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Sample records for aav rep protein

  1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate complex formation between AAV DNA and its integration site in human DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Kyöstiö, S R; Kotin, R M; Owens, R A

    1994-01-01

    AAV is unique among eukaryotic viruses in the ability of its DNA to integrate preferentially into a specific region of the human genome. Understanding AAV integration may aid in developing gene therapy systems with predictable integration sites. Using a gel mobility-shift assay, we have identified a DNA sequence within the AAV integration locus on human chromosome 19 which is specifically bound by the AAV Rep78 and Rep68 proteins. This Rep recognition sequence is a GCTC repeating motif very similar to sequences within the inverted terminal repeats of the AAV genome which are also bound by Rep78 and Rep68. Cloned oligonucleotides containing the recognition sequence can direct specific binding by Rep proteins. Binding assays with mutant Rep proteins show that the amino-terminal portion of Rep78 and Rep68 can direct binding to either the AAV terminal repeat hairpin DNA or chromosome 19. This human genomic DNA can be complexed with AAV DNA by Rep proteins as demonstrated by a dual-label (32P/biotin) assay. These results suggest a role for Rep in targeting viral integration. Images PMID:8016070

  2. Selective Cleavage of AAVS1 Substrates by the Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep68 Protein Is Dependent on Topological and Sequence Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Lamartina, Stefania; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Toniatti, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) Rep78 and Rep68 proteins are required for replication of the virus as well as its site-specific integration into a unique site, called AAVS1, of human chromosome 19. Rep78 and Rep68 initiate replication by binding to a Rep binding site (RBS) contained in the AAV-2 inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) and then specifically nicking at a nearby site called the terminal resolution site (trs). Similarly, Rep78 and Rep68 are postulated to trigger the integration process by binding and nicking RBS and trs homologues present in AAVS1. However, Rep78 and Rep68 cleave in vitro AAVS1 duplex-linear substrates much less efficiently than hairpinned ITRs. In this study, we show that the AAV-2 Rep68 endonuclease activity is affected by the topology of the substrates in that it efficiently cleaves in vitro in a site- and strand-specific manner the AAVS1 trs only if this sequence is in a supercoiled (SC) conformation. DNA sequence mutagenesis in the context of SC templates allowed us to elucidate for the first time the AAVS1 trs sequence and position requirements for Rep68-mediated cleavage. Interestingly, Rep68 did not cleave SC templates containing RBS from other sites of the human genome. These findings have intriguing implications for AAV-2 site-specific integration in vivo. PMID:10982325

  3. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne; Heilbronn, Regine

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference in the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.

  4. Analysis of adeno-associated virus (AAV) wild-type and mutant Rep proteins for their abilities to negatively regulate AAV p5 and p19 mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Kyöstiö, S R; Owens, R A; Weitzman, M D; Antoni, B A; Chejanovsky, N; Carter, B J

    1994-01-01

    The rep gene of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) encodes four overlapping Rep proteins that are involved in gene regulation and replication of the virus. We studied here the regulation of mRNA transcribed from the AAV p5 and p19 promoters, using transient expression in human 293 cells followed by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of the mRNA. The p5 transcript encodes the larger Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, while the p19 transcript encodes the smaller proteins, Rep52 and Rep40. A plasmid (pNTC3) containing the entire AAV genome with an amber mutation in the rep gene accumulated higher levels of p5 and p19 mRNA than a plasmid containing the wild-type AAV genome. Addition of increasing amounts of the wild-type rep gene in trans from a heterologous promoter inhibited p5 and p19 mRNA accumulation from pNTC3, indicating that the levels of both transcripts were decreased by the Rep proteins. Cotransfections with plasmids producing individual wild-type Rep proteins in trans showed that p5 and p19 mRNA accumulation was inhibited 5- to 10-fold by Rep78 and Rep68 and 2- to 3-fold by Rep52 and Rep40. Analysis of carboxyl-terminal truncation mutants of Rep78 showed that the ability of Rep78 to decrease p5 and p19 mRNA levels was lost when 159 or more amino acids were deleted. Rep78 and Rep68 mutants deleted for the methionine at residue 225 showed decreased abilities to down-regulate both p5 and p19 transcript levels, while mutants containing a substitution of glycine for the methionine resembled the wild-type Rep78. A Rep78 protein with a mutation in the putative nucleoside triphosphate binding site inhibited expression from p5 but not from p19, suggesting that the regulation of p5 transcript levels by Rep78 and Rep68 differs from that of p19. A deletion analysis of AAV cis sequences revealed that an intact terminal repeat was not required for negative regulation of p5 and p19 transcript levels and that the regulation of p19 mRNA levels by Rep78 did not require the presence

  5. Adeno-associated virus rep protein synthesis during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Redemann, B.E.; Mendelson, E.; Carter, B.J.

    1989-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate viral DNA replication and can regulate expression from AAV genes. The authors studied the kinetics of synthesis of the four Rep proteins, Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40, during infection of human 293 or KB cells with AAV and helper adenovirus by in vivo labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting analyses. Rep78 and Rep52 were readily detected concomitantly with detection of viral monomer duplex DNA replicating about 10 to 12 h after infection, and Rep68 and Rep40 were detected 2 h later. Rep78 and Rep52 were more abundant than Rep68 and Rep40 owing to a higher synthesis rate throughout the infectious cycle. In some experiments, very low levels of Rep78 could be detected as early as 4 h after infection. The synthesis rates of Rep proteins were maximal between 14 and 24 h and then decreased later after infection. Isotopic pulse-chase experiments showed that each of the Rep proteins was synthesized independently and was stable for at least 15 h. A slower-migrating, modified form of Rep78 was identified late after infection. AAV capsid protein synthesis was detected at 10 to 12 h after infection and also exhibited synthesis kinetics similar to those of the Rep proteins. AAV DNA replication showed at least two clearly defined stages. Bulk duplex replicating DNA accumulation began around 10 to 12 h and reached a maximum level at about 20 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis was maximal. Progeny single-stranded DNA accumulation began about 12 to 13 h, but most of this DNA accumulated after 24 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis had decreased.

  6. The Rep78 gene product of adeno-associated virus (AAV) self-associates to form a hexameric complex in the presence of AAV ori sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R H; Spano, A J; Kotin, R M

    1997-01-01

    The Rep78 and Rep68 proteins of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are replication initiator proteins that bind the viral replicative-form origin of replication, nick the origin in a site- and strand-specific fashion, and mediate vectorial unwinding of the DNA duplex via an ATP-dependent helicase activity, thus initiating a strand displacement mechanism of viral DNA replication. Genetic and biochemical studies have identified Rep mutants that demonstrate a trans-dominant negative phenotype in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possibility that multimerization of Rep is essential for certain replicative functions. In this study, we have investigated the ability of the largest of the Rep proteins, Rep78, to self-associate in vitro and in vivo. Self-association of Rep78 in vivo was demonstrated through the use of a mammalian two-hybrid system. Rep-Rep protein interaction was confirmed in vitro through coimmunoprecipitation experiments with a bacterially expressed maltose-binding protein-Rep78 fusion protein in combination with [35S]methionine-labeled Rep78 synthesized in a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. Mapping studies with N- and C-terminal truncation mutant forms of Rep indicate that amino acid sequences required for maximal self-association occur between residues 164 and 484. Site-directed mutagenesis identified two essential motifs within this 321-amino-acid region: (i) a putative alpha-helix bearing a 3,4-hydrophobic heptad repeat reminiscent of those found in coiled-coil domains and (ii) a previously recognized nucleoside triphosphate-binding motif. Deletion of either of these regions from the full-length polypeptide resulted in severe impairment of Rep-Rep interaction. In addition, gel filtration chromatography and protein cross-linking experiments indicated that Rep78 forms a hexameric complex in the presence of AAV ori sequences. PMID:9151837

  7. Mutational analysis of the adeno-associated virus type 2 Rep68 protein helicase motifs.

    PubMed

    Walker, S L; Wonderling, R S; Owens, R A

    1997-09-01

    The adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) Rep78 and Rep68 proteins are required for viral replication. These proteins are encoded by unspliced and spliced transcripts, respectively, from the p5 promoter of AAV and therefore have overlapping amino acid sequences. The Rep78 and Rep68 proteins share a variety of activities including endonuclease, helicase, and ATPase activities and the ability to bind AAV hairpin DNA. The part of the amino acid sequence which is identical in Rep78 and Rep68 contains consensus helicase motifs that are conserved among the parvovirus replication proteins. In the present study, we mutated highly conserved amino acids within these helicase motifs. The mutant proteins were synthesized as maltose binding protein-Rep68 fusions in Escherichia coli cells and affinity purified on amylose resin. The fusion proteins were assayed in vitro, and their activities were directly compared to those of the fusion protein MBP-Rep68 delta, which contains most of the amino acid sequences common to Rep78 and Rep68 and was demonstrated previously to have all of the in vitro activities of wild-type Rep78 and Rep68. Our analysis showed that almost all mutations in the putative helicase motifs severely reduced or abolished helicase activity in vitro. Most mutants also had ATPase activity less than one-eighth of the wild-type levels and lacked endonuclease activity. PMID:9261429

  8. The Interdomain Linker of AAV-2 Rep68 Is an Integral Part of Its Oligomerization Domain: Role of a Conserved SF3 Helicase Residue in Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bardelli, Martino; Burgner, John W.; Villamil-Jarauta, Maria; Das, Kanni; Kekilli, Demet; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Linden, R. Michael; Escalante, Carlos R.

    2012-01-01

    The four Rep proteins of adeno-associated virus (AAV) orchestrate all aspects of its viral life cycle, including transcription regulation, DNA replication, virus assembly, and site-specific integration of the viral genome into the human chromosome 19. All Rep proteins share a central SF3 superfamily helicase domain. In other SF3 members this domain is sufficient to induce oligomerization. However, the helicase domain in AAV Rep proteins (i.e. Rep40/Rep52) as shown by its monomeric characteristic, is not able to mediate stable oligomerization. This observation led us to hypothesize the existence of an as yet undefined structural determinant that regulates Rep oligomerization. In this document, we described a detailed structural comparison between the helicase domains of AAV-2 Rep proteins and those of the other SF3 members. This analysis shows a major structural difference residing in the small oligomerization sub-domain (OD) of Rep helicase domain. In addition, secondary structure prediction of the linker connecting the helicase domain to the origin-binding domain (OBD) indicates the potential to form α-helices. We demonstrate that mutant Rep40 constructs containing different lengths of the linker are able to form dimers, and in the presence of ATP/ADP, larger oligomers. We further identified an aromatic linker residue (Y224) that is critical for oligomerization, establishing it as a conserved signature motif in SF3 helicases. Mutation of this residue critically affects oligomerization as well as completely abolishes the ability to produce infectious virus. Taken together, our data support a model where the linker residues preceding the helicase domain fold into an α-helix that becomes an integral part of the helicase domain and is critical for the oligomerization and function of Rep68/78 proteins through cooperative interaction with the OBD and helicase domains. PMID:22719256

  9. Lipofection of Purified Adeno-Associated Virus Rep68 Protein: toward a Chromosome-Targeting Nonviral Particle

    PubMed Central

    Lamartina, Stefania; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Rinaudo, Daniela; Delmastro, Paola; Toniatti, Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) integrates very efficiently into a specific site (AAVS1) of human chromosome 19. Two elements of the AAV genome are sufficient: the inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) and the Rep78 or Rep68 protein. The incorporation of the AAV integration machinery in nonviral delivery systems is of great interest for gene therapy. We demonstrate that purified recombinant Rep68 protein is functionally active when directly delivered into human cells by using the polycationic liposome Lipofectamine, promoting the rescue-replication of a codelivered ITR-flanked cassette in adenovirus-infected cells and its site-specific integration in noninfected cells. The sequencing of cloned virus-host DNA junctions confirmed that lipofected Rep68 protein triggers site-specific integration at the same sites in chromosome 19 already characterized in cells latently infected with AAV. PMID:9696870

  10. Adeno-Associated Virus Type 5 Utilizes Alternative Translation Initiation To Encode a Small Rep40-Like Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Farris, K. David; Pintel, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) P19-generated pre-mRNAs generates the small Rep proteins Rep52 and Rep40, which differ in their carboxyl termini. Both proteins are required for optimal packaging of AAV2 genomes. AAV5 Rep-encoding P19-generated transcripts are primarily polyadenylated within the central intron and not efficiently spliced; however, surprisingly, AAV5 was found to generate high levels of a Rep40-like protein. The AAV5 Rep40-like protein was generated by internal initiation and has the same C terminus as Rep52. Although precluded from using alternative splicing to generate multiple Rep isoforms, AAV5 ensures the production of a Rep40-like protein by utilizing a novel internal translation initiation event. PMID:19889770

  11. Analysis of mutations in adeno-associated virus Rep protein in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, D M; Ni, T H; Muzyczka, N

    1992-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep protein is required for both viral DNA replication and transactivation of the AAV promoters. Here we report the effects of mutations in the rep gene on transcription and replication in vivo and terminal repeat binding and terminal resolution site (trs) endonuclease activities in vitro. In all, we examined 10 in-frame deletions and 14 amino acid substitution mutations at eight positions. The point mutations were targeted to regions that are highly conserved among the parvovirus nonstructural proteins and include the extended ATPase domain of the AAV Rep protein. The mutations identify at least two noncontiguous regions of Rep which are essential for terminal repeat binding (amino acids 134 to 242 and amino acids 415 to 490). Mutations in either region render the protein inactive for both DNA replication and transactivation. In addition, mutations within a putative ATPase region also cause defects in replication and transactivation in vivo as well as in the ATP-dependent trs endonuclease activity in vitro. These results suggest that Rep transactivates via a novel mechanism which may require both DNA binding and an enzymatic activity, namely, ATPase or DNA helicase activity. Images PMID:1318396

  12. Intracellular route and biological activity of exogenously delivered Rep proteins from the adeno-associated virus type 2

    SciTech Connect

    Awedikian, Rafi; Francois, Achille; Guilbaud, Mickael; Moullier, Philippe; Salvetti, Anna . E-mail: anna.salvetti@univ-nantes.fr

    2005-05-10

    The two large Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, from the adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) are required for AAV-2 DNA replication, site-specific integration, and for the regulation of viral gene expression. The study of their activities is dependent on the ability to deliver these proteins to the cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. We evaluated the ability of a protein transduction domain (PTD) derived from the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) TAT protein to drive the cellular internalization of exogenously delivered PTD-fused Rep68 proteins. This analysis unexpectedly revealed that recombinant Rep68 alone, in the absence of any PTD, could be endocytosed by the cells. Rep68 as the chimeric TAT-Rep68 proteins were internalized through endocytosis in clathrin-coated vesicles and retained in late endosomes/lysosomes with no detectable nuclear localization. In the presence of adenovirus, the Rep proteins could translocate into the nucleus where they displayed a biological activity. These findings support recent reports on the mechanism of entry of TAT-fused proteins and also revealed a new property of Rep68.

  13. Strategies to generate high-titer, high-potency recombinant AAV3 serotype vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Yin, Zifei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Daniel; Aslanidi, George; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3 (AAV3) vectors were largely ignored previously, owing to their poor transduction efficiency in most cells and tissues examined, our initial observation of the selective tropism of AAV3 serotype vectors for human liver cancer cell lines and primary human hepatocytes has led to renewed interest in this serotype. AAV3 vectors and their variants have recently proven to be extremely efficient in targeting human and nonhuman primate hepatocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. In the present studies, we wished to evaluate the relative contributions of the cis-acting inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) from AAV3 (ITR3), as well as the trans-acting Rep proteins from AAV3 (Rep3) in the AAV3 vector production and transduction. To this end, we utilized two helper plasmids: pAAVr2c3, which carries rep2 and cap3 genes, and pAAVr3c3, which carries rep3 and cap3 genes. The combined use of AAV3 ITRs, AAV3 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids led to the production of recombinant vectors, AAV3-Rep3/ITR3, with up to approximately two to fourfold higher titers than AAV3-Rep2/ITR2 vectors produced using AAV2 ITRs, AAV2 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids. We also observed that the transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors was approximately fourfold higher than that of Rep2/ITR2 AAV3 vectors in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 vectors was increased by ~10-fold, when AAV3 capsids containing mutations in two surface-exposed residues (serine 663 and threonine 492) were used to generate a S663V+T492V double-mutant AAV3 vector. The Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors also transduced human liver tumors in vivo approximately twofold more efficiently than those generated with Rep2/ITR2. Our data suggest that the transduction efficiency of AAV3 vectors can be significantly improved both using homologous Rep proteins and ITRs as well as by capsid optimization. Thus, the combined use of homologous Rep

  14. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep protein inhibits human papillomavirus type 16 E2 recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Marcello, A; Massimi, P; Banks, L; Giacca, M

    2000-10-01

    Infection by human adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a possible protective factor in the development of cervical carcinomas associated with human papillomaviruses (HPV). The replicative proteins of AAV2 (Rep) have been implicated in the inhibition of papillomavirus replication and transforming activities, although the molecular events underlying these effects are poorly understood. We observed that each of the four forms of AAV2 Rep inhibited the E1- and E2-driven replication of oncogenic HPV type 16 (HPV16). Rep40, corresponding to the C-terminal domain of all Rep proteins, inhibited both HPV DNA replication and HPV16 E2-mediated transactivation. Rep40 specifically bound the N-terminal transactivation domain of HPV16 E2 both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction was found to specifically disrupt the binding of E2 to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of Rep on HPV16 E2 transactivation was rescued by the overexpression of p300. These data indicate a novel role of Rep in the down-regulation of papillomaviruses through inhibition of complex formation between the HPV16 E2 transcriptional activator and its cellular coactivator, p300. PMID:10982355

  15. Analysis of the subcellular localization of the proteins Rep, Rep' and Cap of porcine circovirus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterbusch, T. . E-mail: finsterbuscht@rki.de; Steinfeldt, T.; Caliskan, R.; Mankertz, A.

    2005-12-05

    Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) encodes two major ORFs. The cap gene comprises the major structural protein of PCV, the rep gene specifies Rep and Rep', which are both essential for initiating the replication of the viral DNA. Rep corresponds to the full-length protein, whereas Rep' is a truncated splice product that is frame-shifted in its C-terminal sequence. In this study, the cellular localization of PCV1-encoded proteins was investigated by immune fluorescence techniques using antibodies against Rep, Rep' and Cap and by expression of viral proteins fused to green and red fluorescence proteins. Rep and Rep' protein co-localized in the nucleus of infected cells as well as in cells transfected with plasmids expressing Rep and Rep' fused to fluorescence proteins, but no signal was seen in the nucleoli. Rep and Rep' carry three potential nuclear localization signals in their identical N-termini, and the contribution of these motifs to nuclear import was experimentally dissected. In contrast to the rep gene products, the localization of the Cap protein varied. While the Cap protein was restricted to the nucleoli in plasmid-transfected cells and was also localized in the nucleoli at an early stage of PCV1 infection, it was seen in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm later in infection, suggesting that a shuttling between distinct cellular compartments occurs.

  16. Identification of a Functionally Relevant Adeno-Associated Virus Rep68 Oligomeric Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bardelli, Martino; Zárate-Pérez, Francisco; Agúndez, Leticia; Linden, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of the human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) is orchestrated by four Rep proteins. The large Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, are remarkably multifunctional and display a range of biochemical activities, including DNA binding, nicking, and unwinding. Functionally, Rep78 and Rep68 are involved in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and genomic integration. Structurally, the Rep proteins share an AAA+ domain characteristic of superfamily 3 helicases, with the large Rep proteins additionally containing an N-terminal origin-binding domain (OBD) that specifically binds and nicks DNA. The combination of these domains, coupled with dynamic oligomerization properties, is the basis for the remarkable multifunctionality displayed by Rep68 and Rep78 during the AAV life cycle. In this report, we describe an oligomeric interface formed by Rep68 and demonstrate how disruption of this interface has drastic effects on both the oligomerization and functionality of the Rep proteins. Our results support a role for the four-helix bundle in the helicase domain of Rep68 as a bona fide oligomerization domain (OD). We have identified key residues in the OD that are critical for the stabilization of the Rep68-Rep68 interface; mutation of these key residues disrupts the enzymatic activities of Rep68, including DNA binding and nicking, and compromises viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation of the viral promoters. Taken together, our data contribute to our understanding of the dynamic and substrate-responsive Rep78/68 oligomerization that is instrumental in the regulation of the DNA transitions that take place during the AAV life cycle. IMPORTANCE The limited genome size of small viruses has driven the evolution of highly multifunctional proteins that integrate different domains and enzymatic activities within a single polypeptide. The Rep68 protein from adeno-associated virus (AAV) combines a DNA binding and endonuclease domain with a

  17. Cloning of adeno-associated virus type 4 (AAV4) and generation of recombinant AAV4 particles.

    PubMed Central

    Chiorini, J A; Yang, L; Liu, Y; Safer, B; Kotin, R M

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized the full-length genome of adeno-associated virus type 4 (AAV4). The genome of AAV4 is 4,767 nucleotides in length and contains an expanded p5 promoter region compared to AAV2 and AAV3. Within the inverted terminal repeat (ITR), several base changes were identified with respect to AAV2. However, these changes did not affect the ability of this region to fold into a hairpin structure. Within the ITR, the terminal resolution site and Rep binding sites were conserved; however, the Rep binding site was expanded from three GAGC repeats to four. The Rep gene product of AAV4 shows greater than 90% homology to the Rep products of serotypes 2 and 3, with none of the changes occurring in regions which had previously been shown to affect the known functions of Rep68 or Rep78. Most of the differences in the capsid proteins lie in regions which are thought to be on the exterior surface of the viral capsid. It is these unique regions which are most likely to be responsible for the lack of cross-reacting antibodies and the altered tissue tropism compared to AAV2. The results of our studies, performed with a recombinant version of AAV4 carrying a lacZ reporter gene, suggest that AAV4 can transduce human, monkey, and rat cells. Furthermore, comparison of transduction efficiencies in a number of cell lines, competition cotransduction experiments, and the effect of trypsin on transduction efficiency all suggest that the cellular receptor for AAV4 is distinct from that of AAV2. PMID:9261407

  18. PepGMV Rep-Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Mejía-Teniente, Laura; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2012-01-01

    The Geminiviruses genome is a small, single strand DNA that replicates in the plant cell nucleus. Analogous to animal DNA viruses, Geminiviruses depend on the host replication machinery to amplify their genomes and only supply the factors required to initiate their replication. Consequently, Geminiviruses remove the cell-cycle arrest and induce the host replication machinery using an endocycle process. They encode proteins, such as the conserved replication-associated proteins (Rep) that interact with retinoblastoma-like proteins in plants and alter the cell division cycle in yeasts. Therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the impact of Pepper Golden Mosaic Virus (PepGMV) Rep protein in mammalian cells. Results indicate that the pTracer-SV40:Rep construction obtained in this work can be used to analyze the Rep protein effect in mammalian cells in order to compare the cell cycle regulation mechanisms in plants and animals. PMID:23170183

  19. The 2microm-plasmid-encoded Rep1 and Rep2 proteins interact with each other and colocalize to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Y T; Wu, X L; Biswal, S; Velmurugan, S; Volkert, F C; Jayaram, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficient partitioning of the 2microm plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at cell division requires two plasmid-encoded proteins (Rep1p and Rep2p) and a cis-acting locus, REP3 (STB). By using protein hybrids containing fusions of the Rep proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP), we show here that fluorescence from GFP-Rep1p or GFP-Rep2p is almost exclusively localized in the nucleus in a cir+ strain. Nuclear localization of GFP-Rep1p and GFP-Rep2p, though discernible, is less efficient in a cir(0) host. GFP-Rep2p or GFP-Rep1p is able to promote the stability of a 2microm circle-derived plasmid harboring REP1 or REP2, respectively, in a cir(0) background. Under these conditions, fluorescence from GFP-Rep2p or GFP-Rep1p is concentrated within the nucleus, as is the case in cir+ cells. This characteristic nuclear accumulation is not dependent on the expression of the FLP or RAF1 gene of the 2microm circle. Nuclear colocalization of Rep1p and Rep2p is consistent with the hypothesis that the two proteins directly or indirectly interact to form a functional bipartite or high-order protein complex. Immunoprecipitation experiments as well as baiting assays using GST-Rep hybrid proteins suggest a direct interaction between Rep1p and Rep2p which, in principle, may be modulated by other yeast proteins. Furthermore, these assays provide evidence for Rep1p-Rep1p and Rep2p-Rep2p associations as well. The sum of these interactions may be important in controlling the effective cellular concentration of the Rep1p-Rep2p complex. PMID:9393716

  20. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  1. Viral and Cellular Components of AAV2 Replication Compartments.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Rebecca; Seyffert, Michael; Pereira, Bruna de Andrade; Fraefel, Cornel

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is a helpervirus-dependent parvovirus with a bi-phasic life cycle comprising latency in absence and lytic replication in presence of a helpervirus, such as adenovirus (Ad) or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Helpervirus-supported AAV2 replication takes place in replication compartments (RCs) in the cell nucleus where virus DNA replication and transcription occur. RCs consist of a defined set of helper virus-, AAV2-, and cellular proteins. Here we compare the profile of cellular proteins recruited into AAV2 RCs or identified in Rep78-associated complexes when either Ad or HSV-1 is the helpervirus, and we discuss the potential roles of some of these proteins in AAV2 and helpervirus infection. PMID:24222808

  2. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  3. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments.

    PubMed

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N P; Riedmayr, Lisa M; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  4. Transgene expression after rep-mediated site-specific integration into chromosome 19.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Nicola J; Gomos, Janette; Falck-Pedersen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    We have used a plasmid-based transfection model of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep-mediated site-specific integration (RMSSI) pathway to characterize the stability and expression of a site-specifically integrated transgene (either green fluorescent protein [GFP] or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase [CAT]). Three plasmids containing the AAV p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) have been used to study integration and transgene expression in HeLa cells: (1) pRepGFP(itr+) contains both AAV ITRs, rep, and p5IEE and can be used as either a plasmid or rAAV vehicle for integration; (2) pRepGFP(itr-) contains the AAV rep gene and the p5IEE; (3) pAd-p5CAT contains only the 138-bp p5IEE of AAV. The data presented demonstrate that in the absence of drug selection, all three constructs undergo site-specific integration (efficiencies of between 10 and 40% of transduced cell lines). At 6 weeks posttransfection most cell lines that underwent RMSSI also expressed the appropriate transgene product. By 18 weeks posttransfection cell lines that were established with rep in cis to the transgene showed a decline in transgene expression as well as a loss of transgene DNA. In many cell lines, there appears to be transgene-containing DNA that does not contribute to gene expression. Data support a model of gene expression and transgene instability through a Rep-mediated pathway. In contrast to rep-containing cell lines, clonal cell lines containing p5IEECAT (with Rep provided in trans) maintained both the integrated transgene and transgene expression throughout the entire experimental time course (18 weeks). PMID:14965377

  5. Expression, purification and antibody preparation of PCV2 Rep and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyuan; Ma, Teng; Pang, Daxin; Su, Dan; Chen, Fuwang; Chen, Xinrong; Guo, Ning; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rep and ORF3 proteins are important functional proteins of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). Here, Rep and ORF3 genes were cloned, expressed and used to raise polyclonal antibodies. The result showed the recombinant plasmids of Rep and ORF3 genes constructed in this study were expressed efficiently in the prokaryotic system, and the recombinant proteins had antigenicity and immunogenicity. Furthermore, reactivity and specificity of the antiserums were characterized by western blot and indirect immunofluorescent assays. The results elucidated that polyclonal antiserum prepared with Rep or ORF3 had good reactivity and specificity against PCV2, or the Rep and ORF3 expressed in PK-15 cells, respectively. The Rep protein is promising for PCV2 antibody and vaccine development. These results will be helpful for further studies focusing on pathogenesis of PCV2 and serology diagnostic test or vaccine development against PCV2. PMID:26812108

  6. Plasmid-Encoded RepA Proteins Specifically Autorepress Individual repABC Operons in the Multipartite Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Genome

    PubMed Central

    Żebracki, Kamil; Koper, Piotr; Marczak, Małgorzata; Skorupska, Anna; Mazur, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia commonly have very complex genomes with a chromosome and several large plasmids that possess genes belonging to the repABC family. RepA and RepB are members of the ParA and ParB families of partitioning proteins, respectively, whereas RepC is crucial for plasmid replication. In the repABC replicons, partitioning and replication functions are transcriptionally linked resulting in complex regulation of rep gene expression. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii TA1 (RtTA1) consists of a chromosome and four plasmids (pRleTA1a-d), equipped with functional repABC genes. In this work, the regulation of transcription of the individual repABC cassettes of the four RtTA1 plasmids was studied. The involvement of the RepA and RepB as well as parS-like centromere sites in this process was depicted, demonstrating some dissimilarity in expression of respective rep regions. RtTA1 repABC genes of individual plasmids formed operons, which were negatively regulated by RepA and RepB. Individual RepA were able to bind to DNA without added nucleotides, but in the presence of ADP, bound specifically to their own operator sequences containing imperfect palindromes, and caused operon autorepression, whereas the addition of ATP stimulated non-specific binding of RepA to DNA. The RepA proteins were able to dimerize/oligomerize: in general dimers formed independently of ATP or ADP, although ATP diminished the concentration of oligomers that were produced. By the comprehensive approach focusing on a set of plasmids instead of individual replicons, the work highlighted subtle differences between the organization and regulation of particular rep operons as well as the structures and specificity of RepA proteins, which contribute to the fine-tuned coexistence of several replicons with similar repABC cassettes in the complex bacterial genome. PMID:26147968

  7. Plasmid-Encoded RepA Proteins Specifically Autorepress Individual repABC Operons in the Multipartite Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Genome.

    PubMed

    Żebracki, Kamil; Koper, Piotr; Marczak, Małgorzata; Skorupska, Anna; Mazur, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia commonly have very complex genomes with a chromosome and several large plasmids that possess genes belonging to the repABC family. RepA and RepB are members of the ParA and ParB families of partitioning proteins, respectively, whereas RepC is crucial for plasmid replication. In the repABC replicons, partitioning and replication functions are transcriptionally linked resulting in complex regulation of rep gene expression. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii TA1 (RtTA1) consists of a chromosome and four plasmids (pRleTA1a-d), equipped with functional repABC genes. In this work, the regulation of transcription of the individual repABC cassettes of the four RtTA1 plasmids was studied. The involvement of the RepA and RepB as well as parS-like centromere sites in this process was depicted, demonstrating some dissimilarity in expression of respective rep regions. RtTA1 repABC genes of individual plasmids formed operons, which were negatively regulated by RepA and RepB. Individual RepA were able to bind to DNA without added nucleotides, but in the presence of ADP, bound specifically to their own operator sequences containing imperfect palindromes, and caused operon autorepression, whereas the addition of ATP stimulated non-specific binding of RepA to DNA. The RepA proteins were able to dimerize/oligomerize: in general dimers formed independently of ATP or ADP, although ATP diminished the concentration of oligomers that were produced. By the comprehensive approach focusing on a set of plasmids instead of individual replicons, the work highlighted subtle differences between the organization and regulation of particular rep operons as well as the structures and specificity of RepA proteins, which contribute to the fine-tuned coexistence of several replicons with similar repABC cassettes in the complex bacterial genome. PMID:26147968

  8. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3). PMID:25768890

  9. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  10. Rep provides a second motor at the replisome to promote duplication of protein-bound DNA.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Atkinson, John; Gupta, Milind K; Mahdi, Akeel A; Gwynn, Emma J; Rudolph, Christian J; Moon, Peter B; van Knippenberg, Ingeborg C; Cadman, Chris J; Dillingham, Mark S; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-11-25

    Nucleoprotein complexes present challenges to genome stability by acting as potent blocks to replication. One attractive model of how such conflicts are resolved is direct targeting of blocked forks by helicases with the ability to displace the blocking protein-DNA complex. We show that Rep and UvrD each promote movement of E. coli replisomes blocked by nucleoprotein complexes in vitro, that such an activity is required to clear protein blocks (primarily transcription complexes) in vivo, and that a polarity of translocation opposite that of the replicative helicase is critical for this activity. However, these two helicases are not equivalent. Rep but not UvrD interacts physically and functionally with the replicative helicase. In contrast, UvrD likely provides a general means of protein-DNA complex turnover during replication, repair, and recombination. Rep and UvrD therefore provide two contrasting solutions as to how organisms may promote replication of protein-bound DNA. PMID:19941825

  11. Mutants at the 2-Fold Interface of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Structural Proteins Suggest a Role in Viral Transcription for AAV Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Fikret; Salganik, Maxim; Resztak, Justyna; Singh, Jasbir; Bennett, Antonette; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that an amino acid substitution, Y704A, near the 2-fold interface of adeno-associated virus (AAV) was defective for transcription of the packaged genome (M. Salganik, F. Aydemir, H. J. Nam, R. McKenna, M. Agbandje-McKenna, and N. Muzyczka, J Virol 88:1071–1079, 2013, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02093-13). In this report, we have characterized the defect in 6 additional capsid mutants located in a region ∼30 Å in diameter on the surface of the AAV type 2 (AAV2) capsid near the 2-fold interface. These mutants, which are highly conserved among primate serotypes, displayed a severe defect (3 to 6 logs) in infectivity. All of the mutants accumulated significant levels of uncoated DNA in the nucleus, but none of the mutants were able to accumulate significant amounts of genomic mRNA postinfection. In addition, wild-type (wt) capsids that were bound to the conformational antibody A20, which is known to bind the capsid surface in the region of the mutants, were also defective for transcription. In all cases, the mutant virus particles, as well as the antibody-bound wild-type capsids, were able to enter the cell, travel to the nucleus, uncoat, and synthesize a second strand but were unable to transcribe their genomes. Taken together, the phenotype of these mutants provides compelling evidence that the AAV capsid plays a role in the transcription of its genome, and the mutants map this functional region on the surface of the capsid near the 2-fold interface. This appears to be the first example of a viral structural protein that is also involved in the transcription of the viral genome that it delivers to the nucleus. IMPORTANCE Many viruses package enzymes within their capsids that assist in expressing their genomes postinfection, e.g., retroviruses. A number of nonenveloped viruses, including AAV, carry proteases that are needed for capsid maturation or for capsid modification during infection. We describe here what appears to

  12. Oligomeric Properties of Adeno-Associated Virus Rep68 Reflect Its Multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Bardelli, Martino; Burgner, John W.; Villamil-Jarauta, Maria; Kekilli, Demet; Samso, Monserrat

    2013-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) encodes four regulatory proteins called Rep. The large AAV Rep proteins Rep68 and Rep78 are essential factors required in almost every step of the viral life cycle. Structurally, they share two domains: a modified version of the AAA+ domain that characterizes the SF3 family of helicases and an N-terminal domain that binds DNA specifically. The combination of these two domains imparts extraordinary multifunctionality to work as initiators of DNA replication and regulators of transcription, in addition to their essential role during site-specific integration. Although most members of the SF3 family form hexameric rings in vitro, the oligomeric nature of Rep68 is unclear due to its propensity to aggregate in solution. We report here a comprehensive study to determine the oligomeric character of Rep68 using a combination of methods that includes sedimentation velocity ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy, and hydrodynamic modeling. We have determined that residue Cys151 induces Rep68 to aggregate in vitro. We show that Rep68 displays a concentration-dependent dynamic oligomeric behavior characterized by the presence of two populations: one with monomers and dimers in slow equilibrium and a second one consisting of a mixture of multiple-ring structures of seven and eight members. The presence of either ATP or ADP induces formation of larger complexes formed by the stacking of multiple rings. Taken together, our results support the idea of a Rep68 molecule that exhibits the flexible oligomeric behavior needed to perform the wide range of functions occurring during the AAV life cycle. PMID:23152528

  13. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT↓ AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring ≥6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3′→5′ direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation (∼24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV). PMID:17142233

  14. Geminivirus Rep protein interferes with the plant DNA methylation machinery and suppresses transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Piedra-Aguilera, Alvaro; Cruzado, Lucia; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Castillo, Araceli G

    2013-07-01

    Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that promotes gene silencing and plays an important role in genome defence against transposons and invading DNA viruses. Previous data showed that the largest family of single-stranded DNA viruses, Geminiviridae, prevents methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) by interfering with the proper functioning of the plant methylation cycle. Here, we describe a novel counter-defence strategy used by geminiviruses, which reduces the expression of the plant maintenance DNA methyltransferases, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3), in both locally and systemically infected tissues. We demonstrated that the virus-mediated repression of these two maintenance DNA methyltransferases is widespread among geminivirus species. Additionally, we identified Rep (Replication associated protein) as the geminiviral protein responsible for the repression of MET1 and CMT3, and another viral protein, C4, as an ancillary player in MET1 down-regulation. The presence of Rep suppressed TGS of an Arabidopsis thaliana transgene and of host loci whose expression was strongly controlled by CG methylation. Bisulfite sequencing analyses showed that the expression of Rep caused a substantial reduction in the levels of DNA methylation at CG sites. Our findings suggest that Rep, the only viral protein essential for replication, displays TGS suppressor activity through a mechanism distinct from that thus far described for geminiviruses. PMID:23614786

  15. A 110-kDa nuclear shuttle protein, nucleolin, specifically binds to adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) capsid.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Brown, K E

    1999-05-10

    A 110-kDa protein was copurified with adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) virions after CsCl density gradient isopycnic centrifugation. Amino acid sequence of peptides derived from this protein after tryptic digestion, monoclonal antibody production, and Western blot analysis showed that the copurified protein was the major nucleolar phosphoprotein, human nucleolin. Virus overlay assays demonstrated that AAV-2 capsid specifically bound to the human nucleolin, and immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the in vitro binding of nucleolin and intact AAV-2 capsids but not denatured viral proteins. Double-immunofluorescence staining of infected cells showed that AAV capsid and nucleolin were colocalized in both cytoplasm and nucleus. In addition, when cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions were extracted from AAV-infected KB cells at different time points postinfection, immunoprecipitation data and Western blotting showed that AAV capsid formation and nucleolin interact specifically and share their subcellular localization in infected cells. With the known functions of nucleolin in the synthesis of rRNA and ribosome assembly, binding to single-stranded DNA, and acting as a shuttle between cytoplasm and nucleolus, our data showing that AAV-2 capsid binds specifically to nucleolin both in vitro and in vivo suggest a key role of nucleolin in AAV-2 replication, particularly in capsid assembly. PMID:10329548

  16. High Capsid–Genome Correlation Facilitates Creation of AAV Libraries for Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the “natural” AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid–DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid–genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of “natural” AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid–genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype–genotype correlation. PMID:25586687

  17. The 2B domain of the Escherichia coli Rep protein is not required for DNA helicase activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Brendza, Katherine M; Gauss, George H; Korolev, Sergey; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M

    2002-12-10

    The Escherichia coli Rep protein is a 3' to 5' SF1 DNA helicase required for replication of bacteriophage phiX174 in E. coli, and is structurally homologous to the E. coli UvrD helicase and the Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA helicase. Previous crystallographic studies of Rep protein bound to single-stranded DNA revealed that it can undergo a large conformational change consisting of an approximately 130 degrees rotation of its 2B subdomain about a hinge region connected to the 2A subdomain. Based on crystallographic studies of PcrA, its 2B subdomain has been proposed to form part of its duplex DNA binding site and to play a role in duplex destabilization. To test the role of the 2B subdomain in Rep-catalyzed duplex DNA unwinding, we have deleted its 2B subdomain, replacing it with three glycines, to form the RepDelta2B protein. This RepDelta2B protein can support phiX174 replication in a rep(-) E. coli strain, although the growth rate of E. coli containing the repDelta2B gene is approximately 1.5-fold slower than with the wild-type rep gene. Pre-steady-state, single-turnover DNA unwinding kinetics experiments show that purified RepDelta2B protein has DNA helicase activity in vitro and unwinds an 18-bp DNA duplex with rates at least as fast as wild-type Rep, and with higher extents of unwinding and higher affinity for the DNA substrate. These studies show that the 2B domain of Rep is not required for DNA helicase activity in vivo or in vitro, and that it does not facilitate DNA unwinding in vitro. PMID:12441398

  18. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments. PMID:26517888

  19. The adeno-associated virus rep gene suppresses herpes simplex virus-induced DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Bürkle, A; Stephan, S; zur Hausen, H

    1990-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces within the host cell genome DNA amplification which can be suppressed by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV). To characterize the AAV functions mediating this effect, cloned AAV type 2 wild-type or mutant genomes were transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells together with the six HSV replication genes (encoding UL5, UL8, major DNA-binding protein, DNA polymerase, UL42, and UL52) which together are necessary and sufficient for the induction of SV40 DNA amplification (R. Heilbronn and H. zur Hausen, J. Virol. 63:3683-3692, 1989). The AAV rep gene was identified as being responsible for the complete inhibition of HSV-induced SV40 DNA amplification. Likewise, rep inhibited origin-dependent HSV replication. rep neither killed the transfected host cells nor interfered with gene expression from the cotransfected amplification genes. This points to a specific interference with HSV-induced DNA amplification. Images PMID:2159559

  20. Novel ssDNA virus recovered from estuarine Mollusc (Amphibola crenata) whose replication associated protein (Rep) shares similarities with Rep-like sequences of bacterial origin.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Goldstien, Sharyn; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Gomez, Christopher; Harding, Jon S; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-05-01

    Over the past couple of years highly diverse novel ssDNA viruses have been discovered. Here, we present the first ssDNA virus, Gastropod-associated circular ssDNA virus (GaCSV), recovered from a mollusc Amphibola crenata Martyn 1784, which is a deposit feeder that grazes micro-organisms and organic detritus on the surface of tidal mudflats. The GaCSV (2351 nt) genome contains two large bidirectionally transcribed ORFs. The smaller ORF (874 nt) has similarities to viral replication-associated protein (Rep) sequences of some bacteria and circoviruses, whereas the larger ORF (955 nt) does not relate to any sequences in public databases and we presume it potentially encodes the capsid protein. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the GaCSV Rep clusters with Rep-like sequences of bacterial origin, highlighting the role of ssDNA viruses in horizontal gene transfer. The occurrence of previously unknown viruses in organisms associated with human pollution is a relatively unexplored field. PMID:23364192

  1. Rep-mediated nicking of the adeno-associated virus origin requires two biochemical activities, DNA helicase activity and transesterification.

    PubMed

    Brister, J R; Muzyczka, N

    1999-11-01

    The single-stranded adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome is flanked by terminal hairpinned origins of DNA replication (terminal repeats [TRs]) that are nicked at the terminal resolution site (trs) by the AAV Rep protein in an ATP-dependent, site-specific manner. Here we determine the minimal trs sequence necessary for Rep cleavage, 3'-CCGGT/TG-5', and show that this 7-base core sequence is required only on the nicked strand. We also identify a potential stem-loop structure at the trs. Interestingly, Rep nicking on a TR substrate that fixes this trs stem-loop in the extruded form no longer requires ATP. This suggests that ATP-dependent Rep helicase activity is necessary to unwind the duplex trs and extrude the stem-loop structure, prior to the ATP-independent Rep transesterification reaction. The extrusion of origin stem-loop structures prior to nicking appears to be a general mechanism shared by plant and animal viruses and bacterial plasmids. In the case of AAV, this mechanism of TR nicking would provide a possible regulatory function. PMID:10516041

  2. Gene therapy for hemophilia B with liver-specific element mediated by Rep-RBE site-specific integration system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengxin; Ye, Juan; Zhang, Amin; Xie, Linjun; Shen, Qi; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Jinzhong

    2015-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a nonpathogenic virus capable of targeting human chromosome 19 for integration at AAVS1 site, and a 16 bp Rep binding element (RBE) sequence of AAV was sufficient for mediating this specific integration in the presence of AAV regulation proteins (Rep). Previously, we cotransduced 2 plasmids, pRBE-CMV-hFIX and pRC, into the AAVS1 transgenic mice by hydrodynamic injection, and a long-term expression of human coagulation Factor IX (hFIX) was observed. The corresponding AAVS1 locus site-specific integrations were verified by nested polymerase chain reaction. In this study, we established a novel hFIX expression plasmid, pRBE-HCR-hAAT-hFIX, driven by a liver-specific promoter by replacing the CMV promoter of pRBE-CMV-hFIX with a humanized promoter consisting of HCR-hAAT. The expression of hFIX in vitro was almost the same in transient transfection of pRBE-CMV-hFIX or pRBE-HCR-hAAT-hFIX. AAVS1-specific integrations were identified both in mice transfected with pRC/pRBE-CMV-hFIX cocktail and pRC/pRBE-HCR-hAAT-hFIX cocktail. However, the expression of hFIX of pRBE-HCR-hAAT-hFIX mice was higher and persisted longer. It achieved more than 1% of normal plasma hFIX concentration and maintained for 240 days. The result suggested that RBE-HCR-hAAT element could improve the expression of hFIX and present potential usage of Rep-RBE site-specific integration in gene therapy for hemophilia B. PMID:25295466

  3. Specific GFP-binding artificial proteinsRep): a new tool for in vitro to live cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Urvoas, Agathe; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Moutel, Sandrine; Desmadril, Michel; Perez, Franck; Gautreau, Alexis; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie

    2015-01-01

    A family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on a natural family of helical repeat was previously designed. αRep members are efficiently expressed, folded and extremely stable proteins. A large αRep library was constructed creating proteins with a randomized interaction surface. In the present study, we show that the αRep library is an efficient source of tailor-made specific proteins with direct applications in biochemistry and cell biology. From this library, we selected by phage display αRep binders with nanomolar dissociation constants against the GFP. The structures of two independent αRep binders in complex with the GFP target were solved by X-ray crystallography revealing two totally different binding modes. The affinity of the selected αReps for GFP proved sufficient for practically useful applications such as pull-down experiments. αReps are disulfide free proteins and are efficiently and functionally expressed in eukaryotic cells: GFP-specific αReps are clearly sequestrated by their cognate target protein addressed to various cell compartments. These results suggest that αRep proteins with tailor-made specificity can be selected and used in living cells to track, modulate or interfere with intracellular processes. PMID:26182430

  4. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  5. Novel Caprine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Capsid (AAV-Go.1) Is Closely Related to the Primate AAV-5 and Has Unique Tropism and Neutralization Properties

    PubMed Central

    Arbetman, Alejandra E.; Lochrie, Michael; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wellman, Jennifer; Scallan, Ciaran; Doroudchi, Mohammad M.; Randlev, Britta; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Liu, Tongyao; Smith, Peter; Lehmkuhl, Howard; Hobbs, Lea Ann; Pierce, Glenn F.; Colosi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Preexisting humoral immunity to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors may limit their clinical utility in gene delivery. We describe a novel caprine AAV (AAV-Go.1) capsid with unique biological properties. AAV-Go.1 capsid was cloned from goat-derived adenovirus preparations. Surprisingly, AAV-Go.1 capsid was 94% identical to the human AAV-5, with differences predicted to be largely on the surface and on or under the spike-like protrusions. In an in vitro neutralization assay using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) (intravenous immune globulin [IVIG]), AAV-Go.1 had higher resistance than AAV-5 (100-fold) and resistance similar to that of AAV-4 or AAV-8. In an in vivo model, SCID mice were pretreated with IVIG to generate normal human IgG plasma levels prior to the administration of AAV human factor IX vectors. Protein expression after intramuscular administration of AAV-Go.1 was unaffected in IVIG-pretreated mice, while it was reduced 5- and 10-fold after administration of AAV-1 and AAV-8, respectively. In contrast, protein expression after intravenous administration of AAV-Go.1 was reduced 7.1-fold, similar to the 3.8-fold reduction observed after AAV-8administration in IVIG-pretreated mice, and protein expression was essentially extinguished after AAV-2 administration in mice pretreated with much less IVIG (15-fold). AAV-Go.1 vectors also demonstrated a marked tropism for lung when administered intravenously in SCID mice. The pulmonary tropism and high neutralization resistance to human preexisting antibodies suggest novel therapeutic uses for AAV-Go.1 vectors, including targeting diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Nonprimate sources of AAVs may be useful to identify additional capsids with distinct tropisms and high resistance to neutralization by human preexisting antibodies. PMID:16306595

  6. Functions of Rep and Rep' during porcine circovirus rolling-circle replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCV replicates its single-stranded (ss) DNA genome via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. In contrast to other RCR biological systems which utilize only one multi-functional protein (Rep) to replicate their respective genomes, PCV requires two proteins (Rep and Rep'). Rep and Rep' are i...

  7. Purification and characterization of RepA, a protein involved in the copy number control of plasmid pLS1.

    PubMed Central

    del Solar, G H; de al Campa, A G; Pérez-Martín, J; Choli, T; Espinosa, M

    1989-01-01

    The promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pLS1 encodes for the 5.1 kDa RepA protein, involved in the regulation of the plasmid copy number. Synthesis of RepA was observed both in Bacillus subtilis minicells and in an Escherichia coli expression system. From this system, the protein has been purified and it appears to be a dimer of identical subunits. The amino acid sequence of RepA has been determined. RepA shows the alpha helix-turn-alpha helix motif typical of many DNA-binding proteins and it shares homology with a number of repressors, specially with the TrfB repressor encoded by the broad-host-range plasmid RK2. DNase I footprinting revealed that the RepA target is located in the region of the promoter for the repA and repB genes. Trans-complementation analysis showed that in vivo, RepA behaves as a repressor by regulating the plasmid copy number. We propose that the regulatory role of RepA is by limitation of the synthesis of the initiator protein RepB. Images PMID:2497439

  8. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4−/− mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5′-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4−/− mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1. PMID:26420842

  9. DNA Helicase Activity Is Associated with the Replication Initiator Protein Rep of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Geminivirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Clérot, Danielle; Bernardi, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    The Rep protein of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a single-stranded DNA virus of plants, is the replication initiator essential for virus replication. TYLCSV Rep has been classified among ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ ATPases), in superfamily 3 of small DNA and RNA virus replication initiators whose paradigmatic member is simian virus 40 large T antigen. Members of this family are DNA- or RNA-dependent ATPases with helicase activity necessary for viral replication. Another distinctive feature of AAA+ ATPases is their quaternary structure, often composed of hexameric rings. TYLCSV Rep has ATPase activity, but the helicase activity, which is instrumental in further characterization of the mechanism of rolling-circle replication used by geminiviruses, has been a longstanding question. We present results showing that TYLCSV Rep lacking the 121 N-terminal amino acids has helicase activity comparable to that of the other helicases: requirements for a 3′ overhang and 3′-to-5′ polarity of unwinding, with some distinct features and with a minimal AAA+ ATPase domain. We also show that the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric state of the protein. PMID:16943286

  10. Transcriptomics of tomato plants infected with TYLCSV or expressing the central TYLCSV Rep protein domain uncover changes impacting pathogen response and senescence.

    PubMed

    Lucioli, Alessandra; Perla, Carlo; Berardi, Alessandra; Gatti, Francesca; Spanò, Laura; Tavazza, Mario

    2016-06-01

    To establish a successful infection viruses need to overcome plant innate immune responses and redirect host gene expression for their multiplication and diffusion. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) is a geminivirus, which causes significant economic losses in tomato. The multifunctional replication associated geminivirus protein (Rep) has an important role during viral infection. In particular, the Rep central domain spanning from aa 120 to 180 is known to interact with viral and host factors. In this study, we used long serial analysis of gene expression to analyse the transcriptional profiles of transgenic tomato plants expressing the first 210 amino acids of TYLCSV Rep (Rep210) and TYLCSV-infected wild-type tomato plants (Wt-Ty). Also, we compared these profiles with those of transgenic Rep130 tomatoes. Comparison of Wt-Ty and Rep210 libraries with the wild-type one identified 118 and 203 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), respectively. Importantly, 55% of Wt-Ty DEGs were in common with Rep210, and no ones showed opposite expression. Conversely, a negligible overlap was found between Rep130 DEGs and Wt-Ty and Rep210 ones. TYLCSV- and Rep210-repressed genes, but not induced ones, overlapped with the leaf senescence process. Interestingly, TYLCSV upregulates expression of genes involved in the negative regulation of programmed cell death (PCD), several of which were also regulated by the abscisic acid. Rep210 upregulated genes related to defence response, immune system processes and negative regulation of PCD. Collectively, our results support a model in which the Rep central domain has a pivotal role in redirecting host plant gene expression. PMID:26966899

  11. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Gronenborn, Bruno; Jeske, Holger

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  12. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Choroideremia: Preclinical Studies in Personalized Models

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Kohnke, Monika; Black, Aaron D.; Alexandrov, Krill; Zhou, Shangzhen; Maguire, Albert M.; Chung, Daniel C.; Mac, Helen; Sullivan, Lisa; Gadue, Paul; Bennicelli, Jeannette L.; French, Deborah L.; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Choroideremia (CHM) is an X- linked retinal degeneration that is symptomatic in the 1st or 2nd decade of life causing nyctalopia and loss of peripheral vision. The disease progresses through mid-life, when most patients become blind. CHM is a favorable target for gene augmentation therapy, as the disease is due to loss of function of a protein necessary for retinal cell health, Rab Escort Protein 1 (REP1).The CHM cDNA can be packaged in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), which has an established track record in human gene therapy studies, and, in addition, there are sensitive and quantitative assays to document REP1 activity. An animal model that accurately reflects the human condition is not available. In this study, we tested the ability to restore REP1 function in personalized in vitro models of CHM: lymphoblasts and induced pluripotent stems cells (iPSCs) from human patients. The initial step of evaluating safety of the treatment was carried out by evaluating for acute retinal histopathologic effects in normal-sighted mice and no obvious toxicity was identified. Delivery of the CHM cDNA to affected cells restores REP1 enzymatic activity and also restores proper protein trafficking. The gene transfer is efficient and the preliminary safety data are encouraging. These studies pave the way for a human clinical trial of gene therapy for CHM. PMID:23667438

  13. Selection of Specific Protein Binders for Pre-Defined Targets from an Optimized Library of Artificial Helicoidal Repeat Proteins (alphaRep)

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a “filtration” procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×109 independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties. PMID:24014183

  14. Proof of concept for AAV2/5-mediated gene therapy in iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelium of a choroideremia patient

    PubMed Central

    Cereso, Nicolas; Pequignot, Marie O; Robert, Lorenne; Becker, Fabienne; De Luca, Valerie; Nabholz, Nicolas; Rigau, Valerie; De Vos, John; Hamel, Christian P; Kalatzis, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) comprise a large group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases that lead to progressive vision loss, for which a paucity of disease-mimicking animal models renders preclinical studies difficult. We sought to develop pertinent human cellular IRD models, beginning with choroideremia, caused by mutations in the CHM gene encoding Rab escort protein 1 (REP1). We reprogrammed REP1-deficient fibroblasts from a CHM-/y patient into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which we differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This iPSC-derived RPE is a polarized monolayer with a classic morphology, expresses characteristic markers, is functional for fluid transport and phagocytosis, and mimics the biochemical phenotype of patients. We assayed a panel of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector serotypes and showed that AAV2/5 is the most efficient at transducing the iPSC-derived RPE and that CHM gene transfer normalizes the biochemical phenotype. The high, and unmatched, in vitro transduction efficiency is likely aided by phagocytosis and mimics the scenario that an AAV vector encounters in vivo in the subretinal space. We demonstrate the superiority of AAV2/5 in the human RPE and address the potential of patient iPSC–derived RPE to provide a proof-of-concept model for gene replacement in the absence of an appropriate animal model. PMID:26015956

  15. Targeted Gene Delivery to the Enteric Nervous System Using AAV: A Comparison Across Serotypes and Capsid Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Benskey, Matthew J; Kuhn, Nathan C; Galligan, James J; Garcia, Joanna; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Mueller, Christian; Boye, Sanford L; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most widely used gene transfer systems in research and clinical trials. AAV can transduce a wide range of biological tissues, however to date, there has been no investigation on targeted AAV transduction of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Here, we examined the efficiency, tropism, spread, and immunogenicity of AAV transduction in the ENS. Rats received direct injections of various AAV serotypes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the descending colon. AAV serotypes tested included; AAV 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, or 9 and the AAV2 and AAV8 capsid mutants, AAV2-Y444F, AAV2-tripleY-F, AAV2-tripleY-F+T-V, AAV8-Y733F, and AAV8-doubeY-F+T-V. Transduction, as determined by GFP-positive cells, occurred in neurons and enteric glia within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ENS. AAV6 and AAV9 showed the highest levels of transduction within the ENS. Transduction efficiency scaled with titer and time, was translated to the murine ENS, and produced no vector-related immune response. A single injection of AAV into the colon covered an area of ~47 mm2. AAV9 primarily transduced neurons, while AAV6 transduced enteric glia and neurons. This is the first report on targeted AAV transduction of neurons and glia in the ENS. PMID:25592336

  16. Functionalized silk assembled from a recombinant spider silk fusion protein (Z-4RepCT) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Lau, Cheuk H; Ishida, Takuya; Ramström, Margareta; Sandgren, Mats; Hedhammar, My

    2016-05-01

    Functional biological materials are a growing research area with potential applicability in medicine and biotechnology. Using genetic engineering, the possibility to introduce additional functions into spider silk-based materials has been realized. Recently, a recombinant spider silk fusion protein, Z-4RepCT, was produced intracellularly in Escherichia coli and could after purification self-assemble into silk-like fibers with ability to bind antibodies via the IgG-binding Z domain. In this study, the use of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris for production of Z-4RepCT has been investigated. Temperature, pH and production time were influencing the amount of soluble Z-4RepCT retrieved from the extracellular fraction. Purification of secreted Z-4RepCT resulted in a mixture of full-length and degraded silk proteins that failed to self-assemble into fibers. A position in the C-terminal domain of 4RepCT was identified as being subjected to proteolytic cleavage by proteases in the Pichia culture supernatant. Moreover, the C-terminal domain was subjected to glycosylation during production in P. pastoris. These observed alterations of the CT domain are suggested to contribute to the failure in fiber assembly. As alternative approach, Z-4RepCT retrieved from the intracellular fraction, which was less degraded, was used and shown to retain ability to assemble into silk-like fibers after enzymatic deglycosylation. PMID:26814048

  17. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D.; Thomson, Rachel E.; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks’ treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  18. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size.

    PubMed

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D; Thomson, Rachel E; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks' treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  19. Conformational plasticity of RepB, the replication initiator protein of promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D. Roeland; Ruiz-Masó, José Angel; Rueda, Manuel; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Machón, Cristina; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Orozco, Modesto; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication initiation is a vital and tightly regulated step in all replicons and requires an initiator factor that specifically recognizes the DNA replication origin and starts replication. RepB from the promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is a hexameric ring protein evolutionary related to viral initiators. Here we explore the conformational plasticity of the RepB hexamer by i) SAXS, ii) sedimentation experiments, iii) molecular simulations and iv) X-ray crystallography. Combining these techniques, we derive an estimate of the conformational ensemble in solution showing that the C-terminal oligomerisation domains of the protein form a rigid cylindrical scaffold to which the N-terminal DNA-binding/catalytic domains are attached as highly flexible appendages, featuring multiple orientations. In addition, we show that the hinge region connecting both domains plays a pivotal role in the observed plasticity. Sequence comparisons and a literature survey show that this hinge region could exists in other initiators, suggesting that it is a common, crucial structural element for DNA binding and manipulation. PMID:26875695

  20. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Gronenborn, Bruno; Jeske, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. PMID:24999043

  1. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  2. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  3. Widespread AAV1- and AAV2-mediated transgene expression in the nonhuman primate brain: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Stanek, Lisa; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; O'Riordan, Catherine; Mastis, Bryan; San Sebastian, Waldy; Forsayeth, John; Cheng, Seng H; Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a toxic gain-of-function associated with the expression of the mutant huntingtin (htt) protein. Therefore, the use of RNA interference to inhibit Htt expression could represent a disease-modifying therapy. The potential of two recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), AAV1 and AAV2, to transduce the cortico-striatal tissues that are predominantly affected in HD was explored. Green fluorescent protein was used as a reporter in each vector to show that both serotypes were broadly distributed in medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortico-striatal neurons after infusion into the putamen and caudate nucleus of nonhuman primates (NHP), with AAV1-directed expression being slightly more robust than AAV2-driven expression. This study suggests that both serotypes are capable of targeting neurons that degenerate in HD, and it sets the stage for the advanced preclinical evaluation of an RNAi-based therapy for this disease. PMID:27408903

  4. Mutant Rep protein of the porcine circovirus type 2 N-glycosylation:23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianli; Peng, Zhe; Fu, Fang; Xu, Shaojian; Xu, Shengnan; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jiaqiang; Sun, Wenbo; Du, Yijun; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao

    2015-06-12

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Rep protein and the splice variant Rep' protein impact genome replication. The Rep protein contains three potential N-glycosylation at positions 23-25aa (NPS), 256-258aa (NQT) and 286-288aa (NAT). Three double copy infectious clones with Rep protein N-glycosylation at positions mutations 23-25aa (DPS), 256-258aa (DQT) and 286-288aa (DAT) were constructed and their function in virus replication in PK-15 cells was investigated. The results showed that the double copy infectious clone with N-glycosylation site mutation could be rescued in vitro and 23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication. PMID:25829242

  5. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-11-25

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by {approx} 68% and {approx} 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  6. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 in healthy and HIV-1-infected subjects in China: implications for gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Huang, W; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Zhao, J; Song, A; Xie, H; Zhao, C; Gao, D; Wang, Y

    2014-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have attracted attention as potential vectors for gene therapy and vaccines against several diseases, including HIV-1 infection. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) after natural AAV infections inhibits their transfection in re-exposed subjects. To identify candidate AAV vectors for therapeutic or prophylactic HIV vaccines, NAbs against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 were screened in the sera of healthy individuals in China and 10 developed countries and an HIV-1-infected Chinese population. Seroprevalence was higher for AAV2 (96.6%) and AAV8 (82.0%) than for AAV5 (40.2%) in normal Chinese subjects. Among individuals seropositive for AAV5, >80% had low NAb titers (<1:90). The prevalence and titers of NAbs against the three AAVs were significantly higher in China than in developed countries (P<0.01). The prevalence of NAbs against AAV5 did not differ significantly between healthy and HIV-1-infected Chinese subjects (P=0.39). Co-occurrence of NAbs against AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8 was observed in the healthy population, and 15, 41, and 41% of individuals were AAV2(+), AAV2(+)/AAV8(+), and AAV2(+)/AAV5(+)/AAV8(+), respectively. Therefore, AAV5 exposure is low in healthy and HIV-1-infected populations Chinese individuals, and vectors based on AAV5 may be appropriate for human gene therapy or vaccines. PMID:24849042

  7. Humoral Immune Response to AAV

    PubMed Central

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a member of the family Parvoviridae that has been widely used as a vector for gene therapy because of its safety profile, its ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, and its low immunogenicity. AAV has been detected in many different tissues of several animal species but has not been associated with any disease. As a result of natural infections, antibodies to AAV can be found in many animals including humans. It has been shown that pre-existing AAV antibodies can modulate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy by blocking vector transduction or by redirecting distribution of AAV vectors to tissues other than the target organ. This review will summarize antibody responses against natural AAV infections, as well as AAV gene therapy vectors and their impact in the clinical development of AAV vectors for gene therapy. We will also review and discuss the various methods used for AAV antibody detection and strategies to overcome neutralizing antibodies in AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24151496

  8. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The oriV of this plasmid resides

  9. rAAV2/7 vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mouse substantia nigra induces protein aggregation and progressive dose-dependent neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alpha-synuclein is a key protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is the main component of the Lewy bodies, a cardinal neuropathological feature in the disease. In addition, whole locus multiplications and point mutations in the gene coding for alpha-synuclein lead to autosomal dominant monogenic PD. Over the past decade, research on PD has impelled the development of new animal models based on alpha-synuclein. In this context, transgenic mouse lines have failed to reproduce several hallmarks of PD, especially the strong and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration over time that occurs in the patients. In contrast, viral vector-based models in rats and non-human primates display prominent, although highly variable, nigral dopaminergic neuron loss. However, the few studies available on viral vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mice report a weak neurodegenerative process and no clear Lewy body-like pathology. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive comparative study of alpha-synuclein overexpression by means of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotype 2/7 (rAAV2/7) at different doses in adult mouse substantia nigra. Results We noted a significant and dose-dependent alpha-synucleinopathy over time upon nigral viral vector-mediated alpha-synuclein overexpression. We obtained a strong, progressive and dose-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, reaching a maximum of 82% after 8 weeks. This effect correlated with a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum. Moreover, behavioural analysis revealed significant motor impairments from 12 weeks after injection on. In addition, we detected the presence of alpha-synuclein-positive aggregates in the remaining surviving neurons. When comparing wild-type to mutant A53T alpha-synuclein at the same vector dose, both induced a similar degree of cell death. These data were supported by a biochemical

  10. Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep68 Can Bind to Consensus Rep-Binding Sites on the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Tobler, Kurt; Georgiev, Oleg; Vogel, Rebecca; Vogt, Bernd; Agúndez, Leticia; Linden, Michael; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 is known to inhibit replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). This activity has been linked to the helicase- and DNA-binding domains of the Rep68/Rep78 proteins. Here, we show that Rep68 can bind to consensus Rep-binding sites on the HSV-1 genome and that the Rep helicase activity can inhibit replication of any DNA if binding is facilitated. Therefore, we hypothesize that inhibition of HSV-1 replication involves direct binding of Rep68/Rep78 to the HSV-1 genome. PMID:26292324

  11. Oversized AAV Transductifon Is Mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (<4.7 kb). Recent observations demonstrate oversized AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct “fragment” AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger “fragments” mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand–annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy. PMID:23939025

  12. Local Administration of AAV-BDNF to Subventricular Zone Induces Functional Recovery in Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Jin; Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Shen, Hui; Harvey, Brandon K.; Airavaara, Mikko; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Migration of new neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) plays an important role in neurorepair after injury. Previous studies have shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances the migration of NPCs from SVZ explants in neonatal mice in vitro. The purpose of this study was to identify the role of BDNF in SVZ cells using AAV-BDNF in an animal model of stroke. BDNF protein production after AAV‐BDNF infection was verified in primary neuronal culture. AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP was injected into the left SVZ region of adult rats at 14 days prior to right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). SVZ tissues were collected from the brain and placed in Metrigel cultures 1 day after MCAo. Treatment with AAV-BDNF significantly increased the migration of SVZ cells in the stroke brain in vitro. In another set of animals, AAV-GFP was co-injected with AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP to label cells in left SVZ prior to right MCAo. Local administration of AAV-BDNF significantly enhanced recovery of locomotor function and migration of GFP-positive cells from the SVZ toward the lesioned hemisphere in stroke rats. Our data suggest that focal administration of AAV-BDNF to the SVZ increases behavioral recovery post stroke, possibly through the enhancement of migration of cells from SVZ in stroke animals. Regional manipulation of BDNF expression through AAV may be a novel approach for neurorepair in stroke brains. PMID:24312581

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1/Adeno-Associated Virus rep+ Hybrid Amplicon Vector Improves the Stability of Transgene Expression in Human Cells by Site-Specific Integration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Camp, S. M.; Niwano, M.; Shen, X.; Bakowska, J. C.; Breakefield, X. O.; Allen, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are promising gene delivery tools, but their utility in gene therapy has been impeded to some extent by their inability to achieve stable transgene expression. In this study, we examined the possibility of improving transduction stability in cultured human cells via site-specific genomic integration mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep and inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). A rep− HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vector was made by inserting a transgene cassette flanked with AAV ITRs into an HSV-1 amplicon backbone, and a rep+ HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon was made by inserting rep68/78 outside the rep− vector 3′ AAV ITR sequence. Both vectors also had a pair of loxP sites flanking the ITRs. The resulting hybrid amplicon vectors were successfully packaged and compared to a standard amplicon vector for stable transduction frequency (STF) in human 293 and Gli36 cell lines and primary myoblasts. The rep+, but not the rep−, hybrid vector improved STF in all three types of cells; 84% of Gli36 and 40% of 293 stable clones transduced by the rep+ hybrid vector integrated the transgene into the AAVS1 site. Due to the difficulty in expanding primary myoblasts, we did not assess site-specific integration in these cells. A strategy to attempt further improvement of STF by “deconcatenating” the hybrid amplicon DNA via Cre-loxP recombination was tested, but it did not increase STF. These data demonstrate that introducing the integrating elements of AAV into HSV-1 amplicon vectors can significantly improve their ability to achieve stable gene transduction by conferring the AAV-like capability of site-specific genomic integration in dividing cells. PMID:12072515

  14. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Klein, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v.) route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10). The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling. PMID:26445725

  15. REP Concept Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.; Ensworth, Clinton B. F.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Sheehe, Charles J.; Wiersma, Stephen C.; Adamsen, Paul B., II; Frank, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) may have the potential to provide certain advantages, over conventional chemical propulsion, for outer planetary exploration involving small bodies and long term investigations for medium class missions requiring power comparable to past outer planetary exploration missions. This paper describes a study that investigates the concept s feasibility by performing a preliminary conceptual design of an REP-based spacecraft for a design reference mission. The mission utilizes a spacecraft with a radioisotope power supply less than one kilowatt while operating for a minimum of 10-years. A key element of the REP spacecraft is to ensure sustained science return by orbiting or flying in formation with selected targets. Utilizing current and impending technological advances, this study finds that at a conceptual design level a small body REP orbiter/explorer appears to be feasible for the design reference mission selected for this study.

  16. The advent of AAV9 expands applications for brain and spinal cord gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Robert D; Wang, David B; Klein, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Straightforward studies compared adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes to determine the most appropriate one for robust expression in the CNS. AAV9 was efficient when directly injected into the brain, but more surprisingly, AAV9 produced global expression in the brain and spinal cord after a peripheral, systemic route of administration to neonatal mice. Areas covered Topics include AAV9 gene delivery from intraparenchymal, intravenous, intrathecal and intrauterine routes of administration, and related preclinical studies and disease models. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer yields remarkably consistent neuronal expression, though only in early development. AAV9 is versatile to study neuropathological proteins: microtubule-associated protein tau and transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Expert opinion AAV9 will be more widely used based on current data, although other natural serotypes and recombineered vectors may also support or improve upon wide-scale expression. A peripheral-to-central gene delivery that can affect the entire CNS without having to inject the CNS is promising for basic functional experiments, and potentially for gene therapy. Systemic or intra-cerebrospinal fluid routes of AAV9 administration should be considered for spinal muscular atrophy, lysosomal storage diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, if more neuronal expression can be achieved in adults, or if glial expression can be exploited. PMID:22519910

  17. Analyzing Cellular Immunity to AAV in a Canine Model Using ELISpot Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J; Riddell, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated gene transfer represents a promising gene replacement strategy for treating various genetic diseases. One obstacle in using viral-derived vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the vector. Recent studies have demonstrated cellular immune responses specific to capsid proteins of various AAV serotypes in animal models and in human trials for different diseases. We developed a canine specific ELISpot assay to detect such immunity in dogs received AAV treatment. Here, we describe in detail the use of a constructed panel of overlapping peptides spanning the entire VP1 sequence of AAV capsid protein to detect specific T cell responses in peripheral blood in dogs following intra-muscular injection of AAV. This high-throughput method allows the identification of T cell epitopes without the need for large cell numbers and the need for MHC matched cell lines. PMID:21956501

  18. Widespread AAV1- and AAV2-mediated transgene expression in the nonhuman primate brain: implications for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Stanek, Lisa; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; O’Riordan, Catherine; Mastis, Bryan; San Sebastian, Waldy; Forsayeth, John; Cheng, Seng H; Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by a toxic gain-of-function associated with the expression of the mutant huntingtin (htt) protein. Therefore, the use of RNA interference to inhibit Htt expression could represent a disease-modifying therapy. The potential of two recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), AAV1 and AAV2, to transduce the cortico-striatal tissues that are predominantly affected in HD was explored. Green fluorescent protein was used as a reporter in each vector to show that both serotypes were broadly distributed in medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortico-striatal neurons after infusion into the putamen and caudate nucleus of nonhuman primates (NHP), with AAV1-directed expression being slightly more robust than AAV2-driven expression. This study suggests that both serotypes are capable of targeting neurons that degenerate in HD, and it sets the stage for the advanced preclinical evaluation of an RNAi-based therapy for this disease. PMID:27408903

  19. PCNA interacts with Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus rep and downregulates Rep activity.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Chen, Shoajiang; Lal, Sunil K; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2004-11-01

    Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a conserved plant protein as well as an important replication factor, is induced in response to geminivirus infection in the resting cells of the phloem tissues. The biochemical role of PCNA in rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminivirus DNA has not been explored in detail. The initiation of RCR of the bipartite genome of a geminivirus, Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus (IMYMV), is mainly controlled by viral protein Rep (or AL1 or AC1). The role of host PCNA in RCR of IMYMV was revealed by studying the physical and functional interactions between recombinant PCNA and recombinant IMYMV Rep. Pea nuclear PCNA as well as recombinant pea PCNA showed binding to recombinant Rep in experiments involving both affinity chromatography and yeast two-hybrid approaches. The contacting amino acid residues of PCNA seemed to be present throughout a wide region of the trimeric protein, while those of Rep appeared to be localized only in the middle part of the protein. The site-specific nicking-closing activity and the ATPase function of IMYMV Rep were impaired by PCNA. These observations lead to interesting speculations about the control of viral RCR and dynamic profiles of protein-protein interactions at the RCR origin of the geminiviruses. PMID:15479830

  20. Anti-clarin-1 AAV-delivered ribozyme induced apoptosis in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Aarnisalo, A A; Pietola, L; Joensuu, J; Isosomppi, J; Aarnisalo, P; Dinculescu, A; Lewin, A S; Flannery, J; Hauswirth, W W; Sankila, E-M; Jero, J

    2007-08-01

    Usher syndrome type 3 is caused by mutations in the USH3A gene, which encodes the protein clarin-1. Clarin-1 is a member of the tetraspanin superfamily (TM4SF) of transmembrane proteins, expressed in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells of the mouse ear. We have examined whether the AAV-mediated anti-clarin ribozyme delivery causes apoptotic cell death in vivo in the organ of Corti. We used an AAV-2 vector delivered hammerhead ribozyme, AAV-CBA-Rz, which specifically recognizes and cleaves wild type mouse clarin-1 mRNA. Cochleae of CD-1 mice were injected either with 1mul of the AAV-CBA-Rz, or control AAV vectors containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker gene (AAV-CBA-GFP). Additional controls were performed with saline only. At one-week and one-month post-injection, the animals were sacrificed and the cochleae were studied by histology and fluorescence imaging. Mice injected with AAV-CBA-GFP displayed GFP reporter expression of varying fluorescence intensity throughout the length of the cochlea in the outer and inner hair cells and stria vascularis, and to a lesser extent, in vestibular epithelial cells. GFP expression was not detectable in the spiral ganglion. The pro-apoptotic effect of AAV-CBA-delivered anti-clarin-1 ribozymes was evaluated by TUNEL-staining. We observed in the AAV-CBA-Rz, AAV-CBA-GFP and saline control groups apoptotic nuclei in the outer and inner hair cells and in the stria vascularis one week after the microinjection. The vestibular epithelium was also observed to contain apoptotic cells. No TUNEL-positive spiral ganglion neurons were detected. After one-month post-injection, the AAV-CBA-Rz-injected group had significantly more apoptotic outer and inner hair cells and cells of the stria vascularis than the AAV-CBA-GFP group. In this study, we demonstrate that AAV-CBA mediated clarin-1 ribozyme may induce apoptosis of the cochlear hair cells and cells of the stria vascularis. Surprisingly, we did not observe apoptosis in

  1. Homologous recombination is required for AAV-mediated gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Ana; Linden, R. Michael; Jessberger, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    High frequencies of gene targeting can be achieved by infection of mammalian cells with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors [D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (1998) Nature Genet., 18, 325–330; D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (2000) J. Virol., 74, 4612–4620; R. Hirata et al. (2002) Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 735–738], but the mechanism of targeting is unclear and random integration often occurs in parallel. We assessed the role of specific DNA repair and recombination pathways in rAAV gene targeting by measuring correction of a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in cells where homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) had been suppressed by RNAi. EGFP-negative cells were transduced with rAAV vectors carrying a different inactivating deletion in the EGFP, and in parallel with rAAV vectors carrying red fluorescent protein (RFP). Expression of RFP accounted for viral transduction efficiency and long-term random integration. Approximately 0.02% of the infected GFP-negative cells were stably converted to GFP positive cells. Silencing of the essential NHEJ component DNA-PK had no significant effect on the frequency of targeting at any time point examined. Silencing of the SNF2/SWI2 family members RAD54L or RAD54B, which are important for HR, reduced the rate of stable rAAV gene targeting ∼5-fold. Further, partial silencing of the Rad51 paralogue XRCC3 completely abolished stable long-term EGFP expression. These results show that rAAV gene targeting requires the Rad51/Rad54 pathway of HR. PMID:16822856

  2. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  3. The 32 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA) participates in the DNA replication of Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) by interacting with the viral Rep protein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a member of genus begomoviridae and its genome comprises of bipartite (two components, namely DNA-A and DNA-B), single-stranded, circular DNA of about 2.7 kb. During rolling circle replication (RCR) of the DNA, the stability of the genome and maintenance of the stem-loop structure of the replication origin is crucial. Hence the role of host single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), in the RCR of MYMIV was examined. Two RPA subunits, namely the RPA70 kDa and RPA32 kDa, were isolated from pea and their roles were validated in a yeast system in which MYMIV DNA replication has been modelled. Here, we present evidences that only the RPA32 kDa subunit directly interacted with the carboxy terminus of MYMIV-Rep both in vitro as well as in yeast two-hybrid system. RPA32 modulated the functions of Rep by enhancing its ATPase and down regulating its nicking and closing activities. The possible role of these modulations in the context of viral DNA replication has been discussed. Finally, we showed the positive involvement of RPA32 in transient replication of the plasmid DNA bearing MYMIV replication origin using an in planta based assay. PMID:17182628

  4. Gene therapy for choroideremia using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alun R; Groppe, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-03-01

    Choroideremia is an outer retinal degeneration with a characteristic clinical appearance that was first described in the nineteenth century. The disorder begins with reduction of night vision and gradually progresses to blindness by middle age. The appearance of the fundus in sufferers is recognizable by the characteristic pale color caused by the loss of the outer retina, retinal-pigmented epithelium, and choroidal vessels, leading to exposure of the underlying sclera. Choroideremia shows X-linked recessive inheritance and the choroideremia gene (CHM) was one of the first to be identified by positional cloning in 1990. Subsequent identification and characterization of the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), has led to better comprehension of the disease and enabled advances in genetic diagnosis. Despite several decades of work to understand the exact pathogenesis, no established treatments currently exist to stop or even slow the progression of retinal degeneration in choroideremia. Encouragingly, several specific molecular and clinical features make choroideremia an ideal candidate for treatment with gene therapy. This work describes the considerations and challenges in the development of a new clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding the CHM gene. PMID:25359548

  5. The mitochondrial nucleoid protein, Mgm101p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in the maintenance of rho(+) and ori/rep-devoid petite genomes but is not required for hypersuppressive rho(-) mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiao Ming; Clark-Walker, G Desmond; Chen, Xin Jie

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MGM101 gene encodes a DNA-binding protein targeted to mitochondrial nucleoids. MGM101 is essential for maintenance of a functional rho(+) genome because meiotic segregants, with a disrupted mgm101 allele, cannot undergo more than 10 divisions on glycerol medium. Quantitative analysis of mtDNA copy number in a rho(+) strain carrying a temperature-sensitive allele, mgm101-1, revealed that the amount of mtDNA is halved each cell division upon a shift to the restrictive temperature. These data suggest that mtDNA replication is rapidly blocked in cells lacking MGM101. However, a small proportion of meiotic segregants, disrupted in MGM101, have rho(-) genomes that are stably maintained. Interestingly, all surviving rho(-) mtDNAs contain an ori/rep sequence. Disruption of MGM101 in hypersuppressive (HS) strains does not have a significant effect on the propagation of HS rho(-) mtDNA. However, in petites lacking an ori/rep, disruption of MGM101 leads to either a complete loss or a dramatically decreased stability of mtDNA. This discriminatory effect of MGM101 suggests that replication of rho(+) and ori/rep-devoid rho(-) mtDNAs is carried out by the same process. By contrast, the persistence of ori/rep-containing mtDNA in HS petites lacking MGM101 identifies a distinct replication pathway. The alternative mtDNA replication mechanism provided by ori/rep is independent of mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41 as a HS rho(-) genome is stably maintained in a mgm101, rpo41 double mutant. PMID:11973295

  6. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed

    Bentchikou, Esma; Chagneau, Carine; Long, Emilie; Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion. PMID:26244508

  7. Widespread Central Nervous System Gene Transfer and Silencing After Systemic Delivery of Novel AAV-AS Vector.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sourav R; Harris, Anne F; Cabral, Damien J; Keeler, Allison M; Sapp, Ellen; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Johnson, Jacob A; Johnson, Aime K; Su, Qin; Stoica, Lorelei; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil; Martin, Douglas R; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Effective gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is vital for development of novel gene therapies for neurological diseases. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as an effective platform for in vivo gene transfer, but overall neuronal transduction efficiency of vectors derived from naturally occurring AAV capsids after systemic administration is relatively low. Here, we investigated the possibility of improving CNS transduction of existing AAV capsids by genetically fusing peptides to the N-terminus of VP2 capsid protein. A novel vector AAV-AS, generated by the insertion of a poly-alanine peptide, is capable of extensive gene transfer throughout the CNS after systemic administration in adult mice. AAV-AS is 6- and 15-fold more efficient than AAV9 in spinal cord and cerebrum, respectively. The neuronal transduction profile varies across brain regions but is particularly high in the striatum where AAV-AS transduces 36% of striatal neurons. Widespread neuronal gene transfer was also documented in cat brain and spinal cord. A single intravenous injection of an AAV-AS vector encoding an artificial microRNA targeting huntingtin (Htt) resulted in 33-50% knockdown of Htt across multiple CNS structures in adult mice. This novel AAV-AS vector is a promising platform to develop new gene therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26708003

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-03-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  10. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints. PMID:27262111

  11. Differential developmental expression of the rep B and rep D xeroderma pigmentosum related DNA helicase genes from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S K; Yu, S L; Garcia, M X; Alexander, H; Alexander, S

    1997-01-01

    DNA helicases are essential to many cellular processes including recombination, replication and transcription, and some helicases function in multiple processes. The helicases encoded by the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) B and D genes function in both nucleotide excision repair and transcription initiation. Mutations that affect the repair function of these proteins result in XP while mutations affecting transcription result in neurological and developmental abnormalities, although the underlying molecular and cellular basis for these phenotypes is not well understood. To better understand the developmental roles of these genes, we have now identified and characterized the rep B and rep D genes from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum . Both genes encode DNA helicases of the SF2 superfamily of helicases. The rep D gene contains no introns and the rep B gene contains only one intron, which makes their genomic structures dramatically different from the corresponding genes in mammals and fish. However the predicted Dictyostelium proteins share high homology with the human XPB and XPD proteins. The single copy of the rep B and D genes map to chromosomes 3 and 1, respectively. The expression of rep B and D (and the previously isolated rep E) genes during multicellular development was examined, and it was determined that each rep gene has a unique pattern of expression, consistent with the idea that they have specific roles in development. The pattern and extent of expression of these genes was not affected by the growth history of the cells, implying that the expression of these genes is tightly regulated by the developmental program. The expression of the rep genes is a very early step in development and may well represent a key event in the initiation of development in this organism. PMID:9171087

  12. High cerebrospinal fluid levels of interleukin-10 attained by AAV in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pleticha, J; Malkmus, S A; Heilmann, L F; Veesart, S L; Rezek, R; Xu, Q; Yaksh, T L; Beutler, A S

    2015-02-01

    Intrathecal (IT) gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV) may be clinically promising as a treatment for chronic pain if it can produce sufficiently high levels of a transgene product in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although this strategy was developed in rodents, no studies investigating CSF levels of an analgesic or antiallodynic protein delivered by IT AAV have been performed in large animals. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an antiallodynic cytokine for which target therapeutic levels have been established in rats. The present study tested IT AAV8 encoding either human IL-10 (hIL-10) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a dog model of IT drug delivery. AAV8/hIL-10 at a dose of 3.5 × 10(12) genome copies induced high hIL-10 levels in the CSF, exceeding the target concentration previously found to be antiallodynic in rodents by >1000-fold. AAV8/EGFP targeted the primary sensory and motor neurons and the meninges. hIL-10, a xenogeneic protein in dogs, induced anti-hIL-10 antibodies detectable in the CSF and serum of dogs. The high hIL-10 levels demonstrate the efficacy of AAV for delivery of secreted transgenes into the IT space of large animals, suggesting a strong case for further development toward clinical testing. PMID:25354684

  13. Tyrosine capsid-mutant AAV vectors for gene delivery to the canine retina from a subretinal or intravitreal approach

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, FM; Gornik, KR; Dinculescu, A; Boye, SL; Hauswirth, WW; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses are important vectors for retinal gene delivery. Currently utilized vectors have relatively slow onset and for efficient transduction it is necessary to deliver treatment subretinally, with the potential for damage to the retina. Amino-acid substitutions in the viral capsid improve efficiency in rodent eyes by evading host responses. As dogs are important large animal models for human retinitis pigmentosa, we evaluated the speed and efficiency of retinal transduction using capsid-mutant vectors injected both subretinally and intravitreally. We evaluated AAV serotypes 2 and 8 with amino-acid substitutions of surface exposed capsid tyrosine residues. The chicken beta-actin promoter was used to drive green fluorescent protein expression. Twelve normal adult beagles were injected, 4 dogs received intravitreal injections, 8 dogs received subretinal injections. Capsid-mutant viruses tested included AAV2(quad Y-F) (intravitreal and subretinal), and self-complementary scAAV8(Y733F) (subretinal only). Contralateral control eyes received injections of scAAV5 (subretinal) or scAAV2 (intravitreal). Subretinally delivered vectors had a faster expression onset than intravitreally delivered vectors. Subretinally delivered scAAV8(Y733F) had a faster onset of expression than scAAV5. All subretinally injected vector types transduced the outer retina with high efficiency, and the inner retina with moderate efficiency. Intravitreally delivered AAV2(quad Y-F) had a marginally higher efficiency of transduction of both outer retinal and inner retinal cells than scAAV2. Because of their rapid expression onset and efficient transduction, subretinally delivered capsid-mutant AAV8 vectors may increase the efficacy of gene therapy treatment for rapid photoreceptor degenerative diseases. With further refinement, capsid-mutant AAV2 vectors show promise for retinal gene delivery from an intravitreal approach. PMID:24225638

  14. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV-mediated genome editing.

    PubMed

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Pandzic, Tatjana; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-03-11

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large-scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting is suited for knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions and to a lesser degree for gene knock-outs. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time-consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV-mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation-friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ~71% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ~81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV-mediated knock-out. A Gateway-based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations. PMID:25488813

  15. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  16. Microglia-specific targeting by novel capsid-modified AAV6 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Awilda M; Cruz, Pedro E; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Strickland, Michael R; Siemienski, Zoe; Pardo, Meghan; Schob, Keri-Lyn; Li, Andrew; Aslanidi, George V; Srivastava, Arun; Golde, Todd E; Chakrabarty, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) have been widely used in gene therapy applications for central nervous system diseases. Though rAAV can efficiently target neurons and astrocytes in mouse brains, microglia, the immune cells of the brain, are refractile to rAAV. To identify AAV capsids with microglia-specific transduction properties, we initially screened the most commonly used serotypes, AAV1–9 and rh10, on primary mouse microglia cultures. While these capsids were not permissive, we then tested the microglial targeting properties of a newly characterized set of modified rAAV6 capsid variants with high tropism for monocytes. Indeed, these newly characterized rAAV6 capsid variants, specially a triply mutated Y731F/Y705F/T492V form, carrying a self-complementary genome and microglia-specific promoters (F4/80 or CD68) could efficiently and selectively transduce microglia in vitro. Delivery of these constructs in mice brains resulted in microglia-specific expression of green fluorescent protein, albeit at modest levels. We further show that CD68 promoter–driven expression of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, using this capsid variant leads to increased astrogliosis in the brains of wild-type mice. Our study describes the first instance of AAV-targeted microglial gene expression leading to functional modulation of the innate immune system in mice brains. This provides the rationale for utilizing these unique capsid/promoter combinations for microglia-specific gene targeting for modeling or functional studies. PMID:27308302

  17. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation.

    PubMed

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  18. Photoreceptor-targeted gene delivery using intravitreally administered AAV vectors in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Sledge, DG; Boye, SL; Boye, SE; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic transgenes to retinal photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has traditionally required subretinal injection. Recently, photoreceptor transduction efficiency following intravitreal injection (IVT) has improved in rodent models through use of capsid-mutant AAV vectors; but remains limited in large animal models. Thickness of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in large animals is thought to impair retinal penetration by AAV. Our study compared two newly developed AAV vectors containing multiple capsid amino acid substitutions following IVT in dogs. The ability of two promoter constructs to restrict reporter transgene expression to photoreceptors was also evaluated. AAV vectors containing the interphotoreceptor-binding protein (IRBP) promoter drove expression exclusively in rod and cone photoreceptors, with transduction efficiencies of ~ 4% of cones and 2% of rods. Notably, in the central region containing the cone-rich visual streak, 15.6% of cones were transduced. Significant regional variation existed, with lower transduction efficiencies in the temporal regions of all eyes. This variation did not correlate with ILM thickness. Vectors carrying a cone-specific promoter failed to transduce a quantifiable percentage of cone photoreceptors. The newly developed AAV vectors containing the IRBP promoter were capable of producing photoreceptor-specific transgene expression following IVT in the dog. PMID:26467396

  19. RepA-WH1 prionoid: Clues from bacteria on factors governing phase transitions in amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Rafael; Fernández, Cristina; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Molina-García, Laura; Revilla-García, Aída; Sánchez-Martínez, María Cruz; Giménez-Abián, Juan F; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial plasmids, Rep proteins initiate DNA replication by undergoing a structural transformation coupled to dimer dissociation. Amyloidogenesis of the 'winged-helix' N-terminal domain of RepA (WH1) is triggered in vitro upon binding to plasmid-specific DNA sequences, and occurs at the bacterial nucleoid in vivo. Amyloid fibers are made of distorted RepA-WH1 monomers that assemble as single or double intertwined tubular protofilaments. RepA-WH1 causes in E. coli an amyloid proteinopathy, which is transmissible from mother to daughter cells, but not infectious, and enables conformational imprinting in vitro and in vivo; i.e. RepA-WH1 is a 'prionoid'. Microfluidics allow the assessment of the intracellular dynamics of RepA-WH1: bacterial lineages maintain two types (strains-like) of RepA-WH1 amyloids, either multiple compact cytotoxic particles or a single aggregate with the appearance of a fluidized hydrogel that it is mildly detrimental to growth. The Hsp70 chaperone DnaK governs the phase transition between both types of RepA-WH1 aggregates in vivo, thus modulating the vertical propagation of the prionoid. Engineering chimeras between the Sup35p/[PSI(+)] prion and RepA-WH1 generates [REP-PSI(+)], a synthetic prion exhibiting strong and weak phenotypic variants in yeast. These recent findings on a synthetic, self-contained bacterial prionoid illuminate central issues of protein amyloidogenesis. PMID:27040981

  20. RepA-WH1 prionoid: Clues from bacteria on factors governing phase transitions in amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Rafael; Fernández, Cristina; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Molina-García, Laura; Revilla-García, Aída; Sánchez-Martínez, María Cruz; Giménez-Abián, Juan F.; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacterial plasmids, Rep proteins initiate DNA replication by undergoing a structural transformation coupled to dimer dissociation. Amyloidogenesis of the ‘winged-helix’ N-terminal domain of RepA (WH1) is triggered in vitro upon binding to plasmid-specific DNA sequences, and occurs at the bacterial nucleoid in vivo. Amyloid fibers are made of distorted RepA-WH1 monomers that assemble as single or double intertwined tubular protofilaments. RepA-WH1 causes in E. coli an amyloid proteinopathy, which is transmissible from mother to daughter cells, but not infectious, and enables conformational imprinting in vitro and in vivo; i.e. RepA-WH1 is a ‘prionoid’. Microfluidics allow the assessment of the intracellular dynamics of RepA-WH1: bacterial lineages maintain two types (strains-like) of RepA-WH1 amyloids, either multiple compact cytotoxic particles or a single aggregate with the appearance of a fluidized hydrogel that it is mildly detrimental to growth. The Hsp70 chaperone DnaK governs the phase transition between both types of RepA-WH1 aggregates in vivo, thus modulating the vertical propagation of the prionoid. Engineering chimeras between the Sup35p/[PSI+] prion and RepA-WH1 generates [REP-PSI+], a synthetic prion exhibiting strong and weak phenotypic variants in yeast. These recent findings on a synthetic, self-contained bacterial prionoid illuminate central issues of protein amyloidogenesis. PMID:27040981

  1. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene-mediated inhibition of basal gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves its negative regulatory functions.

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, I; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2), a human parvovirus which is apathogenic in adults, inhibits replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. The rep gene of AAV-2, which was shown earlier to be sufficient for this negative interference, also down-regulated the expression of heterologous sequences driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1. This effect was observed in the absence of the HIV-1 transactivator Tat, i.e., at basal levels of LTR-driven transcription. In this work, we studied the involvement of functional subsequences of the HIV-1 LTR in rep-mediated inhibition in the absence of Tat. Mutated LTRs driving an indicator gene (cat) were cointroduced into human SW480 cells together with rep alone or with double-stranded DNA fragments or RNA containing sequences of the HIV-1 LTR. The results indicate that rep strongly enhances the function of negative regulatory elements of the LTR. In addition, the experiments revealed a transcribed sequence element located within the TAR-coding sequence termed AHHH (AAV-HIV homology element derived from HIV-1) which is involved in rep-mediated inhibition. The AHHH element is also involved in down-regulation of basal expression levels in the absence of rep, suggesting that AHHH also contributes to negative regulatory functions of the LTR of HIV-1. In contrast, positive regulatory elements of the HIV-1 LTR such as the NF kappa B and SP1 binding sites have no significant influence on the rep-mediated inhibition. Images PMID:8289357

  2. Fetal Brain-directed AAV Gene Therapy Results in Rapid, Robust, and Persistent Transduction of Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marie Reine; Donsante, Anthony; Zerfas, Patricia; Kaler, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Fetal brain-directed gene addition represents an under-appreciated tool for investigating novel therapeutic approaches in animal models of central nervous system diseases with early prenatal onset. Choroid plexuses (CPs) are specialized neuroectoderm-derived structures that project into the brain's ventricles, produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and regulate CSF biochemical composition. Targeting the CP may be advantageous for adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy for central nervous system disorders due to its immunoprivileged location and slow rate of epithelial turnover. Yet the capacity of AAV vectors to transduce CP has not been delineated precisely. We performed intracerebroventricular injections of recombinant AAV serotype 5-green fluorescent protein (rAAV5-GFP) or rAAV9-GFP in embryonic day 15 (E15) embryos of CD-1 and C57BL/6 pregnant mice and quantified the percentages of GFP expression in CP epithelia (CPE) from lateral and fourth ventricles on E17, postnatal day 2 (P2), and P22. AAV5 was selective for CPE and showed significantly higher transduction efficiency in C57BL/6 mice (P = 0.0128). AAV9 transduced neurons and glial cells in both the mouse strains, in addition to CPE. We documented GFP expression in CPE on E17, within just 48 hours of rAAV administration to the fetal lateral ventricle, and expression by both the serotypes persisted at P130. Our results indicate that prenatal administration of rAAV5 and rAAV9 enables rapid, robust, and sustained transduction of mouse CPE and buttress the rationale for experimental therapeutics targeting the CP.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e101; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.27; published online 25 June 2013. PMID:23799375

  3. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5–2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG. PMID:27332822

  4. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes. PMID:27314914

  5. AAV-8 Is More Efficient than AAV-9 in Transducing Neonatal Dog Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Hakim, Chady H.; Kodippili, Kasun; McDonald, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus serotype-8 and 9 (AAV-8 and 9) are the leading candidate vectors to test bodywide neonatal muscle gene therapy in large mammals. We have previously shown that systemic injection of 2–2.5×1014 viral genome (vg) particles/kg of AAV-9 resulted in widespread skeletal muscle gene transfer in newborn dogs. However, nominal transduction was observed in the heart. In contrast, robust expression was achieved in both skeletal muscle and heart in neonatal dogs with 7.14–9.06×1014 vg particles/kg of AAV-8. To determine whether superior cardiac transduction of AAV-8 is because of the higher vector dose, we delivered 6.14×1014 and 9.65×1014 vg particles/kg of AAV-9 to newborn puppies via the jugular vein. Transduction was examined 2.5 months later. Consistent with our previous reports, we observed robust bodywide transduction in skeletal muscle. However, increased AAV dose only moderately improved heart transduction. It never reached the level achieved by AAV-8. Our results suggest that differential cardiac transduction by AAV-8 and AAV-9 is likely because of the intrinsic property of the viral capsid rather than the vector dose. PMID:25763686

  6. Autoinhibition of Escherichia coli Rep monomer helicase activity by its 2B subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Brendza, Katherine M.; Cheng, Wei; Fischer, Christopher J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2005-01-01

    DNA helicases catalyze separation of double-helical DNA into its complementary single strands, a process essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The Escherichia coli Rep protein, a superfamily 1 DNA helicase, functions in DNA replication restart and is required for replication of several bacteriophages. Monomers of Rep do not display helicase activity in vitro; in fact, DNA unwinding requires Rep dimerization. Here we show that removal of the 2B subdomain of Rep to form RepΔ2B activates monomer helicase activity, albeit with limited processivity. Although both full length Rep and RepΔ2B monomers can translocate with 3′ to 5′ directionality along single-stranded DNA, the 2B subdomain inhibits the helicase activity of full length Rep. This suggests an autoregulatory mechanism for Rep helicase, which may apply to other nonhexameric helicases, whereby helicase activity is regulated by the rotational conformational state of the 2B subdomain; formation of a Rep dimer may relieve autoinhibition by altering the 2B subdomain orientation. PMID:16009938

  7. Autoinhibition of Escherichia coli Rep monomer helicase activity by its 2B subdomain.

    PubMed

    Brendza, Katherine M; Cheng, Wei; Fischer, Christopher J; Chesnik, Marla A; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M

    2005-07-19

    DNA helicases catalyze separation of double-helical DNA into its complementary single strands, a process essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The Escherichia coli Rep protein, a superfamily 1 DNA helicase, functions in DNA replication restart and is required for replication of several bacteriophages. Monomers of Rep do not display helicase activity in vitro; in fact, DNA unwinding requires Rep dimerization. Here we show that removal of the 2B subdomain of Rep to form RepDelta2B activates monomer helicase activity, albeit with limited processivity. Although both full length Rep and RepDelta2B monomers can translocate with 3' to 5' directionality along single-stranded DNA, the 2B subdomain inhibits the helicase activity of full length Rep. This suggests an autoregulatory mechanism for Rep helicase, which may apply to other nonhexameric helicases, whereby helicase activity is regulated by the rotational conformational state of the 2B subdomain; formation of a Rep dimer may relieve autoinhibition by altering the 2B subdomain orientation. PMID:16009938

  8. A RepA-like protein from bacteriophage BFK20 is a multifunctional protein with primase, polymerase, NTPase and helicase activities.

    PubMed

    Halgasova, Nora; Solteszova, Barbora; Pevala, Vladimír; Košťan, Július; Kutejová, Eva; Bukovska, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Phage BFK20 replication protein gp43 comprises an N-terminal prim-pol domain and a C-terminal domain similar to replicative helicases. We prepared and studied two recombinant proteins: gp43-1 containing both prim-pol and helicase domains, and gp43C with the helicase domain only. A SEC-MALS analysis indicated that gp43-1 forms a hexameric homooligomer. NTPase activity testing revealed that gp43-1 was able to hydrolyze a wide spectrum of NTPs, ATP the most efficiently. The ATPase activity of gp43-1 was strongly dependent on the presence of ssDNA in the reaction, but was low in the presence of dsDNA and in the absence of DNA. On the other hand, the ATPase activity of gp43C was very low regardless of the presence of DNA. The helicase activity of gp43-1 was detected using a fluorescence-based assay with a forked DNA substrate in the presence of ATP. However, no helicase activity could be detected for gp43C. We therefore conclude that the prim-pol domain is essential for the helicase and ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity of gp43-1. PMID:26277776

  9. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  10. Comparison of Transduction Efficiency of Recombinant AAV Serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 8 in the Rat Nigrostriatal System

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced delivery and expression of genes in specific neuronal systems is critical for the development of genetic models of neurodegenerative disease and potential gene therapy. Recent discovery of new recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) capsid serotypes has resulted in improved transduction efficiency, but expression levels, spread of transgene, and potential toxicity can differ depending on brain region and among species. We compared the transduction efficiency of titer-matched rAAV 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 to the commonly used rAAV2/2 in the rat nigrostriatal system via expression of the reporter transgene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Newer rAAV serotypes 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 demonstrated marked increase in transduction and spread of EGFP expression in dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons and projections to the striatum and globus pallidus compared to rAAV2/2 at 2 weeks post injection. The number of nigral cells transduced was greatest for rAAV2/1, but for serotypes 2/5 and 2/8 was still 2 to 3-fold higher than that for 2/2. Enhanced transduction did not cause an increase in glial cell response or toxicity. New rAAV serotypes thus promise improved gene delivery to nigrostriatal system with the potential for better models and therapeutics for Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19250335

  11. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1]. PMID:26937449

  12. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article "Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85" [1]. PMID:26937449

  13. Immunosuppression Decreases Inflammation and Increases AAV6-hSERCA2a-Mediated SERCA2a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; McTiernan, Charles F.; Rajagopalan, Navin; Shah, Hemal; Fischer, David; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Letts, Dustin; Bortinger, Jonathan; Gibson, Gregory; Xiang, Wenyu; McCurry, Kenneth; Mathier, Michael; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The calcium pump SERCA2a (sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a), which plays a central role in cardiac contraction, shows decreased expression in heart failure (HF). Increasing SERCA2a expression in HF models improves cardiac function. We used direct cardiac delivery of adeno-associated virus encoding human SERCA2a (AAV6-hSERCA2a) in HF and normal canine models to study safety, efficacy, and the effects of immunosuppression. Tachycardic-paced dogs received left ventricle (LV) wall injection of AAV6-hSERCA2a or solvent. Pacing continued postinjection for 2 or 6 weeks, until euthanasia. Tissue/serum samples were analyzed for hSERCA2a expression (Western blot) and immune responses (histology and AAV6-neutralizing antibodies). Nonpaced dogs received AAV6-hSERCA2a and were analyzed at 12 weeks; a parallel cohort received AAV-hSERCA2a and immunosuppression. AAV-mediated cardiac expression of hSERCA2a peaked at 2 weeks and then declined (to ∼50%; p<0.03, 6 vs. 2 weeks). LV end diastolic and end systolic diameters decreased in 6-week dogs treated with AAV6-hSERCA2a (p<0.05) whereas LV diameters increased in control dogs. Dogs receiving AAV6-hSERCA2a developed neutralizing antibodies (titer ≥1:120) and cardiac cellular infiltration. Immunosuppression dramatically reduced immune responses (reduced inflammation and neutralizing antibody titers <1:20), and maintained hSERCA2a expression. Thus cardiac injection of AAV6-hSERCA2a promotes local hSERCA2a expression and improves cardiac function. However, the hSERCA2a protein level is reduced by host immune responses. Immunosuppression alleviates immune responses and sustains transgene expression, and may be an important adjuvant for clinical gene therapy trials. PMID:22482463

  14. Structure and Function of REP34 Implicates Carboxypeptidase Activity in Francisella tularensis Host Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K.; El-Etr, Sahar; Corzett, Michele H.; Hunter, Mark S.; Belhocine, Kamila; Monack, Denise M.; Frank, Matthias; Segelke, Brent W.; Rasley, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the etiological agent of tularemia, or rabbit fever. Although F. tularensis is a recognized biothreat agent with broad and expanding geographical range, its mechanism of infection and environmental persistence remain poorly understood. Previously, we identified seven F. tularensis proteins that induce a rapid encystment phenotype (REP) in the free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba castellanii. Encystment is essential to the pathogen's long term intracellular survival in the amoeba. Here, we characterize the cellular and molecular function of REP34, a REP protein with a mass of 34 kDa. A REP34 knock-out strain of F. tularensis has a reduced ability to both induce encystment in A. castellanii and invade human macrophages. We determined the crystal structure of REP34 to 2.05-Å resolution and demonstrate robust carboxypeptidase B-like activity for the enzyme. REP34 is a zinc-containing monomeric protein with close structural homology to the metallocarboxypeptidase family of peptidases. REP34 possesses a novel topology and substrate binding pocket that deviates from the canonical funnelin structure of carboxypeptidases, putatively resulting in a catalytic role for a conserved tyrosine and distinct S1′ recognition site. Taken together, these results identify REP34 as an active carboxypeptidase, implicate the enzyme as a potential key F. tularensis effector protein, and may help elucidate a mechanistic understanding of F. tularensis infection of phagocytic cells. PMID:25231992

  15. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  16. AAV ancestral reconstruction library enables selection of broadly infectious viral variants.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Ortiz, J; Ojala, D S; Westesson, O; Weinstein, J R; Wong, S Y; Steinsapir, A; Kumar, S; Holmes, I; Schaffer, D V

    2015-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. However, enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties and to gain insights into AAV's evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes and, in general, ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not use sialic acids, galactose or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19- to 31-fold higher gene expression in the muscle compared with AAV1, a clinically used serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  17. AAV vector-mediated secretion of chondroitinase provides a sensitive tracer for axonal arborisations.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Nuno; Muir, Elizabeth M; Andrews, Melissa R; Ward, Anneliese; Michelmore, Nicholas; Dasgupta, Debayan; Verhaagen, Joost; Moloney, Elizabeth B; Keynes, Roger J; Fawcett, James W; Rogers, John H

    2014-04-30

    As part of a project to express chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in neurons of the central nervous system, we have inserted a modified ChABC gene into an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector and injected it into the vibrissal motor cortex in adult rats to determine the extent and distribution of expression of the enzyme. A similar vector for expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the same location. For each vector, two versions with minor differences were used, giving similar results. After 4 weeks, the brains were stained to show GFP and products of chondroitinase digestion. Chondroitinase was widely expressed, and the AAV-ChABC and AAV-GFP vectors gave similar expression patterns in many respects, consistent with the known projections from the directly transduced neurons in vibrissal motor cortex and adjacent cingulate cortex. In addition, diffusion of vector to deeper neuronal populations led to labelling of remote projection fields which was much more extensive with AAV-ChABC than with AAV-GFP. The most notable of these populations are inferred to be neurons of cortical layer 6, projecting widely in the thalamus, and neurons of the anterior pole of the hippocampus, projecting through most of the hippocampus. We conclude that, whereas GFP does not label the thinnest axonal branches of some neuronal types, chondroitinase is efficiently secreted from these arborisations and enables their extent to be sensitively visualised. After 12 weeks, chondroitinase expression was undiminished. PMID:24583077

  18. E. coli Rep oligomers are required to initiate DNA unwinding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Hsieh, J; Brendza, K M; Lohman, T M

    2001-07-01

    E. coli Rep protein is a 3' to 5' SF1 superfamily DNA helicase which is monomeric in the absence of DNA, but can dimerize upon binding either single-stranded or duplex DNA. A variety of biochemical studies have led to proposals that Rep dimerization is important for its helicase activity; however, recent structural studies of Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA have led to suggestions that SF1 helicases, such as E. coli Rep and E. coli UvrD, function as monomeric helicases. We have examined the question of whether Rep oligomerization is important for its DNA helicase activity using pre-steady state stopped-flow and chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies of Rep-catalyzed DNA unwinding. The results from four independent experiments demonstrate that Rep oligomerization is required for initiation of DNA helicase activity in vitro. No DNA unwinding is observed when only a Rep monomer is bound to the DNA substrate, even when fluorescent DNA substrates are used that can detect partial unwinding of the first few base-pairs at the ss-ds-DNA junction. In fact, under these conditions, ATP hydrolysis causes dissociation of the Rep monomer from the DNA, rather than DNA unwinding. These studies demonstrate that wild-type Rep monomers are unable to initiate DNA unwinding in vitro, and that oligomerization is required. PMID:11428893

  19. Roles of renal erythropoietin-producing (REP) cells in the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietic induction is critical for enhancing the efficiency of oxygen delivery during the chronic phase of the systemic hypoxia response. The erythroid growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) triggers the erythropoietic induction through the activation of erythroid genes related to cell survival, differentiation, and iron metabolism. Because Epo is produced in renal Epo-producing (REP) cells in a hypoxia-inducible manner, REP cells serve as a control center for the systemic hypoxia response. In fact, the loss of Epo production in REP cells causes chronic severe anemia in genetically modified mice, and REP cell-specific inactivation of PHD2 (prolyl-hydroxylase domain enzyme 2) results in erythrocytosis via overexpression of the Epo gene due to the constitutive activation of HIF2α (hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 2α). REP cells are located in the interstitial spaces between renal tubules and capillaries, where the oxygen supply is low but oxygen consumption is high, for the highly sensitive detection of decreased oxygen supplies to the body. Under disease conditions, REP cells transform to myofibroblasts and lose their Epo-producing ability. Therefore, elucidation of Epo gene regulation and REP cell features directly contributes to understanding the pathology of chronic kidney disease. To further analyze REP cells, we introduce a newly established mouse line in which REP cells are efficiently labeled with fluorescent protein. PMID:26452589

  20. Strong cortical and spinal cord transduction after AAV7 and AAV9 delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, Lluis; Salegio, Ernesto A; San Sebastian, Waldy; Kells, Adrian P; Bringas, John R; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2013-05-01

    The present study builds on previous work showing that infusion of adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) into the cisterna magna (CM) of nonhuman primates resulted in widespread transduction throughout cortex and spinal cord. Transduction efficiency was severely limited, however, by the presence of circulating anti-AAV antibodies. Accordingly, we compared AAV9 to a related serotype, AAV7, which has a high capsid homology. CM infusion of either AAV7 or AAV9 directed high level of cell transduction with similar patterns of distribution throughout brain cortex and along the spinal cord. Dorsal root ganglia and corticospinal tracts were also transduced. Both astrocytes and neurons were transduced. Interestingly, little transduction was observed in peripheral organs. Our results indicate that intrathecal delivery of either AAV7 or AAV9 directs a robust and widespread cellular transduction in the central nervous system and other peripheral neural structures. PMID:23517473

  1. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (∼174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-κB subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:26443873

  2. Proof of concept study with an HER-2 mimotope anticancer vaccine deduced from a novel AAV-mimotope library platform

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Josef; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Fazekas, Judit; Thell, Kathrin; Bentley-Lukschal, Anna; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Weghofer, Margit; Ritter, Mirko; Pino Tossi, Kerstin; Hörer, Markus; Michaelis, Uwe; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Anticancer vaccines could represent a valuable complementary strategy to established therapies, especially in settings of early stage and minimal residual disease. HER-2 is an important target for immunotherapy and addressed by the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. We have previously generated HER-2 mimotope peptides from phage display libraries. The synthesized peptides were coupled to carriers and applied for epitope-specific induction of trastuzumab-like IgG. For simplification and to avoid methodological limitations of synthesis and coupling chemistry, we herewith present a novel and optimized approach by using adeno-associated viruses (AAV) as effective and high-density mimotope-display system, which can be directly used for vaccination. Methods: An AAV capsid display library was constructed by genetically incorporating random peptides in a plasmid encoding the wild-type AAV2 capsid protein. AAV clones, expressing peptides specifically reactive to trastuzumab, were employed to immunize BALB/c mice. Antibody titers against human HER-2 were determined, and the isotype composition and functional properties of these were tested. Finally, prophylactically immunized mice were challenged with human HER-2 transfected mouse D2F2/E2 cells. Results: HER-2 mimotope AAV-vaccines induced antibodies specific to human HER-2. Two clones were selected for immunization of mice, which were subsequently grafted D2F2/E2 cells. Both mimotope AAV clones delayed the growth of tumors significantly, as compared to controls. Conclusion: In this study, a novel mimotope AAV-based platform was created allowing the isolation of mimotopes, which can be directly used as anticancer vaccines. The example of trastuzumab AAV-mimotopes demonstrates that this vaccine strategy could help to establish active immunotherapy for breast-cancer patients. PMID:27622022

  3. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  4. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  5. scAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer of Interleukin 1-Receptor Antagonist to Synovium and Articular Cartilage in Large Mammalian Joints

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rachael S.; Broome, Ted A.; Levings, Padraic P.; Rice, Bret L.; Kay, Jesse D.; Smith, Andrew D.; Gouze, Elvire; Gouze, Jean-Noel; Dacanay, E. Anthony; Hauswirth, William W.; Nickerson, David M.; Dark, Michael J.; Colahan, Patrick T.; Ghivizzani, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    With the long-term goal of developing a gene-based treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), we performed studies to evaluate the equine joint as a model for AAV-mediated gene transfer to large, weight-bearing human joints. A self-complementary AAV2 vector containing the coding regions for human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was packaged in AAV capsid serotypes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 9. Following infection of human and equine synovial fibroblasts in culture, we found that both were only receptive to transduction with AAV1, 2 and 5. For these serotypes, however, transgene expression from the equine cells was consistently at least 10-fold higher. Analyses of AAV surface receptor molecules and intracellular trafficking of vector genomes implicate enhanced viral uptake by the equine cells. Following delivery of 1 × 1011 vector genomes of serotypes 2, 5 and 8 into the forelimb joints of the horse, all three enabled hIL-1Ra expression at biologically relevant levels and effectively transduced the same cell types, primarily synovial fibroblasts and, to a lesser degree, chondrocytes in articular cartilage. These results provide optimism that AAV vectors can be effectively adapted for gene delivery to large human joints affected by OA. PMID:23151520

  6. Effect of SERCA2a overexpression in the pericardium mediated by the AAV1 gene transfer on rapid atrial pacing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kuken, B N; Aikemu, A N W E; Xiang, S Y; Wulasihan, M H Y T

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of overexpression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) gene on the activity and protein expression of SERCA2a after rapid atrial pacing (RAP) in New Zealand white rabbits. New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into a sham-operated group (group A), adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1)/EGFP + atrial fibrillation (AF) model group (group B), or AVV1/SERCA2a + AF group (group C). The sham-operated group was used as a negative control. Each group consisted of 10 animals. Groups B and C were injected with 500 μL of the AAV1-EGFP reporter gene and 500 μL of the AAV1-SERCA2a target gene, respectively. Four weeks after AAV1-mediated gene transfer, the rabbits underwent 24 h of RAP to the right atrium. The animals were sacrificed and protein activity and protein expression in the myocardium were measured using the westernblot method. Four weeks after AAV1-mediated gene transfer, SERCA2a protein activity and expression were significantly higher in Group C than in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). RAP of the right atrium induced atrial fibrillation in rabbits, resulting in decreases in the activity and protein expression of SERCA2a. Pericardial AAV-1 mediated SERCA2a gene transfer resulted in the overexpression of SERCA2a, restoring SERCA2a activity and protein expression. PMID:26535677

  7. Rational plasmid design and bioprocess optimization to enhance recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) productivity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Emmerling, Verena V; Pegel, Antje; Milian, Ernest G; Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Kunz, Marion; Wegele, Jessica; Kamen, Amine A; Kochanek, Stefan; Hoerer, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Viral vectors used for gene and oncolytic therapy belong to the most promising biological products for future therapeutics. Clinical success of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) based therapies raises considerable demand for viral vectors, which cannot be met by current manufacturing strategies. Addressing existing bottlenecks, we improved a plasmid system termed rep/cap split packaging and designed a minimal plasmid encoding adenoviral helper function. Plasmid modifications led to a 12-fold increase in rAAV vector titers compared to the widely used pDG standard system. Evaluation of different production approaches revealed superiority of processes based on anchorage- and serum-dependent HEK293T cells, exhibiting about 15-fold higher specific and volumetric productivity compared to well-established suspension cells cultivated in serum-free medium. As for most other viral vectors, classical stirred-tank bioreactor production is thus still not capable of providing drug product of sufficient amount. We show that manufacturing strategies employing classical surface-providing culture systems can be successfully transferred to the new fully-controlled, single-use bioreactor system Integrity(TM) iCELLis(TM) . In summary, we demonstrate substantial bioprocess optimizations leading to more efficient and scalable production processes suggesting a promising way for flexible large-scale rAAV manufacturing. PMID:26284700

  8. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  9. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector.

    PubMed

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  10. Near-perfect infectivity of wild-type AAV as benchmark for infectivity of recombinant AAV vectors

    PubMed Central

    Zeltner, Nadja; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clément, Nathalie; Weber, Thomas; Linden, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are widely used for gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo. The increasing use of AAV as a gene transfer vector, as well as recently demonstrated immunological complications in clinical trials, highlight the necessity to define the specific activity of vector preparations beyond current standards. In this report, we determined the infectious, physical and genome-containing particle titers of several wild-type AAV type 2 (wtAAV2) and recombinant AAV type 2 (rAAV2) preparations that were produced and purified by standard methods. We found that the infectivity of wtAAV2 approaches a physical-to-infectious particle ratio of one. This near-perfect physical-to-infectious particle ratio defines a “ceiling” for the theoretically achievable quality of recombinant AAV vectors. In comparison, for rAAV2, only approximately 50 out of 100 viral particles contained a genome and more strikingly only approximately one of the 100 viral particles was infectious. Our findings suggest that current strategies for rAAV vector design, production and/or purification should be amenable to improvements. Ultimately, this could result in the generation of near-perfect vector particles, a prospect with significant implications for gene therapy. PMID:20336156

  11. AAV ANCESTRAL RECONSTRUCTION LIBRARY ENABLES SELECTION OF BROADLY INFECTIOUS VIRAL VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge; Ojala, David S.; Westesson, Oscar; Weinstein, John R.; Wong, Sophie Y.; Steinsapir, Andrew; Kumar, Sanjay; Holmes, Ian; Schaffer, David V.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. Enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications, however, and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties, and to gain insights into AAV’s evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes, and in general ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not utilize sialic acids, galactose, or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19–31 fold higher gene expression in muscle compared to AAV1, a clinically utilized serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  12. Systemic Administration of a Recombinant AAV1 Vector Encoding IGF-1 Improves Disease Manifestations in SMA Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Ting, Chen-Hung; Lin-Chao, Sue; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Dodge, James C; Passini, Marco A; Cheng, Seng H

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intravenous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector encoding human insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in a severe mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy. Measurable quantities of human IGF-1 transcripts and protein were detected in the liver (up to 3 months postinjection) and in the serum indicating that IGF-1 was secreted from the liver into systemic circulation. Spinal muscular atrophy mice administered AAV1-IGF-1 on postnatal day 1 exhibited a lower extent of motor neuron degeneration, cardiac and muscle atrophy as well as a greater extent of innervation at the neuromuscular junctions compared to untreated controls at day 8 posttreatment. Importantly, treatment with AAV1-IGF-1 prolonged the animals' lifespan, increased their body weights and improved their motor coordination. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that AAV1-mediated expression of IGF-1 led to an increase in survival motor neuron transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord, brain, muscles, and heart. These data indicate that systemically delivered AAV1-IGF-1 can correct several of the biochemical and behavioral deficits in spinal muscular atrophy mice through increasing tissue levels of survival motor neuron. PMID:24814151

  13. An AAV9 coding for frataxin clearly improved the symptoms and prolonged the life of Friedreich ataxia mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Catherine; Xiao, Xiao; Filali, Mohammed; Coulombe, Zoé; Arsenault, Marie; Couet, Jacques; Li, Juan; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Chikh, Amina; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2014-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a genetic disease due to increased repeats of the GAA trinucleotide in intron 1 of the frataxin gene. This mutation leads to a reduced expression of frataxin. We have produced an adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 coding for human frataxin (AAV9-hFXN). This AAV was delivered by intraperitoneal (IP) injection to young conditionally knockout mice in which the frataxin gene had been knocked-out in some tissues during embryogenesis by breeding them with mice expressing the Cre recombinase gene under the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) or the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter. In the first part of the study, different doses of virus were tested from 6 × 1011 v.p. to 6 × 109 v.p. in NSE-cre mice and all leading to an increase in life spent of the mice. The higher and the lower dose were also tested in MCK-cre mice. A single administration of the AAV9-hFXN at 6 × 1011 v.p. more than doubled the life of these mice. In fact the MCK-cre mice treated with the AAV9-hFXN were sacrificed for further molecular investigations at the age of 29 weeks without apparent symptoms. Echography analysis of the heart function clearly indicated that the cardiac systolic function was better preserved in the mice that received 6 × 1011 v.p. of AAV9-hFXN. The human frataxin protein was detected by ELISA in the heart, brain, muscles, kidney, and liver with the higher dose of virus in both mouse models. Thus, gene therapy with an AAV9-hFXN is a potential treatment of FRDA. PMID:26015982

  14. Identification, cDNA cloning and possible roles of seed-specific rice asparaginyl endopeptidase, REP-2.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Sutoh, Keita; Minamikawa, Takao

    2003-08-01

    We previously showed that two major cysteine endopeptidases, REP-1 and REP-2, were present in germinated rice ( Oryza sativa L.) seeds, and that REP-1 was the enzyme that digests seed storage proteins. The present study shows that REP-2 is an asparaginyl endopeptidase that acts as an activator of REP-1, and we separated it into two forms, REP-2alpha (39 kDa) and REP-2beta (40 kDa), using ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Although analysis of the amino terminals revealed that 10 amino acids of both forms were identical, their isoelectric points were different. SDS-PAGE/immunoblot analysis using an antiserum raised against legumain, an asparaginyl endopeptidase from jack bean, indicated that both forms were present in maturing and germinating rice seeds, and that their amounts transiently decreased in dry seeds. Northern blot analysis indicated that REP-2 mRNA was expressed in both maturing and germinating seeds. In germinating seeds, the mRNA was detected in aleurone layers but not in shoot and root tissues. Incubation of the de-embryonated seeds in 10(-6) M gibberellic acid induced the production of large amounts of REP-1, whereas REP-2beta levels declined rapidly. Southern blot analysis showed that there is one gene for REP-2 in the genome, indicating that both REP-2 enzymes are generated from a single gene. The structure of the gene was similar to that of beta-VPE and gamma-VPE isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:12684786

  15. Systemic gene delivery following intravenous administration of AAV9 to fetal and neonatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Wong, Andrew M S; Hoefer, Klemens; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Howe, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan D; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rahim, Ahad A

    2015-09-01

    Several acute monogenic diseases affect multiple body systems, causing death in childhood. The development of novel therapies for such conditions is challenging. However, improvements in gene delivery technology mean that gene therapy has the potential to treat such disorders. We evaluated the ability of the AAV9 vector to mediate systemic gene delivery after intravenous administration to perinatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates (NHPs). Titer-matched single-stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were intravenously administered to fetal and neonatal mice, with noninjected age-matched mice used as the control. Extensive GFP expression was observed in organs throughout the body, with the epithelial and muscle cells being particularly well transduced. ssAAV9 carrying the WPRE sequence mediated significantly more gene expression than its sc counterpart, which lacked the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) sequence. To examine a realistic scale-up to larger models or potentially patients for such an approach, AAV9 was intravenously administered to late-gestation NHPs by using a clinically relevant protocol. Widespread systemic gene expression was measured throughout the body, with cellular tropisms similar to those observed in the mouse studies and no observable adverse events. This study confirms that AAV9 can safely mediate systemic gene delivery in small and large animal models and supports its potential use in clinical systemic gene therapy protocols. PMID:26062602

  16. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  17. AAV-based Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A: Long-Term Correction and Avoidance of Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuhong; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors to the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these ‘inhibitors’ more commonly effect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype thereby avoiding long-term consequences. Serotype rh10 AAV was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery. Coinjection of virions of each FVIII chain intravenously to mice on the second day of life was performed. Mice express sustained FVIII antigen levels of ≥5% to 22 months of life without the development of antibodies to FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development to FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period. PMID:22241178

  18. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved with great spatiotemporal control through stereotaxic surgeries. Recently, discoveries of new AAV vectors with the ability to cross the blood brain barrier have made it possible to also target the adult CNS by intravascular injections. rAAVs have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles in multiple animal models of CNS disorders, and several clinical trials are currently underway. PMID:23686825

  19. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  20. The Signalling Role of the αvβ5-Integrin Can Impact the Efficacy of AAV in Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Therese; Chung, Daniel C.; Yang, Ying; Nandrot, Emeline F.; Bennett, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Sub-retinal injection of the common AAV2 pseudotypes frequently results in strong transduction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) as well as the retina itself. This has been of benefit to date in human clinical trials using AAV, where the disease target is in the RPE. However, many mutations predisposing to retinal disease are located in the photoreceptor cells, present in the neural retina and not the RPE; in this case the sub-retinal injection route may cause an effective “loss” of therapeutic AAV to the RPE. The αvβ5 integrin receptor is highly expressed on the apical surface of the RPE, and is essential to the daily phagocytosis of the outer segment tips of photoreceptor cells. The transduction efficiency of AAV was tested in the retinas of β5−/− mice lacking this receptor and showing defects in photoreceptor outer segment phagocytosis. Following sub-retinal injection of AAV2/5-eGFP, fluorescence was found to be stronger and more widespread in the neural retina of β5−/− mice compared to wild-types with greatly reduced fluorescence in the RPE. Increased levels of the phagocytic signalling protein MFG-E8, the ligand for the αvβ5 integrin receptor, is found to have a moderate inhibitory effect on AAV transduction of the retina. However the opposite effect is found when only the integrin-binding domain of MFG-E8, the RGD (Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid) domain, was increased. In this case RGD enhanced AAV-mediated retinal transduction relative to RPE transduction. These results are presented for their relevance for the design of AAV-based retinal gene therapy strategies strategies targeting retinal/photoreceptor cells. PMID:24281556

  1. Enzyme replacement in the CSF to treat metachromatic leukodystrophy in mouse model using single intracerebroventricular injection of self-complementary AAV1 vector

    PubMed Central

    Hironaka, Kohei; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Yamamoto, Motoko; Miyake, Noriko; Miyake, Koichi; Okada, Takashi; Morita, Akio; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a functional deficiency in human arylsulfatase A (hASA). We recently reported that ependymal cells and the choroid plexus are selectively transduced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) vector and serve as a biological reservoir for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In the present study, we examined the feasibility of this AAV-mediated gene therapy to treat MLD model mice. Preliminary experiments showed that the hASA level in the CSF after ICV injection of self-complementary (sc) AAV1 was much higher than in mice injected with single-stranded AAV1 or scAAV9. However, when 18-week-old MLD mice were treated with ICV injection of scAAV1, the concentration of hASA in the CSF gradually decreased and was not detectable at 12 weeks after injection, probably due to the development of anti-hASA antibodies. As a result, the sulfatide levels in brain tissues of treated MLD mice were only slightly reduced compared with those of untreated MLD mice. These results suggest that this approach is potentially promising for treating MLD, but that controlling the immune response appears to be crucial for long-term expression of therapeutic proteins in the CSF. PMID:26283284

  2. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 108 viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  3. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 10(8) viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  4. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases. PMID:27280971

  5. Functions of AAV-CMV-F.IX And AAV-EF1alpha-F.IX in gene therapy for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2007-02-01

    There has been substantial progress in using gene therapy to treat animals with hemophilia. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer of coagulation factor IX to skeletal muscle and liver of murine and canine models of hemophilia has resulted in sustained systemic expression and, in several studies, in complete cure of the bleeding disorder. Two AAV vectors widely used at present are AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha-F.IX. This work compares the predicted molecular functions of AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX by sequence docking and gene ontology. It is shown that both AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX induce coagulation factor IXa activity; however, AAV-CMV-F.IX administration also yields coagulation factor XIa activity and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX treatment results in coagulation factor Xa activity. Therefore, AAV-CMV-F.IX might be useful for factor XI deficiency. AAV-CMV-F.IX has several additional molecular functions and processes compared with AAV-CMV-F.IX. PMID:17266422

  6. Negative regulation of pPS10 plasmid replication: origin pairing by zipping-up DNA-bound RepA monomers.

    PubMed

    Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Díaz-López, Teresa; Lurz, Rudi; Prieto, Alicia; Fernández-Tresguerres, M Elena; Giraldo, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    In many plasmid replicons of gram-negative bacteria, Rep protein dimers are transcriptional self-repressors of their genes, whereas monomers are initiators of DNA replication. Switching between both functions implies conformational remodelling of Rep, and is promoted by Rep binding to the origin DNA repeats (iterons) or chaperones. Rep proteins play another key role: they bridge together two iteron DNA stretches, found either on the same or on different plasmid molecules. These so-called, respectively, 'looped' and 'handcuffed' complexes are thought to be negative regulators of plasmid replication. Although evidence for Rep-dependent plasmid handcuffing has been found in a number of replicons, the structure of these Rep-DNA assemblies is still unknown. Here, by a combination of proteomics, electron microscopy, genetic analysis and modelling, we provide insight on a possible three-dimensional structure for two handcuffed arrays of the iterons found at the origin of pPS10 replicon. These are brought together in parallel register by zipping-up DNA-bound RepA monomers. We also present evidence for a distinct role of RepA dimers in DNA looping. This work defines a new regulatory interface in Rep proteins. PMID:18284592

  7. AAV-Mediated Clarin-1 Expression in the Mouse Retina: Implications for USH3A Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M.; Min, Seok-Hong; Boye, Sanford L.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Abrahan, Carolina E.; Zhu, Ping; Li, Qiuhong; Strettoi, Enrica; Novelli, Elena; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay; Hauswirth, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3A) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and sensorineural deafness. Efforts to develop therapies for preventing photoreceptor cell loss are hampered by the lack of a retinal phenotype in the existing USH3 mouse models and by conflicting reports regarding the endogenous retinal localization of clarin-1, a transmembrane protein of unknown function. In this study, we used an AAV-based approach to express CLRN1 in the mouse retina in order to determine the pattern of its subcellular localization in different cell types. We found that all major classes of retinal cells express AAV-delivered CLRN1 driven by the ubiquitous, constitutive small chicken β-actin promoter, which has important implications for the design of future USH3 gene therapy studies. Within photoreceptor cells, AAV-expressed CLRN1 is mainly localized at the inner segment region and outer plexiform layer, similar to the endogenous expression of other usher proteins. Subretinal delivery using a full strength viral titer led to significant loss of retinal function as evidenced by ERG analysis, suggesting that there is a critical limit for CLRN1 expression in photoreceptor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CLRN1 expression is potentially supported by a variety of retinal cells, and the right combination of AAV vector dose, promoter, and delivery method needs to be selected to develop safe therapies for USH3 disorder. PMID:26881841

  8. Data on publications, structural analyses, and queries used to build and utilize the AlloRep database.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Parente, Daniel J; Hessman, Jacob A; Chazelle, Allen; Teichmann, Sarah A; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2016-09-01

    The AlloRep database (www.AlloRep.org) (Sousa et al., 2016) [1] compiles extensive sequence, mutagenesis, and structural information for the LacI/GalR family of transcription regulators. Sequence alignments are presented for >3000 proteins in 45 paralog subfamilies and as a subsampled alignment of the whole family. Phenotypic and biochemical data on almost 6000 mutants have been compiled from an exhaustive search of the literature; citations for these data are included herein. These data include information about oligomerization state, stability, DNA binding and allosteric regulation. Protein structural data for 65 proteins are presented as easily-accessible, residue-contact networks. Finally, this article includes example queries to enable the use of the AlloRep database. See the related article, "AlloRep: a repository of sequence, structural and mutagenesis data for the LacI/GalR transcription regulators" (Sousa et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27508249

  9. AAV capsid CD8+ T-cell epitopes are highly conserved across AAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Daniel J; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Pien, Gary C; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Camire, Rodney M; Ertl, Hildegund; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become one of the most promising vectors in gene transfer in the last 10 years with successful translation to clinical trials in humans and even market approval for a first gene therapy product in Europe. Administration to humans, however, revealed that adaptive immune responses against the vector capsid can present an obstacle to sustained transgene expression due to the activation and expansion of capsid-specific T cells. The limited number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from samples within clinical trials allows for little more than monitoring of T-cell responses. We were able to identify immunodominant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes for common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types by using spleens isolated from subjects undergoing splenectomy for non-malignant indications as a source of large numbers of lymphocytes and restimulating them with single AAV capsid peptides in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that these epitopes are naturally processed and functionally relevant. The design of more effective and less immunogenic AAV vectors, and precise immune monitoring of vector-infused subjects, are facilitated by these findings. PMID:26445723

  10. Neonatal Systemic AAV Induces Tolerance to CNS Gene Therapy in MPS I Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Gurda, Brittney L; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Sikora, Tracey; Ruane, Therese; Wang, Ping; Tarantal, Alice F; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2015-08-01

    The potential host immune response to a nonself protein poses a fundamental challenge for gene therapies targeting recessive diseases. We demonstrate in both dogs and nonhuman primates that liver-directed gene transfer using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in neonates induces a persistent state of immunological tolerance to the transgene product, substantially improving the efficacy of subsequent vector administration targeting the central nervous system (CNS). We applied this approach to a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a progressive neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I dogs treated systemically in the first week of life with a vector expressing canine IDUA did not develop antibodies against the enzyme and exhibited robust expression in the CNS upon intrathecal AAV delivery at 1 month of age, resulting in complete correction of brain storage lesions. Newborn rhesus monkeys treated systemically with AAV vector expressing human IDUA developed tolerance to the transgene, resulting in high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IDUA expression and no antibody induction after subsequent CNS gene therapy. These findings suggest that inducing tolerance to the transgene product during a critical period in immunological development can improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy. PMID:26022732

  11. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  12. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  13. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  14. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting. PMID:25183392

  15. Novel rat Alzheimer's disease models based on AAV-mediated gene transfer to selectively increase hippocampal Aβ levels

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Patricia A; Bland, Ross J; Das, Pritam; Price, Robert W; Holloway, Vallie; Smithson, Lisa; Dicker, Bridget L; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Golde, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a decline in cognitive function and accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in extracellular plaques. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins alter APP metabolism resulting in accumulation of Aβ42, a peptide essential for the formation of amyloid deposits and proposed to initiate the cascade leading to AD. However, the role of Aβ40, the more prevalent Aβ peptide secreted by cells and a major component of cerebral Aβ deposits, is less clear. In this study, virally-mediated gene transfer was used to selectively increase hippocampal levels of human Aβ42 and Aβ40 in adult Wistar rats, allowing examination of the contribution of each to the cognitive deficits and pathology seen in AD. Results Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding BRI-Aβ cDNAs were generated resulting in high-level hippocampal expression and secretion of the specific encoded Aβ peptide. As a comparison the effect of AAV-mediated overexpression of APPsw was also examined. Animals were tested for development of learning and memory deficits (open field, Morris water maze, passive avoidance, novel object recognition) three months after infusion of AAV. A range of impairments was found, with the most pronounced deficits observed in animals co-injected with both AAV-BRI-Aβ40 and AAV-BRI-Aβ42. Brain tissue was analyzed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry to quantify levels of detergent soluble and insoluble Aβ peptides. BRI-Aβ42 and the combination of BRI-Aβ40+42 overexpression resulted in elevated levels of detergent-insoluble Aβ. No significant increase in detergent-insoluble Aβ was seen in the rats expressing APPsw or BRI-Aβ40. No pathological features were noted in any rats, except the AAV-BRI-Aβ42 rats which showed focal, amorphous, Thioflavin-negative Aβ42 deposits. Conclusion The results show that AAV-mediated gene transfer is a valuable tool to model aspects of AD pathology in vivo, and demonstrate that

  16. Intravitreal Injection of AAV2 Transduces Macaque Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lu; Greenberg, Kenneth; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Wolfe, Robert; Visel, Meike; Stone, Daniel; Libby, Richard T.; DiLoreto, David; Schaffer, David; Flannery, John; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has been shown to be effective in transducing inner retinal neurons after intravitreal injection in several species. However, results in nonprimates may not be predictive of transduction in the human inner retina, because of differences in eye size and the specialized morphology of the high-acuity human fovea. This was a study of inner retina transduction in the macaque, a primate with ocular characteristics most similar to that of humans. Methods. In vivo imaging and histology were used to examine GFP expression in the macaque inner retina after intravitreal injection of AAV vectors containing five distinct promoters. Results. AAV2 produced pronounced GFP expression in inner retinal cells of the fovea, no expression in the central retina beyond the fovea, and variable expression in the peripheral retina. AAV2 vector incorporating the neuronal promoter human connexin 36 (hCx36) transduced ganglion cells within a dense annulus around the fovea center, whereas AAV2 containing the ubiquitous promoter hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer/chicken-β-actin (CBA) transduced both Müller and ganglion cells in a dense circular disc centered on the fovea. With three shorter promoters—human synapsin (hSYN) and the shortened CBA and hCx36 promoters (smCBA and hCx36sh)—AAV2 produced visible transduction, as seen in fundus images, only when the retina was altered by ganglion cell loss or enzymatic vitreolysis. Conclusions. The results in the macaque suggest that intravitreal injection of AAV2 would produce high levels of gene expression at the human fovea, important in retinal gene therapy, but not in the central retina beyond the fovea. PMID:21310920

  17. Characterization of the nuclear localization signals of duck circovirus replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wu, Z; Xiang, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, R; Chen, J; Xia, L; Lin, S; Yu, W; Ma, Z; Xie, Z; Jiang, S

    2015-12-01

    Duck circovirus (DuCV) possess a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for its replication. Based on the viral genotype, there are two categories of Rep proteins: Rep1 and Rep2. To characterize the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conferring the nuclear localization of the Rep proteins, defined coding regions of the rep gene of two genotypes of DuCV were cloned and co-expressed with the red fluorescent protein DsRed2. The results showed that deleting the putative N-terminal NLS located at amino acid residues 10-37 of Rep1 and Rep2 abrogated nuclear translocation, while deleting the putative C-terminal NLS located at residues 244-274 of Rep1 did not significantly alter its subcellular localization, confirming that only the NLS located at residues 10-37 in the N-termini of the Rep proteins had nuclear targeting activity. PMID:26666192

  18. Directed Evolution of a Novel Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Vector That Crosses the Seizure-compromised Blood–Brain Barrier (BBB)

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Blake, Bonita L; Criswell, Hugh E; Nicolson, Sarah C; Samulski, R Jude; McCown, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    DNA shuffling and directed evolution were employed to develop a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector capable of crossing the seizure-compromised blood–brain barrier (BBB) and transducing cells in the brain. Capsid DNA from AAV serotypes 1–6, 8, and 9 were shuffled and recombined to create a library of chimeric AAVs. One day after kainic acid–induced limbic seizure activity in rats, the virus library was infused intravenously (i.v.), and 3 days later, neuron-rich cells were mechanically dissociated from seizure-sensitive brain sites, collected and viral DNA extracted. After three cycles of selection, green fluorescent protein (GFP)–packaged clones were administered directly into brain or i.v. 1 day after kainic acid–induced seizures. Several clones that were effective after intracranial administration did not transduce brain cells after the i.v. administration. However, two clones (32 and 83) transduced the cells after direct brain infusion and after i.v. administration transduced the cells that were localized to the piriform cortex and ventral hippocampus, areas exhibiting a seizure-compromised BBB. No transduction occurred in areas devoid of BBB compromise. Only one parental serotype (AAV8) exhibited a similar expression profile, but the biodistribution of 32 and 83 diverged dramatically from this parental serotype. Thus, novel AAV vectors have been created that can selectively cross the seizure-compromised BBB and transduce cells. PMID:20040913

  19. AAV9-mediated gene transfer of desmin ameliorates cardiomyopathy in desmin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M B; Bauer, R; Jungmann, A; Winter, L; Rapti, K; Strucksberg, K-H; Clemen, C S; Li, Z; Schröder, R; Katus, H A; Müller, O J

    2016-08-01

    Mutations of the human desmin (DES) gene cause autosomal dominant and recessive myopathies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue. Desmin knockout mice (DES-KO), which develop progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, mirror rare human recessive desminopathies in which mutations on both DES alleles lead to a complete ablation of desmin protein expression. Here, we investigated whether an adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of wild-type desmin cDNA (AAV-DES) attenuates cardiomyopathy in these mice. Our approach leads to a partial reconstitution of desmin protein expression and the de novo formation of the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin network in cardiomyocytes of treated animals. This finding was accompanied by reduced fibrosis and heart weights and improved systolic left-ventricular function when compared with control vector-treated DES-KO mice. Since the re-expression of desmin protein in cardiomyocytes of DES-KO mice restores the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin cytoskeleton, attenuates the degree of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and improves contractile function, AAV-mediated desmin gene transfer may be a novel and promising therapeutic approach for patients with cardiomyopathy due to the complete lack of desmin protein expression. PMID:27101257

  20. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  1. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R. Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  2. Engineering the AAV capsid to optimize vector-host-interactions.

    PubMed

    Büning, Hildegard; Huber, Anke; Zhang, Liang; Meumann, Nadja; Hacker, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are the most widely used delivery system for in vivo gene therapy. Vectors developed from natural AAV isolates achieved clinical benefit for a number of patients suffering from monogenetic disorders. However, high vector doses were required and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies precluded a number of patients from participation. Further challenges are related to AAV's tropism that lacks cell type selectivity resulting in off-target transduction. Conversely, specific cell types representing important targets for gene therapy like stem cells or endothelial cells show low permissiveness. To overcome these limitations, elegant rational design- as well as directed evolution-based strategies were developed to optimize various steps of AAV's host interaction. These efforts resulted in next generation vectors with enhanced capabilities, that is increased efficiency of cell transduction, targeted transduction of previously non-permissive cell types, escape from antibody neutralization and off-target free in vivo delivery of vector genomes. These important achievements are expected to improve current and pave the way towards novel AAV-based applications in gene therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:26302254

  3. Nucleation of Amyloid Oligomers by RepA-WH1-Prionoid-Functionalized Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Cristina; González-Rubio, Guillermo; Langer, Judith; Tardajos, Gloria; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Giraldo, Rafael; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Understanding protein amyloidogenesis is an important topic in protein science, fueled by the role of amyloid aggregates, especially oligomers, in the etiology of a number of devastating human degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that determine the formation of amyloid oligomers remain elusive due to the high complexity of the amyloidogenesis process. For instance, gold nanoparticles promote or inhibit amyloid fibrillation. We have functionalized gold nanorods with a metal-chelating group to selectively immobilize soluble RepA-WH1, a model synthetic bacterial prionoid, using a hexa-histidine tag (H6). H6-RepA-WH1 undergoes stable amyloid oligomerization in the presence of catalytic concentrations of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then, in a physically separated event, such oligomers promote the growth of amyloid fibers of untagged RepA-WH1. SERS spectral changes of H6-RepA-WH1 on spherical citrate-AuNP substrates provide evidence for structural modifications in the protein, which are compatible with a gradual increase in β-sheet structure, as expected in amyloid oligomerization. PMID:27489029

  4. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4,000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV. Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector. PMID:24917028

  5. Development of an AAV9 coding for a 3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 able to increase in vivo the human frataxin in YG8R mice.

    PubMed

    Chapdelaine, P; Gérard, C; Sanchez, N; Cherif, K; Rousseau, J; Ouellet, D L; Jauvin, D; Tremblay, J P

    2016-07-01

    Artificially designed transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins fused to a transcription activation domain (TAD), such as VP64, are able to activate specific eukaryotic promoters. They thus provide a good tool for targeted gene regulation as a therapy. However, the efficacy of such an agent in vivo remains to be demonstrated as the majority of studies have been carried out in cell culture. We produced an adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) coding for a TALEfrat#8 containing 13 repeat variable diresidues able to bind to the proximal promoter of human frataxin (FXN) gene. This TALEfrat#8 was fused with a 3XFLAG at its N terminal and a VP64 TAD at its C terminal, and driven by a CAG promoter. This AAV9_3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 was injected intraperitoneally to 9-day-old and 4-month-old YG8R mice. After 1 month, the heart, muscle and liver were removed and their FXN mRNA and FXN protein were analyzed. The results show that the AAV9_3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 increased the FXN mRNA and FXN protein in the three organs studied. These results corroborate our previous in vitro studies in the FRDA human fibroblasts. Our study indicates that an AAV coding for a TALE protein coupled with a TAD may be used to increase gene expression in vivo as a possible treatment not only for FRDA but also for other haploinsufficiency diseases. PMID:27082765

  6. Development of an AAV9 coding for a 3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 able to increase in vivo the human frataxin in YG8R mice

    PubMed Central

    Chapdelaine, P; Gérard, C; Sanchez, N; Cherif, K; Rousseau, J; Ouellet, D L; Jauvin, D; Tremblay, J P

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins fused to a transcription activation domain (TAD), such as VP64, are able to activate specific eukaryotic promoters. They thus provide a good tool for targeted gene regulation as a therapy. However, the efficacy of such an agent in vivo remains to be demonstrated as the majority of studies have been carried out in cell culture. We produced an adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) coding for a TALEfrat#8 containing 13 repeat variable diresidues able to bind to the proximal promoter of human frataxin (FXN) gene. This TALEfrat#8 was fused with a 3XFLAG at its N terminal and a VP64 TAD at its C terminal, and driven by a CAG promoter. This AAV9_3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 was injected intraperitoneally to 9-day-old and 4-month-old YG8R mice. After 1 month, the heart, muscle and liver were removed and their FXN mRNA and FXN protein were analyzed. The results show that the AAV9_3XFLAG-TALEfrat#8-VP64 increased the FXN mRNA and FXN protein in the three organs studied. These results corroborate our previous in vitro studies in the FRDA human fibroblasts. Our study indicates that an AAV coding for a TALE protein coupled with a TAD may be used to increase gene expression in vivo as a possible treatment not only for FRDA but also for other haploinsufficiency diseases. PMID:27082765

  7. Expression and purification of F-plasmid RepE and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of its complex with operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Wada, Chieko; Miki, Kunio

    2007-04-01

    A dimeric inert form of the replication initiator RepE of the F plasmid was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with the repE operator DNA. Diffraction data were collected to 3.14 Å resolution. The replication initiator factor RepE of the F plasmid in Escherichia coli is an essential protein that stringently regulates the F-plasmid copy number. The RepE protein has a dual function: its monomer functions as a replication initiator, while its dimer acts as a transcriptional repressor of the repE gene. The wild-type dimeric RepE protein was expressed as an N-terminal histidine-tagged protein, purified under native conditions with a high salt concentration and crystallized in complex with the repE operator DNA using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 3.14 Å after the application of dehydration and crystal annealing and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.73, b = 99.32, c = 95.00 Å, β = 108.55°.

  8. Diabetes enhances the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in the retina: therapeutic effect of AAV2 encoding vasoinhibin and soluble VEGF receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Wu, Zhijian; Adán-Castro, Elva; Arnold, Edith; Vázquez-Membrillo, Miguel; Arredondo-Zamarripa, David; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Martinez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Colosi, Peter; Clapp, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of inhibitors of blood-retinal barrier breakdown (BRBB) offers promise for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Here, we demonstrated a reversal of blood-retinal barrier pathology mediated by AAV type 2 (AAV2) vectors encoding vasoinhibin or soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) when administered intravitreally to diabetic rats. Efficacy and safety of the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector were tested by monitoring its effect on diabetes-induced changes in the retinal vascular bed and thickness, and in the electroretinogram (ERG). Also, the transduction of AAV2 vectors and expression of AAV2 receptors and co-receptors were compared between the diabetic and the non-diabetic rat retinas. AAV2 vasoinhibin or AAV2 sFlt-1 vectors were injected intravitreally before or after enhanced BRBB due to diabetes induced by streptozotocin. The BRBB was examined by the Evans blue method, the vascular bed by fluorescein angiography, expression of the AAV2 EGFP reporter vector by confocal microscopy, and the AAV2 genome, expression of transgenes, receptors, and co-receptors by quantitative PCR. AAV2 vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 vectors inhibited the diabetes-mediated increase in BRBB when injected after, but not before, diabetes was induced. The AAV2 vasoinhibin vector decreased retinal microvascular abnormalities and the diabetes-induced reduction of the B-wave of the ERG, but it had no effect in non-diabetic controls. Also, retinal thickness was not altered by diabetes or by the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector. The AAV2 genome, vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 transgenes, and EGFP levels were higher in the retinas from diabetic rats and were associated with an elevated expression of AAV2 receptors (syndecan, glypican, and perlecan) and co-receptors (fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, αvβ5 integrin, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor). We conclude that retinal transduction and efficacy of AAV2 vectors are enhanced in diabetes, possibly due to their elevated

  9. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weihong; Wu Jianqing ||; Zhong Li; Chen Linyuan; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A. |; Qing Keyun; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H. |; Srivastava, Arun |. E-mail: asrivastava@gtc.ufl.edu

    2006-09-30

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors by {approx}25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency {approx}23-fold in WT MEFs, but only {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, {approx}59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only {approx}28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant

  10. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15

  11. Altering Tropism of rAAV by Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Marsic, Damien; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Directed evolution represents an attractive approach to derive AAV capsid variants capable of selectively infect specific tissue or cell targets. It involves the generation of an initial library of high complexity followed by cycles of selection during which the library is progressively enriched for target-specific variants. Each selection cycle consists of the following: reconstitution of complete AAV genomes within plasmid molecules; production of virions for which each particular capsid variant is matched with the particular capsid gene encoding it; recovery of capsid gene sequences from target tissue after systemic administration. Prevalent variants are then analyzed and evaluated. PMID:26611585

  12. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool.

    PubMed

    Hudry, E; Martin, C; Gandhi, S; György, B; Scheffer, D I; Mu, D; Merkel, S F; Mingozzi, F; Fitzpatrick, Z; Dimant, H; Masek, M; Ragan, T; Tan, S; Brisson, A R; Ramirez, S H; Hyman, B T; Maguire, C A

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill and time-intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when the vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared with standard AAV. Here, we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV-transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing three-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex vivo serial two-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable the widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant. PMID:26836117

  13. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Martin, Courtney; Gandhi, Sheetal; György, Bence; Scheffer, Deborah I.; Mu, Dakai; Merkel, Steven F.; Mingozzi, Federico; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Dimant, Hemi; Masek, Marissa; Ragan, Tim; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Alain R.; Ramirez, Servio H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Maguire, Casey A.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill, and time intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared to standard AAV. Here we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation, results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing 3-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex-vivo serial 2-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant. PMID:26836117

  14. Kinetic mechanism for the sequential binding of two single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides to the Escherichia coli Rep helicase dimer.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, K P; Hsieh, J; Amaratunga, M; Lohman, T M

    1998-01-20

    Escherichia coli Rep helicase is a DNA motor protein that unwinds duplex DNA as a dimeric enzyme. Using fluorescence probes positioned asymmetrically within a series of single-stranded (ss) oligodeoxynucleotides, we show that ss-DNA binds with a defined polarity to Rep monomers and to individual subunits of the Rep dimer. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and stopped-flow techniques, we have examined the mechanism of ss-oligodeoxynucleotide binding to preformed Rep dimers in which one binding site is occupied by a single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide, while the other site is free (P2S dimer). We show that ss-DNA binding to the P2S Rep dimer to form the doubly ligated P2S2 dimer occurs by a multistep process with the initial binding step occurring relatively rapidly with a bimolecular rate constant of k1 = approximately 2 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 [20 mM Tris (pH 7.5), 6 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 5 mM 2-mercaptoethanol, and 10% (v/v) glycerol, 4 degrees C]. A minimal kinetic mechanism is proposed which suggests that the two strands of ss-DNA bound to the Rep homodimer are kinetically distinct even within the P2S2 Rep dimer, indicating that this dimer is functionally asymmetric. The implications of these results for the mechanisms of DNA unwinding and translocation by the functional Rep dimer are discussed. PMID:9454579

  15. A dual AAV system enables the Cas9-mediated correction of a metabolic liver disease in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; McMenamin, Deirdre; He, Zhenning; White, John; Yu, Hongwei; Xu, Chenyu; Morizono, Hiroki; Musunuru, Kiran; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M

    2016-03-01

    Many genetic liver diseases in newborns cause repeated, often lethal, metabolic crises. Gene therapy using nonintegrating viruses such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) is not optimal in this setting because the nonintegrating genome is lost as developing hepatocytes proliferate. We reasoned that newborn liver may be an ideal setting for AAV-mediated gene correction using CRISPR-Cas9. Here we intravenously infuse two AAVs, one expressing Cas9 and the other expressing a guide RNA and the donor DNA, into newborn mice with a partial deficiency in the urea cycle disorder enzyme, ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC). This resulted in reversion of the mutation in 10% (6.7-20.1%) of hepatocytes and increased survival in mice challenged with a high-protein diet, which exacerbates disease. Gene correction in adult OTC-deficient mice was lower and accompanied by larger deletions that ablated residual expression from the endogenous OTC gene, leading to diminished protein tolerance and lethal hyperammonemia on a chow diet. PMID:26829317

  16. A dual AAV system enables the Cas9-mediated correction of a metabolic liver disease in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; McMenamin, Deirdre; He, Zhenning; White, John; Yu, Hongwei; Xu, Chenyu; Morizono, Hiroki; Musunuru, Kiran; Batshaw, Mark L.; Wilson, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Many genetic liver diseases present in newborns with repeated, often lethal, metabolic crises. Gene therapy using non-integrating viruses such as AAV is not optimal in this setting because the non-integrating genome is lost as developing hepatocytes proliferate1,2. We reasoned that newborn liver may be an ideal setting for AAV-mediated gene correction using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we intravenously infuse two AAVs, one expressing Cas9 and the other expressing a guide RNA and the donor DNA, into newborn mice with a partial deficiency in the urea cycle disorder enzyme, ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC). This resulted in reversion of the mutation in 10% (6.7% – 20.1%) of hepatocytes and increased survival in mice challenged with a high-protein diet, which exacerbates disease. Gene correction in adult OTC-deficient mice was lower and accompanied by larger deletions that ablated residual expression from the endogenous OTC gene, leading to diminished protein tolerance and lethal hyperammonemia on a chow diet. PMID:26829317

  17. Safety and liver transduction efficacy of rAAV5-cohPBGD in nonhuman primates: a potential therapy for acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pañeda, Astrid; Lopez-Franco, Esperanza; Kaeppel, Christine; Unzu, Carmen; Gil-Royo, Ana Gloria; D'Avola, Delia; Beattie, Stuart G; Olagüe, Cristina; Ferrero, Roberto; Sampedro, Ana; Mauleon, Itsaso; Hermening, Stephan; Salmon, Florence; Benito, Alberto; Gavira, Juan Jose; Cornet, María Eugenia; del Mar Municio, María; von Kalle, Christof; Petry, Harald; Prieto, Jesus; Schmidt, Manfred; Fontanellas, Antonio; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-12-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) results from haplo-insufficient activity of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterized clinically by life-threatening, acute neurovisceral attacks. To date, liver transplantation is the only curative option for AIP. The aim of the present preclinical nonhuman primate study was to determine the safety and transduction efficacy of an adeno-associated viral vector encoding PBGD (recombinant AAV serotype 5-codon-optimized human porphobilinogen deaminase, rAAV5-cohPBGD) administered intravenously as part of a safety program to start a clinical study in patients with AIP. Macaques injected with either 1 × 10(13) or 5 × 10(13) vector genomes/kg of clinical-grade rAAV5-cohPBGD were monitored by standardized clinical parameters, and vector shedding was analyzed. Liver transduction efficacy, biodistribution, vector integration, and histopathology at day 30 postvector administration were determined. There was no evidence of acute toxicity, and no adverse effects were observed. The vector achieved efficient and homogenous hepatocellular transduction, reaching transgenic PBGD expression levels equivalent to 50% of the naturally expressed PBGD mRNA. No cellular immune response was detected against the human PBGD or AAV capsid proteins. Integration site analysis in transduced liver cells revealed an almost random integration pattern supporting the good safety profile of rAAV5-cohPBGD. Together, data obtained in nonhuman primates indicate that rAAV5-cohPBGD represents a safe therapy to correct the metabolic defect present in AIP patients. PMID:24070415

  18. Immune Responses to Intramuscular Administration of Alipogene Tiparvovec (AAV1-LPLS447X) in a Phase II Clinical Trial of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Jaap; Kwikkers, Karin; Aronica, Eleonora; Brisson, Diane; Methot, Julie; Petry, Harald; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular immune responses to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors used for gene therapy have been linked to attenuated transgene expression and loss of efficacy. The impact of such cellular immune responses on the clinical efficacy of alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera; AAV1-LPLS447X; uniQure), a gene therapy consisting of intramuscular administration of a recombinant AAV1 mediating muscle-directed expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), was investigated. Five subjects with LPL deficiency (LPLD) were administered intramuscularly with a dose of 1×1012 gc/kg alipogene tiparvovec. All subjects were treated with immune suppression starting shortly before administration of alipogene tiparvovec and maintained until 12 weeks after administration. Systemic antibody and T cell responses against AAV1 and LPLS447X, as well as local cellular immune responses in the injected muscle, were investigated in five LPLD subjects. Long-term transgene expression was demonstrated despite a transient systemic cellular response and a stable humoral immune response against the AAV1 capsid protein. Cellular infiltrates were found in four of the five subjects but were not associated with adverse clinical events or elevation of inflammation markers. Consistent herewith, CD8+ T cells in the infiltrates lacked cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, FoxP3+/CD4+ T cells were found in the infiltrates, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to local tolerance. Systemic and local immune responses induced by intramuscular injection of alipogene tiparvovec did not appear to have an impact on safety and did not prevent LPL transgene expression. These findings support the use of alipogene tiparvovec in individuals with LPLD and indicate that muscle-directed AAV-based gene therapy remains a promising approach for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:24299335

  19. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  20. UvrD and UvrD252 counteract RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR in a rep mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-09-01

    Rep and UvrD are two related Escherichia coli helicases, and inactivating both is lethal. Based on the observation that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD inactivation is suppressed in the absence of the recombination presynaptic proteins RecF, RecO, or RecR, it was proposed that UvrD is essential in the rep mutant to counteract a deleterious RecFOR-dependent RecA binding. We show here that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD mutations is also suppressed by recQ and recJ inactivation but not by rarA inactivation. Furthermore, it is independent of the action of UvrD in nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. These observations support the idea that UvrD counteracts a deleterious RecA binding to forks blocked in the rep mutant. An ATPase-deficient mutant of UvrD [uvrD(R284A)] is dominant negative in a rep mutant, but only in the presence of all RecQJFOR proteins, suggesting that the UvrD(R284A) mutant protein is deleterious when it counteracts one of these proteins. In contrast, the uvrD252 mutant (G30D), which exhibits a strongly decreased ATPase activity, is viable in a rep mutant, where it allows replication fork reversal. We conclude that the residual ATPase activity of UvrD252 prevents a negative effect on the viability of the rep mutant and allows UvrD to counteract the action of RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR at forks blocked in the rep mutant. Models for the action of UvrD at blocked forks are proposed. PMID:18567657

  1. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  2. IL12-mediated liver inflammation reduces the formation of AAV transcriptionally active forms but has no effect over preexisting AAV transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Gil-Fariña, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Vanrell, Lucia; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; High, Katherine A; Prieto, Jesus; Mingozzi, Federico; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors (rAAV) have proven to be excellent candidates for gene therapy clinical applications. Recent results showed that cellular immunity to AAV represents a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of these vectors. Interestingly, no preclinical animal model has previously fully reproduced the clinical findings. The aim of the present work was to enhance the T cell immune response against AAV capsid in mice by the administration of a rAAV expressing the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12. Our results indicate that although IL-12 expression enhanced the AAV capsid-specific immune response it failed to eliminate transduced hepatocytes and long-term expression was achieved. We found that AAV-mediated transgene expression is altered by IL-12-induced liver inflammation. However, IL-12 expression has no effect over preexisting AAV-mediated transgene expression. IL-12 down-regulates AAV mediated transgene expression via induction of IFN-γ production by NK and T cells, but without altering the transduction efficiency measured by viral genomes. Our results indicate that liver inflammation affects the formation of transcriptionally active AAV vector genomes through an unknown mechanism that can be avoided by the use of DNA-demethylating or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:23844082

  3. IL12-Mediated Liver Inflammation Reduces the Formation of AAV Transcriptionally Active Forms but Has No Effect over Preexisting AAV Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Fariña, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Vanrell, Lucia; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; High, Katherine A.; Prieto, Jesus; Mingozzi, Federico; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors (rAAV) have proven to be excellent candidates for gene therapy clinical applications. Recent results showed that cellular immunity to AAV represents a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of these vectors. Interestingly, no preclinical animal model has previously fully reproduced the clinical findings. The aim of the present work was to enhance the T cell immune response against AAV capsid in mice by the administration of a rAAV expressing the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12. Our results indicate that although IL-12 expression enhanced the AAV capsid-specific immune response it failed to eliminate transduced hepatocytes and long-term expression was achieved. We found that AAV-mediated transgene expression is altered by IL-12-induced liver inflammation. However, IL-12 expression has no effect over preexisting AAV-mediated transgene expression. IL-12 down-regulates AAV mediated transgene expression via induction of IFN-γ production by NK and T cells, but without altering the transduction efficiency measured by viral genomes. Our results indicate that liver inflammation affects the formation of transcriptionally active AAV vector genomes through an unknown mechanism that can be avoided by the use of DNA-demethylating or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:23844082

  4. Development of rAAV2-CFTR: History of the First rAAV Vector Product to be Used in Humans.

    PubMed

    Loring, Heather S; ElMallah, Mai K; Flotte, Terence R

    2016-04-01

    The first human gene therapy trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors were performed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Over 100 CF patients were enrolled in 5 separate trials of rAAV2-CFTR administration via nasal, endobronchial, maxillary sinus, and aerosol delivery. Recombinant AAV vectors were designed to deliver the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and correct the basic CFTR defect by restoring chloride transport and reverting the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. However, vector DNA expression was limited in duration because of the low incidence of integration and natural airway epithelium turnover. In addition, repeated administration of AAV-CFTR vector resulted in a humoral immune response that prevented effective gene transfer from subsequent doses of vector. AAV serotype 2 was used in human trials before the comparison with other serotypes and determination that serotypes 1 and 5 not only possess higher tropism for the airway epithelium, but also are capable of bypassing the binding and trafficking processes-both were important hindrances to the effectiveness of rAAV2. Although rAAV-CFTR gene therapy does not appear likely to supplant newer small-molecule CFTR modulators in the near future, early work with rAAV-CFTR provided an important foundation for later use of rAAV in humans. PMID:26895204

  5. Recurrent AAV2-related insertional mutagenesis in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Mallet, Maxime; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Pilati, Camilla; Verret, Benjamin; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Balabaud, Charles; Calderaro, Julien; Laurent, Alexis; Letexier, Mélanie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are liver tumors related to various etiologies, including alcohol intake and infection with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) virus. Additional risk factors remain to be identified, particularly in patients who develop HCC without cirrhosis. We found clonal integration of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) in 11 of 193 HCCs. These AAV2 integrations occurred in known cancer driver genes, namely CCNA2 (cyclin A2; four cases), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase; one case), CCNE1 (cyclin E1; three cases), TNFSF10 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10; two cases) and KMT2B (lysine-specific methyltransferase 2B; one case), leading to overexpression of the target genes. Tumors with viral integration mainly developed in non-cirrhotic liver (9 of 11 cases) and without known risk factors (6 of 11 cases), suggesting a pathogenic role for AAV2 in these patients. In conclusion, AAV2 is a DNA virus associated with oncogenic insertional mutagenesis in human HCC. PMID:26301494

  6. AAV gene transfer delays disease onset in a TPP1-deficient canine model of the late infantile form of Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Katz, Martin L; Tecedor, Luis; Chen, Yonghong; Williamson, Baye G; Lysenko, Elena; Wininger, Fred A; Young, Whitney M; Johnson, Gayle C; Whiting, Rebecca E H; Coates, Joan R; Davidson, Beverly L

    2015-11-11

    The most common form of the childhood neurodegenerative disease late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also called Batten disease) is caused by deficiency of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) resulting from mutations in the TPP1 gene. We tested whether TPP1 gene transfer to the ependyma, the epithelial lining of the brain ventricular system, in TPP1-deficient dogs would be therapeutically beneficial. A one-time administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing canine TPP1 (rAAV.caTPP1) resulted in high expression of TPP1 predominantly in ependymal cells and secretion of the enzyme into the cerebrospinal fluid leading to clinical benefit. Diseased dogs treated with rAAV.caTPP1 showed delays in onset of clinical signs and disease progression, protection from cognitive decline, and extension of life span. By immunostaining and enzyme assay, recombinant protein was evident throughout the brain and spinal cord, with correction of the neuropathology characteristic of the disease. This study in a naturally occurring canine model of TPP1 deficiency highlights the utility of AAV transduction of ventricular lining cells to accomplish stable secretion of recombinant protein for broad distribution in the central nervous system and therapeutic benefit. PMID:26560358

  7. AAV gene transfer delays disease onset in a TPP1-deficient canine model of the late infantile form of Batten disease

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Martin L.; Tecedor, Luis; Chen, Yonghong; Williamson, Baye G.; Lysenko, Elena; Wininger, Fred A.; Young, Whitney M.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Whiting, Rebecca E. H.; Coates, Joan R.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2016-01-01

    The most common form of the childhood neurodegenerative disease late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also called Batten disease) is caused by deficiency of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) resulting from mutations in the TPP1 gene. We tested whether TPP1 gene transfer to the ependyma, the epithelial lining of the brain ventricular system, in TPP1-deficient dogs would be therapeutically beneficial. A one-time administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing canine TPP1 (rAAV.caTPP1) resulted in high expression of TPP1 predominantly in ependymal cells and secretion of the enzyme into the cerebrospinal fluid leading to clinical benefit. Diseased dogs treated with rAAV.caTPP1 showed delays in onset of clinical signs and disease progression, protection from cognitive decline, and extension of life span. By immunostaining and enzyme assay, recombinant protein was evident throughout the brain and spinal cord, with correction of the neuropathology characteristic of the disease. This study in a naturally occurring canine model of TPP1 deficiency highlights the utility of AAV transduction of ventricular lining cells to accomplish stable secretion of recombinant protein for broad distribution in the central nervous system and therapeutic benefit. PMID:26560358

  8. AAV's Anatomy: Roadmap for Optimizing Vectors for Translational Success

    PubMed Central

    Samulski, R. Jude

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-Associated Virus based vectors (rAAV) are advantageous for human gene therapy due to low inflammatory responses, lack of toxicity, natural persistence, and ability to transencapsidate the genome allowing large variations in vector biology and tropism. Over sixty clinical trials have been conducted using rAAV serotype 2 for gene delivery with a number demonstrating success in immunoprivileged sites, including the retina and the CNS. Furthermore, an increasing number of trials have been initiated utilizing other serotypes of AAV to exploit vector tropism, trafficking, and expression efficiency. While these trials have demonstrated success in safety with emerging success in clinical outcomes, one benefit has been identification of issues associated with vector administration in humans (e.g. the role of pre-existing antibody responses, loss of transgene expression in non-immunoprivileged sites, and low transgene expression levels). For these reasons, several strategies are being used to optimize rAAV vectors, ranging from addition of exogenous agents for immune evasion to optimization of the transgene cassette for enhanced therapeutic output. By far, the vast majority of approaches have focused on genetic manipulation of the viral capsid. These methods include rational mutagenesis, engineering of targeting peptides, generation of chimeric particles, library and directed evolution approaches, as well as immune evasion modifications. Overall, these modifications have created a new repertoire of AAV vectors with improved targeting, transgene expression, and immune evasion. Continued work in these areas should synergize strategies to improve capsids and transgene cassettes that will eventually lead to optimized vectors ideally suited for translational success. PMID:20712583

  9. Differential Effects of AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3 in the Deafened Adult Guinea Pig Ear

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Cameron L.; Wong, Hiu Tung; Swiderski, Donald L.; Shibata, Seiji B.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear hair cell loss results in secondary regression of peripheral auditory fibers (PAFs) and loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). The performance of cochlear implants (CI) in rehabilitating hearing depends on survival of SGNs. Here we compare the effects of adeno-associated virus vectors with neurotrophin gene inserts, AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3, on guinea pig ears deafened systemically (kanamycin and furosemide) or locally (neomycin). AAV.BDNF or AAV.Ntf3 was delivered to the guinea pig cochlea one week following deafening and ears were assessed morphologically 3 months later. At that time, neurotrophins levels were not significantly elevated in the cochlear fluids, even though in vitro and shorter term in vivo experiments demonstrate robust elevation of neurotrophins with these viral vectors. Nevertheless, animals receiving these vectors exhibited considerable re-growth of PAFs in the basilar membrane area. In systemically deafened animals there was a negative correlation between the presence of differentiated supporting cells and PAFs, suggesting that supporting cells influence the outcome of neurotrophin over-expression aimed at enhancing the cochlear neural substrate. Counts of SGN in Rosenthal's canal indicate that BDNF was more effective than NT-3 in preserving SGNs. The results demonstrate that a transient elevation in neurotrophin levels can sustain the cochlear neural substrate in the long term. PMID:25726967

  10. In vivo cellular imaging of various stress/response pathways using AAV following axonal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kosuke; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Yokoyama, Yu; Tomiyama, Yusuke; Tsuda, Satoru; Yasuda, Masayuki; Maekawa, Shigeto; Nakazawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is instigated by various factors, including axonal injury, which eventually leads to a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). To study various pathways reportedly involved in the pathogenesis of RGC death caused by axonal injury, seven pathways were investigated. Pathway-specific fluorescent protein-coded reporters were each packaged into an adeno-associated virus (AAV). After producing axonal injury in the eye, injected with AAV to induce RGC death, the temporal activity of each stress-related pathway was monitored in vivo through the detection of fluorescent RGCs using confocal ophthalmoscopy. We identified the activation of ATF6 and MCP-1 pathways involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and macrophage recruitment, respectively, as early markers of RGC stress that precede neuronal death. Conversely, inflammatory responses probed by NF-κB and cell-death-related pathway p53 were most prominent in the later phases, when RGC death was already ongoing. AAV-mediated delivery of stress/response reporters followed by in vivo cellular imaging is a powerful strategy to characterize the temporal aspects of complex molecular pathways involved in retinal diseases. The identification of promoter elements that are activated before the death of RGCs enables the development of pre-emptive gene therapy, exclusively targeting the early phases of diseased cells. PMID:26670005

  11. Sexually Dimorphic Patterns of Episomal rAAV Genome Persistence in the Adult Mouse Liver and Correlation With Hepatocellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Allison P; Cunningham, Sharon C; Graf, Nicole S; Alexander, Ian E

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAVs) show exceptional promise for liver-targeted gene therapy, with phenotype correction in small and large animal disease models being reported with increasing frequency. Success in humans, however, remains a considerable challenge that demands greater understanding of host–vector interactions, notably those governing the efficiency of initial gene transfer and subsequent long-term persistence of gene expression. In this study, we examined long-term enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genome persistence in the mouse liver after rAAV2/8-mediated gene transfer in early adulthood. Two intriguing findings emerged of considerable scientific and clinical interest. First, adult female and male mice showed distinctly different patterns of persistence of eGFP expression across the hepatic lobule after exhibiting similar patterns initially. Female mice retained a predominantly perivenous pattern of expression, whereas male mice underwent inversion of this pattern with preferential loss of perivenous expression and relative retention of periportal expression. Second, these changing patterns of expression correlated with sexually dimorphic patterns of genome persistence that appear linked both spatially and temporally to underlying hepatocellular proliferation. Observation of the equivalent phenomenon in man could have significant implications for the long-term therapeutic efficacy of rAAV-mediated gene transfer, particularly in the context of correction of liver functions showing metabolic zonation. PMID:19568224

  12. Disease Rescue and Increased Lifespan in a Model of Cardiomyopathy and Muscular Dystrophy by Combined AAV Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Carmen; Faraso, Stefania; Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Nusco, Edoardo; Nigro, Gerardo; Cutillo, Luisa; Calabrò, Raffaele; Auricchio, Alberto; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background The BIO14.6 hamster is an excellent animal model for inherited cardiomyopathy, because of its lethal and well-documented course, due to a spontaneous deletion of delta-sarcoglycan gene promoter and first exon. The muscle disease is progressive and average lifespan is 11 months, because heart slowly dilates towards heart failure. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the ability of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to transduce heart together with skeletal muscle following systemic administration, we delivered human delta-sarcoglycan cDNA into male BIO14.6 hamsters by testing different ages of injection, routes of administration and AAV serotypes. Body-wide restoration of delta-SG expression was associated with functional reconstitution of the sarcoglycan complex and with significant lowering of centralized nuclei and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. Motor ability and cardiac functions were completely rescued. However, BIO14.6 hamsters having less than 70% of fibers recovering sarcoglycan developed cardiomyopathy, even if the total rescued protein was normal. When we used serotype 2/8 in combination with serotype 2/1, lifespan was extended up to 22 months with sustained heart function improvement. Conclusions/Significance Our data support multiple systemic administrations of AAV as a general therapeutic strategy for clinical trials in cardiomyopathies and muscle disorders. PMID:19333401

  13. Injection of AAV2-BMP2 and AAV2-TIMP1 into the nucleus pulposus slows the course of intervertebral disc degeneration in an in vivo rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Steven K.; Bechara, Bernard P.; Hartman, Robert A.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Woods, Barrett I.; Coelho, Joao P.; Witt, William T.; Dong, Qing D.; Bowman, Brent W.; Bell, Kevin M.; Vo, Nam V.; Wang, Bing; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common cause of back pain. Patients who fail conservative management may face the morbidity of surgery. Alternative treatment modalities could have a significant impact on disease progression and patients’ quality of life. PURPOSE To determine if the injection of a virus vector carrying a therapeutic gene directly into the nucleus pulposus improves the course of IDD. STUDY DESIGN Prospective randomized controlled animal study. METHODS Thirty-four skeletally mature New Zealand white rabbits were used. In the treatment group, L2–L3, L3–L4, and L4–L5 discs were punctured in accordance with a previously validated rabbit annulotomy model for IDD and then subsequently treated with adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector carrying genes for either bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1). A nonoperative control group, nonpunctured sham surgical group, and punctured control group were also evaluated. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies at 0, 6, and 12 weeks were obtained, and a validated MRI analysis program was used to quantify degeneration. The rabbits were sacrificed at 12 weeks, and L4–L5 discs were analyzed histologically. Viscoelastic properties of the L3–L4 discs were analyzed using uniaxial load normalized displacement testing. Creep curves were mathematically modeled according to a previously validated two-phase exponential model. Serum samples obtained at 0, 6, and 12 weeks were assayed for biochemical evidence of degeneration. RESULTS The punctured group demonstrated MRI and histologic evidence of degeneration as expected. The treatment groups demonstrated less MRI and histologic evidence of degeneration than the punctured group. The serum biochemical marker C-telopeptide of collagen type II increased rapidly in the punctured group, but the treated groups returned to control values by 12 weeks. The treatment groups

  14. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 1 (AAV1)- and AAV5-Antibody Complex Structures Reveal Evolutionary Commonalities in Parvovirus Antigenic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Gurda, Brittney L.; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Afione, Sandra; Chiorini, John A.; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical utility of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system has been validated by the regulatory approval of an AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vector for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. However, neutralization from preexisting antibodies is detrimental to AAV transduction efficiency. Hence, mapping of AAV antigenic sites and engineering of neutralization-escaping vectors are important for improving clinical efficacy. We report the structures of four AAV-monoclonal antibody fragment complexes, AAV1-ADK1a, AAV1-ADK1b, AAV5-ADK5a, and AAV5-ADK5b, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to a resolution of ∼11 to 12 Å. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the ADK1a epitope to the protrusions surrounding the icosahedral 3-fold axis and the ADK1b and ADK5a epitopes, which overlap, to the wall between depressions at the 2- and 5-fold axes (2/5-fold wall), and the ADK5b epitope spans both the 5-fold axis-facing wall of the 3-fold protrusion and portions of the 2/5-fold wall of the capsid. Combined with the six antigenic sites previously elucidated for different AAV serotypes through structural approaches, including AAV1 and AAV5, this study identified two common AAV epitopes: one on the 3-fold protrusions and one on the 2/5-fold wall. These epitopes coincide with regions with the highest sequence and structure diversity between AAV serotypes and correspond to regions determining receptor recognition and transduction phenotypes. Significantly, these locations overlap the two dominant epitopes reported for autonomous parvoviruses. Thus, rather than the amino acid sequence alone, the antigenic sites of parvoviruses appear to be dictated by structural features evolved to enable specific infectious functions. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors for in vivo therapeutic gene delivery, with more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials that

  15. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications. PMID:26829320

  16. Humoral immunity to AAV-6, 8, and 9 in normal and dystrophic dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Smith, Bruce; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-6, 8, and 9 are promising gene-delivery vectors for testing novel Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model. Humoral immunity greatly influences in vivo AAV transduction. However, neutralizing antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9 have not been systemically examined in normal and dystrophic dogs. To gain information on the seroprevalence of antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9, we measured neutralizing antibody titers using an in vitro transduction inhibition assay. We examined 72 naive serum samples and 26 serum samples obtained from dogs that had received AAV gene transfer. Our data demonstrated that AAV-6 neutralizing antibody was the most prevalent antibody in dogs irrespective of age, gender, disease status (dystrophic or not), and prior parvovirus vaccination history. Surprisingly, high-level anti-AAV-6 antibody was detected at birth in newborn puppies. Further, a robust antibody response was induced in affected, but not normal newborn dogs following systemic AAV gene transfer. Taken together, our data have provided an important baseline on the seroprevalence of AAV-6, 8, and 9 neutralizing antibodies in normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs. These results will help guide translational AAV gene-therapy studies in dog models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:22040468

  17. Global CNS gene delivery and evasion of anti-AAV-neutralizing antibodies by intrathecal AAV administration in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Gray, S J; Nagabhushan Kalburgi, S; McCown, T J; Jude Samulski, R

    2013-04-01

    Injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers a means to achieve widespread transgene delivery to the central nervous system, where the doses can be readily translated from small to large animals. In contrast to studies with other serotypes (AAV2, AAV4 and AAV5) in rodents, we report that a naturally occurring capsid (AAV9) and rationally engineered capsid (AAV2.5) are able to achieve broad transduction throughout the brain and spinal cord parenchyma following a single injection into the CSF (via cisterna magna or lumbar cistern) in non-human primates (NHP). Using either vector at a dose of ∼2 × 10(12) vector genome (vg) per 3-6 kg animal, approximately 2% of the entire brain and spinal cord was transduced, covering all regions of the central nervous system (CNS). AAV9 in particular displayed efficient transduction of spinal cord motor neurons. The peripheral organ biodistribution was highly reduced compared with intravascular delivery, and the presence of circulating anti-AAV-neutralizing antibodies up to a 1:128 titer had no inhibitory effect on CNS gene transfer. Intra-CSF delivery effectively translates from rodents to NHPs, which provides encouragement for the use of this approach in humans to treat motor neuron and lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23303281

  18. Lack of Humoral Immune Response to the Tetracycline (Tet) Activator in Rats Injected Intracranially with Tet-off rAAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Chang, Qin A.; Virag, Tamas; West, Neva C.; George, David; Castro, Maria G.; Bohn, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to safely control transgene expression from viral vectors is a long-term goal in the gene therapy field. We have previously reported tight regulation of GFP expression in rat brain using a self-regulating tet-off rAAV vector. The immune responses against tet regulatory elements observed by other groups in nonhuman primates after intramuscular injection of tet-on encoding vectors raise concerns about the clinical value of tet-regulated vectors. However, previous studies have not examined immune responses following injection of AAV vectors into brain. Therefore, rat striatum was injected with tet-off rAAV harboring a therapeutic gene for Parkinson's disease, either hAADC or hGDNF. The expression of each gene was tightly controlled by the tet-off regulatory system. Using an ELISA developed with purified GST-tTA protein, no detectable immunogenicity against tTA was observed in sera of rats that received an intrastriatal injection of either vector. In contrast, sera from rats intradermally injected with an adenovirus containing either tTA or rtTA, as positive controls, had readily detectable antibodies. These observations suggest that tet-off rAAV vectors do not elicit an immune response when injected into rat brain and that these may offer safer vectors for Parkinson's disease than vectors with constitutive expression. PMID:20164859

  19. Vaccine protection against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge using recombinant AAV vectors expressing codon-optimized genes from pandemic swine origin influenza virus (SOIV).

    PubMed

    Sipo, Isaac; Knauf, Mathias; Fechner, Henry; Poller, Wolfgang; Planz, Oliver; Kurth, Reinhard; Norley, Stephen

    2011-02-11

    The recent H1N1 influenza pandemic and the inevitable delay between identification of the virus and production of the specific vaccine have highlighted the urgent need for new generation influenza vaccines that can preemptively induce broad immunity to different strains of the virus. In this study we have produced AAV-based vectors expressing the A/Mexico/4603/2009 (H1N1) hemagglutinin (HA), nucleocapsid (NP) and the matrix protein M1 and have evaluated their ability to induce specific immune response and protect mice against homologous and heterologous challenge. Each of the vaccine vectors elicited potent cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. Although immunization with AAV-M1 did not improve survival after challenge with the homologous strain, immunization with the AAV-H1 and AAV-NP vectors resulted in survival of all mice, as did inoculation with a combination of all three vectors. Furthermore, trivalent vaccination also conferred partial protection against challenge with the highly heterologous and virulent A/PR/8/34 strain of H1N1 influenza. PMID:21195079

  20. RepA-WH1, the agent of an amyloid proteinopathy in bacteria, builds oligomeric pores through lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Cristina; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    RepA-WH1 is a disease-unrelated protein that recapitulates in bacteria key aspects of human amyloid proteinopathies: i) It undergoes ligand-promoted amyloidogenesis in vitro; ii) its aggregates are able to seed/template amyloidosis on soluble protein molecules; iii) its conformation is modulated by Hsp70 chaperones in vivo, generating transmissible amyloid strains; and iv) causes proliferative senescence. Membrane disruption by amyloidogenic oligomers has been found for most proteins causing human neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report that, as for PrP prion and α-synuclein, acidic phospholipids also promote RepA-WH1 amyloidogenesis in vitro. RepA-WH1 molecules bind to liposomes, where the protein assembles oligomeric membrane pores. Fluorescent tracer molecules entrapped in the lumen of the vesicles leak through these pores and RepA-WH1 can then form large aggregates on the surface of the vesicles without inducing their lysis. These findings prove that it is feasible to generate in vitro a synthetic proteinopathy with a minimal set of cytomimetic components and support the view that cell membranes are primary targets in protein amyloidoses. PMID:26984374

  1. Comparative Analysis of DNA Nanoparticles and AAVs for Ocular Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Conley, Shannon M.; Makkia, Rasha; Guo, Junjing; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV), makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg) than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors. PMID:23272225

  2. Comparative analysis of DNA nanoparticles and AAVs for ocular gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongchao; Conley, Shannon M; Makkia, Rasha; Guo, Junjing; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV), makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg) than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors. PMID:23272225

  3. Initiation and re-initiation of DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip; Rasnik, Ivan; Cheng, Wei; Babcock, Hazen P.; Gauss, George H.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Chu, Steven

    2002-10-01

    Helicases are motor proteins that couple conformational changes induced by ATP binding and hydrolysis with unwinding of duplex nucleic acid, and are involved in several human diseases. Some function as hexameric rings, but the functional form of non-hexameric helicases has been debated. Here we use a combination of a surface immobilization scheme and single-molecule fluorescence assays-which do not interfere with biological activity-to probe DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase. Our studies indicate that a Rep monomer uses ATP hydrolysis to move toward the junction between single-stranded and double-stranded DNA but then displays conformational fluctuations that do not lead to DNA unwinding. DNA unwinding initiates only if a functional helicase is formed via additional protein binding. Partial dissociation of the functional complex during unwinding results in interruptions (`stalls') that lead either to duplex rewinding upon complete dissociation of the complex, or to re-initiation of unwinding upon re-formation of the functional helicase. These results suggest that the low unwinding processivity observed in vitro for Rep is due to the relative instability of the functional complex. We expect that these techniques will be useful for dynamic studies of other helicases and protein-DNA interactions.

  4. AAV-mediated gene targeting methods for human cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iram F; Hirata, Roli K; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types, with targeting frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 10−2 per infected cell. these targeting frequencies are 1–4 logs higher than those obtained by conventional transfection or electroporation approaches. a wide variety of different types of mutations can be introduced into chromosomal loci with high fidelity and without genotoxicity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for gene targeting in human cells with AAV vectors. We describe methods for vector design, stock preparation and titration. optimized transduction protocols are provided for human pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts and transformed cell lines, as well as a method for identifying targeted clones by southern blots. this protocol (from vector design through a single round of targeting and screening) can be completed in ~10 weeks; each subsequent round of targeting and screening should take an additional 7 weeks. PMID:21455185

  5. Reprogramming Immune Response With Capsid-Optimized AAV6 Vectors for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Munjal; Britt, Kellee; Hoffman, Brad; Ling, Chen; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-09-01

    In the current studies we generated novel capsid-optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) vectors expressing a tumor-associated antigen, and assessed their ability to activate a protective T-cell response in an animal model. First, we showed that specific mutations in the AAV6 capsid increase the transduction efficiency of these vectors in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro for approximately 5-fold compared with the wild-type (WT) AAV6 vectors. Next, we evaluated the ability of the mutant AAV6 vectors to initiate specific T-cell clone proliferation in vivo. Our data indicate that the intramuscular administration of AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing ovalbumin (OVA) led to a strong activation (approximately 9%) of specific T cells in peripheral blood compared with AAV6-WT treated animals (<1%). These OVA-specific T cells have a superior killing ability against mouse prostate cancer cell line RM1 stably expressing the OVA antigen when propagated in vitro. Finally, we evaluated the ability of capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors to initiate a protective anticancer immune response in vivo. Our results document the suppression of subcutaneous tumor growth in animals immunized with AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) for approximately 4 weeks in comparison with 1 week and 2 weeks for the negative controls, AAV6-EGFP, and AAV6-WT-PAP treated mice, respectively. These studies suggest that successful inhibition of tumor growth in an animal model would set the stage for potential clinical application of the capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors. PMID:26261893

  6. AAV Hybrid Serotypes: Improved Vectors for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made on studying and engineering adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid, in order to increase efficiency in targeting specific cell types that are non-permissive to wild type (wt) viruses and to improve efficacy in infecting only the cell type of interest. With our previous knowledge of the viral properties of the naturally occurring serotypes and the elucidation of their capsid structures, we can now generate capsid mutants, or hybrid serotypes, by various methods and strategies. In this review, we summarize the studies performed on AAV retargeting, and categorize the available hybrid serotypes to date, based on the type of modification: 1) transcapsidation, 2) adsorption of bi-specific antibody to capsid surface, 3) mosaic capsid, and 4) chimeric capsid. Not only these hybrid serotypes could achieve high efficiency of gene delivery to a specific targeted cell type, which can be better-tailored for a particular clinical application, but also serve as a tool for studying AAV biology such as receptor binding, trafficking and genome delivery into the nucleus. PMID:15975007

  7. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  8. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  9. Transgene regulation using the tetracycline-inducible TetR-KRAB system after AAV-mediated gene transfer in rodents and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Le Guiner, Caroline; Stieger, Knut; Toromanoff, Alice; Guilbaud, Mickaël; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Devaux, Marie; Guigand, Lydie; Cherel, Yan; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne; Adjali, Oumeya

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-based gene delivery platform in vivo. The control of transgene expression in many protocols is highly desirable for therapeutic applications and/or safety reasons. To date, the tetracycline and the rapamycin dependent regulatory systems have been the most widely evaluated. While the long-term regulation of the transgene has been obtained in rodent models, the translation of these studies to larger animals, especially to nonhuman primates (NHP), has often resulted in an immune response against the recombinant regulator protein involved in transgene expression regulation. These immune responses were dependent on the target tissue and vector delivery route. Here, using AAV vectors, we evaluated a doxycyclin-inducible system in rodents and macaques in which the TetR protein is fused to the human Krüppel associated box (KRAB) protein. We demonstrated long term gene regulation efficiency in rodents after subretinal and intramuscular administration of AAV5 and AAV1 vectors, respectively. However, as previously described for other chimeric transactivators, the TetR-KRAB-based system failed to achieve long term regulation in the macaque after intramuscular vector delivery because of the development of an immune response. Thus, immunity against the chimeric transactivator TetR-KRAB emerged as the primary limitation for the clinical translation of the system when targeting the skeletal muscle, as previously described for other regulatory proteins. New developments in the field of chimeric drug-sensitive transactivators with the potential to not trigger the host immune system are still needed. PMID:25248159

  10. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) Spacecraft Design Concept Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.; Fiehler, Douglas I.

    2005-01-01

    Radioisotopic Electric Propulsion (REP) has the potential to provide certain advantages for outer planetary exploration involving small bodies and long term investigation s for medium class missions requiring power comparable to past outer planetary exploration missions. This paper describes a preliminary conceptual design of a REP-based spacecraft where the mission of interest involves a spacecraft with a radioisotope power supply less than one kilowatt while operating at a minimum of 10-years. A key element of the REP spacecraft is to insure sustained science return by orbiting or flying in formation with selected targets. Utilizing current/impending technological advances, REP orbiter/explorer missions may provide a valuable tool for extended scientific investigations of small bodies in the outer solar system.

  11. AAV Vectors Expressing LDLR Gain-of-Function Variants Demonstrate Increased Efficacy in Mouse Models of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Jacobs, Frank; Wang, Qiang; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder that arises due to loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and homozygous FH (hoFH) is a candidate for gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of LDLR (IDOL) negatively regulate LDLR protein and could dampen AAV encoded LDLR expression. Objective We sought to create vectors expressing gain-of-function human LDLR variants that are resistant to degradation by human PCSK9 and IDOL and thereby enhance hepatic LDLR protein abundance and plasma LDL cholesterol reduction. Methods and Results Amino acid substitutions were introduced into the coding sequence of human LDLR cDNA to reduce interaction with hPCSK9 and hIDOL. A panel of mutant hLDLRs was initially screened in vitro for escape from PCSK9. The variant hLDLR-L318D was further evaluated using a mouse model of hoFH lacking endogenous LDLR and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, APOBEC-1 (DKO). Administration of wild type hLDLR to DKO mice, expressing hPCSK9, led to diminished LDLR activity. However, LDLR-L318D was resistant to hPCSK9 mediated degradation and effectively reduced cholesterol levels. Similarly, the LDLR-K809R\\C818A construct avoided hIDOL regulation and achieved stable reductions in serum cholesterol. An AAV8.LDLR-L318D\\K809R\\C818A vector that carried all three amino acid substitutions conferred partial resistance to both hPCSK9 and hIDOL mediated degradation. Conclusion Amino acid substitutions in the human LDLR confer partial resistance to PCSK9 and IDOL regulatory pathways with improved reduction in cholesterol levels and improve upon a potential gene therapeutic approach to treat homozygous FH subjects. PMID:25023731

  12. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium. PMID:25313621

  13. A Preclinical Animal Model to Assess the Effect of Pre-existing Immunity on AAV-mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Lin, Shih-Wen; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongming; Xiang, Zhi Quan; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic adeno-associated virus (AAV)-serotype 2–mediated gene transfer results in sustained transgene expression in experimental animals but not in human subjects. We hypothesized that loss of transgene expression in humans might be caused by immune memory mechanisms that become reactivated upon AAV vector transfer. Here, we tested the effect of immunological memory to AAV capsid on AAV-mediated gene transfer in a mouse model. Upon hepatic transfer of an AAV2 vector expressing human factor IX (hF.IX), mice immunized with adenovirus (Ad) vectors expressing AAV8 capsid before AAV2 transfer developed less circulating hF.IX and showed a gradual loss of hF.IX gene copies in liver cells as compared to control animals. This was not observed in mice immunized with an Ad vectors expressing AAV2 capsid before transfer of rAAV8-hF.IX vectors. The lower hF.IX expression was primarily linked to AAV-binding antibodies that lacked AAV-neutralizing activity in vitro rather than to AAV capsid–specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:19367258

  14. Total ozone decrease in the Arctic after REP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Beloglazov, M. I.; Remenets, G. F.

    2000-03-01

    Eight periods of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) with electron energies of more than 300 keV are identified from VLF data (10-14 kHz) monitored along the Aldra (Norway) - Apatity (Kola peninsula) radio trace. In these cases, anomalous ionization below 55-50 km occurred without disturbing the higher layers of the ionosphere. The daily total ozone values in Murmansk for six days before and six days after the REP events are compared. In seven of eight events a decrease in the total ozone of about 20 DU is observed. In one event of 25 March, 1986, the mean total ozone value for six days before the REP is bigger than that for six days after, but this a case of an extremely high ozone increase (144 DU during the six days). However, on days 3 and 4 there was a minimum of about 47 DU with regard to REP days, so this case also confirms the concept of the ozone decrease after REP. The difference between mean ozone values for periods six days before and six days after the REPs was found also for 23 points in Arctic on TOMS data. The difference was negative only in Murmansk longitudinal sector. Along the meridian of the trace it was negative at high latitudes in both hemispheres and was near zero at low latitudes.

  15. Single tyrosine mutation in AAV8 and AAV9 capsids is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to skeletal muscle and heart.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Yuan, Zhenhua; Li, Jianbin; Tang, Ruhang; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2012-02-01

    Site-directed mutations of tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) on the surface of adeno-associated viral (AAV) capsids have been reported as a simple method to greatly enhance gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. To determine whether the Y-to-F mutation could also enhance AAV8 and AAV9 gene transfer in skeletal muscle and heart to facilitate muscular dystrophy gene therapy, we investigated four capsid mutants of AAV8 (Y447F or Y733F) and AAV9 (Y446F or Y731F). The mutants and their wild-type control AAV8 and AAV9 capsids were used to package reporter genes (luciferase or β-galactosidase) resulting in similar vector yields. To evaluate gene delivery efficiencies, especially in muscle and heart, the vectors were compared side by side in a series of experiments in vivo in two different strains of mice, the outbred ICR and the inbred C57BL/6. Because AAV8 and AAV9 are among the most effective in systemic gene delivery, we first examined the mutant and wild-type vectors in neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection, or in adult mice by intravenous injection. To our surprise, no statistically significant differences in transgene expression were observed between the mutant and wild-type vectors, regardless of the reporter genes, vector doses, and the ages and strains of mice used. In addition, quantitative analyses of vector DNA copy number in various tissues from mice treated with mutant and wild-type vectors also showed similar results. Finally, direct intramuscular injection of the above-described vectors with the luciferase gene into the hind limb muscles revealed the same levels of gene expression between mutant and wild-type vectors. Our results thus demonstrate that a single mutation of Y447F or Y733F on capsids of AAV8, and of Y446F or Y731F on AAV9, is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to the skeletal muscle and heart. PMID:22428978

  16. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G.; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor–depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1–signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  17. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G; Bush, Ronald A; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor-depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1-signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  18. Development of novel AAV serotype 6 based vectors with selective tropism for human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sayroo, R; Nolasco, D; Yin, Z; Colon-Cortes, Y; Pandya, M; Ling, C; Aslanidi, G

    2016-01-01

    Viral vectors-based gene therapy is an attractive alternative to common anti-cancer treatments. In the present studies, AAV serotype 6 vectors were identified to be particularly effective in the transduction of human prostate (PC3), breast (T47D) and liver (Huh7) cancer cells. Next, we developed chimeric AAV vectors with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide incorporated into the viral capsid to enable specific targeting of integrin-overexpressing malignant cells. These AAV6-RGD vectors improved transduction efficiency approximately 3-fold compared with wild-type AAV6 vectors by enhancing the viral entry into the cells. We also observed that transduction efficiency significantly improved, up to approximately 5-fold, by the mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine and threonine residues involved in the intracellular trafficking of AAV vectors. Therefore, in our study, the AAV6-Y705-731F+T492V vector was identified as the most efficient. The combination of RGD peptide, tyrosine and threonine mutations on the same AAV6 capsid further increased the transduction efficiency, approximately 8-fold in vitro. In addition, we mutated lysine (K531E) to impair the affinity of AAV6 vectors to heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Finally, we showed a significant increase in both specificity and efficiency of AAV6-RGD-Y705-731F+T492V+K531E vectors in a xenograft animal model in vivo. In summary, the approach described here can lead to the development of AAV vectors with selective tropism to human cancer cells. PMID:26270885

  19. Transduction, Tropism, and Biodistribution of AAV Vectors in the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Riveros, Paola Perez; Quinn, Kathrina; Handelman, Beverly; Chiorini, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The lacrimal gland (LG) delivers defensive and metabolic factors to the ocular surface. These functions may be disrupted in several diseases, and for most of them there is no cure. The aim of this study is to investigate conditions and limitations for using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors as gene transfer agents to LG. Methods. Eight-week-old Balb/c mice were used to investigate route, gene expression, and time course of AAV gene vector transfer to LG. AAV vectors encoding firefly luciferase were administered to the LG and luciferase expression was evaluated in vivo by immunohistochemistry. Ocular surface and neutralizing antibodies were also evaluated. Results. The present work revealed that AAV vectors are able to delivery DNA to the LGs of mice. Direct injection had the highest level of transduction, and topical ocular drops the lowest. Overall, the AAV strain with highest transduction activity as measured by both luminescence and immunohistochemistry was AAV9, followed by AAV 5w8 and AAV5. Transduction was not different between sexes, could be detected as soon as 24 hours after injection, and lasted for at least 30 days (study termination). No tissue damage was observed when compared with controls. All vectors with detectable LG transduction induced neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions. LG gene delivery by AAV vectors appears to be both safe and well tolerated. The choice of vector influences both the overall transduction activity, as well as the spread of vector to other organs. This work supports the use of AAV-mediated gene therapy for dry eye. PMID:22110082

  20. Molecular Dynamics of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II Ternary Complex and Identification of Their Putative Drug Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Meenakshi; Saini, Vandana; Piplani, Sakshi; Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    The structure-function correlation of membrane proteins have been a difficult task, particularly in context to transient protein complexes. The molecular simulation of ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II was carried out to understand the basic structural events occurring during the prenylation event of Rab proteins, using the software YASARA. The study suggested that the C-terminus of Rab7 has to be in completely extended conformation during prenylation to reach the active site of RabGGTase-II. Also, attempt was made to find putative drug binding sites on the ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II using Q-SiteFinder programme. The comprehensive consensus probe generated by the program revealed a total of 10 major pockets as putative drug binding sites on Rab7::REP:: GGTase-II ternary complex. These pockets were found on REP protein and GGTase protein subunits. The Rab7 was found to be devoid of any putative drug binding sites in the ternary complex. The phylogenetic analysis of 60 Rab proteins of human was carried out using PHYLIP and study indicated the close phylogenetic relationship between Rab7 and Rab9 proteins of human and hence with further in silico study, the present observations can be extrapolated to Rab9 proteins. The study paves a good platform for further experimental verifications of the findings and other in silico studies like identifying the potential drug targets by searching the putative drug binding sites, generating pharmacophoric pattern, searching or constructing suitable ligand and docking studies. PMID:23901157

  1. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  2. A repA-based ELISA for discriminating cattle vaccinated with Brucella suis 2 from those naturally infected with Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Ning; Liu, Wan-Hua; Ren, Juan-Juan; Tang, Pan; Qiu, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Ching-Dong; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The commonest ways of diagnosing brucellosis in animals include the Rose-Bengal plate agglutination test, the buffered plate agglutination test (BPA), the slide agglutination test, the complement fixation test, and the indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA). However, these methods cannot discriminate the Brucella vaccine strain (Brucella suis strain 2; B. suis S2) from naturally acquired virulent strains. Of the six common Brucella species, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and B. suis are the commonest species occurring in China. To develop an ELISA assay that can differentiate between cows inoculated with B. suis S2 and naturally infected with B. abortus and B. melitensis, genomic sequences from six Brucella spp. (B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, Brucella canis, Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis) were compared using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool software. One particular gene, the repA-related gene, was found to be a marker that can differentiate B. suis from B. abortus and B. melitensis. The repA-related gene of B. suis was PCR amplified and subcloned into the pET-32a vector. Expressed repA-related protein was purified and used as an antigen. The repA-based ELISA was optimized and used as specific tests. In the present study, serum from animals inoculated with the B. suis S2 vaccine strain had positive repA-based ELISA results. In contrast, the test-positive reference sera against B. abortus and B. melitensis had negative repA-based ELISA results. The concordance rate between B. abortus antibody-negative (based on the repA-based ELISA) and the Brucella gene-positive (based on the 'Bruce ladder' multiplex PCR) was 100%. Therefore, the findings suggest that the repA-based ELISA is a useful tool for differentiating cows vaccinated with the B. suis S2 and naturally infected with B. abortus and B. melitensis. PMID:24941369

  3. RH10 provides superior transgene expression in mice when compared with natural AAV serotypes for neonatal gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuhong; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating diseases diagnosed before or shortly after birth. Early and long-term expression of therapeutic proteins may limit the consequences of genetic mutations and result in a potential ‘cure’. Adeno-associated viral vectors have shown promise in many areas of adult gene therapy but their properties have not been systematically investigated in the neonate. Methods In these studies using a constitutive promoter expressing luciferase, animals were administered one of ten serotypes of AAV on the second day of life. Examination of expression, organ growth and vector distribution, maintenance of expression and copy number were examined. Results All serotypes demonstrated expression and, in general, transduction of all organs within 3 days, albeit with different biodistribution patterns and expression levels. Highest expression was detected with AAVrh10 while lowest was with AAV4. Expression and genomes declined with growth over the first 10 weeks of life; thereafter, to day 100, expression and genomes remained relatively stable. With the highest expressing vectors, whole animal expression at 100 days declined to ~10% of that detected on the fifth day. AAVrh10 maintained the highest expression level and copy number throughout these studies. Conclusion The impact of tissue and organ growth on the stability of AAV expression will be important if neonatal gene transfer is to be considered as a modality for human gene therapy. While all vectors did demonstrate expression, rh10 holds the greater promise of the vectors tested to maintain copy number in both mitotic and post-mitotic tissues. PMID:20821747

  4. Preclinical Dose-Finding Study With a Liver-Tropic, Recombinant AAV-2/8 Vector in the Mouse Model of Galactosialidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients. PMID:22008912

  5. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F AAV-1, Y445F AAV-6, and Y731F AAV-9) were evaluated. These vectors expressed the alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under transcriptional regulation of either the muscle-specific Spc5-12 promoter or the ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Robust skeletal and cardiac muscle transduction was achieved with Y445F/Y731F AAV-1. However, Y731F AAV-9 only transduced skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, Y445F AAV-6 resulted in minimal muscle transduction. Serological study suggests that the preexisting neutralization antibody may underlie the limited transduction of Y445F AAV-6. In summary, we have identified Y445F/Y731F AAV-1 as a potentially excellent systemic gene transfer vehicle to target both skeletal muscle and the heart in neonatal puppies. Our findings have important implications in exploring systemic neonatal gene therapy in canine models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25105153

  6. Improved Survival and Reduced Phenotypic Severity Following AAV9/MECP2 Gene Transfer to Neonatal and Juvenile Male Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Kamal KE; Bailey, Mark ES; Spike, Rosemary C; Ross, Paul D; Woodard, Kenton T; Kalburgi, Sahana Nagabhushan; Bachaboina, Lavanya; Deng, Jie V; West, Anne E; Samulski, R Jude; Gray, Steven J; Cobb, Stuart R

    2013-01-01

    Typical Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pediatric disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. The demonstrated reversibility of RTT-like phenotypes in mice suggests that MECP2 gene replacement is a potential therapeutic option in patients. We report improvements in survival and phenotypic severity in Mecp2-null male mice after neonatal intracranial delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9/chicken β-actin (CBA)-MECP2 vector. Median survival was 16.6 weeks for MECP2-treated versus 9.3 weeks for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-treated mice. ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2–treated mice also showed significant improvement in the phenotype severity score, in locomotor function, and in exploratory activity, as well as a normalization of neuronal nuclear volume in transduced cells. Wild-type (WT) mice receiving neonatal injections of the same ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2 vector did not show any significant deficits, suggesting a tolerance for modest MeCP2 overexpression. To test a MECP2 gene replacement approach in a manner more relevant for human translation, a self-complementary (sc) adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector designed to drive MeCP2 expression from a fragment of the Mecp2 promoter was injected intravenously (IV) into juvenile (4–5 weeks old) Mecp2-null mice. While the brain transduction efficiency in juvenile mice was low (~2–4% of neurons), modest improvements in survival were still observed. These results support the concept of MECP2 gene therapy for RTT. PMID:23011033

  7. The AAV9 receptor and its modification to improve in vivo lung gene transfer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christie L.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Bell, Peter; Limberis, Maria P.; Gao, Guang-Ping; Van Vliet, Kim; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 9 are candidates for in vivo gene delivery to many organs, but the receptor(s) mediating these tropisms have yet to be defined. We evaluated AAV9 uptake by glycans with terminal sialic acids (SAs), a common mode of cellular entry for viruses. We found, however, that AAV9 binding increased when terminal SA was enzymatically removed, suggesting that galactose, which is the most commonly observed penultimate monosaccharide to SA, may mediate AAV9 transduction. This was confirmed in mutant CHO Pro-5 cells deficient in the enzymes involved in glycoprotein biogenesis, as well as lectin interference studies. Binding of AAV9 to glycans with terminal galactose was demonstrated via glycan binding assays. Co-instillation of AAV9 vector with neuraminidase into mouse lung resulted in exposure of terminal galactose on the apical surface of conducting airway epithelial cells, as shown by lectin binding and increased transduction of these cells, demonstrating the possible utility of this vector in lung-directed gene transfer. Increasing the abundance of the receptor on target cells and improving vector efficacy may improve delivery of AAV vectors to their therapeutic targets. PMID:21576824

  8. Effective delivery of large genes to the retina by dual AAV vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Colella, Pasqualina; Sommella, Andrea; Iodice, Carolina; Cesi, Giulia; de Simone, Sonia; Marrocco, Elena; Rossi, Settimio; Giunti, Massimo; Palfi, Arpad; Farrar, Gwyneth J; Polishchuk, Roman; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, AAV's limited cargo capacity prevents its application to therapies of inherited retinal diseases due to mutations of genes over 5 kb, like Stargardt's disease (STGD) and Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B). Previous methods based on ‘forced’ packaging of large genes into AAV capsids may not be easily translated to the clinic due to the generation of genomes of heterogeneous size which raise safety concerns. Taking advantage of AAV's ability to concatemerize, we generated dual AAV vectors which reconstitute a large gene by either splicing (trans-splicing), homologous recombination (overlapping), or a combination of the two (hybrid). We found that dual trans-splicing and hybrid vectors transduce efficiently mouse and pig photoreceptors to levels that, albeit lower than those achieved with a single AAV, resulted in significant improvement of the retinal phenotype of mouse models of STGD and USH1B. Thus, dual AAV trans-splicing or hybrid vectors are an attractive strategy for gene therapy of retinal diseases that require delivery of large genes. PMID:24150896

  9. Replication-specific conversion of the Staphylococcus aureus pT181 initiator protein from an active homodimer to an inactive heterodimer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, A; Wang, P Z; Novick, R P

    1994-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus rolling circle plasmid pT181 regulates its replication by controlling the synthesis of its initiator protein RepC. RepC is inactivated during pT181 replication by the addition of an oligodeoxynucleotide, giving rise to a new form, RepC*. We analyzed RepC and RepC* in four classes of mutants: plasmid copy number mutants, two classes of RepC mutants affecting different portions of the protein and oriC (origin) mutants. We have found that in the cell with wild-type RepC there are similar relative amounts of RepC and RepC*, regardless of copy number, and that the conversion of RepC to RepC* is replication dependent. Genetic and biochemical evidence is presented that RepC functions as a dimer and that during replication the RepC homodimer is converted to the RepC/RepC* heterodimer. Images PMID:7957090

  10. U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson of Florida during medical tests at JSC's Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson of Florida during medical tests at JSC's Clinic. Photos include Rep. Nelson talking to Sharon Briceno (center) and Betty Lord before the tests begin. The congressman's torso bears a number of sensors for the testing (40835); Portrait view of Rep. Nelson with sensors attached to his chest (40836); Rep. Nelson gets some assistance from nurses at the clinic as he prepares to participate in medical tests. Help is provided by Betty Lord, right, and Sharon Briceno (40837); Rep. Nelson is being assisted to don 'halo' device for tests (40838); Rep. Nelson runs in place on a treadmill device (40839).

  11. Cloning and characterization of Rep-8 (D8S2298E) in the human chromosome 8p11.2-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Yukako; Ichikawa, Koji; Sugawara, Kahori

    1997-01-15

    A novel human gene referred to as the Rep-8 gene (D8S2298E) was cloned by a combination of exon trapping, thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR, and screening of a cDNA library. It is located in human chromosome 8p.11.2-p12. The gene consists of eight exons and spans about 20 kb between the glutathione S-reductase and the protein phosphatase 2A beta subunit genes. The full-length Rep-8 gene contains 1483 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 270 amino acids. Southern blot experiments showed that the Rep-8 gene exists as a single copy per haploid. With a zoo blot analysis, human Rep-8 DNA hybridized strongly with the monkey DNA, but only weakly with the DNAs of species other than Homo sapiens. Northern blot analysis showed that it is expressed abundantly in the testis and ovary, suggesting that the Rep-8 gene product may play a role in reproduction. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Reduced retinal transduction and enhanced transgene-directed immunogenicity with intravitreal delivery of rAAV following posterior vitrectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R F; Boye, S L; Conlon, T J; Erger, K E; Sledge, D G; Langohr, I M; Hauswirth, W W; Komáromy, A M; Boye, S E; Petersen-Jones, S M; Bartoe, J T

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-based gene therapy is a promising treatment strategy for delivery of neurotrophic transgenes to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma patients. Retinal distribution of transgene expression following intravitreal injection (IVT) of AAV is variable in animal models and the vitreous humor may represent a barrier to initial vector penetration. The primary goal of our study was to investigate the effect of prior core vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid membrane peeling on pattern and efficiency of transduction of a capsid amino acid substituted AAV2 vector, carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter transgene following IVT in dogs. When progressive intraocular inflammation developed starting 4 weeks post IVT, the study plan was modified to allow detailed characterization of the etiology as a secondary goal. Unexpectedly, surgical vitrectomy was found to significantly limit transduction, whereas in non-vitrectomized eyes transduction efficiency reached upwards to 37.3% of RGC layer cells. The developing retinitis was characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates resulting from a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, which we suspect was directed at the GFP transgene. Our results, in a canine large animal model, support caution when considering surgical vitrectomy before IVT for retinal gene therapy in patients, as prior vitrectomy appears to significantly reduce transduction efficiency and may predispose the patient to development of vector-induced immune reactions. PMID:27052802

  13. Intrathecal AAV serotype 9-mediated delivery of shRNA against TRPV1 attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takashi; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Sotome, Shinichi; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Ukegawa, Madoka; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Mariko; Tajiri, Mio; Miyata, Haruka; Hirai, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Okawa, Atsushi; Yokota, Takanori

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy for neuropathic pain requires efficient gene delivery to both central and peripheral nervous systems. We previously showed that an adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) could suppress target molecule expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord upon intrathecal injection. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this approach, we constructed an AAV9 vector encoding shRNA against vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), which is an important target gene for acute pain, but its role in chronic neuropathic pain remains unclear. We intrathecally injected it into the subarachnoid space at the upper lumbar spine of mice 3 weeks after spared nerve injury (SNI). Delivered shTRPV1 effectively suppressed mRNA and protein expression of TRPV1 in the DRG and spinal cord, and it attenuated nerve injury-induced thermal allodynia 10-28 days after treatment. Our study provides important evidence for the contribution of TRPV1 to thermal hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain and thus establishes intrathecal AAV9-mediated gene delivery as an investigative and potentially therapeutic platform for the nervous system. PMID:24322332

  14. Generation and in vivo evaluation of IL10-treated dendritic cells in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-based gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Vandamme, Céline; Segovia, Mercedes; Devaux, Marie; Guilbaud, Mickaël; Tilly, Gaëlle; Jaulin, Nicolas; Le Duff, Johanne; Cherel, Yan; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Anegon, Ignacio; Moullier, Philippe; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Adjali, Oumeya

    2014-01-01

    Preventing untoward immune responses against a specific antigen is a major challenge in different clinical settings such as gene therapy, transplantation, or autoimmunity. Following intramuscular delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-derived vectors, transgene rejection can be a roadblock to successful clinical translation. Specific immunomodulation strategies potentially leading to sustained transgene expression while minimizing pharmacological immunosuppression are desirable. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDC) are potential candidates but have not yet been evaluated in the context of gene therapy, to our knowledge. Following intramuscular delivery of rAAV-derived vectors expressing an immunogenic protein in the nonhuman primate model, we assessed the immunomodulating potential of autologous bone marrow-derived TolDC generated in the presence of IL10 and pulsed with the transgene product. TolDC administered either intradermally or intravenously were safe and well tolerated. While the intravenous route showed a modest ability to modulate host immunity against the transgene product, intradermally delivery resulted in a robust vaccination of the macaques when associated to intramuscular rAAV-derived vectors-based gene transfer. These findings demonstrate the critical role of TolDC mode of injection in modulating host immunity. This study also provides the first evidence of the potential of TolDC-based immunomodulation in gene therapy. PMID:26015970

  15. Local and systemic responses following intravitreous injection of AAV2-encoded modified Volvox channelrhodopsin-1 in a genetically blind rat model.

    PubMed

    Sugano, E; Tabata, K; Takahashi, M; Nishiyama, F; Shimizu, H; Sato, M; Tamai, M; Tomita, H

    2016-02-01

    We previously designed a modified channelrhodopsin-1 (mVChR1) protein chimera with a broader action than that of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsin-2 and reported that its transduction into retinal ganglion cells can restore visual function in genetically blind, dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, with photostimuli ranging from 486 to 640 nm. In the current study, we sought to investigate the safety and influence of mVChR1 transgene expression. Adeno-associated virus type 2 encoding mVChR1 was administered by intravitreous injection into dystrophic RCS rats. Reverse-transcription PCR was used to monitor virus and transgene dissemination and the results demonstrated that their expression was restricted specifically within the eye tissues, and not in non-target organs. Moreover, examination of the blood, plasma and serum revealed that no excess immunoreactivity was present, as determined using standard clinical hematological parameters. Serum antibodies targeting the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) capsid increased after the injection; however, no increase in mVChR1 antibody was detected during the observation period. In addition, retinal histological examination showed no signs of inflammation in rAAV-injected rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that mVChR1 can be exogenously expressed without harmful immunological reactions in vivo. These findings will aid in studies of AAV gene transfer to restore vision in late-stage retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26440056

  16. Reduced retinal transduction and enhanced transgene-directed immunogenicity with intravitreal delivery of rAAV following posterior vitrectomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Boye, SL; Conlon, TJ; Erger, KE; Sledge, DG; Langohr, IM; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Boye, SE; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-based gene therapy is a promising treatment strategy for delivery of neurotrophic transgenes to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma patients. Retinal distribution of transgene expression following intravitreal injection (IVT) of AAV is variable in animal models and the vitreous humor may represent a barrier to initial vector penetration. The primary goal of our study was to investigate the effect of prior core vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid membrane peeling on pattern and efficiency of transduction of a capsid amino acid substituted AAV2 vector, carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter transgene following IVT in dogs. When progressive intraocular inflammation developed starting 4 weeks post IVT, the study plan was modified to allow detailed characterization of the etiology as a secondary goal. Unexpectedly, surgical vitrectomy was found to significantly limit transduction, whereas in non-vitrectomized eyes transduction efficiency reached upwards to 37.3% of RGC layer cells. The developing retinitis was characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates resulting from a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, which we suspect was directed at the GFP transgene. Our results, in a canine large animal model, support caution when considering surgical vitrectomy before IVT for retinal gene therapy in patients, as prior vitrectomy appears to significantly reduce transduction efficiency and may predispose the patient to development of vector-induced immune reactions. PMID:27052802

  17. Targeted gene transfer into ependymal cells through intraventricular injection of AAV1 vector and long-term enzyme replacement via the CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Miyake, Koichi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been shown to ameliorate neurological symptoms in model animals with neuropathic metabolic disorders. Gene therapy via the CSF offers a means to achieve a long-term sustainable supply of therapeutic proteins within the central nervous system (CNS) by setting up a continuous source of transgenic products. In the present study, a serotype 1 adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector was injected into a lateral cerebral ventricle in adult mice to transduce the gene encoding human lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (hASA) into the cells of the CNS. Widespread transduction and stable expression of hASA in the choroid plexus and ependymal cells was observed throughout the ventricles for more than 1 year after vector injection. Although humoral immunity to hASA developed after 6 weeks, which diminished the hASA levels detected in CSF from AAV1-injected mice, hASA levels in CSF were maintained for at least 12 weeks when the mice were tolerized to hASA prior of vector injection. Our results suggest that the cells lining the ventricles could potentially serve as a biological reservoir for long-term continuous secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the CSF following intracerebroventricular injection of an AAV1 vector. PMID:24981028

  18. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M.; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M.; Birrer, Michael J.; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2015-01-01

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  19. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pépin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M; Birrer, Michael J; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2015-08-11

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  20. Effect of nuclear factor κB inhibition on serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) minidystrophin gene transfer to the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Reay, Daniel P; Niizawa, Gabriela A; Watchko, Jon F; Daood, Molly; Reay, Ja'Nean C; Raggi, Eugene; Clemens, Paula R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have focused on viral vector-mediated gene transfer to provide therapeutic protein expression or treatment with drugs to limit dystrophic changes in muscle. The pathological activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway has emerged as an important cause of dystrophic muscle changes in muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB may inhibit gene transfer by promoting inflammation in response to the transgene or vector. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of pathological NF-κB activation in muscle would complement the therapeutic benefits of dystrophin gene transfer in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Systemic gene transfer using serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) vectors is promising for treatment of preclinical models of DMD because of vector tropism to cardiac and skeletal muscle. In quadriceps of C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J (mdx) mice, the addition of octalysine (8K)-NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (8K-NBD) peptide treatment to AAV9 minidystrophin gene delivery resulted in increased levels of recombinant dystrophin expression suggesting that 8K-NBD treatment promoted an environment in muscle tissue conducive to higher levels of expression. Indices of necrosis and regeneration were diminished with AAV9 gene delivery alone and to a greater degree with the addition of 8K-NBD treatment. In diaphragm muscle, high-level transgene expression was achieved with AAV9 minidystoophin gene delivery alone; therefore, improvements in histological and physiological indices were comparable in the two treatment groups. The data support benefit from 8K-NBD treatment to complement gene transfer therapy for DMD in muscle tissue that receives incomplete levels of transduction by gene transfer, which may be highly significant for clinical applications of muscle gene delivery. PMID:22231732

  1. Intramuscular delivery of p75NTR ectodomain by an AAV vector attenuates cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ye-Ran; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shu-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hui; Zeng, Fan; Li, Jing; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR) is a receptor for amyloid-beta (Aβ) and mediates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative signals. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously demonstrated that the shedding of p75ECD from the cell surface is down-regulated in AD brains and restoration of the p75ECD level in the brain, through intracranial administration of p75ECD by adeno-associated virus vectors, attenuates AD-like pathologies in an AD mouse model. In this study, we further investigated the feasibility and efficacy of peripheral administration of AAV-p75ECD on brain amyloid burden and associated pathogenesis. We found that intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the level of p75ECD in the blood, significantly improved the behavioral phenotype of amyloid precursor protein/PS1 transgenic mice, and reduced brain amyloid burden, attenuated Tau hyperphosphorylation, and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD was well tolerated. Our results indicate that peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a safe and effective therapeutic strategy for AD. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against amyloid-beta (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the p75ECD levels in the blood, reduced brain amyloid burden through a 'peripheral sink' mechanism and alleviates AD-type pathologies. Peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:26991827

  2. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  3. Assessment of Tropism and Effectiveness of New Primate-Derived Hybrid Recombinant AAV Serotypes in the Mouse and Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M.; Singh, Mandeep S.; Mouravlev, Alexandre; You, Qisheng; Barnard, Alun R.; Hankins, Mark W.; During, Matthew J.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have been shown to be safe in the treatment of retinal degenerations in clinical trials. Thus, improving the efficiency of viral gene delivery has become increasingly important to increase the success of clinical trials. In this study, structural domains of different rAAV serotypes isolated from primate brain were combined to create novel hybrid recombinant AAV serotypes, rAAV2/rec2 and rAAV2/rec3. The efficacy of these novel serotypes were assessed in wild type mice and in two models of retinal degeneration (the Abca4−/− mouse which is a model for Stargardt disease and in the Pde6brd1/rd1 mouse) in vivo, in primate tissue ex-vivo, and in the human-derived SH-SY5Y cell line, using an identical AAV2 expression cassette. We show that these novel hybrid serotypes can transduce retinal tissue in mice and primates efficiently, although no more than AAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 serotypes. Transduction efficiency appeared lower in the Abca4−/− mouse compared to wild type with all vectors tested, suggesting an effect of specific retinal diseases on the efficiency of gene delivery. Shuffling of AAV capsid domains may have clinical applications for patients who develop T-cell immune responses following AAV gene therapy, as specific peptide antigen sequences could be substituted using this technique prior to vector re-treatments. PMID:23593201

  4. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Mediated Dystrophin Gene Transfer Studies and Exon Skipping Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Kawecka, Klaudia; Theodoulides, Michael; Hasoglu, Yalin; Jarmin, Susan; Kymalainen, Hanna; Le-Heron, Anita; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Athanasopoulos, Takis

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked inherited musclewasting disease primarily affecting young boys with prevalence of between1:3,500- 1:5,000, is a rare genetic disease caused by defects in the gene for dystrophin. Dystrophin protein is critical to the stability of myofibers in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There is currently no cure available to ameliorate DMD and/or its patho-physiology. A number of therapeutic strategies including molecular-based therapeutics that replace or correct the missing or nonfunctional dystrophin protein have been devised to correct the patho-physiological consequences induced by dystrophin absence. We will review the current in vivo experimentation status (including preclinical models and clinical trials) for two of these approaches, namely: 1) Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated (micro) dystrophin gene augmentation/ supplementation and 2) Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping strategies. PMID:26159373

  5. AAV vector-mediated reversal of hypoglycemia in canine and murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Kozink, Daniel M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Demaster, Amanda K; Kruse, Meghan A; Vaughn, Valerie; Hillman, Steven; Bird, Andrew; Jackson, Mark; Brown, Talmage; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) profoundly impairs glucose release by the liver due to glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a small human G6Pase transgene was pseudotyped with AAV8 (AAV2/8) to optimize liver tropism. Survival was prolonged in 2-week-old G6Pase (-/-) mice by 600-fold fewer AAV2/8 vector particles (vp), in comparison to previous experiments involving this model (2 x 10(9) vp; 3 x 10(11) vp/kg). When the vector was pseudotyped with AAV1, survival was prolonged only at a higher dose (3 x 10(13) vp/kg). The AAV2/8 vector uniquely prevented hypoglycemia during fasting and fully corrected liver G6Pase deficiency in GSD-Ia mice and dogs. The AAV2/8 vector has prolonged survival in three GSD-Ia dogs to >11 months, which validated this strategy in the large animal model for GSD-Ia. Urinary biomarkers, including lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, were corrected by G6Pase expression solely in the liver. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was reduced almost to the normal level in vector-treated GSD-Ia mice and dogs, as was the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in GSD-Ia mice. These preclinical data demonstrated the efficacy of correcting hepatic G6Pase deficiency, and support the further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:18362924

  6. AAV-mediated, optogenetic ablation of Müller Glia leads to structural and functional changes in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Leah C; Khalid, Fakhra; Lee, Trevor; Zin, Emilia A; Greenberg, Kenneth P; Visel, Meike; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2013-01-01

    Müller glia, the primary glial cell in the retina, provide structural and metabolic support for neurons and are essential for retinal integrity. Müller cells are closely involved in many retinal degenerative diseases, including macular telangiectasia type 2, in which impairment of central vision may be linked to a primary defect in Müller glia. Here, we used an engineered, Müller-specific variant of AAV, called ShH10, to deliver a photo-inducibly toxic protein, KillerRed, to Müller cells in the mouse retina. We characterized the results of specific ablation of these cells on visual function and retinal structure. ShH10-KillerRed expression was obtained following intravitreal injection and eyes were then irradiated with green light to induce toxicity. Induction of KillerRed led to loss of Müller cells and a concomitant decrease of Müller cell markers glutamine synthetase and cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein, reduction of rhodopsin and cone opsin, and upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Loss of Müller cells also resulted in retinal disorganization, including thinning of the outer nuclear layer and the photoreceptor inner and outer segments. High resolution imaging of thin sections revealed displacement of photoreceptors from the ONL, formation of rosette-like structures and the presence of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, Müller cell ablation resulted in increased area and volume of retinal blood vessels, as well as the formation of tortuous blood vessels and vascular leakage. Electrophysiologic measures demonstrated reduced retinal function, evident in decreased photopic and scotopic electroretinogram amplitudes. These results show that loss of Müller cells can cause progressive retinal degenerative disease, and suggest that AAV delivery of an inducibly toxic protein in Müller cells may be useful to create large animal models of retinal dystrophies. PMID:24086689

  7. Benefits of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV)-Mediated Insulinlike Growth Factor I (IGF-I) Overexpression for the Long-Term Reconstruction of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage by Modulation of the IGF-I Axis

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Anja; Madry, Henning; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Schmitt, Gertrud; Frisch, Janina; Wezel, Anna; Jung, Jochen; Kohn, Dieter; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Trippel, Stephen B; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Administration of therapeutic genes to human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage is a potential approach to generate effective, durable treatments against this slow, progressive disorder. Here, we tested the ability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated overexpression of human insulinlike growth factor (hIGF)-I to reproduce an original surface in human OA cartilage in light of the pleiotropic activities of the factor. We examined the proliferative, survival and anabolic effects of the rAAV-hIGF-I treatment in primary human normal and OA chondrocytes in vitro and in explant cultures in situ compared with control (reporter) vector delivery. Efficient, prolonged IGF-I secretion via rAAV stimulated the biological activities of OA chondrocytes in all the systems evaluated over extended periods of time, especially in situ, where it allowed for the long-term reconstruction of OA cartilage (at least for 90 d). Remarkably, production of high, stable amounts of IGF-I in OA cartilage using rAAV advantageously modulated the expression of central effectors of the IGF-I axis by downregulating IGF-I inhibitors (IGF binding protein [IGFBP]-3 and IGFBP4) while up-regulating key potentiators (IGFBP5, the IGF-I receptor and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 [MAPK/ERK-1/2] and phosphatidylinisitol-3/Akt [PI3K/Akt] signal transduction pathways), probably explaining the enhanced responsiveness of OA cartilage to IGF-I treatment. These findings show the benefits of directly providing an IGF-I sequence to articular cartilage via rAAV for the future treatment of human osteoarthritis. PMID:22160392

  8. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  9. Inner Limiting Membrane Barriers to AAV-mediated Retinal Transduction From the Vitreous

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Caporale, Natalia; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral gene therapy has shown great promise in treating retinal disorders, with three promising clinical trials in progress. Numerous adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes can infect various cells of the retina when administered subretinally, but the retinal detachment accompanying this injection induces changes that negatively impact the microenvironment and survival of retinal neurons. Intravitreal administration could circumvent this problem, but only AAV2 can infect retinal cells from the vitreous, and transduction is limited to the inner retina. We therefore sought to investigate and reduce barriers to transduction from the vitreous. We fluorescently labeled several AAV serotype capsids and followed their retinal distribution after intravitreal injection. AAV2, 8, and 9 accumulate at the vitreoretinal junction. AAV1 and 5 show no accumulation, indicating a lack of appropriate receptors at the inner limiting membrane (ILM). Importantly, mild digestion of the ILM with a nonspecific protease enabled substantially enhanced transduction of multiple retinal cell types from the vitreous, with AAV5 mediating particularly remarkable expression in all retinal layers. This protease treatment has no effect on retinal function as shown by electroretinogram (ERG) and visual cortex cell population responses. These findings may help avoid limitations, risks, and damage associated with subretinal injections currently necessary for clinical gene therapy. PMID:19672248

  10. Rehabilitation Education Program for Stroke (REPS): Learning and Practice Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Sara; Szurek, Kristina; Polatajko, Helene J.; Rappolt, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: New research knowledge acquired from Web-based sources may have a better chance of being translated into practice when accompanied by additional educational strategies. This study was undertaken to investigate that hypothesis. Methods: The Rehabilitation Education Program for Stroke (REPS) combines a self-directed online learning…

  11. A Role for REP Sequences in Regulating Translation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenxing; Rudd, Kenneth E.; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY REP sequences are highly structured elements found downstream of ~500 genes in Escherichia coli that result in extensive stem-loop structures in their mRNAs. However, their physiological role has remained elusive. Here, we show that REP sequences can down-regulate translation, but only if they are within 15 nt of a termination codon; a spacing of 16 nt has no effect suggesting that the REP element acts to stall ribosome movement. Ribosome stalling leads to cleavage of the mRNA and induction of the trans-translation process. Using nrdAB as a model, we find that its regulation can be partially reversed by overexpression of RNA helicases, and can be fully overcome upon UV stress, emphasizing the importance of this regulatory process. Since 50% of REP-associated genes have these elements within the critical 15 nt, these findings identify a regulatory mechanism with the potential to affect translation from a large number of genes. PMID:25891074

  12. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  13. In Vivo Selection Yields AAV-B1 Capsid for Central Nervous System and Muscle Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sourav R; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Harris, Anne F; Maitland, Stacy A; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Zhang, Yuanfan; Ma, Shan; Sharma, Rohit B; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Johnson, Jacob A; Johnson, Aime K; Alonso, Laura C; Punzo, Claudio; Wagner, Kathryn R; Maguire, Casey A; Kotin, Robert M; Martin, Douglas R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have shown promise as a platform for gene therapy of neurological disorders. Achieving global gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is key for development of effective therapies for many of these diseases. Here we report the isolation of a novel CNS tropic AAV capsid, AAV-B1, after a single round of in vivo selection from an AAV capsid library. Systemic injection of AAV-B1 vector in adult mice and cat resulted in widespread gene transfer throughout the CNS with transduction of multiple neuronal subpopulations. In addition, AAV-B1 transduces muscle, β-cells, pulmonary alveoli, and retinal vasculature at high efficiency. This vector is more efficient than AAV9 for gene delivery to mouse brain, spinal cord, muscle, pancreas, and lung. Together with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by antibodies in pooled human sera, the broad transduction profile of AAV-B1 represents an important improvement over AAV9 for CNS gene therapy. PMID:27117222

  14. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  15. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response, and growth factor synthesis after direct intraarticular injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the equine middle carpal joint.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla; Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×10(11) vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  16. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Response, and Growth Factor Synthesis After Direct Intraarticular Injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the Equine Middle Carpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×1011 vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  17. A Novel Gene Expression Control System and Its Use in Stable, High-Titer 293 Cell-Based Adeno-Associated Virus Packaging Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2002-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish 293cell-based stable and high-titer adeno-associated virus (AAV) packaging cell lines were unsuccessful, primarily due to adenovirus E1-activated Rep gene expression, which exerts cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on the host cells. Control of the two large AAV Rep proteins (Rep78/68) was insufficient to eliminate the adverse effects, because of the leaky expression of the two small Rep proteins (Rep52/40). However, it was unsuccessful to control Rep52/40 gene expression since its promoter is located within the coding sequence of Rep78/68. To tightly regulate all four Rep proteins by using their own promoters, we have developed a novel gene control paradigm termed “dual splicing switch,” which disrupts all four Rep genes by inserting into their shared coding region an intron that harbors transcription termination sequences flanked the LoxP sites. As a result, the structure and activities of the Rep gene promoters, both p5 and p19, are not affected; however, all of the Rep transcripts are prematurely terminated and the genes were inactivated. Removal of the terminator by Cre protein reactivates the transcription of all four Rep proteins derived from their own promoters. This switch system was initially tested in the lacZ gene and a 600-fold induction of β-galactosidase activity was observed. Using the dual splicing switch strategy, we have subsequently established a number of AAV packaging cell lines from 293 cells, which showed a normal growth rate, high stability, and more importantly, high yields of AAV vectors. Such a gene control paradigm is also useful for other viruses, e.g., autonomous parvoviruses. Finally, the high-titer 293-based AAV packaging cell lines should greatly reduce the risk of wild-type adenovirus contamination and provide a scalable AAV vector production method for both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:12438627

  18. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV2)-mediated apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme: a self-complementary AAV2 vector improves the gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shumei; Sun, Shihua; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2004-01-01

    Background In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. To reduce the levels of apoB mRNA, we have designed an apoB mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme targeted at nucleotide sequences GUA6679 (RB15) mediated by adenovirus, which efficiently cleaves and decreases apoB mRNA by 80% in mouse liver and attenuates the hyperlipidemic condition. In the current study, we used an adeno-associated virus vector, serotype 2 (AAV2) and a self-complementary AAV2 vector (scAAV2) to demonstrate the effect of long-term tissue-specific gene expression of RB15 on the regulation apoB mRNA in vivo. Methods We constructed a hammerhead ribozyme RB15 driven by a liver-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoter using an AAV2 vector (rAAV2-TTR-RB15). HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic mice deficient in both the low density lipoprotein receptor and the apoB mRNA editing enzyme genes (LDLR-/-Apobec1-/-; LDb) were transduced with rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and a control vector rAAV-TTR-RB15-mutant (inactive ribozyme). The effects of ribozyme RB15 on apoB metabolism and atherosclerosis development were determined in LDb mice at 5-month after transduction. A self-complementary AAV2 vector expressing ribozyme RB15 (scAAV2-TTR-RB15) was also engineered and used to transduce HepG2 cells. Studies were designed to compare the gene expression efficiency between rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and scAAV2-TTR-RB15. Results The effect of ribozyme RB15 RNA on reducing apoB mRNA levels in HepG2 cells was observed only on day-7 after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 transduction. And, at 5-month after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 treatment, the apoB mRNA levels in LDb mice were significantly decreased by 43%, compared to LDb mice treated with control vector rAAV2-TTR-RB15-mutant. Moreover, both the rAAV2-TTR-RB15 viral DNA and ribozyme RB15 RNA were still detectable in mice livers at 5-month after treatment. However, this rAAV2-TTR-RB15 vector mediated a prolonged but low level of ribozyme RB15 gene

  19. Conversations with Rep. Ken Calvert. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Rep. Calvert, chair of the House aeronautics and space subcommittee of the Science Committee, answers questions related to priorities for space in the current congressional session: the Vision for Space Exploration, development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and other heavy-lift launch vehicles, entrepreneurial alliances in the space transportation industry, the U.S. aerospace industry, space tourism, entrepreneurs and NASA, U.S. aeronautics research, a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, and priority military space programs. PMID:16044613

  20. Somatic correction of junctional epidermolysis bullosa by a highly recombinogenic AAV variant.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sandra P; Lisowski, Leszek; Bashkirova, Elizaveta; Zhen, Hanson H; Chu, Kirk; Keene, Douglas R; Marinkovich, M Peter; Kay, Mark A; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-04-01

    Definitive correction of disease causing mutations in somatic cells by homologous recombination (HR) is an attractive therapeutic approach for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, HR-based somatic gene therapy is limited by the low efficiency of gene targeting in mammalian cells and replicative senescence of primary cells ex vivo, forcing investigators to explore alternative strategies such as retro- and lentiviral gene transfer, or genome editing in induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report correction of mutations at the LAMA3 locus in primary keratinocytes derived from a patient affected by recessive inherited Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB) disorder using recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV)-mediated HR. We identified a highly recombinogenic AAV serotype, AAV-DJ, that mediates efficient gene targeting in keratinocytes at clinically relevant frequencies with a low rate of random integration. Targeted H-JEB patient cells were selected based on restoration of adhesion phenotype, which eliminated the need for foreign sequences in repaired cells, enhancing the clinical use and safety profile of our approach. Corrected pools of primary cells assembled functional laminin-332 heterotrimer and fully reversed the blistering phenotype both in vitro and in skin grafts. The efficient targeting of the LAMA3 locus by AAV-DJ using phenotypic selection, together with the observed low frequency of off-target events, makes AAV-DJ based somatic cell targeting a promising strategy for ex vivo therapy for this severe and often lethal epithelial disorder. PMID:24390279

  1. Controlling AAV Tropism in the Nervous System with Natural and Engineered Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Michael J.; Turunen, Heikki T.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wolfe, John H.

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred naturally occurring variants of adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been identified, and this library has been further expanded by an array of techniques for modification of the viral capsid. AAV capsid variants possess unique antigenic profiles and demonstrate distinct cellular tropisms driven by differences in receptor binding. AAV capsids can be chemically modified to alter tropism, can be produced as hybrid vectors that combine the properties of multiple serotypes, and can carry peptide insertions that introduce novel receptor-binding activity. Furthermore, directed evolution of shuffled genome libraries can identify engineered variants with unique properties, and rational modification of the viral capsid can alter tropism, reduce blockage by neutralizing antibodies, or enhance transduction efficiency. This large number of AAV variants and engineered capsids provides a varied toolkit for gene delivery to the CNS and retina, with specialized vectors available for many applications, but selecting a capsid variant from the array of available vectors can be difficult. This chapter describes the unique properties of a range of AAV variants and engineered capsids, and provides a guide for selecting the appropriate vector for specific applications in the CNS and retina. PMID:26611584

  2. Current Challenges and Future Directions in Recombinant AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Various characteristics of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors with long-term safe expression have made it an exciting transduction tool for clinical gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although host immune reactions against the vector as well as transgene products were detected in some instances of the clinical studies, there have been promising observations. Methods of producing AAV vectors for considerable in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations have been developed and a number of studies with AAV vector-mediated muscle transduction were attempted. Notably, an intravenous limb perfusion transduction technique enables extensive transgene expression in the skeletal muscles without noticeable adverse events. Furthermore, cardiac transduction by the rAAV9-microdystrophin would be promising to prevent development of cardiac dysfunction. Recent achievements in transduction technology suggest that long-term transgene expression with therapeutic benefits in DMD treatment would be achieved by the rAAV-mediated transduction strategy with an adequate regimen to regulate host immune response. PMID:24276316

  3. AAV9-mediated central nervous system–targeted gene delivery via cisterna magna route in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lukashchuk, Vera; Lewis, Katherine E; Coldicott, Ian; Grierson, Andrew J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2016-01-01

    Current barriers to the use of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) in clinical trials for treating neurological disorders are its high expression in many off-target tissues such as liver and heart, and lack of cell specificity within the central nervous system (CNS) when using ubiquitous promoters such as human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or chicken-β-actin hybrid (CAG). To enhance targeting the transgene expression in CNS cells, self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors, scAAV9-GFP vectors carrying neuronal Hb9 and synapsin 1, and nonspecific CMV and CAG promoters were constructed. We demonstrate that synapsin 1 and Hb9 promoters exclusively targeted neurons in vitro, although their strengths were up to 10-fold lower than that of CMV. In vivo analyses of mouse tissue after scAAV9-GFP vector delivery via the cisterna magna revealed a significant advantage of synapsin 1 promoter over both Hb9 variants in targeting neurons throughout the brain, since Hb9 promoters were driving gene expression mainly within the motor-related areas of the brain stem. In summary, this study demonstrates that cisterna magna administration is a safe alternative to intracranial or intracerebroventricular vector delivery route using scAAV9, and introduces a novel utility of the Hb9 promoter for the targeted gene expression for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:26942208

  4. Gene therapy for hemophilia B mice with scAAV8-LP1-hFIX.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Zhou, Qingzhang; Yang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Gu, Yexing; Shen, Qi; Xue, Jinglun; Dong, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia B is a hemorrhagic disease caused by the deficiency of clotting factor IX (FIX). Gene therapy might be the ultimate strategy for the disease. However, two main problems that should be solved in gene therapy for hemophilia B are immunity and safety. Self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (scAAV8), a non-human primate AAV featuring low immunogenicity and high transfection efficiency in liver cells, might be a potential vector for hemophilia B gene therapy. A strong liver-specific promoter-1 (LP1) was inserted and mutant human FIX Arg338Ala was introduced into plasmid scAAV8-LP1 to develop an optimized AAV8 vector that expresses human clotting factor FIX (hFIX). The efficiency of scAAV8-LP1-hFIX administered through normal systemic injection or hydrodynamic injection was compared. A high expression was achieved using hydrodynamic injection, and the peak hFIX expression levels in the 5 × 10(11) and 1 × 10(11) virus genome (vg) cohorts were 31.94% and 25.02% of normal level, respectively, at 60 days post-injection. From the perspective of long-term (200 days) expression, both injection methods presented promising results with the concentration value maintained above 4% of normal plasma. The results were further verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and activated partial thromboplastin time. Our study provides a potential gene therapy method for hemophilia B. PMID:27052253

  5. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant NT4-NAP/AAV Exerts Potential Antidepressant Effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-Cang; Chu, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Jia, Min; Dang, Yong-Hui; Gao, Cheng-Ge

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to construct a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) which can express NAP in the brain and examine whether this virus can produce antidepressant effects on C57 BL/6 mice that had been subjected to open field test and forced swimming test, via nose-to-brain pathway. When the recombinant plasmid pGEM-T Easy/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments can be obtained and NT4-NAP sequence was consistent with the designed sequence confirmed by DNA sequencing. When the recombinant plasmid pSSCMV/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments is visible. Immunohistochemical staining of fibroblasts revealed that expression of NAP was detected in NT4-NAP/AAV group. Intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV significantly reduced immobility time when the FST was performed after 1 day from the last administration. The effects observed in the FST could not be attributed to non-specific increases in activity since intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV did not alter the behavior of the mice during the open field test. The results indicated that a recombinant AAV vector which could express NAP in cells was successfully constructed and NAP may be a potential target for therapeutic action of antidepressant treatment. PMID:26846142

  6. AAV Vectors for Cardiac Gene Transfer: Experimental Tools and Clinical Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Christina A; Byrne, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    Since the first demonstration of in vivo gene transfer into myocardium there have been a series of advancements that have driven the evolution of cardiac gene delivery from an experimental tool into a therapy currently at the threshold of becoming a viable clinical option. Innovative methods have been established to address practical challenges related to tissue-type specificity, choice of delivery vehicle, potency of the delivered material, and delivery route. Most importantly for therapeutic purposes, these strategies are being thoroughly tested to ensure safety of the delivery system and the delivered genetic material. This review focuses on the development of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as one of the most valuable cardiac gene transfer agents available today. Various forms of rAAV have been used to deliver “pre-event” cardiac protection and to temper the severity of hypertrophy, cardiac ischemia, or infarct size. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have also been functional delivery tools for cardiac gene expression knockdown studies and successfully improving the cardiac aspects of several metabolic and neuromuscular diseases. Viral capsid manipulations along with the development of tissue-specific and regulated promoters have greatly increased the utility of rAAV-mediated gene transfer. Important clinical studies are currently underway to evaluate AAV-based cardiac gene delivery in humans. PMID:21792180

  7. RNA polymerase mutations that facilitate replication progression in the rep uvrD recF mutant lacking two accessory replicative helicases.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Lestini, Roxane; Duigou, Stéphane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-07-01

    We observed that cells lacking Rep and UvrD, two replication accessory helicases, and the recombination protein RecF are cryo-sensitive on rich medium. We isolated five mutations that suppress this Luria-Bertani (LB)-cryo-sensitivity and show that they map in the genes encoding the RNA polymerase subunits RpoB and RpoC. These rpoB (D444G, H447R and N518D) and rpoC mutants (H113R and P451L) were characterized. rpoB(H447R) and rpoB(D444G) prevent activation of the Prrn core promoter in rich medium, but only rpoB(H447R) also suppresses the auxotrophy of a relA spoT mutant (stringent-like phenotype). rpoC(H113R) suppresses the thermo-sensitivity of a greA greB mutant, suggesting that it destabilizes stalled elongation complexes. All mutations but rpoC(P451L) prevent R-loop formation. We propose that these rpo mutations allow replication in the absence of Rep and UvrD by destabilizing RNA Pol upon replication-transcription collisions. In a RecF(+) context, they improve growth of rep uvrD cells only if DinG is present, supporting the hypothesis that Rep, UvrD and DinG facilitate progression of the replication fork across transcribed sequences. They rescue rep uvrD dinG recF cells, indicating that in a recF mutant replication forks arrested by unstable transcription complexes can restart without any of the three known replication accessory helicases Rep, UvrD and DinG. PMID:20497334

  8. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  9. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  10. Intravitreal delivery of a novel AAV vector targets ON bipolar cells and restores visual function in a mouse model of complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Scalabrino, Miranda L; Boye, Sanford L; Fransen, Kathryn M H; Noel, Jennifer M; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; De Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Gregg, Ronald G; McCall, Maureen A; Peachey, Neal S; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) effectively targets therapeutic genes to photoreceptors, pigment epithelia, Müller glia and ganglion cells of the retina. To date, no one has shown the ability to correct, with gene replacement, an inherent defect in bipolar cells (BCs), the excitatory interneurons of the retina. Targeting BCs with gene replacement has been difficult primarily due to the relative inaccessibility of BCs to standard AAV vectors. This approach would be useful for restoration of vision in patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1), where signaling through the ON BCs is eliminated due to mutations in their G-protein-coupled cascade genes. For example, the majority of CSNB1 patients carry a mutation in nyctalopin (NYX), which encodes a protein essential for proper localization of the TRPM1 cation channel required for ON BC light-evoked depolarization. As a group, CSNB1 patients have a normal electroretinogram (ERG) a-wave, indicative of photoreceptor function, but lack a b-wave due to defects in ON BC signaling. Despite retinal dysfunction, the retinas of CSNB1 patients do not degenerate. The Nyx(nob) mouse model of CSNB1 faithfully mimics this phenotype. Here, we show that intravitreally injected, rationally designed AAV2(quadY-F+T-V) containing a novel 'Ple155' promoter drives either GFP or YFP_Nyx in postnatal Nyx(nob) mice. In treated Nyx(nob) retina, robust and targeted Nyx transgene expression in ON BCs partially restored the ERG b-wave and, at the cellular level, signaling in ON BCs. Our results support the potential for gene delivery to BCs and gene replacement therapy in human CSNB1. PMID:26310623

  11. Plasmid replication initiator RepB forms a hexamer reminiscent of ring helicases and has mobile nuclease domains

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D Roeland; Ruíz-Masó, José A; López-Blanco, José R; Blanco, Alexander G; Vives-Llàcer, Mireia; Chacón, Pablo; Usón, Isabel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Espinosa, Manuel; Llorca, Oscar; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    RepB initiates plasmid rolling-circle replication by binding to a triple 11-bp direct repeat (bind locus) and cleaving the DNA at a specific distant site located in a hairpin loop within the nic locus of the origin. The structure of native full-length RepB reveals a hexameric ring molecule, where each protomer has two domains. The origin-binding and catalytic domains show a three-layer α–β–α sandwich fold. The active site is positioned at one of the faces of the β-sheet and coordinates a Mn2+ ion at short distance from the essential nucleophilic Y99. The oligomerization domains (ODs), each consisting of four α-helices, together define a compact ring with a central channel, a feature found in ring helicases. The toroidal arrangement of RepB suggests that, similar to ring helicases, it encircles one of the DNA strands during replication to confer processivity to the replisome complex. The catalytic domains appear to be highly mobile with respect to ODs. This mobility may account for the adaptation of the protein to two distinct DNA recognition sites. PMID:19440202

  12. Serotype-specific Binding Properties and Nanoparticle Characteristics Contribute to the Immunogenicity of rAAV1 Vectors.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Maxime; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Galy, Anne; Boisgerault, Florence

    2015-06-01

    The immunogenic properties of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene transfer vectors remain incompletely characterized in spite of their usage as gene therapy vectors or as vaccines. Molecular interactions between rAAV and various types of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), as well as the impact of these interactions on transgene or capsid-specific immunization remain unclear. We herein show that binding motifs recognized by the capsid and which determine the vector tissue tropism are also critical for key immune activation processes. Using rAAV capsid serotype 1 (rAAV1) vectors which primary receptors on target cells are α2,3 and α2,6 N-linked sialic acids, we show that sialic acid-dependent binding of rAAV1 on APCs is essential to trigger CD4(+) T-cell responses by increasing rAAV1 uptake and contributing to antigenic presentation of both the capsid and transgene product although this involves different APCs. In addition, the nanoparticulate structure of the vector in itself appears to be sufficient to trigger mobilization and activation of some APCs. Therefore, combinations of structural and of serotype-specific cell-targeting properties of rAAV1 determine its complex immunogenicity. These findings may be useful to guide a selection of rAAV variants depending on the intended level of immunogenicity for either gene therapy or vaccination applications. PMID:25881000

  13. Construction of AAV-rat-IL4 and Evaluation of its Modulating Effect on Aβ (1-42)-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokines in Primary Microglia and the B92 Cell Line by Quantitative PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Namayandeh, Mandana; Zare, Maryam; Asaei, Sadaf; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-4 (IL-4), as the most prominent anti-inflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in modulating microglial activation and inflammatory responses in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a chronic inflammatory disorder. Objectives The current study aimed to develop a new recombinant Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector that delivers IL-4 and then assess the counterbalancing effect of the new construct along with recombinant IL-4 (rIL-4) protein in in-vitro models of AD. Materials and Methods The rAAV-IL4 was originally prepared and then employed along with rIL-4 protein to counter Amyloid β (1-42)-induced proinflammatory cytokines in a primary microglia cell culture and the B92 rat microglia continuous cell line, using relative Real-Time PCR assay. Results Aβ (1-42) stimulated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL6, IL1β, TNFα, and IL18 in both the primary microglia cell culture and the B92 cell line. Both the rAAV-IL4 construct and the rIL-4 protein were found to inhibit production of the most important Aβ (1-42)-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs in the two types of cells with different patterns. Conclusions It seems that the new construct can serve as an appropriate option in the modulation of Aβ-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and microglia activation in patients affected by AD. PMID:27217922

  14. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Andrea L. H.; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice. PMID:22065964

  15. Recombinant AAV as a Platform for Translating the Therapeutic Potential of RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Kay, Mark A; Mueller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference has become a ubiquitous biological tool, and is being harnessed for therapeutic purposes as well. Therapeutic posttranscriptional gene silencing takes advantage of the endogenous RNAi pathway through delivery of either chemically synthesized siRNAs, or transgenes expressing hairpin-based inhibitory RNAs (e.g., shRNAs and artificial miRNAs). RNAi has expanded the field of viral gene therapy from gene replacement to gene knockdown. Here, we review various noncoding RNAs such as shRNAs, miRNAs, and miRNA decoys which can be utilized for therapeutic applications when expressed from recombinant adeno-associated vectors (AAV), and present examples of their basic design. In addition the basis of exploiting cellular miRNA profiles for detargeting AAV expression from specific cells is described. Finally, an overview of AAV-mediated RNAi preclinical studies is presented, and current RNAi-based clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24352214

  16. Human Adeno-Associated Virus Type 5 Is Only Distantly Related to Other Known Primate Helper-Dependent Parvoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bantel-Schaal, Ursula; Delius, Hajo; Schmidt, Rainer; zur Hausen, Harald

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized 95% (4,404 nucleotides) of the genome of adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5), including part of the terminal repeats and the terminal resolution site. Our results show that AAV5 is different from all other described AAV serotypes at the nucleotide level and at the amino acid level. The sequence homology to AAV2, AAV3B, AAV4, and AAV6 at the nucleotide level is only between 54 and 56%. The positive strand contains two large open reading frames (ORFs). The left ORF encodes the nonstructural (Rep) proteins, and the right ORF encodes the structural (Cap) proteins. At the amino acid level the identities with the capsid proteins of other AAVs range between 51 and 59%, with a high degree of heterogeneity in regions which are considered to be on the exterior surface of the viral capsid. The overall identity for the nonstructural Rep proteins at the amino acid level is 54.4%. It is lowest at the C-terminal 128 amino acids (10%). There are only two instead of the common three putative Zn fingers in the Rep proteins. The Cap protein data suggest differences in capsid surfaces and raise the possibility of a host range distinct from those of other parvoviruses. This may have important implications for AAV vectors used in gene therapy. PMID:9882294

  17. Integrin alphaVbeta5 is not involved in adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) infection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Brown, K E

    1999-11-25

    alphaVbeta5 integrin was recently proposed as a coreceptor for adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) infection (Summerford et al., 1999, Nat. Med. 5, 78-82), based mainly on the direct binding of AAV2 to denatured beta5 by virus overlay assay. In studies using purified natural or recombinant human integrin alphaVbeta5 we were unable to demonstrate AAV2 binding, either by virus overlay or by liquid binding assay. Furthermore, neither purified integrin alphaVbeta5, nor RGD peptides, nor functional blocking monoclonal antibody blocked rAAV2 transduction. These data strongly suggest that integrin alphaVbeta5 is not involved in AAV2 infection. PMID:10562505

  18. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  19. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  20. Intramuscular Injection of AAV8 in Mice and Macaques Is Associated with Substantial Hepatic Targeting and Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A.; Peng, Hui; Ohlstein, Jason; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Ahonkhai, Omua; Mentzinger, Anne; Grant, Rebecca L.; Roy, Soumitra; Chen, Shu-Jen; Bell, Peter; Tretiakova, Anna P.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular (IM) administration of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has entered the early stages of clinical development with some success, including the first approved gene therapy product in the West called Glybera. In preparation for broader clinical development of IM AAV vector gene therapy, we conducted detailed pre-clinical studies in mice and macaques evaluating aspects of delivery that could affect performance. We found that following IM administration of AAV8 vectors in mice, a portion of the vector reached the liver and hepatic gene expression contributed significantly to total expression of secreted transgenes. The contribution from liver could be controlled by altering injection volume and by the use of traditional (promoter) and non-traditional (tissue-specific microRNA target sites) expression control elements. Hepatic distribution of vector following IM injection was also noted in rhesus macaques. These pre-clinical data on AAV delivery should inform safe and efficient development of future AAV products. PMID:25393537

  1. Biodistribution of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector after intrathecal and intravenous delivery in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Daniel J.; Dykstra, Jaclyn A.; Riedl, Maureen S.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Belur, Lalitha R.; McIvor, R. Scott; Elde, Robert P.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated gene transfer has been reported in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. The current study compared the pattern of expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) across the mouse CNS and selected peripheral tissues after intrathecal (i.t.) or intravenous (i.v.) delivery of equivalent doses of single-stranded AAV9 vector. After i.t. delivery, GFP immunoreactivity (-ir) was observed in spinal neurons, primary afferent fibers and corresponding primary sensory neurons at all spinal levels. Robust transduction was seen in small and large dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as well as trigeminal and vagal primary afferent neurons. Transduction efficiency in sensory ganglia was substantially lower in i.v. treated mice. In brain, i.v. delivery yielded GFP-immunoreactivity (-ir) primarily in spinal trigeminal tract, pituitary, and scattered isolated neurons and astrocytes. In contrast, after i.t. delivery, GFP-ir was widespread throughout CNS, with greater intensity and more abundant neuropil-like staining at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks. Brain regions with prominent GFP-ir included cranial nerve nuclei, ventral pons, cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, pituitary, choroid plexus, and selected nuclei of midbrain, thalamus and hypothalamus. In cortex, GFP-ir was associated with blood vessels, and was seen in both neurons and astrocytes. In the periphery, GFP-ir in colon and ileum was present in the enteric nervous system in both i.v. and i.t. treated mice. Liver and adrenal cortex, but not adrenal medulla, also showed abundant GFP-ir after both routes of delivery. In summary, i.t. delivery yielded higher transduction efficiency in sensory neurons and the CNS. The observation of comparable gene transfer to peripheral tissues using the two routes indicates that a component of i.t. delivered vector is redistributed from the subarachnoid space to the systemic circulation. PMID:24959122

  2. Biodistribution of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector after intrathecal and intravenous delivery in mouse.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniel J; Dykstra, Jaclyn A; Riedl, Maureen S; Kitto, Kelley F; Belur, Lalitha R; McIvor, R Scott; Elde, Robert P; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated gene transfer has been reported in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. The current study compared the pattern of expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) across the mouse CNS and selected peripheral tissues after intrathecal (i.t.) or intravenous (i.v.) delivery of equivalent doses of single-stranded AAV9 vector. After i.t. delivery, GFP immunoreactivity (-ir) was observed in spinal neurons, primary afferent fibers and corresponding primary sensory neurons at all spinal levels. Robust transduction was seen in small and large dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as well as trigeminal and vagal primary afferent neurons. Transduction efficiency in sensory ganglia was substantially lower in i.v. treated mice. In brain, i.v. delivery yielded GFP-immunoreactivity (-ir) primarily in spinal trigeminal tract, pituitary, and scattered isolated neurons and astrocytes. In contrast, after i.t. delivery, GFP-ir was widespread throughout CNS, with greater intensity and more abundant neuropil-like staining at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks. Brain regions with prominent GFP-ir included cranial nerve nuclei, ventral pons, cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, pituitary, choroid plexus, and selected nuclei of midbrain, thalamus and hypothalamus. In cortex, GFP-ir was associated with blood vessels, and was seen in both neurons and astrocytes. In the periphery, GFP-ir in colon and ileum was present in the enteric nervous system in both i.v. and i.t. treated mice. Liver and adrenal cortex, but not adrenal medulla, also showed abundant GFP-ir after both routes of delivery. In summary, i.t. delivery yielded higher transduction efficiency in sensory neurons and the CNS. The observation of comparable gene transfer to peripheral tissues using the two routes indicates that a component of i.t. delivered vector is redistributed from the subarachnoid space to the systemic circulation. PMID:24959122

  3. Sustained correction of FVII deficiency in dogs using AAV-mediated expression of zymogen FVII

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Contreras, Oscar A.; Smith, Shannon M.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Raymer, Robin A.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Faella, Armida; Pavani, Giulia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Nichols, Timothy C.; High, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder treated by infusion of fresh-frozen plasma, plasma-derived FVII concentrates and low-dose recombinant activated FVII. Clinical data suggest that a mild elevation of plasma FVII levels (>10% normal) results in improved hemostasis. Research dogs with a G96E missense FVII mutation (FVII-G96E) have <1% FVII activity. By western blot, we show that they have undetectable plasmatic antigen, thus representing the most prevalent type of human FVII deficiency (low antigen/activity). In these dogs, we determine the feasibility of a gene therapy approach using liver-directed, adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 8 vector delivery of a canine FVII (cFVII) zymogen transgene. FVII-G96E dogs received escalating AAV doses (2E11 to 4.95E13 vector genomes [vg] per kg). Clinically therapeutic expression (15% normal) was attained with as low as 6E11 vg/kg of AAV and has been stable for >1 year (ongoing) without antibody formation to the cFVII transgene. Sustained and supraphysiological expression of 770% normal was observed using 4.95E13 vg/kg of AAV (2.6 years, ongoing). No evidence of pathological activation of coagulation or detrimental animal physiology was observed as platelet counts, d-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and serum chemistries remained normal in all dogs (cumulative 6.4 years). We observed a transient and noninhibitory immunoglobulin G class 2 response against cFVII only in the dog receiving the highest AAV dose. In conclusion, in the only large-animal model representing the majority of FVII mutation types, our data are first to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and long-term duration of AAV-mediated correction of FVII deficiency. PMID:26702064

  4. Slow AAV2 clearance from the brain of nonhuman primates and anti-capsid immune response.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, L; Hadaczek, P; Kells, A P; Bringas, J R; Stockinger, D; San Sebastian, W; Macayan, M; Samineni, S; Pivirotto, P; Forsayeth, J; Bankiewicz, K S

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has previously been reported to be a slowly uncoating virus in peripheral tissues, but persistence of intact vector in primate brain has not been explored. Because some neurological gene therapies may require re-administration of the same vector to patients, it seems important to understand the optimal timeframe in which to consider such repeat intervention. Surprisingly, convection-enhanced delivery of AAV2 into the thalamus of nonhuman primates (NHPs) resulted in robust staining of neurons with A20 antibody that detected intact AAV2 particles at ∼1.5 months after infusion. However, by 2.5 months, no A20 staining was visible. These data confirmed earlier findings of persistence of intact AAV2 particles in ocular and hepatic tissues. In order to probe the potential consequences of this persistence, we infused AAV2-human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase into left and right thalamus of three NHPs, with a 3-month delay between infusions. During that interval, we immunized each animal subcutaneously with AAV2 virus-like particles (empty vector) in order to induce strong anti-capsid humoral immunity. Various high neutralizing antibody titers were achieved. The lowest titer animal showed infiltration of B lymphocytes and CD8(+) T cells into both the secondary and primary infusion sites. In the other two animals, extremely high titers resulted in no transduction of the second site and, therefore, no lymphocytic infiltration. However, such infiltration was prominent at the primary infusion site in each animal and was associated with overt neuronal loss and inflammation. PMID:26510688

  5. AAV-Mediated Gene Editing via Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the ability to edit the mammalian genome was inhibited by the inherent low efficiency of homologous recombination (HR; approximately <1 in a million events) and the inability to deliver DNA efficiently to dividing and non-dividing cells/tissue. Despite these limitations, creative selections designed over 20 years ago, clearly demonstrated the powerful implications of gene knock-in and knockout technology for the genetic engineering of mice (Doetschman et al. Nat 330(6148): 576–578, 1987; Thomas and Capecchi. Cell 51(3): 503–512, 1987). The development and application of recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus (rAAV) have helped to overcome both of the initial limitations regarding DNA delivery and the frequency of HR. Considering DNA delivery, rAAV infects non-dividing and dividing cultured cells as well as most tissues in mouse and larger animal models (including humans). At the DNA editing level, rAAV genomes have been reported to increase the frequency of HR several orders of magnitude by serving as the repair substrate (Russell and Hirata. Nat Genet 18(4): 325–330, 1998). However, reports on the ability of rAAV genomes to stimulate HR, compared to plasmid DNA and oligonucleotides, are variable, and many labs have found it necessary to augment the frequency of rAAV-induced HR using site-specific endonucleases (Ellis et al. Gene Ther, 2012; Hirsch et al. Gene Ther 17(9): 1175–1180, 2010; Porteus et al. Mol Cell Biol 23(10): 3558–3565, 2003; Radecke et al. Mol Ther 14(6): 798–808, 2006). In this protocol, we describe a method to perform rAAV-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair for precise genetic engineering in human cells. PMID:24557911

  6. Anti-Human α-Synuclein N-Terminal Peptide Antibody Protects against Dopaminergic Cell Death and Ameliorates Behavioral Deficits in an AAV-α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahaduzzaman, Md; Nash, Kevin; Hudson, Charles; Sharif, Masroor; Grimmig, Bethany; Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Liu, Hui; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Cao, Chuanhai; Bickford, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn) has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN), while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1), or central region (AB2) of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II) immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2) significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA) and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30) = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29) = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively), as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003). Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37) = 9.786; p = 0.0001) and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD. PMID:25658425

  7. Whole body skeletal muscle transduction in neonatal dogs with AAV-9.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy of muscular dystrophy requires systemic gene delivery to all muscles in the body. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been shown to lead to body-wide muscle transduction after a single intravascular injection. Proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Before initiating clinical trials, it is important to validate these promising results in large animal models. More than a dozen canine muscular dystrophy models have been developed. Here, we outline a protocol for performing systemic AAV gene transfer in neonatal dogs. Implementing this technique in dystrophic dogs will accelerate translational muscular dystrophy research. PMID:21194038

  8. The repABC Plasmids with Quorum-Regulated Transfer Systems in Members of the Rhizobiales Divide into Two Structurally and Separately Evolving Groups

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from those coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. We conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function. PMID:26590210

  9. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from those coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.

  10. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from thosemore » coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.« less

  11. Adeno-associated-virus-mediated transduction of the mammary gland enables sustained production of recombinant proteins in milk

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefan; Thresher, Rosemary; Bland, Ross; Laible, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Biopharming for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary gland of transgenic animals is an attractive but laborious alternative compared to mammalian cell fermentation. The disadvantage of the lengthy process of genetically modifying an entire animal could be circumvented with somatic transduction of only the mammary epithelium with recombinant, replication-defective viruses. While other viral vectors offer very limited scope for this approach, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) appear to be ideal candidates because AAV is helper-dependent, does not induce a strong immune response and has no association with disease. Here, we sought to test the suitability of recombinant AAV (rAAV) for biopharming. Using reporter genes, we showed that injected rAAV efficiently transduced mouse mammary cells. When rAAV encoding human myelin basic protein (hMBP) was injected into the mammary glands of mice and rabbits, this resulted in the expression of readily detectable protein levels of up to 0.5 g/L in the milk. Furthermore we demonstrated that production of hMBP persisted over extended periods and that protein expression could be renewed in a subsequent lactation by re-injection of rAAV into a previously injected mouse gland. PMID:26463440

  12. Adeno-associated-virus-mediated transduction of the mammary gland enables sustained production of recombinant proteins in milk.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Thresher, Rosemary; Bland, Ross; Laible, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Biopharming for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary gland of transgenic animals is an attractive but laborious alternative compared to mammalian cell fermentation. The disadvantage of the lengthy process of genetically modifying an entire animal could be circumvented with somatic transduction of only the mammary epithelium with recombinant, replication-defective viruses. While other viral vectors offer very limited scope for this approach, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) appear to be ideal candidates because AAV is helper-dependent, does not induce a strong immune response and has no association with disease. Here, we sought to test the suitability of recombinant AAV (rAAV) for biopharming. Using reporter genes, we showed that injected rAAV efficiently transduced mouse mammary cells. When rAAV encoding human myelin basic protein (hMBP) was injected into the mammary glands of mice and rabbits, this resulted in the expression of readily detectable protein levels of up to 0.5 g/L in the milk. Furthermore we demonstrated that production of hMBP persisted over extended periods and that protein expression could be renewed in a subsequent lactation by re-injection of rAAV into a previously injected mouse gland. PMID:26463440

  13. UvrD helicase, unlike Rep helicase, dismantles RecA nucleoprotein filaments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veaute, Xavier; Delmas, Stéphane; Selva, Marjorie; Jeusset, Josette; Le Cam, Eric; Matic, Ivan; Fabre, Francis; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2005-01-12

    The roles of UvrD and Rep DNA helicases of Escherichia coli are not yet fully understood. In particular, the reason for rep uvrD double mutant lethality remains obscure. We reported earlier that mutations in recF, recO or recR genes suppress the lethality of uvrD rep, and proposed that an essential activity common to UvrD and Rep is either to participate in the removal of toxic recombination intermediates or to favour the proper progression of replication. Here, we show that UvrD, but not Rep, directly prevents homologous recombination in vivo. In addition to RecFOR, we provide evidence that RecA contributes to toxicity in the rep uvrD mutant. In vitro, UvrD dismantles the RecA nucleoprotein filament, while Rep has only a marginal activity. We conclude that UvrD and Rep do not share a common activity that is essential in vivo: while Rep appears to act at the replication stage, UvrD plays a role of RecA nucleoprotein filament remover. This activity of UvrD is similar to that of the yeast Srs2 helicase. PMID:15565170

  14. Rep. Bill Nelson during space food and consumables orientation and suit fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Rita Rapp, a flight coordinator, briefs U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson (D.-Florida) on space food during an orientation session in the life sciences laboratory at JSC (27753); Rep. Nelson tries on a glove during a suit fitting session (27754); Rep. Nelson samples a package of re-hydratable fruit in the life sciences laboratory during early STS 61-C training (27755); Rep. Nelson listens to Laura Louviere brief him on hygiene articles soon after reporting to Houston for STS 61-C training. On the table in front of him is a tube marked Palmalive, a tube marked Gillette and various other articles (27756).

  15. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J; Soustek, Meghan S; Todd, Adrian Gary; Mah, Cathryn S; Cloutier, Denise A; Kelley, Jeffry S; Clement, Nathalie; Fuller, David D; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA)). Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa–/– mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES) or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)). Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa–/– animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc) at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea). However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease. PMID:26029718

  16. Systemically administered AAV9-sTRAIL combats invasive glioblastoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Kantar, Rami; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Badr, Christian E; Würdinger, Thomas; Maguire, Casey A; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing tumoricidal genes injected directly into brain tumors have shown some promise, however, invasive tumor cells are relatively unaffected. Systemic injection of AAV9 vectors provides widespread delivery to the brain and potentially the tumor/microenvironment. Here we assessed AAV9 for potential glioblastoma therapy using two different promoters driving the expression of the secreted anti-cancer agent sTRAIL as a transgene model; the ubiquitously active chicken β-actin (CBA) promoter and the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter to restrict expression in brain. Intravenous injection of AAV9 vectors encoding a bioluminescent reporter showed similar distribution patterns, although the NSE promoter yielded 100-fold lower expression in the abdomen (liver), with the brain-to-liver expression ratio remaining the same. The main cell types targeted by the CBA promoter were astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, while expression by NSE promoter mostly occurred in neurons. Intravenous administration of either AAV9-CBA-sTRAIL or AAV9-NSE-sTRAIL vectors to mice bearing intracranial patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts led to a slower tumor growth and significantly increased survival, with the CBA promoter having higher efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the potential of systemic injection of AAV9 vector encoding a therapeutic gene for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:27382645

  17. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles. PMID:26506038

  18. BALB/c Mice Show Impaired Hepatic Tolerogenic Response Following AAV Gene Transfer to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Breous, Ekaterina; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Following adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer to the liver, both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice show long-term expression of nonself transgene antigens along with the absence of a transgene-specific immune response. However, in this study, we report that despite the equal ability to induce T-cell tolerance to vector-encoded antigens, the underlying mechanisms are entirely different in these two strains. We have previously shown that in C57BL/6 mice, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to systemic AAV-delivered antigens are suppressed by combined actions of hepatic regulatory T cells (Tregs), Kupffer cells, and hepatic suppressive cytokines. In stark contrast, our present findings reveal that such tolerogenic response is not induced in the liver of BALB/c mice systemically administered with AAV. As a result, these mice fail to suppress a transgene-specific CTL response induced by a strong immunogenic challenge and express dramatically reduced levels of AAV-encoded antigen. Interestingly, there was active B-cell tolerance to the transgene antigen, which was mediated by splenic Tregs. We conclude that lack of tolerance induction in the liver renders BALB/c mice susceptible to CTL-mediated clearance of transduced hepatocytes. PMID:20068550

  19. AAV2 Delivery of Flt23k Intraceptors Inhibits Murine Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Das, Subrata K; Passi, Samuel F; Uehara, Hironori; Bohner, Austin; Chen, Marcus; Tiem, Michelle; Archer, Bonnie; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2015-01-01

    Long-term inhibition of extracellular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may induce retinal neuronal toxicity and risk other side effects. We developed a novel strategy which inhibits retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived VEGF, sparing other highly sensitive retinal tissues. Flt23k, an intraceptor inhibitor of VEGF, was able to inhibit VEGF in vitro. Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2)–mediated expression of Flt23k was maintained for up to 6 months postsubretinal injection in mice. Flt23k was able to effectively inhibit laser-induced murine choroidal neovascularization (CNV). VEGF levels in the RPE/choroid complex decreased significantly in AAV2.Flt23k treated eyes. Neither retinal structure detected by Heidelberg Spectralis nor function measured by electroretinography (ERG) was adversely affected by treatment with AAV2.Flt23k. Hence AAV2.Flt23k can effectively maintain long-term expression and inhibit laser-induced CNV in mice through downregulation of VEGF while maintaining a sound retinal safety profile. These findings suggest a promising novel approach for the treatment of CNV. PMID:25306972

  20. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nolan J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2015-11-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed the development of cell and gene therapies for the treatment of diverse human diseases. Each of these approaches has inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, the two methods align in that, essentially, they are both methods of foreign DNA delivery to complement, eradicate, or supplement nucleotide sequences important for human health. As discussed herein, the combination of these therapies (gene therapy in stem cells), particularly in an ex vivo context, offers powerful genetic engineering which is applicable to the treatment of both genetic and acquired maladies ranging from blood diseases to the treatment of HIV infection. Of the existing gene therapy approaches, including non-viral and viral vectors, those based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently at the forefront as they have been safely used in hundreds of clinical trials and have demonstrated remarkable success in treating blindness and hemophilia B. However, AAV vectors used in combination with cell-based therapies have not transitioned to the clinic. Instead, adenoviral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors are the preferred choice for the modification of stem cells prior to patient infusion. This review provides a general background of AAV gene therapy and cell therapies, and highlights reports demonstrating apparently conflicting data of productive transduction and vector-induced toxicity using recombinant AAV in stem and stem-like cells. PMID:26645905

  1. Quantitative comparison of expression with adeno-associated virus (AAV-2) brain-specific gene cassettes.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Janson, C G; Mastakov, M; Lawlor, P; Young, D; Mouravlev, A; Fitzsimons, H; Choi, K L; Ma, H; Dragunow, M; Leone, P; Chen, Q; Dicker, B; During, M J

    2001-09-01

    This study compared a range of mammalian CNS expression cassettes in recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV-2) vectors using strong endogenous promoter sequences, with or without a strong post-regulatory element and polyadenylation signal. Changes in these elements led to transgene expression varying by over three orders of magnitude. In experiments conducted in primary cell culture and in >100 stereotactically injected rats, we observed highly efficient and stable (>15 months) gene expression in neurons and limited expression in glia; the highest expression occurred with endogenous, nonviral promoters such as neuron-specific enolase and beta-actin. The packaging size of AAV-2 was maximized at 5.7 kb without impairing gene expression, as judged by direct comparison with a number of smaller AAV-2 constructs. The genomic insert size and titer were confirmed by Southern blot and quantitative PCR, and infectivity was tested by particle titer using ELISA with a conformation-dependent epitope that requires the full intact capsid. A packaging and purification protocol we describe allows for high-titer, high-capacity AAV-2 vectors that can transduce over 2 x 10(5) neurons in vivo per microliter of vector, using the strongest expression cassette. PMID:11571569

  2. Development of genetically engineered human intestinal cells for regulated insulin secretion using rAAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiue-Cheng; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2003-04-01

    Cell-based therapies for treating insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) can provide a more physiologic regulation of blood glucose levels in a less invasive fashion than daily insulin injections. Promising cells include intestinal enteroendocrine cells genetically engineered to secrete insulin in response to physiologic stimuli; responsiveness occurs at the exocytosis level to regulate the acute release of recombinant insulin. In this work, we established a human cellular model to demonstrate that meat hydrolysate can simultaneously stimulate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an enteroendocrine cell-derived incretin hormone) and recombinant insulin secretion from the engineered human NCI-H716 intestinal cell line. Cells were genetically modified using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated insulin gene transfer. Recombinant cells were then differentiated to display endocrine features, in particular the formation of granule-like compartments. A fusion protein of insulin and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was designed to reveal the compartments of localization of the fusion protein and assess its co-localization with endogenous GLP-1. Our work provides a unique human cellular model for regulated insulin release through genetic engineering of GLP-1-secreting intestinal cells, which is expected to be useful for cell-based therapies of IDD. PMID:12659868

  3. Recombinant AAV9-TLK1B Administration Ameliorates Fractionated Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan Timiri; Dayton, Robert D.; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Abreo, Fleurette; Caldito, Gloria; Klein, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Salivary glands are highly susceptible to radiation, and patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy invariably suffer from its distressing side effect, salivary hypofunction. The reduction in saliva disrupts oral functions, and significantly impairs oral health. Previously, we demonstrated that adenoviral-mediated expression of Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B) in rat submandibular glands preserves salivary function after single-dose ionizing radiation. To achieve long-term transgene expression for protection of salivary gland function against fractionated radiation, this study examines the usefulness of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector for TLK1B delivery. Lactated Ringers or AAV2/9 with either TLK1B or GFP expression cassette were retroductally delivered to rat submandibular salivary glands (1011 vg/gland), and animals were exposed, or not, to 20 Gy in eight fractions of 2.5 Gy/day. AAV2/9 transduced predominantly the ductal cells, including the convoluted granular tubules of the submandibular glands. Transgene expression after virus delivery could be detected within 5 weeks, and stable gene expression was observed till the end of study. Pilocarpine-stimulated saliva output measured at 8 weeks after completion of radiation demonstrated >10-fold reduction in salivary flow in saline- and AAV2/9-GFP-treated animals compared with the respective nonirradiated groups (90.8% and 92.5% reduction in salivary flow, respectively). Importantly, there was no decrease in stimulated salivary output after irradiation in animals that were pretreated with AAV2/9-TLK1B (121.5% increase in salivary flow; p<0.01). Salivary gland histology was better preserved after irradiation in TLK1B-treated group, though not significantly, compared with control groups. Single preemptive delivery of AAV2/9-TLK1B averts salivary dysfunction resulting from fractionated radiation. Although AAV2/9 transduces mostly the ductal cells of the gland, their protection

  4. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  5. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Amaro, I Alexandra; Henderson, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  6. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIJUN; HAO, YUEWEN; NIE, XIAOWEI; ZHANG, XUEXIN; YANG, GUANGXIAO; WANG, QUANYING

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  7. A Model-Averaging Approach to Replication : The Case of "p[subscript rep]"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Geoffrey J.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Lee, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the recently proposed "p[subscript rep]" statistic is to estimate the probability of concurrence, that is, the probability that a replicate experiment yields an effect of the same sign (Killeen, 2005a). The influential journal "Psychological Science" endorses "p[subscript rep]" and recommends its use over that of traditional…

  8. Autophagy is involved in oral rAAV/Aβ vaccine-induced Aβ clearance in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, He-Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Kuerban, Bolati; Jin, Ying-Lan; Le, Weidong; Hara, Hideo; Fan, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Tabira, Takeshi; Chui, De-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The imbalance between ß-amyloid (Aß) generation and clearance plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The sporadic form of AD is characterized by an overall impairment in Aß clearance. Immunotherapy targeting Aß clearance is believed to be a promising approach and is under active clinical investigation. Autophagy is a conserved pathway for degrading abnormal protein aggregates and is crucial for Aß clearance. We previously reported that oral vaccination with a recombinant AAV/Aß vaccine increased the clearance of Aß from the brain and improved cognitive ability in AD animal models, while the underlying mechanisms were not well understood. In this study, we first demonstrated that oral vaccination with rAAV/Aß decreased the p62 level and up-regulated the LC3B-II/LC3B-I ratio in APP/PS1 mouse brain, suggesting enhanced autophagy. Further, inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway may account for autophagy enhancement. We also found increased anti-Aß antibodies in the sera of APP/PS1 mice with oral vaccination, accompanied by elevation of complement factors C1q and C3 levels in the brain. Our results indicate that autophagy is closely involved in oral vaccination-induced Aß clearance, and modulating the autophagy pathway may be an important strategy for AD prevention and intervention. PMID:26254061

  9. Heat-shock Treatment-mediated Increase in Transduction by Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus 2 Vectors Is Independent of the Cellular Heat-shock Protein 90*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li; Qing, Keyun; Si, Yue; Chen, Linyuan; Tan, Mengqun; Srivastava, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors transduction efficiency varies greatly in different cell types. We have described that a cellular protein, FKBP52, in its phosphorylated form interacts with the D-sequence in the viral inverted terminal repeat, inhibits viral second strand DNA synthesis, and limits transgene expression. Here we investigated the role of cellular heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in AAV transduction because FKBP52 forms a complex with HSP90, and because heat-shock treatment augments AAV transduction efficiency. Heat-shock treatment of HeLa cells resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FKBP52, led to stabilization of the FKBP52-HSP90 complex, and resulted in ∼6-fold increase in AAV transduction. However, when HeLa cells were pre-treated with tyrphostin 23, a specific inhibitor of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates FKBP52 at tyrosine residues, heat-shock treatment resulted in a further 18-fold increase in AAV transduction. HSP90 was shown to be a part of the FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex, but HSP90 by itself did not bind to the D-sequence. Geldanamycin treatment, which disrupts the HSP90-FKBP52 complex, resulted in >22-fold increase in AAV transduction in heat-shock-treated cells compared with heat shock alone. Deliberate overexpression of the human HSP90 gene resulted in a significant decrease in AAV-mediated transduction in tyrphostin 23-treated cells, whereas down-modulation of HSP90 levels led to a decrease in HSP90-FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex formation, resulting in a significant increase in AAV transduction following pre-treatment with tyrphostin 23. These studies suggest that the observed increase in AAV transduction efficiency following heat-shock treatment is unlikely to be mediated by HSP90 alone and that increased levels of HSP90, in the absence of heat shock, facilitate binding of FKBP52 to the AAV D-sequence, thereby leading to inhibition of AAV-mediated transgene expression

  10. Enhancement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression after AAV2-mediated VEGF gene transfer to rat ischemic flaps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Tian; Avanessian, Bella; Ma, Qiangzhong; Durfee, Heather; Tang, Yu Qing; Liu, Paul Y

    2011-01-01

    Necrosis of surgically transferred flaps due to ischemia is a serious wound problem. We evaluated the improvement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression profiles after transfer of the VEGF gene by means of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vector to rat ischemic flaps. Thirty rats were divided into one experimental group, one AAV2-GFP group, and one saline group. AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP were injected intradermally into the rat dorsum in the AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP group. The saline group received saline injection. A 3 × 10 cm flap was raised in each rat two weeks post-injection. One week after surgery, flap viability was evaluated. Angiogenesis real-time PCR array was performed to analyze the expression of angiogenesis-associated genes. The AAV2-VEGF treatment significantly improved flap survival (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased VEGF expression in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. The PCR array identified remarkable changes in 6 out of the 84 angiogenesis-associated genes in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. Particularly, EGF, PDGF-A and VEGF-B genes were up-regulated in these flaps. In contrast, FGF2 gene expression was down-regulated. In conclusion, AAV2-VEGF improves flap survival and affects the expression of a series of endogenous growth factor genes, which likely play critical roles in the enhancement of ischemic flap survival. PMID:21649787

  11. Novel AAV-Based Rat Model of Forebrain Synucleinopathy Shows Extensive Pathologies and Progressive Loss of Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Davidsson, Marcus; Holmqvist, Staffan; Li, Jia-Yi; Björklund, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Synucleinopathies, characterized by intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein protein, share a number of features in pathology and disease progression. However, the vulnerable cell population differs significantly between the disorders, despite being caused by the same protein. While the vulnerability of dopamine cells in the substantia nigra to α-synuclein over-expression, and its link to Parkinson's disease, is well studied, animal models recapitulating the cortical degeneration in dementia with Lewy-bodies (DLB) are much less mature. The aim of this study was to develop a first rat model of widespread progressive synucleinopathy throughout the forebrain using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated gene delivery. Through bilateral injection of an AAV6 vector expressing human wild-type α-synuclein into the forebrain of neonatal rats, we were able to achieve widespread, robust α-synuclein expression with preferential expression in the frontal cortex. These animals displayed a progressive emergence of hyper-locomotion and dysregulated response to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. The animals receiving the α-synuclein vector displayed significant α-synuclein pathology including intra-cellular inclusion bodies, axonal pathology and elevated levels of phosphorylated α-synuclein, accompanied by significant loss of cortical neurons and a progressive reduction in both cortical and striatal ChAT positive interneurons. Furthermore, we found evidence of α-synuclein sequestered by IBA-1 positive microglia, which was coupled with a distinct change in morphology. In areas of most prominent pathology, the total α-synuclein levels were increased to, on average, two-fold, which is similar to the levels observed in patients with SNCA gene triplication, associated with cortical Lewy body pathology. This study provides a novel rat model of progressive cortical synucleinopathy, showing for the first time that cholinergic interneurons are vulnerable to

  12. 75 FR 10524 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for... document entitled: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action...-4737, or by e-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3,...

  13. Automated Production of High Rep Rate Foam Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F.; Spindloe, C.; Haddock, D.; Tolley, M.; Nazarov, W.

    2016-04-01

    Manufacturing low density targets in the numbers needed for high rep rate experiments is highly challenging. This report summarises advances from manual production to semiautomated and the improvements that follow both in terms of production time and target uniformity. The production process is described and shown to be improved by the integration of an xyz robot with dispensing capabilities. Results are obtained from manual and semiautomated production runs and compared. The variance in the foam thickness is reduced significantly which should decrease experimental variation due to target parameters and could allow for whole batches to be characterised by the measurement of a few samples. The work applies to both foil backed and free standing foam targets.

  14. Rep-rate explosive whisker emission cathode investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litz, Marc S.; Golden, Jeffry

    1994-05-01

    An experiment is underway to study the performance of several materials as field-emission cathodes for low voltage (rep-rate. This provides a high average power (50 kW) test bed for the study. A comparison is made of cathodes fabricated from velvet, carbon, diamond coatings, niobium wire nanocomposite, and poly-crystalline tungsten. Surface emission is monitored by an array of Faraday cups. The `turn-on' time, uniformity of emission, and gap closure time are measured as a function of the spatially averaged, macroscopic electric field at the cathode. The carbon fiber cathode produces the largest current density and has the lowest threshold voltage for emission.

  15. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zuleta, Amparo; Vidal, Rene L.; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  16. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection I: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Wu, Wen-Jian; Ou, Qinghui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Chen, Ning; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; O’Brien, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate goal of prophylactic gene therapy is to confer permanent protection against ischemia. Although gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to protect against myocardial infarction at 3 days and up to 2 months, the long-term effects on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the iNOS gene (rAAV/iNOS), which enables long-lasting transgene expression. The ability of rAAV/iNOS to direct the expression of functional iNOS protein was confirmed in COS-7 cells before in vivo gene transfer. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ or rAAV/iNOS; 1 year later, they underwent a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). iNOS gene transfer resulted in elevated iNOS protein expression (+3-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) and iNOS activity (+4.4-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) 1 year later. Infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after iNOS gene transfer (13.5 ± 2.2%, n = 12, vs. 41.7 ± 2.9%, n = 10, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effect of iNOS gene therapy at 1 year was as powerful as that observed 24 h after ischemic preconditioning (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (19.3 ± 2.3%, n = 11; P < 0.05). Importantly, compared with the LacZ group (n = 11), iNOS gene transfer (n = 10) had no effect on LV dimensions or function for up to 1 year (at 1 year: FS 34.5 ± 2.0 vs. 34.6 ± 2.6%, EF 57.0 ± 2.0 vs. 59.7 ± 2.9%, LVEDD 4.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.2 mm, LVESD 2.8 ± 0.1 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2 mm) (echocardiography). These data demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated iNOS gene transfer affords long-term, probably permanent (1 year), cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing a strong rationale for further preclinical testing of prophylactic gene therapy. PMID:21779912

  17. P1 plasmid replication: measurement of initiator protein concentration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Swack, J A; Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Abeles, A L; Chattoraj, D K

    1987-01-01

    To study the functions of the mini-P1 replication initiation protein RepA quantitatively, we have developed a method to measure RepA concentration by using immunoblotting. In vivo, there are about 20 RepA dimers per unit-copy plasmid DNA. RepA was deduced to be a dimer from gel filtration of the purified protein. Since there are 14 binding sites of the protein per replicon, the physiological concentration of the protein appears to be sufficiently low to be a rate-limiting factor for replication. Autoregulation is apparently responsible for the low protein level; at the physiological concentration of the protein, the repA promoter retains only 0.1% of its full activity as determined by gene fusions to lacZ. When the concentration is further decreased by a factor of 3 or increased by a factor of 40, replication is no longer detectable. Images PMID:3611028

  18. Intracisternal delivery of AAV9 results in oligodendrocyte and motor neuron transduction in the whole central nervous system of cats

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, T; Dubreil, L; Colle, M-A; Maquigneau, M; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Moullier, P; Joussemet, B

    2014-01-01

    Systemic and intracerebrospinal fluid delivery of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to achieve widespread gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). However, after systemic injection, the neurotropism of the vector has been reported to vary according to age at injection, with greater neuronal transduction in newborns and preferential glial cell tropism in adults. This difference has not yet been reported after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery. The present study analyzed both neuronal and glial cell transduction in the CNS of cats according to age of AAV9 CSF injection. In both newborns and young cats, administration of AAV9-GFP in the cisterna magna resulted in high levels of motor neurons (MNs) transduction from the cervical (84±5%) to the lumbar (99±1%) spinal cord, demonstrating that the remarkable tropism of AAV9 for MNs is not affected by age at CSF delivery. Surprisingly, numerous oligodendrocytes were also transduced in the brain and in the spinal cord white matter of young cats, but not of neonates, indicating that (i) age of CSF delivery influences the tropism of AAV9 for glial cells and (ii) AAV9 intracisternal delivery could be relevant for both the treatment of MN and demyelinating disorders. PMID:24572783

  19. Inhalable delivery of AAV-based MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA prevents monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Claude, Caroline; Mougenot, Nathalie; Bechaux, Julia; Hadri, Lahouaria; Brockschnieder, Damian; Clergue, Michel; Atassi, Fabrice; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter MRP4 (encoded by ABCC4) regulates membrane cyclic nucleotides concentrations in arterial cells including smooth muscle cells. MRP4/ABCC4 deficient mice display a reduction in smooth muscle cells proliferation and a prevention of pulmonary hypertension in response to hypoxia. We aimed to study gene transfer of a MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA via intratracheal delivery of aerosolized adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1.shMRP4 or AAV1.control) in a monocrotaline-induced model of pulmonary hypertension in rats. Gene transfer was performed at the time of monocrotaline administration and the effect on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling was assessed 35 days later. AAV1.shMRP4 dose-dependently reduced right ventricular systolic pressure and hypertrophy with a significant reduction with the higher doses (i.e., >1011 DRP/animal) as compared to AAV1.control. The higher dose of AAV1.shMRP4 was also associated with a significant reduction in distal pulmonary arteries remodeling. AAV1.shMRP4 was finally associated with a reduction in the expression of ANF, a marker of cardiac hypertrophy. Collectively, these results support a therapeutic potential for downregulation of MRP4 for the treatment of pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:26052533

  20. Ac45 silencing mediated by AAV-sh-Ac45-RNAi prevents both bone loss and inflammation caused by periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Wei; Hao, Liang; Zhu, Guochun; Lu, Yun; Li, Sheng; Wang, Lin; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim Periodontitis induced by oral pathogens leads to severe periodontal tissue damage and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption caused by inflammation. Based on the importance of Ac45 in osteoclast formation and function, we performed this study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of periodontitis by local adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Ac45 gene knockdown. Material and Methods We used AAV-mediated short hairpin RNAi knockdown of Ac45 gene expression (AAV-sh-Ac45) to inhibit bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously in a well-established periodontitis mouse model induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. Histological studies were performed to evaluate the bone protection of AAV-sh-Ac45. Immunochemistry, ELISA and qRT-PCR were performed to reveal the role of Ac45 knockdown on inflammation, immune response and expression of cytokine. Results We found that Ac45 knockdown impaired osteoclast-mediated extracellular acidification and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, local administration of AAV-sh-Ac45 protected mice from bone erosion by >85% and attenuated inflammation and decreased infiltration of T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages in the periodontal lesion. Notably, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also reduced. Conclusions Local AAV-sh-Ac45 gene therapy efficiently protects against periodontal tissue damage and bone erosion through both inhibition of osteoclast function and attenuating inflammation, and may represent a powerful new treatment strategy for periodontitis. PMID:25952706

  1. Structuring the bacterial genome: Y1-transposases associated with REP-BIME sequences†

    PubMed Central

    Ton-Hoang, Bao; Siguier, Patricia; Quentin, Yves; Onillon, Séverine; Marty, Brigitte; Fichant, Gwennaele; Chandler, Mick

    2012-01-01

    REPs are highly repeated intergenic palindromic sequences often clustered into structures called BIMEs including two individual REPs separated by short linker of variable length. They play a variety of key roles in the cell. REPs also resemble the sub-terminal hairpins of the atypical IS200/605 family of insertion sequences which encode Y1 transposases (TnpAIS200/IS605). These belong to the HUH endonuclease family, carry a single catalytic tyrosine (Y) and promote single strand transposition. Recently, a new clade of Y1 transposases (TnpAREP) was found associated with REP/BIME in structures called REPtrons. It has been suggested that TnpAREP is responsible for REP/BIME proliferation over genomes. We analysed and compared REP distribution and REPtron structure in numerous available E. coli and Shigella strains. Phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated that tnpAREP was acquired early in the species radiation and was lost later in some strains. To understand REP/BIME behaviour within the host genome, we also studied E. coli K12 TnpAREP activity in vitro and demonstrated that it catalyses cleavage and recombination of BIMEs. While TnpAREP shared the same general organization and similar catalytic characteristics with TnpAIS200/IS605 transposases, it exhibited distinct properties potentially important in the creation of BIME variability and in their amplification. TnpAREP may therefore be one of the first examples of transposase domestication in prokaryotes. PMID:22199259

  2. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Gortan Cappellari, Gianluca; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  3. AAV9 Delivery of shRNA to the Mouse Heart.

    PubMed

    Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, J G; Foo, Roger S Y; Jiang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a rapid approach to dissect loss-of-function phenotype for a gene of interest. However, it is challenging to perform RNAi in specific organs and tissues in vivo. Engineered viruses can provide a useful tool for delivery of small RNAs in vivo. Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are the preferred method for delivering genes or gene modulators to target cells due to their high titer, low immune response, ability to transduce many types of cell, and overall safety. In this unit, we describe protocols for use of rAAVs as a cargo to deliver miRNA backbone-based shRNA controlled by a cardiac-specific promoter into the mouse heart. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366889

  4. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  5. Head Injury, Alpha-Synuclein Rep1 and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Samuel M; Kamel, Freya; Ross, G Webster; Jewell, Sarah A; Bhudhikanok, Grace S; Umbach, David; Marras, Connie; Hauser, Robert A; Jankovic, Joseph; Factor, Stewart A; Bressman, Susan; Lyons, Kelly E; Meng, Cheryl; Korell, Monica; Roucoux, Diana F; Hoppin, Jane A; Sandler, Dale P; Langston, J William; Tanner, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that variability in SNCA Rep1, a polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite in the promoter region of the gene encoding α-synuclein, modifies the association between head injury and Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk. Methods Participants in Farming and Movement Evaluation (FAME) and Study of Environmental Association and Risk of Parkinsonism using Case-Control Historical Interviews (SEARCH), two independent case-control studies, were genotyped for Rep1 and interviewed regarding head injuries with loss of consciousness or concussion prior to PD diagnosis. Logistic regression modeling adjusted for potential confounding variables and tested interaction between Rep1 genotype and head injury. Results Consistent with prior reports, relative to medium-length Rep1, short Rep1 genotype was associated with reduced PD risk (pooled odds ratio (OR) 0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-0.9), and long Rep1 with increased risk (pooled OR 1.4, 95%CI 0.95-2.2). Overall, head injury was not significantly associated with PD (pooled OR 1.3, 95%CI 0.9-1.8). However, head injury was strongly associated with PD in those with long Rep1 (FAME OR 5.4, 95%CI 1.5-19; SEARCH OR 2.3, 95%CI 0.6-9.2; pooled OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.4-9.2, p-interaction 0.02). Individuals with both head injury and long Rep1 were diagnosed 4.9 years earlier than those with neither risk factor (p = 0.03). Interpretation While head injury alone was not associated with PD risk, our data suggest head injury may initiate and/or accelerate neurodegeneration when levels of synuclein are high, as in those with Rep1 expansion. Given the high population frequency of head injury, independent verification of these results is essential. PMID:22275250

  6. Improved Induction of Immune Tolerance to Factor IX by Hepatic AAV-8 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mario; Nayak, Sushrusha; Hoffman, Brad E.; Terhorst, Cox; Cao, Ou

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy for hemophilia B has been shown to result in long-term expression and immune tolerance to factor IX (F.IX) after in vivo transduction of hepatocytes with adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) vectors in experimental animals. An optimized protocol was effective in several strains of mice with a factor 9 gene deletion (F9−/−). However, immune responses against F.IX were repeatedly observed in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice. We sought to establish a gene transfer protocol that results in sustained expression without a requirement for additional manipulation of the immune system. Compared with AAV-2, AAV-8 was more efficient in transgene expression and induction of tolerance to F.IX in three different strains of wild-type mice. At equal vector doses, AAV-8 induced transgene product-specific regulatory CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells at significantly higher frequency. Moreover, sustained correction of hemophilia B in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice without antibody formation was documented in all animals treated with ≥4 × 1011 vector genomes (VG)/kg and in 80% of mice treated with 8 × 1010 VG/kg. Therefore, it is possible to develop a gene transfer protocol that reliably induces tolerance to F.IX largely independent of genetic factors. A comparison with other studies suggests that additional parameters besides plateau levels of F.IX expression contributed to the improved success rate of tolerance induction. PMID:19309290

  7. Developing immunologically inert adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for gene therapy: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Selot, Ruchita S; Hareendran, Sangeetha; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a clinical reality as demonstrated by remarkable benefits seen in Phase I/II clinical trials for hemophilia B, lipoprotein lipase deficiency and Leber's congenital amarousis. The choice of, and the improved understanding in vector characteristics have contributed significantly to this success. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors used in these trials have been long known to be relatively safe and efficacious. However, certain factors, most notably host immunity to the vector, prevent their widespread use. In patients who have pre-existing antibodies to AAV, these vectors will be rapidly cleared. Administration of a relatively high initial dose of vector to achieve and sustain a higher margin of therapeutic benefit is limited by concerns of vector dose-dependent T cell response. Frequent vector administration necessitated by the non-integrating nature of the virus is difficult due to the variable, yet significant host immunological memory. Thus generation of AAV vectors that are immunologically inert is pivotal for the long-term success with this promising vector system. Several strategies, that aim targeted disruption of antigenic sites or those that chemically modify the vectors have been proposed for host immune evasion. While these approaches have been successful in the pre-clinical model systems, this continues to be a field of intense experimentation and constant improvisation due to limited information available on vector immunology or data from human studies. This review forms a comprehensive report on current strategies available to generate immunologically inert AAV vectors and their potential in mediating longterm gene transfer. PMID:24678652

  8. Clinical Improvement of Alpha-mannosidosis Cat Following a Single Cisterna Magna Infusion of AAV1.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sea Young; Bagel, Jessica H; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Vite, Charles H; Wolfe, John H

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are debilitating neurometabolic disorders for most of which long-term effective therapies have not been developed. Gene therapy is a potential treatment but a critical barrier to treating the brain is the need for global correction. We tested the efficacy of cisterna magna infusion of adeno-associated virus type 1 (AAV1) expressing feline alpha-mannosidase gene in the postsymptomatic alpha-mannosidosis (AMD) cat, a homologue of the human disease. Lysosomal alpha-mannosidase (MANB) activity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were increased above the control values in untreated AMD cats. Clinical neurological signs were delayed in onset and reduced in severity. The lifespan of the treated cats was significantly extended. Postmortem histopathology showed resolution of lysosomal storage lesions throughout the brain. MANB activity in brain tissue was significantly above the levels of untreated tissues. The results demonstrate that a single cisterna magna injection of AAV1 into the CSF can mediate widespread neuronal transduction of the brain and meaningful clinical improvement. Thus, cisterna magna gene delivery by AAV1 appears to be a viable strategy for treatment of the whole brain in AMD and should be applicable to many of the neurotropic LSDs as well as other neurogenetic disorders. PMID:26354342

  9. Biomarkers for disease progression and AAV therapeutic efficacy in feline Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Shirley, Jamie L; McCurdy, Victoria J; Colaco, Alexandria N; Randle, Ashley N; Christopherson, Pete W; Bird, Allison C; Johnson, Aime K; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; De Pompa, Nicholas L; Sorjonen, Donald C; Brunson, Brandon L; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Platt, Frances M; Baker, Henry J; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) and Sandhoff disease (SD), are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex). Due to the recent emergence of novel experimental treatments, biomarker development has become particularly relevant in GM2 gangliosidosis as an objective means to measure therapeutic efficacy. Here we describe blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electrodiagnostic methods for evaluating disease progression in the feline SD model and application of these approaches to assess AAV-mediated gene therapy. SD cats were treated by intracranial injections of the thalami combined with either the deep cerebellar nuclei or a single lateral ventricle using AAVrh8 vectors encoding feline Hex. Significantly altered in untreated SD cats, blood and CSF based biomarkers were normalized after AAV gene therapy. Also reduced after treatment were expansion of the lysosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and elevated activity of secondary lysosomal enzymes. MRI changes characteristic of the gangliosidoses were documented in SD cats and normalized after AAV gene therapy. The minimally invasive biomarkers reported herein should be useful to assess disease progression of untreated GM2 patients and those in future clinical trials. PMID:25284324

  10. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-Jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-Kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-Qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-Wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering: an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector toolbox.

    PubMed

    Senís, Elena; Fatouros, Chronis; Große, Stefanie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Niopek, Dominik; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Börner, Kathleen; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Its remarkable ease and efficiency make the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) DNA editing machinery highly attractive as a new tool for experimental gene annotation and therapeutic genome engineering in eukaryotes. Here, we report a versatile set of plasmids and vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) that allow robust and specific delivery of the two essential CRISPR components - Cas9 and chimeric g(uide)RNA - either alone or in combination. All our constructs share a modular design that enables simple and stringent guide RNA (gRNA) cloning as well as rapid exchange of promoters driving Cas9 or gRNA. Packaging into potent synthetic AAV capsids permits CRISPR delivery even into hard-to-transfect targets, as shown for human T-cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the feasibility to direct Cas9 expression to or away from hepatocytes, using a liver-specific promoter or a hepatic miRNA binding site, respectively. We also report a streamlined and economical protocol for detection of CRISPR-induced mutations in less than 3 h. Finally, we provide original evidence that AAV/CRISPR vectors can be exploited for gene engineering in vivo, as exemplified in the liver of adult mice. Our new tools and protocols should foster the broad application of CRISPR technology in eukaryotic cells and organisms, and accelerate its clinical translation into humans. PMID:25186301

  12. Biomarkers for disease progression and AAV therapeutic efficacy in feline Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Shirley, Jamie L; McCurdy, Victoria J; Colaco, Alexandria N; Randle, Ashley N; Christopherson, Pete W; Bird, Allison C; Johnson, Aime K; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; De Pompa, Nicholas L; Sorjonen, Donald C; Brunson, Brandon L; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Platt, Frances M; Baker, Henry J; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) and Sandhoff disease (SD), are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex). Due to the recent emergence of novel experimental treatments, biomarker development has become particularly relevant in GM2 gangliosidosis as an objective means to measure therapeutic efficacy. Here we describe blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electrodiagnostic methods for evaluating disease progression in the feline SD model and application of these approaches to assess AAV-mediated gene therapy. SD cats were treated by intracranial injections of the thalami combined with either the deep cerebellar nuclei or a single lateral ventricle using AAVrh8 vectors encoding feline Hex. Significantly altered in untreated SD cats, blood and CSF based biomarkers were largely normalized after AAV gene therapy. Also reduced after treatment were expansion of the lysosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and elevated activity of secondary lysosomal enzymes. MRI changes characteristic of the gangliosidoses were documented in SD cats and normalized after AAV gene therapy. The minimally invasive biomarkers reported herein should be useful to assess disease progression of untreated SD patients and those in future clinical trials. PMID:25284324

  13. AAV1.NT-3 Gene Therapy for Charcot–Marie–Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sahenk, Zarife; Galloway, Gloria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Kaspar, Brian K.; Chen, Lei; Braganza, Cilwyn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathies represent a heterogeneous group of peripheral nerve disorders affecting 1 in 2,500 persons. One variant, CMT1A, is a primary Schwann cell (SC) disorder, and represents the single most common variant. In previous studies, we showed that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) improved the tremblerJ (TrJ) mouse and also showed efficacy in CMT1A patients. Long-term treatment with NT-3 was not possible related to its short half-life and lack of availability. This led to considerations of NT-3 gene therapy via adenoassociated virus (AAV) delivery to muscle, acting as secretory organ for widespread distribution of this neurotrophic agent. In the TrJ model of demyelinating CMT, rAAV1.NT-3 therapy resulted in measurable NT-3 secretion levels in blood sufficient to provide improvement in motor function, histopathology, and electrophysiology of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, we showed that the compound muscle action potential amplitude can be used as surrogate for functional improvement and established the therapeutic dose and a preferential muscle-specific promoter to achieve sustained NT-3 levels. These studies of intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of rAAV1.NT-3 serve as a template for future CMT1A clinical trials with a potential to extend treatment to other nerve diseases with impaired nerve regeneration. PMID:24162799

  14. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections. PMID:25786873

  15. Highly Divergent Integration Profile of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 5 Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Janovitz, Tyler; Oliveira, Thiago; Sadelain, Michel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV-5) is a human parvovirus that infects a high percentage of the population. It is the most divergent AAV, the DNA sequence cleaved by the viral endonuclease is distinct from all other described serotypes and, uniquely, AAV-5 does not cross-complement the replication of other serotypes. In contrast to the well-characterized integration of AAV-2, no published studies have investigated the genomic integration of AAV-5. In this study, we analyzed more than 660,000 AAV-5 integration junctions using high-throughput integrant capture sequencing of infected human cells. The integration activity of AAV-5 was 99.7% distinct from AAV-2 and favored intronic sequences. Genome-wide integration was highly correlated with viral replication protein binding and endonuclease sites, and a 39-bp consensus integration motif was revealed that included these features. Algorithmic scanning identified 126 AAV-5 hot spots, the largest of which encompassed 3.3% of all integration events. The unique aspects of AAV-5 integration may provide novel tools for biotechnology and gene therapy. IMPORTANCE Viral integration into the host genome is an important aspect of virus host cell biology. Genomic integration studies of the small single-stranded AAVs have largely focused on site preferential integration of AAV-2, which depends on the viral replication protein (Rep). We have now established the first genome wide integration profile of the highly divergent AAV-5 serotype. Using integrant capture sequencing, more than 600,000 AAV-5 integration junctions in human cells were analyzed. AAV-5 integration hot spots were 99.7% distinct from AAV-2. Integration favored intronic sequences, occurred on all chromosomes, and integration hot spot distribution was correlated with human genomic GAGC repeats and transcriptional activity. These features support expansion of AAV-5 based vectors for gene transfer considerations. PMID:24335317

  16. Impact of Age at Administration, Lysosomal Storage, and Transgene Regulatory Elements on AAV2/8-Mediated Rat Liver Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Karali, Marianthi; Banfi, Sandro; Auricchio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer is being investigated for the treatment of systemic or liver-specific diseases. Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) efficiently transduce liver cells allowing long term transgene expression after a single administration in animal models and in patients. We evaluated the impact on AAV2/8-mediated rat liver transduction of the following variables: i) age at vector administration, ii) presence of lysosomal storage in liver cells, and iii) regulatory elements included in the transgene expression cassette. We found that systemic administration of AAV2/8 to newborn rats results in vector genome dilution and reduced transduction efficacy when compared to adult injected animals, presumably due to hepatocyte proliferation. Accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes does not impact on levels and distribution of AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction. Transgene expression occurs in hepatocytes but not in Kupffer or liver endothelial cells when the liver-specific thyroxine-binding-globulin promoter is used. However, extra-hepatic transduction is observed in the spleen and kidney of animals injected at birth. The use of target sequences for the hematopoietic-specific microRNA miR142-3p does not improve liver transduction efficacy neither reduce immune responses to the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase B. The inclusion of a variant of the Woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE-m) decreases AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction levels. As AAV2/8-mediated liver gene transfer is entering in the clinical arena, these data will provide relevant information to the design of efficient AAV2/8-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:22428010

  17. The 2002 PhRMA Code and Pharmaceutical Marketing: did anybody bother to ask the reps?

    PubMed

    Sillup, George P; Trombetta, Bill; Klimberg, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    After marketing tactics resulted in $1.2 billion fines, the 2002 PhRMA Code attempted to standardize marketing and sales practices. Self-regulation had varied success by other industries and by pharmaceutical industries in other countries. Similarly, the Code addressed negative responses about pharmaceutical's practices but had no provisions for monitoring violations. Representative's (reps) perspectives were assessed using an 18-item instrument with 72 reps from 25 companies. Analyses indicated that reps from bigger companies, PhRMA and non-PhRMA, adhered better. The way reps adhered was split between adhering reluctantly and following faithfully. Two thirds felt it was more difficult to do their jobs, resulting from prior entertainment-based relationships with physicians. PMID:21058100

  18. Serum proteins reflecting inflammation, injury and repair as biomarkers of disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Warner, Roscoe L; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Iklé, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Krischer, Jeffrey; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St. Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Johnson, Kent J; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify circulating proteins that distinguish between active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner complementary to markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Twenty-eight serum proteins representing diverse aspects of the biology of AAV were measured before and 6 months after treatment in a large clinical trial of AAV. Subjects (n=186) enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were available for comparison. The primary outcome was the ability of markers to distinguish severe AAV (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)≥3 at screening) from remission (BVAS/WG=0 at month 6), using areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (median BVAS/WG=8) at screening. In the 137 subjects in remission at month 6, 24 of the 28 markers showed significant declines. ROC analysis indicated that levels of CXCL13 (BCA-1), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) best discriminated active AAV from remission (AUC>0.8) and from healthy controls (AUC>0.9). Correlations among these markers and with ESR or CRP were low. Conclusions Many markers are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but CXCL13, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied, including ESR and CRP. These proteins are particularly promising candidates for future studies to address unmet needs in the assessment of patients with AAV. PMID:22975753

  19. COMPASS Final Report: Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) Centaur Orbiter New Frontiers Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) has been shown in past studies to enable missions to outer planetary bodies including the orbiting of Centaur asteroids. Key to the feasibility for REP missions are long life, low power electric propulsion (EP) devices, low mass Radioisotope Power System (RPS) and light spacecraft (S/C) components. In order to determine the key parameters for EP devices to perform these REP missions a design study was completed to design an REP S/C to orbit a Centaur in a New Frontiers (NF) cost cap. The design shows that an orbiter using several long lived (approx.200 kg xenon (Xe) throughput), low power (approx.700 W) Hall thrusters teamed with six (150 W each) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG) can deliver 60 kg of science instruments to a Centaur in 10 yr within the NF cost cap. Optimal specific impulses (Isp) for the Hall thrusters were found to be around 2000 s with thruster efficiencies over 40 percent. Not only can the REP S/C enable orbiting a Centaur (when compared to an all chemical mission only capable of flybys) but the additional power from the REP system can be used to enhance science and simplify communications. The mission design detailed in this report is a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) powered EP science orbiter to the Centaur Thereus with arrival 10 yr after launch, ending in a 1 yr science mapping mission. Along the trajectory, approximately 1.5 yr into the mission, the REP S/C does a flyby of the Trojan asteroid Tlepolemus. The total (Delta)V of the trajectory is 8.9 km/s. The REP S/C is delivered to orbit on an Atlas 551 class launch vehicle with a Star 48 B solid rocket stage

  20. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Keith E.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multi-resistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families. PMID:19100285

  1. REP-PCR analysis of Pasteurella multocida isolates that cause haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Townsend, K M; Dawkins, H J; Papadimitriou, J M

    1997-01-01

    Amplification of multiple P multocida genomic DNA fragments by outwardly-directed primers based on the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) consensus sequence, generated complex profiles in a PCR-based fingerprinting method known as REP-PCR. Polymorphisms within REP-PCR profiles were used to characterise 38 isolates of P multocida. The high degree of homogeneity observed among haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) strains of serotype B and E provided evidence of a disease-associated REP profile that may serve as a novel method for the identification of HS strains regardless of serotype. REP-PCR profiles of other P multocida serotypes were highly variable, illustrating the potential of this technique for the molecular fingerprinting of fowl cholera or atrophic rhinitis isolates. A specific amplified REP fragment was isolated and used to probe membrane-bound digested P multocida genomic DNA. Hybridisation patterns not only distinguished HS-causing isolates from non-HS P multocida, but also demonstrated a degree of relatedness between HS and HS-like strains. PMID:9429249

  2. A single intramuscular injection of rAAV-mediated mutant erythropoietin protects against MPTP-induced parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Dhanushkodi, A.; Akano, E. O.; Roguski, E. E.; Xue, Y.; Rao, S. K.; Matta, S. G.; Rex, T. S.; McDonald, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is neuroprotective in a number of preparations, but can lead to unacceptably high and even lethal hematocrit levels. Recent reports show that modified Epo variants confer neuroprotection in models of glaucoma and retinal degeneration without raising hematocrit. In this study, neuroprotective effects of two Epo variants (EpoR76E and EpoS71E) were assessed in a model of Parkinson’s disease. The constructs were packaged in recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors and injected intramuscularly. After 3 weeks, mice received five daily injections of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and were killed 5 weeks later. The MPTP-lesioned mice pretreated with rAAV.eGFP (negative control) exhibited a 7- to 9-Hz tremor and slower latencies to move on a grid test (akinesia). Both of these symptomatic features were absent in mice pretreated with either modified Epo construct. The rAAV.eGFP-treated mice lesioned with MPTP exhibited a 41% reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra. The rAAV.EpoS71E construct did not protect nigral neurons, but neuronal loss in mice pretreated with rAAV.EpoR76E was only half that of rAAV.eGFP controls. Although dopamine levels were normal in all groups, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was significantly reduced only in MPTP-lesioned mice pre-treated with rAAV.eGFP, indicating reduced dopamine turnover. Analysis of TH-positive fibers in the striatum showed normalized density in MPTP-lesioned mice pretreated with rAAV.EpoS71E, suggesting that enhanced sprouting induced by EpoS71E may have been responsible for normal behavior and dopaminergic tone in these mice. These results show that systemically administered rAAV-generated non-erythropoietic Epo may protect against MPTP-induced parkinsonism by a combination of neuroprotection and enhanced axonal sprouting. PMID:23190369

  3. Combined Paracrine and Endocrine AAV9 mediated Expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor for the Treatment of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Nischt, Roswitha; Coutelle, Oliver; Hösel, Marianna; Hallek, Michael; Fries, Jochen WU; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2010-01-01

    In chronic renal disease, tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a leading cause of renal failure. Here, we made use of one of the most promising gene therapy vector platforms, the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector system, and the COL4A3-deficient mice, a genetic mouse model of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, to develop a novel bidirectional treatment strategy to prevent renal fibrosis. By comparing different AAV serotypes in reporter studies, we identified AAV9 as the most suitable delivery vector to simultaneously target liver parenchyma for endocrine and renal tubular epithelium for paracrine therapeutic expression of the antifibrogenic cytokine human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). We used transcriptional targeting to drive hHGF expression from the newly developed CMV-enhancer-Ksp-cadherin-promoter (CMV-Ksp) in renal and hepatic tissue following tail vein injection of rAAV9-CMV-Ksp-hHGF into COL4A3-deficient mice. The therapeutic efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by a remarkable attenuation of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and repression of fibrotic markers such as collagen1α1 (Col1A1), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Taken together, our results show the great potential of rAAV9 as an intravenously applicable vector for the combined paracrine and endocrine expression of antifibrogenic factors in the treatment of renal failure caused by tubulointerstitial fibrosis. PMID:20424598

  4. rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His attenuates oxidative stress-induced injury of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Mingyue; Wang, Mingyu; Yang, Yi; Chen, Yixin; Liu, Dujuan; Wang, Xu; Song, Lei; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have revealed that amyloid β (Aβ)-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide antagonizes Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity. However, whether it improves oxidative stress injury remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus constitutively secreting and expressing Aβ-ABAD decoy peptide (rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His) was successfully constructed. Our results showed that rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His increased superoxide dismutase activity in hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress-mediated injury of PC12 cells. Moreover, rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His decreased malondialdehyde content, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and the level of reactive oxygen species. rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His maintained the stability of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, the ATP level remained constant, and apoptosis was reduced. Overall, the results indicate that rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His generates the fusion peptide, Aβ-ABAD decoy peptide, which effectively protects PC12 cells from oxidative stress injury induced by hydrogen peroxide, thus exerting neuroprotective effects. PMID:25206842

  5. Biodistribution of rAAV vectors following intraocular administration: evidence for the presence and persistence of vector DNA in the optic nerve and in the brain.

    PubMed

    Provost, Nathalie; Le Meur, Guylène; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Podevin, Guillaume; Cherel, Yan; Colle, Marie-Anne; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the biodistribution of rAAV vectors following subretinal or intravitreal injection. In rats, we performed subretinal or intravitreal injections of rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp. In large animals, rAAV-2/4.CMV.gfp or rAAV-2/5.CMV.gfp was delivered into the subretinal space while rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp was delivered either to the subretinal space or to the vitreous. In euthanized animals, we undertook a complete necropsy. In animals maintained alive, we collected blood and tissue samples from the submandibular lymph node, liver, and gonads. We analyzed total DNA, extracted from various tissue samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), by PCR. Following subretinal or intravitreal injections in rats and in large animals, vector sequences were not detected in the liver or in the gonads but were occasionally found in PBMC. An unexpected result was the detection of rAAV sequences in the optic nerve following subretinal injection. The most striking finding was the detection of vector sequences in the brain, along the visual pathway, in rAAV-2/2 intravitreally injected dogs. These findings raise safety concerns regarding intraocular administration of rAAV vectors and will have an impact on the development of future gene therapy trials for retinal diseases. PMID:15668139

  6. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  7. Long-Term Correction of Sandhoff Disease Following Intravenous Delivery of rAAV9 to Mouse Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Altaleb, Naderah; Bello, Alexander; Kruck, Christa; LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hurlbut, David; Hemming, Richard; Kobinger, Gary P; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses are severe neurodegenerative disorders resulting from a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase A activity and lacking effective therapies. Using a Sandhoff disease (SD) mouse model (Hexb−/−) of the GM2 gangliosidoses, we tested the potential of systemically delivered adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) expressing Hexb cDNA to correct the neurological phenotype. Neonatal or adult SD and normal mice were intravenously injected with AAV9-HexB or –LacZ and monitored for serum β-hexosaminidase activity, motor function, and survival. Brain GM2 ganglioside, β-hexosaminidase activity, and inflammation were assessed at experimental week 43, or an earlier humane end point. SD mice injected with AAV9-LacZ died by 17 weeks of age, whereas all neonatal AAV9-HexB–treated SD mice survived until 43 weeks (P < 0.0001) with only three exhibiting neurological dysfunction. SD mice treated as adults with AAV9-HexB died between 17 and 35 weeks. Neonatal SD-HexB–treated mice had a significant increase in brain β-hexosaminidase activity, and a reduction in GM2 ganglioside storage and neuroinflammation compared to adult SD-HexB– and SD-LacZ–treated groups. However, at 43 weeks, 8 of 10 neonatal-HexB injected control and SD mice exhibited liver or lung tumors. This study demonstrates the potential for long-term correction of SD and other GM2 gangliosidoses through early rAAV9 based systemic gene therapy. PMID:25515709

  8. Targeted genetic manipulations of neuronal subtypes using promoter-specific combinatorial AAVs in wild-type animals

    PubMed Central

    Gompf, Heinrich S.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Bass, Caroline E.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques to genetically manipulate the activity of defined neuronal subpopulations have been useful in elucidating function, however applicability to translational research beyond transgenic mice is limited. Subtype targeted transgene expression can be achieved using specific promoters, but often currently available promoters are either too large to package into many vectors, in particular adeno-associated virus (AAV), or do not drive expression at levels sufficient to alter behavior. To permit neuron subtype specific gene expression in wildtype animals, we developed a combinatorial AAV targeting system that drives, in combination, subtype specific Cre-recombinase expression with a strong but non-specific Cre-conditional transgene. Using this system we demonstrate that the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre-AAV) restricted expression of channelrhodopsin-2 (EF1α-DIO-ChR2-EYFP-AAV) to the rat ventral tegmental area (VTA), or an activating DREADD (hSyn-DIO-hM3Dq-mCherry-AAV) to  the  rat  locus  coeruleus  (LC). High expression levels were achieved in both regions. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed the majority of ChR2+ neurons (>93%) colocalized with TH in the VTA, and optical stimulation evoked striatal dopamine release. Activation of TH neurons in the LC produced sustained EEG and behavioral arousal. TH-specific hM3Dq expression in the LC was further compared with: (1) a Cre construct driven by a strong but non-specific promoter (non-targeting); and (2) a retrogradely-transported WGA-Cre delivery mechanism (targeting a specific projection). IHC revealed that the area of c-fos activation after CNO treatment in the LC and peri-LC neurons appeared proportional to the resulting increase in wakefulness (non-targeted > targeted > ACC to LC projection restricted). Our dual AAV targeting system effectively overcomes the large size and weak activity barrier prevalent with many subtype specific promoters by functionally separating subtype specificity from

  9. Practical utilization of recombinant AAV vector reference standards: focus on vector genomes titration by free ITR qPCR

    PubMed Central

    D’Costa, Susan; Blouin, Veronique; Broucque, Frederic; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; François, Achille; Perez, Irene C; Le Bec, Christine; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O; Ayuso, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have demonstrated efficacy and a good safety profile. Although the field is advancing quickly, vector analytics and harmonization of dosage units are still a limitation for commercialization. AAV reference standard materials (RSMs) can help ensure product safety by controlling the consistency of assays used to characterize rAAV stocks. The most widely utilized unit of vector dosing is based on the encapsidated vector genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is now the most common method to titer vector genomes (vg); however, significant inter- and intralaboratory variations have been documented using this technique. Here, RSMs and rAAV stocks were titered on the basis of an inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequence-specific qPCR and we found an artificial increase in vg titers using a widely utilized approach. The PCR error was introduced by using single-cut linearized plasmid as the standard curve. This bias was eliminated using plasmid standards linearized just outside the ITR region on each end to facilitate the melting of the palindromic ITR sequences during PCR. This new “Free-ITR” qPCR delivers vg titers that are consistent with titers obtained with transgene-specific qPCR and could be used to normalize in-house product-specific AAV vector standards and controls to the rAAV RSMs. The free-ITR method, including well-characterized controls, will help to calibrate doses to compare preclinical and clinical data in the field. PMID:27069952

  10. Long-term correction of Sandhoff disease following intravenous delivery of rAAV9 to mouse neonates.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Altaleb, Naderah; Bello, Alexander; Kruck, Christa; LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hurlbut, David; Hemming, Richard; Kobinger, Gary P; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    G(M2) gangliosidoses are severe neurodegenerative disorders resulting from a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase A activity and lacking effective therapies. Using a Sandhoff disease (SD) mouse model (Hexb(-/-)) of the G(M2) gangliosidoses, we tested the potential of systemically delivered adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) expressing Hexb cDNA to correct the neurological phenotype. Neonatal or adult SD and normal mice were intravenously injected with AAV9-HexB or -LacZ and monitored for serum β-hexosaminidase activity, motor function, and survival. Brain G(M2) ganglioside, β-hexosaminidase activity, and inflammation were assessed at experimental week 43, or an earlier humane end point. SD mice injected with AAV9-LacZ died by 17 weeks of age, whereas all neonatal AAV9-HexB-treated SD mice survived until 43 weeks (P < 0.0001) with only three exhibiting neurological dysfunction. SD mice treated as adults with AAV9-HexB died between 17 and 35 weeks. Neonatal SD-HexB-treated mice had a significant increase in brain β-hexosaminidase activity, and a reduction in G(M2) ganglioside storage and neuroinflammation compared to adult SD-HexB- and SD-LacZ-treated groups. However, at 43 weeks, 8 of 10 neonatal-HexB injected control and SD mice exhibited liver or lung tumors. This study demonstrates the potential for long-term correction of SD and other G(M2) gangliosidoses through early rAAV9 based systemic gene therapy. PMID:25515709

  11. Mechanisms of DNA Motor Proteins (Helicases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    1996-03-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous motor proteins that couple the binding and hydrolysis of NTP to the unwinding of duplex (ds) DNA to form the single stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that are required for replication, recombination and repair. We are studying the DNA unwinding mechanisms catalyzed by two helicases from E. coli: Rep and Helicase II (UvrD) by examining the linkage of DNA binding, protein dimerization and nucleotide binding using both thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. A dimer of the Rep protein is the active form of the helicase; however, the dimer forms only upon binding either ss or ds DNA. There are significant cooperative interactions between the two DNA binding sites on the dimer and nucleotides (ATP, ADP) allosterically control the stabilities of the DNA ligation states of the Rep dimer. Based on these studies we have proposed an "active, rolling" mechanism for the Rep dimer unwinding of duplex DNA. An essential intermediate is a complex, in which ss- and ds-DNA bind simultaneously to each subunit of a Rep dimer. This model predicts that Rep helicase translocation along DNA is coupled to ATP binding, whereas ATP hydrolysis drives unwinding of multiple DNA base pairs for each catalytic event. Rapid chemical quench-flow and stopped-flow fluorescence studies of Rep and UvrD- catalyzed DNA unwinding of a series of non-natural DNA substrates support the "active, rolling" mechanism and rule out a strictly "passive" mechanism of unwinding. Kinetic studies of DNA and nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis by wild type and mutant Rep proteins will be discussed that bear on the coupling of ATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation along DNA and DNA unwinding.

  12. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/sub 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.

  13. Molecular characterization of Salmonella isolates by REP-PCR and RAPD analysis.

    PubMed

    Albufera, U; Bhugaloo-Vial, P; Issack, M I; Jaufeerally-Fakim, Y

    2009-05-01

    Eighteen Salmonella isolates from both human and food (non-human) sources (fish, meat, and poultry) were characterized using conventional culture methods, biochemical, serological, and molecular analyses. REP-PCR and RAPD produced DNA profiles for differentiation purposes. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC), repetitive extragenic palindronic (REP) and BOXAIR primers were selected for REP-PCR and two arbitrary primers, namely OPP-16 and OPS-11 were used for RAPD to generate DNA fingerprints from the Salmonella isolates. REP-PCR method showed greater discriminatory power in differentiating closely related strains of the related strains of Salmonella and produced more complex banding patterns as compared with RAPD. A dendogram was constructed with both sets of profiles using SPSS Version 13.0 computer software and showed that most human isolates were separately clustered from the non-human isolates. Two of the human isolates were closely related to some of the non-human isolates. A good correlation was also observed between the serogrouping of the O antigen and the molecular profiles obtained from REP-PCR and RAPD data of the Salmonella isolates. The results of a principal coordinate analysis (PCA) corresponded to the clustering in the dendrogram. PMID:18243815

  14. Effective AAV-mediated gene therapy in a mouse model of ethylmalonic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Di Meo, Ivano; Auricchio, Alberto; Lamperti, Costanza; Burlina, Alberto; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an invariably fatal disease, characterized by the accumulation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a highly toxic compound. ETHE1, encoding sulfur dioxygenase (SDO), which takes part in the mitochondrial pathway that converts sulfide into harmless sulfate, is mutated in EE. The main source of H2S is the anaerobic bacterial flora of the colon, although in trace amount it is also produced by tissues, where it acts as a ‘gasotransmitter’. Here, we show that AAV2/8-mediated, ETHE1-gene transfer to the liver of a genetically, metabolically and clinically faithful EE mouse model resulted in full restoration of SDO activity, correction of plasma thiosulfate, a biomarker reflecting the accumulation of H2S, and spectacular clinical improvement. Most of treated animals were alive and well >6–8 months after birth, whereas untreated individuals live 26 ± 7 days. Our results provide proof of concept on the efficacy and safety of AAV2/8-mediated livergene therapy for EE, and alike conditions caused by the accumulation of harmful compounds in body fluids and tissues, which can directly be transferred to the clinic. PMID:22903887

  15. AAV-Mediated Cone Rescue in a Naturally Occurring Mouse Model of CNGA3-Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L.; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A.; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia. PMID:22509403

  16. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII

    PubMed Central

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII. PMID:26447927

  17. AAV1.NT-3 gene therapy attenuates spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yalvac, M E; Arnold, W D; Braganza, C; Chen, L; Mendell, J R; Sahenk, Z

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy (SAPP) model in B7-2 knockout non-obese diabetic mice shares clinical and histological features with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Secondary axonal loss is prominent in the progressive phase of this neuropathy. Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) is an important autocrine factor supporting Schwann cell survival and differentiation and stimulates neurite outgrowth and myelination. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of NT-3 raised considerations of potential efficacy in the SAPP model that could be applicable to CIDP. For this study, scAAV1.tMCK.NT-3 was delivered to the gastrocnemius muscle of 25-week-old SAPP mice. Measurable NT-3 levels were found in the serum at 7-week postgene delivery. The outcome measures included functional, electrophysiological and histological assessments. At week 32, NT-3-treated mice showed increased hind limb grip strength that correlated with improved compound muscle action potential amplitude. Myelinated fiber density was 1.9 times higher in the NT-3-treated group compared with controls and the number of demyelinated axons was significantly lower. The remyelinated nerve fiber population was significantly increased. These improved histopathological parameters from scAAV1.tMCK.NT-3 treatment occurred in the setting of reduced sciatic nerve inflammation. Collectively, these findings suggest a translational application to CIDP. PMID:26125608

  18. Global brain delivery of neprilysin gene by intravascular administration of AAV vector in mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Nobuhisa; Sekiguchi, Misaki; Hattori, Yoshino; Takahashi, Akane; Asai, Masashi; Ji, Bin; Higuchi, Makoto; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Saido, Takaomi C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is closely associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Stereotaxic infusion of neprilysin-encoding viral vectors into the hippocampus has been shown to decrease Aβ in AD-model mice, but more efficient and global delivery is necessary to treat the broadly distributed burden in AD. Here we developed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector capable of providing neuronal gene expression throughout the brains after peripheral administration. A single intracardiac administration of the vector carrying neprilysin gene in AD-model mice elevated neprilysin activity broadly in the brain, and reduced Aβ oligomers, with concurrent alleviation of abnormal learning and memory function and improvement of amyloid burden. The exogenous neprilysin was localized mainly in endosomes, thereby effectively excluding Aβ oligomers from the brain. AAV vector-mediated gene transfer may provide a therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases, where global transduction of a therapeutic gene into the brain is necessary. PMID:23503602

  19. AAV1.NT-3 gene therapy attenuates spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yalvac, M E; Arnold, W D; Braganza, C; Chen, L; Mendell, J R; Sahenk, Z

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy (SAPP) model in B7-2 knockout non-obese diabetic mice shares clinical and histological features with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Secondary axonal loss is prominent in the progressive phase of this neuropathy. Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) is an important autocrine factor supporting Schwann cell survival and differentiation and stimulates neurite outgrowth and myelination. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of NT-3 raised considerations of potential efficacy in the SAPP model that could be applicable to CIDP. For this study, scAAV1.tMCK.NT-3 was delivered to the gastrocnemius muscle of 25-week-old SAPP mice. Measurable NT-3 levels were found in the serum at 7-week postgene delivery. The outcome measures included functional, electrophysiological and histological assessments. At week 32, NT-3-treated mice showed increased hind limb grip strength that correlated with improved compound muscle action potential amplitude. Myelinated fiber density was 1.9 times higher in the NT-3-treated group compared with controls and the number of demyelinated axons was significantly lower. The remyelinated nerve fiber population was significantly increased. These improved histopathological parameters from scAAV1.tMCK.NT-3 treatment occurred in the setting of reduced sciatic nerve inflammation. Collectively, these findings suggest a translational application to CIDP. PMID:26125608

  20. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII. PMID:26447927

  1. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP): A Near-Term Approach to Nuclear Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.; Manzella, David H.; Kamhawi, Hani; Kremic, Tibor; Oleson, Steven R.; Dankanich, John W.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies over the last decade have shown radioisotope-based nuclear electric propulsion to be enhancing and, in some cases, enabling for many potential robotic science missions. Also known as radioisotope electric propulsion (REP), the technology offers the performance advantages of traditional reactor-powered electric propulsion (i.e., high specific impulse propulsion at large distances from the Sun), but with much smaller, affordable spacecraft. Future use of REP requires development of radioisotope power sources with system specific powers well above that of current systems. The US Department of Energy and NASA have developed an advanced Stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG) engineering unit, which was subjected to rigorous flight qualification-level tests in 2008, and began extended lifetime testing later that year. This advancement, along with recent work on small ion thrusters and life extension technology for Hall thrusters, could enable missions using REP sometime during the next decade.

  2. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP): A near-term approach to nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, George R.; Manzella, David H.; Kamhawi, Hani; Kremic, Tibor; Oleson, Steven R.; Dankanich, John W.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2010-02-01

    Studies over the last decade have shown radioisotope-based nuclear electric propulsion to be enhancing and, in some cases, enabling for many potential robotic science missions. Also known as radioisotope electric propulsion (REP), the technology offers the performance advantages of traditional reactor-powered electric propulsion (i.e., high specific impulse propulsion at large distances from the Sun), but with much smaller, affordable spacecraft. Future use of REP requires development of radioisotope power sources with system specific powers well above that of current systems. The US Department of Energy and NASA have developed an advanced Stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG) engineering unit, which was subjected to rigorous flight qualification-level tests in 2008, and began extended lifetime testing later that year. This advancement, along with recent work on small ion thrusters and life extension technology for Hall thrusters, could enable missions using REP sometime during the next decade.

  3. Ultracentrifugation-free chromatography-mediated large-scale purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (rAAV1)

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Taro; Hirai, Yukihiko; Okada, Hironori; Adachi, Kumi; Ishii, Akiko; Shimada, Takashi; Onodera, Masafumi; Tamaoka, Akira; Okada, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is an attractive tool for gene transfer and shows potential for use in human gene therapies. The current methods for the production and purification of rAAV from the transfected cell lysate are mainly based on cesium chloride and iodixanol density ultracentrifugation, although those are not scalable. Meanwhile, chromatography-based systems are more scalable. Therefore, in this study, we developed a novel method for the production and purification of rAAV serotype 1 (rAAV1) from serum-free culture supernatant based on ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography to obtain highly purified products with an ultracentrifugation-free technique towards Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) production. The purified rAAV1 displayed three clear and sharp bands (VP1, VP2, and VP3) following sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and more than 90% of rAAV1 particles contained fully packaged viral genomes according to negative-stain electron micrographic analysis. Consequently, the resultant genomic titer of the purified rAAV1 was 3.63 × 1013 v.g./ml (the total titer was 4.17 × 1013 v.g.) from the 4 × 109 HEK293 cells. This novel chromatography-based method will facilitate scale-up of manufacturing for clinical applications in gene therapy. PMID:26913289

  4. AAV1 mediated co-expression of formylglycine-generating enzyme and arylsulfatase a efficiently corrects sulfatide storage in a mouse model of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kurai, Toshiyuki; Hisayasu, Sanae; Kitagawa, Ryo; Migita, Makoto; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA) and is characterized by deposition of sulfatide in all organs, particularly the nervous system. Recently, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) was found to be essential for activation of sulfatases. This study examined the utility of FGE co-expression in AAV type 1 vector (AAV1)-mediated gene therapy of ASA knockout (MLD) mice. AAV1-ASA alone or AAV1-ASA and AAV1-FGE were co-injected into a single site of the hippocampus. Enzyme assay and immunohistochemical analysis showed that ASA was detected not only in the injected hemisphere but also in the non-injected hemisphere by 7 months after injection. Level of ASA activity and extent of ASA distribution were significantly enhanced by co-introduction of AAV1-FGE. Marked reductions in sulfatide levels were observed throughout the entire brain. The unexpectedly widespread distribution of ASA may be due to a combination of diffusion in extracellular spaces, transport through axons, and circulation in cerebrospinal fluid. The rotarod test revealed improvement of neurological functions. These results demonstrate that direct injection of AAV1 vectors expressing ASA and FGE represents a highly promising approach with significant implications for the development of clinical protocols for MLD gene therapy. PMID:17164773

  5. Ultracentrifugation-free chromatography-mediated large-scale purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (rAAV1).

    PubMed

    Tomono, Taro; Hirai, Yukihiko; Okada, Hironori; Adachi, Kumi; Ishii, Akiko; Shimada, Takashi; Onodera, Masafumi; Tamaoka, Akira; Okada, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is an attractive tool for gene transfer and shows potential for use in human gene therapies. The current methods for the production and purification of rAAV from the transfected cell lysate are mainly based on cesium chloride and iodixanol density ultracentrifugation, although those are not scalable. Meanwhile, chromatography-based systems are more scalable. Therefore, in this study, we developed a novel method for the production and purification of rAAV serotype 1 (rAAV1) from serum-free culture supernatant based on ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography to obtain highly purified products with an ultracentrifugation-free technique towards Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) production. The purified rAAV1 displayed three clear and sharp bands (VP1, VP2, and VP3) following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and more than 90% of rAAV1 particles contained fully packaged viral genomes according to negative-stain electron micrographic analysis. Consequently, the resultant genomic titer of the purified rAAV1 was 3.63 × 10(13) v.g./ml (the total titer was 4.17 × 10(13) v.g.) from the 4 × 10(9) HEK293 cells. This novel chromatography-based method will facilitate scale-up of manufacturing for clinical applications in gene therapy. PMID:26913289

  6. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer's disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain. PMID:27320056

  7. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain. PMID:27320056

  8. In Vivo Hepatic Reprogramming of Myofibroblasts with AAV Vectors as a Therapeutic Strategy for Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Español-Suñer, Regina; Malato, Yann; Dumont, Laure; Grimm, Andrew A; Kienle, Eike; Bindman, Julia G; Wiedtke, Ellen; Hsu, Bernadette Y; Naqvi, Syed J; Schwabe, Robert F; Corvera, Carlos U; Grimm, Dirk; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis, a form of scarring, develops in chronic liver diseases when hepatocyte regeneration cannot compensate for hepatocyte death. Initially, collagen produced by myofibroblasts (MFs) functions to maintain the integrity of the liver, but excessive collagen accumulation suppresses residual hepatocyte function, leading to liver failure. As a strategy to generate new hepatocytes and limit collagen deposition in the chronically injured liver, we developed in vivo reprogramming of MFs into hepatocytes using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing hepatic transcription factors. We first identified the AAV6 capsid as effective in transducing MFs in a mouse model of liver fibrosis. We then showed in lineage-tracing mice that AAV6 vector-mediated in vivo hepatic reprogramming of MFs generates hepatocytes that replicate function and proliferation of primary hepatocytes, and reduces liver fibrosis. Because AAV vectors are already used for liver-directed human gene therapy, our strategy has potential for clinical translation into a therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27257763

  9. Evaluation of Vascular Delivery Methodologies to Enhance rAAV6-mediated Gene Transfer to Canine Striated Musculature

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Schultz, Brian R; Allen, James M; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Blankinship, Michael J; Meznarich, Norman A; Kuhr, Christian S; Doremus, Caitlin; Finn, Eric; Liggitt, Denny; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the development of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for delivery of gene expression cassettes to striated musculature as a method of treating severe neuromuscular conditions. However, it is unclear whether delivery protocols that achieve extensive gene transfer in mice can be adapted to produce similarly extensive gene transfer in larger mammals and ultimately patients. Consequently, we sought to investigate methodological modifications that would facilitate rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the striated musculature of canines. A simple procedure incorporating acute (i) occlusion of limb blood flow, (ii) exsanguination via compression bandage, and (iii) vector “dwell” time of <20 minutes, markedly enhanced the transduction of limb muscles, compared with a simple bolus limb infusion of vector. A complementary method whereby vector was infused into the jugular vein led to efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes and to a lesser degree the diaphragm. Together these methods can be used to achieve transgene expression in heart, diaphragm, and limb muscles of juvenile dogs using rAAV6 vectors. These results establish that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is a viable approach to achieving systemic transduction of striated musculature in mammals approaching the dimensions of newborn humans. PMID:19471246

  10. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C.; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A.; Hui, Daniel J.; Sabatino, Denise E.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J. Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2007-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)–mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti–T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti–IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs. PMID:17609423

  11. Intravitreal AAV2.COMP-Ang1 Prevents Neurovascular Degeneration in a Murine Model of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Judd M; Rai, Ruju R; Carroll, Lara S; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; O'Neil, Christina L; Medina, Reinhold J; Das, Subtrata K; Muddana, Santosh K; Olson, Paul R; Nielson, Spencer; Walker, Kortnie; Flood, Maggie M; Messenger, Wyatt B; Archer, Bonnie J; Barabas, Peter; Krizaj, David; Gibson, Christopher C; Li, Dean Y; Koh, Gou Y; Gao, Guangping; Stitt, Alan W; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in the U.S. The vision-threatening processes of neuroglial and vascular dysfunction in DR occur in concert, driven by hyperglycemia and propelled by a pathway of inflammation, ischemia, vasodegeneration, and breakdown of the blood retinal barrier. Currently, no therapies exist for normalizing the vasculature in DR. Here, we show that a single intravitreal dose of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 encoding a more stable, soluble, and potent form of angiopoietin 1 (AAV2.COMP-Ang1) can ameliorate the structural and functional hallmarks of DR in Ins2Akita mice, with sustained effects observed through six months. In early DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 restored leukocyte-endothelial interaction, retinal oxygenation, vascular density, vascular marker expression, vessel permeability, retinal thickness, inner retinal cellularity, and retinal neurophysiological response to levels comparable with nondiabetic controls. In late DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 enhanced the therapeutic benefit of intravitreally delivered endothelial colony-forming cells by promoting their integration into the vasculature and thereby stemming further visual decline. AAV2.COMP-Ang1 single-dose gene therapy can prevent neurovascular pathology, support vascular regeneration, and stabilize vision in DR. PMID:26340930

  12. The Skeletal Muscle Environment and Its Role in Immunity and Tolerance to AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Boisgérault, Florence; Mingozzi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of gene therapy, muscle has been one the most studied tissue targets for the correction of enzyme deficiencies and myopathies. Several preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Exciting progress has been made in the gene delivery technologies, from the identification of novel AAV serotypes to the development of novel vector delivery techniques. In parallel, significant knowledge has been generated on the host immune system and its interaction with both the vector and the transgene at the muscle level. In particular, the role of underlying muscle inflammation, characteristic of several diseases affecting the muscle, has been defined in terms of its potential detrimental impact on gene transfer with AAV vectors. At the same time, feedback immunomodulatory mechanisms peculiar of skeletal muscle involving resident regulatory T cells have been identified, which seem to play an important role in maintaining, at least to some extent, muscle homeostasis during inflammation and regenerative processes. Devising strategies to tip this balance towards unresponsiveness may represent an avenue to improve the safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer with AAV vectors. PMID:26122097

  13. 75 FR 55808 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of AAV5 Based Therapeutics To Treat Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of AAV5 Based Therapeutics To Treat Human Diseases AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... 404.7(a)(1)(i), that the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services,...

  14. Local administration of AAV-DJ pseudoserotype expressing COX2 provided early onset of transgene expression and promoted bone fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, R; Baylink, D J; Lau, K-H W; Tang, X; Sheng, M H-C; Rundle, C H; Qin, X

    2015-09-01

    We have previously obtained compelling proof-of-principle evidence for COX2 gene therapy for fracture repair using integrating retroviral vectors. For this therapy to be suitable for patient uses, a suitable vector with high safety profile must be used. Accordingly, this study sought to evaluate the feasibility of AAV as the vector for this COX2 gene therapy, because AAV raises less safety issues than the retroviral vectors used previously. However, an appropriate AAV serotype is required to provide early increase in and adequate level of COX2 expression that is needed for fracture repair. Herein, we reported that AAV-DJ, an artificial AAV pseudoserotype, is highly effective in delivering COX2 gene to fracture sites in a mouse femoral fracture model. Compared with AAV-2, the use of AAV-DJ led to ~5-fold increase in infectivity in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and provided an earlier and significantly higher level of transgene expression at the fracture site. Injection of this vector at a dose of 7.5 × 10(11) genomic copies led to high COX2 level at the fracture site on day 3 after injections and significantly promoted fracture union at 21 days, as analyzed by radiography and μ-CT. The therapeutic effect appears to involve enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs and remodeling of callus tissues to laminar bone. This interpretation is supported by the enhanced expression of several key genes participating in the fracture repair process. In conclusion, AAV-DJ is a promising serotype for the AAV-based COX2 gene therapy of fracture repair in humans. PMID:25965395

  15. Mutations in a Partitioning Protein and Altered Chromatin Structure at the Partitioning Locus Prevent Cohesin Recruitment by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Plasmid and Cause Plasmid Missegregation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xian-Mei; Mehta, Shwetal; Uzri, Dina; Jayaram, Makkuni; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian

    2004-01-01

    The 2μm circle is a highly persistent “selfish” DNA element resident in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleus whose stability approaches that of the chromosomes. The plasmid partitioning system, consisting of two plasmid-encoded proteins, Rep1p and Rep2p, and a cis-acting locus, STB, apparently feeds into the chromosome segregation pathway. The Rep proteins assist the recruitment of the yeast cohesin complex to STB during the S phase, presumably to apportion the replicated plasmid molecules equally to daughter cells. The DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions of the partitioning system, as well as the chromatin organization at STB, are important for cohesin recruitment. Rep1p variants that are incompetent in binding to Rep2p, STB, or both fail to assist the assembly of the cohesin complex at STB and are nonfunctional in plasmid maintenance. Preventing the cohesin-STB association without impeding Rep1p-Rep2p-STB interactions also causes plasmid missegregation. During the yeast cell cycle, the Rep1p and Rep2p proteins are expelled from STB during a short interval between the late G1 and early S phases. This dissociation and reassociation event ensures that cohesin loading at STB is replication dependent and is coordinated with chromosomal cohesin recruitment. In an rsc2Δ yeast strain lacking a specific chromatin remodeling complex and exhibiting a high degree of plasmid loss, neither Rep1p nor the cohesin complex can be recruited to STB. The phenotypes of the Rep1p mutations and of the rsc2Δ mutant are consistent with the role of cohesin in plasmid partitioning being analogous to that in chromosome partitioning. PMID:15169893

  16. The 5′-tail of antisense RNAII of pMV158 plays a critical role in binding to the target mRNA and in translation inhibition of repB

    PubMed Central

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Romero-López, Cristina; Espinosa, Manuel; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; del Solar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication of streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is controlled by the concerted action of two trans-acting elements, namely transcriptional repressor CopG and antisense RNAII, which inhibit expression of the repB gene encoding the replication initiator protein. The pMV158-encoded antisense RNAII exerts its activity of replication control by inhibiting translation of the essential repB gene. RNAII is the smallest and simplest among the characterized antisense RNAs involved in control of plasmid replication. Structure analysis of RNAII revealed that it folds into an 8-bp-long stem containing a 1-nt bulge and closed by a 6-nt apical loop. This hairpin is flanked by a 17-nt-long single-stranded 5′-tail and an 8-nt-long 3′-terminal U-rich stretch. Here, the 3′ and 5′ regions of the 5′-tail of RNAII are shown to play a critical role in the binding to the target mRNA and in the inhibition of repB translation, respectively. In contrast, the apical loop of the single hairpin of RNAII plays a rather secondary role and the upper stem region hardly contributes to the binding or inhibition processes. The entire 5′-tail is required for efficient inhibition of repB translation, though only the 8-nt-long region adjacent to the hairpin seems to be essential for rapid binding to the mRNA. These results show that a “kissing” interaction involving base-pairing between complementary hairpin loops in RNAII and mRNA is not critical for efficient RNA/RNA binding or repB translation inhibition. A singular binding mechanism is envisaged whereby initial pairing between complementary single-stranded regions in the antisense and sense RNAs progresses upwards into the corresponding hairpin stems to form the intermolecular duplex. PMID:26175752

  17. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  18. 75 FR 27840 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...: extension of comment period. SUMMARY: On March 8, 2010, (75 FR 10524), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published for public comment a document entitled: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3... COMMISSION NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations...

  19. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H.; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 1012 viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30–50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients. PMID:23681067

  20. U.S. Rep. William Nelson drinking tea from shuttle beverage container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    U.S. Rep. William Nelson of Florida tries drinking tea from a straw-equipped beverage dispenser in JSC's life sciences laboratory during a space food orientation session. The congressman is in early stages of training for a position on the STS 61-C mission.

  1. repRNA: a web server for generating various feature vectors of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Fule; Fang, Longyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid growth of RNA sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop a flexible method that can generate various kinds of vectors to represent these sequences by focusing on their different features. This is because nearly all the existing machine-learning methods, such as SVM (support vector machine) and KNN (k-nearest neighbor), can only handle vectors but not sequences. To meet the increasing demands and speed up the genome analyses, we have developed a new web server, called "representations of RNA sequences" (repRNA). Compared with the existing methods, repRNA is much more comprehensive, flexible and powerful, as reflected by the following facts: (1) it can generate 11 different modes of feature vectors for users to choose according to their investigation purposes; (2) it allows users to select the features from 22 built-in physicochemical properties and even those defined by users' own; (3) the resultant feature vectors and the secondary structures of the corresponding RNA sequences can be visualized. The repRNA web server is freely accessible to the public at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/repRNA/ . PMID:26085220

  2. 76 FR 44401 - Proposed Information Collection (Student Beneficiary Report-REPS (Restored Entitlement Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Student Beneficiary Report--REPS (Restored Entitlement Program... response to this notice. This notice solicits comments on the information needed to confirm a student's... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Student Beneficiary...

  3. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  4. 75 FR 78694 - Proposed Residential Exchange Program Settlement Agreement Proceeding (REP-12); Public Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... governed by Sec. 1010 of BPA's Rules of Procedure Governing Rate Hearings, 51 FR 7611 (1986) (BPA Hearing... (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Residential Exchange Program Settlement Agreement Proceeding (REP-12). SUMMARY: BPA is conducting the 2012 Residential Exchange Program Settlement...

  5. 76 FR 16859 - Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance-REPS); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance--REPS); Comment Request AGENCY...) benefits are actually in enrolled an approved school. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of...

  6. Use of a rep-PCR system to predict species in the Aspergillus section Nigri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Aspergillus niger aggregate within the A. section Nigri, is a group of black-spored aspergilli which taxonomy has been elusive. REP-PCR has become a rapid and cost-effective method for genotyping fungi and bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a semi-automate...

  7. Extracorporeal delivery of rAAV with metabolic exchange and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bieber, Scott; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Finn, Eric; Ahmad, Suhail; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Odom, Guy L

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade much progress has been made towards the treatment of disease with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors, ranging from cancer to muscular dystrophies, and autoimmune diseases to cystic fibrosis. Given inherent challenges of vector delivery we developed a system incorporating commercially available dialysis equipment. This concept was evaluated in vitro utilizing rAAV expressing the reporter gene human placental alkaline phosphatase. A number of pre-circulating conditions were assessed. Vector recovery was evaluated by quantitative vector genome analysis and cellular transduction assays. A dialysis circulation time course was established, and results were recorded across varied conditions ranging from approximately 2 to 90% retention of viable vector. This approach is unique in that it focuses on efficient localized, isolated and continual delivery of vector to target tissues, provides for the preservation of tissue integrity with dialysis for metabolic exchange and allows for the transfer of oxygen through a secondary membrane post-dialysis. PMID:23528884

  8. Similarities between the DNA replication initiators of Gram-negative bacteria plasmids (RepA) and eukaryotes (Orc4p)/archaea (Cdc6p).

    PubMed

    Giraldo, R; Diaz-Orejas, R

    2001-04-24

    The proteins responsible for the initiation of DNA replication are thought to be essentially unrelated in bacteria and archaea/eukaryotes. Here we show that RepA, the initiator from the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10, and the C-terminal domain of ScOrc4p, a subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) origin recognition complex (ORC), share sequence similarities. Based on biochemical and spectroscopic evidence, these similarities include common structural elements, such as a winged-helix domain and a leucine-zipper dimerization motif. We have also found that ScOrc4p, as previously described for RepA-type initiators, interacts with chaperones of the Hsp70 family both in vitro and in vivo, most probably to regulate the assembly of active ORC. In evolutionary terms, our results are compatible with the recruitment of the same protein module for initiation of DNA replication by the ancestors of present-day Gram-negative bacteria plasmids, archaea, and eukaryotes. PMID:11296251

  9. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in CNGB3-Deficient Mice of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; McPherson, Leslie; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Mandapati, Savitri; Robinson, Paulette M; Calcedo, Roberto; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in CNGB3-deficient mice. Three groups of animals (n = 35 males and 35 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 1 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two dose concentrations (1 × 10(12) or 4.2 × 10(12) vg/ml) and were euthanized 4 or 13 weeks later. There were no test-article-related changes in clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, ocular examinations, clinical pathology parameters, organ weights, or macroscopic observations at necropsy. Cone-mediated electroretinography (ERG) responses were detected after vector administration in the treated eyes in 90% of animals in the higher dose group and 31% of animals in the lower dose group. Rod-mediated ERG responses were reduced in the treated eye for all groups, with the greatest reduction in males given the higher dose of vector, but returned to normal by the end of the study. Microscopic pathology results demonstrated minimal mononuclear cell infiltrates in the retina and vitreous of some animals at the interim euthanasia and in the vitreous of some animals at the terminal euthanasia. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in most vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to hCNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in vector-injected eyes but little or no vector DNA in nonocular tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations. PMID:27003752

  10. AAV-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases targeting hepatitis B virus inhibits active replication.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nicholas D; Stone, Daniel; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Schiffer, Joshua T; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB), imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy. PMID:24827459

  11. AAV-Mediated Delivery of Zinc Finger Nucleases Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Inhibits Active Replication

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Stone, Daniel; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S.; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB), imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy. PMID:24827459

  12. AAV6-mediated Cardiac-specific Overexpression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Enhances Myocardial Contractility.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; Odom, Guy L; Nowakowski, Sarah G; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Chen, Xiaolan; Reinecke, Hans; Hauschka, Stephen D; Murry, Charles E; Mahairas, Gregory G; Regnier, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Impaired systolic function, resulting from acute injury or congenital defects, leads to cardiac complications and heart failure. Current therapies slow disease progression but do not rescue cardiac function. We previously reported that elevating the cellular 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP) pool in transgenic mice via increased expression of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme that catalyzes deoxy-nucleotide production, increases myosin-actin interaction and enhances cardiac muscle contractility. For the current studies, we initially injected wild-type mice retro-orbitally with a mixture of adeno-associated virus serotype-6 (rAAV6) containing a miniaturized cardiac-specific regulatory cassette (cTnT(455)) composed of enhancer and promotor portions of the human cardiac troponin T gene (TNNT2) ligated to rat cDNAs encoding either the Rrm1 or Rrm2 subunit. Subsequent studies optimized the system by creating a tandem human RRM1-RRM2 cDNA with a P2A self-cleaving peptide site between the subunits. Both rat and human Rrm1/Rrm2 cDNAs resulted in RNR enzyme overexpression exclusively in the heart and led to a significant elevation of left ventricular (LV) function in normal mice and infarcted rats, measured by echocardiography or isolated heart perfusions, without adverse cardiac remodeling. Our study suggests that increasing RNR levels via rAAV-mediated cardiac-specific expression provide a novel gene therapy approach to potentially enhance cardiac systolic function in animal models and patients with heart failure. PMID:26388461

  13. Genetic Diversity and Evidence for Transmission of Streptococcus mutans by DiversiLab rep-PCR.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Stephanie S; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Ghazal, Tariq; Moser, Stephen A; Childers, Noel K

    2016-09-01

    This two-part study investigated the genetic diversity and transmission of Streptococcus mutans using the DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) approach. For children with S. mutans and participating household members, analysis for evidence of unrelated child-to-child as well as intra-familial transmission was evaluated based on commonality of genotypes. A total of 169 index children and 425 household family members from Uniontown, Alabama were evaluated for genetic diversity using rep-PCR. Thirty-four unique rep-PCR genotypes were observed for 13,906 S. mutans isolates. For transmission, 117 child and household isolates were evaluated for shared genotype (by child and by genotype cases, multiple matches possible for each child). Overall, children had 1-9 genotypes and those with multiple genotypes were 2.3 times more likely to have caries experience (decayed, missing and filled teeth/surfaces>0). Only 28% of children shared all genotypes within the household, while 72% had at least 1 genotype not shared with anyone in the household. Children had genotype(s) not shared with any household members in 157 cases. In 158 cases children and household members shared a genotype in which 55% (87/158 cases) were shared with more than one family member. Children most frequently shared genotypes with their mothers (54%; 85/158), siblings (46%; 72/158) and cousins (23%; 37/158). A reference library for S. mutans for epidemiological surveillance using the DiversiLab rep-PCR approach is detailed. The genetic diversity of S. mutans in this population demonstrated frequent commonality of genotypes. Evidence for both child-to-child and intra-familial transmission of S. mutans was observed by rep-PCR. PMID:27432341

  14. AAV2/8 Vectors Purified from Culture Medium with a Simple and Rapid Protocol Transduce Murine Liver, Muscle, and Retina Efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Monica; Ferrara, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Abstract During the production of some adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, a large amount of vectors is found in the medium of producing cells. For their purification, previous protocols used tangential flow filtration (TFF) of the medium followed by iodixanol gradient centrifugation. Taking advantage of the higher purity of the medium than the cell-derived material as the source of AAV, we tested a simple method that combines production of large culture medium volumes containing AAV from cell stacks with medium clarification+TFF without further time-consuming and nonscalable centrifugation. To test this, we selected AAV2/8, which is emerging as a favored serotype for transduction of liver, muscle, and retina and abundantly found in the extracellular medium. We show that yields and in vitro infectivity of AAV2/8 vectors produced from the culture medium using this method are higher than those of vectors purified from the same cell lysate using a conventional CsCl2 gradient ultracentrifugation-based method, although purity appears inferior. In addition, we found that the transduction efficiency of AAV2/8 purified from medium was similar to that of AAV2/8 purified from the same cell lysate in the murine liver, muscle, and retina. Considering that the purification protocol from the medium we describe requires 3 hr as opposed to the 63 hr of a conventional two-round CsCl2-gradient ultracentrifugation+desalting, we conclude that TFF of the medium containing AAV2/8 represents a quick and scalable method to purify research-grade vectors for use in animal models. PMID:24116943

  15. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I transduced autologous chondrocytes improves cartilage repair in full-thickness defects in the equine model.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-02-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 10(5) AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  16. Genome of brown tide virus (AaV), the little giant of the Megaviridae, elucidates NCLDV genome expansion and host-virus coevolution.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; LeCleir, Gary R; Brown, Christopher M; Gobler, Christopher J; Bidle, Kay D; Wilson, William H; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2014-10-01

    Aureococcus anophagefferens causes economically and ecologically destructive "brown tides" in the United States, China and South Africa. Here we report the 370,920bp genomic sequence of AaV, a virus capable of infecting and lysing A. anophagefferens. AaV is a member of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) group, harboring 377 putative coding sequences and 8 tRNAs. Despite being an algal virus, AaV shows no phylogenetic affinity to the Phycodnaviridae family, to which most algae-infecting viruses belong. Core gene phylogenies, shared gene content and genome-wide similarities suggest AaV is the smallest member of the emerging clade "Megaviridae". The genomic architecture of AaV demonstrates that the ancestral virus had an even smaller genome, which expanded through gene duplication and assimilation of genes from diverse sources including the host itself - some of which probably modulate important host processes. AaV also harbors a number of genes exclusive to phycodnaviruses - reinforcing the hypothesis that Phycodna- and Mimiviridae share a common ancestor. PMID:25035289

  17. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant AAV Containing BDNF Fused with HA2TAT: a Potential Promising Therapy Strategy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xian-cang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Wen-hui; Jia, Min; Wang, Cai-xia; Dong, Ying-ying; Dang, Yong-hui; Gao, Cheng-ge

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a disturbing psychiatric disease with unsatisfied therapy. Not all patients are sensitive to anti-depressants currently in use, side-effects are unavoidable during therapy, and the cases with effectiveness are always accompanied with delayed onset of clinical efficacy. Delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to brain seems to be a promising therapy. However, a better approach to delivery is still rudimentary. The purpose of our present work is to look for a rapid-onset and long-lasting therapeutic strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) by effectively delivering BDNF to brain. BDNF, fused with cell-penetrating peptides (TAT and HA2), was packaged in adenovirus associated virus (AAV) to construct the BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV for intranasally delivering BDNF to central nervous system (CNS) via nose-brain pathway. Intranasal administration of BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV to normal mice displayed anti-depression effect in forced swimming test when the delivery lasted relatively longer. The AAV applied to mice subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) through intranasal administration for 10 days also alleviated depression-like behaviors. Western-blotting analysis revealed that BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV nasal administration enhanced hippocampal BDNF content. These results indicate intranasal administration of constructed BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV exerts anti-depression effect in CMS mice by increasing hippocampal BDNF, suggesting that this strategy holds a promising therapeutic potential for MDD. PMID:26935651

  18. Intra-Amniotic rAAV-Mediated Microdystrophin Gene Transfer Improves Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy and May Induce Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25586688

  19. Protective CD8+ T-cell responses to cytomegalovirus driven by rAAV/GFP/IE1 loading of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuefei; Pilgrim, Petra; Yan, Juqiang; Zhou, Wei; Jenkins, Marjorie; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Bumm, Klaus; Cannon, Martin; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Kast, W Martin; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-based antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) generates in vitro, significant and rapid cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral antigens. Methods We used the rAAV system to induce specific CTLs against CVM antigens for the development of cytomegalovirus HCMV) gene therapy. As an extension of the versatility of the rAAV system, we incorporated immediate-early 1 (IE1), expressed in HCMV. Our rAAV vector induced a strong stimulation of CTLs directed against the HCMV antigen IE1. We then investigated the efficiency of the CTLs in killing IE1 targeted cells. Results A significant MHC Class I-restricted, anti-IE1-specific CTL killing was demonstrated against IE1 positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after one, in vitro, stimulation. Conclusion In summary, single PBMC stimulation with rAAV/IE1 pulsed DCs induces strong antigen specific-CTL generation. CTLs were capable to lyse low doses of peptides pulsed into target cells. These data suggest that AAV-based antigen loading of DCs is highly effective for generating human CTL responses against HCMV antigens. PMID:18834548

  20. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant AAV Containing BDNF Fused with HA2TAT: a Potential Promising Therapy Strategy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-cang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Wen-hui; Jia, Min; Wang, Cai-xia; Dong, Ying-ying; Dang, Yong-hui; Gao, Cheng-ge

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a disturbing psychiatric disease with unsatisfied therapy. Not all patients are sensitive to anti-depressants currently in use, side-effects are unavoidable during therapy, and the cases with effectiveness are always accompanied with delayed onset of clinical efficacy. Delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to brain seems to be a promising therapy. However, a better approach to delivery is still rudimentary. The purpose of our present work is to look for a rapid-onset and long-lasting therapeutic strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) by effectively delivering BDNF to brain. BDNF, fused with cell-penetrating peptides (TAT and HA2), was packaged in adenovirus associated virus (AAV) to construct the BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV for intranasally delivering BDNF to central nervous system (CNS) via nose-brain pathway. Intranasal administration of BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV to normal mice displayed anti-depression effect in forced swimming test when the delivery lasted relatively longer. The AAV applied to mice subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) through intranasal administration for 10 days also alleviated depression-like behaviors. Western-blotting analysis revealed that BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV nasal administration enhanced hippocampal BDNF content. These results indicate intranasal administration of constructed BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV exerts anti-depression effect in CMS mice by increasing hippocampal BDNF, suggesting that this strategy holds a promising therapeutic potential for MDD. PMID:26935651

  1. Gene Delivery of a Viral Anti-Inflammatory Protein to Combat Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Li, Qiuhong; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Lucas, Alexandra R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation of the retina is a contributing factor in ocular diseases such as uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The M013 immunomodulatory protein from myxoma virus has been shown to interfere with the proinflammatory signaling pathways involving both the NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB. We have developed and characterized an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector that delivers a secretable and cell-penetrating form of the M013 protein (TatM013). The expressed TatM013 protein was secreted and blocked the endotoxin-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β in monocyte-derived cells and the reactive aldehyde-induced secretion of IL-1β in retinal pigment epithelium cells. The local anti-inflammatory effects of AAV-delivered TatM013 were evaluated in an endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) mouse model after intravitreal injection of mice with an AAV2-based vector carrying either TatM013 fused to a secreted green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag (sGFP-TatM013) or GFP. Expression of the sGFP-TatM013 transgene was demonstrated by fluorescence funduscopy in living mice. In EIU, the number of infiltrating cells and the concentration of IL-1β in the vitreous body were significantly lower in the eyes injected with AAV-sGFP-TatM013 compared with the eyes injected with control AAV-GFP. These results suggest that a virus-derived inhibitor of the innate immune response, when delivered via AAV, could be a generalized therapy for various inflammatory diseases of the eye. PMID:25420215

  2. Modular adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors used for cellular virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Sven; Baumann, Tobias; Wagner, Hanna J; Morath, Volker; Kaufmann, Beate; Fischer, Adrian; Bergmann, Stefan; Schindler, Patrick; Arndt, Katja M; Müller, Kristian M

    2014-01-01

    The pre-clinical and clinical development of viral vehicles for gene transfer increased in recent years, and a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) drug took center stage upon approval in the European Union. However, lack of standardization, inefficient purification methods and complicated retargeting limit general usability. We address these obstacles by fusing rAAV-2 capsids with two modular targeting molecules (DARPin or Affibody) specific for a cancer cell-surface marker (EGFR) while simultaneously including an affinity tag (His-tag) in a surface-exposed loop. Equipping these particles with genes coding for prodrug converting enzymes (thymidine kinase or cytosine deaminase) we demonstrate tumor marker specific transduction and prodrug-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells. Coding terminal and loop modifications in one gene enabled specific and scalable purification. Our genetic parts for viral production adhere to a standardized cloning strategy facilitating rapid prototyping of virus directed enzyme prodrug therapy (VDEPT). PMID:24457557

  3. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C; Redon, Christophe E; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  4. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  5. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  6. Safety in nonhuman primates of ocular AAV2-RPE65, a candidate treatment for blindness in Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Boye, Sanford L; Aleman, Tomas S; Conlon, Thomas J; Zeiss, Caroline J; Roman, Alejandro J; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komaromy, Andras M; Doobrajh, Michelle; Cheung, Andy Y; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Kaushal, Shalesh; Maguire, Albert M; Flotte, Terence R; Hauswirth, William W

    2006-08-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease group that leads to blindness. LCA caused by RPE65 mutations has been studied in animal models and vision has been restored by subretinal delivery of AAV-RPE65 vector. Human ocular gene transfer trials are being considered. Our safety studies of subretinal AAV-2/2.RPE65 in RPE65-mutant dogs showed evidence of modest photoreceptor loss in the injection region in some animals at higher vector doses. We now test the hypothesis that there can be vectorrelated toxicity to the normal monkey, with its human-like retina. Good Laboratory Practice safety studies following single intraocular injections of AAV-2/2.RPE65 in normal cynomolgus monkeys were performed for 1-week and 3-month durations. Systemic toxicity was not identified. Ocular-specific studies included clinical examinations, electroretinography, and retinal histopathology. Signs of ocular inflammation postinjection had almost disappeared by 1 week. At 3 months, electroretinography in vector-injected eyes was no different than in vehicle-injected control eyes or compared with presurgical recordings. Healed sites of retinal perforation from subretinal injections were noted clinically and by histopathology. Foveal architecture in subretinally injected eyes, vector or vehicle, could be abnormal. Morphometry of central retina showed no photoreceptor layer thickness abnormalities occurring in a dose-dependent manner. Vector sequences were present in the injected retina, vitreous, and optic nerve at 1 week but not consistently in the brain. At 3 months, there were no vector sequences in optic nerve and brain. The results allow for consideration of an upper range for no observed adverse effect level in future human trials of subretinal AAV-2/2.RPE65. The potential value of foveal treatment for LCA and other retinal degenerations warrants further research into how to achieve gene transfer without retinal injury from surgical detachment of the retina

  7. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  8. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector–mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6 × 1013 vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long-term toxicity. Recruitment of CD4+ (but not CD8+) lymphocytes to the liver was elevated in the vector-dosed male animals at study day (SD) 15, and in group 8 animals at SD 113, in comparison to their respective control animals. Administration of the vector, either prior to or after the one ERT injection, uniformly prevented the hypersensitivity induced by subsequent ERT in males, but not always in female animals. The vector genome was sustained in all tissues through 16-week postdosing, except for in blood with a similar tissue tropism between males and females. Administration of the vector alone, or combined with the ERT, was effective in producing significantly increased GAA activity and consequently decreased glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues, and the urine biomarker, Glc4, was significantly reduced. The efficacy of the vector (or with ERT) was better in males than in females, as demonstrated both by the number of tissues showing significantly effective responses and the extent of response in a given tissue. Given the lack of toxicity for AAV2/8LSPhGAApA, further consideration of clinical translation is warranted in Pompe disease. PMID:26015962

  9. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector-mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6 × 10(13) vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long-term toxicity. Recruitment of CD4(+) (but not CD8(+)) lymphocytes to the liver was elevated in the vector-dosed male animals at study day (SD) 15, and in group 8 animals at SD 113, in comparison to their respective control animals. Administration of the vector, either prior to or after the one ERT injection, uniformly prevented the hypersensitivity induced by subsequent ERT in males, but not always in female animals. The vector genome was sustained in all tissues through 16-week postdosing, except for in blood with a similar tissue tropism between males and females. Administration of the vector alone, or combined with the ERT, was effective in producing significantly increased GAA activity and consequently decreased glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues, and the urine biomarker, Glc4, was significantly reduced. The efficacy of the vector (or with ERT) was better in males than in females, as demonstrated both by the number of tissues showing significantly effective responses and the extent of response in a given tissue. Given the lack of toxicity for AAV2/8LSPhGAApA, further consideration of clinical translation is warranted in Pompe disease. PMID:26015962

  10. Carbidopa-Based Modulation of the Functional Effect of the AAV2-hAADC Gene Therapy in 6-OHDA Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2015-01-01

    Progressively blunted response to L-DOPA in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a critical factor that complicates long-term pharmacotherapy in view of the central importance of this drug in management of the PD-related motor disturbance. This phenomenon is likely due to progressive loss of one of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for dopamine in the basal ganglia: aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). We have developed a gene therapy based on an adeno-associated virus encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC) infused into the Parkinsonian striatum. Although no adverse clinical effects of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy have been observed so far, the ability to more precisely regulate transgene expression or transgene product activity could be an important long-term safety feature. The present study was designed to define pharmacological regulation of the functional activity of AAV2-hAADC transgene product by manipulating L-DOPA and carbidopa (AADC inhibitor) administration in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Thirty days after unilateral striatal infusion of AAV2-hAADC, animals displayed circling behavior and acceleration of dopamine metabolism in the lesioned striatum after administration of a low dose of L-DOPA (5 mg/kg) co-administered with 1.25 mg/kg of carbidopa. This phenomenon was not observed in control AAV2-GFP-treated rats. Withdrawal of carbidopa from a daily L-DOPA regimen decreased the peripheral L-DOPA pool, resulting in almost total loss of L-DOPA-induced behavioral response in AAV2-hAADC rats and a significant decline in striatal dopamine turnover. The serum L-DOPA level correlated with the magnitude of circling behavior in AAV2-hAADC rats. Additionally, AADC activity in homogenates of lesioned striata transduced by AAV2-AADC was 10-fold higher when compared with AAV2-GFP-treated control striata, confirming functional transduction. Our data suggests that the pharmacological regulation of circulating L-DOPA might be effective in the controlling of

  11. Carbidopa-based modulation of the functional effect of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sharma, Nitasha; Beyer, Janine; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2015-01-01

    Progressively blunted response to L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a critical factor that complicates long-term pharmacotherapy in view of the central importance of this drug in management of the PD-related motor disturbance. This phenomenon is likely due to progressive loss of one of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for dopamine in the basal ganglia: aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). We have developed a gene therapy based on an adeno-associated virus encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC) infused into the Parkinsonian striatum. Although no adverse clinical effects of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy have been observed so far, the ability to more precisely regulate transgene expression or transgene product activity could be an important long-term safety feature. The present study was designed to define pharmacological regulation of the functional activity of AAV2-hAADC transgene product by manipulating L-DOPA and carbidopa (AADC inhibitor) administration in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Thirty days after unilateral striatal infusion of AAV2-hAADC, animals displayed circling behavior and acceleration of dopamine metabolism in the lesioned striatum after administration of a low dose of L-DOPA (5 mg/kg) co-administered with 1.25 mg/kg of carbidopa. This phenomenon was not observed in control AAV2-GFP-treated rats. Withdrawal of carbidopa from a daily L-DOPA regimen decreased the peripheral L-DOPA pool, resulting in almost total loss of L-DOPA-induced behavioral response in AAV2-hAADC rats and a significant decline in striatal dopamine turnover. The serum L-DOPA level correlated with the magnitude of circling behavior in AAV2-hAADC rats. Additionally, AADC activity in homogenates of lesioned striata transduced by AAV2-AADC was 10-fold higher when compared with AAV2-GFP-treated control striata, confirming functional transduction. Our data suggests that the pharmacological regulation of circulating L-DOPA might be effective in the controlling of

  12. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  13. An AAVS1-targeted minigene platform for correction of iPSCs from all five types of chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Merling, Randall K; Sweeney, Colin L; Chu, Jessica; Bodansky, Aaron; Choi, Uimook; Priel, Debra Long; Kuhns, Douglas B; Wang, Hongmei; Vasilevsky, Sam; De Ravin, Suk See; Winkler, Thomas; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Zou, Jizhong; Zarember, Kol A; Gallin, John I; Holland, Steven M; Malech, Harry L

    2015-01-01

    There are five genetic forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), resulting from mutations in any of five subunits of phagocyte oxidase, an enzyme complex in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages that produces microbicidal reactive oxygen species. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from peripheral blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells of patients with each of five CGD genotypes. We used zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) targeting the AAVS1 safe harbor site together with CGD genotype-specific minigene plasmids with flanking AAVS1 sequence to target correction of iPSC representing each form of CGD. We achieved targeted insertion with constitutive expression of desired oxidase subunit in 70-80% of selected iPSC clones. Neutrophils and macrophages differentiated from corrected CGD iPSCs demonstrated restored oxidase activity and antimicrobial function against CGD bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Granulibacter bethesdensis. Using a standard platform that combines iPSC generation from peripheral blood CD34(+) cells and ZFN mediated AAVS1 safe harbor minigene targeting, we demonstrate efficient generation of genetically corrected iPSCs using an identical approach for all five genetic forms of CGD. This safe harbor minigene targeting platform is broadly applicable to a wide range of inherited single gene metabolic disorders. PMID:25288370

  14. Enhanced efficacy of an AAV vector encoding chimeric, highly secreted acid alpha-glucosidase in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  15. A regulatable AAV vector mediating GDNF biological effects at clinically-approved sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses

    PubMed Central

    Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Bockstael, Olivier; Das, Atze T; Boutry, Sébastien; Breger, Ludivine S; Klaver, Bep; Melas, Catherine; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Tomas; Muller, Robert N; DeWitte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Lundberg, Cecilia; Berkhout, Ben; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data stress the importance of pharmacologically-controlling glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) intracerebral administration to treat PD. The main challenge is finding a combination of a genetic switch and a drug which, when administered at a clinically-approved dose, reaches the brain in sufficient amounts to induce a therapeutic effect. We describe a highly-sensitive doxycycline-inducible adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. This vector allowed for the first time a longitudinal analysis of inducible transgene expression in the brain using bioluminescence imaging. To evaluate the dose range of GDNF biological activity, the inducible AAV vector (8.0 × 109 viral genomes) was injected in the rat striatum at four delivery sites and increasing doxycycline doses administered orally. ERK/Akt signaling activation as well as tyrosine hydroxylase downregulation, a consequence of long-term GDNF treatment, were induced at plasmatic doxycycline concentrations of 140 and 320 ng/ml respectively, which are known not to increase antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in patients. In these conditions, GDNF covered the majority of the striatum. No behavioral abnormalities or weight loss were observed. Motor asymmetry resulting from unilateral GDNF treatment only appeared with a 2.5-fold higher vector and a 13-fold higher inducer doses. Our data suggest that using the herein-described inducible AAV vector, biological effects of GDNF can be obtained in response to sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses. PMID:27069954

  16. E Pluribus Unum: 50 Years of Research, Millions of Viruses, and One Goal--Tailored Acceleration of AAV Evolution.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Dirk; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2015-12-01

    Fifty years ago, a Science paper by Atchison et al. reported a newly discovered virus that would soon become known as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and that would subsequently emerge as one of the most versatile and most auspicious vectors for human gene therapy. A large part of its attraction stems from the ease with which the viral capsid can be engineered for particle retargeting to cell types of choice, evasion from neutralizing antibodies or other desirable properties. Particularly powerful and in the focus of the current review are high-throughput methods aimed at expanding the repertoire of AAV vectors by means of directed molecular evolution, such as random mutagenesis, DNA family shuffling, in silico reconstruction of ancestral capsids, or peptide display. Here, unlike the wealth of prior reviews on this topic, we especially emphasize and critically discuss the practical aspects of the different procedures that affect the ultimate outcome, including diversification protocols, combinatorial library complexity, and selection strategies. Our overall aim is to provide general guidance that should help users at any level, from novice to expert, to safely navigate through the rugged space of directed AAV evolution while avoiding the pitfalls that are associated with these challenging but promising technologies. PMID:26388463

  17. Improved methods of AAV-mediated gene targeting for human cell lines using ribosome-skipping 2A peptide

    PubMed Central

    Karnan, Sivasundaram; Ota, Akinobu; Konishi, Yuko; Wahiduzzaman, Md; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based targeting vector has been one of the tools commonly used for genome modification in human cell lines. It allows for relatively efficient gene targeting associated with 1–4-log higher ratios of homologous-to-random integration of targeting vectors (H/R ratios) than plasmid-based targeting vectors, without actively introducing DNA double-strand breaks. In this study, we sought to improve the efficiency of AAV-mediated gene targeting by introducing a 2A-based promoter-trap system into targeting constructs. We generated three distinct AAV-based targeting vectors carrying 2A for promoter trapping, each targeting a GFP-based reporter module incorporated into the genome, PIGA exon 6 or PIGA intron 5. The absolute gene targeting efficiencies and H/R ratios attained using these vectors were assessed in multiple human cell lines and compared with those attained using targeting vectors carrying internal ribosome entry site (IRES) for promoter trapping. We found that the use of 2A for promoter trapping increased absolute gene targeting efficiencies by 3.4–28-fold and H/R ratios by 2–5-fold compared to values obtained with IRES. In CRISPR-Cas9-assisted gene targeting using plasmid-based targeting vectors, the use of 2A did not enhance the H/R ratios but did upregulate the absolute gene targeting efficiencies compared to the use of IRES. PMID:26657635

  18. Ab-Externo AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery to the Suprachoroidal Space Using a 250 Micron Flexible Microcatheter

    PubMed Central

    Peden, Marc C.; Min, Jeff; Meyers, Craig; Lukowski, Zachary; Li, Qiuhong; Boye, Sanford L.; Levine, Monica; Hauswirth, William W.; Ratnakaram, Ramakrishna; Dawson, William; Smith, Wesley C.; Sherwood, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The current method of delivering gene replacement to the posterior segment of the eye involves a three-port pars plana vitrectomy followed by injection of the agent through a 37-gauge cannula, which is potentially wrought with retinal complications. In this paper we investigate the safety and efficacy of delivering adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to the suprachoroidal space using an ab externo approach that utilizes an illuminated microcatheter. Methods 6 New Zealand White rabbits and 2 Dutch Belted rabbits were used to evaluate the ab externo delivery method. sc-AAV5-smCBA-hGFP vector was delivered into the suprachoroidal space using an illuminated iTrackTM 250A microcatheter. Six weeks after surgery, the rabbits were sacrificed and their eyes evaluated for AAV transfection using immunofluorescent antibody staining of GFP. Results Immunostaining of sectioned and whole-mounted eyes demonstrated robust transfection in all treated eyes, with no fluorescence in untreated control eyes. Transfection occurred diffusely and involved both the choroid and the retina. No apparent adverse effects caused by either the viral vector or the procedure itself could be seen either clinically or histologically. Conclusions The ab externo method of delivery using a microcatheter was successful in safely and effectively delivering a gene therapy agent to the suprachoroidal space. This method presents a less invasive alternative to the current method of virally vectored gene delivery. PMID:21347253

  19. Efficient recombinase-mediated cassette exchange at the AAVS1 locus in human embryonic stem cells using baculoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Chrishan J A; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Kwang, Timothy W X; Choudhury, Yukti; Bak, Xiao Ying; Yang, Jing; Wang, Shu

    2011-09-01

    Insertion of a transgene into a defined genomic locus in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is crucial in preventing random integration-induced insertional mutagenesis, and can possibly enable persistent transgene expression during hESC expansion and in their differentiated progenies. Here, we employed homologous recombination in hESCs to introduce heterospecific loxP sites into the AAVS1 locus, a site with an open chromatin structure that allows averting transgene silencing phenomena. We then performed Cre recombinase mediated cassette exchange using baculoviral vectors to insert a transgene into the modified AAVS1 locus. Targeting efficiency in the master hESC line with the loxP-docking sites was up to 100%. Expression of the inserted transgene lasted for at least 20 passages during hESC expansion and was retained in differentiated cells derived from the genetically modified hESCs. Thus, this study demonstrates the feasibility of genetic manipulation at the AAVS1 locus with homologous recombination and using viral transduction in hESCs to facilitate recombinase-mediated cassette exchange. The method developed will be useful for repeated gene targeting at a defined locus of the hESC genome. PMID:21685448

  20. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Vite, Charles H; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Grant, Rebecca; Bote, Erin; Yu, Hongwei; Pukenas, Bryan; Hurst, Robert; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques-lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery. PMID:26052519

  1. Preclinical Dose-Escalation Study of Intravitreal AAV-RS1 Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of X-linked Retinoschisis: Dose-Dependent Expression and Improved Retinal Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Colosi, Peter; Kjellstrom, Sten; Hiriyanna, Suja; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Santos, Maria; Li, Jinbo; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases has been shown to ameliorate functional and structural defects in both animal models and in human clinical trials. X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is an early-age onset macular dystrophy resulting from loss of an extracellular matrix protein (RS1). In preparation for a human clinical gene therapy trial, we conducted a dose-range efficacy study of the clinical vector, a self-complementary AAV delivering a human retinoschisin (RS1) gene under control of the RS1 promoter and an interphotoreceptor binding protein enhancer (AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS), in the retinoschisin knockout (Rs1-KO) mouse. The therapeutic vector at 1 × 10(6) to 2.5 × 10(9) (1E6-2.5E9) vector genomes (vg)/eye or vehicle was administered to one eye of 229 male Rs1-KO mice by intravitreal injection at 22 ± 3 days postnatal age (PN). Analysis of retinal function (dark-adapted electroretinogram, ERG), structure (cavities and outer nuclear layer thickness) by in vivo retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography, and retinal immunohistochemistry (IHC) for RS1 was done 3-4 months and/or 6-9 months postinjection (PI). RS1 IHC staining was dose dependent across doses ≥1E7 vg/eye, and the threshold for significant improvement in all measures of retinal structure and function was 1E8 vg/eye. Higher doses, however, did not produce additional improvement. At all doses showing efficacy, RS1 staining in Rs1-KO mouse was less than that in wild-type mice. Improvement in the ERG and RS1 staining was unchanged or greater at 6-9 months than at 3-4 months PI. This study demonstrates that vitreal administration of AAV8 scRS/IRBPhRS produces significant improvement in retinal structure and function in the mouse model of XLRS over a vector dose range that can be extended to a human trial. It indicates that a fully normal level of RS1 expression is not necessary for a therapeutic effect. PMID:27036983

  2. Inhibition of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase by REP8839 and Effects of Resistance Mutations on Enzyme Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Green, Louis S.; Bullard, James M.; Ribble, Wendy; Dean, Frank; Ayers, David F.; Ochsner, Urs A.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2009-01-01

    REP8839 is a selective inhibitor of methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) with antibacterial activity against a variety of gram-positive organisms. We determined REP8839 potency against Staphylococcus aureus MetRS and assessed its selectivity for bacterial versus human orthologs of MetRS. The inhibition constant (Ki) of REP8839 was 10 pM for Staphylococcus aureus MetRS. Inhibition of MetRS by REP8839 was competitive with methionine and uncompetitive with ATP. Thus, high physiological ATP levels would actually facilitate optimal binding of the inhibitor. While many gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, express exclusively the MetRS1 subtype, many gram-negative bacteria express an alternative homolog called MetRS2. Some gram-positive bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus anthracis, express both MetRS1 and MetRS2. MetRS2 orthologs were considerably less susceptible to REP8839 inhibition. REP8839 inhibition of human mitochondrial MetRS was 1,000-fold weaker than inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus MetRS; inhibition of human cytoplasmic MetRS was not detectable, corresponding to >1,000,000-fold selectivity for the bacterial target relative to its cytoplasmic counterpart. Mutations in MetRS that confer reduced susceptibility to REP8839 were examined. The mutant MetRS enzymes generally exhibited substantially impaired catalytic activity, particularly in aminoacylation turnover rates. REP8839 Ki values ranged from 4- to 190,000-fold higher for the mutant enzymes than for wild-type MetRS. These observations provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the reduced growth fitness observed with MetRS mutant strains relative to that with wild-type Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:19015366

  3. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA. PMID:27404480

  4. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  5. Feasibility and Safety of Systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU Delivery for Treating Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB: Toxicology, Biodistribution, and Immunological Assessments in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Murrey, Darren A.; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Meadows, Aaron S.; Ware, Tierra A.; Campbell, Katie J.; Bremer, William G.; Walker, Christopher M.; Goodchild, Laurie; Bolon, Brad; La Perle, Krista; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal recessive defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In anticipation of a clinical gene therapy treatment for MPS IIIB in humans, we tested the rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU vector administration to cynomolgus monkeys (n=8) at 1E13 vg/kg or 2E13 vg/kg via intravenous injection. No adverse events or detectable toxicity occurred over a 6-month period. Gene delivery resulted in persistent global central nervous system and broad somatic transduction, with NAGLU activity detected at 2.9–12-fold above endogenous levels in somatic tissues and 1.3–3-fold above endogenous levels in the brain. Secreted rNAGLU was detected in serum. Low levels of preexisting anti-AAV9 antibodies (Abs) did not diminish vector transduction. Importantly, high-level preexisting anti-AAV9 Abs lead to reduced transduction in liver and other somatic tissues, but had no detectable impact on transgene expression in the brain. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay showed Ab responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in treated animals. Serum anti-hNAGLU Abs, but not anti-AAV9 Abs, correlated with the loss of circulating rNAGLU enzyme. However, serum Abs did not affect tissue rNAGLU activity levels. Weekly or monthly peripheral blood interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays detected a CD4+ T-cell (Th-1) response to rNAGLU only at 4 weeks postinjection in one treated subject, without observable correlation to tissue transduction levels. The treatment did not result in detectable CTL responses to either AAV9 or rNAGLU. Our data demonstrate an effective and safe profile for systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector delivery in nonhuman primates, supporting its clinical potential in humans. PMID:24720466

  6. RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

    The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

  7. Released exopolysaccharide (r-EPS) produced from probiotic bacteria reduce biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun

    2009-02-01

    Here, we characterized released-exopolysaccharides (r-EPS) from Lactobacillus acidophilus A4 with the goal of identifying natural compounds that represses biofilm formation. In plastic 96-well microplates that contained 1.0 mg/ml of r-EPS, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) biofilms were dramatically decreased by 87% and 94% on polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces, respectively. In the presence of r-EPS, neither their growth rate nor their autoinducer-2-like activity was affected on the EHEC O157:H7. Importantly, consistent reduction in biofilm formation was also observed when r-EPS was applied to the continuous-flow chamber models. In addition, we found that adding r-EPS significantly repressed biofilm formation by affecting genes related to curli production (crl, csgA, and csgB) and chemotaxis (cheY) in transcriptome analysis. Furthermore, these r-EPS could prevent biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and -positive pathogens. This property may lead to the development of novel food-grade adjuncts for microbial biofilm control. PMID:19103165

  8. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Junqueira, Ana Maria R; Aragão, Francisco J L; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) by expressing a mutated REP protein, which is essential for virus replication. Biosafety studies were performed for a period of three years under field conditions. The abundance of some species was significantly higher in specific treatments in a particular year, but not consistently different in other years. A regular pattern was not observed in the distribution of insects between genetically modified and conventional treatments. Data analyses showed that minor differences observed can be attributed to random variation and were not consistent enough to conclude that the treatments were different. Therefore the present study indicates that the relative abundance of species are similar in transgenic and non-transgenic fields. PMID:24922280

  9. Continuous DOPA synthesis from a single AAV: dosing and efficacy in models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cederfjäll, Erik; Nilsson, Nathalie; Sahin, Gurdal; Chu, Yaping; Nikitidou, Elisabeth; Björklund, Tomas; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Kirik, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    We used a single adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector co-expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) to investigate the relationship between vector dose, and the magnitude and rate of recovery in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Intrastriatal injections of >1E10 genomic copies (gc) of TH-GCH1 vector resulted in complete recovery in drug-naïve behavior tests. Lower vector dose gave partial to no functional improvement. Stereological quantification revealed no striatal NeuN+ cell loss in any of the groups, whereas a TH-GCH1 dose of >1E11 gc resulted in cell loss in globus pallidus. Thus, a TH-GCH1 dose of 1E10 gc gave complete recovery without causing neuronal loss. Safety and efficacy was also studied in non-human primates where the control vector resulted in co-expression of the transgenes in caudate-putamen. In the TH-GCH1 group, GCH1 expression was robust but TH was not detectable. Moreover, TH-GCH1 treatment did not result in functional improvement in non-human primates. PMID:23831692

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease. PMID:25971245

  11. AAV-mediated Gene Therapy Halts Retinal Degeneration in PDE6β-deficient Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Hulin, Philippe; Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Biget, Marine; Ameline, Baptiste; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that subretinal injection of AAV2/5 RK.cpde6β allowed long-term preservation of photoreceptor function and vision in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency. The present study builds on these earlier findings to provide a detailed assessment of the long-term effects of gene therapy on the spatiotemporal pattern of retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs treated at 20 days of age. We analyzed the density distribution of the retinal layers and of particular photoreceptor cells in 3.5-year-old treated and untreated rcd1 dogs. Whereas no rods were observed outside the bleb or in untreated eyes, gene transfer halted rod degeneration in all vector-exposed regions. Moreover, while gene therapy resulted in the preservation of cones, glial cells and both the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, no cells remained in vector-unexposed retinas, except in the visual streak. Finally, the retinal structure of treated 3.5-year-old rcd1 dogs was identical to that of unaffected 4-month-old rcd1 dogs, indicating near complete preservation. Our findings indicate that gene therapy arrests the degenerative process even if intervention is initiated after the onset of photoreceptor degeneration, and point to significant potential of this therapeutic approach in future clinical trials. PMID:26857842

  12. Development of a Liver-specific Tet-On Inducible System for AAV Vectors and Its Application in the Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, Lucia; Di Scala, Marianna; Blanco, Laura; Otano, Itziar; Gil-Farina, Irene; Baldim, Victor; Paneda, Astrid; Berraondo, Pedro; Beattie, Stuart G; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Lilianne; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) are effective gene delivery vehicles that can mediate long-lasting transgene expression. However, tight regulation and tissue-specific transgene expression is required for certain therapeutic applications. For regulatable expression from the liver we designed a hepatospecific bidirectional and autoregulatory tetracycline (Tet)-On system (TetbidirAlb) flanked by AAV inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). We characterized the inducible hepatospecific system in comparison with an inducible ubiquitous expression system (TetbidirCMV) using luciferase (luc). Although the ubiquitous system led to luc expression throughout the mouse, luc expression derived from the hepatospecific system was restricted to the liver. Interestingly, the induction rate of the TetbidirAlb was significantly higher than that of TetbidirCMV, whereas leakage of TetbidirAlb was significantly lower. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this vector, an AAV-Tetbidir-Alb-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) was tested in a murine model for hepatic colorectal metastasis. The vector induced dose-dependent levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), showing no significant toxicity. AAV-Tetbidir-Alb-IL-12 was highly efficient in preventing establishment of metastasis in the liver and induced an efficient T-cell memory response to tumor cells. Thus, we have demonstrated persistent, and inducible in vivo expression of a gene from a liver-specific Tet-On inducible construct delivered via an AAV vector and proved to be an efficient tool for treating liver cancer. PMID:21364542

  13. CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY AND SYSTEMIC MANNITOL INCREASE GENE PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION OF AAV VECTORS 5, 8, AND 9 AND INCREASE GENE PRODUCT IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Nikisha; Lee, Daniel; Dickey, Chad; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jansen-West, Karen; Golde, Todd E.; Gordon, Marcia N.; Morgan, Dave; Nash, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The use of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as a means of gene delivery to the central nervous system has emerged as a potentially viable method for the treatment of several types of degenerative brain diseases. However, a limitation of typical intracranial injections into the adult brain parenchyma is the relatively restricted distribution of the delivered gene to large brain regions such as the cortex, presumably due to confined dispersion of the injected particles. Optimizing the administration techniques to maximize gene distribution and gene expression is an important step in developing gene therapy studies. Here, we have found additive increases in distribution when 3 methods to increase brain distribution of rAAV were combined. The convection enhanced delivery (CED) method with the step-design cannula was used to deliver rAAV vector serotypes 5, 8 and 9 encoding GFP into the hippocampus of the mouse brain. While the CED method improved distribution of all 3 serotypes, the combination of rAAV9 and CED was particularly effective. Systemic mannitol administration, which reduces intracranial pressure, also further expanded distribution of GFP expression, in particular, increased expression on the contralateral hippocampi. These data suggest that combining advanced injection techniques with newer rAAV serotypes greatly improves viral vector distribution, which could have significant benefits for implementation of gene therapy strategies. PMID:20951738

  14. Correction of Neurological Disease of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB in Adult Mice by rAAV9 Trans-Blood–Brain Barrier Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; DiRosario, Julianne; Killedar, Smruti; Zaraspe, Kimberly; McCarty, Douglas M

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge in developing therapies for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is to achieve efficient central nervous system (CNS) delivery across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we used the novel ability of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) to cross the BBB from the vasculature to achieve long-term global CNS, and widespread somatic restoration of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. A single intravenous (IV) injection of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU, without extraneous treatment to disrupt the BBB, restored NAGLU activity to normal or above normal levels in adult MPS IIIB mice, leading to the correction of lysosomal storage pathology in the CNS and periphery, and correction of astrocytosis and neurodegeneration. The IV delivered rAAV9 vector also transduced abundant neurons in the myenteric and submucosal plexus, suggesting peripheral nervous system (PNS) targeting. While CNS entry did not depend on osmotic disruption of the BBB, it was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with an IV infusion of mannitol. Most important, we demonstrate that a single systemic rAAV9-NAGLU gene delivery provides long-term (>18 months) neurological benefits in MPS IIIB mice, resulting in significant improvement in behavioral performance, and extension of survival. These data suggest promising clinical potential using the trans-BBB neurotropic rAAV9 vector for treating MPS IIIB and other neurogenetic diseases. PMID:21386820

  15. AAV-mediated transduction and targeting of retinal bipolar cells with improved mGluR6 promoters in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, T H; Ivanova, E; Cheng, J G; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell type-specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the parafovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27115727

  16. Vitrectomy Before Intravitreal Injection of AAV2/2 Vector Promotes Efficient Transduction of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Ameline, Baptiste; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Nedellec, Steven; Biget, Marine; Provost, Nathalie; Libeau, Lyse; Blouin, Véronique; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Pichard, Virginie; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising vector for retinal gene delivery to restore visual function in certain forms of inherited retinal dystrophies. Several studies in rodent models have shown that intravitreal injection of the AAV2/2 vector is the optimal route for efficient retinal ganglion cell (RGC) transduction. However, translation of these findings to larger species, including humans, is complicated by anatomical differences in the eye, a key difference being the comparatively smaller volume of the vitreous chamber in rodents. Here, we address the role of the vitreous body as a potential barrier to AAV2/2 diffusion and transduction in the RGCs of dogs and macaques, two of the most relevant preclinical models. We intravitreally administered the AAV2/2 vector carrying the CMV-eGFP reporter cassette in dog and macaque eyes, either directly into the vitreous chamber or after complete vitrectomy, a surgical procedure that removes the vitreous body. Our findings suggest that the vitreous body appears to trap the injected vector, thus impairing the diffusion and transduction of AAV2/2 to inner retinal neurons. We show that vitrectomy before intravitreal vector injection is an effective means of overcoming this physical barrier, improving the transduction of RGCs in dog and macaque retinas. These findings support the use of vitrectomy in clinical trials of intravitreal gene transfer techniques targeting inner retinal neurons. PMID:27229628

  17. Intramuscular scAAV9-SMN injection mediates widespread gene delivery to the spinal cord and decreases disease severity in SMA mice.

    PubMed

    Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Besse, Aurore; Roda, Marianne; Duque, Sandra; Astord, Stéphanie; Carcenac, Romain; Marais, Thibaut; Barkats, Martine

    2013-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated the remarkable efficiency of self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors for central nervous system (CNS) gene transfer following intravenous delivery in mice and larger animals. Here, we investigated whether gene delivery to motor neurons (MNs) could also be achieved via intramuscular (i.m.) scAAV9 injection and subsequent retrograde transport along the MNs axons. Unexpectedly, we found that a single injection of scAAV9 into the adult mouse gastrocnemius (GA) mediated widespread MN transduction along the whole spinal cord, without limitation to the MNs connected to the injected muscle. Spinal cord astrocytes and peripheral organs were also transduced, indicating vector spread from the injected muscle to both the CNS and the periphery through release into the blood circulation. Moreover, we showed that i.m. injection of scAAV9 vectors expressing "survival of motor neuron" (Smn) in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) mice mediated high survival motor neuron (SMN) expression levels at both the CNS and the periphery, and increased the median lifespan from 12 days to 163 days. These findings represent to date the longest extent in survival obtained in SMA mice following i.m. viral vector gene delivery, and might generate a renewed interest in the use of i.m. adeno-associated viruses (AAV) delivery for the development of gene therapy strategies for MN diseases. PMID:23295949

  18. Efficient lysis of epithelial ovarian cancer cells by MAGE-A3-induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes using rAAV-6 capsid mutant vector.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Gruzdyn, Oksana V; Moreno-Bost, Amberly M; Szmania, Susann; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Srivastava, Arun; Kolli, Bala K; Weaver, Donald W; van Rhee, Frits; Gruber, Scott A

    2014-02-12

    MAGE-A3 is highly expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), making it a promising candidate for immunotherapy. We investigated whether dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a rAAV-6 capsid mutant vector Y445F could elicit effective MAGE-A3-specific anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in vitro. MAGE-A3 was cloned and rAAV-6-MAGE-A3 purified, followed by proviral genome detection using real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence detection of rAAV-6-Y445F-MAGE-A3-transduced DCs demonstrated 60% transduction efficiency. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed chromosomal integration of rAAV vectors. Flow cytometric analysis of transduced DCs showed unaltered expression of critical monocyte-derived surface molecules with retention of allo-stimulatory activity. Co-culture of autologous T lymphocytes with MAGE-A3-expressing DCs produced CTLs that secreted IFN-γ, and efficiently killed MAGE-A3+ EOC cells. This form of rAAV-based DC immunotherapy, either alone or more likely in combination with other immune-enhancing protocols, may prove useful in the clinical setting for management of EOC. PMID:24406390

  19. Parameters of REP DD's plasma formed during the pulse and pulse-periodic modes in dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2015-12-01

    Main parameters of plasma formed during the pulse and pulse-periodic runaway electron preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) in argon, nitrogen and air at high pressure were measured. An electron concentration in the plasma of pulse and pulse-periodic REP DD in the elevated pressure argon was determined. Average for pulse value of electron density in the argon plasma of pulse REP DD was ~ 3.1015 cm-3. Dynamics of electron density in the atmospheric-pressure plasma of the argon during the REP DD was determined. Measured average values of an electron concentration in the plasma of the pulse-periodic REP DD in atmospheric-pressure air and nitrogen were ~ 3.1014 and ~ 4.1014 cm-3, respectively. In addition, for the plasma formed during the pulse-periodic REP DD in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen and air average values of an electron temperature and reduced electric field, as well their dynamics were determined. Average value of an electron temperature during the pulse duration for nitrogen and air plasmas was ~ 2 eV. Dynamics of an electron temperature and reduced electric field strength was registered. Data on rotational and gas temperatures in the discharge plasma of atmospheric-pressure nitrogen formed in pulse (Tr ≍ 350 K, Tg ≍ 380 K) and pulse-periodic (Tr ≍ 750 K, Tg ≍ 820 K) modes were obtained. In addition, measured value of vibrational temperature in REP DD's plasma formed in pulse mode in nitrogen at pressure of 1 bar was Tv ≍ 3000 K.

  20. Defined DNA sequences promote the assembly of a bacterial protein into distinct amyloid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    RepA, the replication initiator protein of Pseudomonas pPS10 plasmid, is made of two winged-helix (WH) domains. RepA dimers undergo a structural transformation upon binding to origin DNA sequences (iterons), resulting in monomerization and α-helix into β-strand conversion. This affects the N-terminal domain (WH1) and generates a metastable intermediate. Here it is shown that the interaction of short dsDNA oligonucleotides, including iteron or operator RepA targets, with the isolated WH1 domain promotes the assembly of different nanostructures. These range from irregular aggregates to amyloid spheroids and fibers. Their intrinsic order inversely correlates with the extent of the transformation induced by each DNA sequence on RepA. However, DNA is not a constituent of the assembled fibers, in agreement with the protein-only principle for amyloid structure. Thus, the RepA-WH1 domain on DNA binding mimics the behavior of the mammalian prion protein. The stretch of amino acids responsible for WH1 aggregation has been identified, leading to the design of mutants with enhanced or reduced amyloidogenicity and the synthesis of a peptide that assembles into a cross-β structure. RepA amyloid assemblies could have a role in the negative regulation of plasmid replication. This article underlines the potential of specific nucleic acid sequences in promoting protein amyloidogenesis at nearly physiological conditions. PMID:17959784