Is a Major Factor in Genome Packaging.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Lauren M; Lins, Bridget; Janssen, Maria; Bennett, Antonette; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Cardone, Giovanni; Baker, Timothy S; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-10-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising therapeutic gene delivery vectors and better understanding of their capsid assembly and genome packaging mechanism is needed for improved vector production. Empty AAV capsids assemble in the nucleus prior to genome packaging by virally encoded Rep proteins. To elucidate the capsid determinants of this process, structural differences between wild-type (wt) AAV2 and a packaging deficient variant, AAV2-R432A, were examined using cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction both at an ∼5.0-Å resolution (medium) and also at 3.8- and 3.7-Å resolutions (high), respectively. The high resolution structures showed that removal of the arginine side chain in AAV2-R432A eliminated hydrogen bonding interactions, resulting in altered intramolecular and intermolecular interactions propagated from under the 3-fold axis toward the 5-fold channel. Consistent with these observations, differential scanning calorimetry showed an ∼10°C decrease in thermal stability for AAV2-R432A compared to wt-AAV2. In addition, the medium resolution structures revealed differences in the juxtaposition of the less ordered, N-terminal region of their capsid proteins, VP1/2/3. A structural rearrangement in AAV2-R432A repositioned the βA strand region under the icosahedral 2-fold axis rather than antiparallel to the βB strand, eliminating many intramolecular interactions. Thus, a single amino acid substitution can significantly alter the AAV capsid integrity to the extent of reducing its stability and possibly rendering it unable to tolerate the stress of genome packaging. Furthermore, the data show that the 2-, 3-, and 5-fold regions of the capsid contributed to producing the packaging defect and highlight a tight connection between the entire capsid in maintaining packaging efficiency. The mechanism of AAV genome packaging is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the capsid determinants of the required capsid-Rep

  6. Geminivirus vectors for high-level expression of foreign proteins in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Mor, Tsafrir S; Moon, Yong-Sun; Palmer, Kenneth E; Mason, Hugh S

    2003-02-20

    Bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) is a monopartite geminivirus that can infect dicotyledonous plants. We have developed a high-level expression system that utilizes elements of the replication machinery of this single-stranded DNA virus. The replication initiator protein (Rep) mediates release and replication of a replicon from a DNA construct ("LSL vector") that contains an expression cassette for a gene of interest flanked by cis-acting elements of the virus. We used tobacco NT1 cells and biolistic delivery of plasmid DNA for evaluation of replication and expression of reporter genes contained within an LSL vector. By codelivery of a GUS reporter-LSL vector and a Rep-supplying vector, we obtained up to 40-fold increase in expression levels compared to delivery of the reporter-LSL vectors alone. High-copy replication of the LSL vector was correlated with enhanced expression of GUS. Rep expression using a whole BeYDV clone, a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter driving either genomic rep or an intron-deleted rep gene, or 35S-rep contained in the LSL vector all achieved efficient replication and enhancement of GUS expression. We anticipate that this system can be adapted for use in transgenic plants or plant cell cultures with appropriately regulated expression of Rep, with the potential to greatly increase yield of recombinant proteins. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 430-437, 2003.

  7. Recent tissue engineering-based advances for effective rAAV-mediated gene transfer in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-04-01

    Musculoskeletal tissues are diverse and significantly different in their ability to repair upon injury. Current treatments often fail to reproduce the natural functions of the native tissue, leading to an imperfect healing. Gene therapy might improve the repair of tissues by providing a temporarily and spatially defined expression of the therapeutic gene(s) at the site of the injury. Several gene transfer vehicles have been developed to modify various human cells and tissues from musculoskeletal system among which the non-pathogenic, effective, and relatively safe recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors that have emerged as the preferred gene delivery system to treat human disorders. Adapting tissue engineering platforms to gene transfer approaches mediated by rAAV vectors is an attractive tool to circumvent both the limitations of the current therapeutic options to promote an effective healing of the tissue and the natural obstacles from these clinically adapted vectors to achieve an efficient and durable gene expression of the therapeutic sequences within the lesions.

  8. Treatment with Trehalose Prevents Behavioral and Neurochemical Deficits Produced in an AAV α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Koprich, James B; Wang, Ying; Yu, Wen-bo; Xiao, Bao-guo; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein in dopamine (DA) neurons is believed to be of major importance in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Animal models of PD, based on viral-vector-mediated over-expression of α-synuclein, have been developed and show evidence of dopaminergic toxicity, providing us a good tool to investigate potential therapies to interfere with α-synuclein-mediated pathology. An efficient disease-modifying therapeutic molecule should be able to interfere with the neurotoxicity of α-synuclein aggregation. Our study highlighted the ability of an autophagy enhancer, trehalose (at concentrations of 5 and 2% in drinking water), to protect against A53T α-synuclein-mediated DA degeneration in an adeno-associated virus serotype 1/2 (AAV1/2)-based rat model of PD. Behavioral tests and neurochemical analysis demonstrated a significant attenuation in α-synuclein-mediated deficits in motor asymmetry and DA neurodegeneration including impaired DA neuronal survival and DA turnover, as well as α-synuclein accumulation and aggregation in the nigrostriatal system by commencing 5 and 2% trehalose at the same time as delivery of AAV. Trehalose (0.5%) was ineffective on the above behavioral and neurochemical deficits. Further investigation showed that trehalose enhanced autophagy in the striatum by increasing formation of LC3-II. This study supports the concept of using trehalose as a novel therapeutic strategy that might prevent/reverse α-synuclein aggregation for the treatment of PD.

  9. Rice endosperm protein slows progression of fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Miki; Hosojima, Michihiro; Saito, Akihiko; Fujii, Mikio; Fujimura, Shinobu; Kadowaki, Motoni

    2016-10-01

    We previously reported that rice endosperm protein (REP) has renoprotective effects in Goto-Kakizaki rats, a non-obese diabetic model. However, whether these effects occur in obese diabetes remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the effects of REP on obese diabetes, especially on fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy, using the obese diabetic model Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. In total, 7-week-old male ZDF rats were fed diets containing 20 % REP or casein (C) for 8 weeks. Changes in fasting blood glucose levels and urinary markers were monitored during the experimental period. Hepatic lipids and metabolites were measured and renal glomeruli were observed morphologically. HbA1c levels were significantly lower in rats fed REP, compared with C (P<0·05). Compared with C in the liver, REP prevented lipid accumulation (total lipid, TAG and total cholesterol, P<0·01). Liver metabolome analysis indicated that levels of metabolites associated with glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and carnitine metabolism were significantly greater in the REP group than in the C group (P<0·05), suggesting activation of both glucose catabolism and fatty acid oxidation. The metabolite increases promoted by REP may contribute to suppression of liver lipid accumulation. Urinary excretion of albumin and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was significantly reduced in rats fed REP for 8 weeks (P<0·01). In addition, there was a distinct suppression of mesangial matrix expansion and glomerular hypertrophy in response to REP (P<0·01). Thus, REP had preventive effects on obese diabetes, fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Use of a rep-PCR system to predict species in the Aspergillus section Nigri.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Edwin R; Klich, Maren A; Glenn, Anthony E; Bacon, Charles W

    2009-10-01

    The Aspergillus niger aggregate within the A. section Nigri is a group of black-spored aspergilli of great agro-economic importance whose well defined taxonomy has been elusive. Rep-PCR has become a rapid and cost-effective method for genotyping fungi and bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a semi-automated rep-PCR barcoding system to distinguish morphotypic species and compare the results with the data obtained from ITS and partial calmodulin regions. For this purpose, 20 morphotyped black-spored Aspergillus species were used to create the A. section Nigri library in this barcoding system that served to identify 34 field isolates. A pair-wise similarity matrix was calculated using the cone-based Pearson correlation method and the dendrogram was generated by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA), illustrating four different clustered groups: the uniseriate cluster (I), the Aspergillus carbonarius cluster (II), and. the two A. niger aggregate clusters (named III.A and III.B). Rep-PCR showed higher resolution than the ITS and the partial calmodulin gene analytical procedures. The data of the 34 unknown field isolates, collected from different locations in the United States, indicated that only 12% of the field isolates were >95% similar to one of the genotypes included in the A. section Nigri library. However, 64% of the field isolates matched genotypes with the reference library (similarity values >90%). Based on these results, this barcoding procedure has the potential for use as a reproducible tool for identifying the black-spored aspergilli.

  11. Lightweight Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) performing coastal survey operations in REP 10A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incze, Michael L.

    2011-11-01

    Lightweight Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) were developed for Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Group 4 search and survey missions from a commercial AUV baseline (Iver 2) through integration of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware components, and through software development for enhanced on-board Command and Control functions. The development period was 1 year under a project sponsored by the Office of Naval Research TechSolutions Program Office. Hardware integration was completed by the commercial AUV vendor, OceanServer Technology, Inc., and software development was conducted by the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Naval Oceanographic Office, and U MASS Dartmouth, with support from hardware and software application providers (YSI, Inc., Imagenex Technology Corp., and CARIS). At the conclusion of the integration and development period, an at-sea performance evaluation was scheduled for the Lightweight NSW AUVs with NSWG-4 personnel. The venue for this evaluation was the NATO exercise Recognized Environmental Picture 10A (REP 10A), hosted by Marinha Portuguesa, and coordinated by the Faculdade de Engenharia-Universidade do Porto. REP 10A offered an opportunity to evaluate the performance of the new AUVs and to explore the Concept of Operations (CONOPS) for employing them in military survey operations in shallow coastal waters. Shore- and ship-launched scenarios with launch/recovery by a single operator in a one-to-many coordinated survey, on-scene data product generation and visualization, data push to Reach Back Cells for product integration and enhancement, and survey optimization to streamline survey effort and timelines were included in the CONOPS review. Opportunities to explore employment of hybrid AUV fleets in Combined Force scenarios were also utilized. The Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Marinha Portuguesa, the Faculdade de Engenharia-Universidade do Porto, and OceanServer Technology, Inc., were the primary participants bringing in-water resources to

  12. Foil cooling for rep-rated electron beam pumped KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Hegeler, F.; Sethian, J. D.; Wolford, M. F.; Myers, M. C.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Sadowski, D.; Schoonover, K.; Novak, V.

    2006-06-01

    In rep-rated electron beam pumped lasers the foil separating the vacuum diode from the laser gas is subject to repeated heating due to partial beam stopping. Three cooling methods are examined for the Electra KrF laser at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Foil temperature measurements for convective cooling by the recirculating laser gas and by spray mist cooling are reported, along with estimates for thermal conductive foil cooling to the hibachi ribs. Issues on the application of each of these approaches to laser drivers in a fusion power plant are noted. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  13. COMPASS Final Report: Saturn Moons Orbiter Using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP): Flagship Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The COllaborative Modeling and Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team was approached by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) In-Space Project to perform a design session to develop Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) Spacecraft Conceptual Designs (with cost, risk, and reliability) for missions of three different classes: New Frontier s Class Centaur Orbiter (with Trojan flyby), Flagship, and Discovery. The designs will allow trading of current and future propulsion systems. The results will directly support technology development decisions. The results of the Flagship mission design are reported in this document

  14. AAV-PHP.B-Mediated Global-Scale Expression in the Mouse Nervous System Enables GBA1 Gene Therapy for Wide Protection from Synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Giuseppe; Giannelli, Serena G; Ordazzo, Gabriele; Bido, Simone; Castoldi, Valerio; Indrigo, Marzia; Cabassi, Tommaso; Cattaneo, Stefano; Luoni, Mirko; Cancellieri, Cinzia; Sessa, Alessandro; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Taverna, Stefano; Leocani, Letizia; Lanciego, José L; Broccoli, Vania

    2017-12-06

    The lack of technology for direct global-scale targeting of the adult mouse nervous system has hindered research on brain processing and dysfunctions. Currently, gene transfer is normally achieved by intraparenchymal viral injections, but these injections target a restricted brain area. Herein, we demonstrated that intravenous delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B viral particles permeated and diffused throughout the neural parenchyma, targeting both the central and the peripheral nervous system in a global pattern. We then established multiple procedures of viral transduction to control gene expression or inactivate gene function exclusively in the adult nervous system and assessed the underlying behavioral effects. Building on these results, we established an effective gene therapy strategy to counteract the widespread accumulation of α-synuclein deposits throughout the forebrain in a mouse model of synucleinopathy. Transduction of A53T-SCNA transgenic mice with AAV-PHP.B-GBA1 restored physiological levels of the enzyme, reduced α-synuclein pathology, and produced significant behavioral recovery. Finally, we provided evidence that AAV-PHP.B brain penetration does not lead to evident dysfunctions in blood-brain barrier integrity or permeability. Altogether, the AAV-PHP.B viral platform enables non-invasive, widespread, and long-lasting global neural expression of therapeutic genes, such as GBA1, providing an invaluable approach to treat neurodegenerative diseases with diffuse brain pathology such as synucleinopathies. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term correction of very long-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency in mice using AAV9 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Allison M; Conlon, Thomas; Walter, Glenn; Zeng, Huadong; Shaffer, Scott A; Dungtao, Fu; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Tang, Qiushi; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is the rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. VLCAD-deficient mice and patients clinical symptoms stem from not only an energy deficiency but also long-chain metabolite accumulations. VLCAD-deficient mice were treated systemically with 1 × 10(12) vector genomes of recombinant adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9)-VLCAD. Biochemical correction was observed in vector-treated mice beginning 2 weeks postinjection, as characterized by a significant drop in long-chain fatty acyl accumulates in whole blood after an overnight fast. Changes persisted through the termination point around 20 weeks postinjection. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) revealed normalization of intramuscular lipids in treated animals. Correction was not observed in liver tissue extracts, but cardiac muscle extracts showed significant reduction of long-chain metabolites. Disease-specific phenotypes were characterized, including thermoregulation and maintenance of euglycemia after a fasting cold challenge. Internal body temperatures of untreated VLCAD(-/-) mice dropped below 20 °C and the mice became lethargic, requiring euthanasia. In contrast, all rAAV9-treated VLCAD(-/-) mice and the wild-type controls maintained body temperatures. rAAV9-treated VLCAD(-/-) mice maintained euglycemia, whereas untreated VLCAD(-/-) mice suffered hypoglycemia following a fasting cold challenge. These promising results suggest rAAV9 gene therapy as a potential treatment for VLCAD deficiency in humans.

  16. Safety and tolerability of MRI-guided infusion of AAV2-hAADC into the mid-brain of nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Waldy San; Kells, Adrian P; Bringas, John; Samaranch, Lluis; Hadaczek, Piotr; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Macayan, Michael J; Pivirotto, Phillip J; Forsayeth, John; Osborne, Sheryl; Wright, J Fraser; Green, Foad; Heller, Gregory; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive neurological disorder caused by mutations in the DDC gene that leads to an inability to synthesize catecholamines and serotonin. As a result, patients suffer compromised development, particularly in motor function. A recent gene replacement clinical trial explored putaminal delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 vector encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC) in AADC-deficient children. Unfortunately, patients presented only modest amelioration of motor symptoms, which authors acknowledged could be due to insufficient transduction of putamen. We hypothesize that, with the development of a highly accurate MRI-guided cannula placement technology, a more effective approach might be to target the affected mid-brain neurons directly. Transduction of AADC-deficient dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area with locally infused AAV2-hAADC would be expected to lead to restoration of normal dopamine levels in affected children. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of bilateral AAV2-hAADC MRI-guided pressurized infusion into the mid-brain of nonhuman primates. Animals received either vehicle, low or high AAV2-hAADC vector dose and were euthanized 1, 3, or 9 months after surgery. Our data indicate that effective mid-brain transduction was achieved without untoward effects. PMID:25541617

  17. AAV2 production with optimized N/P ratio and PEI-mediated transfection results in low toxicity and high titer for in vitro and in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinping; Hartley, Antja-Voy; Yin, Yishi; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Lah, James J; Ressler, Kerry J

    2013-11-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) is one of the most useful viral vectors for gene delivery for both in vivo and in vitro applications. A variety of methods have been established to produce and characterize recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors; however most methods are quite cumbersome and obtaining consistently high titer can be problematic. This protocol describes a triple-plasmid co-transfection approach with 25 kDa linear polyethylenimine (PEI) in 293 T cells for the production of AAV serotype 2. Seventy-two hours post-transfection, supernatant and cells were harvested and purified by a discontinuous iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation, then dialyzed and concentrated with an Amicon 15 100,000 MWCO concentration unit. To optimize the protocol for AAV2 production using PEI, various N/P ratios and DNA amounts were compared. We found that an N/P ratio of 40 coupled with 1.05 μg DNA per ml of media (21 μg DNA/15 cm dish) was found to produce the highest yields for viral replication and assembly measured multiple ways. The infectious units, as determined by serial dilution, were between 1×10(8) and 2×10(9) IU/ml. The genomic titer of the viral stock was determined by qPCR and ranged from 2×10(12) to 6×10(13) VG/ml. These viral vectors showed high expression both in vivo within the brain and in vitro in cell culture. The use of linear 25 kDa polyethylenamine PEI as a transfection reagent is a simple, more cost-effective, and stable means of high-throughput production of high-titer AAV serotype 2. The use of PEI also eliminates the need to change cell medium post-transfection, lowering cost and workload, while producing high-titer, efficacious AAV2 vectors for routine gene transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of low-cost open source 3D gel printer "RepRap SWIM-ER"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kei; Basher, Samiul; Ota, Takafumi; Tase, Taishi; Takamatsu, Kyuichiro; Saito, Azusa; Khosla, Ajit; Kawakami, Masaru; Furuawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    Gels are soft and wet materials having low friction, good biocompatibility, and material permeability. It is expected that gel materials will be used as new kinds of industrial materials in the engineering and medical applications. But it cannot build a complicated shape. Soft & Wet Matter Engineering Laboratory developed a 3D gel Printer "SWIM-ER", has enabled modeling of complex shapes of the gel. However, this is expensive. Therefore not all of the gel researchers and the companies have such a device. To solve this problem, we manufacture a low-cost open-source 3D gel printer "RepRap SWIM-ER" from the RepRap. We made the components required to manufacture the "RepRap SWIM-ER" from the 3D printer and chose a light source. In addition, we produced the P-DN gel for RepRap SWIM-ER and conducted the molding test to confirm whether RepRap SWIM-ER can used it.

  19. Translocation pathway of protein substrates in ClpAP protease

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Beuron, Fabienne; Kessel, Martin; Wickner, Sue; Maurizi, Michael R.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation, which must be tightly controlled to protect normal proteins, is carried out by ATP-dependent proteases. These multicomponent enzymes have chaperone-like ATPases that recognize and unfold protein substrates and deliver them to the proteinase components for digestion. In ClpAP, hexameric rings of the ClpA ATPase stack axially on either face of the ClpP proteinase, which consists of two apposed heptameric rings. We have used cryoelectron microscopy to characterize interactions of ClpAP with the model substrate, bacteriophage P1 protein, RepA. In complexes stabilized by ATPγS, which bind but do not process substrate, RepA dimers are seen at near-axial sites on the distal surface of ClpA. On ATP addition, RepA is translocated through ≈150 Å into the digestion chamber inside ClpP. Little change is observed in ClpAP, implying that translocation proceeds without major reorganization of the ClpA hexamer. When translocation is observed in complexes containing a ClpP mutant whose digestion chamber is already occupied by unprocessed propeptides, a small increase in density is observed within ClpP, and RepA-associated density is also seen at other axial sites. These sites appear to represent intermediate points on the translocation pathway, at which segments of unfolded RepA subunits transiently accumulate en route to the digestion chamber. PMID:11287666

  20. Topology reconstruction for B-Rep modeling from 3D mesh in reverse engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénière, Roseline; Subsol, Gérard; Gesquière, Gilles; Le Breton, François; Puech, William

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, most of the manufactured objects are designed using CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software. Nevertheless, for visualization, data exchange or manufacturing applications, the geometric model has to be discretized into a 3D mesh composed of a finite number of vertices and edges. But, in some cases, the initial model may be lost or unavailable. In other cases, the 3D discrete representation may be modified, for example after a numerical simulation, and does not correspond anymore to the initial model. A reverse engineering method is then required to reconstruct a 3D continuous representation from the discrete one. In previous work, we have presented a new approach for 3D geometric primitive extraction. In this paper, to complete our automatic and comprehensive reverse engineering process, we propose a method to construct the topology of the retrieved object. To reconstruct a B-Rep model, a new formalism is now introduced to define the adjacency relations. Then a new process is used to construct the boundaries of the object. The whole process is tested on 3D industrial meshes and bring a solution to recover B-Rep models.

  1. Drug reps and the academic medical center: a case for management rather than prohibition.

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract:Academic physicians and bioethicists are increasingly voicing objections to "drug rep" detailing. Leaders in academic medical centers are considering proposals to ban the small gifts of detailing within their walls. Such bans would be a mistake, as the small gifts are unlikely to act as bribes and do not create unacceptable conflicts of interest for physicians. Drug rep detailing does influence physician behavior, but this influence has not been shown to be harmful. Calls for a ban are premised on empirical evidence for harm that is inconclusive at best, and emerging literature in economics suggests that detailing may well be socially beneficial. A preponderance of harm over benefit is not, however, the primary source of the animus against detailing, which stems from moral considerations that are independent of its social consequences. However, pharmaceutical advertising, including detailing, is a morally legitimate aspect of the world of medical practice that we in academic medicine ought to be preparing our trainees to encounter and properly sift.

  2. RepExplore: addressing technical replicate variance in proteomics and metabolomics data analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaab, Enrico; Schneider, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput omics datasets often contain technical replicates included to account for technical sources of noise in the measurement process. Although summarizing these replicate measurements by using robust averages may help to reduce the influence of noise on downstream data analysis, the information on the variance across the replicate measurements is lost in the averaging process and therefore typically disregarded in subsequent statistical analyses.We introduce RepExplore, a web-service dedicated to exploit the information captured in the technical replicate variance to provide more reliable and informative differential expression and abundance statistics for omics datasets. The software builds on previously published statistical methods, which have been applied successfully to biomedical omics data but are difficult to use without prior experience in programming or scripting. RepExplore facilitates the analysis by providing a fully automated data processing and interactive ranking tables, whisker plot, heat map and principal component analysis visualizations to interpret omics data and derived statistics. Freely available at http://www.repexplore.tk enrico.glaab@uni.lu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Generation of RGB-D data for SLAM using robotic framework V-REP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, Pavel S.; Gritsenko, Igor S.; Seidakhmet, Askar Zh.; Abduraimov, Azizbek E.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we will present a methodology to debug RGB-D SLAM systems as well as to generate testing data. We have created a model of a laboratory with an area of 250 m2 (25 × 10) with set of objects of different type. V-REP Microsoft Kinect sensor simulation model was used as a basis for robot vision system. Motion path of the sensor model has multiple loops. We have written a program in V-Rep native language Lua to record data array from the Microsoft Kinect sensor model. The array includes both RGB and Depth streams with full resolution (640 × 480) for every 10 cm of the path. The simulated path has absolute accuracy, since it is a simulation, and is represented by an array of transformation matrices (4 × 4). The length of the data array is 1000 steps or 100 m. The path simulates frequently occurring cases in SLAM, including loops. It is worth noting that the path was modeled for a mobile robot and it is represented by a 2D path parallel to the floor at a height of 40 cm.

  4. The REP2 Repeats of the Genome of Neisseria meningitidis Are Associated with Genes Coordinately Regulated during Bacterial Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Morelle, Sandrine; Carbonnelle, Etienne; Nassif, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Interaction with host cells is essential in meningococcal pathogenesis especially at the blood-brain barrier. This step is likely to involve a common regulatory pathway allowing coordinate regulation of genes necessary for the interaction with endothelial cells. The analysis of the genomic sequence of Neisseria meningitidis Z2491 revealed the presence of many repeats. One of these, designated REP2, contains a −24/−12 type promoter and a ribosome binding site 5 to 13 bp before an ATG. In addition most of these REP2 sequences are located immediately upstream of an ORF. Among these REP2-associated genes are pilC1 and crgA, described as being involved in steps essential for the interaction of N. meningitidis with host cells. Furthermore, the REP2 sequences located upstream of pilC1 and crgA correspond to the previously identified promoters known to be induced during the initial localized adhesion of N. meningitidis with human cells. This characteristic led us to hypothesize that at least some of the REP2-associated genes were upregulated under the same circumstances as pilC1 and crgA. Quantitative PCR in real time demonstrated that the expression of 14 out of 16 REP2-associated genes were upregulated during the initial localized adhesion of N. meningitidis. Taken together, these data suggest that these repeats control a set of genes necessary for the efficient interaction of this pathogen with host cells. Subsequent mutational analysis was performed to address the role of these genes during meningococcus-cell interaction. PMID:12670987

  5. Remodelling of human osteoarthritic cartilage by FGF-2, alone or combined with Sox9 via rAAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Kohn, Dieter; Madry, Henning

    2009-08-01

    Compensating for the loss of extracellular cartilage matrix, as well as counteracting the alterations of the chondrocyte phenotype in osteoarthritis are of key importance to develop effective therapeutic strategies against this disorder. In the present study, we analysed the benefits of applying a potent gene combination to remodel human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We employed the promising recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to deliver the mitogenic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) factor, alone or simultaneously with the transcription factor Sox9 as a key activator of matrix synthesis, to human normal and OA articular chondrocytes. We evaluated the effects of single (FGF-2) or combined (FGF-2/SOX9) transgene expression upon the regenerative activities of chondrocytes in three dimensional cultures in vitro and in cartilage explants in situ. Single overexpression of FGF-2 enhanced the survival and proliferation of both normal and OA chondrocytes, without stimulating the matrix synthetic processes in the increased pools of cells. The mitogenic properties of FGF-2 were maintained when SOX9 was co-overexpressed and concomitant with an increase in the production of proteoglycans and type-II collagen, suggesting that the transcription factor was capable of counterbalancing the effects of FGF-2 on matrix accumulation. Also important, expression of type-X collagen, a marker of hypertrophy strongly decreased following treatment by the candidate vectors. Most remarkably, the levels of activities achieved in co-treated human OA cartilage were similar to or higher than those observed in normal cartilage. The present findings show that combined expression of candidate factors in OA cartilage can re-establish key features of normal cartilage and prevent the pathological shift of metabolic homeostasis. These data provide further motivation to develop coupled gene transfer approaches via rAAV for the treatment of human OA.

  6. Rab15 Effector Protein: A Novel Protein for Receptor Recycling from the Endocytic Recycling CompartmentD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Strick, David J.; Elferink, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    Sorting endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment are critical intracellular stores for the rapid recycling of internalized membrane receptors to the cell surface in multiple cell types. However, the molecular mechanisms distinguishing fast receptor recycling from sorting endosomes and slow receptor recycling from the endocytic recycling compartment remain poorly understood. We previously reported that Rab15 differentially regulates transferrin receptor trafficking through sorting endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment, suggesting a role for distinct Rab15-effector interactions at these endocytic compartments. In this study, we identified the novel protein Rab15 effector protein (REP15) as a binding partner for Rab15-GTP. REP15 is compartment specific, colocalizing with Rab15 and Rab11 on the endocytic recycling compartment but not with Rab15, Rab4, or early endosome antigen 1 on sorting endosomes. REP15 interacts directly with Rab15-GTP but not with Rab5 or Rab11. Consistent with its localization, REP15 overexpression and small interfering RNA-mediated depletion inhibited transferrin receptor recycling from the endocytic recycling compartment, without affecting receptor entry into or recycling from sorting endosomes. Our data identify REP15 as a compartment-specific protein for receptor recycling from the endocytic recycling compartment, highlighting that the rapid and slow modes of transferrin receptor recycling are mechanistically distinct pathways. PMID:16195351

  7. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon outside the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, U.S. Rep Dave Weldon (at left) looks at the U.S. Lab, called Destiny. With him are Thomas R. 'Randy' Galloway, with the Space Station Hardware Integration Office, Dana Gartzke, the congressman's chief of staffm and Boeing workers. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, with five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights.

  8. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon outside the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Standing in front of the U.S. Lab, named Destiny, U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (left) thanks Thomas R. 'Randy' Galloway, with the Space Station Hardware Integration Office, for briefing him on the equipment inside the Lab. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, with five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights.

  9. Open-Source Wax RepRap 3-D Printer for Rapid Prototyping Paper-Based Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M; Anzalone, N C; Heldt, C L

    2016-08-01

    The open-source release of self-replicating rapid prototypers (RepRaps) has created a rich opportunity for low-cost distributed digital fabrication of complex 3-D objects such as scientific equipment. For example, 3-D printable reactionware devices offer the opportunity to combine open hardware microfluidic handling with lab-on-a-chip reactionware to radically reduce costs and increase the number and complexity of microfluidic applications. To further drive down the cost while improving the performance of lab-on-a-chip paper-based microfluidic prototyping, this study reports on the development of a RepRap upgrade capable of converting a Prusa Mendel RepRap into a wax 3-D printer for paper-based microfluidic applications. An open-source hardware approach is used to demonstrate a 3-D printable upgrade for the 3-D printer, which combines a heated syringe pump with the RepRap/Arduino 3-D control. The bill of materials, designs, basic assembly, and use instructions are provided, along with a completely free and open-source software tool chain. The open-source hardware device described here accelerates the potential of the nascent field of electrochemical detection combined with paper-based microfluidics by dropping the marginal cost of prototyping to nearly zero while accelerating the turnover between paper-based microfluidic designs. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Improvement of the Cramer classification for oral exposure using the database TTC RepDose - A strategy description

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present report describes a strategy to refine the current Cramer classification of the TTC concept using a broad database (DB) termed TTC RepDose. Cramer classes 1-3 overlap to some extent, indicating a need for a better separation of structural classes likely to be toxic, mo...

  11. A sequence of basic residues in the porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein is crucial for its co-expression and co-localization with the replication protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Van Renne, Nicolaas; Liu, Changming; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) encodes two major proteins: the replication protein (Rep) and the capsid protein (Cap). Cap displays a conserved stretch of basic residues situated on the inside of the capsid, whose role is so far unknown. We used a reverse-genetics approach to investigate its function and found that mutations in these amino acids hindered Cap mRNA translation and hampered Cap/Rep co-localization, yielding unfit viruses. Intriguingly, co-transfection with a WT PCV2 of a different genotype partially rescued mutant Cap expression, showing the importance of this basic pattern for efficient translation of Cap mRNA into protein. Our results show that Cap and Rep are expressed independently of each other, and that this amino acid sequence of Cap is vital for virus propagation. This study provides a method for studying unfit PCV2 virions and offers new insights into the intracellular modus vivendi of PCV2.

  12. Systemic Gene Transfer of a Hexosaminidase Variant Using an scAAV9.47 Vector Corrects GM2 Gangliosidosis in Sandhoff Mice.

    PubMed

    Osmon, Karlaina J L; Woodley, Evan; Thompson, Patrick; Ong, Katalina; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Keimel, John G; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S

    2016-07-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme deficiency. There is currently no cure. HexA is composed of two similar, nonidentical subunits, α and β, which must interact with the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), a substrate-specific cofactor, to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. Mutations in either subunit or the activator can result in the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside within neurons throughout the central nervous system. The resulting neuronal cell death induces the primary symptoms of the disease: motor impairment, seizures, and sensory impairments. This study assesses the long-term effects of gene transfer in a Sandhoff (β-subunit knockout) mouse model. The study utilized a modified human β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (μ-subunit) that contains critical sequences from the β-subunit that enables formation of a stable homodimer (HexM) and interaction with GM2AP to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. We investigated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (scAAV) vector expressing HexM, through intravenous injections of the neonatal mice. We monitored one cohort for 8 weeks and another cohort long-term for survival benefit, behavioral, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Untreated Sandhoff disease (SD) control mice reached a humane endpoint at approximately 15 weeks, whereas treated mice had a median survival age of 40 weeks, an approximate 2.5-fold survival advantage. On behavioral tests, the treated mice outperformed their knockout age-matched controls and perform similarly to the heterozygous controls. Through the enzymatic and GM2 ganglioside analyses, we observed a significant decrease in the GM2 ganglioside level, even though the enzyme levels were not significantly increased. Molecular analyses revealed a global distribution of the vector between brain and spinal cord regions. In conclusion, the neonatal delivery of a novel viral vector expressing the human HexM enzyme is effective in ameliorating the SD

  13. scAAV-Mediated IL-1Ra gene delivery for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: Test of Efficacy in an Equine Model.

    PubMed

    Watson Levings, Rachael; Smith, Andrew D; Broome, Ted A; Rice, Brett L; Gibbs, Eric P; Myara, D Alex; Hyddmark, Viktoria; Nasri, Elham; Zarezadeh, Ali; Levings, Padraic P; Lu, Yuan; Dacanay, E Anthony; Foremny, Gregory B; Evans, Christopher H; Morton, Alison J; Winter, Mathew; Dark, Michael J; Nickerson, David M; Colahan, Patrick T; Ghivizzani, Steven Craig

    2018-06-05

    We are investigating self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) as a vector for intra-articular gene-delivery of IL-1Ra, and its therapeutic capacity in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). To model gene-transfer on a scale proportional to the human knee, a frequent site of OA incidence, we focused our studies on the joints of the equine forelimb. Using AAV2.5 capsid and equine IL-1Ra as a homologous transgene, we previously identified a functional ceiling dose of ~5 x 1012 viral genomes, which elevated the steady state levels of eqIL-1Ra in synovial fluids by more than 40-fold over endogenous production for at least 6 months. Here, using an osteochondral fragmentation model of early OA, we examined the functional capacity of scAAV.IL-1Ra gene-delivery in equine joints over a period of 12 weeks. In the disease model, transgenic eqIL-1Ra expression was several-fold higher than seen previously in healthy joints, and correlated directly with the severity of joint pathology at the time of treatment. Despite wide variation in expression, the steady-state eqIL-1Ra in synovial fluids exceeded that of IL-1 by > 400-fold in all animals, and a consistent treatment effect was observed. This included a 30-40% reduction in lameness and ~25% improvement in total joint pathology by both MRI and arthroscopic assessments, which included reduced joint effusion and synovitis, and improved repair of the osteochondral lesion. No vector-related increase in eqIL-1Ra levels in blood or urine was noted. Cumulatively our studies in the equine model indicate scAAV.IL-1Ra administration is reasonably safe and capable of sustained therapeutic IL-1Ra production intra-articularly in joints of human scale. This profile supports consideration for human testing in OA.

  14. Intracellular generation of single-strand template increases the knock-in efficiency by combining CRISPR/Cas9 with AAV.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Min, Taishan; Ma, Shuangping; Hu, Lingna; Chen, Hongyan; Lu, Daru

    2018-04-18

    Targeted integration of transgenes facilitates functional genomic research and holds prospect for gene therapy. The established microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ)-based strategy leads to the precise gene knock-in with easily constructed donor, yet the limited efficiency remains to be further improved. Here, we show that single-strand DNA (ssDNA) donor contributes to efficient increase of knock-in efficiency and establishes a method to achieve the intracellular linearization of long ssDNA donor. We identified that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is responsible for breaking double-strand DNA (dsDNA) of palindromic structure in inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) region of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV), leading to the inhibition of viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Combing Cas9 plasmids targeting genome and ITR with AAV donor delivery, the precise knock-in of gene cassette was achieved, with 13-14% of the donor insertion events being mediated by MMEJ in HEK 293T cells. This study describes a novel method to integrate large single-strand transgene cassettes into the genomes, increasing knock-in efficiency by 13.6-19.5-fold relative to conventional AAV-mediated method. It also provides a comprehensive solution to the challenges of complicated production and difficult delivery with large exogenous fragments.

  15. Therapeutic Antiviral Effect of the Nucleic Acid Polymer REP 2055 against Persistent Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Faseeha; Scougall, Catherine A.; Grosse, Arend; Qiao, Qiao; Ajilian, Behzad B.; Reaiche-Miller, Georget; Finnie, John; Werner, Melanie; Broering, Ruth; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Vaillant, Andrew; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) have both entry and post-entry inhibitory activity against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. The inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs prevented DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes in vitro and protected ducks from DHBV infection in vivo and did not result from direct activation of the immune response. In the current study treatment of primary human hepatocytes with NAP REP 2055 did not induce expression of the TNF, IL6, IL10, IFNA4 or IFNB1 genes, confirming the lack of direct immunostimulation by REP 2055. Ducks with persistent DHBV infection were treated with NAP 2055 to determine if the post-entry inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs could provide a therapeutic effect against established DHBV infection in vivo. In all REP 2055-treated ducks, 28 days of treatment lead to initial rapid reductions in serum DHBsAg and DHBV DNA and increases in anti-DHBs antibodies. After treatment, 6/11 ducks experienced a sustained virologic response: DHBsAg and DHBV DNA remained at low or undetectable levels in the serum and no DHBsAg or DHBV core antigen positive hepatocytes and only trace amounts of DHBV total and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) were detected in the liver at 9 or 16 weeks of follow-up. In the remaining 5/11 REP 2055-treated ducks, all markers of DHBV infection rapidly rebounded after treatment withdrawal: At 9 and 16 weeks of follow-up, levels of DHBsAg and DHBcAg and DHBV total and cccDNA in the liver had rebounded and matched levels observed in the control ducks treated with normal saline which remained persistently infected with DHBV. These data demonstrate that treatment with the NAP REP 2055 can lead to sustained control of persistent DHBV infection. These effects may be related to the unique ability of REP 2055 to block release of DHBsAg from infected hepatocytes. PMID:26560490

  16. Intrinsically disordered proteins as molecular shields†

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortee, Sohini; Tripathi, Rashmi; Watson, Matthew; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Kurniawan, Davy P.; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Wise, Michael J.; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The broad family of LEA proteins are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) with several potential roles in desiccation tolerance, or anhydrobiosis, one of which is to limit desiccation-induced aggregation of cellular proteins. We show here that this activity, termed molecular shield function, is distinct from that of a classical molecular chaperone, such as HSP70 – while HSP70 reduces aggregation of citrate synthase (CS) on heating, two LEA proteins, a nematode group 3 protein, AavLEA1, and a plant group 1 protein, Em, do not; conversely, the LEA proteins reduce CS aggregation on desiccation, while HSP70 lacks this ability. There are also differences in interaction with client proteins – HSP70 can be co-immunoprecipitated with a polyglutamine-containing client, consistent with tight complex formation, whereas the LEA proteins can not, although a loose interaction is observed by Förster resonance energy transfer. In a further exploration of molecular shield function, we demonstrate that synthetic polysaccharides, like LEA proteins, are able to reduce desiccation-induced aggregation of a water-soluble proteome, consistent with a steric interference model of anti-aggregation activity. If molecular shields operate by reducing intermolecular cohesion rates, they should not protect against intramolecular protein damage. This was tested using the monomeric red fluorescent protein, mCherry, which does not undergo aggregation on drying, but the absorbance and emission spectra of its intrinsic fluorophore are dramatically reduced, indicative of intramolecular conformational changes. As expected, these changes are not prevented by AavLEA1, except for a slight protection at high molar ratios, and an AavLEA1-mCherry fusion protein is damaged to the same extent as mCherry alone. A recent hypothesis proposed that proteomes from desiccation-tolerant species contain a higher degree of disorder than intolerant examples, and that this might provide greater intrinsic stability

  17. Intrinsically disordered proteins as molecular shields.

    PubMed

    Chakrabortee, Sohini; Tripathi, Rashmi; Watson, Matthew; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Kurniawan, Davy P; Kaminski, Clemens F; Wise, Michael J; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The broad family of LEA proteins are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) with several potential roles in desiccation tolerance, or anhydrobiosis, one of which is to limit desiccation-induced aggregation of cellular proteins. We show here that this activity, termed molecular shield function, is distinct from that of a classical molecular chaperone, such as HSP70 - while HSP70 reduces aggregation of citrate synthase (CS) on heating, two LEA proteins, a nematode group 3 protein, AavLEA1, and a plant group 1 protein, Em, do not; conversely, the LEA proteins reduce CS aggregation on desiccation, while HSP70 lacks this ability. There are also differences in interaction with client proteins - HSP70 can be co-immunoprecipitated with a polyglutamine-containing client, consistent with tight complex formation, whereas the LEA proteins can not, although a loose interaction is observed by Förster resonance energy transfer. In a further exploration of molecular shield function, we demonstrate that synthetic polysaccharides, like LEA proteins, are able to reduce desiccation-induced aggregation of a water-soluble proteome, consistent with a steric interference model of anti-aggregation activity. If molecular shields operate by reducing intermolecular cohesion rates, they should not protect against intramolecular protein damage. This was tested using the monomeric red fluorescent protein, mCherry, which does not undergo aggregation on drying, but the absorbance and emission spectra of its intrinsic fluorophore are dramatically reduced, indicative of intramolecular conformational changes. As expected, these changes are not prevented by AavLEA1, except for a slight protection at high molar ratios, and an AavLEA1-mCherry fusion protein is damaged to the same extent as mCherry alone. A recent hypothesis proposed that proteomes from desiccation-tolerant species contain a higher degree of disorder than intolerant examples, and that this might provide greater intrinsic stability

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a press conference, U.S. Rep. Tom Feeney responds to a question from a reporter about the new mission for NASA outlined by President George W. Bush Jan. 14. Present with Feeney are Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) and U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (right).

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a press conference, U.S. Rep. Tom Feeney responds to a question from a reporter about the new mission for NASA outlined by President George W. Bush Jan. 14. Present with Feeney are Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) and U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (right).

  19. Rosuvastatin Attenuates the Elevation in Blood Pressure Induced by Overexpression of Human C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuguang; Yang, Guangtian; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wang, Dao Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies demonstrated that C-reactive protein (CRP) acts as an inflammatory factor to induce endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in rats. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins suggest that they may attenuate CRP-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Methods Male SD rats were injected with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to induce overexpression of human CRP (AAV-hCRP) or GFP control (AAV-GFP). Two months after injection, rats were administered rosuvastatin by daily oral gavage (10 mg/kg) for two additional months. Blood pressure was monitored, serum hCRP concentrations were assessed by ELISA, and vascular levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), PI3K/Akt, Rho kinase, angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor, MAPK, SOD-1, and NADPH oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Results Rosuvastatin administration attenuated the increased blood pressure and loss of vascular eNOS expression in AAV-hCRP-treated rats. Rosuvastatin also activated PI3K/Akt, inhibited Rho kinase activity, and downregulated the AT1 receptor expression in aorta. Rosuvastatin reduced production of ROS through downregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22 phox and gp91 phox, and upregulation of SOD-1 expression. Conclusions Rosuvastatin attenuated the increase in blood pressure in AAV-hCRP-treated rats through endothelial protection and antioxidant effects. Our data reveals a novel mechanism through which statins may lower blood pressure and suggests the potential use of statins in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:21562509

  20. High-resolution observations in the western Mediterranean Sea: the REP14-MED experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Reiner; Fiekas, Heinz-Volker; Beguery, Laurent; Borrione, Ines; Funk, Andreas; Hemming, Michael; Hernandez-Lasheras, Jaime; Heywood, Karen J.; Kaiser, Jan; Knoll, Michaela; Mourre, Baptiste; Oddo, Paolo; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Queste, Bastien Y.; Russo, Aniello; Shitashima, Kiminori; Siderius, Martin; Thorp Küsel, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    The observational part of the REP14-MED experiment was conducted in June 2014 in the Sardo-Balearic Basin west of Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea). Two research vessels collected high-resolution oceanographic data by means of hydrographic casts, towed systems, and underway measurements. In addition, a vast amount of data was provided by a fleet of 11 ocean gliders, time series were available from moored instruments, and information on Lagrangian flow patterns was obtained from surface drifters and one profiling float. The spatial resolution of the observations encompasses a spectrum over 4 orders of magnitude from 𝒪(101 m) to 𝒪(105 m), and the time series from the moored instruments cover a spectral range of 5 orders from 𝒪(101 s) to 𝒪(106 s). The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the huge data set which has been utilised by various studies, focusing on (i) water masses and circulation, (ii) operational forecasting, (iii) data assimilation, (iv) variability of the ocean, and (v) new payloads for gliders.

  1. Evolutionary Origin of OwlRep, a Megasatellite DNA Associated with Adaptation of Owl Monkeys to Nocturnal Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Stanyon, Roscoe; Kusumi, Junko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rod cells of many nocturnal mammals have a “non-standard” nuclear architecture, which is called the inverted nuclear architecture. Heterochromatin localizes to the central region of the nucleus. This leads to an efficient light transmission to the outer segments of photoreceptors. Rod cells of diurnal mammals have the conventional nuclear architecture. Owl monkeys (genus Aotus) are the only taxon of simian primates that has a nocturnal or cathemeral lifestyle, and this adaptation is widely thought to be secondary. Their rod cells were shown to exhibit an intermediate chromatin distribution: a spherical heterochromatin block was found in the central region of the nucleus although it was less complete than that of typical nocturnal mammals. We recently demonstrated that the primary DNA component of this heterochromatin block was OwlRep, a megasatellite DNA consisting of 187-bp-long repeat units. However, the origin of OwlRep was not known. Here we show that OwlRep was derived from HSAT6, a simple repeat sequence found in the centromere regions of human chromosomes. HSAT6 occurs widely in primates, suggesting that it was already present in the last common ancestor of extant primates. Notably, Strepsirrhini and Tarsiformes apparently carry a single HSAT6 copy, whereas many species of Simiiformes contain multiple copies. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of these copies revealed the entire process of the OwlRep formation. HSAT6, with or without flanking sequences, was segmentally duplicated in New World monkeys. Then, in the owl monkey linage after its divergence from other New World monkeys, a copy of HSAT6 was tandemly amplified, eventually forming a megasatellite DNA. PMID:29294004

  2. Adeno-associated virus vectors can be efficiently produced without helper virus.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, T; Elliger, S; Elliger, C; Podsakoff, G; Villarreal, L; Kurtzman, G J; Iwaki, Y; Colosi, P

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an efficient method for the production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the absence of helper virus. The adenovirus regions that mediate AAV vector replication were identified and assembled into a helper plasmid. These included the VA, E2A and E4 regions. When this helper plasmid was cotransfected into 293 cells, along with plasmids encoding the AAV vector, and rep and cap genes, AAV vector was produced as efficiently as when using adenovirus infection as a source of help. CMV-driven constructs expressing the E4orf6 and the 72-M(r), E2A proteins were able to functionally replace the E4 and E2A regions, respectively. Therefore the minimum set of genes required to produce AAV helper activity equivalent to that provided by adenovirus infection consists of, or is a subset of, the following genes: the E4orf6 gene, the 72-M(r), E2A protein gene, the VA RNA genes and the E1 region. AAV vector preparations made with adenovirus and by the helper virus-free method were essentially indistinguishable with respect to particle density, particle to infectivity ratio, capsimer ratio and efficiency of muscle transduction in vivo. Only AAV vector preparations made by the helper virus-free method were not reactive with anti-adenovirus sera.

  3. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease by Delivery of an Adeno-Associated Virus Encoding a Monoclonal Antibody Targeting the Amyloid Beta Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Masaru; Abe, Shinya; Takahashi, Toru; Shiozaki, Kazumasa; Okuda, Mitsue; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Klinman, Dennis M.; Ozawa, Keiya; Okuda, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported on a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that targeted amyloid beta (Aß) protein. Repeated injection of that mAb reduced the accumulation of Aß protein in the brain of human Aß transgenic mice (Tg2576). In the present study, cDNA encoding the heavy and light chains of this mAb were subcloned into an adeno-associated virus type 1 (AAV) vector with a 2A/furin adapter. A single intramuscular injection of 3.0×1010 viral genome of these AAV vectors into C57BL/6 mice generated serum anti-Aß Ab levels up to 0.3 mg/ml. Anti-Aß Ab levels in excess of 0.1 mg/ml were maintained for up to 64 weeks. The effect of AAV administration on Aß levels in vivo was examined. A significant decrease in Aß levels in the brain of Tg2576 mice treated at 5 months (prophylactic) or 10 months (therapeutic) of age was observed. These results support the use of AAV vector encoding anti-Aß Ab for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23555563

  4. AAV-dominant negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF) gene transfer to the striatum does not rescue medium spiny neurons in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Alto, Laura Taylor; Chen, Xi; Ruhn, Kelly A; Treviño, Isaac; Tansey, Malú G

    2014-01-01

    CNS inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies suggest that the inflammatory response may contribute to neuronal demise. In particular, increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling is implicated in the pathology of both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown that localized gene delivery of dominant negative TNF to the degenerating brain region can limit pathology in animal models of PD and AD. TNF is upregulated in Huntington's disease (HD), like in PD and AD, but it is unknown whether TNF signaling contributes to neuronal degeneration in HD. We used in vivo gene delivery to test whether selective reduction of soluble TNF signaling could attenuate medium spiny neuron (MSN) degeneration in the YAC128 transgenic (TG) mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). AAV vectors encoding cDNA for dominant-negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF) or GFP (control) were injected into the striatum of young adult wild type WT and YAC128 TG mice and achieved 30-50% target coverage. Expression of dominant negative TNF protein was confirmed immunohistologically and biochemically and was maintained as mice aged to one year, but declined significantly over time. However, the extent of striatal DN-TNF gene transfer achieved in our studies was not sufficient to achieve robust effects on neuroinflammation, rescue degenerating MSNs or improve motor function in treated mice. Our findings suggest that alternative drug delivery strategies should be explored to determine whether greater target coverage by DN-TNF protein might afford some level of neuroprotection against HD-like pathology and/or that soluble TNF signaling may not be the primary driver of striatal neuroinflammation and MSN loss in YAC128 TG mice.

  5. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  6. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. AAV-Mediated Administration of Myostatin Pro-Peptide Mutant in Adult Ldlr Null Mice Reduces Diet-Induced Hepatosteatosis and Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen; Wong, Siu; Bhasin, Shalender

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disruption of myostatin or its related signaling is known to cause strong protection against diet-induced metabolic disorders. The translational value of these prior findings, however, is dependent on whether such metabolically favorable phenotype can be reproduced when myostatin blockade begins at an adult age. Here, we reported that AAV-mediated delivery of a myostatin pro-peptide D76A mutant in adult mice attenuates the development of hepatic steatosis and arteriosclerosis, two common diet-induced metabolic diseases. A single dose of AAV-D76A in adult Ldlr null mice resulted in sustained expression of myostatin pro-peptide in the liver. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, D76A-treated mice gained similar amount of lean and fat mass when fed a high fat diet. However, D76A-treated mice displayed significantly reduced aortic lesions and liver fat, in association with a reduction in hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and improvement in liver insulin sensitivity. This suggests that muscle and fat may not be the primary targets of treatment under our experimental condition. In support to this argument, we show that myostatin directly up-regulated lipogenic genes and increased fat accumulation in cultured liver cells. We also show that both myostatin and its receptor were abundantly expressed in mouse aorta. Cultured aortic endothelial cells responded to myostatin with a reduction in eNOS phosphorylation and an increase in ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Conclusions: AAV-mediated expression of myostatin pro-peptide D76A mutant in adult Ldlr null mice sustained metabolic protection without remarkable impacts on body lean and fat mass. Further investigations are needed to determine whether direct impact of myostatin on liver and aortic endothelium may contribute to the related metabolic phenotypes. PMID:23936482

  8. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrés F.

    2012-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination.—Bortolussi, G., Zentilin, L., Baj, G., Giraudi, P., Bellarosa, C., Giacca, M., Tiribelli, C., Muro, A. F. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer. PMID:22094718

  9. A Novel Method Combining Vitreous Aspiration and Intravitreal AAV2/8 Injection Results in Retina-Wide Transduction in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Romain; Röger, Carsten; Segelken, Jasmin; Barben, Maya; Grimm, Christian; Neidhardt, John

    2016-10-01

    Gene therapies to treat eye disorders have been extensively studied in the past 20 years. Frequently, adeno-associated viruses were applied to the subretinal or intravitreal space of the eye to transduce retinal cells with nucleotide sequences of therapeutic potential. In this study we describe a novel intravitreal injection procedure that leads to a reproducible adeno-associated virus (AAV)2/8-mediated transduction of more than 70% of the retina. Prior to a single intravitreal injection of a enhanced green fluorescent protien (GFP)-expressing viral suspension, we performed an aspiration of vitreous tissue from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. One and one-half microliters of AAV2/8 suspension was injected. Funduscopy, optical coherence tomography (OCT), laser scanning microscopy of retinal flat mounts, cryosections of eye cups, and ERG recordings verified the efficacy and safety of the method. The combination of vitreous aspiration and intravitreal injection resulted in an almost complete transduction of the retina in approximately 60% of the eyes and showed transduced cells in all retinal layers. Photoreceptors and RPE cells were predominantly transduced. Eyes presented with well-preserved retinal morphology. Electroretinographic recordings suggested that the new combination of techniques did not cause significant alterations of the retinal physiology. We show a novel application technique of AAV2/8 to the vitreous of mice that leads to widespread transduction of the retina. The results of this study have implications for virus-based gene therapies and basic science; for example, they might provide an approach to apply gene replacement strategies or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in vivo. It may further help to develop similar techniques for larger animal models or humans.

  10. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  11. Recirculating cardiac delivery of AAV2/1SERCA2a improves myocardial function in an experimental model of heart failure in large animals.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M J; Power, J M; Preovolos, A; Mariani, J A; Hajjar, R J; Kaye, D M

    2008-12-01

    Abnormal excitation-contraction coupling is a key pathophysiologic component of heart failure (HF), and at a molecular level reduced expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA2a) is a major contributor. Previous studies in small animals have suggested that restoration of SERCA function is beneficial in HF. Despite this promise, the means by which this information might be translated into potential clinical application remains uncertain. Using a recently established cardiac-directed recirculating method of gene delivery, we administered adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2)/1SERCA2a to sheep with pacing-induced HF. We explored the effects of differing doses of AAV2/1SERCA2a (low 1 x 10(10) d.r.p.; medium 1 x 10(12) d.r.p. and high 1 x 10(13) d.r.p.) in conjunction with an intra-coronary delivery group (2.5 x 10(13) d.r.p.). At the end of the study, haemodynamic, echocardiographic, histopathologic and molecular biologic assessments were performed. Cardiac recirculation delivery of AAV2/1SERCA2a elicited a dose-dependent improvement in cardiac performance determined by left ventricular pressure analysis, (+d P/d t(max); low dose -220+/-70, P>0.05; medium dose 125+/-53, P<0.05; high dose 287+/-104, P<0.05) and echocardiographically (fractional shortening: low dose -3+/-2, P>0.05; medium dose 1+/-2, P>0.05; high dose 6.5+/-3.9, P<0.05). In addition to favourable haemodynamic effects, brain natriuretic peptide expression was reduced consistent with reversal of the HF molecular phenotype. In contrast, direct intra-coronary infusion did not elicit any effect on ventricular function. As such, AAV2/1SERCA2a elicits favourable functional and molecular actions when delivered in a mechanically targeted manner in an experimental model of HF. These observations lay a platform for potential clinical translation.

  12. Recombinant AAV8-mediated intrastriatal gene delivery of CDNF protects rats against methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Liu, Wenmo; Feng, Xinyao; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exerts significant neurotoxicity in experimental animals and humans when taken at high doses or abused chronically. Long-term abusers have decreased dopamine levels, and they are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, few medications are available to treat the METH-induced damage of neurons. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been previously shown to reduce the dopamine-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH. However, the effect of cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), which has been reported to be more specific and efficient than GDNF in protecting dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity, in attenuating METH neurotoxicity has not been determined. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CDNF against METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, CDNF protein increased the survival rate and reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) loss of METH-treated PC12 cells. In vivo, METH was administered to rats following human CDNF overexpression mediated by the recombinant adeno-associated virus. Results demonstrated that CDNF overexpression in the brain could attenuate the METH-induced dopamine and TH loss in the striatum but could not lower METH-induced hyperthermia. PMID:28553166

  13. A survey of ex vivo/in vitro transduction efficiency of mammalian primary cells and cell lines with Nine natural adeno-associated virus (AAV1-9) and one engineered adeno-associated virus serotype.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Brian L; Hirsch, Matthew L; Barker, Jenny C; Connelly, Jon P; Steininger, Robert J; Porteus, Matthew H

    2013-03-06

    The ability to deliver a gene of interest into a specific cell type is an essential aspect of biomedical research. Viruses can be a useful tool for this delivery, particularly in difficult to transfect cell types. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a useful gene transfer vector because of its ability to mediate efficient gene transduction in numerous dividing and quiescent cell types, without inducing any known pathogenicity. There are now a number of natural for that designed AAV serotypes that each has a differential ability to infect a variety of cell types. Although transduction studies have been completed, the bulk of the studies have been done in vivo, and there has never been a comprehensive study of transduction ex vivo/in vitro. Each cell type was infected with each serotype at a multiplicity of infection of 100,000 viral genomes/cell and transduction was analyzed by flow cytometry + . We found that AAV1 and AAV6 have the greatest ability to transduce a wide range of cell types, however, for particular cell types, there are specific serotypes that provide optimal transduction. In this work, we describe the transduction efficiency of ten different AAV serotypes in thirty-four different mammalian cell lines and primary cell types. Although these results may not be universal due to numerous factors such as, culture conditions and/ or cell growth rates and cell heterogeneity, these results provide an important and unique resource for investigators who use AAV as an ex vivo gene delivery vector or who work with cells that are difficult to transfect.

  14. A 10-Year Retrospective Comparison of Two Target Sequences, REP-529 and B1, for Toxoplasma gondii Detection by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Belaz, Sorya; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Dupretz, Peggy; Guiguen, Claude

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the repeated sequence REP-529 compared to that of the B1 gene in the molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in routine diagnosis. Over a 10-year period (2003 to 2013), all patients prospectively diagnosed with a positive REP-529 qPCR result for toxoplasmosis were included. All DNA samples (76 samples from 56 patients) were simultaneously tested using the two qPCR methods (REP-529 and B1). The mean cycle threshold (CT) obtained with the B1 qPCR was significantly higher (+4.71 cycles) than that obtained with REP-529 qPCR (P < 0.0001). Thirty-one out of 69 extracts (45.6%) positive with REP-529 qPCR were not amplified with the B1 qPCR (relative sensitivity of 54.4% compared to that with REP-529), yielding false-negative results with 15/28 placenta, 5 cord blood, 2 amniotic fluid, 4 cerebrospinal fluid, 1 aqueous humor, 2 lymph node puncture, and 1 abortion product sample. This defect in sensitivity would have left 20/56 patients undiagnosed, distributed as follows: 12/40 congenital toxoplasmosis, 4/5 cerebral toxoplasmosis, 2/8 patients with retinochoroiditis, and 2 patients with chronic lymphadenopathy. This poor performance of B1 qPCR might be related to low parasite loads, since the mean Toxoplasma quantification in extracts with B1 false-negative results was 0.4 parasite/reaction. These results clearly show the superiority of the REP-529 sequence in the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by PCR and suggest that this target should be adopted as part of the standardization of the PCR assay. PMID:25653416

  15. A 10-year retrospective comparison of two target sequences, REP-529 and B1, for Toxoplasma gondii detection by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Belaz, Sorya; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Dupretz, Peggy; Guiguen, Claude; Robert-Gangneux, Florence

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the repeated sequence REP-529 compared to that of the B1 gene in the molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in routine diagnosis. Over a 10-year period (2003 to 2013), all patients prospectively diagnosed with a positive REP-529 qPCR result for toxoplasmosis were included. All DNA samples (76 samples from 56 patients) were simultaneously tested using the two qPCR methods (REP-529 and B1). The mean cycle threshold (CT) obtained with the B1 qPCR was significantly higher (+4.71 cycles) than that obtained with REP-529 qPCR (P<0.0001). Thirty-one out of 69 extracts (45.6%) positive with REP-529 qPCR were not amplified with the B1 qPCR (relative sensitivity of 54.4% compared to that with REP-529), yielding false-negative results with 15/28 placenta, 5 cord blood, 2 amniotic fluid, 4 cerebrospinal fluid, 1 aqueous humor, 2 lymph node puncture, and 1 abortion product sample. This defect in sensitivity would have left 20/56 patients undiagnosed, distributed as follows: 12/40 congenital toxoplasmosis, 4/5 cerebral toxoplasmosis, 2/8 patients with retinochoroiditis, and 2 patients with chronic lymphadenopathy. This poor performance of B1 qPCR might be related to low parasite loads, since the mean Toxoplasma quantification in extracts with B1 false-negative results was 0.4 parasite/reaction. These results clearly show the superiority of the REP-529 sequence in the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis by PCR and suggest that this target should be adopted as part of the standardization of the PCR assay. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Characterization of intravitreally delivered capsid mutant AAV2-Cre vector to induce tissue-specific mutations in murine retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Langouet-Astrie, Christophe J; Yang, Zhiyong; Polisetti, Sraavya M; Welsbie, Derek S; Hauswirth, William W; Zack, Donald J; Merbs, Shannath L; Enke, Raymond A

    2016-10-01

    Targeted expression of Cre recombinase in murine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by viral vector is an effective strategy for creating tissue-specific gene knockouts for investigation of genetic contribution to RGC degeneration associated with optic neuropathies. Here we characterize dosage, efficacy and toxicity for sufficient intravitreal delivery of a capsid mutant Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector encoding Cre recombinase. Wild type and Rosa26 (R26) LacZ mice were intravitreally injected with capsid mutant AAV2 viral vectors. Murine eyes were harvested at intervals ranging from 2 weeks to 15 weeks post-injection and were assayed for viral transduction, transgene expression and RGC survival. 10(9) vector genomes (vg) were sufficient for effective in vivo targeting of murine ganglion cell layer (GCL) retinal neurons. Transgene expression was observed as early as 2 weeks post-injection of viral vectors and persisted to 11 weeks. Early expression of Cre had no significant effect on RGC survival, while significant RGC loss was detected beginning 5 weeks post-injection. Early expression of viral Cre recombinase was robust, well-tolerated and predominantly found in GCL neurons suggesting this strategy can be effective in short-term RGC-specific mutation studies in experimental glaucoma models such as optic nerve crush and transection experiments. RGC degeneration with Cre expression for more than 4 weeks suggests that Cre toxicity is a limiting factor for targeted mutation strategies in RGCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. AAV2-mediated gene transfer of GDNF to the striatum of MPTP monkeys enhances the survival and outgrowth of co-implanted fetal dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, JD; Redmond, DE; Leranth, C; Bjugstad, KB; Sladek, JR; Collier, TJ; Foti, SB; Samulski, RJ; Vives, KP; Roth, RH

    2009-01-01

    Neural transplantation offers the potential of treating Parkinson’s disease by grafting fetal dopamine neurons to depleted regions of the brain. However, clinical studies of neural grafting in Parkinson’s disease have produced only modest improvements. One of the main reasons for this is the low survival rate of transplanted neurons. The inadequate supply of critical neurotrophic factors in the adult brain is likely to be a major cause of early cell death and restricted outgrowth of fetal grafts placed into the mature striatum. Glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that is crucial to the survival, outgrowth and maintenance of dopamine neurons, and so is a candidate for protecting grafted fetal dopamine neurons in the adult brain. We found that implantation of adeno-associated virus type 2 encoding GDNF (AAV2-GDNF) in the normal monkey caudate nucleus induced over-expression of GDNF that persisted for at least 6 months after injection. In a 6-month within-animal controlled study, AAV2-GDNF enhanced the survival of fetal dopamine neurons by 4-fold, and increased the outgrowth of grafted fetal dopamine neurons by almost 3-fold in the caudate nucleus of MPTP-treated monkeys, compared with control grafts in the other caudate nucleus. Thus, the addition of GDNF gene therapy to neural transplantation may be a useful strategy to improve treatment for Parkinson’s disease. PMID:18346734

  18. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer of the Obesity-Associated Gene Etv5 in Rat Midbrain Does Not Affect Energy Balance or Motivated Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Boender, Arjen J.; Koning, Nivard A.; van den Heuvel, José K.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; van Rozen, Andrea J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have implicated the transcription factor E-twenty- six version 5 (Etv5) in the regulation of body mass index. Further substantiating the role of Etv5 in feeding behavior are the findings that targeted disruption of Etv5 in mice leads to decreased body weight gain and that expression of Etv5 is decreased in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNpc) after food restriction. As Etv5 has been suggested to influence dopaminergic neurotransmission by driving the expression of genes that are responsible for the synthesis and release of dopamine, we investigated if expression levels of Etv5 are dependent on nutritional state and subsequently influence the expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase. While it was shown that Etv5 expression in the VTA/SNpc increases after central administration of leptin and that Etv5 was able to drive expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vitro, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 into the VTA/SNpc of rats did not alter expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vivo. Moreover, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc did not affect measures of energy balance or performances in a progressive ratio schedule. Thus, these data do not support a role for increased expression of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc in the regulation of feeding behavior. PMID:24710089

  19. Effects of AAV-mediated knockdown of nNOS and GPx-1 gene expression in rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Boone, Deborah R; Leek, Jeanna M; Falduto, Michael T; Torres, Karen E O; Sell, Stacy L; Parsley, Margaret A; Cowart, Jeremy C; Uchida, Tatsuo; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; DeWitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S; Hellmich, Helen L

    2017-01-01

    Virally mediated RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down injury-induced genes could improve functional outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, little is known about the consequences of gene knockdown on downstream cell signaling pathways and how RNAi influences neurodegeneration and behavior. Here, we assessed the effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) siRNA vectors that target two genes with opposing roles in TBI pathogenesis: the allegedly detrimental neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the potentially protective glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1). In rat hippocampal progenitor cells, three siRNAs that target different regions of each gene (nNOS, GPx-1) effectively knocked down gene expression. However, in vivo, in our rat model of fluid percussion brain injury, the consequences of AAV-siRNA were variable. One nNOS siRNA vector significantly reduced the number of degenerating hippocampal neurons and showed a tendency to improve working memory. GPx-1 siRNA treatment did not alter TBI-induced neurodegeneration or working memory deficits. Nevertheless, microarray analysis of laser captured, virus-infected neurons showed that knockdown of nNOS or GPx-1 was specific and had broad effects on downstream genes. Since nNOS knockdown only modestly ameliorated TBI-induced working memory deficits, despite widespread genomic changes, manipulating expression levels of single genes may not be sufficient to alter functional outcome after TBI.

  20. Clinical protocol. Gene therapy of Canavan disease: AAV-2 vector for neurosurgical delivery of aspartoacylase gene (ASPA) to the human brain.

    PubMed

    Janson, Christopher; McPhee, Scott; Bilaniuk, Larissa; Haselgrove, John; Testaiuti, Mark; Freese, Andrew; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Shera, David; Hurh, Peter; Rupin, Joan; Saslow, Elizabeth; Goldfarb, Olga; Goldberg, Michael; Larijani, Ghassem; Sharrar, William; Liouterman, Larisa; Camp, Angelique; Kolodny, Edwin; Samulski, Jude; Leone, Paola

    2002-07-20

    This clinical protocol describes virus-based gene transfer for Canavan disease, a childhood leukodystrophy. Canavan disease, also known as Van Bogaert-Bertrand disease, is a monogeneic, autosomal recessive disease in which the gene coding for the enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA) is defective. The lack of functional enzyme leads to an increase in the central nervous system of the substrate molecule, N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), which impairs normal myelination and results in spongiform degeneration of the brain. No effective treatment currently exists; however, virus-based gene transfer has the potential to arrest or reverse the course of this otherwise fatal condition. This procedure involves neurosurgical administration of approximately 900 billion genomic particles (approximately 10 billion infectious particles) of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing the aspartoacylase gene (ASPA) directly to affected regions of the brain in each of 21 patients with Canavan disease. Pre- and post-delivery assessments include a battery of noninvasive biochemical, radiological, and neurological tests. This gene transfer study represents the first clinical use of AAV in the human brain and the first instance of viral gene transfer for a neurodegenerative disease.

  1. AAV liver expression of FIX-Padua prevents and eradicates FIX inhibitor without increasing thrombogenicity in hemophilia B dogs and mice.

    PubMed

    Crudele, Julie M; Finn, Jonathan D; Siner, Joshua I; Martin, Nicholas B; Niemeyer, Glenn P; Zhou, Shangzhen; Mingozzi, Federico; Lothrop, Clinton D; Arruda, Valder R

    2015-03-05

    Emerging successful clinical data on gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector for hemophilia B (HB) showed that the risk of cellular immune response to vector capsid is clearly dose dependent. To decrease the vector dose, we explored AAV-8 (1-3 × 10(12) vg/kg) encoding a hyperfunctional factor IX (FIX-Padua, arginine 338 to leucine) in FIX inhibitor-prone HB dogs. Two naïve HB dogs showed sustained expression of FIX-Padua with an 8- to 12-fold increased specific activity reaching 25% to 40% activity without antibody formation to FIX. A third dog with preexisting FIX inhibitors exhibited a transient anamnestic response (5 Bethesda units) at 2 weeks after vector delivery following by spontaneous eradication of the antibody to FIX by day 70. In this dog, sustained FIX expression reached ∼200% and 30% of activity and antigen levels, respectively. Immune tolerance was confirmed in all dogs after challenges with plasma-derived FIX concentrate. Shortening of the clotting times and lack of bleeding episodes support the phenotypic correction of the severe phenotype, with no clinical or laboratory evidence of risk of thrombosis. Provocative studies in mice showed that FIX-Padua exhibits similar immunogenicity and thrombogenicity compared with FIX wild type. Collectively, these data support the potential translation of gene-based strategies using FIX-Padua for HB. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. rAAV Gene Therapy in a Canavan's Disease Mouse Model Reveals Immune Impairments and an Extended Pathology Beyond the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Schattgen, Stefan A; Frakes, Ashley E; Sikoglu, Elif M; Su, Qin; Li, Jia; Hampton, Thomas G; Denninger, Andrew R; Kirschner, Daniel A; Kaspar, Brian; Matalon, Reuben; Gao, Guangping

    2016-06-01

    Aspartoacylase (AspA) gene mutations cause the pediatric lethal neurodegenerative Canavan disease (CD). There is emerging promise of successful gene therapy for CD using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs). Here, we report an intracerebroventricularly delivered AspA gene therapy regime using three serotypes of rAAVs at a 20-fold reduced dose than previously described in AspA(-/-) mice, a bona-fide mouse model of CD. Interestingly, central nervous system (CNS)-restricted therapy prolonged survival over systemic therapy in CD mice but failed to sustain motor functions seen in systemically treated mice. Importantly, we reveal through histological and functional examination of untreated CD mice that AspA deficiency in peripheral tissues causes morphological and functional abnormalities in this heretofore CNS-defined disorder. We demonstrate for the first time that AspA deficiency, possibly through excessive N-acetyl aspartic acid accumulation, elicits both a peripheral and CNS immune response in CD mice. Our data establish a role for peripheral tissues in CD pathology and serve to aid the development of more efficacious and sustained gene therapy for this disease.

  3. Rapid B-rep model preprocessing for immersogeometric analysis using analytic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglong; Xu, Fei; Hsu, Ming-Chen; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of flow over complex objects have been performed traditionally using fluid-domain meshes that conform to the shape of the object. However, creating shape conforming meshes for complicated geometries like automobiles require extensive geometry preprocessing. This process is usually tedious and requires modifying the geometry, including specialized operations such as defeaturing and filling of small gaps. Hsu et al. (2016) developed a novel immersogeometric fluid-flow method that does not require the generation of a boundary-fitted mesh for the fluid domain. However, their method used the NURBS parameterization of the surfaces for generating the surface quadrature points to enforce the boundary conditions, which required the B-rep model to be converted completely to NURBS before analysis can be performed. This conversion usually leads to poorly parameterized NURBS surfaces and can lead to poorly trimmed or missing surface features. In addition, converting simple geometries such as cylinders to NURBS imposes a performance penalty since these geometries have to be dealt with as rational splines. As a result, the geometry has to be inspected again after conversion to ensure analysis compatibility and can increase the computational cost. In this work, we have extended the immersogeometric method to generate surface quadrature points directly using analytic surfaces. We have developed quadrature rules for all four kinds of analytic surfaces: planes, cones, spheres, and toroids. We have also developed methods for performing adaptive quadrature on trimmed analytic surfaces. Since analytic surfaces have frequently been used for constructing solid models, this method is also faster to generate quadrature points on real-world geometries than using only NURBS surfaces. To assess the accuracy of the proposed method, we perform simulations of a benchmark problem of flow over a torpedo shape made of analytic surfaces and compare those

  4. Whirlin Replacement Restores the Formation of the USH2 Protein Complex in Whirlin Knockout Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhuang; Luo, Ling; Shen, Zuolian; Chiodo, Vince A.; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Hauswirth, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Whirlin is the causative gene for Usher syndrome type IID (USH2D), a condition manifested as both retinitis pigmentosa and congenital deafness. Mutations in this gene cause disruption of the USH2 protein complex composed of USH2A and VLGR1 at the periciliary membrane complex (PMC) in photoreceptors. In this study, the adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated whirlin replacement was evaluated as a treatment option. Methods. Murine whirlin cDNA driven by the human rhodopsin kinase promoter (hRK) was packaged as an AAV2/5 vector and delivered into the whirlin knockout retina through subretinal injection. The efficiency, efficacy, and safety of this treatment were examined using immunofluorescent staining, confocal imaging, immunoelectron microscopy, Western blot analysis, histologic analysis, and electroretinogram. Results. The AAV-mediated whirlin expression started at two weeks, reached its maximum level at 10 weeks, and lasted up to six months post injection. The transgenic whirlin product had a molecular size and an expression level comparable to the wild-type. It was distributed at the PMC in both rod and cone photoreceptors from the central to peripheral retina. Importantly, the transgenic whirlin restored the cellular localization and expression level of both USH2A and VLGR1 and did not cause defects in the retinal histology and function in the whirlin knockout mouse. Conclusions. Whirlin transgene recruits USH2A and VLGR1 to the PMC and is sufficient for the formation of the USH2 protein complex in photoreceptors. The combined hRK and AAV gene delivery system could be an effective gene therapy approach to treat retinal degeneration in USH2D patients. PMID:21212183

  5. Information analysis of sequences that bind the replication initiator RepA | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The tall letters represent the highly conserved bases in DNA binding sites of several prokaryotic repressors and activators. Conservation is strongest where major grooves of the double helical DNA (represented by crests of a cosine wave) face the protein. This shows that conservation analysis alone can be used to predict the face of DNA that contacts the proteins.

  6. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aalbers, Caroline J.; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J. Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). Methods The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Results Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. Conclusions These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of

  7. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, Caroline J; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J

    2015-01-01

    Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of arthritis in patients with RA.

  8. Cas9/sgRNA selective targeting of the P23H Rhodopsin mutant allele for treating retinitis pigmentosa by intravitreal AAV9.PHP.B-based delivery.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Serena G; Luoni, Mirko; Castoldi, Valerio; Massimino, Luca; Cabassi, Tommaso; Angeloni, Debora; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Leocani, Letizia; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Broccoli, Vania

    2018-03-01

    P23H is the most common mutation in the RHODOPSIN (RHO) gene leading to a dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a rod photoreceptor degeneration that invariably causes vision loss. Specific disruption of the disease P23H RHO mutant while preserving the wild-type (WT) functional allele would be an invaluable therapy for this disease. However, various technologies tested in the past failed to achieve effective changes and consequently therapeutic benefits. We validated a CRISPR/Cas9 strategy to specifically inactivate the P23H RHO mutant, while preserving the WT allele in vitro. We, then, translated this approach in vivo by delivering the CRISPR/Cas9 components in murine Rho+/P23H mutant retinae. Targeted retinae presented a high rate of cleavage in the P23H but not WT Rho allele. This gene manipulation was sufficient to slow photoreceptor degeneration and improve retinal functions. To improve the translational potential of our approach, we tested intravitreal delivery of this system by means of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs). To this purpose, the employment of the AAV9-PHP.B resulted the most effective in disrupting the P23H Rho mutant. Finally, this approach was translated successfully in human cells engineered with the homozygous P23H RHO gene mutation. Overall, this is a significant proof-of-concept that gene allele specific targeting by CRISPR/Cas9 technology is specific and efficient and represents an unprecedented tool for treating RP and more broadly dominant genetic human disorders affecting the eye, as well as other tissues.

  9. The behavioural and neuropathological impact of intranigral AAV-α-synuclein is exacerbated by systemic infusion of the Parkinson's disease-associated pesticide, rotenone, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Pádraig; O'Doherty, Aideen; Paucard, Alexia; O'Brien, Timothy; Kirik, Deniz; Dowd, Eilís

    2013-04-15

    Despite the widely held belief that Parkinson's disease is caused by both underlying genetics and exposure to environmental risk factors, it is still widely modelled in preclinical models using a single genetic or neurotoxic insult. This single-insult approach has resulted in a variety of models that are limited with respect to their aetiological, construct, face and/or predictive validity. Thus, the aim of the current study was to investigate the interplay between genes and the environment as an alternative approach to modelling Parkinson's disease. To do so, rats underwent stereotaxic surgery for unilateral delivery of the Parkinson's disease-associated gene, α-synuclein, into the substantia nigra (using AAV vectors). This was followed 13 weeks later by subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump delivering the Parkinson's disease-associated pesticide, rotenone (2.5mgkg(-1)day(-1) for 4 weeks). The effect of the genetic and environmental insults alone or in combination on lateralised motor performance (Corridor, Stepping and Whisker Tests), nigrostriatal integrity (tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry) and α-synucleinopathy (α-synuclein immunohistochemistry) was assessed. We found that exposing AAV-α-synuclein-treated rats to rotenone led to a model in which the classical Parkinson's disease triad of progressive motor dysfunction, nigrostriatal neurodegeneration and α-synucleinopathy was evident. However, delivering rotenone systemically was also associated with bilateral motor dysfunction and loss of body weight. Thus, although we have shown that Parkinson's disease can be modelled in experimental animals by combined exposure to both genetic and environmental risk factors, this approach is limited by systemic toxicity of the pesticide rotenone. Direct intracerebral delivery of rotenone may be more useful in longer-term studies as we have previously shown that it overcomes this limitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective genetic modification and differentiation of hMSCs upon controlled release of rAAV vectors using alginate/poloxamer composite systems.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; Rey-Rico, A; Madry, H; Landin, M; Cucchiarini, M

    2015-12-30

    Viral vectors are common tools in gene therapy to deliver foreign therapeutic sequences in a specific target population via their natural cellular entry mechanisms. Incorporating such vectors in implantable systems may provide strong alternatives to conventional gene transfer procedures. The goal of the present study was to generate different hydrogel structures based on alginate (AlgPH155) and poloxamer PF127 as new systems to encapsulate and release recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors. Inclusion of rAAV in such polymeric capsules revealed an influence of the hydrogel composition and crosslinking temperature upon the vector release profiles, with alginate (AlgPH155) structures showing the fastest release profiles early on while over time vector release was more effective from AlgPH155+PF127 [H] capsules crosslinked at a high temperature (50°C). Systems prepared at room temperature (AlgPH155+PF127 [C]) allowed instead to achieve a more controlled release profile. When tested for their ability to target human mesenchymal stem cells, the different systems led to high transduction efficiencies over time and to gene expression levels in the range of those achieved upon direct vector application, especially when using AlgPH155+PF127 [H]. No detrimental effects were reported on either cell viability or on the potential for chondrogenic differentiation. Inclusion of PF127 in the capsules was also capable of delaying undesirable hypertrophic cell differentiation. These findings are of promising value for the further development of viral vector controlled release strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon looks at the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, Thomas R. 'Randy' Galloway, with the Space Station Hardware Integration Office, points out a feature to U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (right) in the U.S. Lab, called 'Destiny.' In the far background is Dana Gartzke, the congressman's chief of staff. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, with five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights.

  12. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon looks at the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (center) and his chief of staff Dana Gartzke (second from left) get a close-up look at the interior of the U.S. Lab, called 'Destiny.' Thomas R. 'Randy' Galloway (second from right), with the Space Station Hardware Integration Office, helps with their familiarization of the equipment. They are joined (far left and right) by workers from Boeing. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, with five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights.

  13. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon looks at the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (center) looks over the U.S. Laboratory, called 'Destiny,' with a group of Boeing workers. Behind (left) the congressman is Dana Gartzke, the congressman's chief of staff. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny, which will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, will have five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000.

  14. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon looks at the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the cockpit of the orbiter Atlantis, which is in the Orbiter Processing Facility, Laural Patrick (left), a systems engineer with MEDS, points out a feature of the newly installed Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS), known as the 'glass cockpit,' to U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon. The congressman is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. He was in Palmdale, Calif., when Atlantis underwent the modification and he wanted to see the final product. The full-color, flat-panel MEDS upgrade improves crew/orbiter interaction with easy-to-read, graphic portrayals of key flight indicators like attitude display and mach speed. The installation makes Atlantis the most modern orbiter in the fleet and equals the systems on current commercial jet airliners and military aircraft. Atlantis is scheduled to fly on mission STS- 101 in early December.

  15. U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon looks at the U.S. Lab Destiny in the SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the U.S. Lab, called 'Destiny,' which is in the Space Station Processing Facility, U.S. Rep. Dave Weldon (right) looks over equipment. In the background (center) is Thomas R. 'Randy' Galloway, with the Space Station Hardware Integration Office. Weldon is on the House Science Committee and vice chairman of the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee. Destiny is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the ISS, with five equipment racks aboard to provide essential functions for station systems, including high data-rate communications, and to maintain the station's orientation using control gyroscopes launched earlier. Additional equipment and research racks will be installed in the laboratory on subsequent Shuttle flights.

  16. repDNA: a Python package to generate various modes of feature vectors for DNA sequences by incorporating user-defined physicochemical properties and sequence-order effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Fule; Fang, Longyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-04-15

    In order to develop powerful computational predictors for identifying the biological features or attributes of DNAs, one of the most challenging problems is to find a suitable approach to effectively represent the DNA sequences. To facilitate the studies of DNAs and nucleotides, we developed a Python package called representations of DNAs (repDNA) for generating the widely used features reflecting the physicochemical properties and sequence-order effects of DNAs and nucleotides. There are three feature groups composed of 15 features. The first group calculates three nucleic acid composition features describing the local sequence information by means of kmers; the second group calculates six autocorrelation features describing the level of correlation between two oligonucleotides along a DNA sequence in terms of their specific physicochemical properties; the third group calculates six pseudo nucleotide composition features, which can be used to represent a DNA sequence with a discrete model or vector yet still keep considerable sequence-order information via the physicochemical properties of its constituent oligonucleotides. In addition, these features can be easily calculated based on both the built-in and user-defined properties via using repDNA. The repDNA Python package is freely accessible to the public at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/repDNA/. bliu@insun.hit.edu.cn or kcchou@gordonlifescience.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Direct Application of Rep-PCR on Type I Sourdough Matrix to Monitor the Dominance and Persistence of a Lactobacillus plantarum Starter Throughout Back-Slopping.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2017-08-01

    This study describes the optimization and application of repetitive element-PCR (rep-PCR) technique directly on microbial DNA extracted from type I sourdoughs for fast monitoring of a Lb. plantarum starter strain (P1FMC) throughout daily back-slopping. The challenge was to follow and study the performance of a starter culture directly in sourdoughs without cultivation on selective media. The extraction of good quality microbial DNA suitable for amplification from a complex matrix such as dough was the first target. In addition, the objective to obtain a clear rep-PCR profile referable to a specific starter strain among a microbial community was pursued. Co-inoculum trials, in flour matrix, with Lb. plantarum P1FMC and L. lactis LC71 strains and, subsequently, type I sourdough back-slopping trials were performed. The rep-PCR amplification profiles obtained were clearly referable to that of Lb. plantarum P1FMC starter in both co-inoculum trials (also when it was present with one order of magnitude less with respect to L. lactis LC71) and back-slopping trials where it dominated the fermentation process with loads of 10 8 cfu g -1 and prevailed on the autochthonous microbiota. Thus, the approach proposed in this paper could be considered a methodological advancement, based on a culture-independent one-step rep-PCR, suitable for fast monitoring of starter performance. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Utilisation of Rep-PCR to track microbes in aerosols collected adjacent to their source, a saline lake in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Munday, Chris I; O'Loingsigh, Tadhg; Tapper, Nigel J; De Deckker, Patrick; Allison, Gwen E

    2013-04-15

    Dust storms are a major source of aerosolized bacteria, especially in the drought conditions experienced in Australia in the decade to 2009. The major aims of this project were to identify the culturable bacteria in environmental samples and to genetically fingerprint all isolates using repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR) to investigate the possibility of tracking isolates from their source into the atmosphere. Four field trips were conducted to a dry lake in western Victoria, Australia to sample aerosols and sediments. Aerosols were collected at heights up to 150 m using vacuum pumps with filters attached to a tethered helium balloon, while corresponding sediments were collected in sterile polypropylene tubes. Isolates were cultivated on Tryptic Soy Agar, R2 Agar and Marine Agar, and grown in dark conditions at ambient temperature. By sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of 270 isolates, fifteen different bacterial families were identified, with both the aerosols and sediments dominated by the Bacillaceae family. Four sets of Rep-PCR primers were tested, with the ERIC and (GTG)5 primers proving to be the most suitable for fingerprinting the cultured taxa. Rep-PCR revealed very high strain diversity in the samples collected, however some strains were still able to be tracked from sediments up to 150 m in height. This shows the potential of Rep-PCR, however very large reference databases would be required for the technique to be more useful. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Note on ;New Hierarchies of Integrable Lattice Equations and Associated Properties: Darboux Transformation Conservation Laws and Integrable Coupling; [Rep. Math. Phys. 67 (2011), 259

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Xiang

    2016-12-01

    We prove that two new hierarchies of integrable lattice equations in [Rep. Math. Phys.67 (2011), 259] can be respectively changed into the famous relativistic Toda lattice hierarchies in the polynomial and the rational forms by means of a simple transformation.

  20. Protein-anchoring therapy to target extracellular matrix proteins to their physiological destinations.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji

    2018-02-20

    Endplate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency is a form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) caused by mutations in COLQ, which encodes collagen Q (ColQ). ColQ is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that anchors AChE to the synaptic basal lamina. Biglycan, encoded by BGN, is another ECM protein that binds to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) on skeletal muscle, which links the actin cytoskeleton and ECM proteins to stabilize the sarcolemma during repeated muscle contractions. Upregulation of biglycan stabilizes the DPAC. Gene therapy can potentially ameliorate any disease that can be recapitulated in cultured cells. However, the difficulty of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific regulated expression of transgenes, as well as the difficulty of introducing a transgene into all cells in a specific tissue, prevents us from successfully applying gene therapy to many human diseases. In contrast to intracellular proteins, an ECM protein is anchored to the target tissue via its specific binding affinity for protein(s) expressed on the cell surface within the target tissue. Exploiting this unique feature of ECM proteins, we developed protein-anchoring therapy in which a transgene product expressed even in remote tissues can be delivered and anchored to a target tissue using specific binding signals. We demonstrate the application of protein-anchoring therapy to two disease models. First, intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8-COLQ to Colq-deficient mice, resulting in specific anchoring of ectopically expressed ColQ-AChE at the NMJ, markedly improved motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In the second example, Mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, were intravenously injected with AAV8-BGN. The treatment ameliorated motor deficits, mitigated muscle histopathologies, decreased plasma creatine kinase activities, and upregulated expression

  1. Co-overexpression of TGF-β and SOX9 via rAAV gene transfer modulates the metabolic and chondrogenic activities of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ke; Frisch, Janina; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Schmitt, Gertrud; Madry, Henning; Lin, Jianhao; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-02-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited potential for self-healing. Transplantation of genetically modified progenitor cells like bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an attractive strategy to improve the intrinsic repair capacities of damaged articular cartilage. In this study, we examined the potential benefits of co-overexpressing the pleiotropic transformation growth factor beta (TGF-β) with the cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX9 via gene transfer with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors upon the biological activities of human MSCs (hMSCs). Freshly isolated hMSCs were transduced over time with separate rAAV vectors carrying either TGF-β or sox9 in chondrogenically-induced aggregate cultures to evaluate the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and to monitor the effects of rAAV-mediated genetic modification upon the cellular activities (proliferation, matrix synthesis) and chondrogenic differentiation potency compared with control conditions (lacZ treatment, sequential transductions). Significant, prolonged TGF-β/sox9 co-overexpression was achieved in chondrogenically-induced hMSCs upon co-transduction via rAAV for up to 21 days, leading to enhanced proliferative, biosynthetic, and chondrogenic activities relative to control treatments, especially when co-applying the candidate vectors at the highest vector doses tested. Optimal co-administration of TGF-β with sox9 also advantageously reduced hypertrophic differentiation of the cells in the conditions applied here. The present findings demonstrate the possibility of modifying MSCs by combined therapeutic gene transfer as potent future strategies for implantation in clinically relevant animal models of cartilage defects in vivo.

  2. Chondrogenic Differentiation Processes in Human Bone Marrow Aspirates Seeded in Three-Dimensional Woven Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds Enhanced by rAAV-Mediated SOX9 Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jagadeesh Kumar; Moutos, Franklin T; Rey-Rico, Ana; Estes, Bradley T; Frisch, Janina; Schmitt, Gertrud; Madry, Henning; Guilak, Farshid; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2018-05-02

    Combining gene therapy approaches with tissue engineering procedures is an active area of translational research for the effective treatment of articular cartilage lesions, especially to target chondrogenic progenitor cells such as those derived from the bone marrow. Here, we evaluated the effect of genetically modifying concentrated human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow to induce chondrogenesis by recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector gene transfer of the sex-determining region Y-type high-mobility group box 9 (SOX9) factor upon seeding in three-dimensional (3D) woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds that provide mechanical properties mimicking those of native articular cartilage. Prolonged, effective SOX9 expression was reported in the constructs for at least 21 days, the longest time point evaluated, leading to enhanced metabolic and chondrogenic activities relative to the control conditions (reporter lacZ gene transfer or absence of vector treatment) but without affecting the proliferative activities in the samples. The application of the rAAV SOX9 vector also prevented undesirable hypertrophic and terminal differentiation in the seeded concentrates. As bone marrow is readily accessible during surgery, such findings reveal the therapeutic potential of providing rAAV-modified marrow concentrates within 3D woven PCL scaffolds for repair of focal cartilage lesions.

  3. Climatic fluctuations and malaria transmission dynamics, prior to elimination, in Guna Yala, República de Panamá.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Lisbeth Amarilis; Calzada, José E; Rigg, Chystrie A; Castillo, Milagros; Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2018-02-20

    Malaria has historically been entrenched in indigenous populations of the República de Panamá. This scenario occurs despite the fact that successful methods for malaria elimination were developed during the creation of the Panamá Canal. Today, most malaria cases in the República de Panamá affect the Gunas, an indigenous group, which mainly live in autonomous regions of eastern Panamá. Over recent decades several malaria outbreaks have affected the Gunas, and one hypothesis is that such outbreaks could have been exacerbated by climate change, especially by anomalous weather patterns driven by the EL Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Monthly malaria cases in Guna Yala (1998-2016) were autocorrelated up to 2 months of lag, likely reflecting parasite transmission cycles between humans and mosquitoes, and cyclically for periods of 4 months that might reflect relapses of Plasmodium vivax, the dominant malaria parasite transmitted in Panamá. Moreover, malaria case number was positively associated (P < 0.05) with rainfall (7 months of lag), and negatively with the El Niño 4 index (15 months of lag) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI (8 months of lag), the sign and magnitude of these associations likely related to the impacts of weather patterns and vegetation on the ecology of Anopheles albimanus, the main malaria vector in Guna Yala. Interannual cycles, of approximately 4-year periods, in monthly malaria case numbers were associated with the El Niño 4 index, a climatic index associated with weather and vegetation dynamics in Guna Yala at seasonal and interannual time scales. The results showed that ENSO, rainfall and NDVI were associated with the number of malaria cases in Guna Yala during the study period. These results highlight the vulnerability of Guna populations to malaria, an infection sensitive to climate change, and call for further studies about weather impacts on malaria vector ecology, as well as the association of malaria

  4. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection II: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with heme oxygenase-1 limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Ou, Qinghui; Wu, Wen-Jian; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; Hunt, Gregory N; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts potent cytoprotective effects in response to stress. Previous studies have shown that gene therapy with HO-1 protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury for up to 8 weeks after gene transfer. However, the long-term effects of HO-1 gene therapy on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the HO-1 gene (rAAV/HO-1) that enables long-lasting transgene expression. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ (LacZ group) or rAAV/HO-1 (HO-1 group); 1 year later, they were subjected to a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). Cardiac HO-1 gene expression was confirmed at 1 month and 1 year after gene transfer by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. In the HO-1 group, infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after gene transfer (11.2 ± 2.1%, n = 12, vs. 44.7 ± 3.6%, n = 8, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effects of HO-1 gene therapy at 1 year were as powerful as those observed 24 h after ischemic PC (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (15.0 ± 1.7%, n = 10). There were no appreciable changes in LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction, or LV end-diastolic or end-systolic diameter at 1 year after HO-1 gene transfer as compared to the age-matched controls or with the LacZ group. Histology showed no inflammation in the myocardium 1 year after rAAV/HO-1-mediated gene transfer. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated HO-1 gene transfer confers long-term (1 year), possibly permanent, cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing proof of principle for the concept of achieving prophylactic cardioprotection (i.e., "immunization against infarction").

  5. Molecular epidemiology of SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa by rep-PCR in hospitals in Parana, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kalluf, K O; Arend, L N; Wuicik, T E; Pilonetto, M; Tuon, F F

    2017-04-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms are a global health problem, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, easily disseminated in the hospital environment. The aim of this study was to determine SPM-1 in P. aeruginosa strains in 30 Brazilian hospitals and the genetic similarity of isolates. We analyzed 161 isolates of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. Imipenem/EDTA and imipenem strip were used for phenotypic detection of MBL production; and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genetic detection. Genetic similarity was determined by rep-PCR. We obtained 136/161 (84.5%) isolates with positive phenotypic result for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) and the bla SPM-1 gene was identified in 41 isolates. There was a predominant profile (>95% of genetic similarity) in 92.7% of isolates. This predominant profile was widely disseminated in Paraná state. SPM-1 is the main MBL identified in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa in Southern Brazil. The genetic similarity among some isolates suggests a clonal expansion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Lee Scott, BDT Capital Partners), with Introduction by Rep. Steve Womack (AR)

    ScienceCinema

    Scott, Lee

    2018-01-22

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Rep. Steve Womack of Arkansas, Lee Scott, Chairman of BDT Capital Partners and former Walmart CEO, gave the second keynote presentation of the day.

  7. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Lee Scott, BDT Capital Partners), with Introduction by Rep. Steve Womack (AR)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Lee

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Rep. Steve Womack of Arkansas, Lee Scott, Chairman of BDT Capital Partners and former Walmart CEO, gave the second keynote presentation of the day.

  8. The Composite 259-kb Plasmid of Martelella mediterranea DSM 17316T–A Natural Replicon with Functional RepABC Modules from Rhodobacteraceae and Rhizobiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Bartling, Pascal; Brinkmann, Henner; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Göker, Markus; Petersen, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    A multipartite genome organization with a chromosome and many extrachromosomal replicons (ECRs) is characteristic for Alphaproteobacteria. The best investigated ECRs of terrestrial rhizobia are the symbiotic plasmids for legume root nodulation and the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. RepABC plasmids represent the most abundant alphaproteobacterial replicon type. The currently known homologous replication modules of rhizobia and Rhodobacteraceae are phylogenetically distinct. In this study, we surveyed type-strain genomes from the One Thousand Microbial Genomes (KMG-I) project and identified a roseobacter-specific RepABC-type operon in the draft genome of the marine rhizobium Martelella mediterranea DSM 17316T. PacBio genome sequencing demonstrated the presence of three circular ECRs with sizes of 593, 259, and 170-kb. The rhodobacteral RepABC module is located together with a rhizobial equivalent on the intermediate sized plasmid pMM259, which likely originated in the fusion of a pre-existing rhizobial ECR with a conjugated roseobacter plasmid. Further evidence for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is given by the presence of a roseobacter-specific type IV secretion system on the 259-kb plasmid and the rhodobacteracean origin of 62% of the genes on this plasmid. Functionality tests documented that the genuine rhizobial RepABC module from the Martelella 259-kb plasmid is only maintained in A. tumefaciens C58 (Rhizobiaceae) but not in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395 (Rhodobacteraceae). Unexpectedly, the roseobacter-like replication system is functional and stably maintained in both host strains, thus providing evidence for a broader host range than previously proposed. In conclusion, pMM259 is the first example of a natural plasmid that likely mediates genetic exchange between roseobacters and rhizobia. PMID:28983283

  9. Food irradiation studies at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, Rep. of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying-Kai; Tsai, Chao-Ming; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Ming-Shia; Chang, Yung-Nien; Shu, Shih-Lin

    The use of radiation to inhibit sprouting of potatoes, onions, gingers and garlic was studied at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. The sprout inhibition doses of potatoes, onions, gingers and garlic were found to be 10, 5, 2.5, 7.5 Krads, respectively. Changes in the content of moisture, ash, reducing sugars, total sugars, lipids, proteins, fiber etc. were monitored in various agricultural foodstuffs both with and without γ-irradiation at various doses. Fungicides did not prevent potatoes from decaying at 10 or 25°C with or without gamma radiation. Onions treated with any of fungicides has significantly more healthy tissues than controls at 10°C but not 25°C after 30 and 60 days storage, regardless of the presence or absence of gamma radiation. Insect pests have been causing great damage to stored rice in Taiwan. The four most harmful insects are: Sitophilus Zeamais Mostschulsky. Rhyzopertha dominica. Tribolitum custaneum Herbst and Sitotroga cerealella Oliver. Adults, eggs or larvae of these insect pests were irradiated by 60Co gamma rays. The results show that 40 Krads of gamma-irradiation could completely control these four species of pests in stored rice.

  10. Overexpression of soluble Fas ligand following AAV gene therapy prevents retinal ganglion cell death in chronic and acute murine models of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anitha; Fei, Fei; Jones, Alexander; Busto, Patricia; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Ksander, Bruce R.; Gregory-Ksander, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease resulting in the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and irreversible blindness. Glaucoma-associated RGC cell death depends on the pro-apoptotic and proinflammatory activity of membrane-bound FasL (mFasL). In contrast to mFasL, the natural soluble FasL cleavage product (sFasL) inhibits mFasL-mediated apoptosis and inflammation and is therefore a mFasL antagonist. DBA/2J (D2) mice spontaneously develop glaucoma and predictably RGC destruction is exacerbated by expression of a mutated membrane-only FasL (mFasL) gene that lacks the extracellular cleavage site. Remarkably, one time intraocular adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery of sFasL (AAV2.sFasL) provides complete and sustained neuroprotection in both the chronic D2 and acute microbead-induced models of glaucoma, even in the presence of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). This protection correlated with inhibition of glial activation, reduced production of TNFα, and decreased apoptosis of RGCs and loss of axons. These data indicate that cleavage of FasL under homeostatic conditions, and the ensuing release of sFasL, normally limits the neurodestructive activity of FasL. The data further support the notion that sFasL, and not mFasL, contributes to the immune privileged status of the eye. PMID:27849168

  11. Rep. Ken Calvert, R-Calif., chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, was briefed by X-43A engineer Laurie Grindle during his tour of Dryden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-02

    Rep. Ken Calvert, (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, received an update on the mission of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a visit on June 2, 2005. Rep. Calvert, accompanied by several staff members, was briefed by center management on the Dryden's role as a flight research institution, and then reviewed some of the center's recent, current and upcoming flight research projects during a tour of the facility. During the afternoon, Rep. Calvert received similar briefings on a variety of projects at several aerospace development firms at the Civilian Flight Test Center in Mojave. Rep. Calvert's tour of NASA Dryden was the second in a series of visits to all 10 NASA field centers to better acquaint him with the roles and responsibilities of each center.

  12. Comparison of semi-automated commercial rep-PCR fingerprinting, spoligotyping, 12-locus MIRU-VNTR typing and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the embB gene as molecular typing tools for Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Armas, Federica; Camperio, Cristina; Coltella, Luana; Selvaggini, Serena; Boniotti, Maria Beatrice; Pacciarini, Maria Lodovica; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-08-04

    Highly discriminatory genotyping strategies are essential in molecular epidemiological studies of tuberculosis. In this study we evaluated, for the first time, the efficacy of the repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit over spoligotyping, 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and embB single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis for Mycobacterium bovis typing. A total of 49 M. bovis animal isolates were used. DNA was extracted and genomic DNA was amplified using the DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit. The amplified fragments were separated and detected using a microfluidics chip with Agilent 2100. The resulting rep-PCR-based DNA fingerprints were uploaded to and analysed using web-based DiversiLab software through Pearson's correlation coefficient. Rep-PCR DiversiLab grouped M. bovis isolates into ten different clusters. Most isolates sharing identical spoligotype, MIRU-VNTR profile or embB gene polymorphism were grouped into different rep-PCR clusters. Rep-PCR DiversiLab displayed greater discriminatory power than spoligotyping and embB SNP analysis but a lower resolution power than the 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis. MIRU-VNTR confirmed that it is superior to the other PCR-based methods tested here. In combination with spoligotyping and 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis, rep-PCR improved the discriminatory power for M. bovis typing.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF HIGH VOLTAGE CATHODE RAY IONIZING RADIATION ON SOME OF THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT FLOUR PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Alsup, E.B.

    1959-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on some of the physical and chemical properties of wheat flour protein was determined. A study of the baking quality and palatability of an irradiated flour product, yields of crude gluten from irradiated flour, and electrophoretic analyses of some of the protein fractions of irradiated flour were studied. Triangle taste tests indicated that 50000 rep was the dosage level at which the irradiation treatment of flour could be detected in baking powder biscuits. Taste panel scores for color, odor, and baking characteristics of biscuits made with flour treated with 100000 rep or less of ionizing radiation,more » however, were not significantly different from the scores for the control biscuits. An off-odor and darkening in color of the biscuits were readily apparent at a dosage of 500000 rep. The weight of crude gluten extracted from flour was greater from flour exposed to dosages of 1000000 rep or less than from the control flour, but no differences were found in the volumes of the baked balls of crude gluten. This indicates a greater water retention with the irradiated flour. Very small yields of crude gluten at dosages of 3000000 rep or more indicated that definite changes had occurred in the protein structure. Electrophoretic analyses by the moving boundary method were performed on acetic acid extracts of whole flour in a citric acid-disodium phos, phate buffer pH 2.2, ionic strength 0.024. Electrophoretic patterns obtained from the non-irradiated flour indicated that there were at least six separate protein components present, including one which was fast-moving and high in relative concentration, one which was slow-moving and medium high in relative concentration, and four relatively small components. Irradiation of the flour with 300000 rep produced no apparent changes in the electrophoretic patterns obtained, but it 1000000 rep or more, the relative concentrations of the two largest components were changed (the slow-moving one

  14. A comparison of PCR assays for beak and feather disease virus and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of replicase associated protein and capsid genes.

    PubMed

    Das, Shubhagata; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2016-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) threatens a wide range of endangered psittacine birds worldwide. In this study, we assessed a novel PCR assay and genetic screening method using high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for BFDV targeting the capsid (Cap) gene (HRM-Cap) alongside conventional PCR detection as well as a PCR method that targets a much smaller fragment of the virus genome in the replicase initiator protein (Rep) gene (HRM-Rep). Limits of detection, sensitivity, specificity and discriminatory power for differentiating BFDV sequences were compared. HRM-Cap had a high positive predictive value and could readily differentiate between a reference genotype and 17 other diverse BFDV genomes with more discriminatory power (genotype confidence percentage) than HRM-Rep. Melt curve profiles generated by HRM-Cap correlated with unique DNA sequence profiles for each individual test genome. The limit of detection of HRM-Cap was lower (2×10 -5 ng/reaction or 48 viral copies) than that for both HRM-Rep and conventional BFDV PCR which had similar sensitivity (2×10 -6 ng or 13 viral copies/reaction). However, when used in a diagnostic setting with 348 clinical samples there was strong agreement between HRM-Cap and conventional PCR (kappa=0.87, P<0.01, 98% specificity) and HRM-Cap demonstrated higher specificity (99.9%) than HRM-Rep (80.3%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzootic mosquito vector species at equine encephalitis transmission foci in the República de Panamá.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rolando; Samudio, Rafael; Carrera, Jean-Paul; Young, Josue; Márquez, Ricardo; Hurtado, Lisbeth; Weaver, Scott; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Tesh, Robert; Cáceres, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The identification of mosquito vector species present at arboviral enzootic transmission foci is important to understand transmission eco-epidemiology and to propose and implement prevention and control strategies that reduce vector-borne equine encephalitis transmission. The goal of this study was to identify mosquito species potentially involved in the transmission of enzootic equine encephalitis, in relation to their abundance and diversity at three endemic regions in the República de Panamá. We sampled adult mosquitoes during the dry and rainy season of Panamá. We employed CDC light traps with octanol, EV traps with CO2 and Trinidad 17 traps baited with live hamsters. Traps were deployed in the peridomicile and extradomicile of houses from 18:00 to 6:00 h. We estimated the abundance and diversity of sampled species. We collected a total of 4868 mosquitoes, belonging to 45 species and 11 genera, over 216 sampling nights. Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi, a major Venezuelan equine encephalitis vector was relatively rare (< 2.0% of all sampled mosquitoes). We also found Cx. (Mel) adamesi, Cx. (Mel) crybda, Cx. (Mel) ocossa, Cx. (Mel) spissipes, Cx. (Mel) taeniopus, Cx. (Mel) vomerifer, Aedes scapularis, Ae. angustivittatus, Coquillettidia venezuelensis, Cx. nigripalpus, Cx. declarator, Mansonia titillans, M. pseudotitillans and Psorophora ferox all species known to be vectorially competent for the transmission of arboviruses. Abundance and diversity of mosquitoes in the sampled locations was high, when compared with similar surveys in temperate areas. Information from previous reports about vectorial competence / capacity of the sampled mosquito species suggest that sampled locations have all the elements to support enzootic outbreaks of Venezuelan and Eastern equine encephalitides.

  16. Enzootic mosquito vector species at equine encephalitis transmission foci in the República de Panamá

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rolando; Samudio, Rafael; Carrera, Jean-Paul; Young, Josue; Márquez, Ricardo; Hurtado, Lisbeth; Weaver, Scott; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Tesh, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The identification of mosquito vector species present at arboviral enzootic transmission foci is important to understand transmission eco-epidemiology and to propose and implement prevention and control strategies that reduce vector-borne equine encephalitis transmission. The goal of this study was to identify mosquito species potentially involved in the transmission of enzootic equine encephalitis, in relation to their abundance and diversity at three endemic regions in the República de Panamá. We sampled adult mosquitoes during the dry and rainy season of Panamá. We employed CDC light traps with octanol, EV traps with CO2 and Trinidad 17 traps baited with live hamsters. Traps were deployed in the peridomicile and extradomicile of houses from 18:00 to 6:00 h. We estimated the abundance and diversity of sampled species. We collected a total of 4868 mosquitoes, belonging to 45 species and 11 genera, over 216 sampling nights. Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi, a major Venezuelan equine encephalitis vector was relatively rare (< 2.0% of all sampled mosquitoes). We also found Cx. (Mel) adamesi, Cx. (Mel) crybda, Cx. (Mel) ocossa, Cx. (Mel) spissipes, Cx. (Mel) taeniopus, Cx. (Mel) vomerifer, Aedes scapularis, Ae. angustivittatus, Coquillettidia venezuelensis, Cx. nigripalpus, Cx. declarator, Mansonia titillans, M. pseudotitillans and Psorophora ferox all species known to be vectorially competent for the transmission of arboviruses. Abundance and diversity of mosquitoes in the sampled locations was high, when compared with similar surveys in temperate areas. Information from previous reports about vectorial competence / capacity of the sampled mosquito species suggest that sampled locations have all the elements to support enzootic outbreaks of Venezuelan and Eastern equine encephalitides. PMID:28937995

  17. Identification and Characterization of the UL37 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Demonstration that it Interacts with ICP8, the Major DNA Binding Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-20

    Identification of ORFs HSV DNA binding proteins • 1 3 3 5 7 7 11 17 18 22 reps and its role in HSV replication 23 Biochemical properties . . 23...Figure 1 . 2. 3 • 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Structural model of the herpesvirus virion Schematic diagram of HSV pathogenesis . Diagram of the main...vaccinia virus- 13. Autoradiogram of an immunoblot of HSV - 1 -infected cell proteins harvested at various times postinfec- 85 tioD probed with anti-UL42

  18. High Efficiency CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Editing in Primary Human T-cells Using Mutant Adenoviral E4orf6/E1b55k "Helper" Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, Kamila S; Grier, Alexandra E; Sahni, Jaya; Burleigh, Stephen M; Martin, Unja; Yang, Julia G; Popp, Nicholas A; Krutein, Michelle C; Khan, Iram F; Jacoby, Kyle; Jensen, Michael C; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2016-09-29

    Many future therapeutic applications of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 and related RNA-guided nucleases are likely to require their use to promote gene targeting, thus necessitating development of methods that provide for delivery of three components-Cas9, guide RNAs and recombination templates-to primary cells rendered proficient for homology-directed repair. Here, we demonstrate an electroporation/transduction codelivery method that utilizes mRNA to express both Cas9 and mutant adenoviral E4orf6 and E1b55k helper proteins in association with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing guide RNAs and recombination templates. By transiently enhancing target cell permissiveness to AAV transduction and gene editing efficiency, this novel approach promotes efficient gene disruption and/or gene targeting at multiple loci in primary human T-cells, illustrating its broad potential for application in translational gene editing.

  19. The influence of rAAV2-mediated SOX2 delivery into neonatal and adult human RPE cells; a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ezati, Razie; Etemadzadeh, Azadeh; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ranaei Pirmardan, Ehsan; Davari, Malihe; Najafabadi, Hoda Shams

    2018-02-01

    Cell replacement is a promising therapy for degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since the human retina lacks regeneration capacity, much attention has been directed toward persuading for cells that can differentiate into retinal neurons. In this report, we have investigated reprogramming of the human RPE cells and concerned the effect of donor age on the cellular fate as a critical determinant in reprogramming competence. We evaluated the effect of SOX2 over-expression in human neonatal and adult RPE cells in cultures. The coding region of human SOX2 gene was cloned into adeno-associated virus (AAV2) and primary culture of human neonatal/adult RPE cells were infected by recombinant virus. De-differentiation of RPE to neural/retinal progenitor cells was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and ICC for neural/retinal progenitor cells' markers. Gene expression analysis showed 80-fold and 12-fold over-expression for SOX2 gene in infected neonatal and adult hRPE cells, respectively. The fold of increase for Nestin in neonatal and adult hRPE cells was 3.8-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively. PAX6 expression was increased threefold and 2.5-fold in neonatal/adult treated cultures. Howbeit, we could not detect rhodopsin, and CHX10 expression in neonatal hRPE cultures and expression of rhodopsin in adult hRPE cells. Results showed SOX2 induced human neonatal/adult RPE cells to de-differentiate toward retinal progenitor cells. However, the increased number of PAX6, CHX10, Thy1, and rhodopsin positive cells in adult hRPE treated cultures clearly indicated the considerable generation of neuro-retinal terminally differentiated cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Angiogenin in Parkinson Disease Models: Role of Akt Phosphorylation and Evaluation of AAV-Mediated Angiogenin Expression in MPTP Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steidinger, Trent U.; Slone, Sunny R.; Ding, Huiping; Standaert, David G.; Yacoubian, Talene A.

    2013-01-01

    The angiogenic factor, angiogenin, has been recently linked to both Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson Disease (PD). We have recently shown that endogenous angiogenin levels are dramatically reduced in an alpha-synuclein mouse model of PD and that exogenous angiogenin protects against cell loss in neurotoxin-based cellular models of PD. Here, we extend our studies to examine whether activation of the prosurvival Akt pathway is required for angiogenin's neuroprotective effects against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), as observed in ALS models, and to test the effect of virally-mediated overexpression of angiogenin in an in vivo PD model. Using a dominant negative Akt construct, we demonstrate that inhibition of the Akt pathway does not reduce the protective effect of angiogenin against MPP+ toxicity in the dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line. Furthermore, an ALS-associated mutant of angiogenin, K40I, which fails to induce Akt phosphorylation, was similar to wildtype angiogenin in protection against MPP+. These results confirm previous work showing neuroprotective effects of angiogenin against MPP+, and indicate that Akt is not required for this protective effect. We also investigated whether adeno-associated viral serotype 2 (AAV2)-mediated overexpression of angiogenin protects against dopaminergic neuron loss in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model. We found that angiogenin overexpression using this approach does not reduce the MPTP-induced degeneration of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra, nor limit the depletion of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum. Together, these findings extend the evidence for protective effects of angiogenin in vitro, but also suggest that further study of in vivo models is required to translate these effects into meaningful therapies. PMID:23409128

  1. Safety and durability of effect of contralateral-eye administration of AAV2 gene therapy in patients with childhood-onset blindness caused by RPE65 mutations: a follow-on phase 1 trial.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jean; Wellman, Jennifer; Marshall, Kathleen A; McCague, Sarah; Ashtari, Manzar; DiStefano-Pappas, Julie; Elci, Okan U; Chung, Daniel C; Sun, Junwei; Wright, J Fraser; Cross, Dominique R; Aravand, Puya; Cyckowski, Laura L; Bennicelli, Jeannette L; Mingozzi, Federico; Auricchio, Alberto; Pierce, Eric A; Ruggiero, Jason; Leroy, Bart P; Simonelli, Francesca; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M

    2016-08-13

    Safety and efficacy have been shown in a phase 1 dose-escalation study involving a unilateral subretinal injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing the RPE65 gene (AAV2-hRPE65v2) in individuals with inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations. This finding, along with the bilateral nature of the disease and intended use in treatment, prompted us to determine the safety of administration of AAV2-hRPE65v2 to the contralateral eye in patients enrolled in the phase 1 study. In this follow-on phase 1 trial, one dose of AAV2-hRPE65v2 (1.5 × 10(11) vector genomes) in a total volume of 300 μL was subretinally injected into the contralateral, previously uninjected, eyes of 11 children and adults (aged 11-46 years at second administration) with inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations, 1.71-4.58 years after the initial subretinal injection. We assessed safety, immune response, retinal and visual function, functional vision, and activation of the visual cortex from baseline until 3 year follow-up, with observations ongoing. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01208389. No adverse events related to the AAV were reported, and those related to the procedure were mostly mild (dellen formation in three patients and cataracts in two). One patient developed bacterial endophthalmitis and was excluded from analyses. We noted improvements in efficacy outcomes in most patients without significant immunogenicity. Compared with baseline, pooled analysis of ten participants showed improvements in mean mobility and full-field light sensitivity in the injected eye by day 30 that persisted to year 3 (mobility p=0.0003, white light full-field sensitivity p<0.0001), but no significant change was seen in the previously injected eyes over the same time period (mobility p=0.7398, white light full-field sensitivity p=0.6709). Changes in visual acuity from baseline to year 3 were not significant in pooled analysis in

  2. Safety and durability of effect of contralateral-eye administration of AAV2 gene therapy in patients with childhood-onset blindness caused by RPE65 mutatons: a follow-on phase 1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jean; Wellman, Jennifer; Marshall, Kathleen A; McCague, Sarah; Ashtari, Manzar; DiStefano-Pappas, Julie; Elci, Okan U; Chung, Daniel C; Sun, Junwei; Wright, J Fraser; Cross, Dominique R; Aravand, Puya; Cyckowski, Laura L; Bennicelli, Jeannette L; Mingozzi, Federico; Auricchio, Alberto; Pierce, Eric A; Ruggiero, Jason; Leroy, Bart P; Simonelli, Francesca; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Safety and efficacy have been shown in a phase 1 dose-escalation study involving a unilateral subretinal injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing the RPE65 gene (AAV2-hRPE65v2) in individuals with inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations. This finding, along with the bilateral nature of the disease and intended use in treatment, prompted us to determine the safety of administration of AAV2-hRPE65v2 to the contralateral eye in patients enrolled in the phase 1 study. Methods In this follow-on phase 1 trial, one dose of AAV2-hRPE65v2 (1·5 × 1011 vector genomes) in a total volume of 300 μL was subretinally injected into the contralateral, previously uninjected, eyes of 11 children and adults (aged 11–46 years at second administration) with inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations, 1·71–4·58 years after the initial subretinal injection. We assessed safety, immune response, retinal and visual function, functional vision, and activation of the visual cortex from baseline until 3 year follow-up, with observations ongoing. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01208389. Findings No adverse events related to the AAV were reported, and those related to the procedure were mostly mild (dellen formation in three patients and cataracts in two). One patient developed bacterial endophthalmitis and was excluded from analyses. We noted improvements in efficacy outcomes in most patients without significant immunogenicity. Compared with baseline, pooled analysis of ten participants showed improvements in mean mobility and full-field light sensitivity in the injected eye by day 30 that persisted to year 3 (mobility p=0·0003, white light full-field sensitivity p<0·0001), but no significant change was seen in the previously injected eyes over the same time period (mobility p=0·7398, white light full-field sensitivity p=0·6709). Changes in visual acuity from baseline to year 3

  3. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165-transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Moimas, Silvia; Manasseri, Benedetto; Cuccia, Giuseppe; Stagno d'Alcontres, Francesco; Geuna, Stefano; Pattarini, Lucia; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Colonna, Michele R

    2015-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen-glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine.

  4. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  5. New Protein Mimetics: The Zinc Finger Motif as a Locked-In Tertiary Fold.

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, Gabriele; Lehmann, Christian; Mathieu, Marc

    1998-11-16

    The principle of a molecular kit is used for the covalent assembly of secondary structure forming peptide blocks to predetermined packing topologies. The resulting locked-in folds (LIFs; depicted schematically) are readily accessible and bypass the intriguing folding problem of linear peptide chains. This strategy allows, for example, mimicking of the essential structural and functional features of zinc finger proteins. © 1998 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  6. Protein-Anchoring Therapy of Biglycan for Mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikako; Ehara, Yuka; Li, Jin; Inada, Kosuke; Ohno, Kinji

    2017-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in DMD encoding dystrophin. No rational therapy is currently available. Utrophin is a paralog of dystrophin and is highly expressed at the neuromuscular junction. In mdx mice, utrophin is naturally upregulated throughout the muscle fibers, which mitigates muscular dystrophy. Protein-anchoring therapy was previously reported, in which a recombinant extracellular matrix (ECM) protein is delivered to and anchored to a specific target using its proprietary binding domains. Being prompted by a report that intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection of an ECM protein, biglycan, upregulates expression of utrophin and ameliorates muscle pathology in mdx mice, protein-anchoring therapy was applied to mdx mice. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (rAAV8) carrying hBGN encoding human biglycan was intravenously injected into 5-week-old mdx mice. The rAAV8-hBGN treatment improved motor deficits and decreased plasma creatine kinase activities. In muscle sections of treated mice, the number of central myonuclei and the distribution of myofiber sizes were improved. The treated mice increased gene expressions of utrophin and β1-syntrophin, as well as protein expressions of biglycan, utrophin, γ-sarcoglycan, dystrobrevin, and α1-syntrophin. The expression of hBGN in the skeletal muscle of the treated mice was 1.34-fold higher than that of the native mouse Bgn (mBgn). The low transduction efficiency and improved motor functions suggest that biglycan expressed in a small number of muscle fibers was likely to have been secreted and anchored to the cell surface throughout the whole muscular fibers. It is proposed that the protein-anchoring strategy can be applied not only to deficiency of an ECM protein as previously reported, but also to augmentation of a naturally induced ECM protein.

  7. Nuclear localization signal regulates porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein nuclear export through phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiang; Hou, Shaohua; Chen, Qing; Jia, Hong; Xin, Ting; Jiang, Yitong; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Hongfei

    2018-02-15

    The open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) encodes the major Capsid (Cap) protein, which self-assembles into virus-like particle (VLP) of similar morphology to the PCV2 virion and accumulates in the nucleus through the N-terminal arginine-rich nuclear localization signal (NLS). In this study, PCV2 Cap protein and its derivates were expressed via the baculovirus expression system, and the cellular localization of the recombinant proteins were investigated using anti-Cap mAb by imaging flow cytometry. Analysis of subcellular localization of Cap protein and its variants demonstrated that NLS mediated Cap protein nuclear export as well as nuclear import, and a phosphorylation site (S17) was identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the NLS domain to regulate Cap protein nuclear export. Phosphorylation of NLS regulating the PCV2 Cap protein nuclear export was also demonstrated in PK15 cells by fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, the influence of Rep and Rep' protein on Cap protein subcellular localization was investigated in PK15 cells. Phosphorylation of NLS regulating Cap protein nuclear export provides more detailed knowledge of the PCV2 viral life cycle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Summary of the Ratfor language, an extended portable dialect called REP, its style and flavor, and details of its implementation on the PDP-10

    SciTech Connect

    Figen, J.

    1981-09-10

    Ratfor (RATional FORtran) is a dialect of Fortran that allows structured programming and the use of simple macros. It is the language of the Software Tools package, and is documented in the book Software Tools. It has proved significantly easier than Fortran to read, write, and understand. Although debugging is slightly harder in Ratfor than in Fortran, there is usually less of it to do, since Ratfor lends itself to better program design. Ratfor operates as a preprocessor to any existing Fortran system. It is relatively easy, using Ratfor, to write programs that are portable with little or no changemore » to any environment that supports standard Fortran. REP (Ratfor Extended and Portable) is an extended version of Ratfor. It is fully upward compatible with the Addison-Wesley translator, though there are a few divergences from certain Unix and Software Tools User Group dialects. The principal feature of REP is its fully developed macro facility, a language within a language, capable of doing such things as creating new data types, data structuring, recursive procedures, and much more, portably, and in the spirit of Ratfor, but there are many other lesser though nevertheless important extensions.« less

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interaction network using a multi-objective optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Archana; Rakshit, Pratyusha; Konar, Amit

    2016-06-01

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are very important as they coordinate almost all cellular processes. This paper attempts to formulate PPI prediction problem in a multi-objective optimization framework. The scoring functions for the trial solution deal with simultaneous maximization of functional similarity, strength of the domain interaction profiles, and the number of common neighbors of the proteins predicted to be interacting. The above optimization problem is solved using the proposed Firefly Algorithm with Nondominated Sorting. Experiments undertaken reveal that the proposed PPI prediction technique outperforms existing methods, including gene ontology-based Relative Specific Similarity, multi-domain-based Domain Cohesion Coupling method, domain-based Random Decision Forest method, Bagging with REP Tree, and evolutionary/swarm algorithm-based approaches, with respect to sensitivity, specificity, and F1 score.

  10. [Genetic characterisation of Powassan virus (POWV) isolated from Haemophysalis longicornis ticks in Primorye and two strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus): Alma-Arasan virus (AAV) isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan and Malyshevo virus isolated from Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes in Khabarovsk kray].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Botikov, A G; Aristova, V A

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomes of the three tick-borne flaviviruses (genus Flavivirus, fam. Bunyaviridae) were sequenced: Povassan virus (POWV, strain LEIV-3070Prm, isolated from Haemophysalis logicornis in Primorsky Krai, Russia in 1977), Alma-Arasan virus (AAV, strain LEIV-1380Kaz, isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan in 1977) and Malyshevo virus (isolated from a pool of Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes, in the Khabarovsk Krai, Russia in 1978). It is shown that AAV and Malyshevo virus are the strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and belong to Sibirian and Far-Eastern genotypes, respectively (GenBank ID: AAV KJ744033; strain Malyshevo KJ744034). Phylogenetically AAV is closest related (94,6% nt and 98,3% aa identity) to TBEV strains, isolated in Sibiria (Vasilchenko, Aino, Chita-653, Irkutsk-12). Malyshevo virus is closest related (96,4% nt and 98,3% nt identity) to strains of TBEV, isolated in Far Eastern part of Russia (1230, Spassk-72, Primorye-89). POWV LEIV-3070Prm has 99.7% identity with the prototype strain POWV LB, isolated in Canada and 99.5% of isolates with Far-Eastern strains of POWV (Spassk-9 and Nadezdinsk-1991).

  11. Pseudo-polyprotein translated from the full-length ORF1 of capillovirus is important for pathogenicity, but a truncated ORF1 protein without variable and CP regions is sufficient for replication.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hisae; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Ken; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Oshima, Kenro; Okano, Yukari; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Ugaki, Masashi; Namba, Shigetou

    2010-09-01

    The first open-reading frame (ORF) of the genus Capillovirus encodes an apparently chimeric polyprotein containing conserved regions for replicase (Rep) and coat protein (CP), while other viruses in the family Flexiviridae have separate ORFs encoding these proteins. To investigate the role of the full-length ORF1 polyprotein of capillovirus, we generated truncation mutants of ORF1 of apple stem grooving virus by inserting a termination codon into the variable region located between the putative Rep- and CP-coding regions. These mutants were capable of systemic infection, although their pathogenicity was attenuated. In vitro translation of ORF1 produced both the full-length polyprotein and the smaller Rep protein. The results of in vivo reporter assays suggested that the mechanism of this early termination is a ribosomal -1 frame-shift occurring downstream from the conserved Rep domains. The mechanism of capillovirus gene expression and the very close evolutionary relationship between the genera Capillovirus and Trichovirus are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors carrying small interfering RNA (shHec1)-mediated depletion of kinetochore Hec1 protein in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Yang, L; Scudiero, D A; Miller, S A; Yu, Z-X; Stukenberg, P T; Shoemaker, R H; Kotin, R M

    2007-05-01

    Transcript depletion using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology represents a potentially valuable technique for the treatment of cancer. However, delivering therapeutic quantities of siRNA into solid tumors by chemical transfection is not feasible, whereas viral vectors efficiently transduce many human tumor cell lines. Yet producing sufficient quantities of viral vectors that elicit acute and selective cytotoxicity remains a major obstacle for preclinical and clinical trials. Using the invertebrate Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cell line, we were able to produce high titer stocks of cytotoxic recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) that express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and that efficiently deplete Hec1 (highly expressed in cancer 1), or Kntc2 (kinetochore-associated protein 2), a kinetochore protein directly involved in kinetochore microtubule interactions, chromosome congression and spindle checkpoint signaling. Depletion of Hec1 protein results in persistent spindle checkpoint activation followed by cell death. Because Hec1 expression and activity are only present in mitotic cells, non-dividing cells were not affected by rAAV treatment. On the basis of the results of screening 56 human tumor cell lines with three different serotype vectors, we used a tumor xenograft model to test the effects in vivo. The effects of the shHec1 vector were evident in sectioned and stained tumors. The experiments with rAAV-shRNA vectors demonstrate the utility of producing vectors in invertebrate cells to obtain sufficient concentrations and quantities for solid tumor therapy. This addresses an important requirement for cancer gene therapy, to produce cytotoxic vectors in sufficient quantities and concentrations to enable quantitative transduction and selective killing of solid tumor cells.

  13. Heterologous Protein Secretion in Lactobacilli with Modified pSIP Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Karlskås, Ingrid Lea; Maudal, Kristina; Axelsson, Lars; Rud, Ida; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Mathiesen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    We describe new variants of the modular pSIP-vectors for inducible gene expression and protein secretion in lactobacilli. The basic functionality of the pSIP system was tested in Lactobacillus strains representing 14 species using pSIP411, which harbors the broad-host-range Lactococcus lactis SH71rep replicon and a β-glucuronidase encoding reporter gene. In 10 species, the inducible gene expression system was functional. Based on these results, three pSIP vectors with different signal peptides were modified by replacing their narrow-host-range L. plantarum 256rep replicon with SH71rep and transformed into strains of five different species of Lactobacillus. All recombinant strains secreted the target protein NucA, albeit with varying production levels and secretion efficiencies. The Lp_3050 derived signal peptide generally resulted in the highest levels of secreted NucA. These modified pSIP vectors are useful tools for engineering a wide variety of Lactobacillus species. PMID:24614815

  14. One Size Does Not Fit All: The Effect of Chain Length and Charge Density of Poly(ethylene imine) Based Copolymers on Delivery of pDNA, mRNA, and RepRNA Polyplexes.

    PubMed

    Blakney, Anna K; Yilmaz, Gokhan; McKay, Paul F; Becer, C Remzi; Shattock, Robin J

    2018-05-03

    Nucleic acid delivery systems are commonly translated between different modalities, such as DNA and RNA of varying length and structure, despite physical differences in these molecules that yield disparate delivery efficiency with the same system. Here, we synthesized a library of poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline)/poly(ethylene imine) copolymers with varying molar mass and charge densities in order to probe how pDNA, mRNA, and RepRNA polyplex characteristics affect transfection efficiency. The library was utilized in a full factorial design of experiment (DoE) screening, with outputs of luciferase expression, particle size, surface charge, and particle concentration. The optimal copolymer molar mass and charge density was found as 83 kDa/100%, 72 kDa/100%, and 45 kDa/80% for pDNA, RepRNA, and mRNA, respectively. While 10 of the synthesized copolymers enhanced the transfection efficiency of pDNA and mRNA, only 2 copolymers enhanced RepRNA transfection efficiency, indicating a narrow and more stringent design space for RepRNA. These findings suggest that there is not a "one size fits all" polymer for different nucleic acid species.

  15. Defective-interfering particles of the human parvovirus adeno-associated virus. [uv radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, C.A.; Myers, M.W.; Risin, D.L.

    1979-04-15

    We have previously shown that adeno-associated virus (AAV) grown in KB cells with a helper adenovirus, produced several classes of particles defined by their buoyant density in CsCl. The predominant density classes were referred to as AAV(1.45), AAV(1.41), AAV (1.35), and AAV(1.32), respectively, where the density of the particle was written in the parentheses. The AAV(1.45) and AAV(1.41) particles which contained standard genomes were the only infectious AAV these infectious AAV particles exhibited autointerference. The ligh-density AAV(1.35) and (1.32) particles contained aberrant (deleted and/or snap-back) genomes. We report here experiments which show that the light-density AAV particles were noninfectious butmore » interfered with the replication of AAV(1.41). The interference was intracellular and resulted in inhibition of synthesis of standard (14.5S) AAV genomes. In some cases there was also a concomitant increase in synthesis of aberrant, shorter AAV DNA. The inhibitory activity of the light-density particles was abolished by uv irradiation. These results show that the population of light AAV particles contained DI particles. The observed autointerference of AAV(1.45) or AAV(1.41) virus is postulated to be due to AAV DI particles. Replication of AAV DI genomes appeared to require the presence of replicating, standard AAV genomes. This is interpreted to mean that progeny strand replication of AAV requires an AAV-specified product, presumably the AAV capsid protein. In contrast to standard, infectious AAV, the AAV DI particles alone do not inhibit replication of the helper adenovirus.« less

  16. An AT-hook protein DEPRESSED PALEA1 physically interacts with the TCP Family transcription factor RETARDED PALEA1 in rice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dedong; Liu, Xue; Shi, Zhenying; Li, Dayong; Zhu, Lihuang

    2018-01-01

    The cereal crops (such as rice and maize) which belong to the grass family, are the most important grain crops for human beings, and the development of their flower and inflorescence architecture has attracted extensive attention. Although multiple genes involved in the regulation of floral and inflorescence organogenesis have been identified, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Previously, we identified rice depressed palea1 (dp1) mutants with defects in main structure of palea and its enhancer RETARDED PALEA1 (REP1). DP1 is an AT-hook protein while REP1 is a TCP transcription factor, both of which are important regulators of palea development. However, the relationship of these two proteins has not been elucidated yet. Here, we demonstrated that DP1 interacts physically with REP1 both in yeast and in rice protoplasts. Considering the close phylogenetic relationship between maize and rice, we further hypothesize that their orthologs in maize, BARREN STALK FASTIGIATE (BAF1) and BRANCH ANGLE DEFECTIVE 1 (BAD1), may interact physically. Subsequently, we verified their physical interaction, indicating that the interaction between AT-hook proteins and TCP proteins is conserved in rice and maize. Our findings may reveal a novel molecular mechanism of floral and inflorescence development in grasses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Wild-Type and Vector-Mediated Genomic Integration Profiles of Human Diploid Fibroblasts Analyzed by Third-Generation PacBio DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hüser, Daniela; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome-wide analysis of adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 integration in HeLa cells has shown that wild-type AAV integrates at numerous genomic sites, including AAVS1 on chromosome 19q13.42. Multiple GAGY/C repeats, resembling consensus AAV Rep-binding sites are preferred, whereas rep-deficient AAV vectors (rAAV) regularly show a random integration profile. This study is the first study to analyze wild-type AAV integration in diploid human fibroblasts. Applying high-throughput third-generation PacBio-based DNA sequencing, integration profiles of wild-type AAV and rAAV are compared side by side. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that both wild-type AAV and rAAV prefer open chromatin regions. Although genomic features of AAV integration largely reproduce previous findings, the pattern of integration hot spots differs from that described in HeLa cells before. DNase-Seq data for human fibroblasts and for HeLa cells reveal variant chromatin accessibility at preferred AAV integration hot spots that correlates with variant hot spot preferences. DNase-Seq patterns of these sites in human tissues, including liver, muscle, heart, brain, skin, and embryonic stem cells further underline variant chromatin accessibility. In summary, AAV integration is dependent on cell-type-specific, variant chromatin accessibility leading to random integration profiles for rAAV, whereas wild-type AAV integration sites cluster near GAGY/C repeats. IMPORTANCE Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is assumed to establish latency by chromosomal integration of its DNA. This is the first genome-wide analysis of wild-type AAV2 integration in diploid human cells and the first to compare wild-type to recombinant AAV vector integration side by side under identical experimental conditions. Major determinants of wild-type AAV integration represent open chromatin regions with accessible consensus AAV Rep-binding sites. The variant chromatin accessibility of different human tissues or cell types will

  18. Validation of use of whole-cell repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) for typing strains belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex and application of the method to the investigation of a hospital outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, A M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Hawkey, P M; Heritage, J; Parnell, P; Porter, C; Bodenham, A R; Inglis, T

    1996-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are being reported with increasing frequency as causes of nosocomial infection. In order to identify reservoirs of infection as quickly as possible, a rapid typing method that can differentiate epidemic strains from environmental and nonepidemic strains is needed. In 1993, a cluster of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from five patients in the adult intensive therapy unit of our tertiary-care teaching hospital led us to develop and optimize a rapid repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) typing protocol for members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex that uses boiled colonies and consensus primers aimed at repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences. Four of the five patient isolates gave the same REP-PCR typing pattern as isolates of A. baumannii obtained from the temperature probe of a Bennett humidifier; the fifth isolate had a unique profile. Disinfection of the probe with 70% ethanol, as recommended by the manufacturer, proved ineffective, as A. baumannii with the same REP-PCR pattern was isolated from it 10 days after cleaning, necessitating a change in our decontamination procedure. Results obtained with REP-PCR were subsequently confirmed by ribotyping. To evaluate the discriminatory power (D) of REP-PCR for typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, compared with that of ribotyping, we have applied both methods to a collection of 85 strains that included representatives of six DNA groups within the complex. Ribotyping using EcoRI digests yielded 53 patterns (D = 0.98), whereas 68 different REP-PCR patterns were observed (D = 0.99). By computer-assisted analysis of gel images, 74 patterns were observed with REP-PCR (D = 1.0). Overall, REP-PCR typing proved to be slightly more discriminatory than ribotyping. Our results indicate that REP-PCR typing used boiled colonies is a simple, rapid, and effective means of typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID

  19. Rapid degradation of dominant-negative Rab27 proteins in vivo precludes their use in transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, José S; Anders, Ross; Jaissle, Gesine B; Seeliger, Mathias W; Huxley, Clare; Seabra, Miguel C

    2002-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice have proven to be a powerful system to study normal and pathological gene functions. Here we describe an attempt to generate a transgenic mouse model for choroideremia (CHM), a slow-onset X-linked retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the Rab Escort Protein-1 (REP1) gene. REP1 is part of the Rab geranylgeranylation machinery, a modification that is essential for Rab function in membrane traffic. The loss of REP1 in CHM patients may trigger retinal degeneration through its effects on Rab proteins. We have previously reported that Rab27a is the Rab most affected in CHM lymphoblasts and hypothesised that the selective dysfunction of Rab27a (and possibly a few other Rab GTPases) plays an essential role in the retinal degenerative process. Results To investigate this hypothesis, we generated several lines of dominant-negative, constitutively-active and wild-type Rab27a (and Rab27b) transgenic mice whose expression was driven either by the pigment cell-specific tyrosinase promoter or the ubiquitous β-actin promoter. High levels of mRNA and protein were observed in transgenic lines expressing wild-type or constitutively active Rab27a and Rab27b. However, only modest levels of transgenic protein were expressed. Pulse-chase experiments suggest that the dominant-negative proteins, but not the constitutively-active or wild type proteins, are rapidly degraded. Consistently, no significant phenotype was observed in our transgenic lines. Coat-colour was normal, indicating normal Rab27a activity. Retinal function as determined by fundoscopy, angiography, electroretinography and histology was also normal. Conclusions We suggest that the instability of the dominant-negative mutant Rab27 proteins in vivo precludes the use of this approach to generate mouse models of disease caused by Rab27 GTPases. PMID:12401133

  20. Real-time and quantitative fluorescent live-cell imaging with quadruplex-specific red-edge probe (G4-REP).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunny Y; Amor, Souheila; Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M Y; Monchaud, David

    2017-05-01

    The development of quadruplex-directed molecular diagnostic and therapy rely on mechanistic insights gained at both cellular and tissue levels by fluorescence imaging. This technique is based on fluorescent reporters that label cellular DNA and RNA quadruplexes to spatiotemporally address their complex cell biology. The photophysical characteristics of quadruplex probes usually dictate the modality of cell imaging by governing the selection of the light source (lamp, LED, laser), the optical light filters and the detection modality. Here, we report the characterizations of prototype from a new generation of quadruplex dye termed G4-REP (for quadruplex-specific red-edge probe) that provides fluorescence responses regardless of the excitation wavelength and modality (owing to the versatility gained through the red-edge effect), thus allowing for diverse applications and most imaging facilities. This is demonstrated by cell images (and associated quantifications) collected through confocal and multiphoton microscopy as well as through real-time live-cell imaging system over extended period, monitoring both non-cancerous and cancerous human cell lines. Our results promote a new way of designing versatile, efficient and convenient quadruplex-reporting dyes for tracking these higher-order nucleic acid structures in living human cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "G-quadruplex" Guest Editor: Dr. Concetta Giancola and Dr. Daniela Montesarchio. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Depletion Calculations Based on Perturbations. Application to the Study of a Rep-Like Assembly at Beginning of Cycle with TRIPOLI-4®.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonne, Cyril; Dumonteil, Eric; Malvagi, Fausto; M'Backé Diop, Cheikh

    2014-06-01

    For several years, Monte Carlo burnup/depletion codes have appeared, which couple Monte Carlo codes to simulate the neutron transport to deterministic methods, which handle the medium depletion due to the neutron flux. Solving Boltzmann and Bateman equations in such a way allows to track fine 3-dimensional effects and to get rid of multi-group hypotheses done by deterministic solvers. The counterpart is the prohibitive calculation time due to the Monte Carlo solver called at each time step. In this paper we present a methodology to avoid the repetitive and time-expensive Monte Carlo simulations, and to replace them by perturbation calculations: indeed the different burnup steps may be seen as perturbations of the isotopic concentration of an initial Monte Carlo simulation. In a first time we will present this method, and provide details on the perturbative technique used, namely the correlated sampling. In a second time the implementation of this method in the TRIPOLI-4® code will be discussed, as well as the precise calculation scheme a meme to bring important speed-up of the depletion calculation. Finally, this technique will be used to calculate the depletion of a REP-like assembly, studied at beginning of its cycle. After having validated the method with a reference calculation we will show that it can speed-up by nearly an order of magnitude standard Monte-Carlo depletion codes.

  2. Early postnatal virus inoculation into the scala media achieved extensive expression of exogenous green fluorescent protein in the inner ear and preserved auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfeng; Sun, Yu; Chang, Qing; Ahmad, Shoeb; Zhou, Binfei; Kim, Yeunjung; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer into the inner ear is a promising approach for treating sensorineural hearing loss. The special electrochemical environment of the scala media raises a formidable challenge for effective gene delivery at the same time as keeping normal cochlear function intact. The present study aimed to define a suitable strategy for preserving hearing after viral inoculation directly into the scala media performed at various postnatal developmental stages. We assessed transgene expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by various types of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus (LV) in the mouse cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses were measured 30 days after inoculation to assess effects on hearing. Patterns of GFP expression confirmed extensive exogenous gene expression in various types of cells lining the endolymphatic space. The use of different viral vectors and promoters resulted in specific cellular GFP expression patterns. AAV2/1 with cytomegalovirus promoter apparently gave the best results for GFP expression in the supporting cells. Histological examination showed normal cochlear morphology and no hair cell loss after either AAV or LV injections. We found that hearing thresholds were not significantly changed when the injections were performed in mice younger than postnatal day 5, regardless of the type of virus tested. Viral inoculation and expression in the inner ear for the restoration of hearing must not damage cochlear function. Using normal hearing mice as a model, we have achieved this necessary step, which is required for the treatment of many types of congenital deafness that require early intervention. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Repeat Transduction in the Mouse Lung by Using Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors with Different Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Christine L.; Rutledge, Elizabeth A.; Allen, James M.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    2000-01-01

    Vectors derived from adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) promote gene transfer and expression in the lung; however, we have found that while gene expression can persist for at least 8 months in mice, it was reduced dramatically in rabbits over a period of 2 months. The efficiency and persistence of AAV2-mediated gene expression in the human lung have yet to be determined, but it seems likely that readministration will be necessary over the lifetime of an individual. Unfortunately, we have found that transduction by a second administration of an AAV2 vector is blocked, presumably due to neutralizing antibodies generated in response to the primary vector exposure. Here, we have explored the use of AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with capsid proteins from AAV serotypes 2, 3, and 6 for readministration in the mouse lung. We found that an AAV6 vector transduced airway epithelial and alveolar cells in the lung at rates that were at least as high as those of AAV2 pseudotype vectors, while transduction rates mediated by AAV3 were much lower. AAV6 pseudotype vector transduction was unaffected by prior administration of an AAV2 or AAV3 vector, and transduction by an AAV2 pseudotype vector was unaffected by prior AAV6 vector administration, showing that cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against AAV2 and AAV6 are not generated in mice. Interestingly, while prior administration of an AAV2 vector completely blocked transduction by a second AAV2 pseudotype vector, prior administration of an AAV6 vector only partially inhibited transduction by a second administration of an AAV6 pseudotype vector. Analysis of sera obtained from mice and humans showed that AAV6 is less immunogenic than AAV2, which helps explain this finding. These results support the development of AAV6 vectors for lung gene therapy both alone and in combination with AAV2 vectors. PMID:10627564

  4. An N-terminal region of a Myb-like protein is involved in its intracellular localization and activation of a gibberellin-inducible proteinase gene in germinated rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Sutoh, Keita; Washio, Kenji; Imai, Ryozo; Wada, Masamitsu; Nakai, Tomonori; Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the gene for a proteinase (Rep1) is upregulated by gibberellins. The CAACTC regulatory element (CARE) of the Rep1 promoter is involved in the gibberellin response. We isolated a cDNA for a CARE-binding protein containing a Myb domain in its carboxyl-terminal region and designated the gene Carboxyl-terminal Myb1 (CTMyb1). This gene encodes two polypeptides of two distinctive lengths, CTMyb1L and CTMyb1S, which include or exclude 213 N-terminal amino acid residues, respectively. CTMyb1S transactivated the Rep1 promoter in the presence of OsGAMyb, but not CTMyb1L. We observed an interaction between CTMyb1S and the rice prolamin box-binding factor (RPBF). A bimolecular fluorescence complex analysis detected the CTMyb1S and RPBF complex in the nucleus, but not the CTMyb1L and RPBF complex. The results suggest that the arrangement of the transfactors is involved in gibberellin-inducible expression of Rep1.

  5. Connecting long term species changes and their water competitions in temperate forest Mt. Baegun, Rep. of Korea using hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J.; Lee, H.; Lee, M.; Song, W.; Byeon, S.; Lee, B.; Cho, S.; Park, J.; Kim, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    Many dynamic vegetation model simulations have predicted dramatic changes in species composition of temperate forests due to climate changes and successional reasons. Especially, conifer species are expected to lose their habitats and to be replaced by broadleaf species. Similarly, our more than 15-years-long 880 permenant plots tree survey data in Mt. Baegun, Rep. of Korea, showed substantial decrease of conifer species and their productivities and increase of broadleaved species. One of main reasons for these changes in species could be attributed to the water competition among tree species in the same stand. Therefore, we investigated the differences in water uptake scheme between conifer and broadleaf species from the temperate forests of Korea using stable isotopes. Six study plots showing high competition (conifers vs. broadleaf species) based on previous vegetation survey were chosen and the species-specific water uptake depth was estimated by measuring hydrogen(δ2H) and oxygen(δ18O) ratio from the xylem sap and leaves of individual species and by comparing them with those of soil water from 5 depths, (10, 30, 50, 100 and 120 cm), which extracted by lysimeter. The collection was conducted from April 2016 to Nov 2017. The conifer species included Pinus densiflora and Chamaecyparis obtusa vs. broadleaved species included Carpinus laxiflora, Prunus sargentii, Styrax obassia, Lindera erythrocarpa and Quercus species such as Q. mongolica, Q. serrata, Q. accuticima. Preliminary results showed the stable isotope signatures of soil water was increased from 10 cm to 30 cm, and then decreased gradually until 120 cm. In addition, current dominant canopy species, Chamaecyparis obtusa absorbed majority of their water from 10 to 30 cm depth. In comparison, current mid canopy but one of upcoming dominant species, Styrax obassia's major water source was 30 cm and deeper of soil. Our results could be essential for the prediction of species composition under climate change

  6. Analyses of pea necrotic yellow dwarf virus-encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Björn; Schießl, Ingrid; Greiner, Eva; Krapp, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    Pea necrotic yellow dwarf virus (PNYDV) is a multipartite, circular, single-stranded DNA plant virus. PNYDV encodes eight proteins and the function of three of which remains unknown-U1, U2, and U4. PNYDV proteins cellular localization was analyzed by GFP tagging and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) studies. The interactions of all eight PNYDV proteins were tested pairwise in planta (36 combinations in total). Seven interactions were identified and two (M-Rep with CP and MP with U4) were characterized further. MP and U4 complexes appeared as vesicle-like spots and were localized at the nuclear envelope and cell periphery. These vesicle-like spots were associated with the endoplasmatic reticulum. In addition, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped for U1, and a mutated U1 with NLS disrupted localized at plasmodesmata and therefore might also have a role in movement. Taken together, this study provides evidence for previously undescribed nanovirus protein-protein interactions and their cellular localization with novel findings not only for those proteins with unknown function, but also for characterized proteins such as the CP.

  7. Inhibition of protein synthesis and malaria parasite development by drug targeting of methionyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tahir; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are housekeeping enzymes that couple cognate tRNAs with amino acids to transmit genomic information for protein translation. The Plasmodium falciparum nuclear genome encodes two P. falciparum methionyl-tRNA synthetases (PfMRS), termed PfMRS(cyt) and PfMRS(api). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two proteins are of primitive origin and are related to heterokonts (PfMRS(cyt)) or proteobacteria/primitive bacteria (PfMRS(api)). We show that PfMRS(cyt) localizes in parasite cytoplasm, while PfMRS(api) localizes to apicoplasts in asexual stages of malaria parasites. Two known bacterial MRS inhibitors, REP3123 and REP8839, hampered Plasmodium growth very effectively in the early and late stages of parasite development. Small-molecule drug-like libraries were screened against modeled PfMRS structures, and several "hit" compounds showed significant effects on parasite growth. We then tested the effects of the hit compounds on protein translation by labeling nascent proteins with (35)S-labeled cysteine and methionine. Three of the tested compounds reduced protein synthesis and also blocked parasite growth progression from the ring stage to the trophozoite stage. Drug docking studies suggested distinct modes of binding for the three compounds, compared with the enzyme product methionyl adenylate. Therefore, this study provides new targets (PfMRSs) and hit compounds that can be explored for development as antimalarial drugs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Overexpression and deletion of phospholipid transfer protein reduce HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport[S

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Takashi; Bi, Xin; Cipollari, Eleonora; Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Lagor, William R.; Szapary, Hannah J.; Tohyama, Junichiro; Millar, John S.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) may affect macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (mRCT) through its role in the metabolism of HDL. Ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity and in vivo mRCT were assessed in PLTP deletion and PLTP overexpression mice. PLTP deletion mice had reduced HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity, but unchanged in vivo mRCT. To directly compare the effects of PLTP overexpression and deletion on mRCT, human PLTP was overexpressed in the liver of wild-type animals using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, and control and PLTP deletion animals were injected with AAV-null. PLTP overexpression and deletion reduced plasma HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity. Both substantially decreased ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux, whereas ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux remained the same or increased, even though preβ HDL levels were lower. Neither PLTP overexpression nor deletion affected excretion of macrophage-derived radiocholesterol in the in vivo mRCT assay. The ex vivo and in vivo assays were modified to gauge the rate of cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma. PLTP activity did not affect this metric. Thus, deviations in PLTP activity from the wild-type level reduce HDL mass and ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity, but not the rate of macrophage cholesterol efflux to plasma or in vivo mRCT. PMID:28137768

  9. Whey Protein Supplementation Enhances Whole Body Protein Metabolism and Performance Recovery after Resistance Exercise: A Double-Blind Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    West, Daniel W. D.; Abou Sawan, Sidney; Mazzulla, Michael; Williamson, Eric; Moore, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    No study has concurrently measured changes in free-living whole body protein metabolism and exercise performance during recovery from an acute bout of resistance exercise. We aimed to determine if whey protein ingestion enhances whole body net protein balance and recovery of exercise performance during overnight (10 h) and 24 h recovery after whole body resistance exercise in trained men. In a double-blind crossover design, 12 trained men (76 ± 8 kg, 24 ± 4 years old, 14% ± 5% body fat; means ± standard deviation (SD)) performed resistance exercise in the evening prior to consuming either 25 g of whey protein (PRO; MuscleTech 100% Whey) or an energy-matched placebo (CHO) immediately post-exercise (0 h), and again the following morning (~10 h of recovery). A third randomized trial, completed by the same participants, involving no exercise and no supplement served as a rested control trial (Rest). Participants ingested [15N]glycine to determine whole body protein kinetics and net protein balance over 10 and 24 h of recovery. Performance was assessed pre-exercise and at 0, 10, and 24 h of recovery using a battery of tests. Net protein balance tended to improve in PRO (P = 0.064; effect size (ES) = 0.61, PRO vs. CHO) during overnight recovery. Over 24 h, net balance was enhanced in PRO (P = 0.036) but not in CHO (P = 0.84; ES = 0.69, PRO vs. CHO), which was mediated primarily by a reduction in protein breakdown (PRO < CHO; P < 0.01. Exercise decreased repetitions to failure (REP), maximal strength (MVC), peak and mean power, and countermovement jump performance (CMJ) at 0 h (all P < 0.05 vs. Pre). At 10 h, there were small-to-moderate effects for enhanced recovery of the MVC (ES = 0.56), mean power (ES = 0.49), and CMJ variables (ES: 0.27–0.49) in PRO. At 24 h, protein supplementation improved MVC (ES = 0.76), REP (ES = 0.44), and peak power (ES = 0.55). In conclusion, whey protein supplementation enhances whole body anabolism, and may improve acute recovery of

  10. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  11. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  12. Conventional Morphology Versus PCR Sequencing, rep-PCR, and MALDI-TOF-MS for Identification of Clinical Aspergillus Isolates Collected Over a 2-Year Period in a University Hospital at Kayseri, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Altay; Koc, Ayse Nedret; Suel, Ahmet; Sav, Hafize; Demir, Gonca; Elmali, Ferhan; Cakir, Nuri; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide range of diseases in humans, including allergies, localized infections, or fatal disseminated diseases. Rapid detection and identification of Aspergillus spp. facilitate effective patient management. In the current study we compared conventional morphological methods with PCR sequencing, rep-PCR, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the identification of Aspergillus strains. A total of 24 consecutive clinical isolates of Aspergillus were collected during 2012-2014. Conventional morphology and rep-PCR were performed in our Mycology Laboratory. The identification, evaluation, and reporting of strains using MALDI-TOF-MS were performed by BioMérieux Diagnostic, Inc. in Istanbul. DNA sequence analysis of the clinical isolates was performed by the BMLabosis laboratory in Ankara. Samples consisted of 18 (75%) lower respiratory tract specimens, 3 otomycosis (12.5%) ear tissues, 1 sample from keratitis, and 1 sample from a cutaneous wound. According to DNA sequence analysis, 12 (50%) specimens were identified as A. fumigatus, 8 (33.3%) as A. flavus, 3 (12.5%) as A. niger, and 1 (4.2%) as A. terreus. Statistically, there was good agreement between the conventional morphology and rep-PCR and MALDI-TOF methods; kappa values were κ = 0.869, 0.871, and 0.916, respectively (P < 0.001). The good level of agreement between the methods included in the present study and sequence method could be due to the identification of Aspergillus strains that were commonly encountered. Therefore, it was concluded that studies conducted with a higher number of isolates, which include other Aspergillus strains, are required. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Antitumor activity and inhibitory effects on cancer stem cell-like properties of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -mediated Bmi-1 interference driven by Bmi-1 promoter for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xinyang; Huang, Mingzhu; Gan, Lu; Cheng, Yufan; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bmi-1 is aberrantly activated in various cancers and plays a vital role in maintaining the self-renewal of stem cells. Our previous research revealed that Bmi-1 was overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and it's overexpression was an independent negative prognostic factor, suggesting it can be a therapeutic target. The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the antitumor activity of Bmi-1 interference driven by its own promoter (Ad-Bmi-1i) for GC. In this study, we used adenoviral vector to deliver Bmi-1 shRNA driven by its own promoter to treat GC. Our results revealed that Ad-Bmi-1i could selectively silence Bmi-1 in GC cells which overexpress Bmi-1 and suppress the malignant phenotypes and stem-like properties of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, direct injection of Ad-Bmi-1i into xenografts suppressed tumor growth and destroyed cancer cells in vivo. Ad-Bmi-1i inhibited the proliferation of GC cells mainly via inducing senescence in vitro, but it suppressed tumor through inducing senescence and apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo. Bmi-1 knockdown by Ad-Bmi-1i downregulated VEGF via inhibiting AKT activity. These results suggest that Ad-Bmi-1i not only inhibits tumor growth and stem cell-like phenotype by inducing cellular senescence directly, but also has an indirect anti-tumor activity by anti-angiogenesis effects via regulating PTEN/AKT/VEGF pathway. Transfer of gene interference guided by its own promoter by an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector might be a potent antitumor approach for cancer therapy. PMID:27009837

  14. Postnatal Cardiac Gene Editing Using CRISPR/Cas9 With AAV9-Mediated Delivery of Short Guide RNAs Results in Mosaic Gene Disruption.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anne Katrine; Molenaar, Bas; Versteeg, Danielle; Leitoguinho, Ana Rita; Demkes, Charlotte; Spanjaard, Bastiaan; de Ruiter, Hesther; Akbari Moqadam, Farhad; Kooijman, Lieneke; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; van Rooij, Eva

    2017-10-27

    CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9)-based DNA editing has rapidly evolved as an attractive tool to modify the genome. Although CRISPR/Cas9 has been extensively used to manipulate the germline in zygotes, its application in postnatal gene editing remains incompletely characterized. To evaluate the feasibility of CRISPR/Cas9-based cardiac genome editing in vivo in postnatal mice. We generated cardiomyocyte-specific Cas9 mice and demonstrated that Cas9 expression does not affect cardiac function or gene expression. As a proof-of-concept, we delivered short guide RNAs targeting 3 genes critical for cardiac physiology, Myh6 , Sav1 , and Tbx20 , using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector 9. Despite a similar degree of DNA disruption and subsequent mRNA downregulation, only disruption of Myh6 was sufficient to induce a cardiac phenotype, irrespective of short guide RNA exposure or the level of Cas9 expression. DNA sequencing analysis revealed target-dependent mutations that were highly reproducible across mice resulting in differential rates of in- and out-of-frame mutations. Finally, we applied a dual short guide RNA approach to effectively delete an important coding region of Sav1 , which increased the editing efficiency. Our results indicate that the effect of postnatal CRISPR/Cas9-based cardiac gene editing using adeno-associated virus serotype 9 to deliver a single short guide RNA is target dependent. We demonstrate a mosaic pattern of gene di